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1

Anomalies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This theme issue on anomalies includes Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, and additional resources for elementary and junior high school students. Pertinent activities are suggested, and sidebars discuss UFOs, animal anomalies, and anomalies from nature; and resources covering unexplained phenonmenas like crop circles, Easter Island,…

Online-Offline, 1999

1999-01-01

2

Anomalies  

SciTech Connect

Anomalies have a diverse impact on many aspects of physical phenomena. The role of anomalies in determining physical structure from the amplitude for decay to the foundations of superstring theory will be reviewed. 36 refs.

Bardeen, W.A.

1985-08-01

3

The combination of satellite and topographic/isostatic potential models for mean anomaly determinations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A method is presented for the estimation of a global gravity anomaly field using the combination of satellite-derived potential coefficient models and the coefficients implied by the Airy-Heiskanen topographic/isostatic potential (Rummel et al., 1988) from topographic models with a 30-km depth of compensation. Gravity anomalies calculated with this method are compared with a terrestrial 1 x 1 degree anomaly file where the anomaly standard deviations were less than 10 mgals. Using the GEM T1 model (Marsh et al., 1988) to degree 36, the rms anomaly discrepency was + or - 19 mgals, while the rms values for the terrestrial anomalies was + or - 28 mgals.

Rapp, Richard H.; Pavlis, Nikolaos

4

Clinical and Radiological Characteristics of 22 Children with SHOX Anomalies and Familial Short Stature Suggestive of Léri-Weill Dyschondrosteosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims: To describe genetic, clinical, anthropometric and radiological characteristics of 22 children with SHOX gene anomalies and familial short stature suggestive of Léri-Weill dyschondrosteosis. Methods: Monocentric retrospective observational study. Results: Six children (27%) presented with deletions located downstream of SHOX (mean height –1.4 ± 0.9 SDS) and 16 (68%) with either deletions encompassing SHOX, intragenic deletions or point mutations of

Anne-Sophie Salmon-Musial; Myriam Rosilio; Michel David; Céline Huber; Emmanuel Pichot; Valérie Cormier-Daire; Marc Nicolino

2011-01-01

5

Random matrix model at nonzero chemical potentials with anomaly effects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Phase diagram of the chiral random matrix model with U(1)A breaking term is studied with the quark chemical potentials varied independently at zero temperature by taking the chiral and meson condensates as the order parameters. Although, without the U(1)A breaking term, chiral transition of each flavor can happen separately responding to its chemical potential, the U(1)A breaking terms mix the chiral condensates and correlate the phase transitions. In the three-flavor case, we find that there are mixings between the meson and chiral condensates due to the U(1)A anomaly, which makes the meson condensed phase more stable. Increasing the hypercharge chemical potential (?Y) with the isospin and quark chemical potentials (?I,?q) kept small, we observe that the kaon-condensed phase becomes the ground state and at the larger ?Y the pion-condensed phase appears unexpectedly, which is caused by the competition between the chiral restoration and the meson condensation. The similar happens when ?Y and ?I are exchanged, and the kaon-condensed phase becomes the ground state at larger ?I below the full chiral restoration.

Fujii, H.; Sano, T.

2011-01-01

6

Gravity Potential anomalies on Mars : Shape of the planet and its thermal evolution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study follows previous studies about the existence of paleo shorelines on the surface of Mars (Parker, 1993, Clifford and Parker, 2001). In order to test this hypothesis, we have computed the gravity potential of the shorelines since shorelines should represent equipotential lines at the solid surface of the planet. For the so-called Deuteronilus shoreline, we find that the potential varies with longitude with an order 2. We propose to interpret this order 2 as related to the formation of Tharsis, which makes the shape of the planet close to that of a 3 dimensional ellipsoid. The potential calculated by the spherical harmonic decomposition (SHD) up to degree 2 is close to the SHD up to degree 60. We are exploring the values of J22 which would give a constant potential along that shoreline, assuming that the moment of inertia, the rotation and the volume of the planet remained constant. The results suggest that this equipotential would have formed as Tharsis was being built up during the Hesperian. Another way to test the shoreline hypothesis is to use the first data of Mars Express spectrometer. In a joint study (Sotin et al.), we plan to analyse the OMEGA spectra to identify sedimentary deposits, carbonates or evaporites in the Deuteronilus shoreline region. In parallel, we run numerical experiments describing thermal convection in 3D spherical shells. The code takes into account large viscosity gradients due to temperature variations. Convection occurs in the so-called conductive lid regime. First results suggest that the geometry of the convection is mainly controlled by the formation of one large plume. Temperature variations in latitude, longitude and depth are transformed into density variations that are used to compute both dynamic topography and gravity anomalies. A comparison between observed and computed gravity anomalies will be performed to interpret some of the large scale gravity potential variations.

Couturier, F.; Choblet, G.; Sotin, C.

7

Evaluating Cenozoic equatorial sediment deposition anomalies for potential paleoceanographic and Pacific plate motion applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

If equatorial sediments form characteristic deposits around the equator, they may help to resolve the amount of northwards drift of the Pacific tectonic plate. Relevant to this issue, it has been shown that 230Th has been accumulating on the equatorial seabed faster than its production from radioactive decay in the overlying water column during the Holocene (Marcantonio et al. in Paleoceanography 16:260-267, 2001). Some researchers have argued that this reflects the deposition of particles with adsorbed 230Th carried by bottom currents towards the equator ("focusing"). If correct, this effect may combine with high pelagic productivity, which is also centered on the equator, to yield a characteristic signature of high accumulation rates marking the paleoequator in older deposits. Here we evaluate potential evidence that such an equatorial feature existed in the geological past. Seismic reflection data from seven meridional transects suggest that a band of equatorially enhanced accumulation of restricted latitude was variably developed, both spatially and temporally. It is absent in the interval 14.25-20.1 Ma but is well developed for the interval 8.55-14.25 Ma. We also examined eolian dust accumulation rate histories generated from scientific drilling data. A dust accumulation rate anomaly near the modern equator, which is not obviously related to the inter-tropical convergence zone, is interpreted as caused by focusing. Accumulation rates of Ba and P2O5 (proxies of export production) reveal a static equatorial signature, which suggests that the movement of the Pacific plate over the period 10-25 Ma was modest. The general transition from missing to well-developed focusing signatures around 14.25 Ma in the seismic data coincides with the mid-Miocene development of the western boundary current off New Zealand. This current supplies the Pacific with deep water from Antarctica, and could therefore imply a potential paleoceanographic or paleoclimatic origin. At 10.05-14.25 Ma, the latitudes of the seismic anomalies are up to ~2° different from the paleoequator predicted by Pacific plate-hotspot models, suggesting potentially a small change in the hotspot latitudes relative to the present day (although this inference depends on the precise form of the deposition around the equator). The Ba and P2O5 anomalies, on the other hand, are broadly compatible with plate models predicting slow northward plate movement over 10-25 Ma.

Mitchell, Neil C.; Dubois, Nathalie

2013-09-01

8

Nonrelativistic inverse square potential, scale anomaly, and complex extension  

SciTech Connect

The old problem of a singular, inverse square potential in nonrelativistic quantum mechanics is treated employing a field-theoretic, functional renormalization method. An emergent contact coupling flows to a fixed point or develops a limit cycle depending on the discriminant of its quadratic beta function. We analyze the fixed points in both conformal and nonconformal phases and perform a natural extension of the renormalization group analysis to complex values of the contact coupling. Physical interpretation and motivation for this extension is the presence of an inelastic scattering channel in two-body collisions. We present a geometric description of the complex generalization by considering renormalization group flows on the Riemann sphere. Finally, using bosonization, we find an analytical solution of the extended renormalization group flow equations, constituting the main result of our work.

Moroz, Sergej [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik Universitaet Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: s.moroz@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de; Schmidt, Richard [Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2010-02-15

9

Remote energetic neutral atom imaging of electric potential over a lunar magnetic anomaly  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Abstract<p label="1">The formation of electric <span class="hlt">potential</span> over lunar magnetized regions is essential for understanding fundamental lunar science, for understanding the lunar environment, and for planning human exploration on the Moon. A large positive electric <span class="hlt">potential</span> was predicted and detected from single point measurements. Here, we demonstrate a remote imaging technique of electric <span class="hlt">potential</span> mapping at the lunar surface, making use of a new concept involving hydrogen neutral atoms derived from solar wind. We apply the technique to a lunar magnetized region using an existing dataset of the neutral atom energy spectrometer SARA/CENA on Chandrayaan-1. Electrostatic <span class="hlt">potential</span> larger than +135 V inside the Gerasimovic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is confirmed. This structure is found spreading all over the magnetized region. The widely spread electric <span class="hlt">potential</span> can influence the local plasma and dust environment near the magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Futaana, Y.; Barabash, S.; Wieser, M.; Lue, C.; Wurz, P.; Vorburger, A.; Bhardwaj, A.; Asamura, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">10</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3382912"> <span id="translatedtitle">Processing of semantic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> by right and left hemispheres of commissurotomy patients. Evidence from event-related brain <span class="hlt">potentials</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The ability of 5 commissurotomized patients to appreciate semantic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> presented to their right and left hemispheres was tested using both electrophysiological and behavioural measures. In all cases, the patients heard sentence fragments that were completed either by semantically congruous or incongruous words briefly flashed to the left visual field, right visual field or to both fields simultaneously. A dissociation between behavioural and event-related brain <span class="hlt">potential</span> (ERP) measures was observed. All 5 patients were able to indicate by a pointing response with greater than chance accuracy whether the terminal word of a sentence made sense (i.e., appropriate for the context) or was nonsensical. This was true regardless of the hemisphere receiving the terminal word. Likewise, all the patients responded to right visual field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with a cerebral <span class="hlt">potential</span> (N400) that was typically elicited by such words in control subjects. In contrast, only those 2 patients who developed an overt speech capability under the control of the right hemisphere produced N400 waves in response to left visual field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. These findings were interpreted as <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> possible relationships within language generation and semantic priming. PMID:3382912</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kutas, M; Hillyard, S A; Gazzaniga, M S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">11</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..1411707G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Stress <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and gravitational <span class="hlt">potential</span> energy of the Andean convergent margin from gravity modelling</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Estimates of stress <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and Gravitational <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Energy (GPE) of the Nazca plate and the Andean convergent margin, as derived from gravity modelling and constrained by results of seismic experiments and other prior information, are presented. The normal stress <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> onshore have been computed at the plate interface between the subducting slab and the overriding South American plate, and offshore on top of the oceanic Nazca plate. The GPE estimates have been made for the entire region using a 100 km vertical depth as reference level for the computation. The normal stress <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map of the Nazca plate, except the Nazca ridge, shows generally uniform distribution of stresses. The relatively high values of stress over the Nazca ridge are attributed to high elevation associated with young crust of the ridge. The fore-arc region is characterized by trench parallel low and high stress <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The latter, which is higher by 50 to 100 MPa than in the adjacent regions, might be attributed to high density structures above the plate interface and might indicate regions of enhanced strain energy. Furthermore, the peaks of the high stress <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, except in the region of Iquique, correlate reasonably well with the seismicity of the trench. The high topography of the Andean mountains and the ridges in the Nazca plate exhibits high GPE values relative to the ocean. The resulting stress from GPE could influence the state of stress in the Nazca plate and adjacent regions. Provided that gravity models are well constrained, the resulting density structures could be used to infer the state of stress in the lithosphere and the associated GPE distributions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gutknecht, B. D.; Mahatsente, R.; Götze, H.-J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">12</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1740238"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hazard <span class="hlt">potential</span> ranking of hazardous waste landfill sites and risk of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background: A 33% increase in the risk of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> has been found among residents near hazardous waste landfill sites in a European collaborative study (EUROHAZCON). Aims: To develop and evaluate an expert panel scoring method of the hazard <span class="hlt">potential</span> of EUROHAZCON landfill sites, and to investigate whether sites classified as posing a greater <span class="hlt">potential</span> hazard are those with a greater risk of congenital <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> among nearby residents relative to more distant residents. Methods: A total of 1270 cases of congenital <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and 2308 non-malformed control births were selected in 14 study areas around 20 landfill sites. An expert panel of four landfill specialists scored each site in three categories—overall, water, and air hazard—based on readily available, documented data on site characteristics. Tertiles of the average ranking scores defined low, medium, and high hazard sites. Calculation of odds ratios was based on distance of residence from the sites, comparing a 0–3 km "proximate" with a 3–7 km "distant" zone. Results: Agreement between experts measured by intraclass correlation coefficients was 0.50, 0.44, and 0.20 for overall, water, and air hazard before a consensus meeting and 0.60, 0.56, and 0.53 respectively after this meeting. There was no evidence for a trend of increasing odds ratios with increasing overall hazard or air hazard. For non-chromosomal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, odds ratios by water hazard category showed an increasing trend of borderline statistical significance (p = 0.06) from 0.79 in the low hazard category, 1.43 in the medium, to 1.60 in the high water hazard category. Conclusions: There is little evidence for a relation between risk of congenital <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in proximate relative to distant zones and hazard <span class="hlt">potential</span> of landfill sites as classified by the expert panel, but without external validation of the hazard <span class="hlt">potential</span> scoring method interpretation is difficult. <span class="hlt">Potential</span> misclassification of sites may have reduced our ability to detect any true dose–response effect.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vrijheid, M; Dolk, H; Armstrong, B; Boschi, G; Busby, A; Jorgensen, T; Pointer, P</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">13</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.7810L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Gravity waves generated by sheared three-dimensional <span class="hlt">potential</span> vorticity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The gravity waves produced by three-dimensional <span class="hlt">potential</span> vorticity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are examined under the asumption of constant vertical shear, constant stratification and unbounded domain. As in the two-dimensional case analysed in a previous paper by the same authors, the disturbance at small vertical distance from the <span class="hlt">potential</span> vorticity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is well modelled by the quasi-geostrophic theory. This is not the case at vertical distances that are beyond the inertial layers which are located above and below the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. There, the perturbation is made of vertically propagating gravity waves which vertical structure is described analytically. On top of the sensitivity of the gravity waves emission to the background Richardson number J, already present in the 2D case, the three dimensional results shown here reveal a strong sensitivity of the emission to the orientation of the horizontal wavenumber. More specifically, there are more gravity waves emitted with phase lines making positive angles with the direction of the shear, then gravity waves making negative angles. As the QG dynamics is little sensitive to these angles, it is shown that these differences are related to the absorptive properties of the inertial layers. These results imply that the acceleration related to the wave flow interactions that occur in the inertial layer is essentially to the left of the shear, whereas the wave effective stress vector associated with the waves propagating in the far-field is predominantly oriented to the right.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lott, F.; Plougonven, R.; Vanneste, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">14</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ExG....44..176R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Forward modelling and inversion of self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> caused by 2D inclined sheets</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> observed over sulfide ore bodies can be closely associated with electrochemical reactions and the ohmic <span class="hlt">potential</span> drop within the rocks. Self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> surveys based on laboratory measurements of electrochemical <span class="hlt">potentials</span> allow us either to measure the amplitude of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> generated by this mechanism or to determine the model parameters. In order to achieve these goals, two sheets of zinc and copper were joined together to simulate sheet-like ore bodies. Self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> surveys were conducted over 684 electrodes with the purpose of revealing the influence of various angles of the sheet. In a laboratory experiment, four different inclinations were chosen to perform the forward modelling. The last part of this paper involves the inversion of measured data to recover the distribution of generated self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> signals. The inversion results show a satisfactory agreement with the laboratory measured data. Finding the geometry of the buried source from the shape of the SP response is not intended as it is fixed in advance. The first aim of this paper is to show how the SP response is affected under the presence of a 2D conductive structure (sheet-like) in tank experiments. The second aim is to obtain one of the model parameters (coefficient M) using data regression.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Roudsari, Mohamad Sadegh; Beitollahi, Ali</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">15</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JGE.....9..498G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Inversion of self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> caused by simple-geometry bodies using global optimization algorithms</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Three naturally inspired meta-heuristic algorithms—the genetic algorithm (GA), simulated annealing (SA) and particle swarm optimization (PSO)—were used to invert some of the self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> (SP) <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> originated by some polarized bodies with simple geometries. Both synthetic and field data sets were considered. The tests with the synthetic data comprised of the solutions with both noise-free and noisy data; in the tests with the field data some SP <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> observed over a copper belt (India), graphite deposits (Germany) and metallic sulfide (Turkey) were inverted. The model parameters included the electric dipole moment, polarization angle, depth, shape factor and origin of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The estimated parameters were compared with those from previous studies using various optimization algorithms, mainly least-squares approaches, on the same data sets. During the test studies the solutions by GA, PSO and SA were characterized as being consistent with each other; a good starting model was not a requirement to reach the global minimum. It can be concluded that the global optimization algorithms considered in this study were able to yield compatible solutions with those from widely used local optimization algorithms.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Göktürkler, G.; Balkaya, Ç.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">16</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFMOS34B..06P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Processes affecting the stratification-induced <span class="hlt">potential</span> energy <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> on the Skagit Bay tidal flats</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">On the Skagit Bay tidal flats, the stratification resulting from the buoyancy input of the Skagit River is modulated by tides with a 4 m range. Here, field observations and Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) simulations are used to evaluate the terms in the equation governing the temporal evolution of the stratification-induced <span class="hlt">potential</span> energy <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (?) (Burchard and Hofmeister, Estuar. Coast. Shelf Sci., 77(4), 2008). Profiles of water density (range of 1000 to 1028 kg/m3) and velocity (up to 0.6 m/s) were measured at locations separated by roughly 600 m over a 4 by 4 km region of the flats (0.5 to 2.5 m mean water depth) for 56 days from early July (river discharge of 570 m3s-1) until late August 2009 (discharge of 140 m3s-1). The FVCOM grid of Skagit Bay and surrounding basins is forced with surface winds from a regional wind model, observed river discharge, and water level based on tidal harmonics and observed low-frequency variability. The model bathymetry incorporates numerous data sources including acoustic and LIDAR surveys performed during summer 2009. Temporal changes in ? may result from tidal straining (an effect of sheared flows and horizontally varying water density) of the depth-averaged and vertically-dependent densities, along- and across-flat advection, vertical advection, surface and bottom buoyancy fluxes, mixing, changes in water depth, and turbulent transport. FVCOM simulations <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the horizontal and vertical resolutions of the observations are sufficient to examine the relative importance of the terms in the equation for ?. Preliminary results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that temporal changes in ? primarily are owing to cross-flat tidal straining of the depth-averaged density, cross-flat advection, changing water depth, and mixing. However, model results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the relative importance of the terms depends on proximity to the main river channel, river discharge, and tidal range (e.g., spring versus neap tides). Funded by ONR, NSF, and NSSEFF.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pavel, V.; Raubenheimer, B.; Elgar, S.; Ralston, D. K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">17</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/882035"> <span id="translatedtitle">Interpretation of Self-<span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> Using Constitutive Relationships for Electrochemical and Thermoelectric Coupling Coefficients</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Constitutive relationships for electrochemical and thermoelectric cross-coupling coefficients are derived using ionic mobilities, applying a general derivative of chemical <span class="hlt">potential</span> and employing the zero net current condition. The general derivative of chemical <span class="hlt">potential</span> permits thermal variations which give rise to the thermoelectric effect. It also accounts for nonideal solution behavior. An equation describing electric field strength is similarly derived with the additional assumption of electrical neutrality in the fluid Planck approximation. The Planck approximation implies that self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> (SP) is caused only by local sources and also that the electric field strength has only first order spatial variations. The derived relationships are applied to the NaCl-KCl concentration cell with predicted and measured voltages agreeing within 0.4 mV. The relationships are also applied to the Long Valley and Yellowstone geothermal systems. There is a high degree of correlation between predicted and measured SP response for both systems, giving supporting evidence for the validity of the approach. Predicted SP amplitude exceeds measured in both cases; this is a possible consequence of the Planck approximation. Electrochemical sources account for more than 90% of the predicted response in both cases while thermoelectric mechanisms account for the remaining 10%; electrokinetic effects are not considered. Predicted electrochemical and thermoelectric voltage coupling coefficients are comparable to values measured in the laboratory. The derived relationships are also applied to arbitrary distributions of temperature and fluid composition to investigate the geometric diversity of observed SP <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Amplitudes predicted for hypothetical saline spring and hot spring environments are less than 40 mV. In contrast, hypothetical near surface steam zones generate very large amplitudes, over 2 V in one case. These results should be viewed with some caution due to the uncertain validity of the Planck approximation for these conditions. All amplitudes are controlled by electrochemical mechanisms. Polarities are controlled by the curvature of the concentration or thermal profile. Concave upward thermal profiles produce positive <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, for constant fluid concentrations, whereas concave upward concentration profiles produce negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Concave downward concentration profiles are characterized by small negative closures bounding a larger, positive SP <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Knapp, R. B.; Kasameyer, P. W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">18</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57718337"> <span id="translatedtitle">Naughty Versus Nice: <span class="hlt">Suggestive</span> Pop Music Influences on Perceptions of <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Romantic Partners</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study investigated the effect mainstream music featuring sexually <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> lyrics may have on judgments of <span class="hlt">potential</span> romantic partners. Respondents listened to either sexually provocative or innocuous music. Thereafter, respondents were presented with online personal advertisements featuring ambiguously described target individuals. Respondents rated each individual first on a series of personality and sexual appeal characteristics and later on overall attraction.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Francesca Dillman Carpentier; Silvia Knobloch-Westerwick; Andree Blumhoff</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">19</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JPhCS.239a2015G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Calculations on the threshold <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of weakly bound projectiles with São Paulo and Woods-Saxon polarization <span class="hlt">potentials</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A thorough study of the energy dependence of the nuclear optical <span class="hlt">potential</span> in reactions involving the weakly bound projectiles 8B, 7Be and 6Li on the target 58Ni and 9Be on 27Al is carried out by performing a ?2-analysis of recent measurements of elastic scattering cross sections for energies around and above the Coulomb barrier. For this purpose two different <span class="hlt">potential</span> types are used: the double folding São Paulo <span class="hlt">potential</span> and the Woods-Saxon <span class="hlt">potential</span>. The calculations performed for the energy dependence of the real and imaginary parts of the polarization <span class="hlt">potentials</span> show that these <span class="hlt">potentials</span> besides satisfying the dispersion relation, for some nuclear systems the uncertainties on the energy dependence of the polarization <span class="hlt">potentials</span> allow to conclude that these systems present a behavior consistent with the Breakup Theshold <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>. In other cases, due to the large uncertainties, it is not possible to make a definitive conclusion about the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gómez-Camacho, A.; Aguilera, E. F.; Martínez-Quiroz, E.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lubian, J.; Canto, L. F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">20</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AdAtS..21..923G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Impacts of cloud-induced mass forcing on the development of moist <span class="hlt">potential</span> vorticity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> during torrential rains</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The impacts of cloud-induced mass forcing on the development of the moist <span class="hlt">potential</span> vorticity (MPV) <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> associated with torrential rains are investigated by using NCEP/NCAR 1° × 1° data. The MPV tendency equation with the cloud-induced mass forcing is derived, and applied to the torrential rain event over the Changjiang River-Huaihe River Valleys during 26 30 June 1999. The result shows that positive <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are located mainly between 850 hPa and 500 hPa, while the maximum MPV, maximum positive tendency of the MPV, and maximum surface rainfall are nearly collocated. The cloud-induced mass forcing contributes to the positive tendency of the moist <span class="hlt">potential</span> vorticity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The results indicate that the MPV may be used to track the propagation of rain systems for operational applications.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gao, Shouting; Zhou, Yushu; Cui, Xiaopeng; Dai, Guoping</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> 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onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">21</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5881035"> <span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">suggested</span> procedure for resolving an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in least-squares data analysis known as Peelle's Pertinent Puzzle'' and the general implications for nuclear data evaluation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Modern nuclear-data evaluation methodology is based largely on statistical inference, with the least-squares technique being chosen most often to generate best estimates for physical quantities and their uncertainties. It has been observed that those least-squares evaluations which employ covariance matrices based on absolute errors that are derived directly from the reported experimental data often tend to produce results which appear to be too low. This <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is discussed briefly in this report, and a procedure for resolving it is <span class="hlt">suggested</span>. The method involves employing data uncertainties which are derived from errors expressed in percent. These percent errors are used, in conjunction with reasonable a priori estimates for the quantities to be evaluated, to derive the covariance matrices which are required for applications of the least-squares procedure. This approach appears to lead to more rational weighting of the experimental data and, thus, to more realistic evaluated results than are obtained when the errors are based on the actual data. The procedure is very straightforward when only one parameter must be estimated. However, for those evaluation exercises involving more than one parameter, this technique demands that a priori estimates be provided at the outset for all of the parameters in question. Then, the least-squares method is applied iteratively to produce a sequence of sets of estimated values which are anticipated to convergence toward a particular set of parameters which one then designates as the best'' evaluated results from the exercise. It is found that convergence usually occurs very rapidly when the a priori estimates approximate the final solution reasonably well.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chiba, Satoshi (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States) Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)); Smith, D.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">22</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10121367"> <span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">suggested</span> procedure for resolving an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in least-squares data analysis known as ``Peelle`s Pertinent Puzzle`` and the general implications for nuclear data evaluation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Modern nuclear-data evaluation methodology is based largely on statistical inference, with the least-squares technique being chosen most often to generate best estimates for physical quantities and their uncertainties. It has been observed that those least-squares evaluations which employ covariance matrices based on absolute errors that are derived directly from the reported experimental data often tend to produce results which appear to be too low. This <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is discussed briefly in this report, and a procedure for resolving it is <span class="hlt">suggested</span>. The method involves employing data uncertainties which are derived from errors expressed in percent. These percent errors are used, in conjunction with reasonable a priori estimates for the quantities to be evaluated, to derive the covariance matrices which are required for applications of the least-squares procedure. This approach appears to lead to more rational weighting of the experimental data and, thus, to more realistic evaluated results than are obtained when the errors are based on the actual data. The procedure is very straightforward when only one parameter must be estimated. However, for those evaluation exercises involving more than one parameter, this technique demands that a priori estimates be provided at the outset for all of the parameters in question. Then, the least-squares method is applied iteratively to produce a sequence of sets of estimated values which are anticipated to convergence toward a particular set of parameters which one then designates as the ``best`` evaluated results from the exercise. It is found that convergence usually occurs very rapidly when the a priori estimates approximate the final solution reasonably well.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chiba, Satoshi [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">23</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3585326"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sharing of <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Nest Sites by Etheostoma olmstedi Males <span class="hlt">Suggests</span> Mutual Tolerance in an Alloparental Species</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">When reproductive competitors tolerate or cooperate with one another, they may gain particular benefits, such as collectively guarding resources or attracting mates. Shared resources may be those essential to reproduction, such as a breeding site or nest. Using the tessellated darter, a species where males but not females compete over <span class="hlt">potential</span> nest sites, we examined site use and sharing under controlled conditions of differing competitor density. Sharing was observed even when competitor density was low and individuals could have each occupied a <span class="hlt">potential</span> nest site without same-sex sharing. Males were more likely to share a nest site with one other when the difference in size between them was larger rather than smaller. There was no evidence that female sharing was dependent on their relative size. Fish were generally more likely to use and share larger sites, in accordance with the greater relative surface area they offered. We discuss how one or both sharing males may <span class="hlt">potentially</span> benefit, and how male sharing of <span class="hlt">potential</span> nest sites could relate to female mating preferences. Tessellated darter males are known to provide alloparental care for eggs but this occurs without any social contact between the alloparent and the genetic father of the young. Thus, the <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> that they may also share sites and maintain social contact with reproductive competitors highlights the importance of increased focus on the <span class="hlt">potential</span> complexity of reproductive systems.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stiver, Kelly A.; Wolff, Stephen H.; Alonzo, Suzanne H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">24</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PApGe.170..895T"> <span id="translatedtitle">An Approach for Interpretation of Self-<span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> due to Simple Geometrical Structures Using Fair Function Minimization</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A quantitative interpretation method of self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> has been proposed. The method is designed and implemented for the estimation of center depth, electric dipole moment or magnitude of polarization, polarization angle, and geometric shape factor of a buried body from SP field data, related to simple geometric structures such as cylinders, spheres and sheet-like bodies. The proposed method is based on Fair function minimization and also on stochastic optimization modeling. This new technique was first tested on theoretical synthetic data randomly generated by a chosen statistical distribution from a known model with different random noise components. Such mathematical simulation shows a very close agreement between assumed and estimated model parameters. Being theoretically proven, it has been applied and tested on self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> field data taken from the United States, Germany, India and Turkey. The agreement between results obtained by the <span class="hlt">suggested</span> method and those obtained by other previous methods is good and comparable. Moreover, the depth obtained by this method is found to be in high accordance with that obtained from drilling information.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tlas, M.; Asfahani, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">25</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2327822"> <span id="translatedtitle">Common Congenital <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> account for a substantial proportion of childhood morbidity and mortality. They have become proportionately larger because of the decline of such other categories as infections or birth trauma. Approximately 3% of newborns have a serious handicapping or <span class="hlt">potentially</span> lethal condition; in longterm studies the frequency is much higher. There is no good evidence to <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the rates of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are increasing, although this is a common perception. This article discusses diagnosis and management (especially genetic implications) of heart defects, neural tube defects, orofacial clefting, dislocated hip, clubfoot, and hypospadias.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lowry, R. B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">26</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23202775"> <span id="translatedtitle">Event-related <span class="hlt">potential</span> evidence <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> voters remember political events that never happened.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Voters tend to misattribute issue positions to political candidates that are consistent with their partisan affiliation, even though these candidates have never explicitly stated or endorsed such stances. The prevailing explanation in political science is that voters misattribute candidates' issue positions because they use their political knowledge to make educated but incorrect guesses. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that voter errors can also stem from a different source: false memories. The current study examined event-related <span class="hlt">potential</span> (ERP) responses to misattributed and accurately remembered candidate issue information. We report here that ERP responses to misattributed information can elicit memory signals similar to that of correctly remembered old information-a pattern consistent with a false memory rather than educated guessing interpretation of these misattributions. These results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that some types of voter misinformation about candidates may be harder to correct than previously thought. PMID:23202775</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Coronel, Jason C; Federmeier, Kara D; Gonsalves, Brian D</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-17</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">27</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2712403"> <span id="translatedtitle">Germination Responses to Water <span class="hlt">Potential</span> in Neotropical Pioneers <span class="hlt">Suggest</span> Large-seeded Species Take More Risks</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background and Aims In neotropical forests, very small-seeded pioneer species (<0·1 mg seed mass) recruit preferentially in small tree fall gaps and at gap edges, but large-seeded pioneers do not. Since water availability is related to gap size, these differences in microsite preference may reflect in part species-specific differences in germination at reduced water <span class="hlt">potentials</span>. Methods For 14 neotropical pioneer species, the hypothesis is tested that small-seeded species, with shallow initial rooting depths, reduce the risks associated with desiccation by germinating more slowly and at higher water <span class="hlt">potentials</span> than large-seeded species. Key Results Germination occurred both more quickly and at lower water <span class="hlt">potentials</span> with increasing seed mass. For example, Ochroma pyramidale (seed mass 5·5 mg) had a time to 50 % germination (T50) of 2·8 d and a median base <span class="hlt">potential</span> for germination (?b50) of ?1·8 MPa while Clidemia quinquenervia (seed mass 0·017 mg) had a T50 of 17·6 d and ?b50 of ?1·1 MPa. Conclusions These data <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that small-seeded species germinate only in comparatively moist microsites, such as small canopy gaps, which may reduce the risk of drought-induced mortality. Conversely, large-seeded species are able to germinate in the drier environment of large gaps, where they benefit by enhanced seedling growth in a high irradiance environment. The positive association of seed size and canopy gap size for optimal seedling establishment is maintained by differential germination responses to soil water availability coupled with the scaling of radicle growth rate and seed size, which collectively confer greater drought tolerance on large-seeded species.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Daws, Matthew I.; Crabtree, Lora M.; Dalling, James W.; Mullins, Christopher E.; Burslem, David F. R. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">28</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/37414079"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effects of Advancing Age on the Processing of Semantic <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Adults: Evidence from Event-Related Brain <span class="hlt">Potentials</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Age-related changes in the processing of sentence-embedded semantic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were examined using auditory event-related <span class="hlt">potentials</span> (ERPs). Semantically incongruous words elicited an N400 effect in middle-aged (50s: 55.6 years) and elderly (60s: 64.1 years) subjects, whereas in older elderly adults (70s: 74.9 years) this effect approached significance. N400 peak latencies were not delayed with advancing age; however, there was a reliable</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Anja Faustmann; Bruce E. Murdoch; Simon P. Finnigan; David A. Copland</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">29</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3232202"> <span id="translatedtitle">Chromosome 3 <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> Investigated by Genome Wide SNP Analysis of Benign, Low Malignant <span class="hlt">Potential</span> and Low Grade Ovarian Serous Tumours</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ovarian carcinomas exhibit extensive heterogeneity, and their etiology remains unknown. Histological and genetic evidence has led to the proposal that low grade ovarian serous carcinomas (LGOSC) have a different etiology than high grade carcinomas (HGOSC), arising from serous tumours of low malignant <span class="hlt">potential</span> (LMP). Common regions of chromosome (chr) 3 loss have been observed in all types of serous ovarian tumours, including benign, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that these regions contain genes important in the development of all ovarian serous carcinomas. A high-density genome-wide genotyping bead array technology, which assayed >600,000 markers, was applied to a panel of serous benign and LMP tumours and a small set of LGOSC, to characterize somatic events associated with the most indolent forms of ovarian disease. The genomic patterns inferred were related to TP53, KRAS and BRAF mutations. An increasing frequency of genomic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> was observed with pathology of disease: 3/22 (13.6%) benign cases, 40/53 (75.5%) LMP cases and 10/11 (90.9%) LGOSC cases. Low frequencies of chr3 <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> occurred in all tumour types. Runs of homozygosity were most commonly observed on chr3, with the 3p12-p11 candidate tumour suppressor region the most frequently homozygous region in the genome. An LMP harboured a homozygous deletion on chr6 which created a GOPC-ROS1 fusion gene, previously reported as oncogenic in other cancer types. Somatic TP53, KRAS and BRAF mutations were not observed in benign tumours. KRAS-mutation positive LMP cases displayed significantly more chromosomal aberrations than BRAF-mutation positive or KRAS and BRAF mutation negative cases. Gain of 12p, which harbours the KRAS gene, was particularly evident. A pathology review reclassified all TP53-mutation positive LGOSC cases, some of which acquired a HGOSC status. Taken together, our results support the view that LGOSC could arise from serous benign and LMP tumours, but does not exclude the possibility that HGOSC may derive from LMP tumours.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Birch, Ashley H.; Arcand, Suzanna L.; Oros, Kathleen K.; Rahimi, Kurosh; Watters, A. Kevin; Provencher, Diane; Greenwood, Celia M.; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Tonin, Patricia N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">30</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3065424"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sexual and postmating reproductive isolation between allopatric Drosophila montana populations <span class="hlt">suggest</span> speciation <span class="hlt">potential</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background Widely distributed species with populations adapted to different environmental conditions can provide valuable opportunities for tracing the onset of reproductive incompatibilities and their role in the speciation process. Drosophila montana, a D. virilis group species found in high latitude boreal forests in Nearctic and Palearctic regions around the globe, could be an excellent model system for studying the early stages of speciation, as a wealth of information concerning this species' ecology, mating system, life history, genetics and phylogeography is available. However, reproductive barriers between populations have hereto not been investigated. Results We report both pre- and postmating barriers to reproduction between flies from European (Finnish) and North American (Canadian) populations of Drosophila montana. Using a series of mate-choice designs, we show that flies from these two populations mate assortatively (i.e., exhibit significant sexual isolation) while emphasizing the importance of experimental design in these kinds of studies. We also assessed <span class="hlt">potential</span> postmating isolation by quantifying egg and progeny production in intra- and interpopulation crosses and show a significant one-way reduction in progeny production, affecting both male and female offspring equally. Conclusion We provide evidence that allopatric D. montana populations exhibit reproductive isolation and we discuss the <span class="hlt">potential</span> mechanisms involved. Our data emphasize the importance of experimental design in studies on premating isolation between recently diverged taxa and <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that postmating barriers may be due to postcopulatory-prezygotic mechanisms. D. montana populations seem to be evolving multiple barriers to gene flow in allopatry and our study lays the groundwork for future investigations of the genetic and phenotypic mechanisms underlying these barriers.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">31</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=72355"> <span id="translatedtitle">PERINATAL EXPOSURE TO ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS: <span class="hlt">POTENTIAL</span> ROLE OF HORMONAL ALTERATIONS IN INITIATING ADULT REPRODUCTIVE <span class="hlt">ANOMALIES</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The primary hypothesis to be tested in this series of studies is whether or not exposure to environmental agents, during certain key periods of development, will increase the risk of specific <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the reproductive system. Embedded in this hypothesis is the assumption that...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">32</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=175382"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ribotypes and virulence gene polymorphisms <span class="hlt">suggest</span> three distinct Listeria monocytogenes lineages with differences in pathogenic <span class="hlt">potential</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A total of 133 Listeria monocytogenes isolates were characterized by ribotyping and allelic analysis of the virulence genes hly, actA, and inlA to uncover linkages between independent phylogenetic and specific virulence markers. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphisms revealed 8 hly, 11 inl4, and 2 actA alleles. The combination of these virulence gene alleles and ribotype patterns separated L. monocytogenes into three distinct lineages. While distinct hly and inlA alleles were generally found to cluster into these three lineages, actA alleles segregated independently. These three phylogenetic lineages were confirmed when 22 partial actA DNA sequences were analyzed. The clinical history of the L. monocytogenes strains showed evidence for differences in pathogenic <span class="hlt">potential</span> among the three lineages. Lineage I contains all strains isolated during epidemic outbreaks of listeriosis, while no human isolates were found in lineage III. Animal isolates were found in all three lineages. We found evidence that isolates from lineages I and III have a higher plaquing efficiency than lineage II strains in a cell culture assay. Strains from lineage III also seem to form larger plaques than strains from lineage II. A distinctive ribotype fragment and unique 16S rRNA gene sequences furthermore <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that lineage III might represent a L. monocytogenes subspecies. None of the 20 human isolates available but 11% of our animal isolates were grouped in this lineage, indicating that strains in this lineage might have reduced virulence for humans.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wiedmann, M; Bruce, J L; Keating, C; Johnson, A E; McDonough, P L; Batt, C A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">33</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a000000/a002600/a002695/index.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">SST <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> + Wind <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sea surface temperature (SST) <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and sea surface wind <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> show the development of the 2002-2003 El Nino based on data from NASAs Aqua and QuikSCAT spacecraft. The wind data has been processed using the Variational Analysis Method (VAM).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shirah, Greg; Allen, Jesse; Adamec, David</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-02-03</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">34</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009PhDT.........8Y"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> of water and simple liquids</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This thesis applies statistical physics approaches and computer simulations to investigate quantitatively the relationship between the structure and the dynamic and thermodynamic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> observed in water and some other simple liquids. In Chapter 1, we give a general introduction to the properties of water. In Chapter 2 we address the question of whether spherically-symmetric <span class="hlt">potentials</span> are also able to reproduce the structural <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> found in systems with local tetrahedral order. We find that water-like structural order <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> exist for the two-scale "ramp <span class="hlt">potential</span>". Our findings <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the water-like relationship between structural order and <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is related to the presence of two different length scales in the <span class="hlt">potential</span>. In Chapter 3, we use the ratio of characteristic length scales of the two-scale ramp <span class="hlt">potential</span> as a control parameter to investigate the evolution of dynamic, thermodynamic and structural <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. In this manner we show that the family of tunable spherically-symmetric <span class="hlt">potentials</span> so generated evolves continuously between water-like and hard sphere behavior. These findings <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that strong orientational interactions in the first shell of water are not necessary for a liquid to show thermodynamic, dynamic and structural <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and highlight the importance of the second shell of water. In Chapter 4, we investigate how much orientation-dependent first-shell interaction and the second-shell environment each contribute to water's <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. We show that the changes in the second shell of water are the structural bases for the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. In Chapter 5, we study the quantitative connection between our idealized ramp <span class="hlt">potential</span> and water's pair <span class="hlt">potential</span>, as well as the relation between the regions of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in their respective phase diagrams. Finally in Chapter 6 we show that the "two-body excess entropy" is a useful quantity for predicting the regions of thermodynamic, dynamic and structural <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of water.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yan, Zhenyu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">35</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009ExG....40..214A"> <span id="translatedtitle">A least-squares minimisation approach to depth determination from numerical second horizontal self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper develops a least-squares minimisation approach to determine the depth of a buried structure from numerical second horizontal derivative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> obtained from self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> (SP) data using filters of successive window lengths. The method is based on using a relationship between the depth and a combination of observations at symmetric points with respect to the coordinate of the projection of the centre of the source in the plane of the measurement points with a free parameter (graticule spacing). The problem of depth determination from second derivative SP <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> has been transformed into the problem of finding a solution to a non-linear equation of the form f(z)=0. Formulas have been derived for horizontal cylinders, spheres, and vertical cylinders. Procedures are also formulated to determine the electric dipole moment and the polarization angle. The proposed method was tested on synthetic noisy and real SP data. In the case of the synthetic data, the least-squares method determined the correct depths of the sources. In the case of practical data (SP <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over a sulfide ore deposit, Sariyer, Turkey and over a Malachite Mine, Jefferson County, Colorado, USA), the estimated depths of the buried structures are in good agreement with the results obtained from drilling and surface geology.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Abdelrahman, El-Sayed Mohamed; Soliman, Khalid; Essa, Khalid Sayed; Abo-Ezz, Eid Ragab; El-Araby, Tarek Mohamed</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">36</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFMNS31A1563B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Can we Retrieve the Seepage Velocity From Self-<span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> Associated With Leakages in Dams and Embankments?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">: Leakage in dams and embankments are responsible for self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> (SP) <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, which can be recorded using non-polarizable electrodes. A set of laboratory experiments using glass bead packs were made in order to understand the influence of the Reynolds number, Re, on the amplitude of the self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> signals. At low Re numbers, the coupling coefficient decreases with the increase of Reynolds number. At high Re numbers, the coupling coefficient and the permeability, decreases with the increase of Re numbers. All these variations are described by a new model that we called the BCR model (Streaming <span class="hlt">potentials</span> of granular media. Influence of the Dukhin and Reynolds numbers. Submitted in Journal of Geophysical Research). A finite element numerical simulation (FEMLAB Comsol Mutliphysics 3.2) is performed, using the BCR model, to see if there is a possibility to quantitatively estimate the seepage velocity associated with these self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. This simulation was done on a water filled basin with a preferential fluid flow associated with a gravel-filled pipe. The magnitude of the SP signals depends also on the conductivity of the ground water that can be also measured in the field. A sensitivity analysis shows that, in some conditions, the seepage velocity associated with leakage can be quantitatively estimated from the magnitude of the SP signals providing of the value of the conductivity of water.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Boleve, A.; Revil, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">37</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AIPC.1325..164S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Application of Qualitative and Quantitative Analyses of Self-<span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> in Caves Detection in Djuanda Forest Park, Bandung</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Self-<span class="hlt">Potential</span> (SP) is naturally occurring electric <span class="hlt">potential</span> difference observed at the surface. In the vicinity of a cave, SP <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is dominantly generated by the resistivity contrast of the cave with its environment and the current source associated with the streaming <span class="hlt">potential</span> generated by fluid flow through the cave. In this study we applied a simple qualitative analysis to understand the SP values caused by streaming <span class="hlt">potential</span> and values that are due to the presence of caves. Further, we conducted two-dimensional SP continuous modeling by solving the fluid velocity vector first in the modeling domain. Current source distribution and hence the SP value are obtained by incorporating resistivity value of the subsurface and calculating the divergence of the velocity vector. For validation, this scheme was applied in detection caves dug by Japanese army during WWII as at Djuanda Forest Park, Bandung. The results can be used to understand the characteristics of fluid flow and current source distribution around cavities that are responsible for the observed SP <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> at the surface.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Srigutomo, Wahyu; Arkanuddin, Muhammad R.; Pratomo, Prihandhanu M.; Novana, Eka C.; Agustina, Rena D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">38</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AdMaR.443.1587W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Another <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Explanation for Pioneer <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Cosmic Drag of an Orbit</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Analysis of the radio tracking data from the Pioneer 10/11 spacecraft at distances between about 20-70 AU from the Sun has consistently indicated the presence of a constant acceleration of 8.6× 10-8 cm/s-2 directed towards the Sun. This has been one of the most interesting and intriguing astrophysical problems in the last decade. Currently, an independent research rises from the planetary long-term orbital evolution study and may be helpful to understand the nature of Pioneer <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>. Furthermore, calculation shows that the Pioneer data match with the new discovery’s prediction very well.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, Weijia</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">39</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/38430584"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for the Assessment of the Allergenic <span class="hlt">Potential</span> of Genetically Modified Organisms</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The prevalence of allergic diseases has been increasing continuously and, accordingly, there is a great desire to evaluate the allergenic <span class="hlt">potential</span> of components in our daily environment (e.g., food). Although there is almost no scientific evidence that genetically modified organisms (GMOs) exhibit increased allergenicity compared with the corresponding wild type significant concerns have been raised regarding this matter. In principle,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Armin Spök; Helmut Gaugitsch; Sylvia Laffer; Gabrielle Pauli; Hirohisa Saito; Hugh Sampson; Elopy Sibanda; Wayne Thomas; Marianne van Hage; Rudolf Valenta</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">40</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57418465"> <span id="translatedtitle">In Vitro Interactions of Extracellular Histones with LDL <span class="hlt">Suggest</span> a <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Pro-Atherogenic Role</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">BackgroundNuclear histones have previously been shown to aggregate LDL in vitro, <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> of a possible pro-atherogenic role. Recent studies indicate that histones are released during acute inflammation, and therefore might interact with circulating lipoproteins in vivo. In view of the associative link between inflammation and cardiovascular disease, the behaviour of histones was investigated using in vitro models of LDL retention</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alan D. Pemberton; Jeremy K. Brown</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">41</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2676871"> <span id="translatedtitle">Modeling of Glycerol-3-Phosphate Transporter <span class="hlt">Suggests</span> a <span class="hlt">Potential</span> 'Tilt' Mechanism involved in its Function</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Many major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporters have similar 12-transmembrane ?-helical topologies with two six-helix halves connected by a long loop. In humans, these transporters participate in key physiological processes and are also, as in the case of members of the organic anion transporter (OAT) family, of pharmaceutical interest. Recently, crystal structures of two bacterial representatives of the MFS family — the glycerol-3-phosphate transporter (GlpT) and lac-permease (LacY) — have been solved and, because of assumptions regarding the high structural conservation of this family, there is hope that the results can be applied to mammalian transporters as well. Based on crystallography, it has been <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that a major conformational “switching” mechanism accounts for ligand transport by MFS proteins. This conformational switch would then allow periodic changes in the overall transporter configuration, resulting in its cyclic opening to the periplasm or cytoplasm. Following this lead, we have modeled a possible “switch” mechanism in GlpT, using the concept of rotation of protein domains as in the DynDom program17 and membranephilic constraints predicted by the MAPAS program.23 We found that the minima of energies of intersubunit interactions support two alternate positions consistent with their transport properties. Thus, for GlpT, a “tilt” of 9°–10° rotation had the most favorable energetics of electrostatic interaction between the two halves of the transporter; moreover, this confirmation was sufficient to <span class="hlt">suggest</span> transport of the ligand across the membrane. We conducted steered molecular dynamics simulations of the GlpT-ligand system to explore how glycerol-3-phosphate would be handled by the “tilted” structure, and obtained results generally consistent with experimental mutagenesis data. While biochemical data remain most consistent with a single-site alternating access model, our results raise the possibility that, while the “rocker switch” may apply to certain MFS transporters, intermediate “tilted” states may exist under certain circumstances or as transitional structures. While wet lab experimental confirmation is required, our results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that transport mechanisms in this transporter family should probably not be assumed to be conserved simply based on standard structural homology considerations. Furthermore, steered molecular dynamics elucidating energetic interactions of ligands with amino acid residues in an appropriately modeled transporter may have predictive value in understanding the impact of mutations and/or polymorphisms on transporter function.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tsigelny, Igor F.; Greenberg, Jerry; Kouznetsova, Valentina; Nigam, Sanjay K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">42</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18942157"> <span id="translatedtitle">Modeling of glycerol-3-phosphate transporter <span class="hlt">suggests</span> a <span class="hlt">potential</span> 'tilt' mechanism involved in its function.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Many major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporters have similar 12-transmembrane alpha-helical topologies with two six-helix halves connected by a long loop. In humans, these transporters participate in key physiological processes and are also, as in the case of members of the organic anion transporter (OAT) family, of pharmaceutical interest. Recently, crystal structures of two bacterial representatives of the MFS family--the glycerol-3-phosphate transporter (GlpT) and lac-permease (LacY)--have been solved and, because of assumptions regarding the high structural conservation of this family, there is hope that the results can be applied to mammalian transporters as well. Based on crystallography, it has been <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that a major conformational "switching" mechanism accounts for ligand transport by MFS proteins. This conformational switch would then allow periodic changes in the overall transporter configuration, resulting in its cyclic opening to the periplasm or cytoplasm. Following this lead, we have modeled a possible "switch" mechanism in GlpT, using the concept of rotation of protein domains as in the DynDom program17 and membranephilic constraints predicted by the MAPAS program.(23) We found that the minima of energies of intersubunit interactions support two alternate positions consistent with their transport properties. Thus, for GlpT, a "tilt" of 9 degrees -10 degrees rotation had the most favorable energetics of electrostatic interaction between the two halves of the transporter; moreover, this confirmation was sufficient to <span class="hlt">suggest</span> transport of the ligand across the membrane. We conducted steered molecular dynamics simulations of the GlpT-ligand system to explore how glycerol-3-phosphate would be handled by the "tilted" structure, and obtained results generally consistent with experimental mutagenesis data. While biochemical data remain most consistent with a single-site alternating access model, our results raise the possibility that, while the "rocker switch" may apply to certain MFS transporters, intermediate "tilted" states may exist under certain circumstances or as transitional structures. Although wet lab experimental confirmation is required, our results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that transport mechanisms in this transporter family should probably not be assumed to be conserved simply based on standard structural homology considerations. Furthermore, steered molecular dynamics elucidating energetic interactions of ligands with amino acid residues in an appropriately modeled transporter may have predictive value in understanding the impact of mutations and/or polymorphisms on transporter function. PMID:18942157</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tsigelny, Igor F; Greenberg, Jerry; Kouznetsova, Valentina; Nigam, Sanjay K</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">43</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22869301"> <span id="translatedtitle">Brainstem auditory evoked <span class="hlt">potentials</span> <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a role for the ventral cochlear nucleus in tinnitus.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Numerous studies have demonstrated elevated spontaneous and sound-evoked brainstem activity in animal models of tinnitus, but data on brainstem function in people with this common clinical condition are sparse. Here, auditory nerve and brainstem function in response to sound was assessed via auditory brainstem responses (ABR) in humans with tinnitus and without. Tinnitus subjects showed reduced wave I amplitude (indicating reduced auditory nerve activity) but enhanced wave V (reflecting elevated input to the inferior colliculi) compared with non-tinnitus subjects matched in age, sex, and pure-tone threshold. The transformation from reduced peripheral activity to central hyperactivity in the tinnitus group was especially apparent in the V/I and III/I amplitude ratios. Compared with a third cohort of younger, non-tinnitus subjects, both tinnitus, and matched, non-tinnitus groups showed elevated thresholds above 4 kHz and reduced wave I amplitude, indicating that the differences between tinnitus and matched non-tinnitus subjects occurred against a backdrop of shared peripheral dysfunction that, while not tinnitus specific, cannot be discounted as a factor in tinnitus development. Animal lesion and human neuroanatomical data combine to indicate that waves III and V in humans reflect activity in a pathway originating in the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN) and with spherical bushy cells (SBC) in particular. We conclude that the elevated III/I and V/I amplitude ratios in tinnitus subjects reflect disproportionately high activity in the SBC pathway for a given amount of peripheral input. The results imply a role for the VCN in tinnitus and <span class="hlt">suggest</span> the SBC pathway as a target for tinnitus treatment. PMID:22869301</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gu, Jianwen Wendy; Herrmann, Barbara S; Levine, Robert A; Melcher, Jennifer R</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-08-07</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">44</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3482292"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cervical spine <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Menkes disease: a radiologic finding <span class="hlt">potentially</span> confused with child abuse</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background Menkes disease is an X-linked recessive disorder of copper transport caused by mutations in ATP7A, a copper-transporting ATPase. Certain radiologic findings reported in this condition overlap with those caused by child abuse. However, cervical spine defects simulating cervical spine fracture, a known result of nonaccidental pediatric trauma, have not been reported previously in this illness. Objective To assess the frequency of cervical spine <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Menkes disease after discovery of an apparent C2 posterior arch defect in a child participating in a clinical trial. Materials and methods We examined cervical spine radiographs obtained in 35 children with Menkes disease enrolled in a clinical trial at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. Results Four of the 35 children with Menkes disease had apparent C2 posterior arch defects consistent with spondylolysis or incomplete/delayed ossification. Conclusion Defects in C2 were found in 11% of infants and young children with Menkes disease. Discovery of cervical spine defects expands the spectrum of radiologic findings associated with this condition. As with other skeletal abnormalities, this feature simulates nonaccidental trauma. In the context of Menkes disease, suspicions of child abuse should be considered cautiously and tempered by these findings to avoid unwarranted accusations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hill, Suvimol C.; Dwyer, Andrew J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">45</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23630110"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> teratogenicity of methimazole: exposure of zebrafish embryos to methimazole causes similar developmental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to human methimazole embryopathy.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">While methimazole (MMI) is widely used in the therapy for hyperthyroidism, several groups have reported that maternal exposure to MMI results in a variety of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, including choanal and esophageal atresia, iridic and retinal coloboma, and delayed neurodevelopment. Thus, adverse effects of maternal exposure to MMI on fetal development have long been <span class="hlt">suggested</span>; however, direct evidence for the teratogenicity of MMI has not been presented. Therefore, we studied the effects of MMI on early development by using zebrafish as a model organism. The fertilized eggs of zebrafish were collected immediately after spawning and grown in egg culture water containing MMI at various concentrations. External observation of the embryos revealed that exposure to high concentrations of MMI resulted in loss of pigmentation, hypoplastic hindbrain, turbid tissue in the forebrain, swelling of the notochord, and curly trunk. Furthermore, these effects occurred in a dose-dependent manner. Precise observation of the serial cross-sections of MMI-exposed embryos elucidated delayed development and hypoplasia of the whole brain and spinal cord, narrowing of the pharynx and esophagus, severe disruption of the retina, and aberrant structure of the notochord. These neuronal, pharyngeal, esophageal, and retinal anomalous morphologies have a direct analogy to the congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> observed in children exposed to MMI in utero. Here, we show the teratogenic effects of MMI on the development of zebrafish and provide the first experimental evidence for the connection between exposure to MMI and human MMI embryopathy. PMID:23630110</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Komoike, Yuta; Matsuoka, Masato; Kosaki, Kenjiro</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-29</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">46</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3310790"> <span id="translatedtitle">Age-Dependent Brain Gene Expression and Copy Number <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Autism <span class="hlt">Suggest</span> Distinct Pathological Processes at Young Versus Mature Ages</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder, yet the genetic underpinnings of the disorder are largely unknown. Aberrant brain overgrowth is a well-replicated observation in the autism literature; but association, linkage, and expression studies have not identified genetic factors that explain this trajectory. Few studies have had sufficient statistical power to investigate whole-genome gene expression and genotypic variation in the autistic brain, especially in regions that display the greatest growth abnormality. Previous functional genomic studies have identified possible alterations in transcript levels of genes related to neurodevelopment and immune function. Thus, there is a need for genetic studies involving key brain regions to replicate these findings and solidify the role of particular functional pathways in autism pathogenesis. We therefore sought to identify abnormal brain gene expression patterns via whole-genome analysis of mRNA levels and copy number variations (CNVs) in autistic and control postmortem brain samples. We focused on prefrontal cortex tissue where excess neuron numbers and cortical overgrowth are pronounced in the majority of autism cases. We found evidence for dysregulation in pathways governing cell number, cortical patterning, and differentiation in young autistic prefrontal cortex. In contrast, adult autistic prefrontal cortex showed dysregulation of signaling and repair pathways. Genes regulating cell cycle also exhibited autism-specific CNVs in DNA derived from prefrontal cortex, and these genes were significantly associated with autism in genome-wide association study datasets. Our results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that CNVs and age-dependent gene expression changes in autism may reflect distinct pathological processes in the developing versus the mature autistic prefrontal cortex. Our results raise the hypothesis that genetic dysregulation in the developing brain leads to abnormal regional patterning, excess prefrontal neurons, cortical overgrowth, and neural dysfunction in autism.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Winn, Mary E.; Barnes, Cynthia Carter; Li, Hai-Ri; Weiss, Lauren; Fan, Jian-Bing; Murray, Sarah; April, Craig; Belinson, Haim; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Schork, Nicholas J.; Courchesne, Eric</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">47</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.9396K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of Süleymanköy (Diyarbakir, Eastern Turkey) and Seferihisar (Izmir, Western Turkey) Self <span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> with Multilayer Perceptron Neural Networks</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> (SP) is one of the oldest geophysical methods that provides important information about near-surface structures. Several methods have been developed to interpret SP data using simple geometries. This study investigated inverse solution of a buried, polarized sphere-shaped self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> (SP ) <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> via Multilayer Perceptron Neural Networks ( MLPNN ). The polarization angle ( ? ) and depth to the centre of sphere ( h )were estimated. The MLPNN is applied to synthetic and field SP data. In order to see the capability of the method in detecting the number of sources, MLPNN was applied to different spherical models at different depths and locations.. Additionally, the performance of MLPNN was tested by adding random noise to the same synthetic test data. The sphere model successfully obtained similar parameters under different S/N ratios. Then, MLPNN method was applied to two field examples. The first one is the cross section taken from the SP <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map of the Ergani-Süleymanköy (Turkey) copper mine. MLPNN was also applied to SP data from Seferihisar Izmir (Western Turkey) geothermal field. The MLPNN results showed good agreement with the original synthetic data set. The effect of The technique gave satisfactory results following the addition of 5% and 10% Gaussian noise levels. The MLPNN results were compared to other SP interpretation techniques, such as Normalized Full Gradient (NFG), inverse solution and nomogram methods. All of the techniques showed strong similarity. Consequently, the synthetic and field applications of this study show that MLPNN provides reliable evaluation of the self <span class="hlt">potential</span> data modelled by the sphere model.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kaftan, Ilknur; Sindirgi, Petek</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">48</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54640464"> <span id="translatedtitle">Gravity <span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on Mars : Shape of the planet and its thermal evolution</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study follows previous studies about the existence of paleo shorelines on the surface of Mars (Parker, 1993, Clifford and Parker, 2001). In order to test this hypothesis, we have computed the gravity <span class="hlt">potential</span> of the shorelines since shorelines should represent equipotential lines at the solid surface of the planet. For the so-called Deuteronilus shoreline, we find that the <span class="hlt">potential</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">F. Couturier; G. Choblet; C. Sotin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">49</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AdG.....7..251A"> <span id="translatedtitle">High resolution numerical study of the Algiers 2001 flash flood: sensitivity to the upper-level <span class="hlt">potential</span> vorticity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">From 9 to 11 November 2001, intense cyclogenesis affected the northern coasts of Africa and more particularly the densely populated city of Algiers. During the morning of 10 November, more than 130 mm of precipitation was recorded at Bouzareah and resulted in mudslides which devastated the Bab-el-Oued district. This disaster caused more than 700 casualties and catastrophic damage. Like many other heavy rainstorms in the western Mediterranean, this event was associated with the presence of an upper-level trough materialized by a deep stratospheric intrusion and characterized by high <span class="hlt">potential</span> vorticity values. In this study, the impact of this synoptic structure on the localization and intensity of the precipitation which affected Algiers is investigated using a <span class="hlt">potential</span> vorticity (PV) inversion method coupled for the first time with the French non-hydrostatic MESO-NH model. A set of perturbed synoptic environments was designed by slightly modifying the extent and the intensity of the coherent <span class="hlt">potential</span> vorticity structures in the operational ARPEGE analysis. It is shown that such modifications may have a strong impact on the fine-scale precipitation forecast in the Algiers region, thereby demonstrating the fundamental role played by the <span class="hlt">potential</span> vorticity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> during this exceptional meteorological event.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Argence, S.; Lambert, D.; Richard, E.; Söhne, N.; Chaboureau, J.-P.; Crépin, F.; Arbogast, P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">50</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=489175"> <span id="translatedtitle">Somatosensory and brainstem auditory evoked <span class="hlt">potential</span> in congenital craniovertebral <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>; effect of surgical management.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Clinical features and evoked <span class="hlt">potential</span> recordings were analysed in 32 patients with congenital atlantoaxial dislocation before and after surgery. Seven patients (group 1) had atlantoaxial dislocation, while 22 patients had associated basilar invagination (group 2). In both groups, pyramidal tract signs, posterior column signs, wasting of the upper limbs, and abnormality of somatosensory evoked <span class="hlt">potentials</span> (SSEP) were similar. Conversely, lower cranial nerve involvement and abnormal brainstem auditory evoked <span class="hlt">potentials</span> (BAEP) were significantly more in patients with basilar invagination (p less than 0.05). All seven patients in group 1 and 17 patients in group 2 were operated upon. Clinical and electrophysiological deterioration were significant in patients with basilar invagination (group 2), following posterior fixation compared with group 1. Among the patients in group 2, who clinically deteriorated following posterior fixation, seven had transoral excision of odontoid and six of them improved both clinically and electrophysiologically. Two patients in group 2 had odontoid excision before posterior fixation, and in both the evoked <span class="hlt">potentials</span> improved postoperatively. In group 1 the patient's BAEP remained unaffected following posterior fixation, however, in group 2, eight patients over 53% showed improvement in brainstem function following posterior fixation. This study shows the value of evoked <span class="hlt">potentials</span> in congenital atlantoaxial dislocation, and rationalizes the surgical procedure in these patients. In patients with basilar invagination, odontoid excision is the preferred first stage procedure. Images</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sood, S; Mahapatra, A K; Bhatia, R</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">51</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=technology%27s+AND+effect+AND+brain&pg=4&id=EJ881806"> <span id="translatedtitle">Do U Txt? Event-Related <span class="hlt">Potentials</span> to Semantic <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Standard and Texted English</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Texted English is a hybrid, technology-based language derived from standard English modified to facilitate ease of communication via instant and text messaging. We compared semantic processing of texted and standard English sentences by recording event-related <span class="hlt">potentials</span> in a classic semantic incongruity paradigm designed to elicit an N400 effect.…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Berger, Natalie I.; Coch, Donna</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">52</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18193080"> <span id="translatedtitle">Gravitational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The effective action for fermions moving in external gravitational and gauge fields is analyzed in terms of the corresponding external field propagator. The central object in our approach is the covariant energy-momentum tensor which is extracted from the regular part of the propagator at short distances. It is shown that the Lorentz <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, the conformal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and the gauge <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">H. Leutwyler; S. Mallik</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">53</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23508996"> <span id="translatedtitle">Structure of the NLRP1 caspase recruitment domain <span class="hlt">suggests</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> mechanisms for its association with procaspase-1.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The NLRP1 inflammasome responds to microbial challenges such as Bacillus anthracis infection and is implicated in autoimmune disease such as vitiligo. Human NLRP1 contains both an N-terminal pyrin domain (PYD) and a C-terminal caspase recruitment domain (CARD), with the latter being essential for its association with the downstream effector procaspase-1. Here we report a 2.0 Å crystal structure of the human NLRP1 CARD as a fusion with the maltose-binding protein. The structure reveals the six-helix bundle fold of the NLRP1 CARD, typical of the death domain superfamily. The charge surface of the NLRP1 CARD structure and a procaspase-1 CARD model <span class="hlt">suggests</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> mechanisms for their association through electrostatic attraction. PMID:23508996</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jin, Tengchuan; Curry, James; Smith, Patrick; Jiang, Jiansheng; Xiao, T Sam</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">54</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2350203"> <span id="translatedtitle">Measurements of simultaneously recorded spike and local field <span class="hlt">potentials</span> <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that spatial selection emerges in the frontal eye field</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">SUMMARY The frontal eye field (FEF) participates in selecting the location of behaviorally relevant stimuli for guiding attention and eye movements. We simultaneously recorded local field <span class="hlt">potentials</span> (LFPs) and spiking activity in the FEF of monkeys performing memory-guided saccade and covert visual search tasks. We compared visual latencies and the time course of spatially selective responses in LFPs and spiking activity. Consistent with the view that LFPs represent synaptic input, visual responses appeared first in the LFPs followed by visual responses in the spiking activity. However, spatially selective activity identifying the location of the target in the visual search array appeared in the spikes about 30 ms before it appeared in the LFPs. Because LFPs reflect dendritic input and spikes measure neuronal output in a local brain region, this temporal relationship <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that spatial selection necessary for attention and eye movements is computed locally in FEF from non-spatially selective inputs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Monosov, Ilya E.; Trageser, Jason C.; Thompson, Kirk G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">55</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21370802"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hydrodynamics with Triangle <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We consider the hydrodynamic regime of theories with quantum <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for global currents. We show that a hitherto discarded term in the conserved current is not only allowed by symmetries, but is in fact required by triangle <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the second law of thermodynamics. This term leads to a number of new effects, one of which is chiral separation in a rotating fluid at nonzero chemical <span class="hlt">potential</span>. The new kinetic coefficients can be expressed, in a unique fashion, through the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> coefficients and the equation of state. We briefly discuss the relevance of this new hydrodynamic term for physical situations, including heavy-ion collisions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Son, Dam T. [Institute for Nuclear Theory, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1550 (United States); Surowka, Piotr [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1560 (United States); Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-11-06</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">56</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013NHESS..13.1077A"> <span id="translatedtitle">A comparison of classical and intelligent methods to detect <span class="hlt">potential</span> thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> before the 11 August 2012 Varzeghan, Iran, earthquake (Mw = 6.4)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, a number of classical and intelligent methods, including interquartile, autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA), artificial neural network (ANN) and support vector machine (SVM), have been proposed to quantify <span class="hlt">potential</span> thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> around the time of the 11 August 2012 Varzeghan, Iran, earthquake (Mw = 6.4). The duration of the data set, which is comprised of Aqua-MODIS land surface temperature (LST) night-time snapshot images, is 62 days. In order to quantify variations of LST data obtained from satellite images, the air temperature (AT) data derived from the meteorological station close to the earthquake epicenter has been taken into account. For the models examined here, results indicate the following: (i) ARIMA models, which are the most widely used in the time series community for short-term forecasting, are quickly and easily implemented, and can efficiently act through linear solutions. (ii) A multilayer perceptron (MLP) feed-forward neural network can be a suitable non-parametric method to detect the anomalous changes of a non-linear time series such as variations of LST. (iii) Since SVMs are often used due to their many advantages for classification and regression tasks, it can be shown that, if the difference between the predicted value using the SVM method and the observed value exceeds the pre-defined threshold value, then the observed value could be regarded as an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. (iv) ANN and SVM methods could be powerful tools in modeling complex phenomena such as earthquake precursor time series where we may not know what the underlying data generating process is. There is good agreement in the results obtained from the different methods for quantifying <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in a given LST time series. This paper indicates that the detection of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> derive credibility from the overall efficiencies and <span class="hlt">potentialities</span> of the four integrated methods.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Akhoondzadeh, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">57</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56466265"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mapping Stratigraphy and <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Iron-Rich Volcanoclastics Using Ground-Penetrating Radar: <span class="hlt">Potential</span> for Subsurface Exploration on Mars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) studies conducted in iron-rich volcanoclastics can yield valuable information for interpreting the subsurface stratigraphy resulting from lava flows and intervening unconsolidated volcanic and sedimentary deposits with different compositions and ages. GPR is also valuable for mapping subsurface <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and structures, such as rifts and lava tubes. We performed a geophysical field survey in Craters of the Moon</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">E. Heggy; S. Clifford; S. Khan; J. Fernandez; E. Wiggs; S. L. Gonzalez; D. Wyrick; R. Grimm; C. Dinwiddie; A. Pommerol</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">58</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23813976"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pathogenic rare copy number variants in community-based schizophrenia <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a <span class="hlt">potential</span> role for clinical microarrays.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Individually rare, large copy number variants (CNVs) contribute to genetic vulnerability for schizophrenia. Unresolved questions remain, however, regarding the anticipated yield of clinical microarray testing in schizophrenia. Using high-resolution genome-wide microarrays and rigorous methods, we investigated rare CNVs in a prospectively recruited community-based cohort of 459 unrelated adults with schizophrenia and estimated the minimum prevalence of clinically significant CNVs that would be detectable on a clinical microarray. A blinded review by two independent clinical cytogenetic laboratory directors of all large (>500 kb) rare CNVs in cases and well-matched controls showed that those deemed to be clinically significant were highly enriched in schizophrenia (16.4-fold increase, P < 0.0001). In a single community catchment area, the prevalence of individuals with these CNVs was 8.1%. Rare 1.7 Mb CNVs at 2q13 were found to be significantly associated with schizophrenia for the first time, compared with the prevalence in 23 838 population-based controls (42.9-fold increase, P = 0.0002). Additional novel findings that will facilitate the future clinical interpretation of smaller CNVs in schizophrenia include: (i) a greater proportion of individuals with two or more rare exonic CNVs >10 kb in size (1.5-fold increase, P = 0.0109) in schizophrenia; (ii) the systematic discovery of new candidate genes for schizophrenia; and, (iii) functional gene enrichment mapping highlighting a differential impact in schizophrenia of rare exonic deletions involving diverse functions, including neurodevelopmental and synaptic processes (4.7-fold increase, P = 0.0060). These findings <span class="hlt">suggest</span> consideration of a <span class="hlt">potential</span> role for clinical microarray testing in schizophrenia, as is now the <span class="hlt">suggested</span> standard of care for related developmental disorders like autism. PMID:23813976</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Costain, Gregory; Lionel, Anath C; Merico, Daniele; Forsythe, Pamela; Russell, Kathryn; Lowther, Chelsea; Yuen, Tracy; Husted, Janice; Stavropoulos, Dimitri J; Speevak, Marsha; Chow, Eva W C; Marshall, Christian R; Scherer, Stephen W; Bassett, Anne S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-27</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">59</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10191907"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> tank waste material <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> located near the liquid observation wells: Model predicted responses of a neutron moisture detection system</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Extensive analyses have been completed to demonstrate that a neutron moisture probe can be used to recognize <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in materials and geometry surrounding the liquid observation wells (LOWs). Furthermore, techniques can be developed that will permit the interpretation of detector readings, perturbed by the presence of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, as more accurate moisture concentrations. This analysis effort extends the usefulness of a neutron moisture probe system significantly, especially in the complicated geometries and material conditions that may be encountered in the waste tanks. Both static-source and pulsed-source neutron probes were considered in the analyses. Four different detector configurations were investigated: Thermal and epithermal neutron detectors located in both the near and far field.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Finfrock, S.H.; Toffer, H.; Watson, W.T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">60</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18237829"> <span id="translatedtitle">Gravitational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is shown that in certain parity-violating theories in 4k+2 dimensions, general covariance is spoiled by <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at the one-loop level. This occurs when Weyl fermions of spin-1\\/2 or -3\\/2 or self-dual antisymmetric tensor fields are coupled to gravity. (For Dirac fermions there is no trouble.) The conditions for <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> cancellation between fields of different spin is investigated. In six</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Luis Alvarez-Gaumé; Edward Witten</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a 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onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">61</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3544451"> <span id="translatedtitle">Molecular crosstalk between cancer cells and tumor microenvironment components <span class="hlt">suggests</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> targets for new therapeutic approaches in mobile tongue cancer</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We characterized tumor microenvironment (TME) components of mobile tongue (MT) cancer patients in terms of overall inflammatory infiltrate, focusing on the protumorigenic/anti-inflammatory phenotypes and on cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in order to determine their interrelations and associations with clinical outcomes. In addition, by culturing tongue carcinoma cells (HSC-3) on a three-dimensional myoma organotypic model that mimics TME, we attempted to investigate the possible existence of a molecular crosstalk between cancer cells and TME components. Analysis of 64 cases of MT cancer patients revealed that the overall density of the inflammatory infiltrate was inversely correlated to the density of CAFs (P = 0.01), but that the cumulative density of the protumorigenic/anti-inflammatory phenotypes, including regulatory T cells (Tregs, Foxp3+), tumor-associated macrophages (TAM2, CD163+), and <span class="hlt">potentially</span> Tregs-inducing immune cells (CD80+), was directly correlated with the density of CAFs (P = 0.01). The hazard ratio (HR) for recurrence in a TME rich in CD163+ Foxp3+ CD80+ was 2.9 (95% CI 1.03–8.6, P = 0.043 compared with low in CD163+ Foxp3+ CD80+). The HR for recurrence in a TME rich in CAFs was 4.1 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3–12.8, P = 0.012 compared with low in CAFs). In vitro studies showed cancer-derived exosomes, epithelial–mesenchymal transition process, fibroblast-to-CAF-like cell transdifferentiation, and reciprocal interrelations between different cytokines <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> the presence of molecular crosstalk between cancer cells and TME components. Collectively, these results highlighted the emerging need of new therapies targeting this crosstalk between the cancer cells and TME components in MT cancer.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dayan, Dan; Salo, Tuula; Salo, Sirpa; Nyberg, Pia; Nurmenniemi, Sini; Costea, Daniela Elena; Vered, Marilena</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">62</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21301115"> <span id="translatedtitle">Water: Thermodynamic and Dynamic <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">While the majority of fluids contract upon cooling, water expands when cooled below T = 4 deg. C at atmospheric pressure. This effect is called density <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Besides the density <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, there are more than 60 other <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> known for water. Diffusivity is one of them. For normal liquids the diffusion coefficient decreases under compression. However, experimental results have shown that for water at temperatures below approximately 10 deg. C, the diffusion coefficient increases under compression and has a maximum. The temperature of maximum density line, inside which the density <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> occurs, and the line of maximum in diffusivity are located in the same region of the pressure-temperature phase diagram of water. We show how simulations for water also show thermodynamic and dynamic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. These <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are then demonstrated to be related to two length scales effective <span class="hlt">potential</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Barbosa, Marcia C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre (Brazil)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-04-19</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">63</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Cytology&id=ED018056"> <span id="translatedtitle">DOWN'S <span class="hlt">ANOMALY</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">BOTH CLINICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL ASPECTS AND MATHEMATICAL ELABORATIONS OF DOWN'S <span class="hlt">ANOMALY</span>, KNOWN ALSO AS MONGOLISM, ARE PRESENTED IN THIS REFERENCE MANUAL FOR PROFESSIONAL PERSONNEL. INFORMATION PROVIDED CONCERNS (1) HISTORICAL STUDIES, (2) PHYSICAL SIGNS, (3) BONES AND MUSCLES, (4) MENTAL DEVELOPMENT, (5) DERMATOGLYPHS, (6) HEMATOLOGY, (7)…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">PENROSE, L.S.; SMITH, G.F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">64</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=27882"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in coral reef community metabolism and their <span class="hlt">potential</span> importance in the reef CO2 source-sink debate</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is not certain whether coral reefs are sources of or sinks for atmospheric CO2. Air–sea exchange of CO2 over reefs has been measured directly and inferred from changes in the seawater carbonate equilibrium. Such measurements have provided conflicting results. We provide community metabolic data that indicate that large changes in CO2 concentration can occur in coral reef waters via biogeochemical processes not directly associated with photosynthesis, respiration, calcification, and CaCO3 dissolution. These processes can significantly distort estimates of reef calcification and net productivity and obscure the contribution of coral reefs to global air–sea exchange of CO2. They may, nonetheless, explain apparent <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the metabolic performance of reefs close to land and reconcile the differing experimental findings that have given rise to the CO2 debate.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chisholm, John R. M.; Barnes, David J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">65</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007JGRB..112.3102S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magnetic properties and <span class="hlt">potential</span> field modeling of the Peculiar Knob metamorphosed iron formation, South Australia: An analog for the source of the intense Martian magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Magnetic property measurements show that the strongly metamorphosed Peculiar Knob iron formation (IF), South Australia, is coarse-grained, high-grade hematite with variable amounts of magnetite and maghemite. This body exhibits a relatively low magnetic susceptibility (<0.3 SI) that cannot explain the associated intense magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, 30,000 nT, in terms of induced magnetization alone. Peculiar Knob IF possesses an extremely intense (˜120 A m-1) remanence, directed steeply upward. This ancient remanence reinforces the local Earth's field (inclination -63°). A simple geological model, constrained by drilling and physical property measurements, explains both the observed magnetic and gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, consistent with the Poisson theorem. Koenigsberger ratios (Qs) of 10 and greater, as found here, are rare in nature. We postulate that acquisition of a thermoremanent magnetization (TRM) by the ore during postmetamorphic cooling from above the Curie/Néel temperature accounts for the intense remanence and high Qs. Although the hematite is in the multidomain size range, the coercivity is higher than expected. Also, the natural remanent magnetization (NRM) values are less than 10% of the expected value for a saturated TRM of hematite. On the basis of reflected light, scanning electron microscope observations, and rock magnetism, we propose that the common fine intergrowths of a very small amount of magnetite and/or maghemite within the hematite host are responsible for the relatively high coercivity and contribute to the NRM. These intergrowths are not normal exsolution lamellae and were likely present at high temperature. This study <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that coarse-grained hematite-rich bodies that carry TRM and have been subjected to high-grade (>680°C) metamorphism may be possible sources for some of the prominent Martian <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schmidt, Phillip W.; McEnroe, Suzanne A.; Clark, David A.; Robinson, Peter</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">66</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23635491"> <span id="translatedtitle">Microtopography of the eye surface of the crab Carcinus maenas: an atomic force microscope study <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> a possible antifouling <span class="hlt">potential</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Marine biofouling causes problems for technologies based on the sea, including ships, power plants and marine sensors. Several antifouling techniques have been applied to marine sensors, but most of these methodologies are environmentally unfriendly or ineffective. Bioinspiration, seeking guidance from natural solutions, is a promising approach to antifouling. Here, the eye of the green crab Carcinus maenas was regarded as a marine sensor model and its surface characterized by means of atomic force microscopy. Engineered surface micro- and nanotopography is a new mechanism found to limit biofouling, promising an effective solution with much reduced environmental impact. Besides giving a new insight into the morphology of C. maenas eye and its characterization, our study indicates that the eye surface probably has antifouling/fouling-release <span class="hlt">potential</span>. Furthermore, the topographical features of the surface may influence the wettability properties of the structure and its interaction with organic molecules. Results indicate that the eye surface micro- and nanotopography may lead to bioinspired solutions to antifouling protection. PMID:23635491</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Greco, G; Lanero, T Svaldo; Torrassa, S; Young, R; Vassalli, M; Cavaliere, A; Rolandi, R; Pelucchi, E; Faimali, M; Davenport, J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">67</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3597676"> <span id="translatedtitle">Characterization of MicA interactions <span class="hlt">suggests</span> a <span class="hlt">potential</span> novel means of gene regulation by small non-coding RNAs</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">MicA is a small non-coding RNA that regulates ompA mRNA translation in Escherichia coli. MicA has an inhibitory function, base pairing to the translation initiation region of target mRNAs through short sequences of complementarity, blocking their ribosome-binding sites. The MicA structure contains two stem loops, which impede its interaction with target mRNAs, and it is thought that the RNA chaperone protein Hfq, known to be involved in MicA regulation of ompA, may structurally remodel MicA to reveal the ompA-binding site for cognate pairing. To further characterize these interactions, we undertook biochemical and biophysical studies using native MicA and a ‘stabilized’ version, modified to mimic the conformational state of MicA where the ompA-binding site is exposed. Our data corroborate two proposed roles for Hfq: first, to bring both MicA and ompA into close proximity, and second, to restructure MicA to allow exposure of the ompA-binding site for pairing, thereby demonstrating the RNA chaperone function of Hfq. Additionally, at accumulated MicA levels, we identified a Mg2+-dependent self-association that occludes the ompA-recognition region. We discuss the <span class="hlt">potential</span> contribution of an Mg2+-mediated conformational switch of MicA for the regulation of MicA function.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Henderson, Charlotte A.; Vincent, Helen A.; Stone, Carlanne M.; Phillips, Jack O.; Cary, Peter D.; Gowers, Darren M.; Callaghan, Anastasia J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">68</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23361466"> <span id="translatedtitle">Characterization of MicA interactions <span class="hlt">suggests</span> a <span class="hlt">potential</span> novel means of gene regulation by small non-coding RNAs.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">MicA is a small non-coding RNA that regulates ompA mRNA translation in Escherichia coli. MicA has an inhibitory function, base pairing to the translation initiation region of target mRNAs through short sequences of complementarity, blocking their ribosome-binding sites. The MicA structure contains two stem loops, which impede its interaction with target mRNAs, and it is thought that the RNA chaperone protein Hfq, known to be involved in MicA regulation of ompA, may structurally remodel MicA to reveal the ompA-binding site for cognate pairing. To further characterize these interactions, we undertook biochemical and biophysical studies using native MicA and a 'stabilized' version, modified to mimic the conformational state of MicA where the ompA-binding site is exposed. Our data corroborate two proposed roles for Hfq: first, to bring both MicA and ompA into close proximity, and second, to restructure MicA to allow exposure of the ompA-binding site for pairing, thereby demonstrating the RNA chaperone function of Hfq. Additionally, at accumulated MicA levels, we identified a Mg(2+)-dependent self-association that occludes the ompA-recognition region. We discuss the <span class="hlt">potential</span> contribution of an Mg(2+)-mediated conformational switch of MicA for the regulation of MicA function. PMID:23361466</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Henderson, Charlotte A; Vincent, Helen A; Stone, Carlanne M; Phillips, Jack O; Cary, Peter D; Gowers, Darren M; Callaghan, Anastasia J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-29</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">69</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19019982"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tissue-specific expression patterns of Arabidopsis NF-Y transcription factors <span class="hlt">suggest</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> for extensive combinatorial complexity.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">All aspects of plant and animal development are controlled by complex networks of transcription factors. Transcription factors are essential for converting signaling inputs, such as changes in daylength, into complex gene regulatory outputs. While some transcription factors control gene expression by binding to cis-regulatory elements as individual subunits, others function in a combinatorial fashion. How individual subunits of combinatorial transcription factors are spatially and temporally deployed (e.g. expression-level, posttranslational modifications and subcellular localization) has profound effects on their control of gene expression. In the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), we have identified 36 Nuclear Factor Y (NF-Y) transcription factor subunits (10 NF-YA, 13 NF-YB, and 13 NF-YC subunits) that can theoretically combine to form 1,690 unique complexes. Individual plant subunits have functions in flowering time, embryo maturation, and meristem development, but how they combine to control these processes is unknown. To assist in the process of defining unique NF-Y complexes, we have created promoter:beta-glucuronidase fusion lines for all 36 Arabidopsis genes. Here, we show NF-Y expression patterns inferred from these promoter:beta-glucuronidase lines for roots, light- versus dark-grown seedlings, rosettes, and flowers. Additionally, we review the phylogenetic relationships and examine protein alignments for each NF-Y subunit family. The results are discussed with a special emphasis on <span class="hlt">potential</span> roles for NF-Y subunits in photoperiod-controlled flowering time. PMID:19019982</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Siefers, Nicholas; Dang, Kristen K; Kumimoto, Roderick W; Bynum, William Edwards; Tayrose, Gregory; Holt, Ben F</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-11-19</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">70</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2915710"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Interaction with HMG20a/b Proteins <span class="hlt">Suggests</span> a <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Role for ?-Dystrobrevin in Neuronal Differentiation*</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">? and ? dystrobrevins are cytoplasmic components of the dystrophin-associated protein complex that are thought to play a role as scaffold proteins in signal transduction and intracellular transport. In the search of new insights into the functions of ?-dystrobrevin, the isoform restricted to non-muscle tissues, we performed a two-hybrid screen of a mouse cDNA library to look for interacting proteins. Among the positive clones, one encodes iBRAF/HMG20a, a high mobility group (HMG)-domain protein that activates REST (RE-1 silencing transcription factor)-responsive genes, playing a key role in the initiation of neuronal differentiation. We characterized the ?-dystrobrevin-iBRAF interaction by in vitro and in vivo association assays, localized the binding region of one protein to the other, and assessed the kinetics of the interaction as one of high affinity. We also found that ?-dystrobrevin directly binds to BRAF35/HMG20b, a close homologue of iBRAF and a member of a co-repressor complex required for the repression of neural specific genes in neuronal progenitors. In vitro assays indicated that ?-dystrobrevin binds to RE-1 and represses the promoter activity of synapsin I, a REST-responsive gene that is a marker for neuronal differentiation. Altogether, our data demonstrate a direct interaction of ?-dystrobrevin with the HMG20 proteins iBRAF and BRAF35 and <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that ?-dystrobrevin may be involved in regulating chromatin dynamics, possibly playing a role in neuronal differentiation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Artegiani, Benedetta; Labbaye, Catherine; Sferra, Antonella; Quaranta, Maria Teresa; Torreri, Paola; Macchia, Gianfranco; Ceccarini, Marina; Petrucci, Tamara C.; Macioce, Pompeo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">71</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=122292"> <span id="translatedtitle">Incision of DNA-protein crosslinks by UvrABC nuclease <span class="hlt">suggests</span> a <span class="hlt">potential</span> repair pathway involving nucleotide excision repair</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">DNA–protein crosslinks (DPCs) arise in biological systems as a result of exposure to a variety of chemical and physical agents, many of which are known or suspected carcinogens. The biochemical pathways for the recognition and repair of these lesions are not well understood in part because of methodological difficulties in creating site-specific DPCs. Here, a strategy for obtaining site-specific DPCs is presented, and in vitro interactions of the Escherichia coli nucleotide excision repair (NER) UvrABC nuclease at sites of DPCs are investigated. To create site-specific DPCs, the catalytic chemistry of the T4 pyrimidine dimer glycosylase/apurinic/apyrimidinic site lyase (T4-pdg) has been exploited, namely, its ability to be covalently trapped to apurinic/apyrimidinic sites within duplex DNA under reducing conditions. Incubation of the DPCs with UvrABC proteins resulted in DNA incision at the 8th phosphate 5? and the 5th and 6th phosphates 3? to the protein-adducted site, generating as a major product of the reaction a 12-mer DNA fragment crosslinked with the protein. The incision occurred only in the presence of all three protein subunits, and no incisions were observed in the nondamaged complementary strand. The UvrABC nuclease incises DPCs with a moderate efficiency. The proper assembly and catalytic function of the NER complex on DNA containing a covalently attached 16-kDa protein <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the NER pathway may be involved in DPC repair and that at least some subset of DPCs can be removed by this mechanism without prior proteolytic degradation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Minko, Irina G.; Zou, Yue; Lloyd, R. Stephen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">72</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3476252"> <span id="translatedtitle">Expression Profiling and Biochemical Analysis <span class="hlt">Suggest</span> Stress Response as a <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Mechanism Inhibiting Proliferation of Polyamine-depleted Cells*</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Polyamines are small organic polycations that are absolutely required for cell growth and proliferation; yet the basis for this requirement is mostly unknown. Here, we combined a genome-wide expression profiling with biochemical analysis to reveal the molecular basis for inhibited proliferation of polyamine-depleted cells. Transcriptional responses accompanying growth arrest establishment in polyamine-depleted cells or growth resumption following polyamine replenishment were monitored and compared. Changes in the expression of genes related to various fundamental cellular processes were established. Analysis of mirror-symmetric expression patterns around the G1-arrest point identified a set of genes representing a stress-response signature. Indeed, complementary biochemical analysis demonstrated activation of the PKR-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase arm of the unfolded protein response and of the stress-induced p38 MAPK. These changes were accompanied by induction of key growth-inhibitory factors such as p21 and Gadd45a and reduced expression of various cyclins, most profoundly cyclin D1, setting the basis for the halted proliferation. However, although the induced stress response could arrest growth, polyamine depletion also inhibited proliferation of PKR-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase and p38?-deficient cells and of cells harboring a nonphosphorylatable mutant eIF2? (S51A), <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that additional yet unidentified mechanisms might inhibit proliferation of polyamine-depleted cells. Despite lengthy persistence of the stress and activation of apoptotic signaling, polyamine-depleted cells remained viable, apparently due to induced expression of protective genes and development of autophagy.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Landau, Guy; Ran, Avichai; Bercovich, Zippi; Feldmesser, Ester; Horn-Saban, Shirley; Korkotian, Eduard; Jacob-Hirsh, Jasmine; Rechavi, Gideon; Ron, David; Kahana, Chaim</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">73</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20632857"> <span id="translatedtitle">Understanding <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> to Extract Vacuum Energy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent Russian literature contains some interesting speculations of <span class="hlt">potentially</span> wide applicability regarding the physical vacuum. These investigations examined and applied a theory to various <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to try and understand what these events may represent. Data were collected by Dmitriev to quantify these events and identify commonalties that indicate the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> might have a natural origin. Dyatlov created theories on the Polarized Inhomogeneous Physical Vacuum where he claimed that each <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> possessed a distinct boundary separate from its surroundings. Within this inhomogeneous boundary, the theory <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the magnetic, electric, gravitic, and spin fields would be different from its surroundings. From these findings, he developed equations that resemble the London equations for a superconductor and are somewhat similar to those developed later by Puthoff. The importance of these events is that with additional understanding, they may offer a means for extracting energy from the physical vacuum. Moreover, one may speculate that these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may represent a gravitational vortex or even a portal or a wormhole to look into <span class="hlt">potential</span> travel within other dimensions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Murad, P.A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-02-04</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">74</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/30219509"> <span id="translatedtitle">Debendox does not cause the Poland <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> that Debendox may cause the Poland <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is refuted by a study of the antenatal drug exposure in 46 cases of the Poland <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and 32 cases of isolated absence of the pectoralis major. Debendox had been prescribed in one case of the Poland <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and in one case of isolated pectoralis absence, but in neither was the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T J David</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">75</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jb/jb0802/2007JB005058/2007JB005058.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Zeta <span class="hlt">potential</span> estimation of volcanic rocks on 11 island arc-type volcanoes in Japan: Implication for the generation of local self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">From streaming <span class="hlt">potential</span> measurements, we deduced the zeta <span class="hlt">potential</span> of 73 volcanic rock samples collected in 11 volcanoes where self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> (SP) surveys had also been conducted. Experiments with crushed rock samples and 0.001 mol\\/L NaCl solution showed a large variation in streaming <span class="hlt">potential</span> coefficient, which ranged from ?2860 to 2280 mV\\/MPa (deduced zeta <span class="hlt">potential</span> ranged from ?45.1 to 37.2 mV).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Koki Aizawa; Makoto Uyeshima; Kenji Nogami</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">76</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3527321"> <span id="translatedtitle">Congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Over the past decade, amniotic fluid-derived stem cells have emerged as a novel, experimental approach for the treatment of a wide variety of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> diagnosed either in utero or postnatally. There are a number of unique properties of amniotic fluid stem cells that have allowed it to become a major research focus. These include the relative ease of accessing amniotic fluid cells in a minimally invasive fashion by amniocentesis as well as the relatively rich population of progenitor cells obtained from a small aliquot of fluid. Mesenchymal stem cells, c-kit positive stem cells, as well as induced pluripotent stem cells have all been derived from human amniotic fluid in recent years. This article gives a pediatric surgeon’s perspective on amniotic fluid stem cell therapy for the management of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The current status in the use of amniotic fluid-derived stem cells, particularly as they relate as substrates in tissue engineering-based applications, is described in various animal models. A roadmap for further study and eventual clinical application is also proposed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kunisaki, Shaun M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">77</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20776995"> <span id="translatedtitle">Energy <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> and Polarizability of Carbon Nanotubes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The energy of Fermi sea perturbed by an external <span class="hlt">potential</span> is analyzed with the help of an energy <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Using an example of massive Dirac fermions on a circle, we illustrate how the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> accounts for the contribution of the deep-lying states. The energy <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is a universal function of the applied field and is related to known field-theoretic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Applied to the transverse polarizability of carbon nanotubes, the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> reveals universality and scale invariance of the response dominated by {pi} electrons. The electron band transformation in a strong field-effect regime is predicted.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Novikov, D.S. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Levitov, L.S. [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-27</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">78</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFM.T13A0494Y"> <span id="translatedtitle">Self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> Around the Earthquake Swarm Area in the Southeastern Flank of Ontake Volcano, Central Japan</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ontake Volcano is located in the southern end of the Norikura Volcanic Chain, central Japan, close to the junction of the Izu Bonin and Mariana and Southwestern Japan volcanic arcs. It is almost conical and made of andesite. Earthquake swarm activity has been continuously observed around the southeastern flank of Mt. Ontake since 1976. A phreatic explosion occurred in 1979 at a fissure on the southwestern slope of the Kengamine, the main peak of Mt. Ontake. And a large earthquake with the depth about 2 km and a magnitude of 6.8 occurred in 1984 in the southeastern flank of the volcano. Recently, Kimata et al. (2004) revealed uplift ground deformation above the earthquake swarm area by using repeated leveling. Furthermore, Magnetotelluric soundings estimated a low resistivity region with the depth about 2km beneath the uplift area [Kasaya et al., 2002]. In order to investigate a relationship between tectonic movements and subsurface low resistivity zone, we carried out self-<span class="hlt">potential</span>(SP) measurements from 2003 and 2006 around the focal region of the 1984 Earthquake and the summit area of Mt. Ontake. The equipment for measuring surface self-<span class="hlt">potentials</span> consists of a pair of non-polarizing copper-copper sulfate/silver-silver chloride electrodes, an insulated connecting conductor cable, and a high input impedance digital multimeter. In this survey, profiles totaling to about 90km length (982 sites) were made, with an average measurement interval of 100m. Two distinctive SP features are found around the active earthquake cluster and inside of the aseismic area of southeastern flank of Mt. Ontake. In this presentation, we will report a detail of SP measurements and results.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yoshimura, R.; Yamazaki, K.; Okada, Y.; Oshiman, N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">79</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/962710"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">ANOMALY</span> STRUCTURE OF SUPERGRAVITY AND <span class="hlt">ANOMALY</span> CANCELLATION</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We display the full <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> structure of supergravity, including new D-term contributions to the conformal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. This expression has the super-Weyl and chiral U(1){sub K} transformation properties that are required for implementation of the Green-Schwarz mechanism for <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> cancellation. We outline the procedure for full <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> cancellation. Our results have implications for effective supergravity theories from the weakly coupled heterotic string theory.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Butter, Daniel; Gaillard, Mary K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-06-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">80</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/q43kx51k386tk74r.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Global gravitational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A general formula for global gauge and gravitational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is derived. It is used to show that the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> free supergravity and superstring theories in ten dimensions are all free of global <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that might have ruined their consistency. However, it is shown that global <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> lead to some restrictions on allowed compactifications of these theories. For example, in the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Edward Witten</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">81</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5461614"> <span id="translatedtitle">Chiral <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and differential geometry</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Some properties of chiral <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are described from a geometric point of view. Topics include chiral <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and differential forms, transformation properties of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, identification and use of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and normalization of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. 22 references. (WHK)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zumino, B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">82</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.8110T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Large interannual Arctic sea-ice <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the coming decades: is there hope to predict them?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In projections of 21st-century climate, Arctic sea ice declines and at the same time exhibits strong interannual <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Here, we investigate the <span class="hlt">potential</span> to predict these strong sea-ice <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> under a perfect-model assumption, using the Max-Planck-Institute Earth System Model in the same setup as in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). We study two cases of strong negative sea-ice <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: a five-year-long <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> for present-day conditions, and a ten-year-long <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> for conditions projected for the middle of the 21st century. We treat these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the CMIP5 projections as the truth, and use exactly the same model configuration for predictions of this synthetic truth. We start ensemble predictions at different times during the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, considering lagged-perfect and sea-ice-assimilated initial conditions. We find that the onset and amplitude of the interannual <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are not predictable. However, the further deepening of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> can be predicted for typically one year lead time if predictions start after the onset but before the maximal amplitude of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The magnitude of an extremely low summer sea-ice minimum is hard to predict: the skill of the prediction ensemble is not better than a damped-persistence forecast for lead times of more than a few months, and is not better than a climatology forecast for lead times of two or more years. Predictions of the present-day <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> are more skillful than predictions of the mid-century <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Predictions using sea-ice-assimilated initial conditions are competitive with those using lagged-perfect initial conditions for lead times of a year or less, but yield degraded skill for longer lead times. The results presented here <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that there is limited prospect of predicting the large interannual sea-ice <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> expected to occur throughout the 21st century.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tietsche, Steffen; Notz, Dirk; Jungclaus, Johann H.; Marotzke, Jochem</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">83</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a000000/a002600/a002696/index.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">SST <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> + Wind <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> (with dates)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sea surface temperature (SST) <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and sea surface wind <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> show the development of the 2002-2003 El Nino based on data from NASAs Aqua and QuikSCAT spacecraft. The wind data has been processed using the Variational Analysis Method (VAM).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shirah, Greg; Allen, Jesse; Adamec, David</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-02-03</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">84</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/61354249"> <span id="translatedtitle">Building envelope thermal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> analysis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A detailed study has been made of building energy thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (BETA's) in a large modern office building using computer simulation, on-site inspections, and infrared thermography. The goal was to better understand the heat and moisture flow through these ''bridges,'' develop the beginnings of a classification scheme, and establish techniques for assessing the <span class="hlt">potential</span> for retrofit or initial design modifications.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">B. S. Melton; P. Mulroney; T. Scott; K. W. Childs</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">85</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ssed.gsfc.nasa.gov/gunther/gunther/2007Schmidtetal.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magnetic properties and <span class="hlt">potential</span> field modeling of the Peculiar Knob metamorphosed iron formation, South Australia: An analog for the source of the intense Martian magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">an extremely intense (? 120 A m? 1) remanence, directed steeply upward. This ancient remanence reinforces the local Earth's field (inclination ? 63). A simple geological model, constrained by drilling and physical property measurements, explains both the observed magnetic and gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, consistent with the Poisson theorem. Koenigsberger ratios (Qs) of 10 and greater, as found here, are rare in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Phillip W. Schmidt; Suzanne A. McEnroe; David A. Clark; Peter Robinson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">86</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=N8022386"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Elliptic <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An independent variable different from the time for elliptic orbit integration is used. Such a time transformation provides an analytical step-size regulation along the orbit. An intermediate <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> intermediate between the eccentric and the ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">G. Janin V. R. Bond</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">87</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22526009"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Vascular <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of the iris].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 48-year-old man presented with a vascular <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of the iris in the left eye. Slit-lamp microscopy revealed dilated and tortuous vessels of the iris between 12 and 4 o'clock. Fluorescein angiography confirmed a diagnosis of arteriovenous (AV) malformation of the iris. The vessel originated at the iris base, passed to the pupillary margin and returned to the base. Such AV-malformations of the iris are very rare, benign vascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that have to be distinguished from other, <span class="hlt">potentially</span> malignant pathologies of the iris (e. g. tortuous vessels in iris melanoma). PMID:22526009</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ponto, K A; Mirshahi, A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">88</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23344701"> <span id="translatedtitle">Prevalence and function of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in a community sample of adolescents, using <span class="hlt">suggested</span> DSM-5 criteria for a <span class="hlt">potential</span> NSSI disorder.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Previous prevalence rates of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in adolescents have varied considerably. In the present cross-sectional study, prevalence rates, characteristics and functions of NSSI were assessed in a large randomized community sample consisting of 3,060 (50.5 % female) Swedish adolescents aged 15-17 years. The <span class="hlt">suggested</span> criteria for NSSI disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition, (DSM-5) were used to assess prevalence rates with the aim of arriving at a more precise estimate. Out of the whole sample, 1,088 (35.6 %) adolescents (56.2 % female) reported at least one episode of NSSI during the last year, of which 205 (6.7 %) met <span class="hlt">suggested</span> DSM-5 criteria for a <span class="hlt">potential</span> NSSI disorder diagnosis. The NSSI disorder diagnosis was significantly more common in girls (11.1 % vs. 2.3 %, ? (2) (1, N?=?3046) = 94.08, p?<?0.001, cOR?=?5.43, 95 % CI [3.73, 7.90]). The NSSI disorder group consisted of significantly more smokers and drug users compared to adolescents with NSSI that did not meet DSM-5 criteria for NSSI disorder, and also differed concerning demographic variables. A confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted on reported functions of NSSI, with the aim of validating Nock and Prinstein's (Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology 72:885-890, 2004, Journal of Abnormal Psychology 114:140-146, 2005) four-factor model on a Swedish community sample, resulting in a close to acceptable fit. A two-factor model (social and automatic reinforcement) resulted in a slightly better fit. The most frequently reported factors were positive and negative automatic reinforcement. A majority of functions were significantly more often reported by girls than boys. The implications of the <span class="hlt">suggested</span> DSM-5 criteria and reported functions are discussed. PMID:23344701</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zetterqvist, Maria; Lundh, Lars-Gunnar; Dahlström, Orjan; Svedin, Carl Göran</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">89</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jb/v076/i014/JB076i014p03384/JB076i014p03384.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lunar rocks and thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent microwave and infrared spectral observations of several of the large bright-rayed craters on the moon <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in these craters are produced by large rocks, boulders, and exposed rock strata. The data for the crater Tycho can be simulated by a surface consisting of 16% loose rocks of I-meter size and 4% exposed rock strata. A</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">David Buhl</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1971-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">90</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/30539403"> <span id="translatedtitle">Familial Poland <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Poland <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is usually a non-genetic malformation syndrome. This paper reports two second cousins who both had a typical left sided Poland <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, and this constitutes the first recorded case of this condition affecting more than one member of a family. Despite this, for the purposes of genetic counselling, the Poland <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> can be regarded as a sporadic condition</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T J David</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">91</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2894498"> <span id="translatedtitle">Peters' <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> - Anaesthetic Management</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Summary Peters' <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> occurs as an isolated ocular abnormality, in association with other systemic abnormality or one component of a number of well-defined syndromes. We review our experience of anaesthetic management and systemic association of peters' <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. To the best of our knowledge there are no reports in the literature of Peters' <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> with relevant to anaesthesia.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M, Senthilkumar; V, Darlong; Punj, Jyotsna; Pandey, Ravinder</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">92</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22249375"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> of the HAQ score as clinical indicator <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> comprehensive multidisciplinary assessments: the Swedish TIRA cohort 8 years after diagnosis of RA.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study explores the <span class="hlt">potential</span> of the health assessment questionnaire (HAQ) score as a clinical indicator that can be used to <span class="hlt">suggest</span> comprehensive multidisciplinary assessments, by relating it to more general aspects of disability. In a cohort of 132 patients with early RA (mean age 55, 68% women), 28 joint count Disease Activity Scores (DAS-28), HAQ, and Short Form 36 (SF-36) scores were registered at annual follow-up visits 8 years after diagnosis. The patients were tentatively sub-grouped into a high-HAQ group (HAQ ? 1 at the 8-year follow-up) and a low-HAQ group. The high-HAQ group, comprising 36% of the cohort, had a higher mean HAQ score at inclusion and beyond at all visits compared to the low-HAQ group, and 24% of all individual patients in the high-HAQ group had a HAQ score ? 1 at inclusion. Although the DAS-28 improved in both groups, patients in the high-HAQ group also had significantly more persistent disability according to the SF-36: five scales at each follow-up visit and all eight scales at the majority of the visits. Individual RA patients with HAQ ? 1 probably have considerable persistent disabilities according to the SF-36. The HAQ score could be used as a clinical indicator <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> comprehensive multidisciplinary assessments of the components of disability and corresponding interventions, in addition to the established use of HAQ at group levels and in parallel with the medication strategy based on DAS-28. PMID:22249375</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thyberg, Ingrid; Dahlström, Ö; Björk, M; Arvidsson, P; Thyberg, M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-17</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">93</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3443890"> <span id="translatedtitle">HDFx: a novel biologic immunomodulator accelerates wound healing and is <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> of unique regenerative powers: <span class="hlt">potential</span> implications for the warfighter and disaster victims</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recently, we reported on the discovery of a new, conserved biologic protein (35-40 KDa), termed HDFx, that protects rats, guinea-pigs, mice, and rabbits against lethal hemorrhage, endotoxins, intestinal ischemic-shock, and traumatic injuries. It was found to stimulate several arms of the immune system. The present report demonstrates, for the first time, that HDFx accelerates wound healing in two different models (excision wound model; and incision wound model) in rats. The results shown, herein, indicate that HDFx produces greater rates of wound contraction, greater tensile strength, and more rapid healing than controls. Our new data also show that this biologic increases hydroxyproline content of granulation tissue coupled with a reduction in superoxide dismutase (SOD). In addition, we show that HDFx increases the levels of serum ascorbic acid and stimulates the mononuclear cells of the reticuloendothelial system (RES). Overall, these data <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that HDFx may possess unique regenerative powers. We, thus, believe that HDFx can be of great <span class="hlt">potential</span> use in diverse types of wounds which, otherwise, could result in difficult to treat infections and thus prevent sepsis and loss of body parts from amputations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Altura, Burton M; Carella, Anthony; Gebrewold, Asefa</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">94</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24041019"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Heredity of orthodontic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The survey of most common orthodontic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is given in this article. Authors, utilizing literature data, their own research as well as their therapeutic experience, try to elucidate the role of genetics in determination of dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and malocclusion. They emphasise the fact that genetically determined orthodontic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are not easy to treat. Retention of treatment result could also be a problem. Occurrence of an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in one member of the family should lead to the examination of other members, especially the young ones. PMID:24041019</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Svábová, Miroslava; Racek, Jaroslav; Marková, Marie</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">95</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8243386"> <span id="translatedtitle">Registries of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: EUROCAT.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are one of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> adverse effects of the environment on reproductive health. Registries of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are useful to detect abnormal frequencies, clusters, and trends. Such registries should meet a number of conditions, including an appropriate population denominator, an efficient system for collecting information, standardized diagnostic procedures, postmortem examinations of still-births, and linkage of records. The EUROCAT (European Registration of Congenital <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> and Twins) program is a Concerted Action of the Commission of the European Communities initiated in 1979. One of its objectives is the surveillance of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> as related to environmental hazards. This surveillance system covers at present 350,000 births per year in 15 countries. A number of problems encountered in the development of EUROCAT and in the course of ongoing activities are reviewed: populations coverage, classification of malformations, coding, definition and coverage of late fetal death, registration of induced abortion, validation of diagnostic information, registration of late diagnosed cases, and maintenance of motivation in data collection. The issue of confidentiality and the need for strict safeguards for the protection of individual privacy are emphasized. PMID:8243386</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lechat, M F; Dolk, H</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">96</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002EGSGA..27.4832F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation Of The <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Of Gravity <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> From Satellite Altimetry By Merging With Gravity Data From Various Sources - Application To Coastal Areas</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The region of the Azores archipelago is a natural laboratory for gravity field studies, due to its peculiar geodynamic and oceanographic features, related to rough structures in the gravity field. As a consequence, gravity data from various sources have been collected in the scope of various observation campaigns. The available data set comprises marine, airborne and satellite derived gravity anoma- lies. The satellite data have been derived by altimetric inversion of satellite altimeter data (Topex/Poseidon and ERS), to which processing methods tuned for optimal data recovery in coastal areas have been applied. Marine and airborne data along coinci- dent profiles, some of them coincident with satellite tracks, were collected during an observation campaign that took place in the Azores in 1997, in the scope of the Eu- ropean Union project AGMASCO. In addition, gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from an integrated GPS/INS system installed aboard an aircraft, have also been computed from the posi- tion and navigation data collected during the AGMASCO campaign. This paper presents a comparison study between all available data sets. In particular, the improvement of the satellite derived <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> near the shoreline is assessed with respect to existing satellite derived models and with the high resolution geopotential model GPM98. The impact of these data sets in the regional geoid improvement will also be presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fernandes, M. J.; Bastos, L.; Tomé, P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">97</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://web.engr.orst.edu/~wong/papers/pdf/panda.KDD.2005.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Population-wide <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Early detection of disease outbreaks, particularly an outbreak due to an act of bioterrorism, is a critically important problem due to the <span class="hlt">potential</span> to reduce both morbidity and mortality. One of the most lethal bioterrorism scenarios is a large-scale release of inhalational anthrax. The Population-wide <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection and Assessment (PANDA) algorithm (1) is specifically designed to monitor health-care data for</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Weng-Keen Wong; Gregory F. Cooper; Denver H. Dash; John D. Levander; John N. Dowling; William R. Hogan; Michael M. Wagner</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">98</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17800369"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lunar thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: infrared observations.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The lunar craters Tycho, Copernicus, and Aristarchus have been observed during lunar night at wavelengths between 3 and 14 microns. After an initial fast decrease to a color temperature of 220 degrees K, the temperature remains nearly constant through the lunar night. The data <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that these thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (craters) contain hot and cold regions with the hot portions constituting 2 to 10 percent of the area and probably thermally connected to a subsurface temperatuer of about 200 degrees K. PMID:17800369</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Allen, D A; Ney, E P</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1969-04-25</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">99</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/x087570684807146.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Political Economy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Results in cognitive psychology and experimental economics indicate that under identifiable conditions individuals do not act in an economically rational way. These results are important for Political Economy. <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> appear in the behaviour of voters, politicans and administrators. Economic markets do not fully eliminate <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the aggregation process. It is shown that political aggregation by democracy, bargaining or bureaucracy</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bruno S. Frey; Reiner Eichenberger</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">100</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12000012"> <span id="translatedtitle">The compelling <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of chemical intolerance.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In science, <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> expose the limitations of existing paradigms and drive the search for new ones. In the late 1800s, physicians observed that certain illnesses spread from sick, feverish individuals to those contacting them, paving the way for the germ theory of disease. The germ theory served as a crude, but elegant formulation that explained dozens of seemingly unrelated illnesses affecting literally every organ system. Today, we are witnessing another medical <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-a unique pattern of illness involving chemically exposed groups in more than a dozen countries, who subsequently report multisystem symptoms and new-onset chemical, food, and drug intolerances. These intolerances may be the hallmark for a new disease process or paradigm, just as fever is a hallmark for infection. The fact that diverse demographic groups, sharing little in common except some initial chemical exposure event, develop these intolerances is a compelling <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> pointing to a possible new theory of disease, one that has been referred to as "Toxicant-Induced Loss of Tolerance" ("TILT"). TILT has the <span class="hlt">potential</span> to explain certain cases of asthma, migraine headaches, and depression, as well as chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia, and "Gulf War syndrome". It appears to evolve in two stages: (1) initiation, characterized by a profound breakdown in prior, natural tolerance resulting from either acute or chronic exposure to chemicals (pesticides, solvents, indoor air contaminants, etc.), followed by (2) triggering of symptoms by small quantities of previously tolerated chemicals (traffic exhaust, fragrances, gasoline), foods, drugs, and food/drug combinations (alcohol, caffeine). While the underlying dynamic remains an enigma, observations indicating that affected individuals respond to structurally unrelated drugs and experience cravings and withdrawal-like symptoms, paralleling drug addiction, <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that multiple neurotransmitter pathways may be involved. PMID:12000012</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Miller, C S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return 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showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">101</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22090176"> <span id="translatedtitle">Vascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in children.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Vascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are divided in two major categories: tumours (such as infantile hemangiomas) and malformations. Hemangiomas are common benign neoplasms that undergo a proliferative phase followed by stabilization and eventual spontaneous involution, whereas vascular malformations are rare structural <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> representing morphogenetic errors of developing blood vessels and lymphatics. It is important to properly diagnose vascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> early in childhood because of their distinct differences in morbidity, prognosis and need for a multidisciplinary management. We discuss a number of characteristic clinical features as clues for early diagnosis and identification of associated syndromes. PMID:22090176</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Weibel, L</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">102</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFMGC54A..04R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Observed Wind <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in the Southern Pacific and Their Impact on Tropical SSTs During La Nina</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Here we focus on the interaction between tropical Sea Surface Temperatures (SSTs) and extratropical winds in the Southern hemisphere. Two decades of SSMI satellite retrievals of global wind speeds over the ocean are analyzed, with emphasis on the interannual variability due to ENSO events. Monthly wind <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the Southern hemisphere are studied in detail by decomposing their variance using EOF analysis, together with <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of SSMI precipitation, water vapor, and cloud liquid water. In addition to satellite observations, <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in some dynamical fields from reanalysis datasets are investigated. The leading wind EOF in the Southern Pacific (60S-equator) has a double dipole pattern which extends from the equator to polar latitudes and is strongly correlated to ENSO variability, characterized here by the SST <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the Cold Tongue region. This strong correlation shows that intensified winds in the Southern Pacific lead the cold SST <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> by about 4 months at the onset of La Nina. Further analysis showed that the extratropical wind <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is as relevant as the tropical one, and <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the two regions act together as an organized tropical-extratropical pattern in affecting the cold phase of ENSO. The double dipole pattern, likely associated with the Pacific South American pattern, can be easily identified using satellite observations and has a great <span class="hlt">potential</span> for predictability of La Nina events.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ricciardulli, L.; Wentz, F. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">103</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22789727"> <span id="translatedtitle">A novel resistance mechanism to triclosan that <span class="hlt">suggests</span> horizontal gene transfer and demonstrates a <span class="hlt">potential</span> selective pressure for reduced biocide susceptibility in clinical strains of Staphylococcus aureus.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The widely used biocide triclosan selectively targets FabI, the NADH-dependent trans-2-enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase, which is an important target for narrow-spectrum antimicrobial drug development. In relation to the growing concern about biocide resistance, we compared in vitro mutants and clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus with reduced triclosan susceptibility. Clinical isolates of S. aureus as well as laboratory-generated mutants were assayed for minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) phenotypes and genotypes related to reduced triclosan susceptibility. A <span class="hlt">potential</span> epidemiological cut-off (ECOFF) MBC of >4 mg/L was observed for triclosan in clinical isolates of S. aureus. These showed significantly lower MICs and higher MBCs than laboratory mutants. These groups of strains also had few similarities in the triclosan resistance mechanism. Molecular analysis identified novel resistance mechanisms linked to the presence of an additional sh-fabI allele derived from Staphylococcus haemolyticus. The lack of predictive value of in-vitro-selected mutations for clinical isolates indicates that laboratory tests in the present form appear to be of limited value. More importantly, detection of sh-fabI as a novel resistance mechanism with high <span class="hlt">potential</span> for horizontal gene transfer demonstrates for the first time that a biocide could exert a selective pressure able to drive the spread of a resistance determinant in a human pathogen. PMID:22789727</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ciusa, Maria Laura; Furi, Leonardo; Knight, Daniel; Decorosi, Francesca; Fondi, Marco; Raggi, Carla; Coelho, Joana Rosado; Aragones, Luis; Moce, Laura; Visa, Pilar; Freitas, Ana Teresa; Baldassarri, Lucilla; Fani, Renato; Viti, Carlo; Orefici, Graziella; Martinez, Jose Luis; Morrissey, Ian; Oggioni, Marco Rinaldo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">104</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005PEPI..148..149K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Grain size dependent <span class="hlt">potential</span> for self generation of magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on Mars via thermoremanent magnetic acquisition and magnetic interaction of hematite and magnetite</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Early in the history of planetary evolution portions of Martian crust became magnetized by dynamo-generated magnetic field. A lateral distribution of the secondary magnetic field generated by crustal remanent sources containing magnetic carriers of certain grain size and mineralogy is able to produce an ambient magnetic field of larger intensity than preexisting dynamo. This ambient field is capable of magnetizing portions of deeper crust that cools through its blocking temperatures in an absence of dynamo. We consider both magnetite (Fe3O4) and hematite (?-Fe2O3) as minerals contributing to the overall magnetization. Analysis of magnetization of magnetic minerals of various grain size and concentration reveals that magnetite grains less than 0.01 mm in size, and hematite grains larger than 0.01 mm in size can become effective magnetic source capable of magnetizing magnetic minerals contained in surrounding volume. Preexisting crustal remanence (for example ˜250 A/m relates to 25% of multi-domain hematite) can trigger a self-magnetizing process that can continue in the absence of magnetic dynamo and continue strengthening and/or weakening magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on Mars. Thickness of the primary magnetic layer and concentration of magnetic carriers allow specification of the temperature gradient required to trigger a self-magnetization process.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kletetschka, Gunther; Ness, Norman F.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Acuna, M. H.; Wasilewski, P. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">105</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23747095"> <span id="translatedtitle">Characterization of two candidate flavone 8-O-methyltransferases <span class="hlt">suggests</span> the existence of two <span class="hlt">potential</span> routes to nevadensin in sweet basil.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Regioselective 6-,7-,8-,3'-, and 4'-O-methylations underlie the structural diversity of lipophilic flavones produced in the trichomes of sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L.). The positions 6, 7, and 4' are methylated by a recently described set of cation-independent enzymes. The roles of cation-dependent O-methyltransferases still require elucidation. Here, the basil trichome EST database was used to identify a Mg(2+)-dependent O-methyltransferase that was likely to accept flavonoids as substrates. The recombinant protein was found to be active with a wide range of o-diphenols, and methylated the 8-OH moiety of the flavone backbone with higher catalytic efficiency than the 3'-OH group of candidate substrates. To further investigate flavone 8-O-methylation, the activity of a putative cation-independent flavonoid 8-O-methyltransferase from the same EST collection was assessed with available substrate analogs. Notably, it was strongly inhibited by gardenin B, one of its expected products. The catalytic capacities of the two studied proteins <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that two alternative routes to nevadensin, a major flavone in some basil cultivars, might exist. Correlating the expression of the underlying genes with the accumulation of 8-substituted flavones in four basil lines did not clarify which is the major operating pathway in vivo, yet the combined data <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that the biochemical properties of flavone 7-O-demethylase could play a key role in determining the reaction order. PMID:23747095</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Berim, Anna; Gang, David R</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-06</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">106</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23878335"> <span id="translatedtitle">Response of African humid tropical forests to recent rainfall <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During the last decade, strong negative rainfall <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> resulting from increased sea surface temperature in the tropical Atlantic have caused extensive droughts in rainforests of western Amazonia, exerting persistent effects on the forest canopy. In contrast, there have been no significant impacts on rainforests of West and Central Africa during the same period, despite large-scale droughts and rainfall <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> during the same period. Using a combination of rainfall observations from meteorological stations from the Climate Research Unit (CRU; 1950-2009) and satellite observations of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM; 1998-2010), we show that West and Central Africa experienced strong negative water deficit (WD) <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over the last decade, particularly in 2005, 2006 and 2007. These <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were a continuation of an increasing drying trend in the region that started in the 1970s. We monitored the response of forests to extreme rainfall <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the past decade by analysing the microwave scatterometer data from QuickSCAT (1999-2009) sensitive to variations in canopy water content and structure. Unlike in Amazonia, we found no significant impacts of extreme WD events on forests of Central Africa, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> adaptability of these forests to short-term severe droughts. Only forests near the savanna boundary in West Africa and in fragmented landscapes of the northern Congo Basin responded to extreme droughts with widespread canopy disturbance that lasted only during the period of WD. Time-series analyses of CRU and TRMM data show most regions in Central and West Africa experience seasonal or decadal extreme WDs (less than -600 mm). We hypothesize that the long-term historical extreme WDs with gradual drying trends in the 1970s have increased the adaptability of humid tropical forests in Africa to droughts. PMID:23878335</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Asefi-Najafabady, Salvi; Saatchi, Sassan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-22</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">107</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE88750488"> <span id="translatedtitle">Skyrmions and <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The author summarizes the works presented at the meeting on Skyrmions and <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. He divides the principal issues of this workshop into five categories: QCD effective Lagrangians, chiral bags and the Cheshire cat principle, strangeness problem, phenome...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. Rho</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">108</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12728394"> <span id="translatedtitle">Recurrent chest wall <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Chest wall <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are a heterogeneous group of malformations requiring repair. Recurrence and the need for secondary repair may occur. Congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, including bifid sternum, pentalogy of Cantrell, Jeunes's syndrome and Poland's <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, rarely recur. Pectus carinatum may recur in the original surgical area or an adjacent area and most often recurs in patients who undergo repair before completion of teenage growth. Pectus excavatum may recur in approximately 5% of patients. Simple recurrence, floating sternum, or Acquired Jeune's syndrome may result. All of these would require reoperation. Each chest wall <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> recurrence requires an individualized approach to timing and type of repair. Overall excellent results should be obtained for operative repair of recurrences. PMID:12728394</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Colombani, Paul M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">109</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JHEP...06..137S"> <span id="translatedtitle">When <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> mediation is UV sensitive</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Despite its successes — such as solving the supersymmetric flavor problem — <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> mediated supersymmetry breaking is untenable because of its prediction of tachyonic sleptons. An appealing solution to this problem was proposed by Pomarol and Rattazzi where a threshold controlled by a light field deflects the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> mediated super-symmetry breaking trajectory, thus evading tachyonic sleptons. In this paper we examine an alternate class of deflection models where the non-supersymmetric threshold is accompanied by a heavy, instead of light, singlet. The low energy form of this model is the so-called extended <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> mediation proposed by Nelson and Weiner, but with <span class="hlt">potential</span> for a much higher deflection threshold. The existence of this high deflection threshold implies that the space of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> mediated supersymmetry breaking deflecting models is larger than previously thought.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Setzer, N.; Spinner, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">110</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/12938640"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> and gravity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Yang-Mills type gauge theories of gravity are reviewed. Particular attention is paid to the relation between the Dirac spin, the axial current j5 and the non-covariant gauge spin C. Using diagrammatic techniques, we show that only generalizations of the U(1)- Pontrjagin four-form F ? F = dC arise in the chiral <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, even when coupled to gravity. Implications</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eckehard W. Mielke; Eckehard W</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">111</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3785416"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effects of Hand Orientation on Motor Imagery - Event Related <span class="hlt">Potentials</span> <span class="hlt">Suggest</span> Kinesthetic Motor Imagery to Solve the Hand Laterality Judgment Task</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Motor imagery (MI) refers to the process of imagining the execution of a specific motor action without actually producing an overt movement. Two forms of MI have been distinguished: visual MI and kinesthetic MI. To distinguish between these forms of MI we employed an event related <span class="hlt">potential</span> (ERP) study to measure interference effects induced by hand orientation manipulations in a hand laterality judgement task. We hypothesized that this manipulation should only affect kinesthetic MI but not visual MI. The ERPs elicited by rotated hand stimuli contained the classic rotation related negativity (RRN) with respect to palm view stimuli. We observed that laterally rotated stimuli led to a more marked RRN than medially rotated stimuli. This RRN effect was observed when participants had their hands positioned in either a straight (control) or an inward rotated posture, but not when their hands were positioned in an outward rotated posture. Posture effects on the ERP-RRN have not previously been studied. Apparently, a congruent hand posture (hands positioned in an outward rotated fashion) facilitates the judgement of the otherwise more demanding laterally rotated hand stimuli. These ERP findings support a kinesthetic interpretation of MI involved in solving the hand laterality judgement task. The RRN may be used as a non-invasive marker for kinesthetic MI and seems useful in revealing the covert behavior of MI in e.g. rehabilitation programs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jongsma, Marijtje L. A.; Meulenbroek, Ruud G. J.; Okely, Judith; Baas, C. Marjolein; van der Lubbe, Rob H. J.; Steenbergen, Bert</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">112</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17170064"> <span id="translatedtitle">CpG methylation profiles of endothelial cell-specific gene promoter regions in adipose tissue stem cells <span class="hlt">suggest</span> limited differentiation <span class="hlt">potential</span> toward the endothelial cell lineage.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In vivo endothelial commitment of adipose stem cells (ASCs) has scarcely been reported, and controversy remains on the contribution of ASCs to vascularization. We address the epigenetic commitment of ASCs to the endothelial lineage. We report a bisulfite sequencing analysis of CpG methylation in the promoters of two endothelial-cell-specific genes, CD31 and CD144, in freshly isolated and in cultures of ASCs before and after induction of endothelial differentiation. In contrast to adipose tissue-derived endothelial (CD31(+)) cells, freshly isolated ASCs display a heavily methylated CD31 promoter and a mosaically methylated CD144 promoter despite basal transcription of both genes. Methylation state of both promoters remains globally stable upon culture. Endothelial stimulation of ASCs in methylcellulose elicits phenotypic changes, marginal upregulation of CD31, and CD144 expression and restrictive induction of a CD31(+)CD144(+) immunophenotype. These events are accompanied by discrete changes in CpG methylation in CD31 and CD144 promoters; however, no global demethylation that marks CD31(+) cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells occurs. Immunoselection of CD31(+) cells after endothelial stimulation reveals consistent demethylation of one CpG immediately 3' of the transcription start site of the CD31 promoter. Adipogenic or osteogenic differentiation maintains CD31 and CD144 methylation patterns of undifferentiated cells. Methylation profiles of CD31 and CD144 promoters <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a limited commitment of ASCs to the endothelial lineage. This contrasts with the reported hypomethylation of adipogenic promoters, which reflects a propensity of ASCs toward adipogenic differentiation. Analysis of CpG methylation at lineage-specific promoters provides a robust assessment of epigenetic commitment of stem cells to a specific lineage. PMID:17170064</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Boquest, Andrew C; Noer, Agate; Sørensen, Anita L; Vekterud, Kristin; Collas, Philippe</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-12-14</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">113</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009IAU...261.0702A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Astrometric Solar-System <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">There are four unexplained <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> connected with astrometric data. Perhaps the most disturbing is the fact that when a spacecraft on a flyby trajectory approaches the Earth within 2000 km or less, it experiences a gain in total orbital energy per unit mass (Anderson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 091102). This amounts to a net velocity increase of 13.5 mm/s for the NEAR spacecraft at a closest approach of 539 km, 3.9 mm/s for the Galileo spacecraft at 960 km, and 1.8 mm/s for the Rosetta spacecraft at 1956 km. Next, I <span class="hlt">suggest</span> the change in the astronomical unit AU is definitely a concern. It is increasing by about 15 cm/yr (Krasinsky and Brumberg, Celes. Mech. & Dynam. Astron. 90, 267). The other two <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are perhaps less disturbing because of known sources of nongravitational acceleration. The first is an apparent slowing of the two Pioneer spacecraft as they exit the solar system in opposite directions (Anderson et al., Phys. Rev. D 65, 082004). Some, including me, are convinced this effect is of concern, but many are convinced it is produced by a nearly identical thermal emission from both spacecraft, in a direction away from the Sun, thereby producing acceleration toward the Sun. The fourth <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is a measured increase in the eccentricity of the Moon's orbit. Here again, an increase is expected from tidal friction in both the Earth and Moon. However, there is a reported increase that is about three times larger than expected (J. G. Williams, DDA/AAS Brouwer Award Lecture, Halifax, Nova Scotia 2006). We suspect that all four <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> have mundane explanations. However, the possibility that they will be explained by a new theory of gravitation is not ruled out, perhaps analogous to Einstein's 1916 explanation of the excess precession of Mercury's perihelion.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Anderson, John D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">114</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/990773"> <span id="translatedtitle">Astrometric solar system <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">There are at least four unexplained <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> connected with astrometric data. perhaps the most disturbing is the fact that when a spacecraft on a flyby trajectory approaches the Earth within 2000 km or less, it often experiences a change in total orbital energy per unit mass. next, a secular change in the astronomical unit AU is definitely a concern. It is increasing by about 15 cm yr{sup -1}. The other two <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are perhaps less disturbing because of known sources of nongravitational acceleration. The first is an apparent slowing of the two Pioneer spacecraft as they exit the solar system in opposite directions. Some astronomers and physicists are convinced this effect is of concern, but many others are convinced it is produced by a nearly identical thermal emission from both spacecraft, in a direction away from the Sun, thereby producing acceleration toward the Sun. The fourth <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is a measured increase in the eccentricity of the Moon's orbit. Here again, an increase is expected from tidal friction in both the Earth and Moon. However, there is a reported unexplained increase that is significant at the three-sigma level. It is produent to suspect that all four <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> have mundane explanations, or that one or more <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are a result of systematic error. Yet they might eventually be explained by new physics. For example, a slightly modified theory of gravitation is not ruled out, perhaps analogous to Einstein's 1916 explanation for the excess precession of Mercury's perihelion.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nieto, Michael Martin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Anderson, John D [PROPULSION LABORATORY</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">115</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56562147"> <span id="translatedtitle">Unilateral <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of kidney development: why is left not right?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Abnormal renal development results in congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the kidney and urinary tract. As many studies <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that renal malformations are more often found on the left side, a meta-analysis was performed on the distribution of five different unilateral <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: multicystic dysplastic kidney, renal agenesis\\/aplasia, renal ectopia, pelviureteral junction obstruction, and non-obstructive non-refluxing megaureter. Of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, the left side</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Michiel F Schreuder</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">116</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/59195667"> <span id="translatedtitle">Self-<span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> and CO2 Flux on Active Volcanoes: Insights from Time and Spatial Series at Masaya, Telica, and Cerro Negro, Nicaragua</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Considerable effort worldwide has gone into monitoring heat and mass transfer at active volcanoes, as this information may provide clues about changes in volcanic activity and impending eruptions. One method used is the self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> (SP) method, which has been employed on volcanoes to map hydrothermal systems and structural features and to monitor changes in the hydrothermal system due to volcanic</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Heather L. Lehto</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">117</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1980JGR....85.8295S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on Venus</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Doppler radio tracking of the Pioneer Venus orbiter has provided gravity measures over a significant portion of Venus. Feature resolution is approximately 300-1000 km within an area extending from 10 deg S to 40 deg N latitude and from 70 deg W to 130 deg E longitude (approximately equal to 200 deg). Many <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were detected, and there is considerable correlation with radar altimetry topography (Pettengill et al., 1980). The amplitudes of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are relatively mild and similar to those on earth at this resolution. Calculations for isostatic adjustment reveal that significant compensation has occurred.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sjogren, W. L.; Phillips, R. J.; Birkeland, P. W.; Wimberly, R. N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">118</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24137982"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Impact of the method choice and the extent of correction on the development of visual evoked <span class="hlt">potentials</span> in children and adolescents with refractive <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The article discusses a possible impact of different refraction correction methods, providing full or partial correction, on visual acuity and the development of visual evoked <span class="hlt">potentials</span> in children and adolescents with myopia and myopic astigmatism. The accuracy of identification of visual evoked <span class="hlt">potentials</span> depends, as shown in the article, on the extent of the correction chosen and the method used. In childhood the visual system is very susceptible to visual afferent deficit. The permanent deficit of visual information impedes further maturation of the visual analyzer, i.e. the development of central vision, binocular vision, and stereopsis. In high myopia it is important to decide not only on the extent of the correction but also on the method to use. In patients wearing soft contact lenses the visual evoked <span class="hlt">potentials</span> have more regular shape, amplitude, and latency. The introduction of silicone hydrogel and daily disposal contact lenses, spherical and toric (for astigmatism correction), provided an opportunity to solve hygienic problems associated with contact lens use in children and adolescents and to decrease the risk of hypoxia complications. PMID:24137982</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">119</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54265875"> <span id="translatedtitle">Gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on Venus</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Doppler radio tracking of the Pioneer Venus orbiter has provided gravity measures over a significant portion of Venus. Feature resolution is approximately 300-1000 km within an area extending from 10 deg S to 40 deg N latitude and from 70 deg W to 130 deg E longitude (approximately equal to 200 deg). Many <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were detected, and there is considerable</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">W. L. Sjogren; R. J. Phillips; P. W. Birkeland; R. N. Wimberly</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">120</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5506860"> <span id="translatedtitle">Superstrings, <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and unification</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This volume contains the lectures covering the main lines of developments in the presently most active field of particle physics: string field theory, <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, unification and physics beyond the Planck length. The lectures are generally pedagogical in style, designed at the postdoctoral level, but at the same time they introduce one to the most recent results in the field.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Martinis, M.; Andric, I.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" 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id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">121</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/1424682"> <span id="translatedtitle">Penetrating electron fluctuations associated with GEO spacecraft <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Space weather is a known factor in spacecraft <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Solar minimum carries with it an enhanced electron content. Electrons with sufficient energy to penetrate a spacecraft structure pose a hazard. They can accumulate in interior dielectrics creating an electric <span class="hlt">potential</span> sufficient to cause a spontaneous breakdown. The resulting electrostatic discharge has been a cause of operational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The physical process</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">David P. Love; Donald S. Toomb; Daniel C. Wilkinson; J. B. Parkinson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">122</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010LRR....13....4T"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Pioneer <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Radio-metric Doppler tracking data received from the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft from heliocentric distances of 20-70 AU has consistently indicated the presence of a small, anomalous, blue-shifted frequency drift uniformly changing with a rate of ˜ 6× 10^{-9} Hz/s. Ultimately, the drift was interpreted as a constant sunward deceleration of each particular spacecraft at the level of a_P = (8.74 ± 1.33)× 10^{-10} m/s^2. This apparent violation of the Newton's gravitational inverse square law has become known as the Pioneer <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>; the nature of this <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> remains unexplained. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the physical properties of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and the conditions that led to its detection and characterization. We review various mechanisms proposed to explain the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and discuss the current state of efforts to determine its nature. A comprehensive new investigation of the anomalous behavior of the two Pioneers has begun recently. The new efforts rely on the much-extended set of radio-metric Doppler data for both spacecraft in conjunction with the newly available complete record of their telemetry files and a large archive of original project documentation. As the new study is yet to report its findings, this review provides the necessary background for the new results to appear in the near future. In particular, we provide a significant amount of information on the design, operations and behavior of the two Pioneers during their entire missions, including descriptions of various data formats and techniques used for their navigation and radio-science data analysis. As most of this information was recovered relatively recently, it was not used in the previous studies of the Pioneer <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, but it is critical for the new investigation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Turyshev, Slava G.; Toth, Viktor T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">123</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3812595"> <span id="translatedtitle">Advancements of Data <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection Research in Wireless Sensor Networks: A Survey and Open Issues</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are important and necessary platforms for the future as the concept “Internet of Things” has emerged lately. They are used for monitoring, tracking, or controlling of many applications in industry, health care, habitat, and military. However, the quality of data collected by sensor nodes is affected by <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that occur due to various reasons, such as node failures, reading errors, unusual events, and malicious attacks. Therefore, <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection is a necessary process to ensure the quality of sensor data before it is utilized for making decisions. In this review, we present the challenges of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection in WSNs and state the requirements to design efficient and effective <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection models. We then review the latest advancements of data <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection research in WSNs and classify current detection approaches in five main classes based on the detection methods used to design these approaches. Varieties of the state-of-the-art models for each class are covered and their limitations are highlighted to provide ideas for <span class="hlt">potential</span> future works. Furthermore, the reviewed approaches are compared and evaluated based on how well they meet the stated requirements. Finally, the general limitations of current approaches are mentioned and further research opportunities are <span class="hlt">suggested</span> and discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rassam, Murad A.; Zainal, Anazida; Maarof, Mohd Aizaini</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">124</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=N8913485"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spacecraft Environmental <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> Expert System.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A microcomputer based expert system is being developed to assist in the diagnosis of satellite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> caused by the space environment. The expert system is designed to address <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> caused by surface charging, bulk charging, single event effects, a...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">H. C. Koons D. J. Gorney</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">125</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA430829"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ferret Workflow <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection System.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Ferret workflow <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection system project 2003-2004 has provided validation and <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection in accredited workflows in secure knowledge management systems through the use of continuous, automated audits. A workflow, process, or procedure,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. J. Smith S. Bryant</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">126</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=tac&pg=6&id=EJ346869"> <span id="translatedtitle">Open to <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Offers (1) <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for improving college students' study skills; (2) a system for keeping track of parent, teacher, and community contacts; (3) <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for motivating students using tic tac toe; (4) <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for using etymology to improve word retention; (5) a word search grid; and (6) <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for using postcards in remedial…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Journal of Reading, 1987</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">127</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/37378847"> <span id="translatedtitle">Suicidality and Interrogative <span class="hlt">Suggestibility</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">All people are subject to memory <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>, but suicidal individuals may be especially so. The link between suidality and <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> is unclear given mixed findings and methodological weaknesses of past research. To test the link between suidality and interrogative <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>, 149 undergraduates answered questions about suicidal thoughts and reasons for living, and participated in a direct <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> procedure. As expected,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lea Pritchard-Boone; Lillian M. Range</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">128</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009cip..book..101S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Modeling And Detecting <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> In Scada Systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The detection of attacks and intrusions based on <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is hampered by the limits of specificity underlying the detection techniques. However, in the case of many critical infrastructure systems, domain-specific knowledge and models can impose constraints that <span class="hlt">potentially</span> reduce error rates. At the same time, attackers can use their knowledge of system behavior to mask their manipulations, causing adverse effects to observed only after a significant period of time. This paper describes elementary statistical techniques that can be applied to detect <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in critical infrastructure networks. A SCADA system employed in liquefied natural gas (LNG) production is used as a case study.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Svendsen, Nils; Wolthusen, Stephen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">129</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12149703"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hepatic exstrophy complicating Poland's <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Poland's <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is comprised of a constellation of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. To be included in the syndrome, a child must have a deficiency of the pectoralis major and minor muscles and an associated <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of either the ipsilateral breast or hand. Associated defects may include syndactyly osseous and cartilagenous costal aplasia and adactyly. A case of hepatic exstrophy through a full-thickness chest wall defect in an infant with Poland's <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is reported. PMID:12149703</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Puder, Mark; Greene, Arin; Mooney, David</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">130</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53616115"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Hypothesis for Urban Rainfall <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">METROMEX was the first major field program aimed at studying the reality and causes of urban rainfall <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> <span class="hlt">suggested</span> in several climatological studies. The results from the 1971-74 METROMEX data portray statistically significant increases in summer rainfall, heavy (>2.5 cm) rainstorms, thunderstorms and hail in and just east (downstorm) of St. Louis. Examination of the rainfall yield of individual showers</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. A. Changnon Jr.; R. G. Semonin; F. A. Huff</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">131</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/31471002"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hepatic exstrophy complicating Poland's <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Poland's <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is comprised of a constellation of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. To be included in the syndrome, a child must have a deficiency of the pectoralis major and minor muscles and an associated <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of either the ipsilateral breast or hand. Associated defects may include syndactyly osseous and cartilagenous costal aplasia and adactyly. A case of hepatic exstrophy through a full-thickness chest</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mark Puder; Arin Greene; David Mooney</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">132</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=JPRS65447"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hypnosis and <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The report contains a description of the use of hypnosis and <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> and examines the physiological foundation. It includes a determination of the degree of susceptibility to <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> and hypnosis, the techniques to hypnosis, and the reactions of pat...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. I. Bul</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">133</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.alzinfo.org/12/alz-guide/suggest-memory-screening"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggesting</span> a Memory Screening</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Suggesting</span> a Memory Screening... Text Size: Email This Post Print This Post <span class="hlt">Suggesting</span> a Memory Screening By Kevin Gault It can be a ... cognitive abilities, want to <span class="hlt">suggest</span> screening for possible memory deficit, but aren’t sure how to go ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">134</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2102090"> <span id="translatedtitle">Theories of <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The word “<span class="hlt">suggestion</span>” has been used in educational, scientific and medical literature in slightly different senses. In psychological medicine the use of <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> has developed out of the earlier use of hypnotic influence. Charcot defined hypnosis as an artificial hysteria, Bernheim as an artificially increased <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>. The two definitions need to be combined to give an adequate account of hypnosis. Moreover, due allowance should be made for the factors of dissociation and of rapport in hypnotic phenomena. The relationships between dissociation, <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>, and hypnotizability. Theories of <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> propounded by Pierre Janet, Freud, McDougall, Pawlow and others. Ernest Jones's theory of the nature of auto-<span class="hlt">suggestion</span>. Janet explains <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> in terms of ideo-motor action in which the <span class="hlt">suggested</span> idea, because of the inactivity of competing ideas, produces its maximum effect. Freud explains rapport in terms of the sex instinct “inhibited in its aim” (transference) and brings in his distinction of “ego” and “ego-ideal” (or “super-ego”) to supplement the theory. Jones explains auto-<span class="hlt">suggestion</span> in terms of narcissism. McDougall explains hypnotic <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> in terms of the instinct of self-abasement. But different instincts may supply the driving power to produce <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>-effects in different circumstances. Such instincts as those of self-preservation (fear) and gregariousness may play their part. Auto-<span class="hlt">suggestion</span> as a therapeutic factor is badly named. It supplements, but does not supplant the will, and makes complete volition possible.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brown, William</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1928-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">135</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=prevent+AND+future+AND+problems&pg=2&id=EJ903423"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Life of <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Using the notion of a <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>, or rather charting the life of <span class="hlt">suggestions</span>, this article considers the happenings of chance and embodiment as the "problems that got away." The life of <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> helps us to ask how connectivities are made, how desire functions, and how "immanence" rather than "transcendence" can open up the politics and ethics…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pearce, Cathie</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">136</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/12609486"> <span id="translatedtitle">Holographic gravitational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the AdS\\/CFT correspondence one encounters theories that are not invariant under diffeomorphisms. In the boundary theory this is a gravitational <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, and can arise in 4k+2 dimensions. In the bulk, there can be gravitational Chern-Simons terms which vary by a total derivative. We work out the holographic stress tensor for such theories, and demonstrate agreement between the bulk and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Per Kraus; Finn Larsen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">137</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhRvD..85b5017B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mixed states from <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">There are several instances where quantum <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of continuous and discrete classical symmetries play an important role in fundamental physics. Examples come from chiral <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the Standard Model of fundamental interactions and gravitational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in string theories. Their generic origin is the fact that classical symmetries may not preserve the domains of quantum operators like the Hamiltonian. In this work, we show by simple examples that anomalous symmetries can often be implemented at the expense of working with mixed states having nonzero entropies. In particular there is the result on color breaking by non-abelian magnetic monopoles. This <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> can be rectified by using impure states. We also argue that non-abelian groups of twisted bundles are always anomalous for pure states sharpening an earlier argument of Sorkin and Balachandran [A. P. Balachandran, G. Marmo, B. S. Skagerstam, and A. Stern, Classical Topology and Quantum States (World Scientific, Singapore, 1991).]. This is the case of mapping class groups of geons [A. P. Balachandran, G. Marmo, B. S. Skagerstam, and A. Stern, Classical Topology and Quantum States (World Scientific, Singapore, 1991).] indicating that large diffeos are anomalous for pure states in the presence of geons. Nevertheless diffeo invariance may be restored by using impure states. This work concludes with examples of these ideas drawn from molecular physics. The above approach using impure states is entirely equivalent to restricting all states to the algebra of observables invariant under the anomalous symmetries. For anomalous gauge groups such as color, this would mean that we work with observables singlet under global gauge transformations. For color, this will mean that we work with color singlets, a reasonable constraint.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Balachandran, A. P.; de Queiroz, Amilcar R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">138</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23989523"> <span id="translatedtitle">Complex vascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The classification system for vascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> now used by experts worldwide comprises two distinct disease entities that differ in their biologic and pathologic features: vascular tumors and vascular malformations. Vascular tumors include infantile and congenital hemangiomas, tufted angiomas, and kaposiform hemangioendotheliomas. Infantile hemangiomas, the most common vascular <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, generally have a predetermined life cycle (proliferation and subsequent involution). GLUT-1, a glucose transporter, is a marker for these specific lesions during all phases of development. Vascular malformations are classified according to their vascular tissue of origin and include capillary, venous, arteriovenous, lymphatic, and mixed malformations. Complex lymphatic malformations and complex mixed malformations, which may have most vascular components, are the most difficult vascular malformations to successfully treat. These lesions are present at birth and often expand or grow in response to trauma, infection, or hormonal changes. Imaging advancements have enabled more accurate assessments and improved management of vascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. In addition, many lesions are now being managed with targeted pharmacologic therapy. Propranolol and steroids are used for complex or disfiguring tumors, and new anti-angiogenesis inhibitors such as sirolimus are selectively used to treat lymphatic and venous lymphatic malformations that are poorly responsive to sclerotherapy, embolization, and surgical excision. Multimodal therapies are often essential for complex lesions and require the combined expertise of an interdisciplinary team. PMID:23989523</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Azizkhan, Richard G</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">139</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002AGUFM.T72A1236K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Gravity <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> of the Mariana Trough</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have compiled extensive bathymetry and gravity data of the Mariana Trough, which were collected during several Japanese cruises over the last few years. Free-air gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> was calculated with subtracting the normal gravity field and with corrections of the drift and of the Eotvos effect using the DGPS data. Then, we adjusted the trend of this free-air gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> to that of the free-air gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> from satellite altimetry (Sandwell and Smith, 1997) and we merged them to get better free-air gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Finally, Mantle Bouguer gravity <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> (MBA) was calculated by the method of Parker (1972), using the free air gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and multi-narrow-beam bathymetry. We assumed that the crust is constant thickness of 6 km and that the seawater, crust, and mantle densities are 1030, 2700, and 3300 kg/\\(m^{-3}\\), respectively. The MBA reveals distinct differences between regions: 1) The north of 22N shows extremely low MBA, indicating an incipient rifting. 2) The spreading axis between 22N and 21N shows relatively low MBA, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> abundant magma supply. 3) The central region between 21N and 14N shows "Bull's eyes" features along the axes, which are characteristic slow-spreading features. The center of the "Bull's eye" are always located to the west of the spreading axis, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> asymmetry either in crustal thickness or in melt delivery from the mantle. 4) The south of 14N shows lower MBA than that in the central. Furthermore, we will examine the MBA in the following three points with relation to the spreading process of the back-arc basin: 1) variation of crustal thickness that reflects the amount of the melt supply at the spreading axes, 2) contribution from plate cooling, and 3) contribution from subcrustal density variation that probably reflects the pattern of mantle upwelling, temperature variations, and/or distribution of partial melt.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kitada, K.; Seama, N.; Fujiwara, T.; Yamazaki, T.; Wakabayashi, N.; Nakase, K.; Okino, K.; Nogi, Y.; Suyehiro, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">140</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21409187"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> at finite density and chiral fermions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using perturbation theory in the Euclidean (imaginary time) formalism as well as the nonperturbative Fujikawa method, we verify that the chiral <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> equation remains unaffected in the presence of nonzero chemical <span class="hlt">potential</span>, {mu}. We extend our considerations to fermions with exact chiral symmetry on the lattice and discuss the consequences for the recent Bloch-Wettig proposal for the Dirac operator at finite chemical <span class="hlt">potential</span>. We propose a new simpler method of incorporating {mu} and compare it with the Bloch-Wettig idea.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gavai, R. V.; Sharma, Sayantan [Department of Theoretical Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return 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<img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">141</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010cosp...38.4223D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Space Weather and Satellite <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Results of the Satellite <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Project, which aims to improve the methods of safeguarding satellites in the Earth's magnetosphere from the negative effects of the space environment, are presented. <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> data from the "Kosmos" series satellites in the period 1971-1999 are com-bined in one database, together with similar information on other spacecrafts. This database contains, beyond the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> information, various characteristics of the space weather: geo-magnetic activity indices (Ap, AE and Dst), fluxes and fluencies of electrons and protons at different energies, high energy cosmic ray variations and other solar, interplanetary and solar wind data. A comparative analysis of the distribution of each of these parameters relative to satellite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> was carried out for the total number of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (about 6000 events), and separately for high ( 5000 events) and low (about 800 events) altitude orbit satellites. No relation was found between low and high altitude satellite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Daily numbers of satel-lite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, averaged by a superposed epoch method around sudden storm commencements and proton event onsets for high (?1500 km) and low (¡1500 km) altitude orbits revealed a big difference in a behavior. Satellites were divided on several groups according to the orbital char-acteristics (altitude and inclination). The relation of satellite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to the environmental parameters was found to be different for various orbits that should be taken into account under developing of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> frequency models. The preliminary <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> frequency models are presented. Keywords: Space weather; Satellite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>; Energetic particles; Magnetic storms</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dorman, Lev; Iucci, N.; Levitin, A. E.; Belov, A. V.; Eroshenko, E. A.; Ptitsyna, N. G.; Villoresi, G.; Chizhenkov, G. V.; Gromova, L. I.; Parisi, M.; Tyasto, M. I.; Yanke, V. G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">142</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6653959"> <span id="translatedtitle">Geologic interpretation of gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This Russian textbook provides a sufficiently complete and systematic illumination of physico-geologic and mathematical aspect of complex problem of interpretation of gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The rational methods of localization of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are examined in detail. All methods of interpreting gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are described which have found successful application in practice. Also given are ideas of some new methods of the interpretation of gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, the prospects for further development and industrial testing. Numerous practical examples to interpretation are given. Partial Contents: Bases of gravitational field theory; Physico-geologic bases of gravitational prospecting; Principles of geologic interpretation of gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>; Conversions and calculations of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>; Interpretation of gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for bodies of correct geometric form and for bodies of arbitrary form; Geologic interpretation of the results of regional gravitational photographing; Searches and prospecting of oil- and gas-bearing structures and of deposits of ore and nonmetalliferous useful minerals.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Andreyev, B.A.; Klushin, I.G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-04-19</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">143</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985PhDT........38N"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> General Circulation Models.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The feasibility of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> model is assessed using barotropic and baroclinic models. In the barotropic case, both a stationary and a time-dependent model has been formulated and constructed, whereas only the stationary, linear case is considered in the baroclinic case. Results from the barotropic model indicate that a relation between the stationary solution and the time-averaged non-linear solution exists. The stationary linear baroclinic solution can therefore be considered with some confidence. The linear baroclinic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> model poses a formidable mathematical problem because it is necessary to solve a gigantic linear system to obtain the solution. A new method to find solution of large linear system, based on a projection on the Krylov subspace is shown to be successful when applied to the linearized baroclinic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> model. The scheme consists of projecting the original linear system on the Krylov subspace, thereby reducing the dimensionality of the matrix to be inverted to obtain the solution. With an appropriate setting of the damping parameters, the iterative Krylov method reaches a solution even using a Krylov subspace ten times smaller than the original space of the problem. This generality allows the treatment of the important problem of linear waves in the atmosphere. A larger class (nonzonally symmetric) of basic states can now be treated for the baroclinic primitive equations. These problem leads to large unsymmetrical linear systems of order 10000 and more which can now be successfully tackled by the Krylov method. The (R7) linear <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> model is used to investigate extensively the linear response to equatorial and mid-latitude prescribed heating. The results indicate that the solution is deeply affected by the presence of the stationary waves in the basic state. The instability of the asymmetric flows, first pointed out by Simmons et al. (1983), is active also in the baroclinic case. However, the presence of baroclinic processes modifies the dominant response. The most sensitive areas are identified; they correspond to north Japan, the Pole and Greenland regions. A limited set of higher resolution (R15) experiments indicate that this situation is still present and enhanced at higher resolution. The linear <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> model is also applied to a realistic case. (Abstract shortened with permission of author.).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Navarra, Antonio</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">144</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21583314"> <span id="translatedtitle">Semiclassical <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the quantum mechanical systems and their modifications for the asymptotic matching</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">JWKB solutions to the Initial Value Problems (IVPs) of the Time Independent Schrodinger's Equation (TISE) for the Simple Linear <span class="hlt">Potentials</span> (SLPs) with a turning point parameter have been studied according to the turning points by graphical analysis to test the results of the JWKB solutions and <span class="hlt">suggested</span> modifications. The <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> happening in the classically inaccessible region where the SLP function is smaller than zero and the results of the <span class="hlt">suggested</span> modifications, which are in consistent with the quantum mechanical theories, to remove these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in this region have been presented. The origins of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and verifications of the <span class="hlt">suggested</span> modifications showing a great success in the results have also been studied in terms of a <span class="hlt">suggested</span> M{sub ij}=S{sup {approx}}{sub i-1,j} matrix elements made up of the JWKB expansion terms, S{sub i-1,j} (where i = 1, 2, 3 and j 1, 2). The results of the modifications for the IVPs and their application to the Bound State Problems (BSPs) with an example application of the Harmonic Oscillator (HO) have been presented and their generalization for any <span class="hlt">potential</span> function have been discussed and classified accordingly.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Deniz, Coskun, E-mail: coskun.deniz@ege.edu.tr [Ege University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Bornova 35100, Izmir (Turkey)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-08-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">145</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5984454"> <span id="translatedtitle">Investigations of low-temperature geothermal <span class="hlt">potential</span> in New York State</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Temperature gradient map and published heat flow data indicate a possible <span class="hlt">potential</span> for a geothermal resource in western and central New York State. A new analysis of bottom-hole temperature data for New York State confirms the existence of three positive gradient <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: the East Aurora, Cayuga, and Elmira <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, with gradients as high as 32/sup 0/C/km, 36/sup 0/C/km, and 36/sup 0/C/km, respectively. Ground waters from two of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are enriched in silica relative to surrounding areas. Heat flows based on silica geothermometry are 50 to 70 mWm/sup -2/ for the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and 41.4 mWm/sup -2/ for bordering regional flux. A correlation between Bouguer gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the temperature gradient map <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the geothermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may occur above radioactive granites in the basement.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hodge, D.S.; De Rito, R.; Hifiker, K.; Morgan, P.; Swanberg, C.A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">146</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22110015"> <span id="translatedtitle">Familial Poland <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> revisited.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Poland <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (PA) is a pectoral muscle hypoplasia/aplasia variably associated with ipsilateral thoracic (TA) and/or upper limb <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (ULA). PA is usually sporadic and sometimes familial, making recurrence risk an issue in genetic counseling. Multidisciplinary evaluation of 240 PA patients was carried out, including physical examination of patients and their parents in 190 PA (subjects of the study). Familial conditions were classified into three groups. Group1: true familial PA (F-PA): pectoral muscle defects with familial recurrence: 8(4.2%). Group2: familial Poland-like <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> families (F-PLA): PA index case and ?1 relative(s) showing normal pectoral muscles but ULA and/or TA common in PA: 16(8.4%). Group3: sporadic PA (S-PA): 166(87.4%). F-PA indicated a stronger male (87.5%) and left side (62.5%) prevalence, but fewer ULA (37.5%) compared to the other two groups. Maternal transmission (6/8) was more common in F-PA. Statistical significance was not reached due to the small number of F-PA and F-PLA. Karyotyping and array-comparative genomic hybridization were performed in 13 families. Three maternally inherited copy number variants were identified in three patients: 1p31.1 deletion, Xp11.22 duplication, and 16q23.1 duplication. Interestingly, the proband's mother carrying the 16q23.1 duplication displayed moderate breast and areola asymmetry, but normal pectoral muscles on ultrasound. Though there is no recent review discussing recurrence of PA, we reviewed 31 published PA families. On the basis of our study and previous reports, familial PA is not uncommon. Nonetheless, no information can be derived either regarding a molecular basis or clinical tools with which to identify cases with recurrence risk. PMID:22110015</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Baban, Anwar; Torre, Michele; Costanzo, Sara; Gimelli, Stefania; Bianca, Sebastiano; Divizia, Maria Teresa; Sénès, Filippo Maria; Garavelli, Livia; Rivieri, Francesca; Lerone, Margherita; Valle, Maura; Ravazzolo, Roberto; Calevo, Maria Grazia</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-11-22</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">147</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5685614"> <span id="translatedtitle">Maternal water consumption during pregnancy and congenital cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This case-control study, conducted in a California county that had a local incident of water contamination in 1981, investigated the relation between a mother's reported consumption of tap water during pregnancy and congenital cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in their offspring born during 1981-1983. Data were obtained from telephone interviews with 145 mothers of children born with a severe cardiac <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and 176 mothers of children born without such an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. A positive association between a mother's consumption of home tap water during the first trimester of pregnancy and cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in her infant was unrelated to the incident of water contamination, the mother's race, or her educational level. A negative relation was found between a mother's use of bottled water and cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> among the infants. These findings corresponded primarily to births in 1981. These data could not fully distinguish between a <span class="hlt">potential</span> causal agent in the water and differential reporting of exposure by study subjects.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shaw, G.M.; Swan, S.H.; Harris, J.A.; Malcoe, L.H. (California Birth Defects Monitoring Program, Emeryville (USA))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">148</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013GReGr..45..911B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Scale <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> as the origin of time</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We explore the problem of time in quantum gravity in a point-particle analogue model of scale-invariant gravity. If quantized after reduction to true degrees of freedom, it leads to a time-independent Schrödinger equation. As with the Wheeler-DeWitt equation, time disappears, and a frozen formalism that gives a static wavefunction on the space of possible shapes of the system is obtained. However, if one follows the Dirac procedure and quantizes by imposing constraints, the <span class="hlt">potential</span> that ensures scale invariance gives rise to a conformal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, and the scale invariance is broken. A behaviour closely analogous to renormalization-group (RG) flow results. The wavefunction acquires a dependence on the scale parameter of the RG flow. We interpret this as time evolution and obtain a novel solution of the problem of time in quantum gravity. We apply the general procedure to the three-body problem, showing how to fix a natural initial value condition, introducing the notion of complexity. We recover a time-dependent Schrödinger equation with a repulsive cosmological force in the `late-time' physics and we analyse the role of the scale invariant Planck constant. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that several mechanisms presented in this model could be exploited in more general contexts.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Barbour, Julian; Lostaglio, Matteo; Mercati, Flavio</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">149</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002SPIE.4716..128K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Automated <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection processor</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Robust exploitation of tracking and surveillance data will provide an early warning and cueing capability for military and civilian Law Enforcement Agency operations. This will improve dynamic tasking of limited resources and hence operational efficiency. The challenge is to rapidly identify threat activity within a huge background of noncombatant traffic. We discuss development of an Automated <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection Processor (AADP) that exploits multi-INT, multi-sensor tracking and surveillance data to rapidly identify and characterize events and/or objects of military interest, without requiring operators to specify threat behaviors or templates. The AADP has successfully detected an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in traffic patterns in Los Angeles, analyzed ship track data collected during a Fleet Battle Experiment to detect simulated mine laying behavior amongst maritime noncombatants, and is currently under development for surface vessel tracking within the Coast Guard's Vessel Traffic Service to support port security, ship inspection, and harbor traffic control missions, and to monitor medical surveillance databases for early alert of a bioterrorist attack. The AADP can also be integrated into combat simulations to enhance model fidelity of multi-sensor fusion effects in military operations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kraiman, James B.; Arouh, Scott L.; Webb, Michael L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">150</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JHEP...02..088J"> <span id="translatedtitle">Thermodynamics, gravitational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and cones</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">By studying the Euclidean partition function on a cone, we argue that pure and mixed gravitational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> generate a "Casimir momentum" which manifests itself as parity violating coefficients in the hydrodynamic stress tensor and charge current. The coefficients generated by these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> enter at a lower order in the hydrodynamic gradient expansion than would be naively expected. In 1 + 1 dimensions, the gravitational <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> affects coefficients at zeroth order in the gradient expansion. The mixed <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in 3 + 1 dimensions controls the value of coefficients at first order in the gradient expansion.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jensen, Kristan; Loganayagam, R.; Yarom, Amos</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">151</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/36863408"> <span id="translatedtitle">Diurnal variations in <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The size-weight illusion was used in an effort to get a measure of <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>. 15 subjects, 10 men and 5 women, were given the test five times daily for 26 days. The standard (large) block weighed 55 grams. From the array of smaller blocks one was, at each test, selected as equal to the standard. After 16 days the curve</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">H. L. Hollingworth</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1931-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">152</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20426609"> <span id="translatedtitle">Congenital uterine <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and their impact on fertility.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Congenital uterine <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are not uncommon. Many are asymptomatic and have been associated with normal and adverse reproductive outcomes. The interference of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with a patient's fertility is an interesting but still debatable issue, and the proper management of infertile women with many forms of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> remains controversial. The current literature regarding the frequency and probable causes of infertility among women with congenital uterine <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is insufficient to allow any robust conclusions to be drawn. Diagnostic and selection bias, a lack of objective diagnostic criteria for the different <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> types and heterogeneity of study designs have contributed to the conflicting results from different studies of the prevalence of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> among the infertile and fertile populations. However, emerging evidence from recent literature <span class="hlt">suggests</span> causal associations between these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (particularly the septate uterus) and infertility, and demonstrates significant improvements in the fecundity of women with septate uteri and otherwise unexplained infertility after hysteroscopic metroplasty. This review provides a critical update of the state of knowledge regarding congenital uterine <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, our current understanding of their effect on fertility and discusses how they can be managed from the reproductive perspective. PMID:20426609</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hassan, Mohamed-Ashraf M; Lavery, Stuart A; Trew, Geoffrey H</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">153</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3075271"> <span id="translatedtitle">Turtle Carapace <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>: The Roles of Genetic Diversity and Environment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background Phenotypic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are common in wild populations and multiple genetic, biotic and abiotic factors might contribute to their formation. Turtles are excellent models for the study of developmental instability because <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are easily detected in the form of malformations, additions, or reductions in the number of scutes or scales. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we integrated field observations, manipulative experiments, and climatic and genetic approaches to investigate the origin of carapace scute <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> across Iberian populations of the European pond turtle, Emys orbicularis. The proportion of anomalous individuals varied from 3% to 69% in local populations, with increasing frequency of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in northern regions. We found no significant effect of climatic and soil moisture, or climatic temperature on the occurrence of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. However, lower genetic diversity and inbreeding were good predictors of the prevalence of scute <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> among populations. Both decreasing genetic diversity and increasing proportion of anomalous individuals in northern parts of the Iberian distribution may be linked to recolonization events from the Southern Pleistocene refugium. Conclusions/Significance Overall, our results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that developmental instability in turtle carapace formation might be caused, at least in part, by genetic factors, although the influence of environmental factors affecting the developmental stability of turtle carapace cannot be ruled out. Further studies of the effects of environmental factors, pollutants and heritability of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> would be useful to better understand the complex origin of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in natural populations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Velo-Anton, Guillermo; Becker, C. Guilherme; Cordero-Rivera, Adolfo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">154</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48356719"> <span id="translatedtitle">Modeling And Detecting <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> In Scada Systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The detection of attacks and intrusions based on <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is hampered by the limits of specificity underlying the detection\\u000a techniques. However, in the case of many critical infrastructure systems, domain-specific knowledge and models can impose\\u000a constraints that <span class="hlt">potentially</span> reduce error rates. At the same time, attackers can use their knowledge of system behavior to\\u000a mask their manipulations, causing adverse effects</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nils Svendsen; Stephen Wolthusen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">155</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://journals.tums.ac.ir/upload_files/pdf/12277.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">External Genital <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Newborn Babies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Objective: External genital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are common congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, especially in male newborns. It seems that the incidence of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is increasing. Although the etiology of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is obscure in most cases, genetic and environmental factors have important roles. This study aimed to determine the types and frequency of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in newborn babies and to compare the results</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Siamak Shiva; Pediatric Endocrinologist; Mohammad-Hosein Hoseinian</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">156</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18545770"> <span id="translatedtitle">Exposure to misoprostol and hormones during pregnancy and risk of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study evaluated the association between use of misoprostol and other drugs to induce menstruation, and congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. A sample of 4,856 pregnant women 20 years and older were enrolled consecutively in prenatal services in the Unified National Health System, in six Brazilian State capitals. Data on socio-demographics and use of medicines were obtained using an interview from the 21st to 28th week of pregnancy. Other data, including information on delivery and diagnosis of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> by the attending neonatal physician were obtained from patient charts. <span class="hlt">Potential</span> confounders were adjusted by logistic regression. Use of drugs to induce menstruation was reported by 707 women (14.6%), of whom 120 (17%) reported use of misoprostol. After adjusting for the study center, a positive association was observed between misoprostol and congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (OR = 2.64; 95% CI: 1.03-6.75); a positive association was also observed for sex hormones (OR = 2.24; 95% CI: 1.06-4.74). The results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the use of misoprostol or sex hormones during pregnancy increases the risk of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. PMID:18545770</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dal Pizzol, Tatiane da Silva; Sanseverino, Maria Teresa Vieira; Mengue, Sotero Serrate</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">157</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jb/v083/iB12/JB083iB12p05923/JB083iB12p05923.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Electrokinetic and magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with dilatant regions in a layered earth</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">According to the dilatancy-diffusion earthquake model, there will be fluid motion into a dilatant zone prior to an earthquake. One possible consequence of this fluid motion is the generation of an electric <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> by means of electrokinetic processes. A surface electric <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> will not be produced unless there is a boundary separating regions of differing streaming <span class="hlt">potential</span> coefficient</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">David V. Fitterman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1978-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">158</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JPhCS.432a2030M"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>-induced charges in nucleons</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a novel charge structure inside nucleons in electromagnetic field due to the chiral <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. We use Skyrmions, where nucleons appear as solitons of mesons, to calculate the charge distributions in a single nucleon and find that an additional non-integer charge proportional to the magnetic field would be produced. This might look surprising, but the magnitude of the induced charge is evaluated to be tiny enough to have not been observed yet.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Maezawa, Yu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">159</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://faculty.chicagobooth.edu/ray.ball/research/Papers/1992%20The%20Earnings%20Price%20Anomaly.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">The earnings-price <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This review explores systematic explanations for the anomalous evidence in the relation between accounting earnings and stock prices. The <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is that estimated future abnormal returns are predicted by public information about future earnings, contained in (1) current earnings and (2) current financial statement ratios. The current-earnings <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> appears due to either market inefficiency or substantial costs of investors acquiring</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ray Ball</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">160</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54955304"> <span id="translatedtitle">Measuring <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> with algorithmic entropy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> detection refers to the identification of observations that are considered outside of normal. Since they are unknown to the system prior to training and rare, the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection problem is particularly challenging. Model based techniques require large quantities of existing data are to build the model. Statistically based techniques result in the use of statistical metrics or thresholds for</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wanda M. Solano</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">161</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE83700866"> <span id="translatedtitle">Power Coefficient <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> in JOYO.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Power Coefficient <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> appeared in JOYO, which occurred in 75MW Power Ascension Test, Summer 1979. The substance of this <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> was the non-reproducible power coefficient during the initial power-up from 50MWt to 75MWt and the permanent reactivity los...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. Ishikawa Y. Yamashita Y. Nara H. Yamamoto</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">162</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://rses.anu.edu.au/people/lambeck_k/pdf/20.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Gravity <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> over Ocean Ridges</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Summary The presence of positive free-air gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over ocean ridges is supported by both the global solutions derived essentially from satellite observations and by surface measurements. The <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over the ridges observed by the satellite solutions are described by the harmonics of degree 8 or 9 and higher and they can be supported statically if maximum shear stresses in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kurt Lambeck</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1972-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">163</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55887754"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in the Solar System</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Several observations show unexplained phenomena in our solar system. These observations are e.g. the Pioneer <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>, an unexplained constant acceleration of the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft, the Flyby <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>, an unexplained increase of the velocity of a series of spacecraft after Earth gravity assists, the recently reported increase of the Astronomical Unit defined by the distance of the planets</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hansjoerg Dittus</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">164</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/59293185"> <span id="translatedtitle">Congenital cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in calves</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Seven cases of congenital cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in calves were reviewed from the files of the Ohio Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory. The collection of material occurred during a six-month period from June 1977 to January 1978. The major clinical signs were dyspnoea, failure to gain weight and sudden death in young animals. The cardiac defects included two patent ductus arteriosus, two <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">GE Sandusky; CW Smith</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">165</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JHEP...01..093P"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> equations and intersection theory</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Six-dimensional supergravity theories with mathcal{N} = (1, 0) supersymmetry must satisfy <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> equations. These equations come from demanding the cancellation of gravitational, gauge and mixed <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> equations have implications for the geometrical data of Calabi-Yau threefolds, since F-theory compactified on an elliptically fibered Calabi-Yau threefold with a section generates a consistent six-dimensional mathcal{N} = (1, 0) supergravity theory. In this paper, we show that the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> equations can be summarized by three intersection theory identities. In the process we also identify the geometric counterpart of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> coefficients — in particular, those of the abelian gauge groups — that govern the low-energy dynamics of the theory. We discuss the results in the context of investigating string universality in six dimensions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Park, Daniel S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">166</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23737008"> <span id="translatedtitle">Case report: Macrodont mandibular second premolars, a hereditary dental <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">BACKGROUND: Macrodontia or megadontia is a rare dental <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> that refers to teeth that appear larger than normal. Generalised macrodontia may be associated with certain medical conditions and syndromes. Isolated macrodontia involves single teeth, might be the result of teeth fusion and is mainly seen in the incisor area. CASE REPORTS: This paper describes two unrelated cases presenting with bilateral macrodont second lower premolars and the treatment provided. One case demonstrated the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in both the patient and his father. CONCLUSION: This case report <span class="hlt">suggests</span> for the first time in the literature the genetic aetiology and heritability, as a possible autosomal dominant trait, of this rare dental <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. PMID:23737008</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kyriazidou, A; Haider, D; Mason, C; Parekh, S; Bloch-Zupan, A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">167</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19574822"> <span id="translatedtitle">Developmental venous <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: current concepts and implications for management.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Developmental venous <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (DVAs), formerly known as venous angiomas, have become the most frequently diagnosed intracranial vascular malformation. DVAs are currently considered congenital cerebrovascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with mature venous walls that lack arterial or capillary elements. They are composed of radially arranged medullary veins, which converge in an enlarged transcortical or subependymal collector vein, and have characteristic appearances (caput medusae) on magnetic resonance imaging and angiography. DVAs were once thought to be rare lesions with substantial <span class="hlt">potential</span> for intracerebral hemorrhage and considerable morbidity. The prevalence of incidental and asymptomatic DVAs has been more apparent since the advent of magnetic resonance imaging; recent cohort studies have challenged the once-held view of isolated DVAs as the cause of major neurological complications. The previously reported high incidence of intracerebral hemorrhage associated with DVAs is currently attributed to coexistent, angiographically occult cavernous malformations. Some patients may still have noteworthy neurological morbidity or die as a result of acute infarction or hemorrhage directly attributed to DVA thrombosis. DVAs can coexist with cavernous malformations and arteriovenous malformations. Such combination or transitional forms of malformations might <span class="hlt">suggest</span> common pathways in pathogenesis. Recent data support a key role for DVAs in the pathogenesis of mixed vascular malformations. PMID:19574822</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rammos, Stylianos K; Maina, Raffella; Lanzino, Giuseppe</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">168</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010SpWea...806008A"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Galaxy 15 <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>: Another Satellite in the Wrong Place at a Critical Time</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> on satellites can range from minor, unnoticed events to complete failure of a spacecraft. The exact cause is often difficult to know because the satellites cannot be recovered. We can infer a probable cause by studies in the laboratory that simulate the conditions in space known to have existed at the satellite when the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> struck. It can be helpful to have a history of satellite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to study together with the records of solar activity and disturbed space environment conditions. Such a comprehensive history can <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a possible cause for an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of interest, such as the recent Galaxy 15 (G-15) <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Allen, Joe</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">169</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/257023a0"> <span id="translatedtitle">A major geothermal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the Gulf of California</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have mapped a 3-km wide, high heat flow <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> with a maximum value of 30 ??calorie cm -2 s-1 within a zone of seafloor extension in the central Gulf of California. From seismic reflection data and thermal modelling we <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is caused by a 1-km wide basaltic intrusion which is roughly 100 m deep and less than 18,000 yr old. ?? 1975 Nature Publishing Group.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lawver, L. A.; Williams, D. L.; Von Herzen, R. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">170</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JHEP...09..125D"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> mediation from unbroken supergravity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">When supergravity (SUGRA) is spontaneously broken, it is well known that <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> mediation generates sparticle soft masses proportional to the gravitino mass. Recently, we showed that one-loop <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-mediated gaugino masses should be associated with unbroken supersymmetry (SUSY). This counterintuitive result arises because the underlying symmetry structure of (broken) SUGRA in flat space is in fact (unbroken) SUSY in anti-de Sitter (AdS) space. When quantum corrections are regulated in a way that preserves SUGRA, the underlying AdS curvature (proportional to the gravitino mass) necessarily appears in the regulated action, yielding soft masses without corresponding goldstino couplings. In this paper, we extend our analysis of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> mediation to sfermion soft masses. Already at tree-level we encounter a number of surprises, including the fact that zero soft masses correspond to broken (AdS) SUSY. At one-loop, we explain how <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> mediation appears when regulating SUGRA in a way that preserves super-Weyl invariance. We find that recent claims in the literature about the non-existence of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> mediation were based on a Wilsonian effective action with residual gauge dependence, and the gauge-invariant 1PI effective action contains the expected <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-mediated spectrum. Finally, we calculate the sfermion spectrum to all orders, and use supertrace relations to derive the familiar two-loop soft masses from minimal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> mediation, as well as unfamiliar tree-level and one-loop goldstino couplings consistent with renormalization group invariance.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D'Eramo, Francesco; Thaler, Jesse; Thomas, Zachary</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">171</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21537700"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reactor antineutrino <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recently, new reactor antineutrino spectra have been provided for {sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Pu, and {sup 238}U, increasing the mean flux by about 3%. To a good approximation, this reevaluation applies to all reactor neutrino experiments. The synthesis of published experiments at reactor-detector distances <100 m leads to a ratio of observed event rate to predicted rate of 0.976{+-}0.024. With our new flux evaluation, this ratio shifts to 0.943{+-}0.023, leading to a deviation from unity at 98.6% C.L. which we call the reactor antineutrino <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The compatibility of our results with the existence of a fourth nonstandard neutrino state driving neutrino oscillations at short distances is discussed. The combined analysis of reactor data, gallium solar neutrino calibration experiments, and MiniBooNE-{nu} data disfavors the no-oscillation hypothesis at 99.8% C.L. The oscillation parameters are such that |{Delta}m{sub new}{sup 2}|>1.5 eV{sup 2} (95%) and sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub new})=0.14{+-}0.08 (95%). Constraints on the {theta}{sub 13} neutrino mixing angle are revised.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mention, G.; Fechner, M. [CEA, Irfu, SPP, Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Lasserre, Th.; Cribier, M. [CEA, Irfu, SPP, Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Astroparticule et Cosmologie APC, 10 rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet, 75205 Paris cedex 13 (France); Mueller, Th. A.; Lhuillier, D.; Letourneau, A. [CEA, Irfu, SPhN, Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">172</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006JHEP...03..100L"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> and graded coisotropic branes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We compute the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of the axial U(1) current in the A-model on a Calabi-Yau manifold, in the presence of coisotropic branes discovered by Kapustin and Orlov. Our results relate the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-free condition to a recently proposed definition of graded coisotropic branes in Calabi-Yau manifolds. More specifically, we find that a coisotropic brane is <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-free if and only if it is gradable. We also comment on a different grading for coisotropic submanifolds introduced recently by Oh.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Li, Yi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">173</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ChJOL..31.1129F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Surface thermal centroid <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of the eastern equatorial Pacific as a unified Niño index</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">By analyzing the variability of global SST (sea surface temperature) <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, we propose a unified Niño index using the surface thermal centroid <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of the region along the Pacific equator embraced by the 0.7°C contour line of the standard deviation of the SST <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and try to unify the traditional Niño regions into a single entity. The unified Niño region covers almost all of the traditional Niño regions. The <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> time series of the averaged SST over this region are closely correlated to historical Niño indices. The <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> time series of the zonal and meridional thermal centroid have close correlation with historical TNI (Trans-Niño index) indices, showing differences among El Niño (La Niña) events. The meridional centroid <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that areas of maximum temperature <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> are moving meridionally (although slightly) with synchronous zonal movement. The zonal centroid <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the unified Niño region are found helpful in the classification of the Eastern Pacific (EP)/Central Pacific (CP) types of El Niño events. More importantly, the zonal centroid <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> shows that warm areas might move during a single warming/cooling phase. All the current Niño indices can be well represented by a simple linear combination of unified Niño indices, which <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the thermal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (SSTA) and thermal centroid location <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of the unified Niño region would yield a more complete image of each El Niño/La Niña event.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fang, Mingqiang; Chen, Yan; Li, Hongping; Wu, Lixin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">174</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23916956"> <span id="translatedtitle">Expression and/or activity of the SVCT2 ascorbate transporter may be decreased in many aggressive cancers, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> utility for sodium bicarbonate and dehydroascorbic acid in cancer therapy.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a heterodimer transcription factor whose elevated activity in many cancers helps them to survive under hypoxic conditions and enhances their capacity to grow invasively, establish metastases, and survive chemo- or radiotherapy. Optimal intracellular levels of ascorbate suppress the level and transcriptional activity of HIF-1under normoxic or mildly hypoxic conditions by supporting the activity of proly and asparagyl hydroxylases that target HIF-1alpha. High intracellular ascorbate can also work in various ways to down-regulate activation of NF-kappaB which, like HIF-1 is constitutively active in many cancers and promotes aggressive behavior - in part by promoting transcription of HIF-1alpha. Yet recent evidence <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that, even in the context of adequate ascorbate nutrition, the intracellular ascorbate content of many aggressive cancers may be supoptimal for effective HIF-1 control. This likely reflects low expression or activity of the SVCT2 ascorbate transporter. The expression of SVCT2 in cancers has so far received little study; but the extracellular acidity characteristic of many tumors would be expected to reduce the activity of this transporter, which has a mildly alkaline pH optimum. Unfortunately, since SVCT2 has a high affinity for ascorbate, and its activity is nearly saturated at normal healthy serum levels of this vitamin, increased oral administration of ascorbate would be unlikely to have much impact on the intracellular ascorbate content of tumors. However, cancers in which HIF-1 is active express high levels of glucose transporters such as GLUT-1, and these transporters can promote influx of dehydroascorbic acid (DHA) via facilitated diffusion; once inside the cell, DHA is rapidly reduced to ascorbate, which effectively is "trapped" within the cell. Hence, episodic intravenous infusions of modest doses of DHA may have <span class="hlt">potential</span> for optimizing the intracellular ascorbate content of cancers, <span class="hlt">potentially</span> rendering them less aggressive. Indeed, several published studies have concluded that parenteral DHA - sometimes in quite modest doses - can retard the growth of transplanted tumors in rodents. As an alternative or adjunctive strategy, oral administration of sodium bicarbonate, by normalizing the extracellular pH of tumors, has the <span class="hlt">potential</span> to boost the activity of SCTV2 in tumor cells, thereby promoting increased ascorbate uptake. Indeed, the utility of oral sodium bicarbonate for suppressing metastasis formation in nude mice xenografted with a human breast cancer has been reported. Hence, oral sodium bicarbonate and intravenous DHA may have the <span class="hlt">potential</span> to blunt the aggressiveness of certain cancers in which suboptimal intracellular ascorbate levels contribute to elevated HIF-1 activity. PMID:23916956</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McCarty, Mark F</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-08-02</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">175</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a000000/a002700/a002793/index.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pacific Temperature <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> with Graph</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This animation shows the El Nino-La Nina Sea Surface Temperature <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> from January 1997 through July 1999. A graph inset shows the global average sea surface temperature fluctuation during this time period.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shirah, Greg; Bridgman, Tom; Starr, Cindy; Busalacchi, Antonio; Schultz, Peter</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-08-30</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">176</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=IFINFT1621978"> <span id="translatedtitle">Axial <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> in Nonrenormalizable Theories.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> for the axial current in nonrenormalizable theories with electromagnetic coupling is considered. The spinor electrodynamics with Pauli term is examined in detail using the Feynman graph technique and the point-splitting method. The same finite...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. Marculescu L. Mezincescu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1978-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">177</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFMSM33D..08S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Plasma structure over dayside lunar magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is well-known that the Moon has neither global intrinsic magnetic field nor thick atmosphere. Different from the Earth’s case where the intrinsic global magnetic field prevents the solar wind from penetrating into the magnetosphere, solar wind directly impacts the lunar surface. Since the discovery of the lunar crustal magnetic field in 1960s, several papers have been published concerning the interaction between the solar wind and the lunar magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> including both numerical simulations and observation by lunar orbiters. MAG/ER on Lunar Prospector found heating of the solar wind electrons presumably due to the interaction between the solar wind and the lunar magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the existence of the mini-magnetosphere was <span class="hlt">suggested</span>. However, the detailed mechanism of the interaction has been unclear mainly due to the lack of the in-situ observed low energy ion data. MAgnetic field and Plasma experiment - Plasma energy Angle and Composition Experiment (MAP-PACE) on Kaguya (SELENE) completed its ˜1.5-year observation of the low energy charged particles around the Moon on 10 June 2009. MAP-PACE made observations at a circular lunar polar orbit of 100km altitude for about 1 year between January 2008 and December 2008. During the last 5 months, the orbit was lowered to ˜50km-altitude between January 2009 and April 2009, and some orbits had further lower perilune altitude of ˜10km after April 2009. When Kaguya flew over strong magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, deceleration of the solar wind ions, acceleration of the solar wind electrons, and ions reflected by magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were observed. The deceleration of the solar wind ions was observed for both two major solar wind ion components: protons and alpha particles. Deceleration of the solar wind had the same ? E/q (? E : deceleration energy, q: charge) for both protons and alpha particles. In addition, the acceleration energy of the electrons was the same as the deceleration energy of the ions. It indicates the existence of DC electric field over Kaguya spacecraft. Since the gyro-radius of the electrons was smaller than the size of the magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, incident electrons were mirror reflected back. On the other hand, the gyro-radius of the ions was much larger than the size of the magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Therefore the incident ions could penetrate deeper into the magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. As a result, DC electric field was generated over dayside magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The reflected ions were observed in much larger area than the area where strong magnetic field was observed. Mass profile of the reflected ions showed existence of reflected alpha particles as expected from the magnetic mirror reflection. However, the energy of the reflected alpha particles was found to be lower than that of the alpha particles in the incident solar wind. In addition, the reflected protons also had lower energy and higher temperature than those of the incident solar wind protons. It clearly indicates the existence of a non-adiabatic interaction between solar wind ions and lunar magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Saito, Y.; Nishino, M. N.; Yamamoto, T.; Uemura, K.; Yokota, S.; Asamura, K.; Tsunakawa, H.; Kaguya Map Team</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">178</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/91090"> <span id="translatedtitle">Brain <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in velo-cardio-facial syndrome</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in 11 consecutively referred patients with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCF) showed <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in nine cases including small vermis, cysts adjacent to the frontal horns, and small posterior fossa. Focal signal hyperintensities in the white matter on long TR images were also noted. The nine patients showed a variety of behavioral abnormalities including mild development delay, learning disabilities, and characteristic personality traits typical of this common multiple <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> syndrome which has been related to a microdeletion at 22q11. Analysis of the behavorial findings showed no specific pattern related to the brain <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and the patients with VCF who did not have detectable brain lesions also had behavioral abnormalities consistent with VCF. The significance of the lesions is not yet known, but the high prevalence of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in this sample <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that structural brain abnormalities are probably common in VCF. 25 refs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mitnick, R.J.; Bello, J.A.; Shprintzen, R.J. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-06-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">179</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.T33B2391D"> <span id="translatedtitle">New magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map in East Asia</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Magnetic data provides basic information for geologic and geophysical interpretation. From 2004 to 2010 we have collected 57 magnetic cruises by using different research vessels. In this study we attempt to compile the newly collected and existing magnetic data including land, marine and aeromagnetic data in East Asia area, which can provide us a general overview of the tectonic framework of the study area. Based on newly compiled map, several magnetic features can be identified in the new magnetic map. (1) The NE-SW trending high positive magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> zone presenting in southwest Taiwan is still apparently. (2) A sharp boundary, named Zhongnan Fault, separates South China Sea into east and southwest sub-basin. The magnetic patterns in the southwest sub-basin differ from in east, not only in amplitude, but also in the trending of the spreading. (3) Between Gagua ridge and Luzon-Okinawa Fracture Zone, the magnetic lineations reveals NW-SE direction. This indicates that the spreading direction was NE-SW in this area. (4) Strong positive magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over the Taiwan-Sinzi, Yushan, Yandang, and Zhemin Ridges <span class="hlt">suggest</span> the existence of remnant volcanic arcs. High positive magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> located beneath Ryukyu arc and Ryukyu Trench implies a high magnetized material of the subducted Philippine Sea Plate.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Doo, W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">180</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23579825"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in GLDAS-1996 dataset.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) data are widely used for land-surface flux simulations. Therefore, the simulation accuracy using GLDAS dataset is largely contingent upon the accuracy of the GLDAS dataset. It is found that GLDAS land-surface model simulated runoff exhibits strong <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for 1996. These <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are investigated by evaluating four GLDAS meteorological forcing data (precipitation, air temperature, downward shortwave radiation and downward longwave radiation) in six large basins across the world (Danube, Mississippi, Yangtze, Congo, Amazon and Murray-Darling basins). Precipitation data from the Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) are also compared with GLDAS forcing precipitation data. Large errors and lack of monthly variability in GLDAS-1996 precipitation data are the main sources for the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the simulated runoff. The impact of the precipitation data on simulated runoff for 1996 is investigated with the Community Atmosphere Biosphere Land Exchange (CABLE) land-surface model in the Yangtze basin, for which area high-quality local precipitation data are obtained from the China Meteorological Administration (CMA). The CABLE model is driven by GLDAS daily precipitation data and CMA daily precipitation, respectively. The simulated daily and monthly runoffs obtained from CMA data are noticeably better than those obtained from GLDAS data, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that GLDAS-1996 precipitation data are not so reliable for land-surface flux simulations. PMID:23579825</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhou, Xinyao; Zhang, Yongqiang; Yang, Yonghui; Yang, Yanmin; Han, Shumin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return 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title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">181</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013Tectp.585..172G"> <span id="translatedtitle">New continental margin magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of East Antarctica</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Over the past decade, Australian, Norwegian and Russian marine surveys have collected integrated seismic, gravity and magnetic data in the southern Indian Ocean. The more than 350,000 line-km of new airborne and marine magnetic observations for the East Antarctic continental margin have been compiled into an improved definition of crustal magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> patterns. This compilation provides important new constraints on the breakup processes and igneous activity related to the formation of the passive margin of East Antarctica. The eastern sector of the map from Bruce Rise in the west to the D'Urville Sea in the east is largely dominated by seafloor spreading magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The 'Adélie Rift Block' of highly stretched and extensively faulted continental crust is associated with a smooth <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> fabric. Abrupt magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> changes along the oceanic-continent transition in the Cooperation Sea including the Enderby Basin <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> extend for more than 1680 km from the Kerguelen Plateau towards the Cosmonaut Sea. Three sectors of the East Antarctic continental margin exhibit pronounced disparities in the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> patterns that strongly <span class="hlt">suggest</span> different modes of seafloor formation. Strong positive seafloor magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> mark the southern margin of the Kerguelen Plateau, the Maud Rise and adjacent areas in the Riiser-Larsen Sea. The new compilation <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that at least 300 km of the Enderby Basin and Shackleton Basin may be part of the Cretaceous Kerguelen Volcanic Province and possibly maps an abandoned 'fossil' spreading center in the central Enderby Basin. The majority of the published age models for the Enderby Basin and "Australian sector" of the East Antarctic margin are not in agreement with the structural grain of magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the newly compiled map.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Golynsky, A. V.; Ivanov, S. V.; Kazankov, A. Ju.; Jokat, W.; Masolov, V. N.; von Frese, R. R. B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">182</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002PhRvE..66c1509W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Phase behavior and thermodynamic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of core-softened fluids</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report extensive simulation studies of phase behavior in single component systems of particles interacting via a core-softened interparticle <span class="hlt">potential</span>. Two recently proposed examples of such <span class="hlt">potentials</span> are considered; one in which the hard core exhibits a shoulder [Sadr-Lahijany et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 4895 (1998)], and the other in which the softening takes the form of a linear ramp [Jagla, Phys. Rev. E 63, 061501 (2001)]. Using a combination of state-of-the-art Monte Carlo methods, we obtain the gas, liquid, and solid phase behavior of the shoulder model in two dimensions. We then focus on the thermodynamic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the liquid phase, namely, maxima in the density and compressibility as a function of temperature. Analysis of the finite-size behavior of these maxima <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that, rather than stemming from a metastable liquid-liquid critical point, as previously supposed, they are actually induced by the quasicontinuous nature of the two dimensional freezing transition. For the ramp model in three dimensions, we confirm the existence of a stable liquid-liquid (``second'') critical point occurring at higher pressure and lower temperature than the liquid-gas critical point. Both these critical points and portions of their associated coexistence curves are located to high precision. In contrast to the shoulder model, the observed thermodynamic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of this model are found to be authentic, i.e., they are not engendered by an incipient new phase. We trace the locus of density and compressibility maxima, the former of which appears to terminate close to the second critical point.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wilding, Nigel B.; Magee, James E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">183</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001AGUSM..GP32A04L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Icelandic Thermal Modeling Constrained by Satellite Geopotential Field <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Free-air gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> derived from near-surface and satellite observations were spectrally correlated with the gravity effects of the terrain for a crustal thickness model of Iceland and the Greenland-Scotland Ridge. The heatflow effects of the Iceland plume and the Mid-Atlantic Ridge were modeled by the effects of an infinite vertical cylinder and vertical sheet, respectively. A conservative estimate of 100 mW/m2 was inferred for the mid-ocean ridge, while heatflow exceeding 150 mWm2 was assumed entering the lower crust of Iceland over the plume center. These effects were superposed on the steady state temperature field crustal slab that was augmented by the higher order effects of the crustal surface topography and Moho relief. The thermal effects for the Moho and the topographiy, as well as the idealized bodies beneath the crustal slab, were estimated by <span class="hlt">potential</span> theory using Poisson's relationship for correlative <span class="hlt">potentials</span>. The modeled isotherms demonstrate complex thermal structure across Iceland and the larger Greenland-Scotland Ridge that help explain descrepant predictions for partial melt in the crust. For example, the modeled 1200oC basalt solidus occurs at 20-23 km beneath northern Iceland and southwest Iceland that is compatible with the cooler crust that has been predicted from the seismic soundings in these areas. Thermal conditions above the plume core near the Vatnajökull area, however, <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a raised 1200oC isotherm approaching 14 km depth that is more compatible with geophysical inferences for the presence of partial melt at shallow depths beneath central Iceland. The thermal modeling also predicts a magnetically viscous region of the lower crust that may help account for the the prominent regionally positive magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> over Iceland that has been observed by the Magsat and Ørsted satellite missions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Leftwich, T. E.; von Frese, R. R.; Kim, H. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">184</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21486862"> <span id="translatedtitle">FOLD LENS FLUX <span class="hlt">ANOMALIES</span>: A GEOMETRIC APPROACH</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We develop a new approach for studying flux <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in quadruply imaged fold lens systems. We show that in the absence of substructure, microlensing, or differential absorption, the expected flux ratios of a fold pair can be tightly constrained using only geometric arguments. We apply this technique to 11 known quadruple lens systems in the radio and infrared and compare our estimates to the Monte Carlo based results of Keeton et al. We show that a robust estimate for a flux ratio from a smoothly varying <span class="hlt">potential</span> can be found, and at long wavelengths those lenses deviating from this ratio almost certainly contain significant substructure.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Goldberg, David M.; Chessey, Mary K.; Harris, Wendy B.; Richards, Gordon T., E-mail: goldberg@drexel.ed [Department of Physics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">185</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/861207"> <span id="translatedtitle">A New Methodology for Early <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection of BWR Instabilities</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The objective of the performed research is to develop an early <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection methodology so as to enhance safety, availability, and operational flexibility of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) nuclear power plants. The technical approach relies on suppression of <span class="hlt">potential</span> power oscillations in BWRs by detecting small <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at an early stage and taking appropriate prognostic actions based on an anticipated operation schedule. The research utilizes a model of coupled (two-phase) thermal-hydraulic and neutron flux dynamics, which is used as a generator of time series data for <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection at an early stage. The model captures critical nonlinear features of coupled thermal-hydraulic and nuclear reactor dynamics and (slow time-scale) evolution of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> as non-stationary parameters. The time series data derived from this nonlinear non-stationary model serves as the source of information for generating the symbolic dynamics for characterization of model parameter changes that quantitatively represent small <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The major focus of the presented research activity was on developing and qualifying algorithms of pattern recognition for power instability based on <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection from time series data, which later can be used to formulate real-time decision and control algorithms for suppression of power oscillations for a variety of anticipated operating conditions. The research being performed in the framework of this project is essential to make significant improvement in the capability of thermal instability analyses for enhancing safety, availability, and operational flexibility of currently operating and next generation BWRs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ivanov, K. N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-11-27</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">186</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19383541"> <span id="translatedtitle">In vitro and in vivo reproduction toxicology of 12 monoaminergic reuptake inhibitors: possible mechanisms of infrequent cardiovascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The rat Whole Embryo Culture (WEC) has been used to predict the <span class="hlt">potential</span> teratogenicity of 12 selective/mixed monoaminergic reuptake inhibitors (MRUI). WEC results were compared with in vivo animal and human epidemiological teratogenicity data. In vitro, paroxetine and the positive control retinol were the only compounds identified as a clear teratogen, but developmental morphological indicators <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> of a teratogenic <span class="hlt">potential</span> were observed for most other MRUIs, including fluoxetine, citalopram and venlafaxine. No clear evidence of teratogenic <span class="hlt">potential</span> was observed for three compounds, however, all compounds assessed showed a dose-dependent general embryotoxicity. In vivo testing of nine MRUIs for teratogenicity was limited by maternal toxicity (e.g. anorexia) without showing overt embryotoxicity (e.g. implantation loss). Next to complete absence, the cardiovascular (CV) <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> observed (mostly) in rabbits ranged from a low incidence (e.g. above historical background of 0.35%) to a clear incidence (mean 4.1%). It is <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that observed specific malformations in vitro (e.g. branchial bars deformed, displaced or additional otic system), not noted in any (historical) controls, may be early ontogenetic indicators for infrequent CV-<span class="hlt">anomalies</span> observed in vivo. Despite the low incidence of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in vitro or in vivo, they may yet be clinically relevant as in the case of paroxetine. Possible mechanisms are discussed, e.g. perturbed neural crest cell migration. PMID:19383541</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sloot, Willem N; Bowden, H Clare; Yih, Tjong D</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-04-19</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">187</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21250855"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> freedom in perturbative loop quantum gravity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A fully consistent linear perturbation theory for cosmology is derived in the presence of quantum corrections as they are <span class="hlt">suggested</span> by properties of inverse volume operators in loop quantum gravity. The underlying constraints present a consistent deformation of the classical system, which shows that the discreteness in loop quantum gravity can be implemented in effective equations without spoiling space-time covariance. Nevertheless, nontrivial quantum corrections do arise in the constraint algebra. Since correction terms must appear in tightly controlled forms to avoid <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, detailed insights for the correct implementation of constraint operators can be gained. The procedures of this article thus provide a clear link between fundamental quantum gravity and phenomenology.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bojowald, Martin; Hossain, Golam Mortuza; Kagan, Mikhail; Shankaranarayanan, S. [Institute for Gravitational Physics and Geometry, Pennsylvania State University, 104 Davey Lab, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Institute for Gravitational Physics and Geometry, Pennsylvania State University, 104 Davey Lab, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States) and Department of Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, Abington, Pennsylvania 19001 (United States); Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Mercantile House, Portsmouth P01 2EG (United Kingdom)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-09-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">188</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23615613"> <span id="translatedtitle">Long-term sedimentary recycling of rare sulphur isotope <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The accumulation of substantial quantities of O2 in the atmosphere has come to control the chemistry and ecological structure of Earth's surface. Non-mass-dependent (NMD) sulphur isotope <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the rock record are the central tool used to reconstruct the redox history of the early atmosphere. The generation and initial delivery of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to marine sediments requires low partial pressures of atmospheric O2 (p(O2); refs 2, 3), and the disappearance of NMD <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from the rock record 2.32 billion years ago is thought to have signalled a departure from persistently low atmospheric oxygen levels (less than about 10(-5) times the present atmospheric level) during approximately the first two billion years of Earth's history. Here we present a model study designed to describe the long-term surface recycling of crustal NMD <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and show that the record of this geochemical signal is likely to display a 'crustal memory effect' following increases in atmospheric p(O2) above this threshold. Once NMD <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> have been buried in the upper crust they are extremely resistant to removal, and can be erased only through successive cycles of weathering, dilution and burial on an oxygenated Earth surface. This recycling results in the residual incorporation of NMD <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> into the sedimentary record long after synchronous atmospheric generation of the isotopic signal has ceased, with dynamic and measurable signals probably surviving for as long as 10-100 million years subsequent to an increase in atmospheric p(O2) to more than 10(-5) times the present atmospheric level. Our results can reconcile geochemical evidence for oxygen production and transient accumulation with the maintenance of NMD <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on the early Earth, and <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that future work should investigate the notion that temporally continuous generation of new NMD sulphur isotope <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the atmosphere was likely to have ceased long before their ultimate disappearance from the rock record. PMID:23615613</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Reinhard, Christopher T; Planavsky, Noah J; Lyons, Timothy W</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-24</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">189</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1046548"> <span id="translatedtitle">Graph <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in cyber communications</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Enterprises monitor cyber traffic for viruses, intruders and stolen information. Detection methods look for known signatures of malicious traffic or search for <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with respect to a nominal reference model. Traditional <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection focuses on aggregate traffic at central nodes or on user-level monitoring. More recently, however, traffic is being viewed more holistically as a dynamic communication graph. Attention to the graph nature of the traffic has expanded the types of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that are being sought. We give an overview of several cyber data streams collected at Los Alamos National Laboratory and discuss current work in modeling the graph dynamics of traffic over the network. We consider global properties and local properties within the communication graph. A method for monitoring relative entropy on multiple correlated properties is discussed in detail.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vander Wiel, Scott A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Storlie, Curtis B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandine, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hagberg, Aric A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fisk, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">190</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7210447"> <span id="translatedtitle">Congenital cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in calves.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Seven cases of congenital cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in calves were reviewed from the files of the Ohio Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory. The collection of material occurred during a six-month period from June 1977 to January 1978. The major clinical signs were dyspnoea, failure to gain weight and sudden death in young animals. The cardiac defects included two patent ductus arteriosus, two <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the coronary vessels, one persistent truncus arteriosus, one transposition of the aorta and pulmonary artery and one ventricular septal defect. PMID:7210447</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sandusky, G E; Smith, C W</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-02-21</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">191</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6281798"> <span id="translatedtitle">Two-hit model for sporadic congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in mice with the disorganization mutation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> have complex etiologies involving both genetic and nongenetic components. Many are sporadic, without obvious evidence for heritability. An important model for these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is a mutation in laboratory mice that is called [open quotes]disorganization[close quotes] (Ds), which functions as a variable autosomal dominant and leads to a wide variety of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> involving many developmental processes and systems. Variable expressivity, asymmetrical manifestations, and low penetrance <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that somatic events determine the location and nature of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. A statistical analysis <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that occurrence of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in mice with the Ds mutation follows a Poisson distribution. These results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in mice with the Ds mutation occur independently of each other. The authors propose that Ds causes a heritable predisposition to congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and that Ds and appropriate somatic events combine to compromise normal development. They also propose that some sporadic, nonheritable congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> involve somatic mutations at Ds-like loci. Ds may therefore serve not only as a model for developmental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in cell fate and pattern formation but also for complex developmental traits showing variable expressivity, low penetrance, and sporadic occurrence in mice and humans. 58 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Crosby, J.L. (Jackson Lab., Bar Harbor, ME (United States) Univ. of Maine, Orono (United States) Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States)); Varnum, D.S.; Nadeau, J.H. (Jackson Lab., Bar Harbor, ME (United States))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">192</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2784935"> <span id="translatedtitle">Congenital cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in relation to water contamination, Santa Clara County, California, 1981-1983.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In November 1981, a leak of solvents from an underground storage tank was detected at an electronics manufacturing plant in Santa Clara County, California. Solvents (predominantly 1,1,1-trichloroethene, or methyl chloroform) were found in a nearby well which supplied drinking water to the surrounding community. Residents were concerned about a possible relation between adverse reproductive outcomes and consumption of contaminated water. To address this concern, the California Department of Health Services conducted two epidemiologic studies: one of these, reported here, is a county-wide study of cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. This study, which looked at major cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> among births throughout Santa Clara County in 1981-1983, found an increased prevalence in the service area of the water company which operated the contaminated well. During the <span class="hlt">potentially</span> exposed time period (January 1981 through August 1982), 12 babies with major cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were born to residents of this area. This represents an excess of six cases over the number expected based on the prevalence in the remainder of the county (relative risk = 2.2, 95 per cent confidence interval 1.2-4.0). No excess was observed in the unexposed time period (September 1982 through December 1983). However, the temporal distribution of major cardiac cases born during the exposed time period <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the solvent leak is an unlikely explanation for this excess. PMID:2784935</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Swan, S H; Shaw, G; Harris, J A; Neutra, R R</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">193</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008E%26PSL.274..103T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Multiple Ir <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in uppermost Triassic to Jurassic-age strata of the Blomidon Formation, Fundy basin, eastern Canada</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A detailed profile of Ir concentrations in continental strata of the Blomidon Formation ostensibly spanning the Triassic-Jurassic boundary confirms the existence of multiple <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, with a peak Ir concentration of 450 pg/g. The total amount of Ir deposited exceeds 4 ng/cm 2, a value that requires an external source other than typical terrestrial sediment. Of the 10 other elements measure, only Zn and organic carbon are correlated to Ir. The organic carbon appears to be concentrated in mm-thick kerogenous laminae in greenish-grey to dark grey sediment layers that also host the Ir <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The stratigraphic distribution of Ir and probably Zn appears to be controlled largely by redox boundaries conditions, with Ir probably forming organo-metallic complexes. We find no specific geochemical or sedimentological evidence for an extraterrestrial source for this enrichment, although we cannot exclude an impact origin. However, the close spatial and temporal relationship of the Ir <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the Fundy and Newark basins to the basalts of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province <span class="hlt">suggests</span> alternative working hypotheses. <span class="hlt">Potentially</span>, the volcanic rocks sourced the Ir through post-eruptive fluid mobilization into the surrounding sediments. Conversely, mantle outgassing and aerosol deposition during early stages of the eruptions may have been the source for the Ir <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. At this time, the data are insufficient to eliminate any of these hypotheses conclusively.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tanner, Lawrence H.; Kyte, Frank T.; Walker, Ann E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">194</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/59266118"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pharmacotherapy for Smoking Cessation: Unvalidated Assumptions, <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>, and <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for Future Research</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This article questions several assumptions about the rationale for pharmacological therapies for smoking cessation, including whether (a) future smokers will be those more dependent on nicotine and thus in greater need of nicotine replacement of other pharmacotherapy, (b) transdermal nicotine and nicotine gum work by reducing withdrawal symptoms, and (c) clonidine works by decreasing sympathetic arousal. After describing currently available</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">John R. Hughes</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">195</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18422384"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quantum tunneling and trace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We compute the corrections, using the tunneling formalism based on a quantum WKB approach, to the Hawking temperature and Bekenstein–Hawking entropy for the Schwarzschild black hole. The results are related to the trace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and are shown to be equivalent to findings inferred from Hawking's original calculation based on path integrals using zeta function regularization. Finally, exploiting the corrected temperature</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rabin Banerjee; Bibhas Ranjan Majhi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">196</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/30523984"> <span id="translatedtitle">Möbius Syndrome with Poland's <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A five-year-old boy with Möbius syndrome, Poland's <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, and dextrocardia is described. These malformations have not been previously reported. The propositus had ipsilateral absence of the sternal portion of the pectoralis major muscle associated with acromicria, syndactyly, brachydactyly of the index, middle, ring, and fifth finger, as well as radiological evidence of hypoplasia of the index middle and ring fingers,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gerald I. Sugarman; Herbert H. Stark</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1973-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">197</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=233766"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coral can have growth <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Coral growth <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (GAs) are changes in the coral cells that deposit the calcium carbonate skeleton. They usually appear as raised areas of the skeleton and tissue that are different from the surrounding normal areas on the same colony. The features include abnormal shape a...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">198</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/1676676"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> detection from hyperspectral imagery</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We develop <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detectors, i.e., detectors that do not presuppose a signature model of one or more dimensions, for three clutter models: the local normal model, the global normal mixture model, and the global linear mixture model. The local normal model treats the neighborhood of a pixel as having a normal probability distribution. The normal mixture model considers the observation</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. W. J. Stein; S. G. Beaven; L. E. Hoff; E. M. Winter; A. P. Schaum; A. D. Stocker</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">199</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013SPIE.8871E..0CC"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>-specified virtual dimensionality</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Virtual dimensionality (VD) has received considerable interest where VD is used to estimate the number of spectral distinct signatures, denoted by p. Unfortunately, no specific definition is provided by VD for what a spectrally distinct signature is. As a result, various types of spectral distinct signatures determine different values of VD. There is no one value-fit-all for VD. In order to address this issue this paper presents a new concept, referred to as <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-specified VD (AS-VD) which determines the number of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of interest present in the data. Specifically, two types of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection algorithms are of particular interest, sample covariance matrix K-based <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detector developed by Reed and Yu, referred to as K-RXD and sample correlation matrix R-based RXD, referred to as R-RXD. Since K-RXD is only determined by 2nd order statistics compared to R-RXD which is specified by statistics of the first two orders including sample mean as the first order statistics, the values determined by K-RXD and R-RXD will be different. Experiments are conducted in comparison with widely used eigen-based approaches.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chen, Shih-Yu; Paylor, Drew; Chang, Chein-I.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">200</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.scientificexploration.org/journal/jse_02_2_richards.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Archaeological <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in the Bahamas</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Controversial claims have been made for the presence of anom- alous underwater archaeological sites in the Bahamas by a number of in- vestigators. The proponents emphasize extraordinary explanations for the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and tend to bypass the scientific journals in favor of popular presentations with little scientific rigor. The skeptics debunk selected claims for some of the sites, do not adequately</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">DOUGLAS G. RICHARDS</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">201</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1024777"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pregnancy outcome and Ebstein's <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">BACKGROUND--Ebstein's <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is an uncommon congenital cardiac abnormality that may be associated with cyanosis and arrhythmias. For those female patients with the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> who survive to adult life there is little information available about pregnancy, maternal complications, and fetal outcome. This study was designed to address this issue so that these patients can receive appropriate advice and management. METHODS AND RESULTS--Forty two pregnancies in 12 women with Ebstein's <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> were studied. The mothers' cardiac lesions were assessed on the basis of symptoms, the presence of cyanosis or arrhythmia, and by echocardiographic grading of severity. In the absence of important maternal cyanosis or arrhythmia, pregnancy was well tolerated. Neonatal outcome was good though there was an increased risk of prematurity and dysmaturity in the babies born to mothers with cyanosis. CONCLUSIONS--This study indicates that women with Ebstein's <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> who reach child-bearing age can be advised that pregnancy is likely to be well tolerated with good fetal outcome. Maternal arrhythmia or cyanosis are indications for closer maternal and fetal observation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Donnelly, J E; Brown, J M; Radford, D J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">202</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.econ.cudenver.edu/beckman/tiffany/camerer%20thaler%20jep%201995%20bargaining.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>: Ultimatums, Dictators and Manners</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Economics can be distinguished from other social sciences by the belief that most (all?) behavior can be explained by assuming that agents have stable, well-defined preferences and make rational choices consistent with those pref- erences in markets that (eventually) clear. An empirical result qualifies as an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> if it is difficult to \\</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Colin Camerer; Richard H. Thaler</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">203</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://www.afajof.org/pdfs/2004program/UPDF/P564_Asset_Pricing.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Accounting <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> and Information Uncertainty</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We examine whether rational investor responses to information uncertainty explain properties of and returns to accounting-based trading <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. We proxy for information uncertainty with two measures of earnings quality: the standard deviation of the residuals from a Dechow and Dichev (2002) model relating accruals to cash flows, and the absolute value of performance-adjusted abnormal accruals from a modified Jones (1991)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jennifer Francis; Ryan LaFond; Per Olsson; Katherine Schipper</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">204</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/124258"> <span id="translatedtitle">Machine learning techniques for the computer security domain of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this dissertation, we examine the machine learning issues raised by the domain of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection for computer security. The <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection task is to recognize the presence of an unusual and <span class="hlt">potentially</span> hazardous state within the activities of a computer user, system, or network. “Unusual” is defined with respect to some model of “normal” behavior which may be either</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">205</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56227112"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ellipsoidal corrections for geoid undulation computations using gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in a cap</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ellipsoidal correction terms have been derived for geoid undulation computations when the Stokes equation using gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in a cap is combined with <span class="hlt">potential</span> coefficient information. The correction terms are long wavelength and depend on the cap size in which its gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are given. Using the regular Stokes equation, the maximum correction for a cap size of 20 deg</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. H. Rapp</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">206</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE83901189"> <span id="translatedtitle">Model for Explaining the Geothermal <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> of the Rhine Graben by Deep-Strata Water Flow and Its Tectonic Preconditions and Consequences.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that the geothermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the Rhine graben have been caused by hydrothermal convection. Mathematical modelling yields a good agreement between the calculated and the measured temperature. The age of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may be at least 80,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">B. Hoffers</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">207</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26626963"> <span id="translatedtitle">Thermodynamics of sublimation of cubane: natural <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> or experimental error?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">An analysis of the available experimental values of the enthalpy of sublimation of monocyclic, bicyclic, and ‘cage’ hydrocarbons is performed. Based on the results of this analysis, the value of the enthalpy of sublimation for cubane is found to be anomalous in the series of structurally related hydrocarbons. The <span class="hlt">potential</span> cause of this <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, as well as its impact on</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vladimir V Diky; Michael Frenkel; Larisa S Karpushenkava</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">208</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005CRPhy...6..251M"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>, Gauss laws, and Page charges in M-theory</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We review the E model of the M-theory 3-form, and its applications to <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> cancellation, Gauss laws, quantization of Page charge, and the 5-brane partition function. We discuss the <span class="hlt">potentially</span> problematic behavior of the model under parity. To cite this article: G.W. Moore, C. R. Physique 6 (2005).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Moore, Gregory W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">209</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11905251"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bilio-pancreatic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> obscured with MRCP.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this article the authors discuss whether or not diagnostic <span class="hlt">potential</span> of MR cholangiopancreatography is strong enough to replace direct cholangiography in all cases. The pre-surgery analysis of a variety of pancreato-biliary disorders diagnosed using MRCP images is presented with the emphasising the importance of source images. Six cases of pancreato-biliary disorders are presented in which MRCP indicated the place of ductal stenosis as well as the morphologic variants or ductal uninspected shape which is critical for surgery or planned drainage. Coronal and axial MRCP source and MIP images were obtained with 0.5 T Gyroscan NT. <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> of the biliary or pancreatic ducts included two cases of choledochal cystic dilatation; two cases of aberrant biliary ducts, one case of gallbladder duct variant and a case of an additional pancreatic duct. In 3 out of 6 cases, the MRCP source images produced using the complementary method supplied more complete information concerning ductal junctions than the MIP images. Whereas in 3 out of 6 cases, both kinds of images were equally reliable. In 4 out of 6 cases, endoscopy was performed, and in 2 cases ERCP images were not diagnostic for ductal anatomy. However, full delineation of biliary and pancreatic ducts was complete in all MRCP images. MRCP within source images and maximum intensity projections show particular promise for the assessment of pancreato-biliary <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in order to reduce the number of higher-risk endoscopic interventions. The technique should be the method of choice in cases of suspected pancreato-biliary <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> resulting from any imaging modality and is helpful for planning the optimal drainage method. In the long run this practice would reduce the number of ducts damaged during surgery. PMID:11905251</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bobek-Billewicz, Barbara; Gorycki, Tomasz; Studniarek, Micha?; Szurowska, Edyta</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">210</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21293372"> <span id="translatedtitle">Field Theory Model of the Flyby <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Precision tracking of spacecraft on interplanetary missions has turned up several anomalous deviations from predictions of general relativity. The Flyby <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>, wherein spacecraft gain or lose energy in an earth-centric frame after an encounter with earth, is clearly associated with the rotation of the earth. The possibility that the missing ingredient is a new type of <span class="hlt">potential</span> field surrounding the earth is assessed in this write-up. A scalar field with the kinetic energy distribution of the earth as a source is evaluated numerically, with an amplitude parameter adjusted to match the data of Anderson et al.(2008). The new field can be interpreted as a coupling between kinetic energies of objects, a field analogous to fluid mechanics, or a field coupled to acceleration. The <span class="hlt">potential</span> field violates various aspects of standard physics, such as energy non-conservation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lewis, R. A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-03-16</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">211</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE91601161"> <span id="translatedtitle">Threshold <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in doublet nd-scattering.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The doublet nd-scattering amplitude behaviour near the three-particle threshold is studied analytically and numerically. The scattering amplitude possesses an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> caused by the small energy of singlet deuteron virtual level. The <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> manifests itse...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. V. Shapoval I. V. Simenog</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">212</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/29553079"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">ANOMALIES</span> OF THE FLEXOR DIGITORUM SUPERFICIALIS MUSCLE</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Three <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the human flexor digitorum superficialis are presented. The normal development of this muscle from the amphibian to the human is discussed and the described <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the muscle in humans classified.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D ELLIOT; A. R KHANDWALA; M KULKARNI</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">213</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/24729064"> <span id="translatedtitle">In utero sonography of genitourinary <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the genitourinary system represent the commonest fetal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The sonographic findings in hydronephrosis,\\u000a multicystic kidney (dysplastic kidney) polycystic kidney, and renal agenesis are reviewed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. C. Sanders</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">214</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23515395"> <span id="translatedtitle">Neural mechanisms of rapid sensitivity to syntactic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent psycholinguistic models hypothesize that anticipatory processing can speed the response to linguistic input during language comprehension by pre-activating representations necessary for word recognition. We investigated the neurocognitive mechanisms of anticipatory processing by recording event-related <span class="hlt">potentials</span> (ERPs) to syntactically anomalous (The thief was caught by for police) and well-formed (e.g., The thief was caught by the police) sentences. One group of participants saw <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> elicited by the same word in every instance (e.g., for; low-variability stimuli), providing high affordances for predictions about the word-form appearing in the critical position. A second group saw <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> elicited by seven different prepositions (at, of, on, for, from, over, with; high-variability stimuli) across the study, creating a more difficult prediction task. Syntactic category <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> enhanced the occipital-temporal N170 component of the ERP, indicating rapid sensitivity - within 200?ms of word-onset - to syntactic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. For low-variability but not the high-variability stimuli, syntactic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> also enhanced the earlier occipital-temporal P1 component, around 130?ms after word-onset, indicating that affordances for prediction engendered earlier sensitivity to syntactic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Independent components analysis revealed three sources within the ERP signal whose functional dynamics were consistent with predictive processing and early responses to syntactic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Distributed neural source modeling (sLORETA) of these early active sources produced a candidate network for early responses to words during reading in the right posterior occipital, left occipital-temporal, and medial parietal cortex. PMID:23515395</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kim, Albert E; Gilley, Phillip M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-18</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">215</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMIN11C1312V"> <span id="translatedtitle">Applications of TOPS <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection Framework to Amazon Drought Analysis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Terrestrial Observation and Prediction System (TOPS) is a flexible modeling software system that integrates ecosystem models with frequent satellite and surface weather observations to produce ecosystem nowcasts (assessments of current conditions) and forecasts useful in natural resources management, public health and disaster management. We have been extending the Terrestrial Observation and Prediction System (TOPS) to include capability for automated <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection and analysis of both on-line (streaming) and off-line data. While there are large numbers of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection algorithms for multivariate datasets, we are extending this capability beyond the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection itself and towards an automated analysis that would discover the possible causes of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. In order to best capture the knowledge about data hierarchies, Earth science models and implied dependencies between <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and occurrences of observable events such as urbanization, deforestation, or fires, we have developed an ontology to serve as a knowledge base. The knowledge is captured using OWL ontology language, where connections are defined in a schema that is later extended by including specific instances of datasets and models. We have integrated this knowledge base with a framework for deploying an ensemble of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection algorithms on large volumes of Earth science datasets and applied it to specific scientific applications that support research conducted by our group. In one early application, we were able to process large number of MODIS, TRMM, CERES data along with ground-based weather and river flow observations to detect the evolution of 2010 drought in the Amazon, identify the affected area, and publish the results in three weeks. A similar analysis of the 2005 drought using the same data sets took nearly 2 years, highlighting the <span class="hlt">potential</span> contribution of our <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> framework in accelerating scientific discoveries.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Votava, P.; Nemani, R. R.; Ganguly, S.; Michaelis, A.; Hashimoto, H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">216</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.earth.ox.ac.uk/~tony/watts/downloads/Wyer_Watts_2006.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and segmentation at the East Coast, USA continental margin</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The free-air gravity `edge effect' <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> at rifted continental margins has generally been attributed to the transition between thick continental and thin oceanic crust. While crustal thinning is a major contributor, recent studies <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that sediment loading and magmatism may significantly modify the edge effect <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and cause it, at some margins, to be highly segmented along their strike. In</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. Wyer; A. B. Watts</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">217</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52717143"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Indian Ocean MAGSAT <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and strong geomagnetic field during Cretaceous `quiet' zone</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The palaeomagnetic palaeointensities, natural remanent magnetic intensities of ocean-floor basalts and MAGSAT <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over the central Pacific and North Atlantic oceans <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the geomagnetic field was appreciably stronger during the ~ 35 Ma long Cretaceous `quiet' zone of fixed normal polarity. It is shown here that two MAGSAT <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over this `quiet' zone in the central and eastern Indian</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Poorna C. Pal</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">218</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011GeoJI.187...85S"> <span id="translatedtitle">The North German Conductivity <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> revisited</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The North German Conductivity <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> was detected already in the early years of electromagnetic deep sounding. It refers to the reversal of induction arrows (as a graphical representation of the tipper transfer function, the ratio of vertical to horizontal magnetic field variations) at the northern and southern margins of the North German Basin. In spite of the many experiments carried out so far, its origin has remained ambiguous; explanations encompass a deep-crustal or even mantle source as well as the simple response to deepening of sedimentary sequences in the centre of the basin. Here, we report on modelling of new long-period magnetotelluric data collected along two profiles in NE Germany and S Sweden, with one transect crossing the Sorgenfrei-Tornquist Zone as the main boundary between Precambrian Baltica and the Palaeozoic belts of central Europe. With the exception of a few sites probably influenced by 3-D salt domes, the data allow a 2-D analysis. Resolution is reduced for large depths due to a well-conducting, saline aquifer, extending across the entire basin. The main result is that the reversal of induction arrows can largely be explained by the resistivity contrast between crystalline basement and sedimentary basin fill. Beneath Rügen island, a southward dipping conductor is interpreted to reflect an alum shale layer in Middle Cambrian-Lower Ordovician sediments. Beneath the southern basin, a moderately conductive upper mantle is modelled (although not very well resolved) which may reflect the thinning of the lithosphere as implied by seismic tomography. As the main anomalously inductive effect is primarily explained by the basin edges and numerous other <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> exist inside the basin, we <span class="hlt">suggest</span> not using the term 'North German Conductivity <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>' any longer.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schäfer, A.; Houpt, L.; Brasse, H.; Hoffmann, N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">219</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUSMGP13A..07N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Band Iron Formations and Satellite Magnetic <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Band Iron Formations (BIF) are mainly Precambrian (2.5-1.8 Ga) sedimentary deposits and are composed of alternating layers of iron rich material and silica (chert). Precambrian BIF mark growth in the level of free oxygen in the atmosphere and the ocean which happened about 2.2 Ga. Distribution of main BIF includes Hamersley Range, Australia; Transvaal-Griquatown, South Africa; Minas Gerais, Brazil; Labrador Trough, Canada, and Kursk-Krivoi Rog (Russia). Together these five very large BIF deposits constitute about 90 percent of Earth's total estimated BIF (5.76*10 14 ). On each continent these ancient rocks usually metamorphosed and crystallized include what are variously described as hematite-quartzites, banded iron formations, banded jaspers or calico-rocks. West African, Hudson Bay and Western Australian Satellite Magnetic <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> coincide with distribution BIF deposits. The Kursk Satellite Magnetic <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> (KMA) (about 22 nT at the altitude=400km, centered at 51o N, 37o E) also was identified by ground and aeromagnetic observations and is recognized as one of the largest magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> on the Earth. Magnetic modeling shows that immense Precambrian iron ore deposits (iron bands) of Voronezh uplift are the main source of KMA. Magnetic properties of 10000 BIF samples outcropped in the KMA area have been measured and analyzed (Krutikhovskaya et al., 1964) Rockmag BIF dataset is presented at: http://core2.gsfc.nasa.gov/MPDB/datasets.html. Mean NRM value is about 42 A/M, Qn about 1.4. Demagnetization tests <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that hard and stable NRM component is caused by hematite occurring in BIF in different forms and grain sizes. Hematite deposits discovered on Mars in western equatorial area with layered topography of Aram Chaos and Sinus Meridiani could be of hydrothermal origin and may be formed similar to hematite precipitated in BIF on Earth.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nazarova, K. A.; Wasilewski, P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">220</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985CMaPh.100...83M"> <span id="translatedtitle">The aetiology of sigma model <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Certain nonlinear sigma models with fermions are ill-defined due to an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> which exhibits characteristics of both the nonabelian gauge theory <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and the SU(2) <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The simplest way to diagnose the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> involves consideration of the global topology of the theory. We review the mathematical methods needed for this analysis and apply them to several supersymmetric sigma models. Some of these are found to be anomalous.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Moore, Gregory; Nelson, Philip</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">221</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/gl/gl0419/2004GL020640/2004GL020640.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, layered intrusions and Mars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Studies of remanence-controlled magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on Earth provide possibilities to interpret the nature of crustal rocks that cause the large remanent <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on Mars. What types of conditions on Earth can create large remanent magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>? Such an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, extending for 20 km centered over a norite layer in the Bjerkreim-Sokndal (BKS) Intrusion, shows a minimum ?13000 nT below background</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. A. McEnroe; J. R. Skilbrei; P. Robinson; F. Heidelbach; F. Langenhorst; L. L. Brown</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">222</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/5065322"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestion</span> Reduces the Stroop Effect</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">ABSTRACT—We examined,the effects of <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>,on Stroop interference,in highly,<span class="hlt">suggestible</span>,individuals. Participantscompleted the Stroop task with and without a <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> to perceive Stroop words,as meaningless,sym- bols. Half the participants were given this <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> in hypnosis, and half were given the <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> without the induction of hypnosis. <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span> produced,a significant reduction in Stroop inhibition, accounting for about 45% of the variance in Stroop responding,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Amir Raz; Irving Kirsch; Jessica Pollard; Yael Nitkin-kaner</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">223</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/15010425"> <span id="translatedtitle">Iridium <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Approximately Synchronous with Terminal Eocene Extinctions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">An iridium <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> has been found in coincidence with the known microtektite level in cores from Deep Sea Drilling Project site 149 in the Caribbean Sea. The iridium was probably not in the microtektites but deposited simultaneously with them; this could occur if the iridium was deposited from a dust cloud resulting from a bolide impact, as <span class="hlt">suggested</span> for the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Walter Alvarez; Frank Asaro; Helen V. Michel; Luis W. Alvarez</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">224</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/651465"> <span id="translatedtitle">Safeguarding SCADA Systems with <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper will show how the accuracy and security of SCADA systems can be improved by using <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection to identify bad values caused by attacks and faults. The performance of invariant induction and n- gram <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-detectors will be compared and this paper will also outline plans for taking this work further by integrating the output from several <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>- detecting</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">John Bigham; David Gamez; Ning Lu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">225</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/50493"> <span id="translatedtitle">A signal analysis of network traffic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Identifying <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> rapidly and accurately is critical to the efficient operation of large computer networks. Accurately characterizing important classes of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> greatly facilitates their identification; however, the subtleties and complexities of anomalous traffic can easily confound this process. In this paper we report results of signal analysis of four classes of network traffic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: outages, flash crowds, attacks and measurement</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paul Barford; Jeffery Kline; David Plonka; Amos Ron</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">226</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2556920"> <span id="translatedtitle">Poland <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in mother and daughter.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report on Poland <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in a mother and her daughter. Further family history was negative for abnormalities of the hands or the pectoralis major muscle. A review of published cases of familial Poland <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is presented. Implications concerning the possible etiology of familial cases of Poland <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> are given. PMID:2556920</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cobben, J M; Robinson, P H; van Essen, A J; van der Wiel, H L; ten Kate, L P</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">227</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3758712"> <span id="translatedtitle">Limb Body Wall Complex: A Rare <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present autopsy findings of a case of limb body wall complex (LBWC). The fetus had encephalocele, genitourinary agenesis, skeletal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and body wall defects. The rare finding in our case is the occurrence of both cranial and urogenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The presence of complex <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in this fetus, supports embryonal dysplasia theory of pathogenesis for LBWC.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chikkannaiah, Panduranga; Dhumale, Hema; Kangle, Ranjit; Shekar, Rosini</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">228</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PCE....36.1318E"> <span id="translatedtitle">Study of magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over archaeological targets in urban environments</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Magnetic prospecting is one of the most widely used methods for investigating archaeological sites in the world. It is often applied before and during various types of industrial development and in agricultural areas. In Israel, most <span class="hlt">potential</span> archaeological targets are located in urban settings, which substantially complicate their geophysical signatures. Noise from natural factors such as the inclined magnetization (about 44°) complex geological structure of the sites, and uneven terrain relief as well as artificial sources such as modern iron-containing objects, power lines and underground communications can confound the interpretation of magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. For the quantitative analysis of magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from ancient targets in Israel nonconventional procedures (Khesin et al., 1996; Eppelbaum and Khesin, 2001) were applied. In this paper the effects of power lines on the quantitative analysis of magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> indicative of archaeological objects are investigated. The method was tested on two typical models of physical-archaeological ancient remains by using different distances to the power line.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eppelbaum, Lev V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">229</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21432951"> <span id="translatedtitle">Deep correlation between cosmic-ray <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and neutrino masses</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The positron <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> recently reported by the cosmic-ray measurements <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that, if explained by the decay of dark matter particle, the decay source is closely linked with the leptonic sector of the standard model. It is observed that, with a simple dimensional analysis, the lifetime of dark matter for the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is expressed by the energy scale of neutrino masses. We present two scenarios in which these two matters at issue (the dark matter width and the tiny neutrino masses) stem from a single operator involving a gauge-singlet scalar field.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Matsumoto, Shigeki [Department of Physics, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Yoshioka, Koichi [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">230</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1081686"> <span id="translatedtitle">Automatic Construction of <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detectors from Graphical Models</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Detection of rare or previously unseen attacks in cyber security presents a central challenge: how does one search for a sufficiently wide variety of types of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and yet allow the process to scale to increasingly complex data? In particular, creating each <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detector manually and training each one separately presents untenable strains on both human and computer resources. In this paper we propose a systematic method for constructing a <span class="hlt">potentially</span> very large number of complementary <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detectors from a single probabilistic model of the data. Only one model needs to be trained, but numerous detectors can then be implemented. This approach promises to scale better than manual methods to the complex heterogeneity of real-life data. As an example, we develop a Latent Dirichlet Allocation probability model of TCP connections entering Oak Ridge National Laboratory. We show that several detectors can be automatically constructed from the model and will provide <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection at flow, sub-flow, and host (both server and client) levels. This demonstrates how the fundamental connection between <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection and probabilistic modeling can be exploited to develop more robust operational solutions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ferragut, Erik M [ORNL; Darmon, David M [ORNL; Shue, Craig A [ORNL; Kelley, Stephen [ORNL</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">231</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/445629"> <span id="translatedtitle">Correlation of cerium <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with indicators of paleoenvironment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Among 21 whole-rock samples of the Upper Cretaceous Niobrara Formation from Colorado, the abundance of cerium relative to other rate earth elements (Ce <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>), the weight percent organic carbon (%C{sub org}), and the intensity of bioturbation all covary. This covariation is provocative because %C{sub org} and intensity of bioturbation track changes in the concentration of oxygen in the local water column at the time of deposition (Savrda and Bottjer 1989). Ce <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in apatite-rich fractions of the Maastrichtian Zumaya-Algorta Formation from France and Spain and the Miocene Monterey Formation from California show changes that also may coincide with changes in ancient oxygen levels. Results for the Niobrara samples are the closest correspondence demonstrated between paleo-redox conditions and Ce <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, but the authors cannot yet determine whether the correspondence reflects a cause-and-effect relationship. Variation in Ce <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is influenced by a number of factors, including terrigenous input, depositional environment, and diagenetic conditions. <span class="hlt">Potential</span> interplay of these factors prevents a unique interpretation of the whole-rock data; dissecting whole-rock Ce <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> through analysis of isolated sedimentary components, though, is a promising avenue of research.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">MacLeod, K.G. [Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC (United States). Dept. of Paleobiology; Irving, A.J. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">232</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/37339057"> <span id="translatedtitle">Types of <span class="hlt">Suggestibility</span>: Relationships Among Compliance, Indirect, and Direct <span class="hlt">Suggestibility</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is commonly believed that direct <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>, referring to overt influence, and indirect <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>, in which the intention to influence is hidden, correlate poorly. This study demonstrates that they are substantially related, provided that they tap similar areas of influence. Test results from 103 students, 55 women and 48 men, were entered into regression analyses. Indirect <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>, as measured by</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Romuald Polczyk; Tomasz Pasek</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">233</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3004483"> <span id="translatedtitle">Genetics of kidney development: pathogenesis of renal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) account for more than 50% of abdominal masses found in neonates and involve about 0.5% of all pregnancies. CAKUT has a major role in renal failure, and increasing evidence <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that certain abnormalities predispose to the development of hypertension and cardiovascular disease in adulthood. To understand the pathogenesis of human renal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, understanding the development of kidney is important. Diverse <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the kidney corresponding to defects at a particular stage of development have been documented recently; however, more research is required to understand the molecular networks underlying kidney development, and such an investigation will provide a clue to the therapeutic intervention for CAKUT.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">234</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5026785"> <span id="translatedtitle">Iridium <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> approximately synchronous with terminal eocene extinctions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An iridium <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> has been found in coincidence with the known microtektite level in cores from Deep Sea Drilling Project site 149 in the Caribbean Sea. The iridium was probably not in the microtektites but deposited simultaneously with them; this could occur if the iridium was deposited from a dust cloud resulting from a bolide impact, as <span class="hlt">suggested</span> for the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> associated with the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary. Other workers have deduced that the microtektites are part of the North American strewn tektite field, which is dated at about 34 million years before present, and that the microtektite horizon in deep-sea cores is synchronous with the extinction of five radiolarian species. Mass extinctions also occur in terrestrial mammals within 4 million years of this time. The iridium <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and the tektites and microtektites are supportive of a major bolide impact about 34 million years ago.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alvarez, W. (Univ. of California, Berkeley); Asaro, F.; Michel, H.V.; Alvarez, L.W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-05-21</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">235</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54532704"> <span id="translatedtitle">Uncertainty in magnetization directions derived from planetary magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in view of numerical experiments with coalesced <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from Earth</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Martian magnetization vectors and paleopole locations determined by different investigators using different methodologies are contradictory. I <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that one of the reasons for this is that the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that are assumed to be caused by a homogeneously magnetized source may actually be due to coalescence of multiple crustal sources that may be magnetically coherently or incoherently magnetized and whose coalescence</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. Ravat</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">236</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49162276"> <span id="translatedtitle">Combination of escitalopram and a 5HT 1A receptor antagonist selectively decreases the extracellular levels of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens relative to striatum through 5HT 2C receptor stimulation; <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> of antipsychotic <span class="hlt">potential</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Serotonin 5-HT2C receptors are widely distributed throughout the brain located on GABAergic interneurons and afferent neurons in the ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra. Consequently, activation of this receptor modulates the dopaminergic neurotransmission. The antipsychotic <span class="hlt">potential</span> of the combined treatment with escitalopram, in therapeutic relevant doses, and the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, WAY-100635, has been evaluated by assessment of conditioned avoidance</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nanna Hovelsø; Thomas Nicolaj Sager; Arne Mørk</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">237</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JGRD..11715111I"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dominant modes of Diurnal Temperature Range variability over Europe and their relationships with large-scale atmospheric circulation and sea surface temperature <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> patterns</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The relationships between the dominant modes of interannual variability of Diurnal Temperature Range (DTR) over Europe and large-scale atmospheric circulation and sea surface temperature <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> fields are investigated through statistical analysis of observed and reanalysis data. It is shown that the dominant DTR modes as well as their relationship with large-scale atmospheric circulation and sea surface temperature <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> fields are specific for each season. During winter the first and second modes of interannual DTR variability are strongly related with the North Atlantic Oscillation and the Scandinavian pattern, while the third mode is related with the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. Strong influence of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation and the Arctic Oscillation on spring DTR modes of variability was also detected. During summer the DTR variability is influenced mostly by a blocking-like pattern over Europe, while the autumn DTR variability is associated with a wave train like pattern, which develops over the Atlantic Ocean and extends up to Siberia. It is also found that the response of DTR to global sea surface temperature is much weaker in spring and summer comparing to winter and autumn. A correlation analysis reveals a strong relationship between DTR modes of variability and the Cloud Cover <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> during all seasons. The influence of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> evapotranspiration and precipitation <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on DTR modes of variability is strongest during summer, but it is significant also in spring and autumn. It is <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that a large part of interannual to decadal DTR variability over Europe is induced by the large-scale climate <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> patterns via modulation of cloud cover, precipitation and <span class="hlt">potential</span> evapotranspiration <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> fields.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ionita, M.; Lohmann, G.; Rimbu, N.; Scholz, P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">238</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.7041I"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dominant modes of Diurnal Temperature Range variability over Europe and their relationships with large-scale atmospheric circulation and sea surface temperature <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> patterns</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The relationships between the dominant modes of interannual variability of Diurnal Temperature Range (DTR) over Europe and large-scale atmospheric circulation and sea surface temperature <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> fields are investigated through statistical analysis of observed and reanalysis data. It is shown that the dominant DTR modes as well as their relationship with large-scale atmospheric circulation and sea surface temperature <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> fields are specific for each season. During winter the first and second modes of interannual DTR variability are strongly related with the North Atlantic Oscillation and the Scandinavian pattern, while the third mode is related with the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. Strong influence of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation and the Arctic Oscillation on spring DTR modes of variability was also detected. During summer the DTR variability is influenced mostly by a blocking-like pattern over Europe, while the autumn DTR variability is associated with a wave-train like pattern, which develops over the Atlantic Ocean and extends up to Siberia. It is also found that the response of DTR to global sea surface temperature is much weaker in spring and summer comparing to winter and autumn. A correlation analysis reveals a strong relationship between DTR modes of variability and the Cloud Cover <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> during all seasons. The influence of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> evapotranspiration and precipitation <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on DTR modes of variability is strongest during summer, but it is significant also in spring and autumn. It is <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that a large part of interannual to decadal DTR variability over Europe is induced by the large-scale climate <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> patterns via modulation of cloud cover, precipitation and <span class="hlt">potential</span> evapotranspiration <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> fields.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ionita-Scholz, Monica; Lohmann, Gerrit; Rimbu, Norel; Scholz, Patrick</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">239</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5837390"> <span id="translatedtitle">Theory of hyperfine <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in muonic atoms</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Negative muon spin precession experiments by Yamazaki, et al. have found giant hyperfine <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in muonic atoms ranging from a few percent up to 36%. In order to understand their results, we present Breit interaction calculations based on atomic self-consistent unrestricted Dirac-Fock solutions which explicitly include all electrons and the negative muon. The Breit interaction results (including the relativistic correction for the bound muon g-factor), vary from near zero for ..mu../sup -/ O/N to -5% for ..mu../sup -/Pd/Rh; this latter is much larger than the calculated muonic or nuclear Bohr-Weisskopf <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and much smaller than the 36% measured value. For ..mu../sup -/Ni/Co we find a calculated range of results (depending on assumed electronic configurations) of -2.3 to -2.7% in excellent agreement with recent measurements of the Yamazaki group. This excellent agreement in ..mu../sup -/Ni/Co provides strong support for the earlier <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> that the discrepancy in the case of ..mu../sup -/Pd/Rh is due to experimental factors.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Freeman, A.J.; Mallow, J.V.; Desclaux, J.P.; Weinert, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">240</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/979362"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> and Discrete Chiral Symmetries</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The quantum <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> that breaks the U(1) axial symmetry of massless multi-flavored QCD leaves behind a discrete flavor-singlet chiral invariance. With massive quarks, this residual symmetry has a close connection with the strong CP-violating parameter theta. One result is that if the lightest quarks are degenerate, then a first order transition will occur when theta passes through pi. The resulting framework helps clarify when the rooting prescription for extrapolating in the number of flavors is valid.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Creutz, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-09-07</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return 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showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">241</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/31973772"> <span id="translatedtitle">Surgical treatment of cloacal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">From 1989–1998 14 patients were treated with cloacal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: 5 typical cloacas (PC), 5 posterior cloacas, and 4 cloacal\\u000a exstrophies (CE); 12 underwent surgery. Four typical cloacas were resolved with posterior sagittal anorectovagino-urethroplasty\\u000a (PSARVUP), whereas in the 5th total urogenital mobilization (TUM) was used. Three PCs were managed with transanorectal TUM\\u000a and 2 with anterior TUM without opening the anal</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Z. D. Krstic; M. Lukac; R. Lukac; Z. Smoljanic; V. Vukadinovic; D. Varinac</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">242</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20446549"> <span id="translatedtitle">[An obscure <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>: regional odontodysplasia].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In a 3-year-old child, acute dental abscesses in combination with clinical and radiographic impressions of a number of deciduous teeth indicated regional odontodysplasia as probable diagnosis. Histological examination of the removed deciduous teeth confirmed the diagnosis. Early determination of this regional developmental <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the odontogenesis is of great importance for optimal guidance of the dental care of a patient with regional odontodysplasia. PMID:20446549</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hoff, M; van der Haring, I S; van der Wal, J E; Vissink, A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">243</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.P22A..03S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Possible recent volcanoes and coronae on Venus: Emissivity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, lithospheric thickness, and resurfacing</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Extensive calibration of the Venus Express near infrared imaging data, which currently covers most of the southern hemisphere, shows regions of anomalously high or low thermal emission (Mueller et al., 2008; Helbert et al., 2008). Typically high thermal emission <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are associated with volcanoes or corona, and lows associated with tessera. Mueller et al. (2008) and Helbert et al. (2008) interpret these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> as likely to be associated with either compositional variations or relatively recent volcanic flows that are less weathered. They believe that thermal variations are unlikely to persist over the duration of data collection. In this study we focus on <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with coronae and volcanoes, and examine additional data that could distinguish between compositional variations, lack of weathering on recent flows, or <span class="hlt">potentially</span> some combination of the two. Mueller et al. (2008) describe 6 volcanoes or coronae with high emissivity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Of these, 3 are in Themis Regio, 2 in Dione Regio, and one in Imdr Regio. All of these areas have been identified as likely hotspots with possible current mantle upwelling. The estimated elastic thickness is quite small (0-10 km) at Themis and Dione, consistent with an interpretation of active volcanic centers. The resolution of the gravity data at Imdr is too low to get a reliable elastic thickness estimate, but the large depth of compensation does <span class="hlt">suggest</span> the presence of a plume. We also examine some flows associated with Atete Corona in Parga Chasma that appear to have low emissivity. Atete is 600 km in diameter and has an elastic thickness of ~45 km. We interpret this region as an area of unusual composition, possibly due to melting in a region of delamination (Elkins-Tanton et al., 2007). Further evidence for the interpretation that these areas of anomalous emissivity may be recent comes from analysis of the resurfacing history of Venus. Phillips and Izenberg (1995) examined the distribution of craters with and without haloes (thin ejecta blankets deposited by the wind) and the degree of modification of haloes. They found two regions with both low spatial crater densities and a large proportion of embayed and tectonized craters. They interpret these as areas of relatively recent resurfacing. One is the Beta-Atla- Themis triangle, which is known for its concentration of volcanic features, and the other is the Lavinia Plantia region. Themis and Dione Regios and Atete Corona lie within these regions, as do some of the areas of low emissivity tessera. Idunn volcano in Imdr is the lone exception, but it does lie on the transition from possibly older areas to younger areas. These lines of evidence strongly <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a relatively recent origin for the emissivity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with coronae and volcanoes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Smrekar, S. E.; Stofan, E. R.; Mueller, N.; Helbert, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">244</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/971154"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> detection and diagnosis in Grid environments.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Identifying and diagnosing <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in application behavior is critical to delivering reliable application-level performance. In this paper we introduce a strategy to detect <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and diagnose the possible reasons behind them. Our approach extends the traditional window-based strategy by using signal-processing techniques to filter out recurring, background fluctuations in resource behavior. In addition, we have developed a diagnosis technique that uses standard monitoring data to determine which related changes in behavior may cause <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. We evaluate our <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection and diagnosis technique by applying it in three contexts when we insert <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> into the system at random intervals. The experimental results show that our strategy detects up to 96% of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> while reducing the false positive rate by up to 90% compared to the traditional window average strategy. In addition, our strategy can diagnose the reason for the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> approximately 75% of the time.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yang, L.; Liu, C.; Schopf, J. M.; Foster, I.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Chicago; Microsoft Corp.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">245</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999IJCli..19..291Y"> <span id="translatedtitle">Winter temperature <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the North China Plain and macroscale extratropical circulation patterns</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Monthly temperature <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data for 38 weather stations in the North China Plain and its vicinity were analyzed for winter months (November-March) during 1951-1992. The study area was divided into two subregions based on principal component analysis. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients between the scores of the temperature <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> principal components and geopotential height <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the Eastern Atlantic-Eurasia-Western Pacific realm <span class="hlt">suggested</span> different macroscale circulation patterns that influence the spatial variation of temperature <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the subregions. Temperature <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the southern subregion were more closely related to the northern Asian teleconnection pattern, while those in the northern subregion were more closely related to the Eurasian pattern. Composite maps of geopotential height <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> indicated that the extreme positive and negative temperature <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the southern subregion were probably associated with the widening and narrowing of the Asian trough, while those in the northern subregion were associated with the filling and deepening of the trough. The characteristics of the Asian trough were strongly influenced by the variation of the geopotential heights over Siberia. In stepwise regression, the teleconnection indices explained ca. 22 and 37% of the variation in the mean temperature <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the southern and northern subregions respectively, indicating a stronger association between temperature <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the northern subregion and macroscale circulation patterns than that in the southern subregion.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yin, Zhi-Yong</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">246</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001JGR...10627825H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Initial mapping and interpretation of lunar crustal magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> using Lunar Prospector magnetometer data</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Maps of relatively strong crustal magnetic field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> detected at low altitudes with the magnetometer instrument on Lunar Prospector are presented. On the lunar nearside, relatively strong <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are mapped over the Reiner Gamma Formation on western Oceanus Procellarum and over the Rima Sirsalis rille on the southwestern border of Oceanus Procellarum. The main Rima Sirsalis <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> does not correlate well with the rille itself but is centered over an Imbrian-aged smooth plains unit interpreted as primary or secondary basin ejecta. The stronger Reiner Gamma <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> correlate with the locations of both the main Reiner Gamma albedo marking and its northeastward extension. Both the Rima Sirsalis and the Reiner Gamma <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are extended in directions approximately radial to the center of the Imbrium basin. This alignment <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that Imbrium basin ejecta materials (lying in many cases beneath the visible mare surface) are the sources of the nearside <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. If so, then the albedo markings associated with the stronger Reiner Gamma <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may be consistent with a model involving magnetic shielding of freshly exposed mare materials from the solar wind ion bombardment. Two regions of extensive magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are mapped in regions centered on the Ingenii basin on the south central farside and near the crater Gerasimovic on the southeastern farside. These regions are approximately antipodal to the Imbrium and Crisium basins, respectively. The Imbrium antipode <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> group is the most areally extensive on the Moon, while the largest <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the Crisium antipode group is the strongest detected by the Lunar Prospector magnetometer. A consideration of the expected antipodal effects of basin-forming impacts as well as a combination of sample data and orbital measurements on the nearside leads to the conclusion that the most probable sources of magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in these two regions are ejecta materials from the respective impacts. In both regions the strongest individual <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> correlate with swirl-like albedo markings of the Reiner Gamma class visible on available orbital photography.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hood, L. L.; Zakharian, A.; Halekas, J.; Mitchell, D. L.; Lin, R. P.; Acuña, M. H.; Binder, A. B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">247</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013APS..MARG32008S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Structure and Transport <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Soft Colloids</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present structure, dynamics and rheology measurements for model nanoparticle suspensions comprising of silica nanoparticles, densely grafted with oligomeric polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains and suspended in similar PEG oligomers. Small angle X-ray scattering reveals anomalous structural trends wherein the particle-particle correlations are found to decrease as the particle volume fraction rises beyond the point of particle overlap. Upon further increase in the particle loading, investigation of the particle dynamics through X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy points towards an unusual speeding up of the nanoparticles. Analogous ``cascade of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>'' are observed in systems including complex molecular fluids like water and silica as well as in systems interacting via soft repulsive <span class="hlt">potentials</span>, and similar forces are expected to lead to the origin of these anomalous trends in all the cases.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Srivastava, Samanvaya; Archer, Lynden</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">248</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2000106028"> <span id="translatedtitle">Production of Antibodies to New Craniofacial Genes Relevant to <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> and Oral Cancer.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The research and development contract has produced a series of antibodies to craniofacial genes <span class="hlt">potentially</span> relevant to embryonic development, <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and oral cancer, including interesting novel genes. It has also provided valuable information about t...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. Rosenbloom</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">249</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22739063"> <span id="translatedtitle">Water and other tetrahedral liquids: order, <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and solvation.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In order to understand the common features of tetrahedral liquids with water-like <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, the relationship between local order and <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> has been studied using molecular dynamics simulations for three categories of such liquids: (a) atomistic rigid-body models for water (TIP4P, TIP4P/2005, mTIP3P, SPC/E), (b) ionic melts, BeF(2) (TRIM model) and SiO(2) (BKS <span class="hlt">potential</span>) and (c) Stillinger-Weber liquids parametrized to model water (mW) and silicon. Rigid-body, atomistic models for water and the Stillinger-Weber liquids show a strong correlation between tetrahedral and pair correlation order and the temperature for the onset of the density <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is close to the melting temperature. In contrast, the ionic melts show weaker and more variable degrees of correlation between tetrahedral and pair correlation metrics, and the onset temperature for the density <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is more than twice the melting temperature. In the case of water, the relationship between water-like <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and solvation is studied by examining the hydration of spherical solutes (Na(+), Cl(-), Ar) in water models with different temperature regimes of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (SPC/E, TIP4P and mTIP3P). For both ionic and nonpolar solutes, the local structure and energy of water molecules is essentially the same as in bulk water beyond the second-neighbour shell. The local order and binding energy of water molecules are not perturbed by the presence of a hydrophobic solute. In the case of ionic solutes, the perturbation is largely localized within the first hydration shell. The binding energies for the ions are strongly dependent on the water models and clearly indicate that the geometry of the partial charge distributions, and the associated multipole moments, play an important role. However the anomalous behaviour of the water network has been found to be unimportant for polar solvation. PMID:22739063</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jabes, B Shadrack; Nayar, Divya; Dhabal, Debdas; Molinero, Valeria; Chakravarty, Charusita</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-06-27</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">250</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1719557"> <span id="translatedtitle">Survival of children born with congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aim: To describe the survival to age 5 years of children born with congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Methods: Between 1980 and 1997, 6153 live born cases of congenital <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> were diagnosed and registered by the population based Glasgow Register of Congenital <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>. They were retrospectively followed to assess their survival status from birth up to the age of 5 years. Results: The proportions of all live born infants with congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> surviving to the end of the first week, and first and fifth year were 94%, 89%, and 88%, respectively. Survival to age 5, the end point of follow up, was significantly poorer for infants with chromosomal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (48%) compared to neural tube defects (72%), respiratory system <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (74%), congenital heart disease (75%), nervous system <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (77%), and Down's syndrome (84%). Conclusion: Although almost 90% of all live born infants with congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> survive to 5 years, there are notable variations in survival between <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> types. Our findings should be useful for both clinicians and geneticists to assess the prognosis of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. This information is also important for affected families and for the planning of health care needs for this high risk population.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dastgiri, S; Gilmour, W; Stone, D</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">251</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2698103"> <span id="translatedtitle">Prenatal Sonographic Diagnosis of Focal Musculoskeletal <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Focal musculoskeletal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> vary, and can manifest as part of a syndrome or be accompanied by numerous other conditions such as genetic disorders, karyotype abnormalities, central nervous system <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and other skeletal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Isolated focal musculoskeletal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> does, however, also occur; its early prenatal diagnosis is important in deciding prenatal care, and also helps in counseling parents about the postnatal effects of numerous possible associated <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. We have encountered 50 cases involving focal musculoskeletal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, including focal limb dysplasia [radial ray abnormality (n=3), mesomelic dysplasia (n=1)]; <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the hand [polydactyly (n=8), syndactyly (n=3), ectrodactyly (n=1), clinodactyly (n=6), clenched hand (n=5)]; <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the foot [clubfoot (n=10), rockerbottom foot (n=5), sandal gap deformity (n=1), curly toe (n=2)]; amniotic band syndrome (n=3); and <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the focal spine [block vertebra (n=1), hemivertebra (n=1)]. Among these 50 cases, five [polydactyly (n=1), syndactyly (n=2) and curly toe (n=2)] were confirmed by postnatal physical evaluation, two (focal spine <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>) were diagnosed after postnatal radiologic examination, and the remaining 43 were proven at autopsy. For each condition, we describe the prenatal sonographic findings, and include a brief review.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ryu, Jung Kyu; Choi, Jong Sun</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">252</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhRvD..87g5022H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Strictly <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> mediated supersymmetry breaking</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We consider an extension of the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model with <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> mediation as the only source of supersymmetry breaking, and the tachyonic slepton problem solved by a gauged U(1) symmetry. The extra gauge symmetry is broken at high energies in a manner preserving supersymmetry, while also introducing both the seesaw mechanism for neutrino masses, and the Higgs ?-term. We call the model strictly <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> mediated supersymmetry breaking. We present typical spectra for the model and compare them with those from so-called minimal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> mediated supersymmetry breaking. We find a Standard Model-like Higgs of mass 125 GeV with a gravitino mass of 140 TeV and tan??=16. However, the muon anomalous magnetic moment is 3? away from the experimental value. The model naturally produces a period of hybrid inflation, which can exit to a false vacuum characterized by large Higgs vacuum expectation values, reaching the true ground state after a period of thermal inflation. The scalar spectral index is reduced to approximately 0.975, and the correct abundance of neutralino dark matter can be produced by decays of thermally produced gravitinos, provided the gravitino mass (and hence the Higgs mass) is high. Naturally light cosmic strings are produced, satisfying bounds from the cosmic microwave background. The complementary pulsar timing and cosmic ray bounds require that strings decay primarily via loops into gravitational waves. Unless the loops are extremely small, the next generation pulsar timing array will rule out or detect the string-derived gravitational radiation background in this model.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hindmarsh, Mark; Jones, D. R. Timothy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">253</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012SPIE.8408E...5B"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> detection for internet surveillance</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Many threats in the real world can be related to activity of persons on the internet. Internet surveillance aims to predict and prevent attacks and to assist in finding suspects based on information from the web. However, the amount of data on the internet rapidly increases and it is time consuming to monitor many websites. In this paper, we present a novel method to automatically monitor trends and find <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on the internet. The system was tested on Twitter data. The results showed that it can successfully recognize abnormal changes in activity or emotion.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bouma, Henri; Raaijmakers, Stephan; Halma, Arvid; Wedemeijer, Harry</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">254</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993PhLB..302..230B"> <span id="translatedtitle">A new <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> matching condition?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We formulate ``Witten'' matching conditions for confining gauge theories. The conditions are analogous to 't Hooft's, but involve Witten's global SU(2) <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Using a group theoretic result of Geng, Marshak, Zhao and Okubo, we show that if the fourth homotopy group of the flavor group H is trivial (?4(H)=0) then realizations of massless composite fermions that satisfy the't Hooft conditions also satisfy the Witten conditions. If ?4(H) is nontrivial, the new matching conditioms can yield additional information about the low energy spectrum of the theory. We give a simple physical proof of Geng et al.'s result. Junior Fellow, Harvard Society of Fellows.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bhansali, Vineer; Hsu, Stephen D. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">255</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/37385915"> <span id="translatedtitle">The quality of <span class="hlt">suggested</span> memories</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Alarge number of studies have demonstrated that participants could be led to report <span class="hlt">suggested</span> events that were never witnessed (Loftus & Palmer, 1974). The present study attempts to explore the quality of such <span class="hlt">suggested</span> memories. Thirty?six participants were exposed to a live event of brief duration (20 s). They were then misled about certain aspects of the event. Memory was assessed</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vanita Sondhi; Ashum Gupta</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">256</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhRvB..87x5406K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Origins of conductance <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in a p-type GaAs quantum point contact</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Low-temperature transport measurements on a p-GaAs quantum point contact are presented which reveal the presence of a conductance <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> that is markedly different from the conventional “0.7 <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.” A lateral shift by asymmetric gating of the conducting channel is utilized to identify and separate different conductance <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of local and generic origins experimentally. While the more generic 0.7 <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is not directly affected by changing the gate configuration, a model is proposed which attributes the additional conductance features to a gate-dependent coupling of the propagating states to localized states emerging due to a nearby <span class="hlt">potential</span> imperfection. Finite bias conductivity measurements reveal the interplay between the two <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> consistently with a two-impurity Kondo model.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Komijani, Y.; Csontos, M.; Ihn, T.; Ensslin, K.; Meir, Y.; Reuter, D.; Wieck, A. D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">257</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17721195"> <span id="translatedtitle">Translocation-positive low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma: clinicopathologic and molecular analysis of a series expanding the morphologic spectrum and <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> relationship to sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma: a study from the French Sarcoma Group.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Low-grade fibromyxoid sarcomas (LGFMS) bear either the t(7,16) (q32-34;p11) or t(11,16) (p11;p11) translocations, resulting in FUS-CREB3L2 or FUS-CREB3L1 fusions, respectively. Heretofore, fusion transcripts were mainly detected in frozen tissues, using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. In this study, we aimed to develop a reliable method to detect these in paraffin-embedded tissues, and to examine the clinicopathologic characteristics of a series of translocation-positive LGFMS. Sixty-three neoplasms with typical morphologic features of LGFMS and 66 non-LGFMS tumors selected for their resemblance to LGFMS (LGFMS-like tumors) were examined. RNA of sufficient quality could be extracted from 111/129 (86%) cases (59 LGFMS, 52 non-LGFMS). Of all, 48/59 (sensitivity, 81%) LGFMS contained detectable transcripts (45 FUS-CREB3L2, 3 FUS-CREB3L1). Most relevant clinicopathologic features of fusion-positive LGFMS included predominance in lower extremities (22/48; thigh: 13/48), deep situation (46/48), and occasional presence of unusual histologic features, for example, hypercellular areas (16/48), foci of epithelioid cells (13/48), and giant rosettes (6/48). Most tumors expressed EMA (41/45), at least focally, CD99 (38/41) and bcl-2 (36/41) while being essentially negative for CD34 (2/45), mdm2 (1/41), smooth muscle actin (1/45), S100 protein (0/46), desmin (0/44), h-caldesmon (0/42), keratins (0/44), and CD117 (0/40). Eleven presumed LGFMS were fusion negative. Of all, 7/52 non-LGMFS neoplasms contained FUS-CREB3L2 transcripts, of which 4 had been diagnosed as sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma. In conclusion, FUS-CREB3L1/L2 fusion transcripts can be detected in paraffin-embedded LGFMS in a sensitive manner, using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Most fusion-positive LGFMS are EMA-positive and CD34/S100/smooth muscle actin negative. The presence of epithelioid cells and fusion transcripts in both LGFMS and a subset of sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that these neoplasms might be related. PMID:17721195</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Guillou, Louis; Benhattar, Jean; Gengler, Carole; Gallagher, Gabrielle; Ranchère-Vince, Dominique; Collin, Françoise; Terrier, Philippe; Terrier-Lacombe, Marie-José; Leroux, Agnès; Marquès, Bernard; Aubain Somerhausen, Nicolas de Saint; Keslair, Frédérique; Pedeutour, Florence; Coindre, Jean-Michel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">258</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.T51B1882N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magnetic <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in the South of Corad Rise, the Southern Indian Ocean</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Seafloor age estimated from magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the Southern Indian Ocean are vital to understanding the fragmentation process of the Gondwana, but the seafloor age still remain less well-defined because of the sparse observations in this area. To understand the seafloor spreading history related to the Gondwana breakup, total intensity and vector geomagnetic field measurements as well as swath bathymetry mapping were conducted during the R/V Hakuho-maru cruise KH-07-4 Leg3 in the Southern Indian Ocean between Cape Town, South Africa, and off Lützow-Holm Bay, Antarctica. Magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data have been collected along WNW-ESE trending structures of unknown origin inferred from satellite gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> just to the south of Conrad Rise. We have also collected magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data along NNE-SSW trending lineaments from satellite gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data between the south of the Conrad Rise and off Lützow-Holm Bay. Magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with amplitude of about 500 nT, originating from normal and reversed magnetization of oceanic crust, are detected along the WNW-ESE trending structures just to the south of Conrad Rise. These magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> possibly belong to Mesozoic magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> sequence and this shows the part of the oceanic crust just to the south of the Conrad Rise formed before the long Cretaceous normal polarity superchron although magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> C34 has been identified just to the north of the Conrad Rise. Magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with amplitude of about 300 nT are also observed along the NNE-SSW trending lineaments between the south of the Conrad Rise and off Lützow-Holm Bay, and most likely indicate Mesozoic magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> sequence. These <span class="hlt">suggest</span> the extinct spreading axes in the south of Conrad Rise and complicated seafloor spreading history in this area.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nogi, Y.; Ikehara, M.; Nakamura, Y.; Kameo, K.; Katsuki, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kita, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">259</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2280977"> <span id="translatedtitle">Visual <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with albinism.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">All mammals with hypopigmentation of the retinal pigment epithelium have abnormal visual systems. Albino mammals have been found to have: (1) reduced numbers of uncrossed optic fibers projecting to all visual centers, (2) disorganization of the pattern (lamination) of the dorsal lateral geniculate nuclei, and (3) disorganization of projections from the dorsal lateral geniculate nuclei to the visual cortex. The disorganization of central visual centers has catastrophic effects on stereovision and optokinetic nystagmus. Variable expression in oculocutaneous albinism <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that affected individuals cannot always be identified by hypopigmentation, reduced visual acuity and nystagmus. Careful observation of foveal development in individuals even with normal vision is necessary to detect all persons with albinism. The scalp-recorded visually evoked <span class="hlt">potential</span> designed to detect optic misrouting is the most reliable concomitant for determining albinism. PMID:2280977</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Creel, D J; Summers, C G; King, R A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">260</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1931005"> <span id="translatedtitle">The DiGeorge <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The DiGeorge <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, DGA (formerly termed DiGeorge syndrome), is now known to be a developmental field defect in which pharyngeal pouch derivatives do not arise, usually because of inadequate neural crest contributions. The conditions in which this occurs include exposure to teratogens, cytogenetic abnormalities, and Mendelian disorders. As a result, the facies and cardiovascular defects which occur are very characteristic. Two rare conotruncal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, type B interrupted aortic arch and truncus arteriosus account for over half of the cardiac lesions seen in DGA. Failure of descent of the thymus is extremely common in DGA, but immunodeficiency which requires correction occurs only in approximately 25% of the cases. The term, complete DGA, should be reserved for those patients in need of reconstitution of the immune system. One can identify those patients requiring treatment of the thymic defect by T cell enumeration and in vitro proliferation assays. Two alternatives for therapy are thymus transplantation and bone marrow transplantation from a HLA matched sibling. PMID:1931005</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hong, R</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">261</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991E%26PSL.107...13F"> <span id="translatedtitle">CE <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the LEW85300 eucrite - Evidence for REE mobilization during Antarctic weathering</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">SIMS is used to investigate the microdistribution of Ce <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the Antarctic polymict eucrite LEW85300. Ce <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are present in all three of the minerals (plagioclase, pyroxene, and silica) analyzed. The <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> occur in grains from all four clasts as well as in mineral and lithic fragments from the surrounding matrix; thus there apears to be no lithologic association. Silica exhibits a LREE-enriched pattern with negative Ce and Eu <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, consistent with a derivation of the REE from a Ca-phosphate dissolution: trivalent REE are leached from the phosphates, with preferential retention of tetravalent Ce, and redeposited on silica. Pyroxene is also widely affected by REE mobilization, due to an extensive, shock-induced microcrack network along cleavage planes. A tendency for the largest Ce <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to occur at low LREE concentrations <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that pyroxene itself experienced REE leaching with concomitant Ce retention.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Floss, Christine; Crozaz, Ghislaine</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">262</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://learningcenter.nsta.org/product_detail.aspx?id=10.2505/4/jcst09_038_06_42"> <span id="translatedtitle">Current Research: Summer Reading <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">To supplement your summer reading, NSTA's affiliates would like to <span class="hlt">suggest</span> some recent articles on education research. These articles cover a variety of topics that include diversity, technology, and science teacher retention. The abstracts of these impor</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">263</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/878950"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>-free sets of fermions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present new techniques for finding <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-free sets of fermions. Although the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> cancellation conditions typically include cubic equations with integer variables that cannot be solved in general, we prove by construction that any chiral set of fermions can be embedded in a larger set of fermions which is chiral and <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-free. Applying these techniques to extensions of the Standard Model, we find <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-free models that have arbitrary quark and lepton charges under an additional U(1) gauge group.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Batra, Puneet; /Argonne; Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; /Fermilab; Spivak, David; /UC, Berkeley, Math. Dept.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">264</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20860760"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>-free sets of fermions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present new techniques for finding <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-free sets of fermions. Although the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> cancellation conditions typically include cubic equations with integer variables that cannot be solved in general, we prove by construction that any chiral set of fermions can be embedded in a larger set of fermions which is chiral and <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-free. Applying these techniques to extensions of the standard model, we find <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-free models that have arbitrary quark and lepton charges under an additional U(1) gauge group.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Batra, Puneet; Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Spivak, David [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Lab, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Theoretical Physics Department, Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Mathematics Department, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-08-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">265</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUFMGP43B0856T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Deep-tow Study of Magnetic <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in the Pacific Jurassic Quiet Zone</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Jurassic Quiet Zone (JQZ) is a region of low-amplitude, short-wavelength, difficult-to-correlate magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> located on Jurassic seafloor and thought to represent a time of decreased field strength and rapid reversals. We collected new deep-tow magnetic data over the Pacific JQZ that complement 2 deep-tow profiles reported in Sager et al. (J. Geophys. Res., vol.103, p. 5269, 1998). Our primary goals were to extend the correlation of deep-tow magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> farther back in time, crossing ODP Site 801 (where Jurassic ocean crust has been drilled and cored), to evaluate the correlation of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and to refine the Jurassic geomagnetic polarity reversal time scale developed by Sager et al. (1998). These new data include: (1) closely spaced lines around M34 and Site 801, (2) two long lines extending from the previous survey, across Site 801 to the southeast, and (3) one line between the previous lines in the area of difficult-to-correlate <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Systematic changes in <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> amplitudes occur along the deep-tow lines, perhaps indicating changes in field strength. From northwest to southeast (i.e., increasing in age) <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> amplitudes and wavelengths decrease, become nearly constant, and then increase slightly. The zone of smallest, shortest wavelength <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> corresponds to a period of ~4 m.y. that appears to have an abrupt end. Comparing <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> between lines, correlations were excellent on the closely-spaced profiles over M34 and around Hole 801C. Correlation over supposedly older seafloor to the south of Site 801 was also good. However, <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> correlation in the region between M34 and Site 801 was difficult. As with other studies of magnetic profiles, it is impossible to uniquely determine which <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are caused by reversals and which are not. Many of the larger <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are likely caused by changes in polarity, whereas smaller <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may be intensity fluctuations. The new deep-tow data, being closer to the source than the previous lines, show more short-wavelength <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in some areas, particularly the area where <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> amplitudes are least. This observation <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that many of these short-wavelength <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may result from intensity fluctuations. To construct a reversal time scale, we limit short wavelengths by modeling magnetic profiles upward continued to mid-water depth.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tominaga, M.; Sager, W. W.; Tivey, M. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">266</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.1761C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of Solar Irradiation <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Long Term Over India</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">India has a high <span class="hlt">potential</span> for solar energy applications due to its geographic position within the Sun Belt and the large number of cloudless days in many regions of the country. However, certain regions of India, particularly those largely populated, can exhibit large aerosol loading in the atmosphere as a consequence of anthropogenic emissions that could have a negative feedback in the solar resource <span class="hlt">potential</span>. This effect, named as solar dimming, has already been observed in India, and in some other regions in the world, by some authors using ground data from the last two decades. The recent interest in the promotion of solar energy applications in India highlights the need of extending and improving the knowledge of the solar radiation resources in this country, since most of the long term measurements available correspond to global horizontal radiation and most of them are also located big cities or highly populated areas. In addition, accurate knowledge on the aerosol column quantification and on its dynamical behavior with high spatial resolution is particularly important in the case of India, due to their impact on direct normal irradiation. Long term studies of solar irradiation over India can be performed using monthly means of global hemispheric irradiation measurements from the Indian Meteorological Department. Ground data are available from 1964 till today through the World Radiation Data Centre that publish these values in the web. This work shows a long term analysis of solar irradiation in India using <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> techniques and trends in ten places over India. Most of the places have exhibit a decreasing trend and negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> confirming thus the darkening effect already reported by solar dimming studies. The analysis of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> has also found two periods of different behavior. From 1964 till 1988 the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> observed were positive and the last 20 years seems to be a period of negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. This observation is also consequent with solar dimming effect, apparently increased during the last two decades due to the increase of aerosol loading in the atmosphere. These results remark the important of having accurate knowledge of atmospheric aerosol loading and its dynamics over India with high spatial resolution in the framework of solar energy deployment in the country. It is worth to mention that greater <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and a noticeable decreasing trend found in Calcutta could be correlated with the highly population rate, and thus the greater the population density of the area the greater the negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the decreasing trend of solar irradiation monthly means.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cony, M.; Polo, J.; Martin, L.; Navarro, A.; Serra, I.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">267</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012SPIE.8510E..17L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Characterization of Suomi-NPP VIIRS reflective solar bands dual gain <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Visible/Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) contains six dual gain bands in the reflective solar spectrum. The dual gain bands are designed to switch gain mode at pre-defined thresholds to achieve high resolution at low radiances while maintaining the required dynamic range for science. During pre-launch testing, an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the electronic response before transitioning from high to low gain was discovered and was characterized. This <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> has been confirmed using MODIS data collected during Simultaneous Nadir Overpasses (SNOs). The analysis of the Earth scene data shows that this dual gain <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> can be characterized using sensor earth-view observations. To help understand this dual gain artifact, the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region and electronic offsets were tracked during the first 8 months of VIIRS operation. The temporal analysis shows the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region can drift ~20 DN and is impacted by a detector's DC Restore. The estimated <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> flagging regions cover ~2.5 % of the high gain dynamic range and are consistent with prelaunch analysis and the on-orbit flagging LookUp Table. The prelaunch results had a smaller <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> range, likely due to more stable electronics over a shorter data collection time. Finally, this study <span class="hlt">suggests</span> future calibration efforts to focus on the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>'s impact on science products and a possible correction method to reduce uncertainties.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lee, Shihyan; McIntire, Jeff; Oudrari, Hassan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">268</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010DPS....42.0107S"> <span id="translatedtitle">An Unexpected Regional Thermal <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> on Mimas</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Images of thermal emission from Mimas taken at a wavelength of 9 - 16 µm by Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) in February 2010, centered near longitude 150 W, reveal an extremely unusual pattern of daytime temperatures. Low- and mid-latitudes on the leading hemisphere are up to 15 K colder than both the visible portions of the trailing hemisphere, and high latitudes on the leading hemisphere. The same pattern is also evident, with benefit of hindsight, in lower-resolution CIRS Mimas data taken in 1995. The V-shaped boundary between the warmer and colder regions is sharp at CIRS resolution ( 15 km), and does not correspond to any dramatic change in surface albedo in clear-filter ISS images, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that thermal inertia variations are probably largely responsible for the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>: the cold region appears to have unusually high thermal inertia. Global color maps of Mimas (Schenk et al. 2010, Plasma, plumes and rings: Saturn system dynamics as recorded in global color patterns on its midsize icy satellites, Icarus, in press), show an unusually blue region centered on Mimas' apex of orbital motion, that is similar in shape and extent, and thus may have the same cause, as the observed portion of the cold region seen by CIRS. Schenk et al. note that the shape of the blue region is consistent with its formation by irradiation of Mimas' surface by high-energy electrons, and it is therefore possible that the CIRS thermal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> has the same cause. However the mechanism by which electron irradiation could produce the high thermal inertias necessary to explain the observed temperatures in the cold region is still mysterious.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Spencer, John R.; Howett, C. J.; Schenk, P.; Hurford, T. A.; Segura, M. E.; Pearl, J. C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">269</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1980BAMS...61..702C"> <span id="translatedtitle">More on the La Porte <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>: A Review.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The anomalous behavior of the precipitation in northwestern Indiana (the La Porte <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>) since the late 1930s has been extensively studied and debated. Local records <span class="hlt">suggested</span> an upward shift in warm season rainfall, thunderstorms, and hail during the 1935-65 period. The possible causes for this included changed station exposure, a poor observer, urban influences on the atmosphere due to nearby Chicago, and/or shifts in the general circulation patterns. Most debate has centered on the observer error versus urban effects explanation, but the La Porte <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> has become a cause célèbre in the interwoven areas of climate change, air pollution, weather modification, and the quality of climatic records. A variety of recent studies of rainfall conditions and their areas of impact (streamflow, crop yields, and hail losses) show that the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the La Porte area began to shift locale in the 1950s and then disappeared in the 1960s. Taken in totality, it seems likely that the anomalous precipitation at La Porte was due to urban influences on the atmosphere, but the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> either ended or shifted into Lake Michigan (where it cannot now be detected) as the general circulation pattern changed, leading to fewer cyclonic passages and a more southward position of the Polar Front in the Midwest since 1960.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Changnon, Stanley A., Jr.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">270</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2186352"> <span id="translatedtitle">Insecure attachment is associated with the ?-EEG <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> during sleep</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background The ?-EEG <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> during sleep, originally associated with chronic pain, is noted in several psychiatric and medical conditions and is also present in some normal subjects. The exact significance of the ?-EEG <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is uncertain, but it has been <span class="hlt">suggested</span> to be a nonspecific response to a variety of noxious stimuli. We propose that attachment insecurity, which is often associated with a state of hypervigilance during wakefulness, may be associated with the ?-EEG <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> during sleep. Methods Thirty one consecutive patients referred to a Sleep Disorders Clinic for clinical assessment of sleep complaints underwent standard polysomnographic recording. The degree of alpha activity in polysomnographs was scored visually according to standard criteria. Attachment insecurity was measured with the Experience in Close Relationships – Revised questionnaire. Results Attachment anxiety was significantly associated with the proportion of sleep in which ? waves were present (df = 1, F = 5.01, p = 0.03). The relationship between the ?-EEG <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and attachment anxiety was not explained by the distribution of sleep and mood diagnoses, medications, anxiety symptoms or depression symptoms. Conclusion Interpersonal style in close relationships may be related to sleep physiology. Further research to determine the nature of the relationship between attachment, sleep and other factors that are related to each of these, such as a history of personal adversity, is warranted.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sloan, Eileen P; Maunder, Robert G; Hunter, Jonathan J; Moldofsky, Harvey</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">271</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=cyberbullying&pg=5&id=EJ868107"> <span id="translatedtitle">Prevent Cyberbullying: <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for Parents</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|The school, playground, and neighborhood often come to mind when one thinks about bullying that occurs among children and teens. However, given the significant role technology plays in the lives of today's youth, the <span class="hlt">potential</span> of these media to function as a venue for social interaction that includes victimization, or cyberbullying, also needs to…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Demaray, Michelle K.; Brown, Christina F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">272</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=lecture&id=EJ891901"> <span id="translatedtitle">10 <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for Enhancing Lecturing</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Criticism of the lecture method remains a staple of discussion and writing in academia--and most of the time it's deserved! Those interested in improving this aspect of their teaching might wish to consider some or all of the following <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for enhancing lectures. These include: (1) Lectures must start with a "grabber"; (2) Lectures must be…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Heitzmann, Ray</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">273</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=AD643591"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous and <span class="hlt">Suggested</span> Posthypnotic Amnesia.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The investigation was carried out to obtain comparable figures on the prevalence of spontaneous and <span class="hlt">suggested</span> posthypnotic amnesia. Ninety-one introductory psychology students were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups, and were required to serve as Ss for t...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">E. R. Hilgard L. M. Cooper</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1965-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">274</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/36842318"> <span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> for the IRS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Suggests</span> that private psychology practitioners, hospitals, and psychological centers should be allowed to deduct discounts given to clients who are unable to pay or who are unable to pay the full fee. Currently, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) does not permit such deductions. (0 ref)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">William P. Hill</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1971-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">275</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22Library+Automatic%22&id=EJ203536"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for Library Network Design.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Various approaches to the design of automatic library systems are described, <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for the design of rational and effective automated library processes are posed, and an attempt is made to assess the importance and effect of library network systems on library operations and library effectiveness. (Author/CWM)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Salton, Gerald</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1979-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">276</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMSM41A1995C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hot Flow <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> at Venus</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a multi-instrument study of a Hot Flow <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> (HFA) observed by the Venus Express spacecraft in the Venutian foreshock, expanding on an initial study by Slavin et al [2009] that employed magnetometer observations of an HFA-like event during the flyby of NASA's Messenger spacecraft. Whilst the Messenger events were indicative of an HFA, they were unable to demonstrate the unambiguous signatures of plasma heating or deflection due to the paucity of data. We examine the complex internal structure of a Venutian HFA on the 22nd of March 2008, incorporating both Venus Express magnetometer and ASPERA plasma observations to demonstrate the presence of plasma heating within one such event. Centered on an interplanetary discontinuity and bounded by shock, the properties of this event are consistent with those of HFA's observed at other planets within the Solar System. Finally, we present a discussion of the implications of an HFA on the planet Venus.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Collinson, G. A.; Sibeck, D. G.; Masters, A.; Shane, N.; Slavin, J. A.; Coates, A. J.; Zhang, T.; Boardsen, S. A.; Moore, T. E.; Barabash, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">277</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1015953"> <span id="translatedtitle">Oculoauriculovertebral spectrum and cerebral <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report on three Dutch children with a clinical diagnosis of oculoauriculovertebral spectrum (OAVS) and hydrocephalus. The clinical features are compared to 15 published cases of OAVS and hydrocephalus. Several other cerebral abnormalities were present in the whole group. About half of the cases had cleft lip/palate, anophthalmia/microphthalmia, or a cardiac defect. Mental retardation was found in five of the surviving 11 patients and early death occurred in one-third. We compared the cases with OAVS and hydrocephalus with published reports of OAVS and other cerebral <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and found no significant clinical differences. However, the clinical characteristics were clearly more severely expressed than generally found in patients with OAVS. Children with OAVS and more severe clinical features, especially anophthalmia/microphthalmia and cleft lip/palate, seem to be at an increased risk for cerebral malformations and for mental retardation. Images</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schrander-Stumpel, C T; de Die-Smulders, C E; Hennekam, R C; Fryns, J P; Bouckaert, P X; Brouwer, O F; da Costa, J J; Lommen, E J; Maaswinkel-Mooy, P D</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">278</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_139574.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rheumatoid Arthritis Increases <span class="hlt">Potential</span> for Blood Clots, Study <span class="hlt">Suggests</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases and head of rheumatology at Diakonhjemmet Hospital in Oslo, Norway. The research ... Y.; Tore Kvien, M.D., Ph.D., professor, rheumatology, University of Oslo, and head, rheumatology, Diakonjemmet Hospital, ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">279</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.fda.gov/biologicsbloodvaccines/scienceresearch/ucm329607.htm"> <span id="translatedtitle">FDA study <span class="hlt">suggests</span> critical <span class="hlt">potential</span> role of individual bacteria ...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://google2.fda.gov/search?client=FDAgov&site=FDAgov&lr=&proxystylesheet=FDAgov&output=xml_no_dtd&&proxycustom=%3CADVANCED/%3E">Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... The spread of the most dangerous type of anthrax infection through the body slows down when the bacteria hit a temporary bottleneck created by ... More results from www.fda.gov/biologicsbloodvaccines/scienceresearch</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">280</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70016776"> <span id="translatedtitle">The longevity of the South Pacific isotopic and thermal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The South Pacific is anomalous in terms of the Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope ratios of its hot spot basalts, a thermally enhanced lithosphere, and possibly a hotter mantle. We have studied the Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope characteristics of 12 Cretaceous seamounts in the Magellans, Marshall and Wake seamount groups (western Pacific Ocean) that originated in this South Pacific Isotopic and Thermal <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> (SOPITA). The range and values of isotope ratios of the Cretaceous seamount data are similar to those of the island chains of Samoa, Tahiti, Marquesas and Cook/Austral in the SOPITA. These define two major mantle components <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that isotopically extreme lavas have been produced at SOPITA for at least 120 Ma. Shallow bathymetry, and weakened lithosphere beneath some of the seamounts studied <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that at least some of the thermal effects prevailed during the Cretaceous as well. These data, in the context of published data, <span class="hlt">suggest</span>: 1. (1)|SOPITA is a long-lived feature, and enhanced heat transfer into the lithosphere and isotopically anomalous mantle appear to be an intrinsic characteristic of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. 2. (2)|The less pronounced depth <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> during northwesterly plate motion <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that some of the expressions of SOPITA may be controlled by the direction of plate motion. Motion parallel to the alignment of SOPITA hot spots focusses the heat (and chemical input into the lithosphere) on a smaller cross section than oblique motion. 3. (3)|The lithosphere in the eastern and central SOPITA appears to have lost its original depleted mantle characteristics, probably due to enhanced plume/lithosphere interaction, and it is dominated by isotopic compositions derived from plume materials. 4. (4)|We speculate (following D.L. Anderson) that the origin of the SOPITA, and possibly the DUPAL <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is largely due to focussed subduction through long periods of the geological history of the earth, creating a heterogeneous distribution of recycled components in the lower mantle. ?? 1991.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Staudigel, H.; Park, K. -H.; Pringle, M.; Rubenstone, J. L.; Smith, W. H. F.; Zindler, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return 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href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">281</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008GReGr..40.2533Z"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hawking radiation of dyon particles from the Einstein Maxwell-Dilaton Axion black hole via covariant <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Hawking radiation of particles with electric and magnetic charges from the Einstein Maxwell-Dilaton Axion black hole is derived via the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> cancellation method, initiated by Robinson and Wilczek and elaborated by Banerjee and Kulkarni recently. We reconstruct the electromagnetic field tensor to redefine the gauge <span class="hlt">potential</span> and equivalent charge corresponding to the source with electric and magnetic charges. We only adopt the covariant gauge and gravitational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to discuss the near-horizon quantum <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the dragging coordinate frame. Our result shows that Hawking radiation in this case also can be reproduced from the viewpoint of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zeng, Xiao-Xiong; Liu, Xiong-Wei; Yang, Shu-Zheng</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">282</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54660945"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magnetic <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in the Red Sea</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Marine magnetic profiles over the Red Sea between 18 degrees N and 25 degrees N latitudes confirm previous hypotheses that strongly magnetic rocks underlie the axial trough. The symmetrical nature of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and their close correspondence to seafloor spreading magnetic models support a rifting origin for the trough. The dominant magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> trends strike about N 35 degrees W</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. D. Phillips</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1970-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">283</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ursi.org/Proceedings/ProcGA05/pdf/G02b.4%20(01378).pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">IONOSPHERIC EQUATORIAL <span class="hlt">ANOMALY</span> STUDIES DURING SOLAR STORMS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The ionosphere is the major error source in GNSS receivers. Models for single frequency time delay correction do not work at low geomagnetic latitude regions (±20º), where the ionosphere has a peculiar behavior, known as the Ionospheric Equatorial <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>. In order to study the global behavior of the Ionospheric Equatorial <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>, dynamic maps based on IONEX data have been generated.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alexandre B. V. Oliveira; F. Walter</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">284</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1986ZPhyC..32..575A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Stochastic perturbative derivation of the axial <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The axial <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is calculated as the infinite Langevin time limit of stochastic triangle diagrams. Their regularization is insured with the help of an analytic stochastic regulator. The usual axial <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is recovered only when the Langevin equations used to generate the perturbative expansion are gauge covariant.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ader, J. P.; Wallet, J. C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">285</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/1466563"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> detection and classification for hyperspectral imagery</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> detection becomes increasingly important in hyperspectral image analysis, since hyperspectral imagers can now uncover many material substances which were previously unresolved by multispectral sensors. Two types of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection are of interest and considered in this paper. One was previously developed by Reed and Yu to detect targets whose signatures are distinct from their surroundings. Another was designed to</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chein-I. Chang; Shao-Shan Chiang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">286</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57642977"> <span id="translatedtitle">Junction magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> north of Waikato River</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A linear magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is traced northwards from Waikato through North Auckland and Northland until it meets the Tasman Sea west of Kaitaia. The <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, which has amplitudes up to 700 gammas and half-widths of 5–15 km, is believed to be due to serpentinite and probably represents the extension of the ultramafic belt which separates the principal facies of the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Trevor Hatherton; R. H. Sibson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1970-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">287</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ccs3.lanl.gov/ml/pubs/2004_anomaly/paper.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Classification Framework for <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">One way to describe <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is by saying that <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are not concentrated. This leads to the problem of finding level sets for the data generating density. We interpret this learning problem as a binary classification problem and compare the corresponding classification risk with the standard performance measure for the density level problem. In particular it turns out that the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ingo Steinwart; Don R. Hush; Clint Scovel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">288</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=482979"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cor triatriatum dexter with imperforate Ebstein's <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A case of cor triatriatum dexter is described in which the anomalous right atrial partition is identified as the right venous valve; there is an associated <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of the right atrioventricular valve which combines features of Ebstein's <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, and an atypical, imperforate, tricuspid atresia. Images</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gerlis, L M; Anderson, R H</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">289</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/4520/1/MPRA_paper_4520.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">The biological basis of expected utility <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We assess the biological basis of expected utility <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> through an experiment of the Allais paradox. A questionnaire study of 120 subjects replicates the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and further gathers information about the respondents’ bio-characteristics, such as gender, age, parenthood, handedness, second to fourth digit ratio, current emotional state, past negative experiences, and religiousness. We find that some of those bio-characteristics matter</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Raul Matsushita; Dinorá Baldo; Bruna Martin; Sergio Da Silva</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">290</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://scielo.isciii.es/pdf/ejpen/v22n3/original6.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Minor physical <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Tourette syndrome</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background and Objectives: The prevalence of minor physical <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (prenatal errors of morphogenesis) was evaluated in patients with Tourette syndrome to get indirect data on the possible role of aberrant neurodevelopment in the aetiology of Tourette syndrome. No published study is known on the minor physical <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> preva- lence in this recently intensively investigated disorder, and connecting to current opinions</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Györgyi Csábi; Júlia Gádoros; Sára Jeges; Eszter Gyenge; Mátyás Trixler; Tamás Tényi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">291</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39308957"> <span id="translatedtitle">Detecting and analyzing relationships among <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The HRL <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> analysis tool was developed as part of the IEEE VAST Challenge 2009. One of the tasks involved processing badge and network traffic in order to detect and identify a fictitious embassy employee suspected of leaking information. The tool is designed to assist an analyst in detecting, analyzing, and visualizing <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and their relationships. Two key visualizations in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">David Allen; Tsai-Ching Lu; Dave Huber</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">292</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/972533"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> of Nuclear Criticality, Revision 6</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report is revision 6 of the <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> of Nuclear Criticality. This report is required reading for the training of criticality professionals in many organizations both nationally and internationally. This report describes many different classes of nuclear criticality <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that are different than expected.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Clayton, E. D.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Durst, Bonita E.; Erickson, David; Puigh, Raymond J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-02-19</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">293</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56372504"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spherical earth gravity and magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> analysis by equivalent point source inversion</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">To facilitate geologic interpretation of satellite elevation <span class="hlt">potential</span> field data, analysis techniques are developed and verified in the spherical domain that are commensurate with conventional flat earth methods of <span class="hlt">potential</span> field interpretation. A powerful approach to the spherical earth problem relates <span class="hlt">potential</span> field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to a distribution of equivalent point sources by least squares matrix inversion. Linear transformations of the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. R. B. von Frese; W. J. Hinze; L. W. Braile</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">294</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54740654"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lithospheric interpretation and modeling of satellite elevation gravity and magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">To facilitate geologic interpretation of satellite elevation <span class="hlt">potential</span> field data analysis techniques are developed and verified in the spherical domain that are commensurate with conventional flat Earth methods of <span class="hlt">potential</span> field interpretation. A powerful approach to the spherical Earth problem relates <span class="hlt">potential</span> field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to a distribution of equivalent point sources by least squares matrix inversion. Linear transformation of the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. R. B. Vonfrese</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">295</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1059337"> <span id="translatedtitle">A New, Principled Approach to <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Intrusion detection is often described as having two main approaches: signature-based and <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-based. We argue that only unsupervised methods are suitable for detecting <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. However, there has been a tendency in the literature to conflate the notion of an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> with the notion of a malicious event. As a result, the methods used to discover <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> have typically been ad hoc, making it nearly impossible to systematically compare between models or regulate the number of alerts. We propose a new, principled approach to <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection that addresses the main shortcomings of ad hoc approaches. We provide both theoretical and cyber-specific examples to demonstrate the benefits of our more principled approach.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ferragut, Erik M [ORNL; Laska, Jason A [ORNL; Bridges, Robert A [ORNL</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">296</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6146417"> <span id="translatedtitle">Global magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and aurora of Neptune</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The large offset and tilt of Neptune's dipole magnetic field combine to create a global magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, analogous to but much more important than Earth's South Atlantic <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>. Energetic particle precipitation loss within the Neptune <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> creates atmospheric drift shadows within which particle fluxes are greatly reduced. The energetic particle dropout observed by Voyager near closest approach occurred near the predicted times when Voyager passed within the atmospheric drift shadow. Extremely soft, structured bursts of ions and electrons within the drift shadow may result from plasma wave-induced pitch angle scattering of trapped particles confined near the magnetic equator. The dropout does not necessarily imply that Voyager passed through an Earth-like discrete auroral zone, as earlier reported. The ion and electron fluxes observed within the dropout period correspond to particles that must precipitate to Neptune's atmosphere within the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region. This <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> precipitation can account for a major portion of the ultraviolet emissions previously identified as Neptune aurora.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cheng, A.F. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (USA))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">297</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004GeoRL..3117110F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Atmospheric <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> observed during earthquake occurrences</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Appearance of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the atmosphere before earthquakes (EQs) has been verified, through observation of anomalous transmission of VHF electromagnetic (EM) waves beyond line-of-sight. Anomalous increase of the received intensity for a few minutes - several hours on a day was identified by the previous 15-day running median and its inter-quartile range. The cross-correlation between the EQ occurrences and the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> shows that the appearance of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> was significantly enhanced within 5 days before M >= 4.8 EQs. The one-day average number of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> appearance within 5 days was found 2.4 times larger than that of other days. Through the polarization measurement of the received EM waves, the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were found to occur in the atmosphere.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fujiwara, H.; Kamogawa, M.; Ikeda, M.; Liu, J. Y.; Sakata, H.; Chen, Y. I.; Ofuruton, H.; Muramatsu, S.; Chuo, Y. J.; Ohtsuki, Y. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">298</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1984ucsg.rept.....C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Upward continuation of surface gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Investigations on the upward continuation of gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> given on the surface of the Earth's visible topography are reported. Results are compared for three upward continuation procedures: first, the direct Poisson integration of the original terrain-uncorrected surface <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>; second, the direct Poisson integration of terrain-corrected (i.e., Faye) surface <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>; and third, the so-called indirect method. In the indirect method the original <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> field is basically split into three frequency ranges that are then modeled separately: the low frequencies are modeled by spherical harmonics; the medium frequencies are modeled by Poisson integration of residual surface <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with long-wavelength terrain correction applied; and the high frequencies are modeled by prism integration of the gravitational effects of certain shallow topographic masses of assumed constant density.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cruz, J. Y.; Laskowski, P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">299</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22403388"> <span id="translatedtitle">An impactor origin for lunar magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Moon possesses strong magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that are enigmatic given the weak magnetism of lunar rocks. We show that the most prominent grouping of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> can be explained by highly magnetic extralunar materials from the projectile that formed the largest and oldest impact crater on the Moon: the South Pole-Aitken basin. The distribution of projectile materials from a model oblique impact coincides with the distribution of magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> surrounding this basin, and the magnetic properties of these materials can account for the intensity of the observed <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> if they were magnetized in a core dynamo field. Distal ejecta from this event can explain the origin of isolated magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> far from this basin. PMID:22403388</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wieczorek, Mark A; Weiss, Benjamin P; Stewart, Sarah T</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">300</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/4334910"> <span id="translatedtitle">Design of an artificial immune system as a novel <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detector for combating financial fraud in the retail sector</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The retail sector often does not possess sufficient knowledge about <span class="hlt">potential</span> or actual frauds. This requires the retail sector to employ an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection approach to fraud detection. To detect <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in retail transactions, the fraud detection system introduced in this work implements various salient features of the human immune system. This novel artificial immune system, called CIFD (Computer Immune</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jungwon Kim; Arlene Ong; Richard E. Overill</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">301</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.U43B0057M"> <span id="translatedtitle">High Resolution Imaging of the Aspen <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> - CREST and USArray</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Aspen <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is a low velocity (-4.5% Vs and -2.5% Vp) upper mantle feature that approximately underlies the highest elevations of the Colorado Rocky Mountains. It is geographically, and possibly causatively, associated with Proterozoic structure in the lithosphere underlying the Colorado Mineral Belt. The coincidence of high topography, evidence of Cenozoic uplift, slow mantle velocities, magmatism, and possible inherited Proterozoic lithospheric structure and associated rheological weakness, together <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the Aspen <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> may be a significant mantle geodynamic influence on the evolution of the central Colorado Rocky Mountains through to the present day. Competing end-member models for the origin of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> are: 1) upwelling asthenosphere associated with Cenozoic mantle modification, and 2) thermal, rheological, and/or compositional variations in the lithosphere resulting from reactivation of much older lithospheric structures. Hybrid models involving interaction between recent mantle reorganization and older lithospheric flaws are also possible. In August of 2008, we deployed 59 IRIS PASSCAL broadband seismographs above the Aspen <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> with a mean station spacing of 26 km, which will remain in place until October 2009. This IRIS PASSCAL deployment was embedded within the 70-km spacing USArray Transportable array and 4 NEIC sites. In total, this composite array is 94 seismic sites which will provide improved resolution to transition zone depths beneath the Colorado Rockies. We report on resolution tests for seismic and joint seismic/gravity inversion and results from early data from this experiment in the context of Aspen <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> hypotheses and predictions for three-dimensional upper-mantle velocity heterogeneity.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">MacCarthy, J. K.; Aster, R. C.; Dueker, K.; Karlstrom, K. E.; Hansen, S. M.; Stachnik, J. C.; Zang, Z.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">302</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.V33B2636N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Microgravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> observed during eruptions at Karymsky Volcano, Kamchatka</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Over the last few decades, continuous microgravity monitoring has emerged as a useful technique for observing mass and density changes that may indicate fluid movement within the shallow plumbing systems of active volcanoes. For several days in September 1999, a continuously recording gravimeter was deployed at the base of Karymsky Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia. This was part of an effort to observe the episodic explosive degassing eruptions that occurred during the later stages of the volcano's 1996-1999 eruptive phase. During the course of the deployment, over 10 hours of data were recorded at a 1 Hz sample rate, providing sufficient resolution to compare the microgravity to seismic and acoustic data that was simultaneously recorded at several stations around the volcano. Microgravity event data exhibit negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> ranging from about 10-150 ?gal, sometimes preceded by a slight positive <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, and generally lasting from 40-200 seconds. All <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> coincide with eruptions as they appear in the seismic record, yet the gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> only occur during about a third of the eruptions and they do not correlate with seismic amplitudes. In this study, we analyze and compare the microgravity observations with associated data sets to discern why certain eruptions produce gravity fluctuations while others do not. Previous experiments at Karymsky <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that observed seismic and acoustic signals are generated at shallow depth within the volcano's main conduit by a common source. Given the coseismic nature of the microgravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, we explore the relationship between these geophysical signals in order to place further constraints on the conduit model for Karymsky.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nies, A. P.; Lees, J. M.; Brodsky, E. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">303</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.sbfisica.org.br/bjp/files/v34_17.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Interpretation of Water <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Terms of Core-Softened Models</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the first part of this paper I review the understanding of anomalous properties of water in terms of particles interacting by core-softened <span class="hlt">potentials</span>. I discuss the origin of the bulk <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in terms of the two different configurations of neighbor particles: low energy-high volume and high energy-low volume. In the second part I study some <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of water under</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">E. A. Jaglay</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">304</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013A%26A...557A..32R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Removal of two large-scale cosmic microwave background <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> after subtraction of the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Context. Although there is currently a debate over the significance of the claimed large-scale <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the cosmic microwave background (CMB), their existence is not totally dismissed. In parallel to the debate over their statistical significance, recent work has also focussed on masks and secondary anisotropies as <span class="hlt">potential</span> sources of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Aims: In this work we investigate simultaneously the impact of the method used to account for masked regions as well as the impact of the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect, which is the large-scale secondary anisotropy most likely to affect the CMB <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. In this sense, our work is an update of previous works. Our aim is to identify trends in CMB data from different years and with different mask treatments. Methods: We reconstruct the ISW signal due to 2 Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) and NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) galaxies, effectively reconstructing the low-redshift ISW signal out to z ~ 1. We account for regions of missing data using the sparse inpainting technique. We test sparse inpainting of the CMB, large scale structure and ISW and find that it constitutes a bias-free reconstruction method suitable to study large-scale statistical isotropy and the ISW effect. Results: We focus on three large-scale CMB <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: the low quadrupole, the quadrupole/octopole alignment, and the octopole planarity. After sparse inpainting, the low quadrupole becomes more anomalous, whilst the quadrupole/octopole alignment becomes less anomalous. The significance of the low quadrupole is unchanged after subtraction of the ISW effect, while the trend amongst the CMB maps is that both the low quadrupole and the quadrupole/octopole alignment have reduced significance, yet other hypotheses remain possible as well (e.g. exotic physics). Our results also <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that both of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may be due to the quadrupole alone. While the octopole planarity significance is reduced after inpainting and after ISW subtraction, however, we do not find that it was very anomalous to start with. In the spirit of participating in reproducible research, we make all codes and resulting products which constitute main results of this paper public here: http://www.cosmostat.org/<span class="hlt">anomalies</span>CMB.html</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rassat, A.; Starck, J.-L.; Dupé, F.-X.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">305</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Features/Zircon/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ancient Crystals <span class="hlt">Suggest</span> Earlier Ocean</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report describes the findings of two scientists who studied the chemical makeup of crystals of zircon from rocks in Western Australia's Jack Hills. The zircon crystals are thought to be 4.5 billion years old, making them some of the oldest materials yet found on Earth. The ratios of oxygen isotopes found in the crystals <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that conditions during the Hadean Eon, the first 500 million years of Earth's history when the crystals were formed, were cooler and wetter than previously thought. Links to a glossary are embedded in the text.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">306</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AdWR...44...20S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Inversion of pressure <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data for detecting leakage at geologic carbon sequestration sites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Leakage from abandoned wells and geologic faults represents one of the greatest risks to the integrity of geologic CO2 sequestration sites. The ability to detect leakage in a timely manner is, therefore, crucial for mitigating the <span class="hlt">potential</span> adverse impacts of leakage to the public and environment. We present an inversion approach for recovering both leakage locations and rates by using observed pressure <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data. The approach is based on formulation of a linear system of equations using the unit-step response method, which is applicable to both analytical and numerical models. Because the resulting system is often ill conditioned, we investigate the efficacy of regularization methods for stabilizing the solutions. Further, when prior information is insufficient to restrict the number of search locations, a global optimization algorithm is used to solve the challenging problem of joint location and leakage history inversion. The performance of several linear inversion solvers is compared while considering effects such as measurement error and spatial heterogeneity. The results are promising and <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that our pressure-<span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-based leakage detection algorithm can be used to identify leaky wells in practice. It can be deployed as an integrated component of CO2 risk management frameworks.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sun, Alexander Y.; Nicot, Jean-Philippe</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">307</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3770011"> <span id="translatedtitle">Interactions between Cytokines, Congenital <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> of Kidney and Urinary Tract and Chronic Kidney Disease</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fetal hydronephrosis is the most common <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detected on antenatal ultrasound, affecting 1–5% of pregnancies. Postnatal investigation has the major aim in detecting infants with severe urinary tract obstruction and clinically significant urinary tract <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> among the heterogeneous universe of patients. Congenital uropathies are frequent causes of pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD). Imaging techniques clearly contribute to this purpose; however, sometimes, these exams are invasive, very expensive, and not sufficient to precisely define the best approach as well as the prognosis. Recently, biomarkers have become a focus of clinical research as <span class="hlt">potentially</span> useful diagnostic tools in pediatric urological diseases. In this regard, recent studies <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a role for cytokines and chemokines in the pathophysiology of CAKUT and for the progression to CKD. Some authors proposed that the evaluation of these inflammatory mediators might help the management of postnatal uropathies and the detection of patients with high risk to developed chronic kidney disease. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to revise general aspects of cytokines and the link between cytokines, CAKUT, and CKD by including experimental and clinical evidence.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Simoes e Silva, Ana Cristina; Valerio, Flavia Cordeiro; Vasconcelos, Mariana Affonso; Miranda, Debora Marques; Oliveira, Eduardo Araujo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">308</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ajnr.org/cgi/reprint/21/5/941.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bilateral Thoracic Bifurcation of the Common Carotid Artery Associated with Klippel-Feil <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Summary: We report the case of a 72-year-old man with bilateral intrathoracic carotid bifurcations associated with a Klippel-Feil <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The left and right carotid bifur- cations were located at levels corresponding to the second and fourth thoracic vertebrae, respectively. A possible as- sociation between low carotid bifurcation and the Klippel- Feil <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is <span class="hlt">suggested</span>. The level of the common carotid</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Philippe Gailloud; Kieran J. Murphy; Daniele Rigamonti</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">309</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21209756"> <span id="translatedtitle">Septate uterus with hypoplastic left adnexa with cervical duplication and longitudinal vaginal septum: Rare Mullerian <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A large analysis of all the studies in the period from 1950 to 2007 <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the prevalence of congenital uterine <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the general population is 6.7%; and in the infertile population, 7.3%. We report a rare case of unilateral hypoplastic fallopian tube and ovary with septate uterus, cervical duplication, longitudinal vaginal septum. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of such a congregation of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. PMID:21209756</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nigam, Aruna; Puri, Manju; Trivedi, Shubha Sagar; Chattopadhyay, Barenya</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">310</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ats.ctsnetjournals.org/cgi/reprint/66/5/1539.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Late results of bioprosthetic tricuspid valve replacement in Ebstein’s <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background. Historically, porcine bioprosthetic valves have poor durability in pediatric patients; nearly half will require replacement within 5 years. However, our early experience with patients having Ebstein’s <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that tricuspid bioprostheses in this <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> might have better durability.Methods. One hundred fifty-eight patients who received a primary tricuspid bioprosthesis because of tricuspid valve anatomy unsuitable for repair between April 1972</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">H. Tarik Kiziltan; David A Theodoro; Carole A Warnes; Patrick W O’Leary; Betty J Anderson; Gordon K Danielson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">311</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhRvD..88h1701E"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ferromagnetic neutron stars: Axial <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, dense neutron matter, and pionic wall</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We show that a chiral nonlinear sigma model coupled to degenerate neutrons exhibits a ferromagnetic phase at high density. The magnetization is due to the axial <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> acting on the parallel layers of neutral pion domain walls spontaneously formed at high density. The emergent magnetic field would reach the QCD scale ˜1019[G], which <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the quantum <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> can be a microscopic origin of the magnetars (highly magnetized neutron stars).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eto, Minoru; Hashimoto, Koji; Hatsuda, Tetsuo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">312</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/443768"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hydrocephalus, skeletal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and mental disturbances in a mother and three daughters: A new syndrome</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report on a family in which a mother and her 3 daughters have delayed psychomotor development and/or psychosis, hydrocephalus with white matter alterations, arachnoid cysts, skeletal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> consisting of brachydactyly, and Sprengel <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Biochemical and cytogenetic analyses were normal on all 4 patients. The pattern of inheritance, clinical manifestations, and variability of expression <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that this is a new hydrocephalus syndrome possibly transmitted as an X-linked dominant trait. 24 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ferlini, A.; Zanetti, A.; Milan, M.; Calzolari, E. [Universita di Ferrara, London (United Kingdom)] [and others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-12-04</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">313</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/vt44n211173913n1.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Covariant <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and Hawking radiation from the modified black hole in the rainbow gravity theory</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recently, Banerjee and Kulkarni (R. Banerjee, S. Kulkarni, arXiv: 0707. 2449 [hep-th]) <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that it is conceptually clean\\u000a and economical to use only the covariant <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> to derive Hawking radiation from a black hole. Based upon this simplified\\u000a formalism, we apply the covariant <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> cancellation method to investigate Hawking radiation from a modified Schwarzschild\\u000a black hole in the theory of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jun-Jin Peng; Shuang-Qing Wu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">314</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21579889"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nonrelativistic scale <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, and composite operators with complex scaling dimensions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Research Highlights: > Nonrelativistic scale <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> leads to operators with complex scaling dimensions. > We study an operator O={psi}{psi} in quantum mechanics with 1/r{sup 2} potenial. > The propagator of the composite operator is analytically computed. - Abstract: It is demonstrated that a nonrelativistic quantum scale <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> manifests itself in the appearance of composite operators with complex scaling dimensions. In particular, we study nonrelativistic quantum mechanics with an inverse square <span class="hlt">potential</span> and consider a composite s-wave operator O={psi}{psi}. We analytically compute the scaling dimension of this operator and determine the propagator <0|TOO{sup +}|0>. The operator O represents an infinite tower of bound states with a geometric energy spectrum. Operators with higher angular momenta are briefly discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Moroz, Sergej, E-mail: s.moroz@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-05-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">315</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011GeoRL..3814704C"> <span id="translatedtitle">The impact of devegetated dune fields on North American climate during the late Medieval Climate <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During the Medieval Climate <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>, North America experienced severe droughts and widespread mobilization of dune fields that persisted for decades. We use an atmosphere general circulation model, forced by a tropical Pacific sea surface temperature reconstruction and changes in the land surface consistent with estimates of dune mobilization (conceptualized as partial devegetation), to investigate whether the devegetation could have exacerbated the medieval droughts. Presence of devegetated dunes in the model significantly increases surface temperatures, but has little impact on precipitation or drought severity, as defined by either the Palmer Drought Severity Index or the ratio of precipitation to <span class="hlt">potential</span> evapotranspiration. Results are similar to recent studies of the 1930s Dust Bowl drought, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> bare soil associated with the dunes, in and of itself, is not sufficient to amplify droughts over North America.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cook, B. I.; Seager, R.; Miller, R. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">316</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19946851"> <span id="translatedtitle">Collie Eye <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> in Switzerland.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this retrospective study, the results of 3'527 eye examinations in 6 different breeds affected with Collie Eye <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> (CEA) over a period of 8 years (1999 - 2007) are described. CEA was divided into three main ophthalmoscopic features, a) choroidal hypoplasia (CRH), b) CRH and coloboma and c) coloboma alone. Of the 101 Smooth Collies 8.9 % showed signs of CRH, whereas 36.9 % of Rough Collies were affected with CRH, 2.8 % with CRH and coloboma and 0.38 % with coloboma alone. Choroidal hypoplasia was present in 13.1 %, CRH and coloboma in 1.8 % and coloboma alone in 0.2 % of the Shetland Sheepdogs. Only one Australian Shepherd dog had CRH, while 0.7 % of the Border Collies were affected with CRH. None of the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers were affected with CEA. There were no statistically significant differences in the occurrence of CEA between males and females, nor was there any relation between coat colors. Significant differences could be shown between dogs younger or older than 8 weeks at first examination. CEA was more often diagnosed in dogs younger than 8 weeks within the Rough Collie and Shetland Sheepdog. PMID:19946851</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Walser-Reinhardt, L; Hässig, M; Spiess, B</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">317</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23567964"> <span id="translatedtitle">Etiology of biliary atresia as a developmental <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>: recent advances.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Biliary atresia (BA) is a progressive fibro-obliterative cholangiopathy affecting the extra- and intrahepatic biliary tree to various degrees and resulting in obstructive bile flow, cholestasis and icterus in neonates. It is the most common cause of pediatric liver transplantation. The etiology of BA is still unclear, although there is some evidence pointing to viral, toxic, and multiple genetic factors. For new therapeutic options other than liver transplantation to be developed, a greater understanding of the pathogenesis of BA is indispensable. The fact that the pathology of BA develops during a period of biliary growth and remodeling <span class="hlt">suggests</span> an involvement of developmental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Recent studies indicate an association of the etiology of BA with some genetic factors such as laterality genes, epigenetic regulation and/or microRNA function. In this paper, we present an overview of recent advances in the understanding of the disease focusing on bile duct developmental <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. PMID:23567964</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nakamura, Kazuaki; Tanoue, Akito</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">318</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhRvD..86f4023A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Brans-Dicke theory and the Pioneer <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Scalar-tensor theory offers the possibility of a modification of Newtonian gravity due to the presence of a 4d scalar dilaton field. The prototypical version of such a theory, massless Brans-Dicke theory, is considered here in the Einstein frame representation. The acceleration of a test mass is obtained from the exact 4d Xanthopoulos-Zannias solutions with spherical symmetry. The deviation of this acceleration from the pure Newtonian gravitational acceleration is examined to see if it can account for the anomalous Pioneer acceleration, while satisfying solar system constraints. Theoretical considerations, along with limits inferred from Pioneer 10 data, <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that Brans-Dicke gravity could account for no more than a small fraction of the Pioneer <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, so that a complete explanation of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> must lie elsewhere.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Anderson, John D.; Morris, J. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">319</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5587891"> <span id="translatedtitle">Regional magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> constraints on continental breakup</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Continental lithosphere magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> mapped by the Magsat satellite are related to tectonic features associated with regional compositional variations of the crust and upper mantle and crustal thickness and thermal perturbations. These continental-scale <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> patterns when corrected for varying observation elevation and the global change in the direction and intensity of the geomagnetic field show remarkable correlation of regional lithospheric magnetic sources across rifted continental margins when plotted on a reconstruction of Pangea. Accordingly, these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> provide new and fundamental constraints on the geologic evolution and dynamics of the continents and oceans.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">von Frese, R.R.B.; Hinze, W.J.; Olivier, R.; Bentley, C.R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">320</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JHEP...06..075M"> <span id="translatedtitle">The conformal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of M5-branes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We show that the conformal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> for N M5-branes grows like N 3. The method we employ relates Coulomb branch interactions in six dimensions to interactions in four dimensions using supersymmetry. This leads to a relation between the six-dimensional conformal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and the conformal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of N = 4 Yang-Mills. Along the way, we determine the structure of the four derivative interactions for the toroidally compactified (2, 0) theory, while encountering interesting novelties in the structure of the six derivative interactions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Maxfield, Travis; Sethi, Savdeep</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" 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class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We analyze Chandra X-ray spectra of the M0 V+M0 V binary GJ 338. As quantified by X-ray surface flux, these are the most inactive M dwarfs ever observed with X-ray grating spectroscopy. We focus on measuring coronal abundances, in particular searching for evidence of abundance <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> related to first ionization <span class="hlt">potential</span> (FIP). In the solar corona and wind, low-FIP elements are overabundant, which is the so-called FIP effect. For other stars, particularly very active ones, an "inverse FIP effect" is often observed, with low-FIP elements being underabundant. For both members of the GJ 338 binary, we find evidence for a modest inverse FIP effect, consistent with expectations from a previously reported correlation between spectral type and FIP bias. This amounts to strong evidence that all M dwarfs should exhibit the inverse FIP effect phenomenon, not just the active ones. We take the first step toward modeling the inverse FIP phenomenon in M dwarfs, building on past work that has demonstrated that MHD waves coursing through coronal loops can lead to a ponderomotive force that fractionates elements in a manner consistent with the FIP effect. We demonstrate that in certain circumstances this model can also lead to an inverse FIP effect, pointing the way to more detailed modeling of M dwarf coronal abundances in the future.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wood, Brian E.; Laming, J. Martin; Karovska, Margarita</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">322</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22036895"> <span id="translatedtitle">THE CORONAL ABUNDANCE <span class="hlt">ANOMALIES</span> OF M DWARFS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We analyze Chandra X-ray spectra of the M0 V+M0 V binary GJ 338. As quantified by X-ray surface flux, these are the most inactive M dwarfs ever observed with X-ray grating spectroscopy. We focus on measuring coronal abundances, in particular searching for evidence of abundance <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> related to first ionization <span class="hlt">potential</span> (FIP). In the solar corona and wind, low-FIP elements are overabundant, which is the so-called FIP effect. For other stars, particularly very active ones, an 'inverse FIP effect' is often observed, with low-FIP elements being underabundant. For both members of the GJ 338 binary, we find evidence for a modest inverse FIP effect, consistent with expectations from a previously reported correlation between spectral type and FIP bias. This amounts to strong evidence that all M dwarfs should exhibit the inverse FIP effect phenomenon, not just the active ones. We take the first step toward modeling the inverse FIP phenomenon in M dwarfs, building on past work that has demonstrated that MHD waves coursing through coronal loops can lead to a ponderomotive force that fractionates elements in a manner consistent with the FIP effect. We demonstrate that in certain circumstances this model can also lead to an inverse FIP effect, pointing the way to more detailed modeling of M dwarf coronal abundances in the future.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wood, Brian E.; Laming, J. Martin [Naval Research Laboratory, Space Science Division, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Karovska, Margarita, E-mail: brian.wood@nrl.navy.mil [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">323</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24062718"> <span id="translatedtitle">Disentangling hippocampal shape <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in epilepsy.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and epileptic syndromes related to malformations of cortical development (MCD) are associated with complex hippocampal morphology. The contribution of volume and position to the overall hippocampal shape in these conditions has not been studied. We propose a surface-based framework to localize volume changes through measurement of Jacobian determinants, and quantify fine-scale position and curvature through a medial axis model. We applied our methodology to T1-weighted 3D volumetric MRI of 88 patients with TLE and 78 patients with MCD, including focal cortical dysplasia (FCD, n?=?29), heterotopia (HET, n?=?40), and polymicrogyria (PMG, n?=?19). Patients were compared to 46 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Surface-based analysis of volume in TLE revealed severe ipsilateral atrophy mainly along the rostro-caudal extent of the hippocampal CA1 subfield. In MCD, patterns of volume changes included bilateral CA1 atrophy in HET and FCD, and left dentate hypertrophy in all three groups. The analysis of curvature revealed medial bending of the posterior hippocampus in TLE, whereas in MCD there was a supero-medial shift of the hippocampal body. Albeit hippocampal shape <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in TLE and MCD result from a combination of volume and positional changes, their nature and distribution <span class="hlt">suggest</span> different pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:24062718</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kim, Hosung; Mansi, Tommaso; Bernasconi, Neda</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">324</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006epsc.conf..175G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Current thinking about Jupiter's magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Repeated imaging of Jupiter's aurora has shown that the northern main oval has a distorted 'kidney bean' shape in the general range of 90-150o System III longitude, which appears unchanged since 1994. While it is more difficult to observe the conjugate regions in the southern aurora, no corresponding distortion appears in the south. Recent improved accuracy in locating the auroral footprint emission of Io has provided new information about the geometry of Jupiter's magnetic field in this and other areas. The persistent pattern of the main oval implies a disturbance of the local magnetic field, and the increased latitudinal separation of the locus of the Io footprint from the main oval implies a locally weaker field strength. The most recent images obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope Advance Camera for Surveys (ACS) allow us to complement previous observations with the location of the auroral footprints of Io, Europa, and Ganymede in the region of interest. Their footpaths vary in parallel and form a kink in the 90-150° S3 sector which strongly <span class="hlt">suggests</span> the presence of a magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in this region.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Grodent, D.; Gerard, J.-C.; Gustin, J.; Clarke, J. T.; Connerney, J. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">325</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997JAESc..15..161O"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of east and southeast Asia andtheir linear features</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map of east and southeast Asia was produced by compiling manydata sets collected by air-borne and ship-borne surveys. In order to tie between adjoining areas, DGRF-RGRF removal and a linear shift were applied to each data set. Linear features are detected from the map as a special reference to <span class="hlt">suggest</span> possible crustal structures. They can be classified into several provinces where they have similar trends. The trends <span class="hlt">suggest</span> histories of origin and their subsequent deformations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Okubo, Yasukuni; Ishihara, Takemi; Daigo, Maria Joy N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">326</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.G33B1247H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Detection of Characteristic Precipitation <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Patterns of El Nino / La Nina in Time- variable Gravity Fields by GRACE</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) satellites, launched in March 2002, have been mapping monthly gravity fields of the Earth, allowing us to infer changes in surface mass, e.g. water and ice. Past findings include the ice mass loss in southern Greenland (Luthcke et al., 2006) and its acceleration in 2004 (Velicogna and Wahr, 2006), crustal dilatation by the 2004 Sumatra Earthquake (Han et al., 2006) and the postseismic movement of water in mantle (Ogawa and Heki, 2007). ENSO (El Nino and Southern Oscillation) brings about global climate impacts, together with its opposite phenomenon, La Nina. Ropelewski and Halpert (1987) showed typical precipitation patterns in ENSO years; characteristic regional-scale precipitation <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> occur in India, tropical and southern Africa and South America. Nearly opposite precipitation <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are shown to occur in La Nina years (Ropelewski and Halpert, 1988). Here we report the detection of such precipitation <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> patterns in the GRACE monthly gravity data 2002 - 2007, which includes both La Nina (2005 fall - 2006 spring) and El Nino (2006 fall - 2007 spring) periods. We modeled the worldwide gravity time series with constant trends and seasonal changes, and extracted deviations of gravity values at two time epochs, i.e. February 2006 and 2007, and converted them into the changes in equivalent surface water mass. East Africa showed negative gravity deviation (-20.5 cm in water) in 2006 February (La Nina), which reversed to positive (18.7 cm) in 2007 February (El Nino). Northern and southern parts of South America also showed similar see-saw patterns. Such patterns closely resemble to those found meteorologically (Ropelewski and Halpert, 1987; 1988), <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> the <span class="hlt">potential</span> of GRACE as a sensor of inter-annual precipitation <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> through changes in continental water storage. We performed numerical simulations of soil moisture changes at grid points in land area incorporating the CMAP precipitation data, NCEP/NCAR temperature data, and <span class="hlt">potential</span> evapotranspiration calculated after Thornswaite (1942). We took out the soil moisture <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in 2006 February and 2007 February by modeling its time series in the same way as gravity, and confirmed that they are quantitatively consistent with GRACE gravity deviations. Out study demonstrates that satellite gravity data can detect not only of global warming signals in high latitude regions but also inter-annual climate changes in low and middle latitude continental regions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Heki, K.; Morishita, Y.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">327</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6888236"> <span id="translatedtitle">A source for the New York-Alabama magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in eastern Tennessee: Felsic intrusions concealed beneath the Paleozoic shelf strata</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Several vibroseis industry seismic lines have been reprocessed and recorrelated to obtain images from the deep crust. These lines straddle the New York-Alabama magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and intersect it at approximately right angles. Beneath the Paleozoic shelf rocks within the crystalline crust a distinct wedge-shaped geometry appears in the data that opens up to the northeast and tapers to an apex near the steepest part of the magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Two parallel reflection seismic profiles indicate that the wedge-shaped feature extends for at least 25 km in a NE-SW direction along the New York-Alabama magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The data image a geometry that is bounded above by the Paleozoic rocks of the Cumberland plateau and Valley and Ridge provinces, and below by a west dipping contact between the interpreted felsic intrusion and adjacent rocks. The intrusion exhibits overall low reflectivity with faintly visible subhorizontal reflections. The crust southeast and beneath the body is characterized by high reflectivity and a strong west-dipping fabric. The contrast between the wedge and adjacent crust could result from the emplacement of the body following events that produced the west-dipping fabric. The gravity signature requires a negative density contrast between the interpreted felsic wedge and the adjacent crust, the density of the wedge being lower. The magnetic signature can be interpreted to indicate that the wedge has a higher susceptibility than adjacent crust. The <span class="hlt">potential</span> field data are consistent with the interpretation of a granitic wedge that is accompanied by a contact aureole of even higher magnetic susceptibility. The authors propose that felsic intrusions, possibly with contact aureoles, are responsible for at least part of the strong New York-Alabama magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The striking linearity of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> <span class="hlt">suggests</span> tectonic control on the emplacement of the intrusions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hopkins, D.L.; Costain, J.K. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences); Zietz, I. (George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (United States). Inst. of Geography and Geology)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">328</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/dba/documents/factsheet_cogenitalanomalies.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Congenital <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... the abdomen might be required to determine whether abnormalities in the kidneys are present. Do congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> affect my or ... one in five people with DBA have congenital abnormalities in the kidneys, urinary tract, and genital organs. Examples are: ABSENT ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">329</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/30571833"> <span id="translatedtitle">Poland <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> with contralateral ulnar ray defect</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report an atypical case of the Poland <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Unreported features are that the hand abnormality is on the contralateral side to the chest wall defect, there is an ulnar ray predominance, and lack of syndactyly.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C V Powell; R C Coombs; T J David</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">330</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE87702696"> <span id="translatedtitle">Axial <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in External Tensor Fields.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Computation of the axial <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> for Dirac fermions in external tensor fields is studied. The sequence of the supersymmetric one-dimensional models is presented. Their supercharges are equal, after quantization, to Dirac operators in external tensor field...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">O. M. Khudaverdyan R. L. Mkrtchyan L. A. Zurabyan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">331</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6710330"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cervicobrachialgia with congenital vertebral <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and diastematomyelia.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A case of diastematomyelia in an adult female patient is reported. The relationship of the cervicobrachialgia, which was the presenting sign, to the diastematomyelia and the congenital vertebral <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is discussed. PMID:6710330</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Roosen, N; De Moor, J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">332</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/h7x4xwg07425q564.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Assessing congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> after preimplantation genetic diagnosis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background: Preimplantation genetic diagnosis is an exciting advance in prenatal diagnosis. However, the safety of embryo biopsy must be determined with respect to both pregnancy rate and cogenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Joe Leigh Simpson; Inge Liebaers</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">333</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=research+AND+method+AND+plate+AND+theory&id=EJ386135"> <span id="translatedtitle">Understanding Magnetic <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> and Their Significance.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Describes a laboratory exercise testing the Vine-Matthews-Morley hypothesis of plate tectonics. Includes 14 questions with explanations using graphs and charts. Provides a historical account of the current plate tectonic and magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> theory. (MVL)|</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shea, James H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">334</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993Metic..28R.317A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Wolf-Rayet Stars and the Isotopic <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Connection</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Isotopic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are now known to be carried by high-temperature inclusions of primitive meteorites that formed from solar reservoirs out of equilibrium with the rest of the solar nebula, as well as by various types of grains (diamond, graphite, SiC) that are considered to be of circumstellar origin, and have survived the process of incorporation into the solar system (see e.g. [1] for a recent review). Such <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> provide new clues to many important astrophysical problems, and raise the question of their nucleosynthetic origin. In fact, they offer the exciting perspective of confronting abundance observations with nucleosynthesis models for a very limited number of events, even possibly a single one. This situation is in marked contrast with the one encountered when trying to understand the bulk solar system composition. Up to now, Red Giant stars, massive mass loosing objects (of the Wolf-Rayet type), novae or supernovae have been proposed as possible contributors to the observed <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. In this paper, we revisit the role that could possibly be played in that respect by Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars. Wolf-Rayet stars are appealing isotopic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> contributors for many reasons. In particular (1) they are observed to loose mass at very large rates that can exceed 10^-5M solar masses yr^-l, the ejected material being contaminated with the products of hydrogen and helium burning, and (2) certain WR stars are known to make dust episodically in their winds [e.g., 2]. In addition, the role of WR stars would be well in line with the "bing-bang" model for the isotopic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> promoted by Reeves [3]. The aim of this contribution is to extent and update previous calculations [4,5] of the isotopic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that could be carried by the wind of WR stars of various masses and initial compositions during different phases of their evolution, those <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> possibly loading circumstellar WR grains. The calculation of the WR wind composition is performed on grounds of detailed stellar evolutionary models that incorporate extended nuclear reaction networks, as well as recent improvements in our knowledge of various basic physical ingredients, like mass loss rates, opacities, or nuclear reaction rates. Results will be presented for various radionuclides with lifetimes in excess of ~10^5 yr, which are considered to be responsible for certain observed <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, or which could lead to <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that remain unobserved at present. Isotopic patterns for the elements ranging from carbon to lead will also be presented. Those predictions will be confronted with existing data, or will help unravel cases of <span class="hlt">potential</span> interest for further laboratory quest. References: [1] Harper C. L. Jr. (1992) In Nuclei in the Cosmos II (F. Kappeler and K. Wisshak, eds.), 113-126, IOP Publ. Co. [2] Williams P. M. et al. (1992) Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc., 258, 461-475. [3] Reeves H. (1978) In Protostars and Planets (T. Gehrels, ed.), 339-426, Univ. of Arizona. [4] Arnould M. and Prantzos N. (1986) In Nucleosynthesis and Its Implications on Nuclear and Particle Physics, (J. Audouze and N. Mathieu, eds.), 363-372, Reidel. [5] Meynet G. and Arnould M. (1993) In Origin and Evolution of the Elements (N. Prantzos et al., eds.), Cambridge, in press.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Arnould, M.; Paulus, G.; Meynet, G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">335</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..11.6460N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mesozoic Sequence Magnetic <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in the South of Corad Rise, the Southern Indian Ocean</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Southern Indian Ocean is key area for understanding the fragmentation process of the Gondwana. However, tectonic history in the Southern Indian Ocean still remains less well-defined because of the sparse observations in this area. The R/V Hakuho-maru cruise KH-07-4 Leg3 were conducted to understand the tectonic history related to the Gondwana breakup in the Southern Indian Ocean between Cape Town, South Africa, and off Lutzow-Holm Bay, Antarctica. Total intensity and vector geomagnetic field measurements as well as swath bathymetry mapping were collected during the cruise. Magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data have been collected along WNW-ESE trending inferred from satellite gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> just to the south of Conrad Rise. We have also collected magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data along NNE-SSW trending lineaments from satellite gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data between the south of the Conrad Rise and off Lutzow-Holm Bay. Magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with amplitude of about 500 nT, originating from normal and reversed magnetization of oceanic crust are detected along the WNW-ESE trending structures just to the south of Conrad Rise. Those magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> most likely indicate Mesozoic magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> sequence, Mesozoic sequence magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with amplitude of about 300 nT are also observed along the NNE-SSW trending lineaments between the south of the Conrad Rise and off Lutzow-Holm Bay. Oceanic crusts formed during Cretaceous normal polarity superchron are found in both profiles, although magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> C34 has been identified just to the north of the Conrad Rise. These <span class="hlt">suggest</span> the extinct spreading axes in the south of Conrad Rise and the two different seafloor spreading systems were active around Cretaceous normal polarity superchron between the south of the Conrad Rise and off Lutzow-Holm Bay. These provide new constraints for the fragmentation process of the Gondwana.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nogi, Y.; Ikehara, M.; Nakamura, Y.; Kameo, K.; Katsuki, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kita, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">336</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57380842"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cerebral <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> and Chiari Type 1 Malformation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Objective: To analyze the association of diverse cerebral <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in a series of pediatric patients with cerebellar tonsillar ectopia. Methods: We reviewed the medical records of 60 children diagnosed with Chiari type 1 malformation (CM1), of these, 20 patients (11 boys and 9 girls; mean age 7.2 years, range 2–16 years) had an associated cerebral <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Symptoms of tonsillar ectopia</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Marcelo Galarza; Juan F. Martínez-Lage; Steven Ham; Sandeep Sood</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">337</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/3162393"> <span id="translatedtitle">“Great Salinity <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>” in the North Atlantic</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We revisited the “Great Salinity <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>” of the 1970s (GSA'70s; Dickson et al., 1988) and documented the newly identified “Great Salinity <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>” of the 1980s (hence termed GSA'80s), both propagated around the North Atlantic in a similar fashion. The advective mechanism, initially proposed to explain the observed sequence of low-salinity, low-temperature events during the GSA'70s, apparently holds also for the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Igor M. Belkin; Sydney Levitus; John Antonov; Svend-Aage Malmberg</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">338</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20850610"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lumbocostovertebral syndrome with associated VACTERL <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Lumbocostovertebral syndrome is a rare clinical association syndrome rarely accompanied by associated VACTERL <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Only one similar case has been reported previously. We describe the second case, where a male neonate born at 38 weeks of gestation had an unusually high number of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> including thoracic hemivertebrae with kyphoscoliosis, a high anorectal malformation, dextrocardia with an atrial septal defect, renal pelvic pyelectasis, hypospadias, and congenital talipes equinovarus. PMID:20850610</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lyngdoh, Toijam S; Mahalik, Santosh; Naredi, Bikash; Samujh, Ram; Khanna, Sanat</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">339</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48202532"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection Approaches for Communication Networks</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">\\u000a In recent years, network <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection has become an important area for both commercial interests as well as academic\\u000a research. Applications of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection typically stem from the perspectives of network monitoring and network security.\\u000a In network monitoring, a service provider is often interested in capturing such network characteristics as heavy flows, flow\\u000a size distributions, and the number of distinct</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Marina Thottan; Guanglei Liu; Chuanyi Ji</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">340</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3472568"> <span id="translatedtitle">Congenital <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Infant with Congenital Hypothyroidism</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Objective Congenital hypothyroidism is characterized by inadequate thyroid hormone production in newborn infants. Many infants with CH have co-occurring congenital malformations. This is an investigation on the frequency and types of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in infants with congenital hypothyroidism born from May 2006-2010 in Hamadan, west province of Iran. Methods The Iranian neonatal screening program for congenital hypothyroidism was initiated in May 2005. This prospective descriptive study was conducted in infants diagnosed with congenital hypothyroidism being followed up in Pediatric Endocrinology Clinic of Besat Hospital, a tertiary care centre in Hamadan. Cases included all infants with congenital hypothyroidism diagnosed through newborn screening program or detected clinically. <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> were identified by clinical examination, echocardiography, and X-ray of the hip during the infant’s first year of life. Results A total of 150 infants with biochemically confirmed primary congenital hypothyroidism (72 females and 78 males) were recruited during the period between May 2006-2010. Overall, 30 (20%) infants had associated congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The most common type of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> was Down syndrome. Seven infants (3.1%) had congenital cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> such as: ASD (n=3), VSD (n=2), PS (n =1), PDA (n=1). Three children (2.6%) had developmental dysplasia of the hip (n=3). Conclusion The overall frequency of Down syndrome, cardiac malformation and other birth defect was high in infants with CH. This reinforces the need to examine all infants with congenital hypothyroidism for the presence of associated congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Razavi, Zahra; Yavarikia, Alireza; Torabian, Saadat</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span 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</span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">341</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16354495"> <span id="translatedtitle">Causal hypothesis for some congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are a major cause of fetal and neonatal death and of childhood morbidity. Chromosomal and other genetic abnormalities, environmental teratogens and some nutritional deficiencies account for some congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> but the majority are of unknown etiology. The hypothesis is here proposed that a significant proportion of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and cerebral palsy of unknown etiology are attributable to a monozygotic multiple conception with monochorionic placentation and that these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, even in singletons, may be explained by early, unrecognized or unrecorded loss of one conceptus in a monochorionic monozygotic conception. The pathological mechanism is hemodynamic instability with episodes of acute feto-fetal transfusion that produce ischemic organ impairment in either or both twins. The resultant clinical abnormality will depend on range of severity (fetal death, infant death, congenital <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, normal infant), site or combination of sites (which organ[s] present[s] with the congenital <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>) and timing (early, middle or late in gestation as shown by variation in brain pathology that is observed). PMID:16354495</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pharoah, Peter O D</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">342</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004cosp...35.2804R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Space Weather Applications and Spacecraft <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The first priority for the use of space weather information for improving spacecraft performance is in the diagnosis of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> so that designs and procedures may be optimised to limit their occurrence. The association of certain spacecraft <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with the space environment is well established on the basis of statistical correlations with space weather indicators. However, the global indicators commonly used are frequently only an indirect measure of the aspects of the environment that causes the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Better diagnosis of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> should be possible by processing raw data to extract physically relevant parameters. Spacecraft operators can rapidly diagnose <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and even anticipate or avoid them if provided with now-casts and short-term forecasts of relevant hazard indicators. This is the goal of space weather applications like GEOSHAFT, part of ESA's network of space weather prototype services. The space weather indices currently available need to be supplemented by data that is more directly related to the way the space environment interacts with electronic equipment, e.g. for the outer belt, charging current is preferred to electron flux; and for solar particle events LET is preferred to energy. Instruments such as Merlin are focussed on collecting data which will aid <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> diagnosis.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rodgers, D.; Dyer, C.; Clucas, S.; Hunter, K.; Ryden, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">343</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7747752"> <span id="translatedtitle">Poland <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> with unusual associated <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: case report of an apparent disorganized defect.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report on a 2 1/2-year-old boy with absence of clavicular head of pectoralis major on the left side, ipsilateral upper limb <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the lower limbs such as popliteal webbing, median cleft of right foot, bifid left hallux, syndactyly of toes, and toenail hypoplasia. Other <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> included undescended testis, hairy nevus in the lumbosacral region, and a pedunculated finger-like tag on the right thigh. The pathogenesis of these associated <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> cannot be explained on the basis of compromised local blood supply alone. A possible link with the disorganization mutation is discussed. PMID:7747752</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kabra, M; Suri, M; Jain, U; Verma, I C</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">344</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.2290S"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> Vorticity Attribution and Causality</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The electrostatic analogy provides a well known paradigm for the concept of <span class="hlt">potential</span> vorticity (PV) attribution. Just as electric fields can be attributed to electric charges, so are localized PV <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> thought to induce far-fields of flow and temperature, at least after geostrophic adjustment. Piecewise PV inversion (PPVI) exploits this concept. Idealized examples of PPVI are discussed by selecting isolated <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> which are inverted to yield the far-field 'caused' by the PV <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The causality of attribution is tested in this study by seeking an unbalanced initial state containing the same PV <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> but without a far-field from which the balanced state can be attained by geostrophic adjustment. It is shown that the far-field of a balanced axisymmetric PV-<span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in shallow water, without mean PV-gradients, may evolve from a localized <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> without a far-field. For the more general example of the electrostatics analogy, namely a three-dimensional spherical PV-<span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, the initial state has to be non-hydrostatic and needs to exhibit a mass deficit. As this mass deficit cannot be removed during hydrostatic and geostrophic adjustment, it follows that PV attribution does not imply a causal relationship between the far-field of a PV <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> itself.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Spengler, T.; Egger, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">345</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFMPP11A1409G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Barbados Corals as Recorders of Amazon River Salinity <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Low salinity plumes of Amazon and Orinoco sourced water have previously been detected around the island of Barbados. Barbados corals may therefore have the <span class="hlt">potential</span> to record salinity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> governed by natural, climate-related, and anthropogenic changes in the Amazon and Orinoco Basin watersheds beyond the recent historic record. In order to determine whether Barbados corals record salinity variations associated with local or Amazon/Orinoco sourced signals, multiple specimens of Montastraea sp. and Siderastrea sp. coral skeletons were analyzed for stable C and O isotope and Sr/Ca variations. Corals were collected from the northwest, central-west, and southwest regions of the island to determine degree of salinity signal heterogeneity over a 5-6 year period at approximately monthly resolution. Four separate published paleotemperature equations were used to assess the importance of temperature on stable oxygen isotope composition. In situ temperature measurements obtained from NOAA show an annual sea surface temperature (SST) cycle of approximately 4 degrees Celsius off Barbados. If governed solely by SST, stable isotope data from all 8 corals in this study indicate a significantly greater annual temperature range of approximately 6 degrees Celsius. This <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that salinity related fluctuations in oxygen isotopic composition of water are an important influence on the geochemistry of Barbados corals. Some regional differences in geochemical composition of corals were apparent. Corals from the southwest of Barbados showed the clearest sub-annual isotope signal, better correlations with mean annual SST measurements, and lowest mean salinity of the regions. Corals from the central-west and northwest showed distinctly higher mean, but more variable, salinity than corals from the south. Stable carbon isotope data from southwest corals also best <span class="hlt">potentially</span> reflect the Suess Effect. Montastraea sp. corals generally show a higher paleotemperature offset from in situ values, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that the ability to extract salinity data from Barbados corals may be species-specific. These results may have implications for understanding local eddy patterns as Amazon-sourced water encounters Barbados. It is possible that the central and northern lee coasts may be less impacted by Amazon water and more subject to local restriction from open marine conditions and/or increased evaporative effects.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Greer, L.; Telfeyan, K.; Arienzo, M. M.; Rosenberg, A. D.; Waite, A. J.; Swart, P. K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">346</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57217082"> <span id="translatedtitle">The BP Oil Spill as a Cultural <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>? Institutional Context, Conflict, and Change</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This article argues that the BP Oil Spill is, <span class="hlt">potentially</span>, a “cultural <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>” for institutional changes in environmental management and fossil fuel production. The problem as defined by the spill’s context, the <span class="hlt">potential</span> solutions provided by the competing logics in that context, and the selection of problem—solution bundles through the fortuitous timing of events, and more calculative efforts of institutional</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Andrew J. Hoffman; P. Devereaux Jennings</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">347</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JGRE..116.2002B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lunar swirls: Examining crustal magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and space weathering trends</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have used multispectral images from Clementine and data from Lunar Prospector's magnetometer to conduct a survey of lunar crustal magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, prominent lunar swirls, and lesser known swirl markings to provide new information on the nature of swirls and their association with magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. We find that all swirls and swirl-like albedo patterns are associated with areas of magnetized crust, but not all areas of magnetized crust are colocated with swirl-like albedo <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. All observed swirls exhibit spectral characteristics similar to immature material and generally have slightly lower FeO values compared with their surroundings as determined with a multispectral iron-mapping method. We discuss these results in relation to the various hypotheses for swirl formation. The comet impact hypothesis for lunar swirls would not predict a difference in the spectrally determined FeO content between swirls and nearby ordinary surfaces. The compositional difference could be explained as a consequence of (1) magnetic shielding of the surface from the solar wind, which could produce anomalous space weathering (little darkening with limited reddening) and <span class="hlt">potentially</span> alter the predictions of the multispectral iron-mapping algorithm while the compositional contrast could be enhanced by delivery of lower-FeO ejecta from outside the swirl; and (2) accumulation of fine plagioclase-rich dust moving under the influence of electric fields induced by solar wind interactions with a magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Therefore, we cannot at present clearly distinguish between the solar wind shielding and electrostatic dust accumulation models for swirl formation. We describe future measurements that could contribute to solution of the puzzle of swirl origin.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Blewett, David T.; Coman, Ecaterina I.; Hawke, B. Ray; Gillis-Davis, Jeffrey J.; Purucker, Michael E.; Hughes, Christopher G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">348</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003JGRE..108.5015K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Photometric <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the lunar surface: Results from Clementine data</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We mapped the photometric characteristics of the lunar surface for several small areas using Clementine UVVIS camera images. The maps of the phase function steepness showed several anomalous sites. Several small fresh impact craters have anomalous halos in these maps. The phase function within the halos is less steep than for the surrounding mare surface. We interpret these halos to be due to geologically recent impact-caused alteration of the equilibrium millimeter-scale regolith structure. This equilibrium structure is established through micrometeoritic bombardment at a geologically short timescale. An <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of the same signature was found at the Apollo 15 landing site. We interpret it as being a result of the regolith structure alteration with the lander jets. A unique photometric <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> not correlated with albedo was found within the Reiner Gamma Formation. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that this <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is genetically related to the formation, which indicates its young age. This favors the impact hypothesis for the nature of the Reiner Gamma Formation. Our study showed that mapping of photometric characteristics is a new powerful tool in studies of the surfaces of atmosphereless bodies. Future photometric studies of the Moon with existing and new data sets are promising for a search for traces of recent seismic events, studies of the recent population of meteoroids in the inner solar system, an advance in the understanding of swirls, etc.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kreslavsky, M. A.; Shkuratov, Y. G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">349</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.V11B2028P"> <span id="translatedtitle">MODIS thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> during strombolian activity at Stromboli</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigated the spectral radiance of Stromboli volcano through a time-series of more than 1200 nighttimes and daytimes MODIS granules. MODIS images allowed us to analyse the infrared radiation of Stromboli volcano during the period spanning between 1 January 2008 and 4 September 2008. MODIS data has been resampled within a spatial mask (15 km X 15 km) including the volcano. Then we applied a cloud mask algorithm and the NTI to the all pixels in order to detect the pixel containing the thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. According to this principle, the MODVOLC algorithm detects an alert whenever a pixel has an NTI higher than a fixed threshold (-0.8); such thresholds were settled in order to avoid false alarms on a global scale. At Stromboli volcano a clear seasonal pattern is evident for the measured specific NTI trend and many thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may be detected when this parameter is lower than -0.8, as well. Therefore we processed all data by means of an automatic routine without setting any fixed threshold. Since during typical strombolian activity, thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are located within the crater area, we monitored the pixel with highest NTI within the spatial mask. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the thermal energy measured for these peaks can be better related to the amount of lava erupted, thus providing a tools to refine the estimate of the effusion rates during the typical strombolian activity.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Piscopo, D.; Cigolini, C.; Coppola, D.; Delle Donne, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">350</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/1226335"> <span id="translatedtitle">Empirical Analysis of Safety-Critical <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> During Operations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Analysis of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that occur during operations is an important means of improving the quality of current and future software. Although the benefits of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> analysis of operational software are widely recognized, there has been relatively little research on <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> analysis of safety-critical systems. In particular, patterns of software <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data for operational, safety-critical systems are not well understood. This</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Robyn R. Lutz; Ines Carmen Mikulski</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">351</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/50557606"> <span id="translatedtitle">Methods to remove <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from human body model pulse generators</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Small <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> found in pulses from HBM testers have been the subject of much recent research. Reported <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> have been shown to adversely effect HBM testing. This paper reviews the cause of many <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and describes an HBM pulse generation system that eliminates or reduces these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to negligible levels.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Evan Grund; Marcos Hernandez</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">352</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12592127"> <span id="translatedtitle">Radionuclide imaging of rare congenital renal fusion <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Demonstration of a congenital renal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> plays an important role in the treatment of patients with renal infection. These patients are prone to infections because of coexisting urinary tract <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> such as duplicated ureter, ureter opening <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and urinary stasis. Assessment of renal parenchymal damage resulting from acute or chronic renal infection is the primary indication for radionuclide imaging with Tc-99m DMSA. In addition, this technique allows congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to be identified. The authors review congenital renal fusion <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> identified in children through Tc-99m DMSA imaging. They conclude that Tc-99m DMSA imaging can reveal important diagnostic information about various congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, including fusion <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. PMID:12592127</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Volkan, Bilge; Ceylan, Emel; Kiratli, Pinar Ozgen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">353</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53853184"> <span id="translatedtitle">Different greenhouse gases as a possible origin of the different behaviour of TIR <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> observed from satellite in seismogenic areas</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Many studies have been <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> for decades a relation between Thermal Infrared (TIR) <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, observed from satellite, and seismic activity. In particular, the Robust Satellite Technique (RST) for the first time provided a statistics-based definition of \\</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. Aliano; R. Corrado; C. Filizzola; V. Lanorte; M. Lisi; R. Paciello; N. Pergola; V. Tramutoli; T. Tsamalashvili</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">354</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EPJST.216...83M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Vibrational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and marginal stability of glasses</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The experimentally measured vibrational spectrum of glasses strongly deviates from that expected in Debye's elasticity theory: The density of states deviates from Debye's ?2 law ("boson peak"), the sound velocity shows a negative dispersion in the boson-peak frequency regime, and there is a strong increase in the sound attenuation near the boson-peak frequency. A generalized elasticity theory is presented, based on the model assumption that the shear modulus of the disordered medium fluctuates randomly in space. The fluctuations are assumed to be uncorrelated and have a certain distribution (Gaussian or otherwise). Using field-theoretical techniques one is able to derive mean-field theories for the vibrational spectrum of a disordered system. The theory based on a Gaussian distribution uses a self-consistent Born approximation (SCBA),while the theory for non-Gaussian distributions is based on a coherent-<span class="hlt">potential</span> approximation (CPA). Both approximate theories appear to be saddle-point approximations of effective replica field theories. The theory gives a satisfactory explanation of the vibrational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in glasses. Excellent agreement of the SCBA theory with simulation data on a soft-sphere glass is reached. Since the SCBA is based on a Gaussian distribution of local shear moduli, including negative values, this theory describes a shear instability as a function of the variance of shear fluctuations. In the vicinity of this instability, a fractal frequency dependence of the density of states and the sound attenuation ? ?1+ a is predicted with a ? 1/2. Such a frequency dependence is indeed observed both in simulations and in experimental data. We argue that the observed frequency dependence stems from marginally stable regions in a glass and discuss these findings in terms of rigidity percolation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Marruzzo, Alessia; Köhler, Stephan; Fratalocchi, Andrea; Ruocco, Giancarlo; Schirmacher, Walter</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">355</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009cip3.conf..139S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Using Physical Models for <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection in Control Systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems are increasingly used to operate critical infrastructure assets. However, the inclusion of advanced information technology and communications components and elaborate control strategies in SCADA systems increase the threat surface for external and subversion-type attacks. The problems are exacerbated by site-specific properties of SCADA environments that make subversion detection impractical; and by sensor noise and feedback characteristics that degrade conventional <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection systems. Moreover, <span class="hlt">potential</span> attack mechanisms are ill-defined and may include both physical and logical aspects.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Svendsen, Nils; Wolthusen, Stephen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">356</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JAESc..62..616S"> <span id="translatedtitle">High-resolution residual geoid and gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data of the northern Indian Ocean - An input to geological understanding</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Geoid data are more sensitive to density distributions deep within the Earth, thus the data are useful for studying the internal processes of the Earth leading to formation of geological structures. In this paper, we present much improved version of high resolution (1? × 1?) geoid <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map of the northern Indian Ocean generated from the altimeter data obtained from Geodetic Missions of GEOSAT and ERS-1 along with ERS-2, TOPEX/POSIDEON and JASON satellites. The geoid map of the Indian Ocean is dominated by a significant low of -106 m south of Sri Lanka, named as the Indian Ocean Geoid Low (IOGL), whose origin is not clearly known yet. The residual geoid data are retrieved from the geoid data by removing the long-wavelength core-mantle density effects using recent spherical harmonic coefficients of Earth Gravity Model 2008 (EGM2008) up to degree and order 50 from the observed geoid data. The coefficients are smoothly rolled off between degrees 30-70 in order to avoid artifacts related to the sharp truncation at degree 50. With this process we observed significant improvement in the residual geoid data when compared to the previous low-spatial resolution maps. The previous version was superposed by systematic broad regional highs and lows (like checker board) with amplitude up to ±12 m, though the trends of geoid in general match in both versions. These methodical artifacts in the previous version may have arisen due to the use of old Rapp's geo-<span class="hlt">potential</span> model coefficients, as well as sharp truncation of reference model at degree and order 50. Geoid <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are converted to free-air gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and validated with cross-over corrected ship-borne gravity data of the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal. The present satellite derived gravity data matches well with the ship-borne data with Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) of 5.1-7.8 mGal, and this is found to be within the error limits when compared with other globally available satellite data. Spectral analysis of ship-borne and satellite data <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that the satellite gravity data have a resolution down to 16-18 km. Further, the geoid, residual geoid and gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are integrated with seismic data along two profiles in the Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea, and inferences have been made in terms of density distributions at different depths. The new residual geoid <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map shows excellent correlation with regional tectonic features such as Sunda subduction zone, volcanic traces (Chagos-Laccadive, Ninetyeast and 85°E ridges) and mid-ocean ridge systems (Central Indian and Carlsberg ridges).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sreejith, K. M.; Rajesh, S.; Majumdar, T. J.; Srinivasa Rao, G.; Radhakrishna, M.; Krishna, K. S.; Rajawat, A. S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">357</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22229671"> <span id="translatedtitle">Case report: a prototypical experience of 'poltergeist' activity, conspicuous quantitative electroencephalographic patterns, and sLORETA profiles - <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for intervention.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">People who report objects moving in their presence, unusual sounds, glows around other people, and multiple sensed presences but do not meet the criteria for psychiatric disorders have been shown to exhibit electrical <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over the right temporal lobes. This article reports the striking quantitative electroencephalography, sLORETA results, and experimental elicitation of similar subjective experiences in a middle-aged woman who has been distressed by these classic phenomena that began after a head injury. She exhibited a chronic electrical <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> over the right temporoinsular region. The rotation of a small pinwheel near her while she 'concentrated' upon it was associated with increased coherence between the left and right temporal lobes and concurrent activation of the left prefrontal region. The occurrence of the unusual phenomena and marked 'sadness' was associated with increased geomagnetic activity; she reported a similar mood when these variations were simulated experimentally. Our quantitative measurements <span class="hlt">suggest</span> people displaying these experiences and possible anomalous energies can be viewed clinically and <span class="hlt">potentially</span> treated. PMID:22229671</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Roll, William G; Saroka, Kevin S; Mulligan, Bryce P; Hunter, Mathew D; Dotta, Blake T; Gang, Noa; Scott, Mandy A; St-Pierre, Linda S; Persinger, Michael A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-09</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">358</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009SpWea...7.9003O"> <span id="translatedtitle">SEAES-GEO: A spacecraft environmental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> expert system for geosynchronous orbit</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Indications of the space environment hazard at any point in space and time along geosynchronous orbit (GEO) can be obtained using the set of rules described in this paper. These rules are implemented using real-time Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite particle sensor data and the magnetic index Kp. These rules should be useful for both real-time and posthoc analysis of GEO spacecraft <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The hazards covered are surface charging, internal charging, single-event effects due to solar particle events, and total dose (solar arrays). The system provides a "hazard quotient," the ratio of the instantaneous to mission-averaged likelihood of an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> due to each hazard, based on environmental measurements. With the exception of total dose, the hazard quotients are derived from lists of on-orbit <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> or their proxies, and it is assumed that the probability of future <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> will share the same functional dependence on the environment exhibited by the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the lists. Hazard quotients are <span class="hlt">potentially</span> more valuable to satellite operators than are raw measurements, as hazard quotients directly convey the statistical relationship between the radiation environment and the likelihood of an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">O'Brien, T. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">359</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20871460"> <span id="translatedtitle">Axial <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of QED in a strong magnetic field and noncommutative <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Adler-Bell-Jackiw (ABJ) <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of a 3+1 dimensional QED is calculated in the presence of a strong magnetic field. It is shown that in the regime with the lowest Landau level (LLL) dominance a dimensional reduction from D=4 to D=2 dimensions occurs in the longitudinal sector of the low energy effective field theory. In the chiral limit, the resulting <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is therefore comparable with the axial <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of a two-dimensional massless Schwinger model. It is further shown that the U{sub A}(1) <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of QED in a strong magnetic field is closely related to the nonplanar axial <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of a conventional noncommutative U(1) gauge theory.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sadooghi, N. [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics (IPM), School of Physics, P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jafari Salim, A. [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-10-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">360</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011EaSci..24..549H"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> of the ionospheric electron density close to earthquakes: Case studies of Pu'er and Wenchuan earthquakes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The electron density recorded onboard the DEMETER satellite was analyzed to search for possible <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> before earthquakes both in space and time. To distinguish pre-earthquake <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from the other <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> related to geomagnetic activity, data were filtered using the K p index. The analysis is based on the comparison of data recorded closely to earthquakes in space and time and past data for the same area. In analyzing data around the time and location of the Pu'er and Wenchuan earthquakes, obvious <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in electron density were found close to the epicenters, and some remarkable disturbances were detected before the earthquakes occurred. The results were finally compared with those of previous works that used the same data but employed different analysis methods. Good agreement was found which <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> have a close relation to the earthquake preparation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">He, Yufei; Yang, Dongmei; Qian, Jiadong; Parrot, Michel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" 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showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">361</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JESS..118..405S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of offshore Krishna-Godavari basin, eastern continental margin of India</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The marine magnetic data acquired from offshore Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin, eastern continental margin of India (ECMI), brought out a prominent NE-SW trending feature, which could be explained by a buried structural high formed by volcanic activity. The magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> feature is also associated with a distinct negative gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> similar to the one associated with 85°E Ridge. The gravity low could be attributed to a flexure at the Moho boundary, which could in turn be filled with the volcanic material. Inversion of the magnetic and gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> was also carried out to establish the similarity of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the two geological features (structural high on the margin and the 85°E Ridge) and their interpretations. In both cases, the magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were caused dominantly by the magnetization contrast between the volcanic material and the surrounding oceanic crust, whereas the low gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are by the flexures of the order of 3-4 km at Moho boundary beneath them. The analysis <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that both structural high present in offshore Krishna-Godavari basin and the 85°E Ridge have been emplaced on relatively older oceanic crust by a common volcanic process, but at discrete times, and that several of the gravity lows in the Bay of Bengal can be attributed to flexures on the Moho, each created due to the load of volcanic material.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Swamy, K. V.; Radhakrishna Murthy, I. V.; Krishna, K. S.; Murthy, K. S. R.; Subrahmanyam, A. S.; Malleswara Rao, M. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">362</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23143349"> <span id="translatedtitle">Increased incidence of coronary artery origin <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with isolated patent ductus arteriosus.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Coronary artery <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may increase the risk of sudden death. Despite awareness of this association with certain congenital heart <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> such as tetralogy of Fallot and transposition of the great arteries, it is thought to be an infrequent finding in cases of isolated patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). The authors report their experience with coronary <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in PDA patients. This study aimed to estimate the incidence of coronary artery <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in patients with PDA. The study reviewed 206 angiograms of PDA patients obtained between 1999 and 2011 to determine the origin of the coronary arteries. In 102 angiograms (49.5 %), the origin of the coronary arteries could be adequately visualized. An anomalous origin of coronary arteries was detected in 11 of the 102 patients (10.8 %). Seven of these patients had a single common coronary artery origin (6.8 %). One patient had an aberrant origin of the left coronary artery from the noncoronary sinus, and three patients had an aberrant origin of the right coronary artery: two from the left coronary sinus and one from the noncoronary sinus. These findings <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the incidence of coronary artery <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in association with an isolated PDA may be considerably higher than expected and previously reported. In view of the increased risk for sudden death with coronary <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, a reasonable approach is to determine the coronary artery origin and pathway after the diagnosis of an isolated PDA. PMID:23143349</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dotan, Moshe; Roguin, Ariel; Sinyor, Daniel; Yalonetsky, Sergey; Asaad, Khoury; Schwartz, Yitzhack; Khatib, Ihab; Lorber, Avraham</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-11-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">363</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70011277"> <span id="translatedtitle">Statistical averaging of marine magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the aging of oceanic crust.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Visual comparison of Mesozoic and Cenozoic magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the North Pacific <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that older <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> contain less short-wavelength information than younger <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in this area. To test this observation, magnetic profiles from the North Pacific are examined from crust of three ages: 0-2.1, 29.3-33.1, and 64.9-70.3Ma. For each time period, at least nine profiles were analyzed by 1) calculating the power density spectrum of each profile, 2) averaging the spectra together, and 3) computing a 'recording filter' for each time period by assuming a hypothetical seafloor model. The model assumes that the top of the source is acoustic basement, the source thickness is 0.5km, and the time scale of geomagnetic reversals is according to Ness et al. (1980). The calculated power density spectra of the three recording filters are complex in shape but show an increase of attenuation of short-wavelength information as the crust ages. These results are interpreted using a multilayer model for marine magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in which the upper layer, corresponding to pillow basalt of seismic layer 2A, acts as a source of noise to the magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. As the ocean crust ages, this noisy contribution by the pillow basalts becomes less significant to the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Consequently, magnetic sources below layer 2A must be faithful recorders of geomagnetic reversals.-AuthorPacific power density spectrum</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Blakely, R. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">364</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003JCli...16.3482M"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Amplification of East Pacific Madden-Julian Oscillation Convection and Wind <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> during June-November.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) wind and convection <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are locally amplified over the northeast Pacific warm pool during June-November. Composite analysis using NCEP reanalysis data indicates that perturbation available <span class="hlt">potential</span> energy (PAPE) production through the positive correlation of intraseasonal temperature and convective diabatic heating <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> supports the local intensification of MJO-related east Pacific warm pool wind <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. PAPE production is maximum during periods of strong MJO convection and low-level westerly wind perturbations. PAPE is converted to perturbation kinetic energy through positive correlations between intraseasonal temperature and vertical velocity. Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) temperature and NOAA outgoing longwave radiation data support the energy budget results derived from NCEP reanalysis.The amplified east Pacific circulation enhances surface convergence and latent heat flux <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> during MJO convective periods. The surface convergence <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> have a strong frictional component. Intraseasonal surface convergence and latent heat flux <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are strongly correlated (greater than 0.7) with the negative outgoing longwave radiation <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that is associated with east Pacific MJO convective regions. Surface latent heat and convergence variations may therefore be important in modulating MJO convective <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over the east Pacific during June-November. Enhanced surface flux and convergence <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with an enhanced surface circulation may intensify MJO convection, thereby creating a feedback loop that leads to the further intensification of local wind and convection <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Work with mesoscale or general circulation models is needed to confirm that surface latent heat and convergence variations are indeed important for modulating east Pacific MJO convection.Enhanced MJO convection over the boreal summer east Pacific is accompanied by positive water vapor <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> throughout the troposphere. Column precipitable water <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from both NASA Water Vapor Project (NVAP) and NCEP reanalysis are in phase with MJO convection <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over the east Pacific. These results support the observations of previous studies that the equatorial troposphere must be sufficiently moistened before significant MJO deep convection can occur. The strongest NCEP reanalysis specific humidity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at lower levels are collocated with positive surface latent heat flux and surface convergence <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Maloney, Eric. D.; Esbensen, Steven K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">365</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EOSTr..93..473K"> <span id="translatedtitle">U.S. temperature and drought: Recent <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and trends</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The spring and summer (March through August) of 2011-2012 set many new climatological records across the contiguous United States, including the hottest month in the instrumental record: July 2012. Various measures of temperature extremes and drought severity serve to put this period into historical perspective (1895 to present) and to assess to what extent the recent <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are consistent with observed trends. During spring and summer, anomalously high temperatures can combine with unusually dry conditions to amplify temperature and drought feedbacks. Observational data from 2011 and 2012 are strongly <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> of such an amplification and reveal a number of significant trends for various measures of high temperatures in the United States.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Karl, T. R.; Gleason, B. E.; Menne, M. J.; McMahon, J. R.; Heim, R. R., Jr.; Brewer, M. J.; Kunkel, K. E.; Arndt, D. S.; Privette, J. L.; Bates, J. J.; Groisman, P. Y.; Easterling, D. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">366</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3417077"> <span id="translatedtitle">Associations Between Pediatric Choledochal Cysts, Biliary Atresia, and Congenital Cardiac <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background In our institutional experience treating pediatric choledochal cysts over the last 12 years, we noted 7/32 patients (21.9%) had comorbid congenital cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. This association has not been previously described other than in isolated case reports. We aimed to quantify this association on a national level. Materials and Methods We queried the 2009 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids' Inpatient Database. Patients with a diagnosis of choledochal cyst (ICD-9-CM 75169, 75162, 75160) or biliary atresia (75161) were identified. Cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were defined using the Clinical Classification Software code (CCS 213). Comorbid choledochal cysts or biliary atresia and congenital cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were quantified in both infant (<12 mos) and child (1–18 yrs) subpopulations. Results Of 1,646 estimated discharges for patients with choledochal cysts, 506 (30.7%) were for patients who also had congenital cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, compared to 2.6% in the general hospitalized population (?2, p<0.0001). The frequency of congenital cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> was lower in 1,973 hospitalizations for biliary atresia (13.8%) than in those for patients with choledochal cysts (?2, p<0.0001). Cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were detected in 44.9% of choledochal cyst hospitalizations for infants <12 months (vs. 3.44% general hospitalized population; ?2, p<0.0001), but in 6.9% of for children ages 1–18 yrs (vs. 1.3% general hospitalized population; ?2, p<0.0001). Conclusions A strong association was observed between pediatric choledochal cysts and congenital cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that more commonly manifests in infancy. When choledochal cysts are diagnosed either prenatally or in infancy, we <span class="hlt">suggest</span> echocardiographic screening for cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, which may impact timing of surgery and anesthetic planning.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Murphy, Andrew J.; Axt, Jason R.; Lovvorn, Harold N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">367</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUFM.P23A0227K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lunar magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the solar wind: Possible existence of mini-magnetosphere</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It has been <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that lunar magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> fields are interacted with the solar wind plasma to form the mini-magnetosphere on the lunar surface. From the Lunar Prospector (LP) observations of magnetic fields, Lin et al.(1998) pointed out that a mini-magnetosphere was formed in the solar wind downstream of the strong magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in Imbrium antipode region. Harnett et al.(2000, 2002) demonstrated the presence of lunar mini-magnetospheres with MHD and particle simulations. If the mini-magnetosphere exists on the lunar surface and deflects solar wind particles, its role of barrier could produce a high-albedo region around the magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. In this study, we mainly investigate magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> fields in the solar wind using the LP MAG low-altitude (15-40 km) data of level1. We detected lunar magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> after preprocessing of the level1 data, using Hood's (1981) technique. In the present study, magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were mapped from the data sets in the tail lobe, the moon wake and the solar wind, and were compared with each other. We preliminarily analyzed three typical <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> regions (Crisium antipode region, Descartes region, and Reiner Gamma region), and all of these three regions show clear magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> even in the solar wind. We further carried out the detailed analysis of Reiner Gamma region. Its contour pattern of magnetic field intensities in the tail lobe or the wake is almost symmetrical with respect to the north-south line. However, such symmetry is obviously distorted in the solar wind to show some elongation toward the downstream of the solar wind. Also, the form of distortion seems to be changed when the solar wind conditions (dynamic pressure, the angle of incidence, and so on) are different. These results may support existence of the mini-magnetosphere in Reiner Gamma region. We will discuss the possible mini-magnetosphere comparing the LP MAG data with the ACE data of the solar wind.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kurata, M.; Tsunakawa, H.; Saito, Y.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">368</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003EAEJA.....8011A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Satellite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> caused by disturbed space weather</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Seven types of satellite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are discussed and examples are given from historical reports. Types of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and their causes are: o Single Event Upsets (SEU) caused by penetrating energetic ions; o Deep dielectric ("bulk") charging (DDC) by high-energy electrons; o Surface charging by thermal electrons causing electrostatic discharge (ESD) and Phantom Commands (PC); o Magnetopause crossing events (MPE) that reverse ambient fields at geostationary satellite altitudes; o dB/dT of field-aligned currents causing satellite tumbling at lower altitudes; o Optical effects of high-energy ions on star-trackers and limb sensors; and o Power panel degradation from high-energy ions. Recent and older events are considered, in part because the problems recur even though technology has changed to take them into account and awareness of the conditions causing them seems widespread. Systematic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> reporting is requested to increase the significance of records collected for particular events.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Allen, J. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">369</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011IJMPA..26.4475C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Supergravity Dual of the Superconformal <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The supergravity dual of the superconformal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> multiplet in a four-dimensional supersymmetric gauge theory is investigated. We consider a well-established dual correspondence between an { N} = 1 SU(N+M) × SU(N) supersymmetric gauge theory and type IIB superstring in a space-time background described by the Klebanov-Strassler solution. Based on the fact that fractional D3-branes lead to superconformal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> on the field theory side and in the meantime deform AdS5 × T1, 1 space-time background on the gravity side, we observe the five-dimensional gauged supergravity yielded from the spontaneous compactification on the deformed T1, 1, and find that the spontaneous breaking of local symmetries and the consequent super-Higgs effect in the gauged AdS5 supergravity should be the dual of the superconformal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of the four-dimensional supersymmetric gauge theory.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chen, Wenfeng</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">370</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24036791"> <span id="translatedtitle">Type II First Branchial Cleft <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">First branchial cleft <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is a rare disease of the head and neck. It accounts for less than 8% of all branchial abnormalities. It is classified into type I, which is thought to arise from the duplication of the membranous external ear canal and are composed of ectoderm only, and type II that have ectoderm and mesoderm. Because of its rarity, first branchial cleft <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is often misdiagnosed and results in inappropriate management. A 9-year-old girl presented to us with fistula in the submandibular region and discharge in the external ear. Under general anesthesia, complete surgical excision of the fistula tract was done through step-ladder approach, and the histopathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis of type II first branchial cleft <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. PMID:24036791</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Al-Mahdi, Akmam H; Al-Khurri, Luay E; Atto, Ghada Z; Dhaher, Ameer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">371</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.2578L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lithospheric sources of magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the Aldan shield and Alpha Ridge</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Regional <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> Aldan Shield is dated to ancient greenstone belt of the earth's crust. Belt is characterized by high depth forming sequences. Rocks of the upper and middle part of the section contain ferruginous quartzite. Geomagnetic and density sections allowed to estimate the power density and magnetic crustal heterogeneities. The methodology of constructing the cuts is the spectral-spatial representation of the fields, convertible into the underlying magnetic and density cuts. According to satellite data confirms the presence of regional <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> within the Aldan shield, at an altitude of 100 km, it is about 100 nT. The presence of the Central Aldan crast-mantle fault depth of 50-80 km defines metallogenic situation of the region. The structure of the Aldan Shield detects rotational structure. Regional magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> arc tangent frame Central Aldan region. May <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that such behavior of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is caused by of the ancient (Pre-Cambrian) fireplace mantle (the nucleus). Studies have shown that lithospheric sources Aldan shield on satellite magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (?T) a Russia are located at depths of 30 to 35 and 40 to 70 km. They are confined to vertical zone deconsolidated at depths of about 30 and 40 - 70 km. By magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (?T) a Russian in the crust of the Aldan shield a depth of 15 - 17 km and 25 - 30 km depth revealed magnetite zone, the formation of which is due to the processes of regional metamorphism of ancient crust. Studies have shown the limits of the depth distribution of magnetite zones, mosaic developed within the crust of the Aldan shield after repeated activation of the processes of regional metamorphism.Alpha Ridge in the Arctic Ocean is one of the largest igneous provinces in the world. Tectonic history of the Arctic while not significantly deciphered. Deep structure of the Earth's crust are poorly understood Linearly elongated magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> Alpha Ridge clearly seen at the height of the satellite. At an altitude of 100 km reach values of 100 - 120 nT, with gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the reduction of Faye in the central part is only 0 - 20 mg, to the periphery of the ridge rising to values of 40-50 mg. The maximum values of the magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are confined to the Alpha Ridge of the span latitudes 84 - 85N.Deep density and magnetic sections along the latitudinal profiles by satellite measurements showed the following. Lithospheric sources of satellite magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> Alpha Ridge located at a depth of about 40 km and are confined to vertical zone centered deconsolidated at depths 30 - 40 km. Higher in the section allocated powerful lens decompressed at a depth of 9 - 18 km.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Litvinova, Tamara; Petrova, Alevtina</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">372</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1047647"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection for Discrete Sequences: A Survey</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This survey attempts to provide a comprehensive and structured overview of the existing research for the problem of detecting <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in discrete/symbolic sequences. The objective is to provide a global understanding of the sequence <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection problem and how existing techniques relate to each other. The key contribution of this survey is the classification of the existing research into three distinct categories, based on the problem formulation that they are trying to solve. These problem formulations are: 1) identifying anomalous sequences with respect to a database of normal sequences; 2) identifying an anomalous subsequence within a long sequence; and 3) identifying a pattern in a sequence whose frequency of occurrence is anomalous. We show how each of these problem formulations is characteristically distinct from each other and discuss their relevance in various application domains. We review techniques from many disparate and disconnected application domains that address each of these formulations. Within each problem formulation, we group techniques into categories based on the nature of the underlying algorithm. For each category, we provide a basic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection technique, and show how the existing techniques are variants of the basic technique. This approach shows how different techniques within a category are related or different from each other. Our categorization reveals new variants and combinations that have not been investigated before for <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection. We also provide a discussion of relative strengths and weaknesses of different techniques. We show how techniques developed for one problem formulation can be adapted to solve a different formulation, thereby providing several novel adaptations to solve the different problem formulations. We also highlight the applicability of the techniques that handle discrete sequences to other related areas such as online <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection and time series <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chandola, Varun [ORNL; Banerjee, Arindam [University of Minnesota; Kumar, Vipin [University of Minnesota</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">373</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhLB..708..300D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Singlet deflected <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>/gauge mediation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study an extension of the standard <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>/gauge mediation scenario where the messenger fields have direct interactions with an extra gauge singlet. This realizes a phenomenologically viable NMSSM-like scenario free of the ?-b problem. Current cosmological constraints imply a small size for the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-mediation contributions, unless some source of R-parity violation is permitted. In the latter case the allowed regions in the parameter space can be substantially larger than in the corresponding gauge-mediation scenario.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">de Blas, J.; Delgado, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">374</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/details.jsp?query_id=0&page=0&ostiID=1093253"> <span id="translatedtitle">Radioactive <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> discrimination from spectral ratios</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A method for discriminating a radioactive <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> from naturally occurring radioactive materials includes detecting a first number of gamma photons having energies in a first range of energy values within a predetermined period of time and detecting a second number of gamma photons having energies in a second range of energy values within the predetermined period of time. The method further includes determining, in a controller, a ratio of the first number of gamma photons having energies in the first range and the second number of gamma photons having energies in the second range, and determining that a radioactive <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is present when the ratio exceeds a threshold value.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Maniscalco, James; Sjoden, Glenn; Chapman, Mac Clements</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-08-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">375</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013CG.....51..247G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Preferential filtering for gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> separation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the preferential filtering method for gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> separation based on Green equivalent-layer concept and Wiener filter. Compared to the conventional upward continuation and the preferential continuation, the preferential filtering method has the advantage of no requirement of continuation height. The method was tested both on the synthetic gravity data of a model of multiple rectangular prisms and on the real gravity data from a magnetite area in Jilin Province, China. The results show that the preferential filtering method produced better separation of gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> than both the conventional low-pass filtering and the upward continuation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Guo, Lianghui; Meng, Xiaohong; Chen, Zhaoxi; Li, Shuling; Zheng, Yuanman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">376</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21424052"> <span id="translatedtitle">Talon cusp: a morphological dental <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Talon cusp is a rare developmental <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> that occurs most commonly on the lingual side of the incisors. It may cause various clinical problems, such as occlusal interference, irritation of the tongue, pulpal necrosis, caries and periodontal problems. Genetics is thought to be a major cause for the occurrence of this <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. This article reports three cases of talon cusp in three members of the same family. Clinical and radiographic findings of talon cusp in two siblings and the mother are presented. Early diagnosis of talon cusp helps in selecting the correct treatment procedure and avoiding complications. PMID:21424052</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Balcio?lu, H A; Kekliko?lu, N; Kökten, Gülseren</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">377</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3241545"> <span id="translatedtitle">Association of rib <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and childhood cancers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background: Congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> have been found more often in children with cancer than in those without. Rib abnormalities (RAs) have been associated with childhood cancer; however, studies have differed in the type of RAs and cancers implicated. Methods: Rib abnormalities were assessed predominantly by X-ray in a hospital-based case–control study. Results: There was a significant difference in the number of cases vs controls with RAs after controlling for age and sex, specifically for acute myelogenous leukaemia, renal tumours, and hepatoblastoma. Conclusion: The results of this study support previous reports that there is an association of rib <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with childhood cancer.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zierhut, H; Murati, M; Holm, T; Hoggard, E; Spector, L G</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">378</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998E%26PSL.158..143V"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Lower Cretaceous, syn-extensional magmatic source for a linear belt of positive magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: the Pacific Margin <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> (PMA), western Palmer Land, Antarctica</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ar-Ar laserprobe dating <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that in western Palmer Land, plutons associated with a curvilinear belt of positive magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> along the Pacific margin of the Antarctic Peninsula, the Pacific Margin <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> (PMA), are Early Cretaceous in age. The new ages, combined with published structural and geochemical studies, <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that highly magnetically susceptible gabbroic to tonalitic-granodioritic rocks, the probable source of the Palmer Land segment of the PMA, were generated during Early Cretaceous extension when mantle-derived basaltic magma intruded mafic lower to middle crust. Continued extension uplifted newly generated, lower to middle crust through the Curie Isotherm (ca. 600°C) forming the magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The PMA broadly tracks an arc-parallel band in western Palmer Land where crustal extension and uplift of lower crust were greatest. The close spatial relationship between the PMA and Early Cretaceous, syn-extensional plutons <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> area can be used as a crude proxy for the volume of a related plutonic complex; the areal extent of the PMA indicates that a significant proportion of the arc crust was newly generated during the Early Cretaceous in western Palmer Land.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vaughan, A. P. M.; Wareham, C. D.; Johnson, A. C.; Kelley, S. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">379</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004cosp...35..503S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Albedo <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and paleomagnetism on the Moon</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">There are two main classes of hypothesises of the swirl origin: formation of the swirls in the regions antipodal to large impact basins (1), and formation of the swirls in result of cometary impacts (2). The first version of the swirl origin proposed that swirls represent regions whose higher albedo have been preserved due to deflection of the solar wind ion bombardment by strong crustal fields. It was proposed the most likely magnetization mechanism in which the ionized vapor cloud produced in a hypervelocity basin-forming impact expands around the Moon and concentrates the pre-existing ambient magnetic field at the basin antipode. The recent data obtained by the Lunar Prospector show that swirl features are associated with magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and they lie on regions antipodal to the Imbrium, Serenitatis, and Crisium basins. On the other hand it was <span class="hlt">suggested</span> a mechanism of a local magnetic field origin on the Moon in result of cometary impact. The local shock produced by collision of the main mass of a comet nucleus with the Moon will indeed occur just when the ambient solar wind fields have been strongly enhanced, as the large partially ionized cometary coma is compressed against the lunar surface. It was considered that swirl patterns on the lunar surface could be related to the imprint of recent cometary impacts. This hypothesis does not <span class="hlt">suggest</span> correlation between the swirl locations and the regions antipodal to basins. Locations of the regions antipodal to young and large (diameter of the main rim is more than 500 km) basins were analysed. The more strong correlation is observed for youngest large basins: Orientale and Imbrium (3.2 - 3.8 b.y.). However, the swirls are absent in region antipodal to youngest (younger than Imbrium basin) Schrodinger basin. The swirl area is observed on region antipodal to Serenitatis basin, but any swirl markings are absent on regions antipodal to Humorum, Hertzprung, and Humboldtianum basins in spate of similar ages and sizes of them. On the other hand, there are two cases of absence of correlation between swirl areas and regions antipodal to the large impact. The Reiner Gamma formation is most obvious example of that the correlation mentioned above is not strong and do not exclude the swirl origin associated with external reason, such as cometary impact. Finally, it is needed to note that remote sensing determinations shown that the swirl's age is not more than 107 years. Therefore, these formations can not appear as result of large impacts when the lunar basins were formed. Nature of the swirl formations and connection of them with magnetization of lunar surface materials are open questions in lunar science.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shevchenko, V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">380</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010cosp...38..968M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Imaging riometer observation in South Atlantic <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The total geomagnetic field intensity is especially weak around the southern part of Latin America. This region is called South Atlantic <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> (SAA). We named this singularity region as "Geomagnetic Hole". High energetic particles larger than 100keV are precipitating into Geomagnetic Hole from Radiation belt. Since the intensity of Geomagnetic Hole is sharply decreasing now, the quantity of particle precipitation in this region will become more large near future. In order to examine Geomagnetic Hole phenomena, imaging riometer, photometer and other instruments are installed at INPE southern space observatory (SSO) and started observation since 1997. We also installed similar instruments and continue the observation at Concepcion / Punta Arenas in Chile and Kakioka in Japan. We study Cosmic Noise Absorption (CNA) obtained by imaging riometer and their relationships to particle data by GOES Satellite. From our analysis results, typical CNA events are observed in associated with big geomagnetic storm period at SSO and GOES particle date shows sharp decrease of energetic particle in this time. It <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that radiation belt particles are precipitating to Geomagnetic Hole during ge-omagnetic storm period. Sometimes, CNA events are also observed during big substorm period and during the X-ray flare event. We also examined Punta Arenas, Concepcion and Kakioka imaging riometer data during geomagnetic storm time. However, typical CNA corresponding to SSO event is not found in our analysis. Our preliminary result <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that particle precip-itation region is confined in a limited area around SSO, Brazil. On the other hands, Traveling Ionosphere Disturbance (TID) events are also observed at Concepcion and Kakioka as well as SSO by imaging riometer. Generally, number density of ionosphere electron increases and electron density disturbance with stripe-like structures are traveling during TID event. From imaging riometer observation, similar stripe-like CNA structure are also recognized during this TID event. It means that CNA occurs by not only energetic particle precipitation but also F-layer electron density disturbance. In order to examine the latitudinal/longitudinal width and its dynamical variation of CNA (or particle precipitation) more in detail, more imaging riometer are planning to install at Trelew Geomagnetic Observatory, Argentina and University of Vale de Paraiba, Brazil around SSO near future.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Makita, Kazuo; Hoshino, Mituo; Kato, Yasuo; Masanori, Nishino; Schuch, Nelson Jorge; Foppiano, Alberto J.; Ovalle, Ellias; Tanaka, Yoshi; Monreal, Ricardo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a 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href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">381</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23714436"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ovulation induction and epigenetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this systematic review of ovulation induction and epigenetic control, studies mainly done in the mouse model highlight how hormone treatments may be prejudicial to the epigenetic reprogramming of gametes as well as early embryos. Moreover, the hormone protocols used in assisted reproduction may also modify the physiologic environment of the uterus, a <span class="hlt">potential</span> link to endometrial epigenetic disturbances. At present, the few available data in humans are insufficient to allow us to independently determine the impact of a woman's age and infertility problems and treatment protocols and hormone doses on such processes as genomic imprinting. PMID:23714436</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fauque, Patricia</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">382</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1989GeCoA..53.3331S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Is plagioclase removal responsible for the negative EU <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the source regions of mare basalts?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The nearly ubiquitous presence of a negative Eu <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the mare basalts has been <span class="hlt">suggested</span> to indicate prior separation and flotation of plagioclase from the basalt source region during its crystallization from a lunar magma ocean (LMO). Are there any mare basalts derived from a mantle source which did not experience prior plagioclase separation? Crystal chemical rationale for REE substitution in pyroxene <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the combination of REE size and charge, M2 site characteristics of pyroxene, fO2, magma chemistry, and temperature may account for the negative Eu <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the source region of some types of primitive, low TiO2 mare basalts. This origin for the negative Eu <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> does not preclude the possibility of the LMO as many mare basalts still require prior plagioclase crystallization and separation and/or hybridization involving a KREEP component.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shearer, C. K.; Papike, J. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">383</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7060969"> <span id="translatedtitle">Is plagioclase removal responsible for the negative Eu <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the source regions of mare basalts</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The nearly ubiquitous presence of a negative Eu <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the mare basalts has been <span class="hlt">suggested</span> to indicate prior separation and flotation of plagioclase from the basalt source region during its crystallization from a lunar magma ocean (LMO). Are there any mare basalts derived from a mantle source which did not experience prior plagioclase separation Crystal chemical rationale for REE substitution in pyroxene <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the combination of REE size and charge, M2 site characteristics of pyroxene, fO{sub 2}, magma chemistry, and temperature may account for the negative Eu <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the source region of some types of primitive, low TiO{sub 2} mare basalts. This origin for the negative Eu <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> does not preclude the possibility of the LMO as many mare basalts still require prior plagioclase crystallization and separation and/or hybridization involving a KREEP component.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shearer, C.K.; Papike, J.J. (South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City (USA))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">384</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3378853"> <span id="translatedtitle">Loss of Msx2 Function Down-Regulates the FoxE3 Expression and Results in Anterior Segment Dysgenesis Resembling Peters <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Complex molecular interactions dictate the developmental steps that lead to a mature and functional cornea and lens. Peters <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is one subtype of anterior segment dysgenesis especially due to abnormal development of the cornea and lens. MSX2 was recently implicated as a <span class="hlt">potential</span> gene that is critical for anterior segment development. However, the role of MSX2 within the complex mechanisms of eye development remains elusive. Our present study observed the morphologic changes in conventional Msx2 knockout (KO) mice and found phenotypes consistent with Peters <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and microphthalmia seen in humans. The role of Msx2 in cornea and lens development was further investigated using IHC, in situ hybridization, and quantification of proliferative and apoptotic lens cells. Loss of Msx2 down-regulated FoxE3 expression and up-regulated Prox1 and crystallin expression in the lens. The FoxE3 and Prox1 malfunction and precocious Prox1 and crystallin expression contribute to a disturbed lens cell cycle in lens vesicles and eventually to cornea-lentoid adhesions and microphthalmia in Msx2 KO mice. The observed changes in the expression of FoxE3 <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that Msx2 is an important contributor in controlling transcription of target genes critical for early eye development. These results provide the first direct genetic evidence of the involvement of MSX2 in Peters <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and the distinct function of MSX2 in regulating the growth and development of lens vesicles.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhao, Jiangyue; Kawai, Kirio; Wang, Hongyan; Wu, Di; Wang, Mingwu; Yue, Zhicao; Zhang, Jinsong; Liu, Yi-Hsin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">385</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005ASAJ..118Q1856L"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggested</span> noise criteria for plumbing systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The issue of noise that is generated by plumbing systems has been addressed in several articles and texts in the acoustic literature, but most of this information deals with a description of the various noise generation mechanisms and recommended methods of controlling noise from plumbing fixtures and piping. As with any noise source that has the <span class="hlt">potential</span> for generating annoyance, the question of how much noise is too much noise eventually arises. Chapter 47 of the 2003 ASHRAE Applications Handbook contains newly published guidelines for plumbing noise criteria as it impacts building occupants. This paper discusses the ASHRAE guidelines, and it also <span class="hlt">suggests</span> additional noise criteria for other plumbing-related sources of noise in multitenant buildings.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lilly, Jerry</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">386</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUFM.B22B..08A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mass-47 of Atmospheric CO2: Tropospheric Seasonal Variations and Stratospheric <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">CO2 concentration in air and its ?13C and ?18O values are used to constrain fluxes to and from the atmosphere. However, the large number of sources and sinks prevent these from fully constraining the budget. Molecules containing two rare isotopes <span class="hlt">potentially</span> carry additional information. We examined CO2 having mass 47, mostly 13C18O16O, in ambient air from Pasadena, CA, and in stratospheric air. We report data using ?_{47, mass 47 <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, defined as the deviation of R47 from that expected for a random distribution of isotopologues. At thermodynamic equilibrium, CO2 closely approaches the random distribution at very high temperatures whereas at low temperatures bonds between 13C and 18O preferentially form to produce positive ?47. Most low temperature sources of tropospheric CO2 involve isotopic exchange with water that should drive CO2 toward thermodynamic equilibrium and are likely to result in ?47 values reflecting the exchange temperature. Such processes are expected to lead to seasonal variations with maximum winter values of 0.99‰ and minimum summer values of 0.92‰, based on averaged temperatures in Pasadena, CA. These values should then be decreased slightly by CO2 from combustion sources, but the seasonal range should be little changed. During 2004, measured ?47 was 0.76‰ in winter, increased to 0.87‰ in summer, gradually decreased to 0.82‰ in autumn and increased again to 0.93‰ in June 2005. Summer values approached equilibrium at the local mean temperature (22° C, 0.94‰) but winter values were always lower than predicted (16° C, 0.97‰). ?47 pattern during 2004 was approximately synchronized with that for ?13C, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> vegetation control for both tracers. Importantly, the observed variations were significantly greater than predicted at equilibrium, and the pattern was opposite of that predicted, indicating that at least one of the major fluxes does not reflect equilibrium values. We hypothesize that exchange of atmospheric CO2 with leaf water during photosynthesis drives ?47 toward equilibrium values in summer and that respiration produces CO2 with values lower than equilibrium and draws the atmospheric value down in winter when photosynthetic activity is low. Stratospheric CO2 is enriched in both 18O and 17O by isotopic exchange with ozone via O(1D). This reaction creates 17O <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (?17O) in stratospheric CO2, which are reset at the surface by exchange with water and can be used to constrain gross photosynthetic fluxes. We find that stratospheric CO2 samples with high ?17O values (2.6 and 5.9‰) also had exceptionally high ?47 values (1.28 to 1.61‰), <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that stratospheric mass-47 <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, like 17O <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, are produced by reaction with O(1D). If this is the mechanism responsible, however, photochemical modeling shows that there must be a non-negligible effect of 13C in isotope exchange between CO2 and O(1D) (e.g., perhaps due to the lower zero point energy of 13C-18O bonds, such that decomposition of CO3* preferentially produces 13C18O16O, thus increasing ?47). In summary, since ?47 in atmospheric CO2 is controlled by factors other than those controlling ?13C and ?18O, it <span class="hlt">potentially</span> provides useful additional information for deconvolving fluxes based on atmospheric records.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Affek, H. P.; Guo, W.; Eiler, J. M.; Boering, K. A.; Hoag, K. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">387</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21166823"> <span id="translatedtitle">Recovery of opercular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in gilthead sea bream, Sparus aurata L.: morphological and morphometric analysis.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Opercular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are very frequent in reared gilthead sea bream and these can negatively influence the product value. Field observations have <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that opercular malformations can recover over time. In order to verify this hypothesis, 140-day-old gilthead sea bream with monolateral opercular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were divided into three groups, according to the type and increasing seriousness of the opercular malformations, and another group was composed of fish with bilateral opercular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. All groups were monitored for 16 months. In the group with monolateral <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, the opercular recovery process was documented by morphological (stereomicroscope) and morphometric analysis. For the latter analysis, two relevant areas, A and T, were identified in the cephalic region. The ratio (T - A)/T, tending to 1, represents the recovery index (RI) of anatomical integrity and quantifies the recovery level of opercular complex <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Results <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that the recovery process was considerable over the 16 months of investigation but should not be considered complete. At the end of the study, 61% of the gilthead sea bream population with monolateral opercular defects recovered external integrity, whereas the population with bilateral defects showed a poorer recovery capability. PMID:21166823</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Beraldo, P; Canavese, B</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">388</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001JGR...10614601H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mapping and modeling of magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the northern polar region of Mars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Vector crustal magnetic field maps of the northern polar zone (60°N to 90°N) are constructed from selected Mars Global Surveyor magnetometer data obtained during the period from May 28 to September 13, 1998. Two medium <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (amplitudes >50 nT at 170 km altitude) are mapped in locations consistent with earlier studies. No visible surface features correlate with the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that the sources lie beneath the visible veneer of polar deposits and volcanic lava flows. If so, then they formed prior to the immediate end of the heavy bombardment (upper Hesperian) period. Modeling of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> vector field components combined with independent constraints on the depth to the Curie isotherm yields lower limits on bulk magnetization intensities (0.4-0.9 A/m) that are significantly greater than those measured for Martian (SNC) meteorite samples. Rocks that contain substantially more titanomagnetite than SNC meteorites, or that contain magnetic phases in addition to titanomagnetite, possibly resulting from hydrothermal alteration, are therefore <span class="hlt">suggested</span>. Alternatively, remanence acquisition in a field of Earthlike intensity (~50 ?T), rather than in the relatively weak inferred paleointensities for SNC meteorites (~1-10 ?T), would also help to explain the relatively strong inferred remanent magnetizations. The approximate south paleomagnetic pole positions corresponding to these two <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> sources are located in a region between Olympus Mons and the present north rotational pole. This region is adjacent to the approximate location predicted by Melosh [1980] for the paleopole prior to the formation of the Tharsis gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hood, L. L.; Zakharian, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">389</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.eecs.lehigh.edu/~chuah/publications/wish07_anomaly.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">ECG <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection via Time Series Analysis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recently, wireless sensor networks have been proposed for assisted living and residential monitoring. In such networks, physiological sensors are used to monitor vital signs e.g. heartbeats, pulse rates, oxygen saturation of senior citizens. Sensor data is sent periodically via wireless links to a personal computer that analyzes the data. In this paper, we propose an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection scheme based on</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mooi Choo Chuah; Fen Fu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">390</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49667581"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Voyager <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> and the GEM Theory</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">For over a decade, the Pioneer <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> (PA) was an object of study and remains unresolved. Basically it is a sunward constant acceleration of the spacecraft that appeared unambiguously after the satellites passage beyond Saturn. It now appears possible the PA acceleration is the appearance of second, string-like, solution to the Einstein Equations first discussed in the context of charged</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. E. Brandenburg</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">391</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22161464"> <span id="translatedtitle">Uterine <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and recurrent pregnancy loss.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Women with recurrent pregnancy loss have a 3.2 to 6.9% likelihood of having a major uterine <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and a 1.0 to 16.9% chance of having an arcuate uterus. Bicornuate and septate uterine have a negative impact on reproductive outcomes and are associated with subsequent euploid miscarriage. The impact of an arcuate uterus on pregnancy outcome remains unclear. There are no definitive criteria to distinguish among the arcuate, septate, and bicornuate uteri. The American Fertility Society classification of Müllerian <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is the most common standardized classification of uterine <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. According to estimates, 65 to 85% of patients with bicornuate or septate uteri have a successful pregnancy outcome after metroplasty. However, 59.5% of the patients with such <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> have a successful subsequent pregnancy without surgery, with a cumulative live birthrate of 78.0%. There is no case-control study to compare live birthrates in women who had surgery compared with those who did not. Strict criteria to distinguish between the bicornuate and septate uterus should be established. Further study is needed to confirm the benefits of metroplasty. PMID:22161464</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sugiura-Ogasawara, Mayumi; Ozaki, Yasuhiko; Katano, Kinue; Suzumori, Nobuhiro; Mizutani, Eita</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-08</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">392</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24082660"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magnetic resonance imaging in obstructive Müllerian <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich (HWW) syndrome is a very rare congenital <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of the urogenital tract involving Müllerian ducts and Wolffian structures. It is characterized by the triad of didelphys uterus, obstructed hemivagina, and ipsilateral renal agenesis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a sensitive, non-invasive diagnostic modality for demonstrating anatomic variation and associated complications. PMID:24082660</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sen, Kamal Kumar; Balasubramaniam, Dhivya; Kanagaraj, Vikrant</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">393</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=neurotransmitter&id=EJ802118"> <span id="translatedtitle">Psychoeducational Implications of Sex Chromosome <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Numerous <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> involving the sex chromosomes (X or Y) have been documented and their impact on development, learning, and behavior studied. This article reviews three of these disorders, Turner syndrome, Klinefelter syndrome, and Lesch-Nyhan disease. Each of these three is associated with one or more selective impairments or behavioral…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wodrich, David L.; Tarbox, Jennifer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">394</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/1189016"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hyperspectral imagery: Clutter adaptation in <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Hyperspectral sensors are passive sensors that simultaneously record images for hundreds of contiguous and narrowly spaced regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Each image corresponds to the same ground scene, thus creating a cube of images that contain both spatial and spectral information about the objects and backgrounds in the scene. In this paper, we present an adaptive <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detector designed</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Susan M. Schweizer; José M. F. Moura</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">395</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ADNDT..99...62P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Table of hyperfine <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in atomic systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This table is a compilation of experimental values of magnetic hyperfine <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in atomic and ionic systems. The last extensive compilation was published in 1984 by Büttgenbach [S. Büttgenbach, Hyperfine Int. 20 (1984) 1] and the aim here is to make an up to date compilation. The literature search covers the period up to January 2011.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Persson, J. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">396</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/59293635"> <span id="translatedtitle">Collie eye <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the United Kingdom</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Approximately 2500 rough collies, smooth collies and Shetland sheepdogs were examined during a three year period in an attempt to establish the incidence of collie eye <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the United Kingdom and to produce data on the hereditability of the disease. The overall incidence in the two collie breeds was approximately 64 per cent, but the disease was seen with</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">PG Bedford</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">397</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JGCD...33.1115A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lorentz Accelerations in the Earth Flyby <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Mission engineers have detected an unexpected <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> on six spacecraft during low-altitude gravity-assist maneuvers around Earth. This Earth flyby <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> involves an acceleration that, to date, researchers cannot account for based on known forces or errors in measurement or modeling. This paper evaluates Lorentz accelerations associated with spacecraft electrostatic charging as a possible explanation for the Earth flyby <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. This analysis does not explicitly address plasma physics but, instead, bases its conclusions on fundamental six-state flight dynamics. The analysis focuses on the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous spacecraft, because it exhibited the largest anomalous error with the smallest estimated residuals. The analysis takes the form of a boundary-value problem in which vector-disturbance time histories are found numerically through nonlinear optimization methods. The analysis identifies the unknown, but required, acceleration based on a model of the Lorentz-force interaction. The algorithm cannot converge on a solution that fully reproduces the anomalous error in all six orbital states. It is unlikely, based on this analysis, that Lorentz forces cause the flyby <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Atchison, Justin A.; Peck, Mason A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">398</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JGP....62.1038H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Modular forms and generalized <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> cancellation formulas</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, we generalize the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> cancellation formulas given by Alvarez-Gaumé and Witten (1983), Liu (1995) and Han and Zhang (2004) [1,2,7] to the cases where an auxiliary bundle W and a complex line bundle ? are involved with no conditions on the first Pontryagin forms being assumed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Han, Fei; Liu, Kefeng; Zhang, Weiping</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">399</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22547849"> <span id="translatedtitle">Congenital cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in an English bulldog.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 4-year-old male castrated English bulldog was referred to the Atlantic Veterinary College for evaluation of exercise intolerance, multiple syncopal episodes, and a grade IV/VI heart murmur. The dog was shown to have 3 congenital cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: atrial septal defect, mitral valve dysplasia, and subaortic stenosis. Medical management consisted of exercise restriction, atenolol, pimobendan, and taurine. PMID:22547849</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McConkey, Marina J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">400</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Probability+AND+%22statistical+inference%22+&pg=4&id=ED513684"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection Techniques for Ad Hoc Networks</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|<span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> detection is an important and indispensable aspect of any computer security mechanism. Ad hoc and mobile networks consist of a number of peer mobile nodes that are capable of communicating with each other absent a fixed infrastructure. Arbitrary node movements and lack of centralized control make them vulnerable to a wide variety of…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cai, Chaoli</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> 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title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">401</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=AD781584"> <span id="translatedtitle">Gravity <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in the Galapagos Islands Area.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In a recent report Case et al, (1973) presented a free-air gravity map of the Galapagos Islands based on 32 gravity stations on the islands. They state that the Galapagos Islands are associated with an east-west trending 'residual negative <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>' superi...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. B. Watts J. R. Cochran</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1973-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">402</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE83015392"> <span id="translatedtitle">Theory of Hyperfine <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Muonic Atoms.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Negative muon spin precession experiments by Yamazaki, et al. have found giant hyperfine <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in muonic atoms ranging from a few percent up to 36%. In order to understand their results, we present Breit interaction calculations based on atomic self-c...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. J. Freeman J. V. Mallow J. P. Desclaux M. Weinert</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">403</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/29296135"> <span id="translatedtitle">Management of Infants with Roboin <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Congenital micrognathia and secondary glossoptosis, with or without cleft palate, constitute the Robin <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Neonates with this condition are usually at great risk for life-threatening respiratory and feeding problems. The approach to the management of infants with this condition has included, in order of increasing complexity, positioning of the patient, surgical tongue- lip adhesion and tracheostomy. Because of dissatisfaction with</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Michael B. Lewis; Hermine M. Pashayan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">404</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22klinefelter%22&id=EJ802118"> <span id="translatedtitle">Psychoeducational Implications of Sex Chromosome <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Numerous <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> involving the sex chromosomes (X or Y) have been documented and their impact on development, learning, and behavior studied. This article reviews three of these disorders, Turner syndrome, Klinefelter syndrome, and Lesch-Nyhan disease. Each of these three is associated with one or more selective impairments or behavioral…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wodrich, David L.; Tarbox, Jennifer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">405</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/30372402"> <span id="translatedtitle">Vascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> compressing the oesophagus and trachea</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Vascular rings formed by <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of major arteries can compress the trachea and oesophagus so much as to cause respiratory distress and dysphagia. Twenty-nine patients with this condition are reviewed and discussed in five groups. The symptoms and signs are noted. Radiological examination by barium swallow is the most useful diagnostic aid. Symptoms can only be relieved by operation. The</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. C. R. Lincoln; P. B. Deverall; J. Stark; E. Aberdeen; D. J. Waterston</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1969-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">406</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/3707055"> <span id="translatedtitle">Satellite <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> from Galactic Cosmic Rays</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in communication satellite operation have been caused by the unexpected triggering of digital circuits. Interactions with galactic cosmic rays were investigated as a mechanism for a number of these events. The mechanism assumed was the charging of the base-emitter capacitance of sensitive transistors to the turn-on voltage. The calculation of the cosmic ray event rate required the determination of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. Binder; E. C. Smith; A. B. Holman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">407</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://reference.kfupm.edu.sa/content/w/a/w___anomaly_detection_using_call_stack_i_26589.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection Using Call Stack Information</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The call stack of a program execution can be a very good information source for intrusion detection. There is no pri or work on dynamically extracting information from call stack and effectively using it to detect exploits. In this paper, w e propose a new method to do <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection using call stack information. The basic idea is to extract</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Henry Hanping Feng; Oleg M. Kolesnikov; Prahlad Fogla; Wenke Lee; Weibo Gong</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">408</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..1413778S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Response of Tropical Forests to Intense Climate Variability and Rainfall <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> over the Last Decade</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During the last decade, strong precipitation <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> resulted from increased sea surface temperature in the tropical Atlantic, have caused extensive drying trends in rainforests of western Amazonia, exerting water stress, tree mortality, biomass loss, and large-scale fire disturbance. In contrast, there have been no reports on large-scale disturbance in rainforests of west and central Africa, though being exposed to similar intensity of climate variability. Using data from Tropical Rainfall Mapping Mission (TRMM) (1999-2010), and time series of rainfall observations from meteorological stations (1971-2000), we show that both Amazonian and African rainforest experienced strong precipitation <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from 2005-2010. We monitored the response of forest to the climate variability by analyzing the canopy water content observed by SeaWinds Ku-band Scatterometer (QSCAT) (1999-2009) and found that more than 70 million ha of forests in western Amazonia experienced a strong water deficit during the dry season of 2005 and a closely corresponding decline in canopy backscatter that persisted until the next major drought in 2010. This decline in backscatter has been attributed to loss of canopy water content and large-scale tree mortality corroborated by ground and airborne observations. However, no strong impacts was observed on tropical forests of Africa, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that the African rainforest may have more resilience to droughts. We tested this hypothesis by examining the seasonal rainfall patterns, maximum water deficit, and the surface temperature variations. Results show that there is a complex pattern of low annual rainfall, moderate seasonality, and lower surface temperature in Central Africa compared to Amazonia, indicating <span class="hlt">potentially</span> a lower evapotranspiration circumventing strong water deficits</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Saatchi, S.; Asefi, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">409</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.H33E1184W"> <span id="translatedtitle">In-Situ Hydraulic Conductivities of Soils and <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> at a Future Biofuel Production Site</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Forested hillslopes of the Upper Coastal Plain at the Savannah River Site, SC, feature a shallow clay loam argillic layer with low median saturated hydraulic conductivity. Observations from a grid of shallow, maximum-rise piezometers indicate that perching on this clay layer is common. However, flow measurements from an interflow-interception trench indicate that lateral flow is rare and most soil water percolates through the clay layer. We hypothesize that the lack of frequent lateral flow is due to penetration of the clay layer by roots of pine trees. We used ground penetrating radar (GPR) to map the soil structure and <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, such as root holes, down to two meters depth at three 10×10-m plots. At each plot, a 1×10-m trench was later back-hoe excavated along a transect that showed the most <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on the GPR maps. Each trench was excavated at 0.5-m intervals until the clay layer was reached (two plots were excavated to a final depth of 0.875 m and the third plot was excavated to a final depth of 1.0 m). At each interval, compact constant-head permeameters (CCHPs) were used to measure in-situ hydraulic conductivities in the clay-loam matrix and in any visually apparent <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Conductivity was also estimated using a second 1×10-m transect of CCHP measurements taken within randomly placed augur holes. Additional holes targeted GPR <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The second transect was created in case the back-hoe impacted conductivity readings. High-conductivity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were also visually investigated by excavating with a shovel. Photographs of soil wetness were taken at visually apparent <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with a multispectral camera. We discovered that all visually apparent <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> found are represented on the GPR maps, but that not all of the predicted <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on the GPR maps are visually apparent. We discovered that tree root holes create <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, but that there were also many conductivity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that could not be visually distinguished from low-conductivity soil.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Williamson, M. F.; Jackson, C. R.; Hale, J. C.; Sletten, H. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">410</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA189491"> <span id="translatedtitle">NAVARES (NAVSTAR <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Resolution Expert System): A Prototype Expert System for NAVSTAR <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Resolution.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The operational NAVSTAR Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite constellation must meet the challenge posed by on-orbit <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> without the extensive contractor support. The objective of this research was to demonstrate the ability of expert systems t...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. A. Rampino</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">411</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/4228427"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Based Character Distribution Models in the Detection of SQL Injection Attacks</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The ubiquity of web applications has led to an increased focus on the development of attacks targeting these applications. One particular type of attack that has recently become prominent is the SQL injection attack. SQL injection attacks can <span class="hlt">potentially</span> result in unauthorized access to confidential information stored in a backend database. In this paper we describe an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> based approach</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mehdi Kiani; Andrew Clark; George M. Mohay</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">412</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.1133R"> <span id="translatedtitle">What drives the Tibetan crust to the South East Asia? Role of upper mantle density discontinuities as inferred from the continental geoid <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Himalaya-Tibet orogen formed as a result of the northward convergence of India into the Asia over the past 55 Ma had caused the north south crustal shortening and Cenozoic upliftment of the Tibetan plateau, which significantly affected the tectonic and climatic framework of the Asia. Geodetic measurements have also shown eastward crustal extrusion of Tibet, especially along major east-southeast strike slip faults at a slip rate of 15-20 mm a-1 and around 40 mm a-1. Such continental scale deformations have been modeled as block rotation by fault boundary stresses developed due to the India-Eurasia collision. However, the Thin Sheet model explained the crustal deformation mechanism by considering varying gravitational <span class="hlt">potential</span> energy arise out of varying crustal thickness of the viscous lithosphere. The Channel Flow model, which also <span class="hlt">suggests</span> extrusion is a boundary fault guided flow along the shallow crustal brittle-ductile regime. Although many models have proposed, but no consensus in these models to explain the dynamics of measured surface geodetic deformation of the Tibetan plateau. But what remains conspicuous is the origin of driving forces that cause the observed Tibetan crustal flow towards the South East Asia. Is the crustal flow originated only because of the differential stresses that developed in the shallow crustal brittle-ductile regime? Or should the stress transfer to the shallow crustal layers as a result of gravitational <span class="hlt">potential</span> energy gradient driven upper mantle flow also to be accounted. In this work, I examine the role of latter in the light of depth distribution of continental geoid <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> beneath the Himalaya-Tibet across major upper mantle density discontinuities. These discontinuity surfaces in the upper mantle are susceptible to hold the plastic deformation that may occur as a result of the density gradient driven flow. The distribution of geoid <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> across these density discontinuities at 220, 410 and 660 km depth in the upper mantle beneath the Himalaya-Tibet has been studied by analyzing the geoid undulation data obtained from various satellite geodetic missions along with the recent and old (EGM2008 and EGM2006) Earth Gravity models. Results show that the net geoid <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> varies from -65 m to -20 m, which signify a density stratified upper mantle beneath the Himalaya-Tibet and the same has been confirmed from the results of regional seismic tomography studies. The density <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> distribution beneath Tibet from 163 km depth to its upper mantle thickness of 1063 km show a strong NW-SE elliptically oriented positive geoid <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of magnitude around 40 meter. Asymmetric density <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> gradient have been observed along the Himalayan arc from west to east as well as across the arc from north to south. This caused differential gravitational <span class="hlt">potential</span> gradient and hence an elliptical flow structure of the Tibetan continental mantle along the resultant NW-SE direction, which is in concurrence with the observed present day direction of the Tibetan crustal flow. Thus the geoid <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> distributed at various depth ranges show how the gradient in the upper mantle gravitational <span class="hlt">potential</span> energy, especially across the deformed discontinuity surface, is significant in determining the transfer of deviatoric stresses and providing traction to the flow of crustal layers of the Tibetan Plateau. This <span class="hlt">suggests</span> the viscous flow model could be a preferable choice, which could better accommodate the dynamics of the upper mantle, in explaining the crustal extrusion processes of the Tibetan Plateau.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rajesh, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">413</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/w7v3jx61437r83q1.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lower Urinary Tract <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> of Urogenital Sinus and Female Genital <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the female genital tract result from müllerian duct <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and\\/or abnormalities of the urogenital\\u000a sinus or cloaca. Failure of fusion of the müllerian ducts results in a wide variety of fusion abnormalities of the uterus,\\u000a cervix, and vagina (Gruenwald 1941). Müllerian duct abnormalities may occur alone or in association with urogenital sinus or cloacal malformations. Persistence\\u000a of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Theresa E. Geley; Ingmar Gassner</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">414</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=N7220640"> <span id="translatedtitle">An <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>-Free Version of Weinbergs Model.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The difficulties of carrying the renormalization program in a theory containing Adler <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are discussed. Some models of weak and electromagnetic interactions, involving both lepton and quark fields, in which the troublesome <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> cancel are pres...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. Bouchiat J. Tliopoulos P. Meyer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1972-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">415</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA552764"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comparative Evaluation of <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection Algorithms for Maritime Video Surveillance.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A variety of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection algorithms have been applied to surveillance tasks for detecting threats with some success. However, it is not clear which <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection algorithms should be used for domains such as ground-based maritime video surveilla...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">B. Auslander D. W. Aha K. M. Gupta</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">416</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ClDy..tmp..377G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Large-scale atmospheric response to eastern Mediterranean summer-autumn SST <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the associated regional impact</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Since the Mediterranean Sea is halfway between subtropical and middle latitudes, and it represents a marginal oceanic region, research has tended to focus on how large-scale modes of atmospheric variability modulate its surface temperature. Conversely, the present study examines the <span class="hlt">potential</span> influence of the Mediterranean Sea surface temperature (SST) <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on the Northern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation. In particular, this work explores the large-scale changes in the global circulation forced/influenced by the eastern Mediterranean summer-autumn SST pattern. To isolate the atmospheric response, AGCM sensitivity experiments with prescribed SST over the Mediterranean Sea and climatology elsewhere are analysed. Observational diagnostics upon the period used to define the boundary conditions (1979-2002) are also interpreted. Our results support the hypothesis of an atmospheric pattern initiated in the Mediterranean basin, pointing out both a local baroclinic response and a barotropic circumglobal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. This atmospheric teleconnection pattern projects onto a hemispheric wave-like structure, reflecting the waveguide effect of the westerly jets. Results <span class="hlt">suggest</span>, thereby, that the recurrent summer-autumn circumglobal teleconnection pattern can be excited locally by changes in the atmosphere over the Mediterranean region. A linear behaviour is found upon a regional impact over northeastern Africa. The remote impacts present however a nonlinear signature: anomalous warm conditions influencing on northern Europe and Euro-Asia, whereas anomalous cold conditions impacting more on the North Pacific basin. Limitations in our model setup are also discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">García-Serrano, J.; Polo, I.; Rodríguez-Fonseca, B.; Losada, T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">417</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010ApJ...720.1577D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Neutron-rich Chromium Isotope <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Supernova Nanoparticles</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Neutron-rich isotopes with masses near that of iron are produced in Type Ia and II supernovae (SNeIa and SNeII). Traces of such nucleosynthesis are found in primitive meteorites in the form of variations in the isotopic abundance of 54Cr, the most neutron-rich stable isotope of chromium. The hosts of these isotopic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> must be presolar grains that condensed in the outflows of SNe, offering the opportunity to study the nucleosynthesis of iron-peak nuclei in ways that complement spectroscopic observations and can inform models of stellar evolution. However, despite almost two decades of extensive search, the carrier of 54Cr <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is still unknown, presumably because it is fine grained and is chemically labile. Here, we identify in the primitive meteorite Orgueil the carrier of 54Cr <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> as nanoparticles (<100 nm), most likely spinels that show large enrichments in 54Cr relative to solar composition (54Cr/52Cr ratio >3.6 × solar). Such large enrichments in 54Cr can only be produced in SNe. The mineralogy of the grains supports condensation in the O/Ne-O/C zones of an SNII, although a Type Ia origin cannot be excluded. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that planetary materials incorporated different amounts of these nanoparticles, possibly due to late injection by a nearby SN that also delivered 26Al and 60Fe to the solar system. This idea explains why the relative abundance of 54Cr and other neutron-rich isotopes vary between planets and meteorites. We anticipate that future isotopic studies of the grains identified here will shed new light on the birth of the solar system and the conditions in SNe.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dauphas, N.; Remusat, L.; Chen, J. H.; Roskosz, M.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Stodolna, J.; Guan, Y.; Ma, C.; Eiler, J. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">418</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21460040"> <span id="translatedtitle">NEUTRON-RICH CHROMIUM ISOTOPE <span class="hlt">ANOMALIES</span> IN SUPERNOVA NANOPARTICLES</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Neutron-rich isotopes with masses near that of iron are produced in Type Ia and II supernovae (SNeIa and SNeII). Traces of such nucleosynthesis are found in primitive meteorites in the form of variations in the isotopic abundance of {sup 54}Cr, the most neutron-rich stable isotope of chromium. The hosts of these isotopic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> must be presolar grains that condensed in the outflows of SNe, offering the opportunity to study the nucleosynthesis of iron-peak nuclei in ways that complement spectroscopic observations and can inform models of stellar evolution. However, despite almost two decades of extensive search, the carrier of {sup 54}Cr <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is still unknown, presumably because it is fine grained and is chemically labile. Here, we identify in the primitive meteorite Orgueil the carrier of {sup 54}Cr <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> as nanoparticles (<100 nm), most likely spinels that show large enrichments in {sup 54}Cr relative to solar composition ({sup 54}Cr/{sup 52}Cr ratio >3.6 x solar). Such large enrichments in {sup 54}Cr can only be produced in SNe. The mineralogy of the grains supports condensation in the O/Ne-O/C zones of an SNII, although a Type Ia origin cannot be excluded. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that planetary materials incorporated different amounts of these nanoparticles, possibly due to late injection by a nearby SN that also delivered {sup 26}Al and {sup 60}Fe to the solar system. This idea explains why the relative abundance of {sup 54}Cr and other neutron-rich isotopes vary between planets and meteorites. We anticipate that future isotopic studies of the grains identified here will shed new light on the birth of the solar system and the conditions in SNe.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dauphas, N. [Origins Laboratory, Department of the Geophysical Sciences and Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, 5734 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Remusat, L.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Guan, Y.; Ma, C.; Eiler, J. M. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Chen, J. H. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Roskosz, M.; Stodolna, J., E-mail: dauphas@uchicago.ed [Unite Materiaux et Transformations, Universite de Lille 1, CNRS UMR 8207, 59655 Villeneuve d'Ascq (France)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-09-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">419</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009ChPhB..18..462Z"> <span id="translatedtitle">GENERAL: Hawking radiation from the charged and magnetized BTZ black hole via covariant <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper discusses Hawking radiation from the charged and magnetized Bañados-Teitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) black hole from the viewpoint of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, initiated by Robinson and Wilczek recently. It reconstructs the electromagnetic field tensor and the Lagrangian of the field corresponding to the source with electric and magnetic charges to redefine an equivalent charge and gauge <span class="hlt">potential</span>. It employs the covariant <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> cancellation method to determine the compensating fluxes of charge flow and energy-momentum tensor, which are shown to match with those of the 2-dimensional blackbody radiation at the Hawking temperature exactly.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zeng, Xiao-Xiong; Yang, Shu-Zheng</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">420</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/pq867378224j2150.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Wireless Sensor Network <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>: Diagnosis and Detection Strategies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">\\u000a Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) can experience problems (<span class="hlt">anomalies</span>) during deployment, due to dynamic environmental factors\\u000a or node hardware and software failures. These <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> demand reliable detection strategies for supporting long term and\\/or\\u000a large scale WSN deployments. Several strategies have been proposed for detecting specific subsets of WSN <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, yet there\\u000a is still a need for more comprehensive <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection strategies</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Raja Jurdak; X. Rosalind Wang; Oliver Obst; Philip Valencia</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return 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href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">421</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/415620"> <span id="translatedtitle">Weak extremely-low-frequency magnetic field-induced regeneration <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the planarian, Dugesia tigrina</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The authors recently reported that cephalic regeneration in the planarian Dugesia tigrina was significantly delayed in populations exposed continuously to combined parallel DC and AC magnetic fields. This effect was consistent with hypotheses <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> an underlying resonance phenomenon. The authors report here, in a parallel series of investigations on the same model system, that the incidence of regeneration <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> presenting as tumor-like protuberances also increases significantly (P < .001) in association with exposure to weak 60 Hz magnetic fields, with peak intensities ranging between 1.0 and 80.0 {micro}T. These <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> often culminate in the complete disaggregation of the organism. Similar to regeneration rate effects, the incidence of regeneration <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is specifically dependent upon the planaria possessing a fixed orientation with respect to the applied magnetic field vectors. However, unlike the regeneration rate effects, the AC magnetic field alone, in the absence of any measurable DC field, is capable of producing these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Moreover, the incidence of regeneration <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> follows a clear dose-response relationship as a function of AC magnetic field intensity, with the threshold for induced electric field intensity estimated at 5 {micro} V/m. The addition of either 51.1 or 78.4 {micro}T DC magnetic fields, applied in parallel combination with the AC field, enhances the appearance of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> relative to the 60 Hz AC field alone, but only at certain AC field intensities. Thus, whereas the previous study of regeneration rate effects appeared to involve exclusively resonance interactions, the regeneration <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> reported here appear to result primarily from Faraday induction coupling.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jenrow, K.A.; Smith, C.H.; Liboff, A.R. [Oakland Univ., Rochester, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-12-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">422</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/44251395"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evidence for spreading center jumps from fine-scale bathymetry and magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> near the Galapagos Islands</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Evidence, in the form of recognizable patterns of bathymetry and magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, is presented that small spreading-center jumps (tens of kilometres) occur. With the effect of jumps postulated o