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1

Developing global climate anomalies suggest potential disease risks for 2006 – 2007  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: El Niño\\/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) related climate anomalies have been shown to have an impact on infectious disease outbreaks. The Climate Prediction Center of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA\\/CPC) has recently issued an unscheduled El Niño advisory, indicating that warmer than normal sea surface temperatures across the equatorial eastern Pacific may have pronounced impacts on global tropical precipitation

Assaf Anyamba; Jean-Paul Chretien; Jennifer Small; Compton J Tucker; Kenneth J Linthicum

2006-01-01

2

Anomalies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This theme issue on anomalies includes Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, and additional resources for elementary and junior high school students. Pertinent activities are suggested, and sidebars discuss UFOs, animal anomalies, and anomalies from nature; and resources covering unexplained phenonmenas like crop circles, Easter Island,…

Online-Offline, 1999

1999-01-01

3

Singularity analysis of potential fields to enhance weak anomalies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Geoanomalies generally are nonlinear, non-stationary and weak, especially in the land cover areas, however, the traditional methods of geoanomaly identification are usually based on linear theory. In past two decades, many power-law function models have been developed based on fractal concept in mineral exploration and mineral resource assessment, such that the density-area (C-A) model and spectrum-area model (S-A) suggested by Qiuming Cheng have played important roles in extracting geophysical and geochemical anomalies. Several power-law relationships are evident in geophysical potential fields, such as field value-distance, power spectrum-wave number as well as density-area models. The singularity index based on density-area model involves the first derivative transformation of the measure. Hence, we introduce the singularity analysis to develop a novel high-pass filter for extracting gravity and magnetic anomalies with the advantage of scale invariance. Furthermore, we suggest that the statistics of singularity indices can provide a new edge detection scheme for the gravity or magnetic source bodies. Meanwhile, theoretical magnetic anomalies are established to verify these assertions. In the case study from Nanling mineral district in south China and Qikou Depression in east China, compared with traditional geophysical filtering methods including multiscale wavelet analysis and total horizontal gradient methods, the singularity method enhances and extracts the weak anomalies caused by buried magmatic rocks more effectively, and provides more distinct boundary information of rocks. Moreover, the singularity mapping results have good correspondence relationship with both the outcropping rocks and known mineral deposits to support future mineral resource exploration. The singularity method based on fractal analysis has potential to be a new useful theory and technique for processing gravity and magnetic anomaly data.

Chen, G.; Cheng, Q.; Liu, T.

2013-12-01

4

Modeling of self-potential anomalies near vertical dikes.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The self-potential (SP) Green's function for an outcropping vertical dike is derived from solutions for the dc resistivity problem for the same geometry. The Green's functions are numerically integrated over rectangular source regions on the contacts between the dike and the surrounding material to obtain the SP anomaly. The analysis is valid for thermoelectrical source mechanisms. Two types of anomalies can be produced by this geometry. When the two source planes are polarized in opposite directions, a monopolar anomaly is produced. This corresponds to the thermoelectrical properties of the dike being in contrast with the surrounding material. When the thermoelectric coefficients change monotonically across the dike, a dipolar anomaly is produced. In either case positive and negative anomalies are possible, and the greatest variation in potential will occur in the most resistive regions. -Author

Fitterman, D. V.

1983-01-01

5

Tomography of self-potential anomalies of electrochemical nature  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ore deposits and buried metals like pipelines behave as dipolar electrical geobatteries in which the source is due to (1) variation of the redox potential with depth, (2) oxido-reduction reactions acting at the ore body/groundwater contact, and (3) migration of electrons in the ore body itself between the reducing and oxidizing zones. This polarization mechanism is responsible for an electrical field at the ground surface, the so-called self-potential anomaly. A new quick-look tomographic algorithm is developed to locate electrical dipolar sources in the subsurface of the Earth from the analysis of these self-potential signals. We applied this model to the self-potential anomaly discussed by Stoll et al. [1995] in the vicinity of the KTB-boreholes drilled during the Continental Deep Drilling Project in Germany. The source of this self-potential signal is related to the presence of massive graphite veins associated with steeply inclined fault zones within the gneisses and observed in the KTB-boreholes.

Revil, A.; Ehouarne, L.; Thyreault, E.

6

The combination of satellite and topographic/isostatic potential models for mean anomaly determinations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A method is presented for the estimation of a global gravity anomaly field using the combination of satellite-derived potential coefficient models and the coefficients implied by the Airy-Heiskanen topographic/isostatic potential (Rummel et al., 1988) from topographic models with a 30-km depth of compensation. Gravity anomalies calculated with this method are compared with a terrestrial 1 x 1 degree anomaly file where the anomaly standard deviations were less than 10 mgals. Using the GEM T1 model (Marsh et al., 1988) to degree 36, the rms anomaly discrepency was + or - 19 mgals, while the rms values for the terrestrial anomalies was + or - 28 mgals.

Rapp, Richard H.; Pavlis, Nikolaos

1989-01-01

7

Random matrix model at nonzero chemical potentials with anomaly effects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Phase diagram of the chiral random matrix model with U(1)A breaking term is studied with the quark chemical potentials varied independently at zero temperature by taking the chiral and meson condensates as the order parameters. Although, without the U(1)A breaking term, chiral transition of each flavor can happen separately responding to its chemical potential, the U(1)A breaking terms mix the chiral condensates and correlate the phase transitions. In the three-flavor case, we find that there are mixings between the meson and chiral condensates due to the U(1)A anomaly, which makes the meson condensed phase more stable. Increasing the hypercharge chemical potential (?Y) with the isospin and quark chemical potentials (?I,?q) kept small, we observe that the kaon-condensed phase becomes the ground state and at the larger ?Y the pion-condensed phase appears unexpectedly, which is caused by the competition between the chiral restoration and the meson condensation. The similar happens when ?Y and ?I are exchanged, and the kaon-condensed phase becomes the ground state at larger ?I below the full chiral restoration.

Fujii, H.; Sano, T.

2011-01-01

8

Quantitative Interpretation of Self-Potential Anomalies of Some Simple Geometric Bodies  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have developed a new numerical method to determine the shape (shape factor), depth, polarization angle, and electric dipole moment of a buried structure from residual self-potential (SP) anomalies. The method is based on defining the anomaly value at the origin and four characteristic points and their corresponding distances on the anomaly profile. The problem of shape determination from residual

E. M. Abdelrahman; K. S. Soliman; E. R. Abo-Ezz; K. S. Essa; T. M. El-Araby

2009-01-01

9

Rapid fluid disruption: A source for self-potential anomalies on volcanoes  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Self-potential (SP) anomalies observed above suspected magma reservoirs, dikes, etc., on various volcanoes (Kilauea, Hawaii; Mount Unzen, Japan; Piton de la Fournaise, Reunion Island, Miyake Jima, Japan) result from transient surface electric fields of tens of millivolts per kilometer and generally have a positive polarity. These SP anomalies are usually attributed to electrokinetic effects where properties controlling this process are poorly constrained. We propose an alternate explanation that contributions to electric fields of correct polarity should be expected from charge generation by fluid vaporization/disruption. As liquids are vaporized or removed as droplets by gas transport away from hot dike intrusions, both charge generation and local increase in electrical resistivity by removal of fluids should occur. We report laboratory observations of electric fields in hot rock samples generated by pulses of fluid (water) through the rock at atmospheric pressure. These indicate the relative amplitudes of rapid fluid disruption (RFD) potentials and electrokinetic potentials to be dramatically different and the signals are opposite in sign. Above vaporization temperatures, RFD effects of positive sign in the direction of gas flow dominate, whereas below these temperatures, effects of negative sign dominate. This suggests that the primary contribution to observed self-potential anomalies arises from gas-related charge transport processes at temperatures high enough to produce vigorous boiling and vapor transport. At lower temperatures, the primary contribution is from electrokinetic effects modulated perhaps by changing electrical resistivity and RFD effects from high-pressure but low-temperature CO2 and SO2 gas flow ripping water molecules from saturated crustal rocks. If charge generation is continuous, as could well occur above a newly emplaced dike, positive static potentials will be set up that could be sustained for many years, and the simplest method for identifying these hot, active regions would be to identify the SP anomalies they generate.

Johnston, M. J. S.; Byerlee, J. D.; Lockner, D.

2001-01-01

10

A Least-squares Approach to Shape Determination from Residual Self-potential Anomalies  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have developed a least-squares minimization approach to determine the shape (shape-factor) of a buried polarized body from a residual self-potential anomaly profile. By defining the zero anomaly distance and the anomaly value at the origin on the profile, the problem of the shape-factor determination is transformed into the problem of finding a solution of a nonlinear equation of the

E. M. Abdelrahman; T. M. El-Araby; A. A. Ammar; H. I. Hassanein

1997-01-01

11

Quantitative Interpretation of Self-Potential Anomalies of Some Simple Geometric Bodies  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have developed a new numerical method to determine the shape (shape factor), depth, polarization angle, and electric dipole\\u000a moment of a buried structure from residual self-potential (SP) anomalies. The method is based on defining the anomaly value\\u000a at the origin and four characteristic points and their corresponding distances on the anomaly profile. The problem of shape\\u000a determination from residual

E. M. Abdelrahman; K. S. Soliman; E. R. Abo-Ezz; K. S. Essa; T. M. El-Araby

2009-01-01

12

Potential Mars 2001 Sites Coincident with Magnetic Anomalies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Of the areas that meet the engineering criteria for MSP 01, only two are coincident with magnetic anomalies measured by the MAG/ER instrument on MGS. Area A is centered on about 10 deg S, 202 deg W and extends from about 7.5 deg S to 15 S. This area is associated with three bands of magnetic anomalies, two with positive values surrounding an area with negative values. Area B corresponds with a circular high positive magnetic anomaly and is centered at 13.5 deg S, 166 deg W. In addition to magnetic anomalies, the proposed sites have other attributes that make then attractive from of standpoint of meeting the objectives of the Mars Program. The landing site candidates meet the engineering requirements outlined on the Mars '01 landing site page htip://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/2001/landingsite. These are (source of data in parentheses): latitude between 3 deg N and 12 deg S, rock abundance between 5-10% (IRTM), fine-component thermal inertia > 4 cgs units (IRTM), topography < 2.5 km (MOLA). There are three exceptions: 1) Area B contains sites that lie up to about 15 deg S, 2) some sites are considered that have rock abundance values of 3-13%. 3) High resolution Viking coverage may not be available. These exceptions will be noted.

Gilmore, M. S.

1999-01-01

13

How attractive interaction changes water-like anomalies of a core-softened model potential  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Understanding the origin of anomalous properties of water is of prime importance. A pertinent question in this respect is: whether tetrahedral orientational interaction is a prerequisite for the manifestation of water-like anomalies. Recently it is shown that spherically symmetric potentials with two length scales, popularly known as coresoftened potentials yield water-like anomalies. In the present study, we investigate the effect of attractive interactions among the particles on the existence and location of density anomaly in the temperature-density (T-?) plane. Using a suitable form of the core-softened potential, we employ extensive molecular dynamic simulations to understand microscopic origin of the density anomaly in terms of local structure of the model fluid. We observe that with the increase of the attractive interaction, the density anomaly region shifts towards higher densities and higher temperatures.

Pant, Shashank; Gera, Tarun; Choudhury, Niharendu

2014-04-01

14

LAAS Study of Slow-Moving Ionosphere Anomalies and Their Potential Impacts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Triggered by several severe ionosphere storms that have occurred in recent years, research has been done to studying those anomalies, the physics behind them, and their potential impact on augmented GNSS users. In previous work (1-5), it was found that such ionosphere anomalies can threaten LAAS users under extreme conditions. To determine this, a spatial-gradient \\

Ming Luo; Sam Pullen; Seebany Datta-Barua; Godwin Zhang; Todd Walter; Per Enge

2005-01-01

15

Interpretation of spontaneous potential anomalies from some simple geometrically shaped bodies using neural network inversion  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new approach is proposed in order to interpret spontaneous potential (self-potential) anomalies related to simple geometric-shaped\\u000a models such as sphere, horizontal cylinder, and vertical cylinder. This approach is mainly based on using neural network inversion\\u000a of SP anomalies, particularly modular algorithm, for estimating the parameters of different simple geometrical bodies. However,\\u000a Hilbert transforms are involved to determine the origin

Mansour A. Al-Garni

2010-01-01

16

Evaluating Cenozoic equatorial sediment deposition anomalies for potential paleoceanographic and Pacific plate motion applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

If equatorial sediments form characteristic deposits around the equator, they may help to resolve the amount of northwards drift of the Pacific tectonic plate. Relevant to this issue, it has been shown that 230Th has been accumulating on the equatorial seabed faster than its production from radioactive decay in the overlying water column during the Holocene (Marcantonio et al. in Paleoceanography 16:260-267, 2001). Some researchers have argued that this reflects the deposition of particles with adsorbed 230Th carried by bottom currents towards the equator ("focusing"). If correct, this effect may combine with high pelagic productivity, which is also centered on the equator, to yield a characteristic signature of high accumulation rates marking the paleoequator in older deposits. Here we evaluate potential evidence that such an equatorial feature existed in the geological past. Seismic reflection data from seven meridional transects suggest that a band of equatorially enhanced accumulation of restricted latitude was variably developed, both spatially and temporally. It is absent in the interval 14.25-20.1 Ma but is well developed for the interval 8.55-14.25 Ma. We also examined eolian dust accumulation rate histories generated from scientific drilling data. A dust accumulation rate anomaly near the modern equator, which is not obviously related to the inter-tropical convergence zone, is interpreted as caused by focusing. Accumulation rates of Ba and P2O5 (proxies of export production) reveal a static equatorial signature, which suggests that the movement of the Pacific plate over the period 10-25 Ma was modest. The general transition from missing to well-developed focusing signatures around 14.25 Ma in the seismic data coincides with the mid-Miocene development of the western boundary current off New Zealand. This current supplies the Pacific with deep water from Antarctica, and could therefore imply a potential paleoceanographic or paleoclimatic origin. At 10.05-14.25 Ma, the latitudes of the seismic anomalies are up to ~2° different from the paleoequator predicted by Pacific plate-hotspot models, suggesting potentially a small change in the hotspot latitudes relative to the present day (although this inference depends on the precise form of the deposition around the equator). The Ba and P2O5 anomalies, on the other hand, are broadly compatible with plate models predicting slow northward plate movement over 10-25 Ma.

Mitchell, Neil C.; Dubois, Nathalie

2014-03-01

17

A new method for complete quantitative interpretation of self-potential anomalies  

Microsoft Academic Search

A least-squares minimization approach to determine the shape of a buried polarized body from a self-potential (SP) anomaly profile has been developed. By defining the anomaly value at three points on the profile, one at the origin and the others at any two symmetrical points around the origin, the problem of the shape-factor determination is transformed into the problem of

Hesham M. El-Araby

2004-01-01

18

Random matrix model at nonzero chemical potentials with anomaly effects  

Microsoft Academic Search

Phase diagram of the chiral random matrix model with U(1){sub A} breaking term is studied with the quark chemical potentials varied independently at zero temperature by taking the chiral and meson condensates as the order parameters. Although, without the U(1){sub A} breaking term, chiral transition of each flavor can happen separately responding to its chemical potential, the U(1){sub A} breaking

H. Fujii; T. Sano

2011-01-01

19

Random matrix model at nonzero chemical potentials with anomaly effects  

Microsoft Academic Search

Phase diagram of the chiral random matrix model with U(1)A breaking term is studied with the quark chemical potentials varied independently at zero temperature by taking the chiral and meson condensates as the order parameters. Although, without the U(1)A breaking term, chiral transition of each flavor can happen separately responding to its chemical potential, the U(1)A breaking terms mix the

H. Fujii; T. Sano

2011-01-01

20

Inversion of Self Potential Anomalies with Multilayer Perceptron Neural Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study investigates the inverse solution on a buried and polarized sphere-shaped body using the self-potential method via multilayer perceptron neural networks (MLPNN). The polarization angle (?), depth to the centre of sphere (h), electrical dipole moment (K) and the zero distance from the origin (x 0) were estimated. For testing the success of the MLPNN for sphere model, parameters were also estimated by the traditional Damped Least Squares (Levenberg-Marquardt) inversion technique (DLS). The MLPNN was first tested on a synthetic example. The performance of method was also tested for two S/N ratios (5 % and 10 %) by adding noise to the same synthetic data, the estimated model parameters with MLPNN and DLS method are satisfactory. The MLPNN also applied for the field data example in ?zmir, Urla district, Turkey, with two cross-section data evaluated by MLPNN and DLS, and the two methods showed good agreement.

Kaftan, Ilknur; S?nd?rg?, Petek; Akdemir, Özer

2014-02-01

21

Nonrelativistic inverse square potential, scale anomaly, and complex extension  

SciTech Connect

The old problem of a singular, inverse square potential in nonrelativistic quantum mechanics is treated employing a field-theoretic, functional renormalization method. An emergent contact coupling flows to a fixed point or develops a limit cycle depending on the discriminant of its quadratic beta function. We analyze the fixed points in both conformal and nonconformal phases and perform a natural extension of the renormalization group analysis to complex values of the contact coupling. Physical interpretation and motivation for this extension is the presence of an inelastic scattering channel in two-body collisions. We present a geometric description of the complex generalization by considering renormalization group flows on the Riemann sphere. Finally, using bosonization, we find an analytical solution of the extended renormalization group flow equations, constituting the main result of our work.

Moroz, Sergej [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik Universitaet Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: s.moroz@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de; Schmidt, Richard [Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2010-02-15

22

Remote energetic neutral atom imaging of electric potential over a lunar magnetic anomaly  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Abstract<p label="1">The formation of electric <span class="hlt">potential</span> over lunar magnetized regions is essential for understanding fundamental lunar science, for understanding the lunar environment, and for planning human exploration on the Moon. A large positive electric <span class="hlt">potential</span> was predicted and detected from single point measurements. Here, we demonstrate a remote imaging technique of electric <span class="hlt">potential</span> mapping at the lunar surface, making use of a new concept involving hydrogen neutral atoms derived from solar wind. We apply the technique to a lunar magnetized region using an existing dataset of the neutral atom energy spectrometer SARA/CENA on Chandrayaan-1. Electrostatic <span class="hlt">potential</span> larger than +135 V inside the Gerasimovic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is confirmed. This structure is found spreading all over the magnetized region. The widely spread electric <span class="hlt">potential</span> can influence the local plasma and dust environment near the magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Futaana, Y.; Barabash, S.; Wieser, M.; Lue, C.; Wurz, P.; Vorburger, A.; Bhardwaj, A.; Asamura, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">23</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JChPh.139x4505P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effect of attractive interactions on the water-like <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of a core-softened model <span class="hlt">potential</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is now well established that water-like <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> can be reproduced by a spherically symmetric <span class="hlt">potential</span> with two length scales, popularly known as core-softened <span class="hlt">potential</span>. In the present study we aim to investigate the effect of attractive interactions among the particles in a model fluid interacting with core-softened <span class="hlt">potential</span> on the existence and location of various water-like <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the temperature-pressure plane. We employ extensive molecular dynamic simulations to study anomalous nature of various order parameters and properties under isothermal compression. Order map analyses have also been done for all the <span class="hlt">potentials</span>. We observe that all the systems with varying depth of attractive wells show structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. As many of the previous studies involving model water and a class of core softened <span class="hlt">potentials</span> have concluded that the structural <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region encloses the diffusion <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region, which in turn, encloses the density <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region, the same pattern has also been observed in the present study for the systems with less depth of attractive well. For the systems with deeper attractive well, we observe that the diffusion <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region shifts toward higher densities and is not always enclosed by the structural <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region. Also, density <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region is not completely enclosed by diffusion <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region in this case.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pant, Shashank; Gera, Tarun; Choudhury, Niharendu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">24</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/43076674"> <span id="translatedtitle">Shape and depth determinations from second moving average residual self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have developed a semi-automatic method to determine the depth and shape (shape factor) of a buried structure from second moving average residual self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> obtained from observed data using filters of successive window lengths. The method involves using a relationship between the depth and the shape to source and a combination of windowed observations. The relationship represents a parametric</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">E M Abdelrahman; T M El-Araby; K S Essa</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">25</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19870009504&hterms=molodensky&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3D%2522molodensky%2522"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spherical harmonic expansions of the Earth's gravitational <span class="hlt">potential</span> to degree 360 using 30' mean <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Two <span class="hlt">potential</span> coefficient fields that are complete to degree and order 360 have been computed. One field (OSU86E) excludes geophysically predicted <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> while the other (OSU86F) includes such <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. These fields were computed using a set of 30' mean gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> derived from satellite altimetry in the ocean areas and from land measurements in North America, Europe, Australia, Japan and a few other areas. Where no 30' data existed, 1 deg x 1 deg mean <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> estimates were used if available. No rigorous combination of satellite and terrestrial data was carried out. Instead advantage was taken of the adjusted <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and <span class="hlt">potential</span> coefficients from a rigorous combination of the GEML2' <span class="hlt">potential</span> coefficient set and 1 deg x 1 deg mean gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The two new fields were computed using a quadrature procedure with de-smoothing factors. The spectra of the new fields agree well with the spectra of the fields with 1 deg x 1 deg data out to degree 180. Above degree 180 the new fields have more power. The fields have been tested through comparison of Doppler station geoid undulations with undulations from various geopotential models. The agreement between the two types of undulations is approximately + or - 1.6 m. The use of a 360 field over a 180 field does not significantly improve the comparison. Instead it allows the comparison to be done at some stations where high frequency effects are important. In addition maps made in areas of high frequency information (such as trench areas) clearly reveal the signal in the new fields from degree 181 to 360.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rapp, Richard H.; Cruz, Jaime Y.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">26</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60545085"> <span id="translatedtitle">Detecting and modeling persistent self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from underground nuclear explosions at the Nevada Test Site</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are naturally occurring, nearly stationary electric fields that are detected by measuring the <span class="hlt">potential</span> difference between two points on (or in) the ground. SP <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> arise from a number of causes: principally electrochemical reactions, and heat and fluid flows. SP is routinely used to locate mineral deposits, geothermal systems, and zones of seepage. This paper is a progress</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">H. L. McKague; E. Kansa; P. W. Kasameyer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">27</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19770048221&hterms=bouguer+anomaly+gravity&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dbouguer%2Banomaly%2Bgravity"> <span id="translatedtitle">On the gravitational <span class="hlt">potential</span> and field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> due to thin mass layers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The gravitational <span class="hlt">potential</span> and field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for thin mass layers are derived using the technique of matched asymptotic expansions. An inner solution is obtained using an expansion in powers of the thickness and it is shown that the outer solution is given by a surface distribution of mass sources and dipoles. Coefficients are evaluated by matching the inner expansion of the outer solution with the outer expansion of the inner solution. The leading term in the inner expansion for the normal gravitational field gives the Bouguer formula. The leading term in the expansion for the gravitational <span class="hlt">potential</span> gives an expression for the perturbation to the geoid. The predictions given by this term are compared with measurements by satellite altimetry. The second-order terms in the expansion for the gravitational field are required to predict the gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> at a continental margin. The results are compared with observations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ockendon, J. R.; Turcotte, D. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1977-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">28</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.P43F..06W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Laboratory studies of magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> effects on electric <span class="hlt">potential</span> distributions near the lunar surface</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Moon does not have a global magnetic field, unlike the Earth, rather it has strong crustal magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Data from Lunar Prospector and SELENE (Kaguya) observed strong interactions between the solar wind and these localized magnetic fields. In the laboratory, a configuration of a horseshoe permanent magnet below an insulating surface is used as an analogue of lunar crustal magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Plasmas are created above the surface by a hot filament discharge. <span class="hlt">Potential</span> distributions are measured with an emissive probe and show complex spatial structures. In our experiments, electrons are magnetized with gyro-radii r smaller than the distance from the surface d (r < d) and ions are un-magnetized with r > d. Unlike negative charging on surfaces with no magnetic fields, the surface <span class="hlt">potential</span> at the center of the magnetic dipole is found close to the plasma bulk <span class="hlt">potential</span>. The surface charging is dominated by the cold unmagnetized ions, while the electrons are shielded away. A <span class="hlt">potential</span> minimum is formed between the center of the surface and the bulk plasma, most likely caused by the trapped electrons between the two magnetic mirrors at the cusps. The value of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> minimum with respect to the bulk plasma <span class="hlt">potential</span> decreases with increasing plasma density and neutral pressure, indicating that the mirror-trapped electrons are scattered by electron-electron and electron-neutral collisions. The <span class="hlt">potential</span> at the two cusps are found to be more negative due to the electrons following the magnetic field lines onto the surface.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wang, X.; Robertson, S. H.; Horanyi, M.; NASA Lunar Science Institute: Colorado Center for Lunar Dust; Atmospheric Studies</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">29</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFMGP43B0800S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Drainage-Divide Approach to Finding Boundaries of Geologic Bodies Using Gradients of 2D <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Field <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> and 3D Tomographic Velocity <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The locations of steep horizontal gradients of gravity and magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> often approximate the locations of edges of geologic source bodies, especially shallow sources. Typically, colored or contoured plots of horizontal gradient values display curvilinear high ridges that separate regions of low gradient. Various approaches have been <span class="hlt">suggested</span> for locating ridge points and for connecting them to form continuous boundaries. A common approach for locating ridges is to examine variously oriented cross- sections at each point in the gradient field for parabolic-shaped cross-sections indicative of a ridge, or to attempt to fit a paraboloid to a small grid of points surrounding the point of interest. Although the resulting collection of ridge points determined by these methods yields a set of curvilinear lines, these lines are often disconnected and do not form continuous boundaries around the intervening low-gradient areas, which would be useful if one wished to "terrace" (as with rice fields) the <span class="hlt">potential</span> field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (e.g., Cordell and McCafferty, 1989), thereby delineating the "bodies" inferred from the ridge lines of steepest gradient. Mother nature has provided a convenient way for discovering ridges using the flow of raindrops. Gradient ridges form "drainage divides" separating "drainage basins" in the gradient field. Our approach is to identify the lows in the gridded gradient field, and then to determine into which low a raindrop falling at each gridpoint will ultimately come to rest, so that each low corresponds to a drainage basin. This can result in a great many drainage basins for noisy data, but consolidating nearby lows or putting "lakes" in low areas can simplify the pattern of basins. Ridge points can also be tagged with the value of the gradient at the point, offering some quality assessment of boundary lines. One advantage is that drainage basins translate directly into terrace regions. The approach can be easily extended to 3D data sets such as tomographic velocity models where 3D <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in velocity may, in some cases, be caused by geologic bodies with sharp contacts that it would be desirable to locate.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Simpson, R. W.; Jachens, R. C.; Langenheim, V. E.; Hildenbrand, T. G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">30</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.balkangeophysoc.gr/online-journal/2004_V7/may2004/paper_12_22.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Estimation of the paleopole positions from <span class="hlt">potential</span> field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of a local area in northern central Turkey</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Gravity and aeromagnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of a local area in northern central Turkey obtained from the General Directorate of Mineral Research and Exploration of Turkey (MTA) used to estimate the source body magnetization, which can also reveal the remanent magnetization component. Rocks collected from the outcrops <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a mafic origin for the gravity and magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Possible paleopole positions of latitude</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">F. Bilim; A. Ates</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">31</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.V31B2783H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magmatic reservoir modeling of the Azufral Volcano from interpreted <span class="hlt">potential</span> field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, Nariño, Colombia</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Azufral Volcano is an active volcano located at 1 ° 5 'N, 77 ° 43'W, at 565 km from Bogotá, in the Southern Colombian Andes. The volcano has a semicircular crater that involves a lake and four generations of rhyodacitic domes. The crater lake has a width of 300 m and a length of 1 km approximately. Azufral is considered one of the most explosive volcanoes of Colombia, apparently with a valuable geothermal <span class="hlt">potential</span> . A gravity and magnetic survey was carried out in an area of approximately 600 km2, in the Volcano influence zone. Data reduction, data filtering and spectral analysis were applied in order to highlight details on the gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that allowed correlation analysis with the general geological setting of the area including the volcano. The Complete Bouguer <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> map shows in general, two large blocks NE-SW trend coincident with the general direction of the faults in the region, showing between these two sites a total absolute change of about 118 mGal. Spectral analysis, Euler Deconvolution showed that the region trend is that the bodies that generate the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are located in predominantly shallow crustal levels, less than 5 km above the volcano summit. Profile modeling in the WE direction and passing through the volcano, shows stratified deposits, typical for volcanic regions with vertical density variations from the basement, modeled at about 3 km over the summit, to shallow levels where are modeled ignimbrites, Lavas, moraines and lava domes located in the vicinity of the crater lake. In the crater lake area it is possible to outline the probable existence of an elongated zone, with a top at around 2 km deep, extending in depth about 2 km, that can be associated with an abnormal structure that is the causative body of a clear negative <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> on this particular zone.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hernandez, O.; Gomez, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">32</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..11.3959A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Edge detection of <span class="hlt">potential</span> field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> using tilt angle and its inferred filters</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> field images that are obtained in <span class="hlt">potential</span> field methods (Gravity, Magnetic) are used worldwide as part of exploration programs for mineral resources. These images consist of different <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> which in many cases are coated with noises. In order to extraction details of these images and enhancing their features, filtering techniques are applied. In this process more effort is balance between signals and noises in filtered images. When data quality permits a range of high-pass filters, such as upward continuation and vertical derivative, can be used to bring out fine details. However, since they are a form of high-pass filter they also have an undesirable property of enhancing noise. Other applied filters are local phase filters such as tilt angle filter and theta filter which fundamentally of these filters are local phase measuring of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> field data over images. The tilt angle is ratio of the vertical derivative to absolute amplitude of the total horizontal derivative. The tilt angle is positive when over the causative body, zero near body edges and negative outside the body. Advantages of this filter are possibility of comparison between its results to derivative-based filters, its dimensionless nature and simple interpretation rather than analytic signal. Disadvantage of this filter is encountering with deep sources the detected edge is blurred as form of hallo. For overcome this problem such new tilt inferred filters namely total horizontal derivative of tilt angle (THDR), 2-order vertical derivative of tilt angle, normalized total horizontal derivative (NTHD) are introduced which produce more improvement results. These filters produce useful information in both deep and shallow sources. Furthermore these filters act as a method to separate regional <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from residual <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. In this work we applied these filters on synthetic gravity data and on real aeromagnetic data from Abadeh quadrangle in Iran. This region has been located in 55° 35' longitudes and 32° 31' latitude. The main structure in this area is Dehshir-Baft fault with NW-SE trend which separates Shirkooh granite in northeast from Abarkooh plain in center. Other magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> source is ophiolite outcrop in southeast. With application of these fitters the main geological and structural features such as basic lava in south, ophiolite outcrops in southeast and main fault with NE_SW in northeast have been enhanced. Keywords: <span class="hlt">Potential</span> field, Signal, High-pass filter, Derivative-based filter, Local-phase filter, Tilt angle, THDR, NTHD</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alamdar, K.; Ansari, A. H.; Ghorbani, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">33</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=51063"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">SUGGESTIONS</span> FOR COLLECTION AND REPORTING OF CHEMOSENSORY (OLFACTORY) EVENT-RELATED <span class="hlt">POTENTIALS</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Chemosensory event-related <span class="hlt">potentials</span> hold great promise for furthering understanding of the olfactory system and the processing of olfactory information. ollection of this type of data has been difficult and <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> are presented to aid investigators new to this field. ugges...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">34</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.T11D2494L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Influence of Older Structure on Quaternary Faulting in Northeastern California <span class="hlt">Suggested</span> by <span class="hlt">Potential</span>-Field Data</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Interpretation of aeromagnetic and new gravity data supports the earlier hypothesis by Blakely et al. (1997) that Quaternary faulting is influenced by preexisting basement structure in the region between Mt. Shasta and Lassen Peak volcanoes. Analysis of aeromagnetic data and more than 800 new gravity measurements provide structural detail within the Hat Creek graben and along the northeast-striking gravity high located between the two volcanoes. Late Cenozoic volcanic rocks coincide with short-wavelength magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of both normal and reversed polarity, whereas a markedly smoother magnetic field overlies Paleozoic basement rocks and early Cenozoic cover. The boundary between the two magnetic patterns is roughly parallel to the southeast boundary of the gravity high, which coincides with a change in strike and distribution of Quaternary faults. The linear northeast-trending boundary of the magnetic pattern <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that no significant dextral shear (more than 2 km) associated with the Walker Lane has propagated from the southeast through this region. Although the magnetic field over the Cenozoic volcanic rocks is complex, the Hat Creek fault, which displaces basalt dated at 24 × 6 ka (Turrin et al., 2007) and which forms the eastern margin of the Hat Creek graben, is marked by the eastern edge of a 30-km-long north-trending magnetic high. The western edge of the magnetic high, however, does not coincide with the western margin of the graben, but instead bisects the down-dropped block. This pattern is mimicked in the gravity field, where the eastern part of the graben has gravity values 5-6 mGal higher than the western part of the graben. Preliminary modeling <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the Hat Creek fault may have as much as 2 km of near-vertical offset to account for the gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> across the fault. At the northern end of the graben at about latitude 41° 52.5'N, the Hat Creek fault is expressed by many short faults distributed between Burney and Pittville. Here both the gravity and magnetic character changes, with the disappearance of the gravity high along the eastern margin of the graben and a shift to the northeast in the strike of the magnetic high. The gravity low that spans the graben at this latitude coincides with the present topographic lowland, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that this area has been low-lying for as much as 1.5 million years, based on extensive diatomite lake beds (Page and Renne, 1994). This change in fault character coincides with a northeast-striking alignment of prominent, semicircular magnetic lows that we interpret as small calc-alkaline volcanoes erupted during reversed polarity epochs. These volcanoes appear to be concealed beneath younger volcanic flows. The distribution of these older volcanoes may have been influenced by the preexisting crustal structure delineated by the northeast-striking gravity high discussed by Blakely et al. (1997). This fundamental crustal change also may account for the westward jump of the 2-3 Ma Cascade arc axis to its present location.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Langenheim, V. E.; Jachens, R. C.; Clynne, M. A.; Muffler, L. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">35</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/882035"> <span id="translatedtitle">Interpretation of Self-<span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> Using Constitutive Relationships for Electrochemical and Thermoelectric Coupling Coefficients</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Constitutive relationships for electrochemical and thermoelectric cross-coupling coefficients are derived using ionic mobilities, applying a general derivative of chemical <span class="hlt">potential</span> and employing the zero net current condition. The general derivative of chemical <span class="hlt">potential</span> permits thermal variations which give rise to the thermoelectric effect. It also accounts for nonideal solution behavior. An equation describing electric field strength is similarly derived with the additional assumption of electrical neutrality in the fluid Planck approximation. The Planck approximation implies that self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> (SP) is caused only by local sources and also that the electric field strength has only first order spatial variations. The derived relationships are applied to the NaCl-KCl concentration cell with predicted and measured voltages agreeing within 0.4 mV. The relationships are also applied to the Long Valley and Yellowstone geothermal systems. There is a high degree of correlation between predicted and measured SP response for both systems, giving supporting evidence for the validity of the approach. Predicted SP amplitude exceeds measured in both cases; this is a possible consequence of the Planck approximation. Electrochemical sources account for more than 90% of the predicted response in both cases while thermoelectric mechanisms account for the remaining 10%; electrokinetic effects are not considered. Predicted electrochemical and thermoelectric voltage coupling coefficients are comparable to values measured in the laboratory. The derived relationships are also applied to arbitrary distributions of temperature and fluid composition to investigate the geometric diversity of observed SP <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Amplitudes predicted for hypothetical saline spring and hot spring environments are less than 40 mV. In contrast, hypothetical near surface steam zones generate very large amplitudes, over 2 V in one case. These results should be viewed with some caution due to the uncertain validity of the Planck approximation for these conditions. All amplitudes are controlled by electrochemical mechanisms. Polarities are controlled by the curvature of the concentration or thermal profile. Concave upward thermal profiles produce positive <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, for constant fluid concentrations, whereas concave upward concentration profiles produce negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Concave downward concentration profiles are characterized by small negative closures bounding a larger, positive SP <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Knapp, R. B.; Kasameyer, P. W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">36</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22830617"> <span id="translatedtitle">Extreme sensitivity of the spin-splitting and 0.7 <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> to confining <span class="hlt">potential</span> in one-dimensional nanoelectronic devices.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Quantum point contacts (QPCs) have shown promise as nanoscale spin-selective components for spintronic applications and are of fundamental interest in the study of electron many-body effects such as the 0.7 × 2e(2)/h <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. We report on the dependence of the 1D Landé g-factor g and 0.7 <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> on electron density and confinement in QPCs with two different top-gate architectures. We obtain g values up to 2.8 for the lowest 1D subband, significantly exceeding previous in-plane g-factor values in AlGaAs/GaAs QPCs and approaching that in InGaAs/InP QPCs. We show that g is highly sensitive to confinement <span class="hlt">potential</span>, particularly for the lowest 1D subband. This <span class="hlt">suggests</span> careful management of the QPC's confinement <span class="hlt">potential</span> may enable the high g desirable for spintronic applications without resorting to narrow-gap materials such as InAs or InSb. The 0.7 <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and zero-bias peak are also highly sensitive to confining <span class="hlt">potential</span>, explaining the conflicting density dependencies of the 0.7 <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the literature. PMID:22830617</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Burke, A M; Klochan, O; Farrer, I; Ritchie, D A; Hamilton, A R; Micolich, A P</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-09-12</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">37</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3585326"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sharing of <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Nest Sites by Etheostoma olmstedi Males <span class="hlt">Suggests</span> Mutual Tolerance in an Alloparental Species</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">When reproductive competitors tolerate or cooperate with one another, they may gain particular benefits, such as collectively guarding resources or attracting mates. Shared resources may be those essential to reproduction, such as a breeding site or nest. Using the tessellated darter, a species where males but not females compete over <span class="hlt">potential</span> nest sites, we examined site use and sharing under controlled conditions of differing competitor density. Sharing was observed even when competitor density was low and individuals could have each occupied a <span class="hlt">potential</span> nest site without same-sex sharing. Males were more likely to share a nest site with one other when the difference in size between them was larger rather than smaller. There was no evidence that female sharing was dependent on their relative size. Fish were generally more likely to use and share larger sites, in accordance with the greater relative surface area they offered. We discuss how one or both sharing males may <span class="hlt">potentially</span> benefit, and how male sharing of <span class="hlt">potential</span> nest sites could relate to female mating preferences. Tessellated darter males are known to provide alloparental care for eggs but this occurs without any social contact between the alloparent and the genetic father of the young. Thus, the <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> that they may also share sites and maintain social contact with reproductive competitors highlights the importance of increased focus on the <span class="hlt">potential</span> complexity of reproductive systems.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stiver, Kelly A.; Wolff, Stephen H.; Alonzo, Suzanne H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">38</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23468853"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sharing of <span class="hlt">potential</span> nest sites by Etheostoma olmstedi males <span class="hlt">suggests</span> mutual tolerance in an alloparental species.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">When reproductive competitors tolerate or cooperate with one another, they may gain particular benefits, such as collectively guarding resources or attracting mates. Shared resources may be those essential to reproduction, such as a breeding site or nest. Using the tessellated darter, a species where males but not females compete over <span class="hlt">potential</span> nest sites, we examined site use and sharing under controlled conditions of differing competitor density. Sharing was observed even when competitor density was low and individuals could have each occupied a <span class="hlt">potential</span> nest site without same-sex sharing. Males were more likely to share a nest site with one other when the difference in size between them was larger rather than smaller. There was no evidence that female sharing was dependent on their relative size. Fish were generally more likely to use and share larger sites, in accordance with the greater relative surface area they offered. We discuss how one or both sharing males may <span class="hlt">potentially</span> benefit, and how male sharing of <span class="hlt">potential</span> nest sites could relate to female mating preferences. Tessellated darter males are known to provide alloparental care for eggs but this occurs without any social contact between the alloparent and the genetic father of the young. Thus, the <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> that they may also share sites and maintain social contact with reproductive competitors highlights the importance of increased focus on the <span class="hlt">potential</span> complexity of reproductive systems. PMID:23468853</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stiver, Kelly A; Wolff, Stephen H; Alonzo, Suzanne H</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">39</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFM.V53A1720L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> on Active Volcanoes: New Time and Spatial Series from Masaya, Telica, and Cerro Negro, Nicaragua</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Considerable effort worldwide has gone into monitoring heat and mass transfer at active volcanoes because such information may provide clues about changes in volcanic activity and impending eruptions. Here we present new time and spatial series of spontaneous <span class="hlt">potential</span> (SP) <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from Masaya and Telica volcanoes, and spatial series collected at Cerro Negro volcano. Our primary purpose is to investigate correlations between more easily and cheaply monitored SP and CO2 gas flux, measured by an infrared CO2 analysis system. SP data were collected using nonpolarizing Pb-PbCL2 electrodes that we constructed following the approach of Petiau. Mapping at both Masaya, and Cerro Negro reveals broad correlations between SP <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and CO2 flux through soils. In addition, we monitored temperature, barometric pressure, and rainfall at one minute intervals from May-August, 2006 at Masaya and Telica volcanoes. During this period it is clear that SP responds to changes in volcanic activity, with transient <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of 75 mV as well as atmospheric forcing due to rainfall, producing <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of 56 mV and related phenomena. Preliminary lab experiments provide further details of the electrokinetic origin of these SP <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Our preliminary work supports the idea that large and inexpensive networks of electrodes might track changes in SP <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with changes in mass flow at active volcanoes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lehto, H.; Pearson, S.; Connor, C.; Sanford, W.; Saballos, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">40</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2712403"> <span id="translatedtitle">Germination Responses to Water <span class="hlt">Potential</span> in Neotropical Pioneers <span class="hlt">Suggest</span> Large-seeded Species Take More Risks</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background and Aims In neotropical forests, very small-seeded pioneer species (<0·1 mg seed mass) recruit preferentially in small tree fall gaps and at gap edges, but large-seeded pioneers do not. Since water availability is related to gap size, these differences in microsite preference may reflect in part species-specific differences in germination at reduced water <span class="hlt">potentials</span>. Methods For 14 neotropical pioneer species, the hypothesis is tested that small-seeded species, with shallow initial rooting depths, reduce the risks associated with desiccation by germinating more slowly and at higher water <span class="hlt">potentials</span> than large-seeded species. Key Results Germination occurred both more quickly and at lower water <span class="hlt">potentials</span> with increasing seed mass. For example, Ochroma pyramidale (seed mass 5·5 mg) had a time to 50 % germination (T50) of 2·8 d and a median base <span class="hlt">potential</span> for germination (?b50) of ?1·8 MPa while Clidemia quinquenervia (seed mass 0·017 mg) had a T50 of 17·6 d and ?b50 of ?1·1 MPa. Conclusions These data <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that small-seeded species germinate only in comparatively moist microsites, such as small canopy gaps, which may reduce the risk of drought-induced mortality. Conversely, large-seeded species are able to germinate in the drier environment of large gaps, where they benefit by enhanced seedling growth in a high irradiance environment. The positive association of seed size and canopy gap size for optimal seedling establishment is maintained by differential germination responses to soil water availability coupled with the scaling of radicle growth rate and seed size, which collectively confer greater drought tolerance on large-seeded species.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Daws, Matthew I.; Crabtree, Lora M.; Dalling, James W.; Mullins, Christopher E.; Burslem, David F. R. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a 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href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">41</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JChPh.133x4506D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effects of the attractive interactions in the thermodynamic, dynamic, and structural <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of a two length scale <span class="hlt">potential</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using molecular dynamic simulations, we study a system of particles interacting through a continuous core-softened <span class="hlt">potentials</span> consisting of a hard core, a shoulder at closest distances, and an attractive well at further distance. We obtain the pressure-temperature phase diagram of this system for various depths of the tunable attractive well. Since this is a two length scale <span class="hlt">potential</span>, density, diffusion, and structural <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are expected. We show that the effect of increasing the attractive interaction between the molecules is to shrink the region in pressure in which the density and the diffusion <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are present. If the attractive forces are too strong, particle will be predominantly in one of the two length scales and no density of diffusion <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is observed. The structural anomalous region is present for all the cases.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">da Silva, Jonathas Nunes; Salcedo, Evy; de Oliveira, Alan Barros; Barbosa, Marcia C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">42</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/10123754"> <span id="translatedtitle">Detecting and modeling persistent self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from underground nuclear explosions at the Nevada Test Site</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are naturally occurring, nearly stationary electric fields that are detected by measuring the <span class="hlt">potential</span> difference between two points on (or in) the ground. SP <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> arise from a number of causes: principally electrochemical reactions, and heat and fluid flows. SP is routinely used to locate mineral deposits, geothermal systems, and zones of seepage. This paper is a progress report on our work toward detecting explosion-related SP signals at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and in understanding the physics of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that persist and continue changing over periods of time that range from months to years. As background, we also include a brief description of how SP signals arise, and we mention their use in other areas such as exploring for geothermal resources and locating seepage through dams. Between the years 1988 and 1991, we surveyed the areas around seven underground nuclear tests for persistent SP <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. We not only detected <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, but we also found that various phenomena could be contributing to them and that we did not know which of these were actually occurring. We analyzed our new data with existing steady state codes and with a newly developed time-dependent thermal modeling code. Our results with the new code showed that the conductive decay of the thermal pulse from an underground nuclear test could produce many of the observed signals, and that others are probably caused by movement of fluid induced by the explosion. 25 refs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McKague, H.L.; Kansa, E.; Kasameyer, P.W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-22</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">43</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52232885"> <span id="translatedtitle">A least-squares minimisation approach to depth determination from numerical second horizontal self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper develops a least-squares minimisation approach to determine the depth of a buried structure from numerical second horizontal derivative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> obtained from self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> (SP) data using filters of successive window lengths. The method is based on using a relationship between the depth and a combination of observations at symmetric points with respect to the coordinate of the projection of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">El-Sayed Mohamed Abdelrahman; Khalid Soliman; Khalid Sayed Essa; Eid Ragab Abo-Ezz; Tarek Mohamed El-Araby</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">44</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.publish.csiro.au/?act=view_file&file_id=EG08123.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">A least-squares minimisation approach to depth determination from numerical second horizontal self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper develops a least-squares minimisation approach to determine the depth of a buried structure from numerical second horizontal derivative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> obtained from self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> (SP) data using filters of successive window lengths. The method is based on using a relationship between the depth and a combination of observations at symmetric pointswithrespecttothecoordinateoftheprojectionofthecentreofthesourceintheplaneofthemeasurementpointswitha free parameter (graticule spacing). The problem of depth determination</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">El-Sayed Mohamed Abdelrahman; Khalid Soliman; Khalid Sayed Essa; Eid Ragab Abo-Ezz; Tarek Mohamed El-Araby</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">45</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.G11A0856N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Detection of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in ocean acoustic velocity structure and their effect in sea-bottom crustal deformation measurement: synthetic test and future <span class="hlt">suggestion</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">On-land geodetic observations are not enough to monitor crustal activities in and around the subduction zone, so seafloor geodetic observations have been required. However, present accuracy of seafloor geodetic observation is an order of 1 cm or larger, which is difficult to detect differences from plate motion in short time interval, which means a plate coupling rate and its spatio-temporal variation. Our group has been developed observation system and methodology for seafloor geodesy, which is combined kinematic GPS and ocean acoustic ranging. One of influence factors is acoustic velocity change in ocean, due to change in temperature, ocean currents in different scale, and so on. A typical perturbation of acoustic velocity makes an order of 1 ms difference in travel time, which corresponds to 1 m difference in ray length. We have investigated this effect in seafloor geodesy using both observed and synthetic data to reduce estimation error of benchmarker (transponder) positions and to develop our strategy for observation and its analyses. In this paper, we focus on forward modeling of travel times of acoustic ranging data and recovery tests using synthetic data comparing with observed results [Eto et al., 2011; in this meeting]. Estimation procedure for benchmarker positions is similar to those used in earthquake location method and seismic tomography. So we have applied methods in seismic study, especially in tomographic inversion. First, we use method of a one-dimensional velocity inversion with station corrections, proposed by Kissling et al. [1994], to detect spatio-temporal change in ocean acoustic velocity from observed data in the Suruga-Nankai Trough, Japan. From these analyses, some important information has been clarified in travel time data [Eto et al., 2011]. Most of them can explain small velocity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> at a depth of 300m or shallower, through forward modeling of travel time data using simple velocity structure with velocity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. However, due to simple data acquisition procedure, we cannot detect velocity <span class="hlt">anomaly(s</span>) in space and time precisely, that is size of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and its (their) movement. As a next step, we demonstrate recovery of benchmarker positions in tomographic inversion using synthetic data including anomalous travel time data to develop idea to calculate benchmarker positions with high-accuracy. In the tomographic inversion, we introduce some constraints corresponding to realistic conditions. This step gives us new developed system to detect crustal deformation in seafloor geodesy and new findings for understanding these in and around plate boundaries.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nagai, S.; Eto, S.; Tadokoro, K.; Watanabe, T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">46</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=100002"> <span id="translatedtitle">Domain Structure of the NRIF3 Family of Coregulators <span class="hlt">Suggests</span> <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Dual Roles in Transcriptional Regulation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The identification of a novel coregulator for nuclear hormone receptors, designated NRIF3, was recently reported (D. Li et al., Mol. Cell. Biol. 19:7191–7202, 1999). Unlike most known coactivators, NRIF3 exhibits a distinct receptor specificity in interacting with and <span class="hlt">potentiating</span> the activity of only TRs and RXRs but not other examined nuclear receptors. However, the molecular basis underlying such specificity is unclear. In this report, we extended our study of NRIF3-receptor interactions. Our results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a bivalent interaction model, where a single NRIF3 molecule utilizes both the C-terminal LXXIL (receptor-interacting domain 1 [RID1]) and the N-terminal LXXLL (RID2) modules to cooperatively interact with TR or RXR (presumably a receptor dimer), with the spacing between RID1 and RID2 playing an important role in influencing the affinity of the interactions. During the course of these studies, we also uncovered an NRIF3-NRIF3 interaction domain. Deletion and mutagenesis analyses mapped the dimerization domain to a region in the middle of NRIF3 (residues 84 to 112), which is predicted to form a coiled-coil structure and contains a putative leucine zipper-like motif. By using Gal4 fusion constructs, we identified an autonomous transactivation domain (AD1) at the C terminus of NRIF3. Somewhat surprisingly, full-length NRIF3 fused to the DNA-binding domain of Gal4 was found to repress transcription of a Gal4 reporter. Further analyses mapped a novel repression domain (RepD1) to a small region at the N-terminal portion of NRIF3 (residues 20 to 50). The NRIF3 gene encodes at least two additional isoforms due to alternative splicing. These two isoforms contain the same RepD1 region as NRIF3. Consistent with this, Gal4 fusions of these two isoforms were also found to repress transcription. Cotransfection of NRIF3 or its two isoforms did not relieve the transrepression function mediated by their corresponding Gal4 fusion proteins, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that the repression involves a mechanism(s) other than the recruitment of a titratable corepressor. Interestingly, a single amino acid residue change of a <span class="hlt">potential</span> phosphorylation site in RepD1 (Ser28 to Ala) abolishes its transrepression function, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that the coregulatory property of NRIF3 (or its isoforms) might be subjected to regulation by cellular signaling. Taken together, our results identify NRIF3 as an interesting coregulator that possesses both transactivation and transrepression domains and/or functions. Collectively, the NRIF3 family of coregulators (which includes NRIF3 and its other isoforms) may play dual roles in mediating both positive and negative regulatory effects on gene expression.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Li, Dangsheng; Wang, Fang; Samuels, Herbert H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">47</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25010769"> <span id="translatedtitle">Widespread Sequence Variations in VAMP1 across Vertebrates <span class="hlt">Suggest</span> a <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Selective Pressure from Botulinum Neurotoxins.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT/A-G), the most potent toxins known, act by cleaving three SNARE proteins required for synaptic vesicle exocytosis. Previous studies on BoNTs have generally utilized the major SNARE homologues expressed in brain (VAMP2, syntaxin 1, and SNAP-25). However, BoNTs target peripheral motor neurons and cause death by paralyzing respiratory muscles such as the diaphragm. Here we report that VAMP1, but not VAMP2, is the SNARE homologue predominantly expressed in adult rodent diaphragm motor nerve terminals and in differentiated human motor neurons. In contrast to the highly conserved VAMP2, BoNT-resistant variations in VAMP1 are widespread across vertebrates. In particular, we identified a polymorphism at position 48 of VAMP1 in rats, which renders VAMP1 either resistant (I48) or sensitive (M48) to BoNT/D. Taking advantage of this finding, we showed that rat diaphragms with I48 in VAMP1 are insensitive to BoNT/D compared to rat diaphragms with M48 in VAMP1. This unique intra-species comparison establishes VAMP1 as a physiological toxin target in diaphragm motor nerve terminals, and demonstrates that the resistance of VAMP1 to BoNTs can underlie the insensitivity of a species to members of BoNTs. Consistently, human VAMP1 contains I48, which may explain why humans are insensitive to BoNT/D. Finally, we report that residue 48 of VAMP1 varies frequently between M and I across seventeen closely related primate species, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> a <span class="hlt">potential</span> selective pressure from members of BoNTs for resistance in vertebrates. PMID:25010769</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Peng, Lisheng; Adler, Michael; Demogines, Ann; Borrell, Andrew; Liu, Huisheng; Tao, Liang; Tepp, William H; Zhang, Su-Chun; Johnson, Eric A; Sawyer, Sara L; Dong, Min</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">48</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4092145"> <span id="translatedtitle">Widespread Sequence Variations in VAMP1 across Vertebrates <span class="hlt">Suggest</span> a <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Selective Pressure from Botulinum Neurotoxins</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT/A-G), the most potent toxins known, act by cleaving three SNARE proteins required for synaptic vesicle exocytosis. Previous studies on BoNTs have generally utilized the major SNARE homologues expressed in brain (VAMP2, syntaxin 1, and SNAP-25). However, BoNTs target peripheral motor neurons and cause death by paralyzing respiratory muscles such as the diaphragm. Here we report that VAMP1, but not VAMP2, is the SNARE homologue predominantly expressed in adult rodent diaphragm motor nerve terminals and in differentiated human motor neurons. In contrast to the highly conserved VAMP2, BoNT-resistant variations in VAMP1 are widespread across vertebrates. In particular, we identified a polymorphism at position 48 of VAMP1 in rats, which renders VAMP1 either resistant (I48) or sensitive (M48) to BoNT/D. Taking advantage of this finding, we showed that rat diaphragms with I48 in VAMP1 are insensitive to BoNT/D compared to rat diaphragms with M48 in VAMP1. This unique intra-species comparison establishes VAMP1 as a physiological toxin target in diaphragm motor nerve terminals, and demonstrates that the resistance of VAMP1 to BoNTs can underlie the insensitivity of a species to members of BoNTs. Consistently, human VAMP1 contains I48, which may explain why humans are insensitive to BoNT/D. Finally, we report that residue 48 of VAMP1 varies frequently between M and I across seventeen closely related primate species, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> a <span class="hlt">potential</span> selective pressure from members of BoNTs for resistance in vertebrates.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Peng, Lisheng; Adler, Michael; Demogines, Ann; Borrell, Andrew; Liu, Huisheng; Tao, Liang; Tepp, William H.; Zhang, Su-Chun; Johnson, Eric A.; Sawyer, Sara L.; Dong, Min</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">49</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/38430584"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for the Assessment of the Allergenic <span class="hlt">Potential</span> of Genetically Modified Organisms</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The prevalence of allergic diseases has been increasing continuously and, accordingly, there is a great desire to evaluate the allergenic <span class="hlt">potential</span> of components in our daily environment (e.g., food). Although there is almost no scientific evidence that genetically modified organisms (GMOs) exhibit increased allergenicity compared with the corresponding wild type significant concerns have been raised regarding this matter. In principle,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Armin Spök; Helmut Gaugitsch; Sylvia Laffer; Gabrielle Pauli; Hirohisa Saito; Hugh Sampson; Elopy Sibanda; Wayne Thomas; Marianne van Hage; Rudolf Valenta</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">50</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=72355"> <span id="translatedtitle">PERINATAL EXPOSURE TO ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS: <span class="hlt">POTENTIAL</span> ROLE OF HORMONAL ALTERATIONS IN INITIATING ADULT REPRODUCTIVE <span class="hlt">ANOMALIES</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The primary hypothesis to be tested in this series of studies is whether or not exposure to environmental agents, during certain key periods of development, will increase the risk of specific <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the reproductive system. Embedded in this hypothesis is the assumption that...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">51</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52794405"> <span id="translatedtitle">Classification of Self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> on Volcanoes and Its Implication for the Hydraulic Structure Deduced From SP Surveys on 10 Island-arc Type Volcanoes in Japan</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is widely believed that the self <span class="hlt">potential</span> (SP) <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on volcanoes provide information on the subsurface hydraulic and hydrothermal flow. Many studies report that the SP around active craters or fissures is relatively positive and is interpreted as a manifestation of an upward hydrothermal flow. However, there are no SP <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on some volcanoes in which the hydrothermal upwelling</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">K. Aizawa; M. Uyeshima; O. Kuwano</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">52</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19790020473&hterms=conventional+method&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3D%2522conventional%2Bmethod%2522"> <span id="translatedtitle">Global accuracy estimates of point and mean undulation differences obtained from gravity disturbances, gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and <span class="hlt">potential</span> coefficients</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Through the method of truncation functions, the oceanic geoid undulation is divided into two constituents: an inner zone contribution expressed as an integral of surface gravity disturbances over a spherical cap; and an outer zone contribution derived from a finite set of <span class="hlt">potential</span> harmonic coefficients. Global, average error estimates are formulated for undulation differences, thereby providing accuracies for a relative geoid. The error analysis focuses on the outer zone contribution for which the <span class="hlt">potential</span> coefficient errors are modeled. The method of computing undulations based on gravity disturbance data for the inner zone is compared to the similar, conventional method which presupposes gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data within this zone.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jekeli, C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1979-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">53</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18942157"> <span id="translatedtitle">Modeling of glycerol-3-phosphate transporter <span class="hlt">suggests</span> a <span class="hlt">potential</span> 'tilt' mechanism involved in its function.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Many major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporters have similar 12-transmembrane alpha-helical topologies with two six-helix halves connected by a long loop. In humans, these transporters participate in key physiological processes and are also, as in the case of members of the organic anion transporter (OAT) family, of pharmaceutical interest. Recently, crystal structures of two bacterial representatives of the MFS family--the glycerol-3-phosphate transporter (GlpT) and lac-permease (LacY)--have been solved and, because of assumptions regarding the high structural conservation of this family, there is hope that the results can be applied to mammalian transporters as well. Based on crystallography, it has been <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that a major conformational "switching" mechanism accounts for ligand transport by MFS proteins. This conformational switch would then allow periodic changes in the overall transporter configuration, resulting in its cyclic opening to the periplasm or cytoplasm. Following this lead, we have modeled a possible "switch" mechanism in GlpT, using the concept of rotation of protein domains as in the DynDom program17 and membranephilic constraints predicted by the MAPAS program.(23) We found that the minima of energies of intersubunit interactions support two alternate positions consistent with their transport properties. Thus, for GlpT, a "tilt" of 9 degrees -10 degrees rotation had the most favorable energetics of electrostatic interaction between the two halves of the transporter; moreover, this confirmation was sufficient to <span class="hlt">suggest</span> transport of the ligand across the membrane. We conducted steered molecular dynamics simulations of the GlpT-ligand system to explore how glycerol-3-phosphate would be handled by the "tilted" structure, and obtained results generally consistent with experimental mutagenesis data. While biochemical data remain most consistent with a single-site alternating access model, our results raise the possibility that, while the "rocker switch" may apply to certain MFS transporters, intermediate "tilted" states may exist under certain circumstances or as transitional structures. Although wet lab experimental confirmation is required, our results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that transport mechanisms in this transporter family should probably not be assumed to be conserved simply based on standard structural homology considerations. Furthermore, steered molecular dynamics elucidating energetic interactions of ligands with amino acid residues in an appropriately modeled transporter may have predictive value in understanding the impact of mutations and/or polymorphisms on transporter function. PMID:18942157</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tsigelny, Igor F; Greenberg, Jerry; Kouznetsova, Valentina; Nigam, Sanjay K</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">54</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2676871"> <span id="translatedtitle">Modeling of Glycerol-3-Phosphate Transporter <span class="hlt">Suggests</span> a <span class="hlt">Potential</span> 'Tilt' Mechanism involved in its Function</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Many major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporters have similar 12-transmembrane ?-helical topologies with two six-helix halves connected by a long loop. In humans, these transporters participate in key physiological processes and are also, as in the case of members of the organic anion transporter (OAT) family, of pharmaceutical interest. Recently, crystal structures of two bacterial representatives of the MFS family — the glycerol-3-phosphate transporter (GlpT) and lac-permease (LacY) — have been solved and, because of assumptions regarding the high structural conservation of this family, there is hope that the results can be applied to mammalian transporters as well. Based on crystallography, it has been <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that a major conformational “switching” mechanism accounts for ligand transport by MFS proteins. This conformational switch would then allow periodic changes in the overall transporter configuration, resulting in its cyclic opening to the periplasm or cytoplasm. Following this lead, we have modeled a possible “switch” mechanism in GlpT, using the concept of rotation of protein domains as in the DynDom program17 and membranephilic constraints predicted by the MAPAS program.23 We found that the minima of energies of intersubunit interactions support two alternate positions consistent with their transport properties. Thus, for GlpT, a “tilt” of 9°–10° rotation had the most favorable energetics of electrostatic interaction between the two halves of the transporter; moreover, this confirmation was sufficient to <span class="hlt">suggest</span> transport of the ligand across the membrane. We conducted steered molecular dynamics simulations of the GlpT-ligand system to explore how glycerol-3-phosphate would be handled by the “tilted” structure, and obtained results generally consistent with experimental mutagenesis data. While biochemical data remain most consistent with a single-site alternating access model, our results raise the possibility that, while the “rocker switch” may apply to certain MFS transporters, intermediate “tilted” states may exist under certain circumstances or as transitional structures. While wet lab experimental confirmation is required, our results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that transport mechanisms in this transporter family should probably not be assumed to be conserved simply based on standard structural homology considerations. Furthermore, steered molecular dynamics elucidating energetic interactions of ligands with amino acid residues in an appropriately modeled transporter may have predictive value in understanding the impact of mutations and/or polymorphisms on transporter function.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tsigelny, Igor F.; Greenberg, Jerry; Kouznetsova, Valentina; Nigam, Sanjay K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">55</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1995JGR...10010197J"> <span id="translatedtitle">Streaming <span class="hlt">potential</span> and permeability of saturated sandstones under triaxial stress: Consequences for electrotelluric <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> prior to earthquakes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The streaming <span class="hlt">potential</span>, due to fluid circulation in rock, was measured on saturated sediments (Fontainebleau sandstones). The electrokinetic coupling coefficient, which is the ratio of the streaming <span class="hlt">potential</span> and the excess pore pressure, is proportional to the fluid resistivity. Additionally, for a fluid conductivity of 10-3 S/m, the electrokinetic coupling coefficient varies from 10 to 6642 mV/0.1 MPa for sample permeability in the range of permeabilities from 0.15 × 10-15 to 1220 × 10-15 m2. The different values of the electrokinetic coupling coefficient have been explained by the effect of increasing surface conductivity which becomes nonnegligible compared to fluid conductivity for low permeability. When the sample is deformed under triaxial stress up to failure, the vertical permeability (along the principal stress) drops by about 0.20%/0.1 MPa when failure occurs. The typical variation of the electrokinetic coupling coefficient is a large increase beginning with the onset of the localization of the shear band at about 75% of the yield stress and stopping at the failure. This increase of the electrokinetic coupling coefficient is due to an increase of ? <span class="hlt">potential</span> in the shear zone when new surfaces are created and connected. Possible consequences of our results are given concerning the electrical fields which could appear during the preparation of an earthquake. It is shown that in some cases, self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> reported in the deformed zone preceding an earthquake occurrence could be due to an increase of the electrokinetic coupling coefficient from 75% of the yield stress to rupture in the vicinity of one of the electrodes. Any variation of fluid resistivity or permeability in the vicinity of one electrode could change the electrokinetic coupling coefficient, inducing a surface electrokinetic <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. In regard to the interpretation of the electrokinetic effect which occurs at large distance from the epicenter, a larger electrokinetic <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> could be measured between electrodes situated along a vertical fluid flow, for instance, in a shallow borehole. An electrokinetic <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> up to 30 mV, for a fluid conductivity of 0.01 S/m and a rock permeability of 10-12 m2, could be observed with a change of the underground water table level as slight as 50 cm (50 mbar). Moreover, if the permeability between the electrodes is increased by a factor of 8 × 103, the electrokinetic coupling coefficient could be enhanced by a factor up to 650.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jouniaux, Laurence; Pozzi, Jean-Pierre</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">56</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23973090"> <span id="translatedtitle">ECG Features that <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a <span class="hlt">potentially</span> life-threatening arrhythmia as the cause for syncope.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Syncope is a risk factor for sudden cardiac death (SCD) in many conditions associated with structural heart disease as well as inherited heart disease. The ECG in patients with syncope should be examined carefully for signs of structural heart disease, such as myocardial infarction or cardiomyopathy; signs of conduction system disease, such as bundle branch block or atrioventricular block; and signs of primary electrical disease. Important forms of cardiomyopathy accompanied by ECG changes include hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD/C). Common ECG findings in HCM include left ventricular hypertrophy by voltage, repolarization abnormalities, QRS widening, pseudoinfarction patterns, and slurred QRS upstroke mimicking delta waves. Classical ECG findings of ARVD/C include T-wave inversions and epsilon waves in the right precordial leads (V?-V?). Important forms of primary electrical disease which may result in syncope include Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, long QT syndrome, and Brugada syndrome, which is characterized by coved ST-segments in the right precordial leads, associated with a history of syncope, ventricular arrhythmia, or sudden cardiac death in probands or family member. There are three Brugada ECG patterns; however, only type I (spontaneous or induced) is considered diagnostic. Recently, studies have <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that patients with J-point elevation or early repolarization pattern on ECG are at elevated risk of SCD. The clinical significance of finding early repolarization in a patient with syncope is unknown and should be a subject of future research. PMID:23973090</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Marine, Joseph E</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">57</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24682408"> <span id="translatedtitle">Posture-induced changes of ocular vestibular evoked myogenic <span class="hlt">potentials</span> <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a modulation by intracranial pressure.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ocular vestibular evoked myogenic <span class="hlt">potentials</span> (oVEMPs) represent extraocular muscle activity in response to vestibular stimulation. We sought to investigate whether oVEMPs are modulated by increasing intracranial pressure (ICP). Air-conducted oVEMPs were elicited in 20 healthy subjects lying supine on a tilt table. In order to elevate the ICP, the table was stepwise tilted from the horizontal plane to a 30° declination, corresponding to a 0°, 10°, 20° and 30° head-down position. At each inclination angle, oVEMP recording was performed in two head positions: (1) the head in line with the body and (2) the head positioned horizontally with the body tilted. When tilting both the body and head, oVEMP amplitudes gradually declined from 4.59 ?V at 0° to 2.24 ?V at 30° head-down position, revealing a highly significant reduction in amplitudes for all tilt angles when compared to the baseline value (p < 0.001). In parallel, the response prevalence decreased and latencies prolonged. Similar effects were observed when the body was tilted but the head positioned horizontally, even though the decrease in oVEMP amplitudes was less pronounced. A gravitoinertial force effect upon the otolith organs could thereby be excluded as a possible confounder. Hence, oVEMPs were most likely modulated by increasing ICP. In the range of the horizontal plane to a 30° head-down tilt, there was a linear correlation between oVEMP amplitudes and the inclination angle. oVEMPs might in principle be suited for non-invasive ICP monitoring. PMID:24682408</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jerin, Claudia; Gürkov, Robert</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">58</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a000000/a002600/a002695/index.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">SST <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> + Wind <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sea surface temperature (SST) <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and sea surface wind <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> show the development of the 2002-2003 El Nino based on data from NASAs Aqua and QuikSCAT spacecraft. The wind data has been processed using the Variational Analysis Method (VAM).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shirah, Greg; Allen, Jesse; Adamec, David</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-02-03</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">59</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AIPC.1325..164S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Application of Qualitative and Quantitative Analyses of Self-<span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> in Caves Detection in Djuanda Forest Park, Bandung</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Self-<span class="hlt">Potential</span> (SP) is naturally occurring electric <span class="hlt">potential</span> difference observed at the surface. In the vicinity of a cave, SP <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is dominantly generated by the resistivity contrast of the cave with its environment and the current source associated with the streaming <span class="hlt">potential</span> generated by fluid flow through the cave. In this study we applied a simple qualitative analysis to understand the SP values caused by streaming <span class="hlt">potential</span> and values that are due to the presence of caves. Further, we conducted two-dimensional SP continuous modeling by solving the fluid velocity vector first in the modeling domain. Current source distribution and hence the SP value are obtained by incorporating resistivity value of the subsurface and calculating the divergence of the velocity vector. For validation, this scheme was applied in detection caves dug by Japanese army during WWII as at Djuanda Forest Park, Bandung. The results can be used to understand the characteristics of fluid flow and current source distribution around cavities that are responsible for the observed SP <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> at the surface.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Srigutomo, Wahyu; Arkanuddin, Muhammad R.; Pratomo, Prihandhanu M.; Novana, Eka C.; Agustina, Rena D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">60</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/35379597"> <span id="translatedtitle">Genetic knockout and pharmacological blockade studies of the 5HT 7 receptor <span class="hlt">suggest</span> therapeutic <span class="hlt">potential</span> in depression</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The affinity of several antidepressant and antipsychotic drugs for the 5-HT7 receptor and its CNS distribution <span class="hlt">suggest</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> in the treatment of psychiatric diseases. However, there is little direct evidence of receptor function in vivo to support this. We therefore evaluated 5-HT7 receptors as a <span class="hlt">potential</span> drug target by generating and assessing a 5-HT7 receptor knockout mouse. No difference in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. Guscott; L. J. Bristow; K. Hadingham; T. W. Rosahl; M. S. Beer; J. A. Stanton; F. Bromidge; A. P. Owens; I. Huscroft; J. Myers; N. M. Rupniak; S. Patel; P. J. Whiting; P. H. Hutson; K. C. Fone; S. M. Biello; J. J. Kulagowski; G. McAllister</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a 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href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">61</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.V52B..04S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Oxygen Isotope <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> in the Carbonate Fractions of Aerosols and its <span class="hlt">Potential</span> to Assess Urban Pollution</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Mineral dust is emitted into the atmosphere from arid regions in Asia yearly, accounting for ~36% of global aerosol emissions, 5900 Tg yr-1 [IPCC 2007]. Increasing anthropogenic emissions and persistent dust emissions not only have reduced the air quality in Asia itself, but are also affecting the pollutant deposition into the Pacific Ocean and air quality in downwind areas. The carbonate component of mineral dust (calcite (CaCO3) and dolomite (CaMg(CO3)2) is particularly reactive and can comprise as much as 30% of the total mineral dust aerosol, depending on the source region [Claquin et al., 1999]. Carbonate can affect atmospheric chemical processes and aerosol characteristics because the acid neutralizing capacity of this species facilitates the heterogeneous conversion of sulphate and nitrate. Understanding heterogeneous reactions occurring on the surface of aerosol particles will lead to a better understanding of the fate and transport of molecules in the troposphere as well as to resolve their role in air quality and pollution. The primary goal of this work is to develop an isotope methodology for carbonates that can be used as a chemical marker for the origin of polluted air plumes and chemical transformation during the long range transport of air masses. We will discuss the carbon and oxygen isotope composition of the CO2 released from the fine (< 1 ?m) and coarse (> 1 ?m) particles collected at two different sites [Mt. Soledad (800 ft) and Scripps Pier, La Jolla, California] and its possible utility as a tracer to identify the long-range transport of aerosol from local pollution events. The degree of urban influence of sampled air parcels at each site was quantified through back-trajectory analysis of NOAA HYSPLIT output data. Interestingly, the isotopes of oxygen did not follow standard mass dependent relationship (?17O ~ 0.52 ?18O) rather have excess 17O (?17O = ?17O- 0.52?18O) ranging from 0.9 to 3.9 per mil. A highly significant correlation (r2= 0.887) was observed between oxygen isotope <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (?17O) in the carbonate fraction of coarse aerosols and urban index, indicating that the isotope <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of carbonates can be used as a proxy for urban pollution. Additionally, controlled laboratory experiments to understand the origin of isotope <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the carbonate fraction of aerosols will be discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shaheen, R.; Abramian, A.; Dominguez, G.; Jackson, T.; Thiemens, M. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">62</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3310790"> <span id="translatedtitle">Age-Dependent Brain Gene Expression and Copy Number <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Autism <span class="hlt">Suggest</span> Distinct Pathological Processes at Young Versus Mature Ages</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder, yet the genetic underpinnings of the disorder are largely unknown. Aberrant brain overgrowth is a well-replicated observation in the autism literature; but association, linkage, and expression studies have not identified genetic factors that explain this trajectory. Few studies have had sufficient statistical power to investigate whole-genome gene expression and genotypic variation in the autistic brain, especially in regions that display the greatest growth abnormality. Previous functional genomic studies have identified possible alterations in transcript levels of genes related to neurodevelopment and immune function. Thus, there is a need for genetic studies involving key brain regions to replicate these findings and solidify the role of particular functional pathways in autism pathogenesis. We therefore sought to identify abnormal brain gene expression patterns via whole-genome analysis of mRNA levels and copy number variations (CNVs) in autistic and control postmortem brain samples. We focused on prefrontal cortex tissue where excess neuron numbers and cortical overgrowth are pronounced in the majority of autism cases. We found evidence for dysregulation in pathways governing cell number, cortical patterning, and differentiation in young autistic prefrontal cortex. In contrast, adult autistic prefrontal cortex showed dysregulation of signaling and repair pathways. Genes regulating cell cycle also exhibited autism-specific CNVs in DNA derived from prefrontal cortex, and these genes were significantly associated with autism in genome-wide association study datasets. Our results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that CNVs and age-dependent gene expression changes in autism may reflect distinct pathological processes in the developing versus the mature autistic prefrontal cortex. Our results raise the hypothesis that genetic dysregulation in the developing brain leads to abnormal regional patterning, excess prefrontal neurons, cortical overgrowth, and neural dysfunction in autism.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Winn, Mary E.; Barnes, Cynthia Carter; Li, Hai-Ri; Weiss, Lauren; Fan, Jian-Bing; Murray, Sarah; April, Craig; Belinson, Haim; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Schork, Nicholas J.; Courchesne, Eric</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">63</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004PhRvB..70f4201R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Local properties of the <span class="hlt">potential</span>-energy landscape of a model glass:Understanding the low-temperature <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Though the existence of two-level systems (TLS) is widely accepted to explain low temperature <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the sound absorption, heat capacity, thermal conductivity and other quantities, an exact description of their microscopic nature is still lacking. We performed computer simulations for a binary Lennard-Jones system, using a newly developed algorithm to locate double-well <span class="hlt">potentials</span> (DWP) and thus two-level systems on a systematic basis. We show that the intrinsic limitations of computer simulations like finite time and finite size problems do not hamper this analysis. We discuss how the DWP are embedded in the total <span class="hlt">potential</span> energy landscape. It turns out that most DWP are connected to the dynamics of the smaller particles and that these DWP are rather localized. However, DWP related to the larger particles are more collective.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Reinisch, J.; Heuer, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">64</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3482292"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cervical spine <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Menkes disease: a radiologic finding <span class="hlt">potentially</span> confused with child abuse</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background Menkes disease is an X-linked recessive disorder of copper transport caused by mutations in ATP7A, a copper-transporting ATPase. Certain radiologic findings reported in this condition overlap with those caused by child abuse. However, cervical spine defects simulating cervical spine fracture, a known result of nonaccidental pediatric trauma, have not been reported previously in this illness. Objective To assess the frequency of cervical spine <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Menkes disease after discovery of an apparent C2 posterior arch defect in a child participating in a clinical trial. Materials and methods We examined cervical spine radiographs obtained in 35 children with Menkes disease enrolled in a clinical trial at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. Results Four of the 35 children with Menkes disease had apparent C2 posterior arch defects consistent with spondylolysis or incomplete/delayed ossification. Conclusion Defects in C2 were found in 11% of infants and young children with Menkes disease. Discovery of cervical spine defects expands the spectrum of radiologic findings associated with this condition. As with other skeletal abnormalities, this feature simulates nonaccidental trauma. In the context of Menkes disease, suspicions of child abuse should be considered cautiously and tempered by these findings to avoid unwarranted accusations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hill, Suvimol C.; Dwyer, Andrew J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">65</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.9396K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of Süleymanköy (Diyarbakir, Eastern Turkey) and Seferihisar (Izmir, Western Turkey) Self <span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> with Multilayer Perceptron Neural Networks</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> (SP) is one of the oldest geophysical methods that provides important information about near-surface structures. Several methods have been developed to interpret SP data using simple geometries. This study investigated inverse solution of a buried, polarized sphere-shaped self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> (SP ) <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> via Multilayer Perceptron Neural Networks ( MLPNN ). The polarization angle ( ? ) and depth to the centre of sphere ( h )were estimated. The MLPNN is applied to synthetic and field SP data. In order to see the capability of the method in detecting the number of sources, MLPNN was applied to different spherical models at different depths and locations.. Additionally, the performance of MLPNN was tested by adding random noise to the same synthetic test data. The sphere model successfully obtained similar parameters under different S/N ratios. Then, MLPNN method was applied to two field examples. The first one is the cross section taken from the SP <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map of the Ergani-Süleymanköy (Turkey) copper mine. MLPNN was also applied to SP data from Seferihisar Izmir (Western Turkey) geothermal field. The MLPNN results showed good agreement with the original synthetic data set. The effect of The technique gave satisfactory results following the addition of 5% and 10% Gaussian noise levels. The MLPNN results were compared to other SP interpretation techniques, such as Normalized Full Gradient (NFG), inverse solution and nomogram methods. All of the techniques showed strong similarity. Consequently, the synthetic and field applications of this study show that MLPNN provides reliable evaluation of the self <span class="hlt">potential</span> data modelled by the sphere model.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kaftan, Ilknur; Sindirgi, Petek</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">66</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860012497&hterms=bouguer+anomaly+gravity&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dbouguer%2Banomaly%2Bgravity"> <span id="translatedtitle">Constraints on lithospheric structure from satellite <span class="hlt">potential</span> field data: Africa and Asia. Analysis and interpretation of MAGSAT <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over North Africa</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Crustal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection with MAGSAT data is frustrated by the inherent resolving power of the data and by contamination from the external and core fields. The quality of the data might be tested by modeling specific tectonic features which produce <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that fall within the proposed resolution and crustal amplitude capabilities of the MAGSAT fields. To test this hypothesis, the north African hotspots associated with Ahaggar, Tibestia and Darfur have been modeled as magnetic induction <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> due solely to shallower depth to the Curie isotherm surface beneath these features. The MAGSAT data were reduced by subtracting the external and core fields to isolate the scalar and vertical component crustal signals. The predicted model magnetic signal arising from the surface topography of the uplift and the Curie isotherm surface was calculated at MAGSAT altitudes by the Fourier transform technique modified to allow for variable magnetization. In summary it is <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that the region beneath Ahaggar is associated with a strong thermal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and the predicted <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> best fits the associated MAGSAT <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> if the African plate is moving in a northeasterly direction.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Phillips, R. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">67</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMNS33A..08B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Efficacy of very fast simulated annealing global optimization method for interpretation of self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> by different forward formulation over 2D inclined sheet type structure</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Self-<span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is an important geophysical technique that measures the electrical <span class="hlt">potential</span> due natural source of current in the Earth's subsurface. An inclined sheet type model is a very familiar structure associated with mineralization, fault plane, groundwater flow and many other geological features which exhibits self <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. A number of linearized and global inversion approaches have been developed for the interpretation of SP <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> over different structures for various purposes. Mathematical expression to compute the forward response over a two-dimensional dipping sheet type structures can be described in three different ways using five variables in each case. Complexities in the inversion using three different forward approaches are different. Interpretation of self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> using very fast simulated annealing global optimization has been developed in the present study which yielded a new insight about the uncertainty and equivalence in model parameters. Interpretation of the measured data yields the location of the causative body, depth to the top, extension, dip and quality of the causative body. In the present study, a comparative performance of three different forward approaches in the interpretation of self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is performed to assess the efficacy of the each approach in resolving the possible ambiguity. Even though each forward formulation yields the same forward response but optimization of different sets of variable using different forward problems poses different kinds of ambiguity in the interpretation. Performance of the three approaches in optimization has been compared and it is observed that out of three methods, one approach is best and suitable for this kind of study. Our VFSA approach has been tested on synthetic, noisy and field data for three different methods to show the efficacy and suitability of the best method. It is important to use the forward problem in the optimization that yields the best result without any ambiguity and smaller uncertainty. Keywords: SP <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, inclined sheet, 2D structure, forward problems, VFSA Optimization,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Biswas, A.; Sharma, S. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">68</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..11.3696A"> <span id="translatedtitle">High resolution method to geological boundary detection of <span class="hlt">potential</span> field <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> field methods such as gravity and magnetic are most applicability geophysical methods in mineral exploration. A high-resolution technique is developed to image geologic boundaries such as contacts and faults. <span class="hlt">Potential</span> field derivatives are basis of many interpretations techniques. In boundary detection analytic signal quantity defines by combining horizontal derivatives and vertical derivative. The outlines of the geologic boundaries can be determined by tracing the maximum amplitudes of analytic signal. However in cases that a variety of sources are adjacent, due to superposition effects the detected boundaries are blurred. For overcome to this problem enhanced analytic signal composed of the nth- order vertical derivative of analytic signal are used. The locations of its maximum amplitudes are independent of magnetization direction and geomagnetic parameters. This technique is particularly suitable when interference effects are considerable and when remanent magnetization are nor negligible. In this paper this technique has been applied to gravity data of southwest England. Using this method, five granites outcrops and their separator faults are enhanced accurately. Keywords: <span class="hlt">Potential</span> field data, horizontal derivative, vertical derivative, Enhanced Analytic Signal, magnetization direction, interference.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alamdar, K.; Ansari, A. H.; Ghorbani, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">69</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3924353"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> cancer-related role of circadian gene TIMELESS <span class="hlt">suggested</span> by expression profiling and in vitro analyses</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background The circadian clock and cell cycle are two global regulatory systems that have pervasive behavioral and physiological effects on eukaryotic cells, and both play a role in cancer development. Recent studies have indicated that the circadian and cell cycle regulator, TIMELESS, may serve as a molecular bridge between these two regulatory systems. Methods To assess the role of TIMELESS in tumorigenesis, we analyzed TIMELESS expression data from publically accessible online databases. A loss-of-function analysis was then performed using TIMELESS-targeting siRNA oligos followed by a whole-genome expression microarray and network analysis. We further tested the effect of TIMELESS down-regulation on cell proliferation rates of a breast and cervical cancer cell line, as <span class="hlt">suggested</span> by the results of our network analysis. Results TIMELESS was found to be frequently overexpressed in different tumor types compared to normal controls. Elevated expression of TIMELESS was significantly associated with more advanced tumor stage and poorer breast cancer prognosis. We identified a cancer-relevant network of transcripts with altered expression following TIMELESS knockdown which contained many genes with known functions in cancer development and progression. Furthermore, we observed that TIMELESS knockdown significantly decreased cell proliferation rate. Conclusions Our results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a <span class="hlt">potential</span> role for TIMELESS in tumorigenesis, which warrants further investigation of TIMELESS expression as a <span class="hlt">potential</span> biomarker of cancer susceptibility and prognostic outcome.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">70</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMED11C0757T"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> hazards from structural and gravitational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> within sedimentary basins of northwest Washington</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study presents preliminary models based on new and existing gravity and magnetic data for two regions in the Puget Sound, Washington, area: the Bellingham basin and the Muckleshoot basin. The principle goals of the project are to determine whether and how faults mapped outside of these basins continue beneath their thick sedimentary cover. In the Bellingham basin, cross-sectional models focus on the Drayton-Harbor magnetic lineament and the Birch Bay fault. Late Holocene displacements have been observed along these structures along the western Washington coast, and analyses of magnetic data and Lidar data <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that these faults extend eastward into the basin. Preliminary models are consistent with the inland continuation of the Birch Bay fault towards Bellingham. The new gravity data also <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the Bellingham basin may consist of smaller subbasins, rather than one large basin, as previously mapped. In the Muckleshoot basin, cross-sectional models focus on the possible connection of the east-trending Tacoma fault (west of the basin) and the northwest-trending White River fault, mapped to the east of the Muckleshoot basin. A connection between these two fault systems would have significant implications for hazard estimates in terms of the length and size of these seismogenic structures.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Taylor, J. P.; Wolf, L. W.; Blakely, R. J.; Sherrod, B. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">71</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23568360"> <span id="translatedtitle">CT colonography for investigation of patients with symptoms <span class="hlt">potentially</span> <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> of colorectal cancer: a review of the UK SIGGAR trials.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper argues for the use of CT colonography (CTC) to investigate patients with symptoms <span class="hlt">potentially</span> <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> of colorectal cancer. It describes the rationale for the UK Special Interest Group in Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (SIGGAR) randomised controlled trials that compared CTC with barium enema (BE) or colonoscopy for diagnosis of colorectal cancer or large polyps in symptomatic patients. Diagnostic outcomes from the trials are detailed for both intra- and extracolonic disease, along with psychological reactions of patients to the tests, and cost-effectiveness of the different diagnostic strategies. The author concludes that BE should be replaced by CTC immediately and that CTC is a sensitive, acceptable and equally cost-effective alternative to colonoscopy in patients in whom colonoscopy is contraindicated or undesirable. PMID:23568360</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Halligan, S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">72</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3719982"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lymphocyte phenotypes in wild-caught rats <span class="hlt">suggest</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> mechanisms underlying increased immune sensitivity in post-industrial environments</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The immune systems of wild rats and of laboratory rats can been utilized as models of the human immune system in pre-industrial and post-industrial societies, respectively. In this study, lymphocyte phenotypes in wild rats were broadly characterized, and the results were compared to those obtained by us and by others using cells derived from various strains of laboratory rats. Although not expected, the production of regulatory T cells was not apparently different in wild rats compared to laboratory rats. On the other hand, differences in expression of markers involved in complement regulation, adhesion, signaling and maturation <span class="hlt">suggest</span> increased complement regulation and decreased sensitivity in wild-caught rats compared to laboratory rats, and point toward complex differences between the maturation of T cells. The results <span class="hlt">potentially</span> lend insight into the pathogenesis of post-industrial epidemics of allergy and autoimmune disease.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Trama, Ashley M; Holzknecht, Zoie E; Thomas, Anitra D; Su, Kuei-Ying; Lee, Sean M; Foltz, Emily E; Perkins, Sarah E; Lin, Shu S; Parker, William</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">73</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23813976"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pathogenic rare copy number variants in community-based schizophrenia <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a <span class="hlt">potential</span> role for clinical microarrays.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Individually rare, large copy number variants (CNVs) contribute to genetic vulnerability for schizophrenia. Unresolved questions remain, however, regarding the anticipated yield of clinical microarray testing in schizophrenia. Using high-resolution genome-wide microarrays and rigorous methods, we investigated rare CNVs in a prospectively recruited community-based cohort of 459 unrelated adults with schizophrenia and estimated the minimum prevalence of clinically significant CNVs that would be detectable on a clinical microarray. A blinded review by two independent clinical cytogenetic laboratory directors of all large (>500 kb) rare CNVs in cases and well-matched controls showed that those deemed to be clinically significant were highly enriched in schizophrenia (16.4-fold increase, P < 0.0001). In a single community catchment area, the prevalence of individuals with these CNVs was 8.1%. Rare 1.7 Mb CNVs at 2q13 were found to be significantly associated with schizophrenia for the first time, compared with the prevalence in 23 838 population-based controls (42.9-fold increase, P = 0.0002). Additional novel findings that will facilitate the future clinical interpretation of smaller CNVs in schizophrenia include: (i) a greater proportion of individuals with two or more rare exonic CNVs >10 kb in size (1.5-fold increase, P = 0.0109) in schizophrenia; (ii) the systematic discovery of new candidate genes for schizophrenia; and, (iii) functional gene enrichment mapping highlighting a differential impact in schizophrenia of rare exonic deletions involving diverse functions, including neurodevelopmental and synaptic processes (4.7-fold increase, P = 0.0060). These findings <span class="hlt">suggest</span> consideration of a <span class="hlt">potential</span> role for clinical microarray testing in schizophrenia, as is now the <span class="hlt">suggested</span> standard of care for related developmental disorders like autism. PMID:23813976</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Costain, Gregory; Lionel, Anath C; Merico, Daniele; Forsythe, Pamela; Russell, Kathryn; Lowther, Chelsea; Yuen, Tracy; Husted, Janice; Stavropoulos, Dimitri J; Speevak, Marsha; Chow, Eva W C; Marshall, Christian R; Scherer, Stephen W; Bassett, Anne S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-11-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">74</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24853175"> <span id="translatedtitle">High level of HSF1 associates with aggressive endometrial carcinoma and <span class="hlt">suggests</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> for HSP90 inhibitors.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background:Recent identification of a specific role of HSF1 in cancer progression has led to new relevance of HSF1 as both a prognostic and a predictive marker. The role of HSF1 in endometrial cancer has so far been unexplored.Methods:A total of 823 lesions from endometrial carcinoma precursors, primary tumours and metastases were prospectively collected and explored for HSF1 protein expression in relation to established markers for aggressive disease and survival. Transcriptional alterations related to HSF1 protein level were investigated by microarray analysis for 224 freshly frozen samples in parallel.Results:High expression of HSF1 protein in endometrial carcinoma is significantly associated with aggressive disease and poor survival (all P-values ?0.02), also among ER?-positive patients presumed to have good prognosis. The HSF1-related gene signatures increase during disease progression and were also found to have prognostic value. Gene expression analyses identified HSP90 inhibition as a <span class="hlt">potential</span> novel therapeutic approach for cases with high protein expression of HSF1.Conclusions:We demonstrate for the first time in endometrial cancer that high expression of HSF1 and measures for transcriptional activation of HSF1 associate with poor outcome and disease progression. The HSP90 inhibitors are <span class="hlt">suggested</span> as new targeted therapeutics for patients with high HSF1 levels in tumour in particular. PMID:24853175</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Engerud, H; Tangen, I L; Berg, A; Kusonmano, K; Halle, M K; Oyan, A M; Kalland, K H; Stefansson, I; Trovik, J; Salvesen, H B; Krakstad, C</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">75</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4105788"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mutant phenotype analysis <span class="hlt">suggests</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> roles for C-type natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR-B) in male mouse fertility</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) signaling through its receptor natriuretic peptide receptor B (NPR-B) is a key molecule for mammalian reproduction, and known to play important roles in female fertility. However, the function of these peptides in mouse male reproduction remains largely unknown. To determine the role of CNP/NPR-B signaling in male reproduction we investigated phenotype of Npr2-deficient short-limbed-dwarfism (Npr2 slw/slw ) mice, which have been shown to have gastrointestinal (GI) abnormalities. Findings In homozygous Npr2 slw/slw mice, spermatogenesis is developmentally delayed at both 2 and 4 weeks of age, with vacuolation and degenerating apoptotic germ cells being observed at 3 weeks age. However, the adult Npr2 slw/slw mice exhibited apparently normal spermatogenesis, albeit with some aberrant spermatids, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that developmental delay was overcome. In addition, the adult Npr2 slw/slw mice showed abnormal penile morphology (paraphimosis). Conclusions The <span class="hlt">potential</span> role of CNP signaling via the NPR-B receptor in male fertility appears to be mediated not through germ-cell development, but may be through maintenance of normal penile function.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">76</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040081281&hterms=bouguer+anomaly+gravity&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dbouguer%2Banomaly%2Bgravity"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bangui <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Bangui <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is the name given to one of the Earth s largest crustal magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the largest over the African continent. It covers two-thirds of the Central African Republic and therefore the name derives from the capitol city-Bangui that is also near the center of this feature. From surface magnetic survey data Godivier and Le Donche (1962) were the first to describe this <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Subsequently high-altitude world magnetic surveying by the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office (Project Magnet) recorded a greater than 1000 nT dipolar, peak-to-trough <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> with the major portion being negative (figure 1). Satellite observations (Cosmos 49) were first reported in 1964, these revealed a 40nT <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> at 350 km altitude. Subsequently the higher altitude (417-499km) POGO (Polar Orbiting Geomagnetic Observatory) satellite data recorded peak-to-trough <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of 20 nT these data were added to Cosmos 49 measurements by Regan et al. (1975) for a regional satellite altitude map. In October 1979, with the launch of Magsat, a satellite designed to measure crustal magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, a more uniform satellite altitude magnetic map was obtained. These data, computed at 375 km altitude recorded a -22 nT <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (figure 2). This elliptically shaped <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is approximately 760 by 1000 km and is centered at 6%, 18%. The Bangui <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is composed of three segments; there are two positive <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> lobes north and south of a large central negative field. This displays the classic pattern of a magnetic anomalous body being magnetized by induction in a zero inclination field. This is not surprising since the magnetic equator passes near the center of this body.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Taylor, Patrick T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">77</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2216834"> <span id="translatedtitle">Action <span class="hlt">potentials</span> and chemosensitive conductances in the dendrites of olfactory neurons <span class="hlt">suggest</span> new features for odor transduction</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Odors affect the excitability of an olfactory neuron by altering membrane conductances at the ciliated end of a single, long dendrite. One mechanism to increase the sensitivity of olfactory neurons to odorants would be for their dendrites to support action <span class="hlt">potentials</span>. We show for the first time that isolated olfactory dendrites from the mudpuppy Necturus maculosus contain a high density of voltage-activated Na+ channels and produce Na-dependent action <span class="hlt">potentials</span> in response to depolarizing current pulses. Furthermore, all required steps in the transduction process beginning with odor detection and culminating with action <span class="hlt">potential</span> initiation occur in the ciliated dendrite. We have previously shown that odors can modulate Cl- and K+ conductances in intact olfactory neurons, producing both excitation and inhibition. Here we show that both conductances are also present in the isolated, ciliated dendrite near the site of odor binding, that they are modulated by odors, and that they affect neuronal excitability. Voltage- activated Cl- currents blocked by 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2' disulfonic acid and niflumic acid were found at greater than five times higher average density in the ciliated dendrite than in the soma, whereas voltage-activated K+ currents inhibited by intracellular Cs+ were distributed on average more uniformly throughout the cell. When ciliated, chemosensitive dendrites were stimulated with the odorant taurine, the responses were similar to those seen in intact cells: Cl- currents were increased in some dendrites, whereas in others Cl- or K+ currents were decreased, and responses washed out during whole-cell recording. The Cl- equilibrium <span class="hlt">potential</span> for intact neurons bathed in physiological saline was found to be -45 mV using an on-cell voltage- ramp protocol and delayed application of channel blockers. We postulate that transduction of some odors is caused by second messenger-mediated modulation of the resting membrane conductance (as opposed to a specialized generator conductance) in the cilia or apical region of the dendrite, and show how this could alter the firing frequency of olfactory neurons.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">78</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3673149"> <span id="translatedtitle">Microtopography of the eye surface of the crab Carcinus maenas: an atomic force microscope study <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> a possible antifouling <span class="hlt">potential</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Marine biofouling causes problems for technologies based on the sea, including ships, power plants and marine sensors. Several antifouling techniques have been applied to marine sensors, but most of these methodologies are environmentally unfriendly or ineffective. Bioinspiration, seeking guidance from natural solutions, is a promising approach to antifouling. Here, the eye of the green crab Carcinus maenas was regarded as a marine sensor model and its surface characterized by means of atomic force microscopy. Engineered surface micro- and nanotopography is a new mechanism found to limit biofouling, promising an effective solution with much reduced environmental impact. Besides giving a new insight into the morphology of C. maenas eye and its characterization, our study indicates that the eye surface probably has antifouling/fouling-release <span class="hlt">potential</span>. Furthermore, the topographical features of the surface may influence the wettability properties of the structure and its interaction with organic molecules. Results indicate that the eye surface micro- and nanotopography may lead to bioinspired solutions to antifouling protection.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Greco, G.; Lanero, T. Svaldo; Torrassa, S.; Young, R.; Vassalli, M.; Cavaliere, A.; Rolandi, R.; Pelucchi, E.; Faimali, M.; Davenport, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">79</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23666632"> <span id="translatedtitle">Computational identification and analysis of arsenate reductase protein in Cronobacter sakazakii ATCC BAA-894 <span class="hlt">suggests</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> microorganism for reducing arsenate.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study focuses a bioinformatics-based prediction of arsC gene product arsenate reductase (ArsC) protein in Cronobacter sakazakii BAA-894 strain. A protein structure-based study encloses three-dimensional structural modeling of target ArsC protein, was carried out by homology modeling method. Ultimately, the detection of active binding regions was carried out for characterization of functional sites in protein. The ten probable ligand binding sites were predicted for target protein structure and highlighted the common binding residues between target and template protein. It has been first time identified that modeled ArsC protein structure in C. sakazakii was structurally and functionally similar to well-characterized ArsC protein of Escherichia coli because of having same structural motifs and fold with similar protein topology and function. Investigation revealed that ArsC from C. sakazakii can play significant role during arsenic resistance and <span class="hlt">potential</span> microorganism for bioremediation of arsenic toxicity. PMID:23666632</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chaturvedi, Navaneet; Singh, Vinay Kumar; Pandey, Paras Nath</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">80</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001EPJE....4..411K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Co-ion dependence of DNA nuclease activity <span class="hlt">suggests</span> hydrophobic cavitation as a <span class="hlt">potential</span> source of activation energy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The source of the activation energy that allows cutting of DNA by restriction enzymes is unclear. A systematic study of the cutting efficiency of the type-II restriction endonuclease EcoRI, with varying background electrolyte ion pair and buffer reported here, shows only a modest dependence of efficiency on cation type. Surprisingly, efficiency does depend strongly on the presumed indifferent anion of the background salt. What emerges is that competition between the background salt anion and the buffer anion for the enzyme and DNA surfaces is crucial. The results are unexpected and counterintuitive from the point of view of conventional electrolyte theory. However, taken together with recent developments in surface chemistry, the results do fall into place and could also <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a novel mechanism for enzyme activity as an alternative to metal-activated hydrolysis: microscopic cavitation in a hydrophobic pocket might be the source of activation energy.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kim, H.-K.; Tuite, E.; Nordén, B.; Ninham, B. W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">4</a> <a 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href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">81</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21441749"> <span id="translatedtitle">Motor evoked <span class="hlt">potential</span> study <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> L5 radiculopathy caused by l1-2 disc herniation: case report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 38-year-old male was referred because of pain in the left 5th lumbar (L5) root territory. Physical examination found moderate motor weakness in the left extensor hallucis longus (EHL) and the left tibialis anterior muscles. Magnetic resonance imaging found no stenotic lesion between L4-L5, but disc herniation was observed on the left between L1-L2. An L5 nerve root block provided temporary relief of the pain but the left foot weakness was exacerbated. Therefore, surgery was performed. Partial laminectomy and left herniotomy were performed at L1-L2, L2-L3, and L3-L4 with motor evoked <span class="hlt">potential</span> (MEP) monitoring. The MEP amplitude of the left EHL muscle increased immediately after L1-L2 herniotomy. The MEP amplitude of the right EHL muscle also increased after both laminectomy and herniotomy. The postoperative course was uneventful. The left leg pain and motor weakness disappeared. The patient has been doing fine without recurrence for 12 months. Since the MEP of both left and right EHL muscles improved after the L1-2 herniotomy, circulatory insufficiency might have caused the L5 symptoms. Monitoring of the MEP during the surgery was useful for confirming the responsible lesion and also for predicting the postoperative course. PMID:21441749</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yasuda, Muneyoshi; Nakura, Takahiro; Kamiya, Taeko; Takayasu, Masakazu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">82</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2914625"> <span id="translatedtitle">Genomic Alterations in Biliary Atresia <span class="hlt">Suggests</span> Region of <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Disease Susceptibility in 2q37.3</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Biliary atresia (BA) is a progressive, idiopathic obliteration of the extrahepatic biliary system occurring exclusively in the neonatal period. It is the most common disease leading to liver transplantation in children. The etiology of BA is unknown, although infectious, immune and genetic causes have been <span class="hlt">suggested</span>. While the recurrence of BA in families is not common, there are more than 30 multiplex families reported and an underlying genetic susceptibility has been hypothesized. We screened a cohort of 35 BA patients for genomic alterations that might confer susceptibility to BA. DNA was genotyped on the Illumina Quad550 platform, which analyzes over 550,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for genomic deletions and duplications. Areas of increased and decreased copy number were compared to those found in control populations. In order to identify regions that could serve as susceptibility factors for BA, we searched for regions that were found in BA patients, but not in controls. We identified two unrelated BA patients with overlapping heterozygous deletions of 2q37.3. Patient 1 had a 1.76 Mb (280 SNP), heterozygous deletion containing thirty genes. Patient 2 had a 5.87 Mb (1,346 SNP) heterozygous deletion containing fifty-five genes. The overlapping 1.76 Mb deletion on chromosome 2q37.3 from 240,936,900 to 242,692,820 constitutes the critical region and the genes within this region could be candidates for susceptibility to BA.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Leyva-Vega, Melissa; Gerfen, Jennifer; Thiel, Brian D.; Jurkiewicz, Dorota; Rand, Elizabeth B.; Pawlowska, Joanna; Kaminska, Diana; Russo, Pierre; Gai, Xiaowu; Krantz, Ian D.; Kamath, Binita M.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Haber, Barbara A.; Spinner, Nancy B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">83</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3749441"> <span id="translatedtitle">Combined analyses of kinship and FST <span class="hlt">suggest</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> drivers of chaotic genetic patchiness in high gene-flow populations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We combine kinship estimates with traditional F-statistics to explain contemporary drivers of population genetic differentiation despite high gene flow. We investigate range-wide population genetic structure of the California spiny (or red rock) lobster (Panulirus interruptus) and find slight, but significant global population differentiation in mtDNA (?ST = 0.006, P = 0.001; Dest_Chao = 0.025) and seven nuclear microsatellites (FST = 0.004, P < 0.001; Dest_Chao = 0.03), despite the species’ 240- to 330-day pelagic larval duration. Significant population structure does not correlate with distance between sampling locations, and pairwise FST between adjacent sites often exceeds that among geographically distant locations. This result would typically be interpreted as unexplainable, chaotic genetic patchiness. However, kinship levels differ significantly among sites (pseudo-F16,988 = 1.39, P = 0.001), and ten of 17 sample sites have significantly greater numbers of kin than expected by chance (P < 0.05). Moreover, a higher proportion of kin within sites strongly correlates with greater genetic differentiation among sites (Dest_Chao, R2 = 0.66, P < 0.005). Sites with elevated mean kinship were geographically proximate to regions of high upwelling intensity (R2 = 0.41, P = 0.0009). These results indicate that P. interruptus does not maintain a single homogenous population, despite extreme dispersal <span class="hlt">potential</span>. Instead, these lobsters appear to either have substantial localized recruitment or maintain planktonic larval cohesiveness whereby siblings more likely settle together than disperse across sites. More broadly, our results contribute to a growing number of studies showing that low FST and high family structure across populations can coexist, illuminating the foundations of cryptic genetic patterns and the nature of marine dispersal.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Iacchei, Matthew; Ben-Horin, Tal; Selkoe, Kimberly A; Bird, Christopher E; Garcia-Rodriguez, Francisco J; Toonen, Robert J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">84</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3476252"> <span id="translatedtitle">Expression Profiling and Biochemical Analysis <span class="hlt">Suggest</span> Stress Response as a <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Mechanism Inhibiting Proliferation of Polyamine-depleted Cells*</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Polyamines are small organic polycations that are absolutely required for cell growth and proliferation; yet the basis for this requirement is mostly unknown. Here, we combined a genome-wide expression profiling with biochemical analysis to reveal the molecular basis for inhibited proliferation of polyamine-depleted cells. Transcriptional responses accompanying growth arrest establishment in polyamine-depleted cells or growth resumption following polyamine replenishment were monitored and compared. Changes in the expression of genes related to various fundamental cellular processes were established. Analysis of mirror-symmetric expression patterns around the G1-arrest point identified a set of genes representing a stress-response signature. Indeed, complementary biochemical analysis demonstrated activation of the PKR-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase arm of the unfolded protein response and of the stress-induced p38 MAPK. These changes were accompanied by induction of key growth-inhibitory factors such as p21 and Gadd45a and reduced expression of various cyclins, most profoundly cyclin D1, setting the basis for the halted proliferation. However, although the induced stress response could arrest growth, polyamine depletion also inhibited proliferation of PKR-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase and p38?-deficient cells and of cells harboring a nonphosphorylatable mutant eIF2? (S51A), <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that additional yet unidentified mechanisms might inhibit proliferation of polyamine-depleted cells. Despite lengthy persistence of the stress and activation of apoptotic signaling, polyamine-depleted cells remained viable, apparently due to induced expression of protective genes and development of autophagy.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Landau, Guy; Ran, Avichai; Bercovich, Zippi; Feldmesser, Ester; Horn-Saban, Shirley; Korkotian, Eduard; Jacob-Hirsh, Jasmine; Rechavi, Gideon; Ron, David; Kahana, Chaim</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">85</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=27882"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in coral reef community metabolism and their <span class="hlt">potential</span> importance in the reef CO2 source-sink debate</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is not certain whether coral reefs are sources of or sinks for atmospheric CO2. Air–sea exchange of CO2 over reefs has been measured directly and inferred from changes in the seawater carbonate equilibrium. Such measurements have provided conflicting results. We provide community metabolic data that indicate that large changes in CO2 concentration can occur in coral reef waters via biogeochemical processes not directly associated with photosynthesis, respiration, calcification, and CaCO3 dissolution. These processes can significantly distort estimates of reef calcification and net productivity and obscure the contribution of coral reefs to global air–sea exchange of CO2. They may, nonetheless, explain apparent <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the metabolic performance of reefs close to land and reconcile the differing experimental findings that have given rise to the CO2 debate.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chisholm, John R. M.; Barnes, David J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">86</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3616597"> <span id="translatedtitle">Peters' <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">While conducting medical aid in Mozambique, a 41 year old African male presented to our eye clinic complaining of visual impairment. The male was found to have Peters’ <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> type 2, a rare congenital ocular malformation leading to sensory amblyopia and glaucoma.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sault, Robert W.; Sheridan, Jeffrey</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">87</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Cytology&id=ED018056"> <span id="translatedtitle">DOWN'S <span class="hlt">ANOMALY</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">BOTH CLINICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL ASPECTS AND MATHEMATICAL ELABORATIONS OF DOWN'S <span class="hlt">ANOMALY</span>, KNOWN ALSO AS MONGOLISM, ARE PRESENTED IN THIS REFERENCE MANUAL FOR PROFESSIONAL PERSONNEL. INFORMATION PROVIDED CONCERNS (1) HISTORICAL STUDIES, (2) PHYSICAL SIGNS, (3) BONES AND MUSCLES, (4) MENTAL DEVELOPMENT, (5) DERMATOGLYPHS, (6) HEMATOLOGY, (7)…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">PENROSE, L.S.; SMITH, G.F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">88</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PApGe.168.1851A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Detection of High-<span class="hlt">Potential</span> Oil and Gas Fields Using Normalized Full Gradient of Gravity <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>: A Case Study in the Tabas Basin, Eastern Iran</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The normalized full gradient (NFG) represents the full gradient of the gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> at a point divided by the average of the full gradient at the same point. The NFG minimum between two maxima in an NFG section or a closed minimum surrounded by closed maxima on an NFG map may indicate density-deficient <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> closely related to possible oil-gas reservoirs. On a cross-section, closed minima can be used to estimate the depth to centers of possible hydrocarbon reservoirs. The NFG map can also be used to locate oil-gas exploratory wells for estimation of the depth of possible reservoirs. The objective of this paper is to use two and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) NFG on gravity data of the Tabas basin in Yazd province, eastern Iran. A hypothetical model is first considered to explore the NFG characteristics and their relationship with the geometry of the model. The physical properties of the model are then studied to simplify the interpretation of real data. Finally 2D and 3D NFG models are developed for real gravity data to predict the location of any possible high <span class="hlt">potential</span> oil-gas reservoirs. The results obtained indicate two zones in the northern and central parts of the Tabas basin suitable for hydrocarbon prospecting. However, the favorable zone located in the middle of the basin in which anticline E is detected at a depth of 5-7 km is more important for the purpose of hydrocarbon exploration.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Aghajani, Hamid; Moradzadeh, Ali; Zeng, Hualin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">89</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24502034"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ebstein's <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ebstein's <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is a rare congenital heart disease, accounting for less than 1% of all congenital heart diseases, characterized by a wide clinical, electrocardiographic, echocardiographic, anatomic and prognostic polymorphism. The disease can be fatal since birth or may remain asymptomatic until adulthood, sometimes being associated with septal defects, transposition of great vessels, preexcitation syndromes, or left ventricular noncompaction. The genetic changes underlying this syndrome are not fully known, but in the cases associating left ventricular nonompaction a mutation in MYH7 gene encoding the beta-myosin heavy chain was recently detected. The authors present 2 cases of Ebstein's <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> with different onset and course and discuss the current clinical, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic criteria used for prognostic stratification of Ebstein disease in relation to international literature. PMID:24502034</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dima-Cozma, Corina; Cojocaru, Doina-Clementina; Chiriac, Silvia; Negru, R; Mitu, F</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">90</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.usgs.gov/mf/2004/2327/D/@displayLabelhtml@noteINDEX+PAGE#texthttp://ngmdb.usgs.gov/Prodesc/proddesc_67690.htm"> <span id="translatedtitle">Geologic Insights and <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> on Mineral <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Based on Analyses of Geophysical Data of the Southern Toquima Range, Nye County, Nevada</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aeromagnetic and gravity data provide confirmation of major structural and lithologic units in the southern Toquima Range, Nevada. These units include Cretaceous granite plutons and Tertiary calderas. In addition, the geophysical maps pinpoint numerous faults and lesser intrusions, and they <span class="hlt">suggest</span> locations of several inferred subsurface intrusions. They also corroborate a system of northwesterly and northeasterly conjugate structures that probably are fundamental to the structural framework of the Toquima Range. A combination of geophysical, geochemical, and geologic data available for the widely mineralized and productive area <span class="hlt">suggests</span> additional mineral resource <span class="hlt">potential</span>, especially in and (or) adjacent to the Round Mountain, Jefferson, Manhattan, and Belmont mining districts. Also, evidence for mineral <span class="hlt">potential</span> exists for areas near the Flower mercury mine south of Mount Jefferson caldera, and in the Bald Mountain Canyon belt of gold-quartz veins in the Manhattan caldera. A few other areas also show <span class="hlt">potential</span> for mineral resources. The various geologic environments indicated within the map area <span class="hlt">suggest</span> base- and precious-metal <span class="hlt">potential</span> in porphyry deposits as well as in quartz-vein and skarn deposits associated with intrusive stocks.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shawe, D. R.; Kucks, R. P.; Hildenbrand, T. G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">91</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42012020"> <span id="translatedtitle">Zeta <span class="hlt">potential</span> estimation of volcanic rocks on 11 island arc-type volcanoes in Japan: Implication for the generation of local self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">From streaming <span class="hlt">potential</span> measurements, we deduced the zeta <span class="hlt">potential</span> of 73 volcanic rock samples collected in 11 volcanoes where self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> (SP) surveys had also been conducted. Experiments with crushed rock samples and 0.001 mol\\/L NaCl solution showed a large variation in streaming <span class="hlt">potential</span> coefficient, which ranged from -2860 to 2280 mV\\/MPa (deduced zeta <span class="hlt">potential</span> ranged from -45.1 to 37.2 mV).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Koki Aizawa; Makoto Uyeshima; Kenji Nogami</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">92</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jb/jb0802/2007JB005058/2007JB005058.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Zeta <span class="hlt">potential</span> estimation of volcanic rocks on 11 island arc-type volcanoes in Japan: Implication for the generation of local self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">From streaming <span class="hlt">potential</span> measurements, we deduced the zeta <span class="hlt">potential</span> of 73 volcanic rock samples collected in 11 volcanoes where self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> (SP) surveys had also been conducted. Experiments with crushed rock samples and 0.001 mol\\/L NaCl solution showed a large variation in streaming <span class="hlt">potential</span> coefficient, which ranged from ?2860 to 2280 mV\\/MPa (deduced zeta <span class="hlt">potential</span> ranged from ?45.1 to 37.2 mV).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Koki Aizawa; Makoto Uyeshima; Kenji Nogami</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">93</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2883487"> <span id="translatedtitle">Attenuated and Lethal Variants of Pichind? Virus Induce Differential Patterns of NF-?B Activation <span class="hlt">Suggesting</span> a <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Target for Novel Therapeutics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Abstract Lassa virus pathogenesis is believed to involve dysregulation of cytokines. We have previously shown nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B) inhibition using a BSL-2 model for Lassa fever. Here we further define the <span class="hlt">potential</span> mechanism for NF-?B inhibition as involving increased levels of repressive p50/p50 homodimers, and <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a novel therapeutic strategy that acts via modulation of host signaling.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bowick, Gavin C.; Fennewald, Susan M.; Zhang, Lihong; Yang, Xianbin; Aronson, Judith F.; Shope, Robert E.; Luxon, Bruce A.; Gorenstein, David G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">94</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19951183"> <span id="translatedtitle">Attenuated and lethal variants of Pichindé virus induce differential patterns of NF-kappaB activation <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> a <span class="hlt">potential</span> target for novel therapeutics.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Lassa virus pathogenesis is believed to involve dysregulation of cytokines. We have previously shown nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) inhibition using a BSL-2 model for Lassa fever. Here we further define the <span class="hlt">potential</span> mechanism for NF-kappaB inhibition as involving increased levels of repressive p50/p50 homodimers, and <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a novel therapeutic strategy that acts via modulation of host signaling. PMID:19951183</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bowick, Gavin C; Fennewald, Susan M; Zhang, Lihong; Yang, Xianbin; Aronson, Judith F; Shope, Robert E; Luxon, Bruce A; Gorenstein, David G; Herzog, Norbert K</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">95</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014GeoRL..41.2243J"> <span id="translatedtitle">On vertical electric fields at lunar magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the interaction between a magnetic dipole mimicking the Gerasimovich magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> on the lunar surface and the solar wind in a self-consistent 3-D quasi-neutral hybrid simulation where ions are modeled as particles and electrons as a charge-neutralizing fluid. Especially, we consider the origin of the recently observed electric <span class="hlt">potentials</span> at lunar magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. An antimoonward Hall electric field forms in our simulation resulting in a <span class="hlt">potential</span> difference of <300V on the lunar surface, in which the value is similar to observations. Since the hybrid model assumes charge neutrality, our results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the electric <span class="hlt">potentials</span> at lunar magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> can be formed by decoupling of ion and electron motion even without charge separation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jarvinen, R.; Alho, M.; Kallio, E.; Wurz, P.; Barabash, S.; Futaana, Y.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">96</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/12595076"> <span id="translatedtitle">Yukawa textures and <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We augment the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model with a gauged family-dependent U(1) to reproduce Yukawa textures compatible with experiment. In the simplest model with one extra chiral electroweak singlet field, acceptable textures require this U(1) to be anomalous. The cancellation of its <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> by a generic Green-Schwarz mechanism requires sin2?w = 38 at the string scale, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> a supersting a</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pierre Binétruy; Pierre Ramond</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">97</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.7071R"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Transform method for initializing climate forecas.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new approach, an <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Transform method (AT) using a physics based metric, is developed to initialize decadal climate hindcast within the German climate prediction MiKlip project. The method starts from balanced <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> structures in space and time and between variables derived from control runs and applies an orthogalization to these. Two physics based metric are used to set up the eigen problem (1) the weighted total energy with its zonal, meridional kinetic and available <span class="hlt">potential</span> energy terms having equal contributions, and (2) the weighted ocean heat content in which a disturbance is applied only to the initial temperature fields. The choice of a reference state defining the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the selected sequence of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, once on a seasonal timescales and second on an interannual timescales, project a-priori only the slow modes of the ocean physical processes, such that the disturbances grow mainly in the Western Boundary Currents, in the ACC and ENSO regions. An additional set of initial conditions was designed to fit in a least square sense <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from the GECCO-2 ocean reanalysis. These sets of AT initial conditions and the MPIOM-ESM coupled model in T63L47/GR15 resolution were used for ensemble experiments and a retrospective forecast. The weighted total energy norm is used to monitor the amplitudes and rates of the fastest growing error modes. The results showed minor dependence of the instability growth on the selected metric but considerable change due to the rescaling coefficients magnitude on the perturbation amplitude. In contrary to similar atmospheric applications, we find an energy conversion from kinetic to available <span class="hlt">potential</span> energy, which <span class="hlt">suggests</span> different source of uncertainties mainly associated with changes in density fields.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Romanova, Vanya; Hense, Andreas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">98</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE86005489"> <span id="translatedtitle">Gauge <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>, Gravitational <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>, and Superstrings.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The structure of gauge and gravitational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> will be reviewed. The impact of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on the construction, consistency, and application of the new superstring theories will be discussed. 25 refs. (ERA citation 11:021380)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">W. A. Bardeen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">99</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21399858"> <span id="translatedtitle">Penile <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in adolescence.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This article considers the impact and outcomes of both treatment and underlying condition of penile <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in adolescent males. Major congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (such as exstrophy/epispadias) are discussed, including the psychological outcomes, common problems (such as corporal asymmetry, chordee, and scarring) in this group, and surgical assessment for <span class="hlt">potential</span> surgical candidates. The emergence of new surgical techniques continues to improve outcomes and <span class="hlt">potentially</span> raises patient expectations. The importance of balanced discussion in conditions such as micropenis, including multidisciplinary support for patients, is important in order to achieve appropriate treatment decisions. Topical treatments may be of value, but in extreme cases, phalloplasty is a valuable option for patients to consider. In buried penis, the importance of careful assessment and, for the majority, a delay in surgery until puberty has completed is emphasised. In hypospadias patients, the variety of surgical procedures has complicated assessment of outcomes. It appears that true surgical success may be difficult to measure as many men who have had earlier operations are not reassessed in either puberty or adult life. There is also a brief discussion of acquired penile <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, including causation and treatment of lymphoedema, penile fracture/trauma, and priapism. PMID:21399858</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wood, Dan; Woodhouse, Christopher</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">100</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54424974"> <span id="translatedtitle">A new method for gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> distortion correction</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> covariance function based on second-order Gaussian Markov gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> model, the state equation of gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> signal is obtained in marine gravimetry. Combined with the system state equation and the measurement equation, a new method of cascade Kalman filter is proposed and applied to the correction of gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> distortion. In the signal processing procedure, inverse</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liye Zhao; Hongsheng Li</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' 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href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">101</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040034236&hterms=admap&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dadmap"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reliability of CHAMP <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Continuations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">CHAMP is recording state-of-the-art magnetic and gravity field observations at altitudes ranging over roughly 300 - 550 km. However, <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> continuation is severely limited by the non-uniqueness of the process and satellite <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> errors. Indeed, our numerical <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> simulations from satellite to airborne altitudes show that effective downward continuations of the CHAMP data are restricted to within approximately 50 km of the observation altitudes while upward continuations can be effective over a somewhat larger altitude range. The great unreliability of downward continuation requires that the satellite geopotential observations must be analyzed at satellite altitudes if the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> details are to be exploited most fully. Given current <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> error levels, joint inversion of satellite and near- surface <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is the best approach for implementing satellite geopotential observations for subsurface studies. We demonstrate the power of this approach using a crustal model constrained by joint inversions of near-surface and satellite magnetic and gravity observations for Maude Rise, Antarctica, in the southwestern Indian Ocean. Our modeling <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the dominant satellite altitude magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are produced by crustal thickness variations and remanent magnetization of the normal polarity Cretaceous Quiet Zone.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">vonFrese, Ralph R. B.; Kim, Hyung Rae; Taylor, Patrick T.; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">102</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850023277&hterms=binning&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dbinning"> <span id="translatedtitle">Binning of satellite magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Crustal magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> signals over satellite orbits were simulated to investigate numerical averaging as an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> estimator. Averaging as an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> estimator involves significant problems concerning spatial and amplitude smoothing of the satellite magnetic observations. The results of simulations <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the error of numerical averaging constitutes a small and relatively minor component of the total error-budget of higher orbital <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> estimates, whereas for lower orbital estimates numerical averaging error increases substantially. As an alternative to numerical averaging, least-squares collocation was investigated and observed to produce substantially more accurate <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> estimates, particularly as the orbital elevation of prediction was decreased towards the crustal sources. In contrast to averaging, collocation is a significantly more resource-intensive procedure to apply because of the practical, but surmountable problems related to establishing and inverting the covariance matrix for accurate <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> prediction. However, collocation may be much more effectively used to exploit the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> details contained in the lower orbital satellite magnetic data for geologic analysis.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Goyal, H. K.; Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">103</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19910411"> <span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of adherence, biofilm formation and cytotoxicity <span class="hlt">suggests</span> a greater virulence <span class="hlt">potential</span> of Gardnerella vaginalis relative to other bacterial-vaginosis-associated anaerobes.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Worldwide, bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common vaginal disorder in women of childbearing age. BV is characterized by a dramatic shift in the vaginal microflora, involving a relative decrease in lactobacilli, and a proliferation of anaerobes. In most cases of BV, the predominant bacterial species found is Gardnerella vaginalis. However, pure cultures of G. vaginalis do not always result in BV, and asymptomatic women are sometimes colonized with low numbers of G. vaginalis. Thus, there is controversy about whether G. vaginalis is an opportunistic pathogen and the causative agent of many cases of BV, or whether BV is a polymicrobial condition caused by the collective effects of an altered microbial flora. Recent studies of the biofilm-forming <span class="hlt">potential</span> and cytotoxic activity of G. vaginalis have renewed interest in the virulence <span class="hlt">potential</span> of this organism. In an effort to tease apart the aetiology of this disorder, we utilized in vitro assays to compare three virulence properties of G. vaginalis relative to other BV-associated anaerobes. We designed a viable assay to analyse bacterial adherence to vaginal epithelial cells, we compared biofilm-producing capacities, and we assessed cytotoxic activity. Of the BV-associated anaerobes tested, only G. vaginalis demonstrated all three virulence properties combined. This study <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that G. vaginalis is more virulent than other BV-associated anaerobes, and that many of the bacterial species frequently isolated from BV may be relatively avirulent opportunists that colonize the vagina after G. vaginalis has initiated an infection. PMID:19910411</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Patterson, Jennifer L; Stull-Lane, Annica; Girerd, Philippe H; Jefferson, Kimberly K</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">104</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4045223"> <span id="translatedtitle">Familial Polythelia associated with dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: a case report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Polythelia has been defined as the presence of supernumerary nipples without accessory glandular tissue. Usually, these growths follow imaginary mammary lines running from the armpits to the groin. Although the presence of dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may occasion only a simple cosmetic problem with specific clinical considerations, the association with familial polythelia has been scarcely reported. This paper reports on a case of polythelia that is associated with dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in an Argentine family and discusses <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for a thorough dental history and medical consultation to prevent possible pathological conditions or <span class="hlt">potential</span> malignant transformation of mammary tissues.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cantin, Mario</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">105</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19750039971&hterms=magnetic+anomaly+map&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dmagnetic%2Banomaly%2Bmap"> <span id="translatedtitle">A global magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A subset of Pogo satellite magnetometer data has been formed that is suitable for analysis of crustal magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Through the use of a thirteenth-order field model fit to these data, magnetic residuals have been calculated over the world to latitude limits of plus or minus 50 deg. These residuals, averaged over 1-degree latitude-longitude blocks, represent a detailed global magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map derived solely from satellite data. The occurrence of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on all individual satellite passes independent of local time and their decay as altitude increases imply a definite internal origin. Their wavelength structure and their correlation with known tectonic features further <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are primarily of geologic origin and have their sources in the lithosphere.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Regan, R. D.; Davis, W. M.; Cain, J. C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">106</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/525996"> <span id="translatedtitle">Classifying sex biased congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The reasons for sex biases in congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that arise before structural or hormonal dimorphisms are established has long been unclear. A review of such disorders shows that patterning and tissue <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are female biased, and structural findings are more common in males. This <span class="hlt">suggests</span> different gender dependent susceptibilities to developmental disturbances, with female vulnerabilities focused on early blastogenesis/determination, while males are more likely to involve later organogenesis/morphogenesis. A dual origin for some <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> explains paradoxical reductions of sex biases with greater severity (i.e., multiple rather than single malformations), presumably as more severe events increase the involvement of an otherwise minor process with opposite biases to those of the primary mechanism. The cause for these sex differences is unknown, but early dimorphisms, such as differences in growth or presence of H-Y antigen, may be responsible. This model provides a useful rationale for understanding and classifying sex-biased congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. 42 refs., 7 tabs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lubinsky, M.S. [Medical College of Wisconsin and Children`s Hospital, Milwaukee, WI (United States)] [Medical College of Wisconsin and Children`s Hospital, Milwaukee, WI (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-03-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">107</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20100012788&hterms=Axiom&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3DAxiom"> <span id="translatedtitle">An Extreme-Value Approach to <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Vulnerability Identification</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The objective of this paper is to present a method for importance analysis in parametric probabilistic modeling where the result of interest is the identification of <span class="hlt">potential</span> engineering vulnerabilities associated with postulated <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in system behavior. In the context of Accident Precursor Analysis (APA), under which this method has been developed, these vulnerabilities, designated as <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> vulnerabilities, are conditions that produce high risk in the presence of anomalous system behavior. The method defines a parameter-specific Parameter Vulnerability Importance measure (PVI), which identifies <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> risk-model parameter values that indicate the <span class="hlt">potential</span> presence of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> vulnerabilities, and allows them to be prioritized for further investigation. This entails analyzing each uncertain risk-model parameter over its credible range of values to determine where it produces the maximum risk. A parameter that produces high system risk for a particular range of values <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the system is vulnerable to the modeled anomalous conditions, if indeed the true parameter value lies in that range. Thus, PVI analysis provides a means of identifying and prioritizing <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-related engineering issues that at the very least warrant improved understanding to reduce uncertainty, such that true vulnerabilities may be identified and proper corrective actions taken.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Everett, Chris; Maggio, Gaspare; Groen, Frank</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">108</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22903291"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dosing of adult pigeons with as little as one #9 lead pellet caused severe ?-ALAD depression, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> adverse effects in wild populations.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Avian wildlife species commonly ingest lead (Pb) spent shot or bullet fragments as grit or mistakenly as food. In previous studies in our laboratory and others, the toxicity varied based on the diet as well as type and quantity of Pb ingested. In the current study, domestic pigeons were gavaged with 1, 2, or 3 Pb pellets and then followed with weekly radiographs and blood physiologic endpoints for 28 days. Pellet retention decreased by roughly 50 % per week as pellets were either absorbed or excreted, except for week 4 where pellet number no longer was diminished. Size of retained pellets visually decreased over retention time. Birds dosed with a single #9 pellet showed mean blood Pb levels over 80 times higher than those of the controls, verifying Pb pellet absorption from the gut. A single Pb pellet also reduced plasma ?-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (?-ALAD) activity by over 80 % compared to controls, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> the <span class="hlt">potential</span> for population injury in Pb pellet-exposed pigeons. PMID:22903291</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Holladay, Jeremy P; Nisanian, Mandy; Williams, Susan; Tuckfield, R Cary; Kerr, Richard; Jarrett, Timothy; Tannenbaum, Lawrence; Holladay, Steven D; Sharma, Ajay; Gogal, Robert M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">109</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3443890"> <span id="translatedtitle">HDFx: a novel biologic immunomodulator accelerates wound healing and is <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> of unique regenerative powers: <span class="hlt">potential</span> implications for the warfighter and disaster victims</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recently, we reported on the discovery of a new, conserved biologic protein (35-40 KDa), termed HDFx, that protects rats, guinea-pigs, mice, and rabbits against lethal hemorrhage, endotoxins, intestinal ischemic-shock, and traumatic injuries. It was found to stimulate several arms of the immune system. The present report demonstrates, for the first time, that HDFx accelerates wound healing in two different models (excision wound model; and incision wound model) in rats. The results shown, herein, indicate that HDFx produces greater rates of wound contraction, greater tensile strength, and more rapid healing than controls. Our new data also show that this biologic increases hydroxyproline content of granulation tissue coupled with a reduction in superoxide dismutase (SOD). In addition, we show that HDFx increases the levels of serum ascorbic acid and stimulates the mononuclear cells of the reticuloendothelial system (RES). Overall, these data <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that HDFx may possess unique regenerative powers. We, thus, believe that HDFx can be of great <span class="hlt">potential</span> use in diverse types of wounds which, otherwise, could result in difficult to treat infections and thus prevent sepsis and loss of body parts from amputations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Altura, Burton M; Carella, Anthony; Gebrewold, Asefa</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">110</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20120011729&hterms=venus&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dvenus"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experimental Investigation into the Radar <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> on the Surface of Venus</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Radar mapping of thc surface of Venus shows areas of high reflectivity (low emissivity) in the Venusian highlands at altitudes between 2.5-4.75 kilometers. The origin of the radar <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> found in the Venusian highlands remains unclear. Most explanations of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> causes for these radar <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> come from theoretical work. Previous studies <span class="hlt">suggest</span> increased surface roughness or materials with higher dielectric constants as well as surface atmospheric interactions. Several possible candidates of high-dielectric materials are tellurium) ferroelectric materials, and lead or bismuth sulfides. While previous studies have been influential in determining possible sources for the Venus <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, only a very few hypotheses have been verified via experimentation. This work intends to experimentally constrain the source of the radar <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on Venus. This study proposes to investigate four possible materials that could <span class="hlt">potentially</span> cause the high reflectivities on the surface of Venus and tests their behavior under simulated Venusian conditions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kohler, E.; Gavin, P.; Chevrier, V.; Johnson, Natasha M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">111</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2671831"> <span id="translatedtitle">Congenital Stapes <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> with Normal Eardrum</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Objectives A non-progressive and conductive hearing loss with normal eardrum, but no history of trauma and infection, is highly <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> of a congenital ossicular malformation. Among ossicular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, stapes <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is the most common. The purpose of this study is to describe patterns of stapes <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and to analyze its surgical outcome with special reference to its patterns. Methods We conducted a retrospective case review. The subjects comprised 66 patients (76 ears) who were decisively confirmed by the exploratory tympanotomy as congenital stapes <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> without any <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the tympanic membrane and external auditory canal. The preoperative and postoperative audiological findings, temporal bone computed tomography scan, and operative findings were analyzed. Results There were 16 anomalous patterns of stapes among which footplate fixation was the most common <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. These 16 patterns were classified into 4 types according to the status of stapes footplate. Successful hearing gain was achieved in 51 out of 76 ears (67.1%) after surgical treatment. Conclusion Footplate fixation was usually bilateral, whereas stapes <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with other ossicular <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> were usually unilateral. The success of the surgical treatment of stapes <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> might depend on its developmental status of the footplate. Stapes <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were detected without any fixed patterns, therefore, it is quite possible to detect a large variety of patterns in future.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Park, Hun Yi; Han, Dong Hee; Lee, Jong Bin; Han, Nam Soo; Choung, Yun-Hoon</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">112</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a000000/a002600/a002696/index.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">SST <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> + Wind <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> (with dates)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sea surface temperature (SST) <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and sea surface wind <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> show the development of the 2002-2003 El Nino based on data from NASAs Aqua and QuikSCAT spacecraft. The wind data has been processed using the Variational Analysis Method (VAM).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shirah, Greg; Allen, Jesse; Adamec, David</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-02-03</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">113</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/51158313"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection for Cybersecurity of the Substations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Cybersecurity of the substations in a power system is a major issue as the substations become increasingly dependent on computer and communication networks. This paper is concerned with <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection in the computer network environment of a substation. An <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> inference algorithm is proposed for early detection of cyber-intrusions at the substations. The <span class="hlt">potential</span> sce- nario of simultaneous intrusions launched</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chee-Wooi Ten; Junho Hong; Chen-Ching Liu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">114</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56703954"> <span id="translatedtitle">Understanding <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> to Extract Vacuum Energy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent Russian literature contains some interesting speculations of <span class="hlt">potentially</span> wide applicability regarding the physical vacuum. These investigations examined and applied a theory to various <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to try and understand what these events may represent. Data were collected by Dmitriev to quantify these events and identify commonalties that indicate the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> might have a natural origin. Dyatlov created theories on the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. A. Murad</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">115</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/151997"> <span id="translatedtitle">Information-Theoretic Measures for <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> detection is an essential component of the pro- tection mechanisms against novel attacks. In this pa- per, we propose to use several information-theoretic mea- sures, namely, entropy, conditional entropy, relative condi- tional entropy, information gain, and information cost for <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection. These measures can be used to describe the characteristics of an audit data set, <span class="hlt">suggest</span> the appro- priate</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wenke Lee; Dong Xiang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">116</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jb/v076/i014/JB076i014p03384/JB076i014p03384.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lunar rocks and thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent microwave and infrared spectral observations of several of the large bright-rayed craters on the moon <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in these craters are produced by large rocks, boulders, and exposed rock strata. The data for the crater Tycho can be simulated by a surface consisting of 16% loose rocks of I-meter size and 4% exposed rock strata. A</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">David Buhl</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1971-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">117</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/14984290"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magnetic <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> over Iceland</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">An aeromagnetic survey of Iceland reveals broad <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of large amplitude over zones of recent volcanic activity. The source of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is ascribed to large masses of basalt that have been coherently remagnetized by intrusive heating. A simple correlation of the Icelandic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with those of the ocean floor therefore appears unjustified.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. H. Serson; W. Hannaford; G. V. Haines</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1968-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">118</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17836657"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magnetic <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> over Iceland.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An aeromagnetic survey of Iceland reveals broad <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of large amplitude over zones of recent volcanic activity. The source of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is ascribed to large masses of basalt that have been coherently remagnetized by intrusive heating. A simple correlation of the Icelandic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with those of the ocean floor therefore appears unjustified. PMID:17836657</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Serson, P H; Hannaford, W; Haines, G V</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1968-10-18</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">119</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007JMMM..310..362K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Elastic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of UGe2</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have performed the ultrasonic sound velocity measurement on the single crystal of UGe2 in the temperature range 4.2-120 K at ambient pressure, focusing attention on the elastic behavior around the characteristic temperature T*?30 K. In the elastic constants for three modes c11, c55 and c66, all modes show the hardening with a kink at the Curie temperature as decreasing temperatures. We found the elastic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> related to T* in the longitudinal c11 mode. However, the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> around T* is very broad. Therefore, this result may <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that T* is not related to a phase boundary of some second-order phase transition. On the other hand, no clear <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> was observed around T* in the transverse c55 and c66 modes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kuwahara, K.; Sakai, T.; Kohgi, M.; Haga, Y.; ?nuki, Y.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">120</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.P43B1929R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lunar Orbit <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Independent experiments show a large <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in measurements of lunar orbital evolution, with applications to cosmology and the speed of light. The Moon has long been known to be slowly drifting farther from Earth due to tidal forces. The Lunar Laser Ranging Experiment (LLRE) indicates the Moon's semimajor axis increasing at 3.82 ± .07 cm/yr, anomalously high. If the Moon were today gaining angular momentum at this rate, it would have coincided with Earth less than 2 Gyr ago. Study of tidal rhythmites indicates a rate of 2.9 ± 0.6 cm/yr. Historical eclipse observations independently measure a recession rate of 2.82 ± .08 cm/yr. Detailed numerical simulation of lunar orbital evolution predicts 2.91 cm/yr. LLRE differs from three independent experiments by over12 sigma. A cosmology where speed of light c is related to time t by GM=tc^3 has been <span class="hlt">suggested</span> to predict the redshifts of Type Ia supernovae, and a 4.507034% proportion of baryonic matter. If c were changing in the amount predicted, lunar orbital distance would appear to increase by an additional 0.935 cm/yr. An <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the lunar orbit may be precisely calculated, shedding light on puzzles of 'dark energy'. In Planck units this cosmology may be summarized as M=R=t.Lunar Recession Rate;</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Riofrio, L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return 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<img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">121</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19760015183&hterms=global+stability+analysis+mechanically+stabilized+earth+wall&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dglobal%2Bstability%2Banalysis%2Bmechanically%2Bstabilized%2Bearth%2Bwall"> <span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of spacecraft <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from 316 spacecraft covering the entire U.S. space program were analyzed to determine if there were any experimental or technological programs which could be implemented to remove the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from future space activity. Thirty specific categories of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were found to cover nearly 85 percent of all observed <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Thirteen experiments were defined to deal with 17 of these categories; nine additional experiments were identified to deal with other classes of observed and anticipated <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Preliminary analyses indicate that all 22 experimental programs are both technically feasible and economically viable.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bloomquist, C. E.; Graham, W. C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">122</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007SPIE.6565E..18B"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> detection using topology</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper we present a new topology-based algorithm for <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection in dimensionally large datasets. The motivating application is hyperspectral imaging where the dataset can be a collection of ~ 106 points in Rk, representing the reflected (or radiometric) spectra of electromagnetic radiation. The algorithm begins by building a graph whose edges connect close pairs of points. The background points are the points in the largest components of this graph and all other points are designated as <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are ranked according to their distance to the background. The algorithm is termed Topological <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection (TAD). The algorithm is tested on hyperspectral imagery collected with the HYDICE sensor which contains targets of known reflectance and spatial location. <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> maps are created and compared to results from the common <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection algorithm RX. We show that the TAD algorithm performs better than RX by achieving greater separation of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from the background for this dataset.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Basener, Bill; Ientilucci, Emmett J.; Messinger, David W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">123</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24590274"> <span id="translatedtitle">Genetics of lymphatic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Lymphatic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> include a variety of developmental and/or functional defects affecting the lymphatic vessels: sporadic and familial forms of primary lymphedema, secondary lymphedema, chylothorax and chylous ascites, lymphatic malformations, and overgrowth syndromes with a lymphatic component. Germline mutations have been identified in at least 20 genes that encode proteins acting around VEGFR-3 signaling but also downstream of other tyrosine kinase receptors. These mutations exert their effects via the RAS/MAPK and the PI3K/AKT pathways and explain more than a quarter of the incidence of primary lymphedema, mostly of inherited forms. More common forms may also result from multigenic effects or post-zygotic mutations. Most of the corresponding murine knockouts are homozygous lethal, while heterozygotes are healthy, which <span class="hlt">suggests</span> differences in human and murine physiology and the influence of other factors. PMID:24590274</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brouillard, Pascal; Boon, Laurence; Vikkula, Miikka</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">124</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24150935"> <span id="translatedtitle">Multiple myeloma-associated hDIS3 mutations cause perturbations in cellular RNA metabolism and <span class="hlt">suggest</span> hDIS3 PIN domain as a <span class="hlt">potential</span> drug target.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">hDIS3 is a mainly nuclear, catalytic subunit of the human exosome complex, containing exonucleolytic (RNB) and endonucleolytic (PIN) active domains. Mutations in hDIS3 have been found in ?10% of patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Here, we show that these mutations interfere with hDIS3 exonucleolytic activity. Yeast harboring corresponding mutations in DIS3 show growth inhibition and changes in nuclear RNA metabolism typical for exosome dysfunction. Construction of a conditional DIS3 knockout in the chicken DT40 cell line revealed that DIS3 is essential for cell survival, indicating that its function cannot be replaced by other exosome-associated nucleases: hDIS3L and hRRP6. Moreover, HEK293-derived cells, in which depletion of endogenous wild-type hDIS3 was complemented with exogenously expressed MM hDIS3 mutants, proliferate at a slower rate and exhibit aberrant RNA metabolism. Importantly, MM mutations are synthetically lethal with the hDIS3 PIN domain catalytic mutation both in yeast and human cells. Since mutations in PIN domain alone have little effect on cell physiology, our results predict the hDIS3 PIN domain as a <span class="hlt">potential</span> drug target for MM patients with hDIS3 mutations. It is an interesting example of intramolecular synthetic lethality with putative therapeutic <span class="hlt">potential</span> in humans. PMID:24150935</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tomecki, Rafal; Drazkowska, Karolina; Kucinski, Iwo; Stodus, Krystian; Szczesny, Roman J; Gruchota, Jakub; Owczarek, Ewelina P; Kalisiak, Katarzyna; Dziembowski, Andrzej</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">125</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23747095"> <span id="translatedtitle">Characterization of two candidate flavone 8-O-methyltransferases <span class="hlt">suggests</span> the existence of two <span class="hlt">potential</span> routes to nevadensin in sweet basil.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Regioselective 6-,7-,8-,3'-, and 4'-O-methylations underlie the structural diversity of lipophilic flavones produced in the trichomes of sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L.). The positions 6, 7, and 4' are methylated by a recently described set of cation-independent enzymes. The roles of cation-dependent O-methyltransferases still require elucidation. Here, the basil trichome EST database was used to identify a Mg(2+)-dependent O-methyltransferase that was likely to accept flavonoids as substrates. The recombinant protein was found to be active with a wide range of o-diphenols, and methylated the 8-OH moiety of the flavone backbone with higher catalytic efficiency than the 3'-OH group of candidate substrates. To further investigate flavone 8-O-methylation, the activity of a putative cation-independent flavonoid 8-O-methyltransferase from the same EST collection was assessed with available substrate analogs. Notably, it was strongly inhibited by gardenin B, one of its expected products. The catalytic capacities of the two studied proteins <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that two alternative routes to nevadensin, a major flavone in some basil cultivars, might exist. Correlating the expression of the underlying genes with the accumulation of 8-substituted flavones in four basil lines did not clarify which is the major operating pathway in vivo, yet the combined data <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that the biochemical properties of flavone 7-O-demethylase could play a key role in determining the reaction order. PMID:23747095</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Berim, Anna; Gang, David R</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">126</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19790055292&hterms=bouguer+anomaly+gravity&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dbouguer%2Banomaly%2Bgravity"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lunar Bouguer gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> - Imbrian age craters</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Bouguer gravity of mass <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with four Imbrian age craters, analyzed in the present paper, are found to differ considerably from the values of the mass <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with some young lunar craters. Of the Imbrian age craters, only Piccolomini exhibits a negative gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (i.e., a low density region) which is characteristic of the young craters studied. The Bouguer gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are zero for each of the remaining Imbrian age craters. Since, Piccolomini is younger, or at least less modified, than the other Imbrian age craters, it is <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that the processes responsible for the post-impact modification of the Imbrian age craters may also be responsible for removing the negative mass <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> initially associated with these features.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dvorak, J.; Phillips, R. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1978-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">127</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.terrapub.co.jp/journals/EPS/pdf/2006/5803/58030287.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">The generalized Bouguer <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper states on the new concept of the generalized Bouguer <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (GBA) that is defined upon the datum level of an arbitrary elevation. Discussions are particularly focused on how to realize the Bouguer <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> that is free from the assumption of the Bouguer reduction density rhoB, namely, the rhoB-free Bouguer <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, and on what is meant by the rhoB-free</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kyozo Nozaki</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">128</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3745388"> <span id="translatedtitle">Myeloid Cells Expressing VEGF and Arginase-1 Following Uptake of Damaged Retinal Pigment Epithelium <span class="hlt">Suggests</span> <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Mechanism That Drives the Onset of Choroidal Angiogenesis in Mice</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Whilst data recognise both myeloid cell accumulation during choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) as well as complement activation, none of the data has presented a clear explanation for the angiogenic drive that promotes pathological angiogenesis. One possibility that is a pre-eminent drive is a specific and early conditioning and activation of the myeloid cell infiltrate. Using a laser-induced CNV murine model, we have identified that disruption of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and Bruch’s membrane resulted in an early recruitment of macrophages derived from monocytes and microglia, prior to angiogenesis and contemporaneous with lesional complement activation. Early recruited CD11b+ cells expressed a definitive gene signature of selective inflammatory mediators particularly a pronounced Arg-1 expression. Accumulating macrophages from retina and peripheral blood were activated at the site of injury, displaying enhanced VEGF expression, and notably prior to exaggerated VEGF expression from RPE, or earliest stages of angiogenesis. All of these initial events, including distinct VEGF + Arg-1+ myeloid cells, subsided when CNV was established and at the time RPE-VEGF expression was maximal. Depletion of inflammatory CCR2-positive monocytes confirmed origin of infiltrating monocyte Arg-1 expression, as following depletion Arg-1 signal was lost and CNV suppressed. Furthermore, our in vitro data supported a myeloid cell uptake of damaged RPE or its derivatives as a mechanism generating VEGF + Arg-1+ phenotype in vivo. Our results reveal a <span class="hlt">potential</span> early driver initiating angiogenesis via myeloid-derived VEGF drive following uptake of damaged RPE and deliver an explanation of why CNV develops during any of the stages of macular degeneration and can be explored further for therapeutic gain.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liu, Jian; Copland, David A.; Horie, Shintaro; Wu, Wei-Kang; Chen, Mei; Xu, Yunhe; Paul Morgan, B.; Mack, Matthias; Xu, Heping; Nicholson, Lindsay B.; Dick, Andrew D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">129</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24970651"> <span id="translatedtitle">Body-on-a-chip simulation with gastrointestinal tract and liver tissues <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that ingested nanoparticles have the <span class="hlt">potential</span> to cause liver injury.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The use of nanoparticles in medical applications is highly anticipated, and at the same time little is known about how these nanoparticles affect human tissues. Here we have simulated the oral uptake of 50 nm carboxylated polystyrene nanoparticles with a microscale body-on-a-chip system (also referred to as multi-tissue microphysiological system or micro Cell Culture Analog). Using the 'GI tract-liver-other tissues' system allowed us to observe compounding effects and detect liver tissue injury at lower nanoparticle concentrations than was expected from experiments with single tissues. To construct this system, we combined in vitro models of the human intestinal epithelium, represented by a co-culture of enterocytes (Caco-2) and mucin-producing cells (TH29-MTX), and the liver, represented by HepG2/C3A cells, within one microfluidic device. The device also contained chambers that together represented the liquid portions of all other organs of the human body. Measuring the transport of 50 nm carboxylated polystyrene nanoparticles across the Caco-2/HT29-MTX co-culture, we found that this multi-cell layer presents an effective barrier to 90.5 ± 2.9% of the nanoparticles. Further, our simulation <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that a larger fraction of the 9.5 ± 2.9% nanoparticles that travelled across the Caco-2/HT29-MTX cell layer were not large nanoparticle aggregates, but primarily single nanoparticles and small aggregates. After crossing the GI tract epithelium, nanoparticles that were administered in high doses estimated in terms of possible daily human consumption (240 and 480 × 10(11) nanoparticles mL(-1)) induced the release of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), an intracellular enzyme of the liver that indicates liver cell injury. Our results indicate that body-on-a-chip devices are highly relevant in vitro models for evaluating nanoparticle interactions with human tissues. PMID:24970651</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Esch, Mandy B; Mahler, Gretchen J; Stokol, Tracy; Shuler, Michael L</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-14</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">130</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008SPIE.7130E.188Z"> <span id="translatedtitle">A new method for gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> distortion correction</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> covariance function based on second-order Gaussian Markov gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> model, the state equation of gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> signal is obtained in marine gravimetry. Combined with the system state equation and the measurement equation, a new method of cascade Kalman filter is proposed and applied to the correction of gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> distortion. In the signal processing procedure, inverse Kalman filter is used to restore the gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> signal and high frequent noises firstly, then a adaptive Kalman filter - which uses the gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> state equation as system equation - is set to estimate the actual gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data. Emulations and experiments indicate that both the cascade Kalman filter method and the single inverse Kalman filter method are effective in alleviating the distortion of the gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> signal, but the performance of the cascade Kalman filter method is better than that of single inverse Kalman filter method.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhao, Liye; Li, Hongsheng</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">131</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/x087570684807146.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Political Economy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Results in cognitive psychology and experimental economics indicate that under identifiable conditions individuals do not act in an economically rational way. These results are important for Political Economy. <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> appear in the behaviour of voters, politicans and administrators. Economic markets do not fully eliminate <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the aggregation process. It is shown that political aggregation by democracy, bargaining or bureaucracy</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bruno S. Frey; Reiner Eichenberger</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">132</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jb/v077/i035/JB077i035p07089/JB077i035p07089.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Filtering Marine Magnetic <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">When marine magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> can be adequately modeled by two-dimensional magnetic structures within one or more plane layers, many interesting manipulations of both models and <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are linear filtering operations [Dean, 1958; Bott, 1967; Black and Scollar, 1969; Schouten, 1971]. Linear filters can be applied quickly and accurately by using the fast Fourier transform algorithm [Cooley and Tukey, 1965]. We</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hans Schouten; Keith McCamy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1972-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">133</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20010021221&hterms=temporal+anomaly&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dtemporal%2Banomaly"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magnetosheath Flow <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in 3-D</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Measurements of the plasma and magnetic field with high temporal resolution on the Interball Tail probe reveal many flow <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the magnetosheath. They are usually seen as flow direction and number density variations, accompanied by magnetic field discontinuities. Large flow <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with number density variations of factor of 2 or more and velocity variations of 100 km/s or more are seen with periodicity of about I per hour. The cases of flow <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> following in succession are also observed, and <span class="hlt">suggest</span> their decay while propagating through the magnetosheath. Some magnetospheric disturbances observed in the outer magnetosphere after the satellite has crossed the magnetopause on the inbound orbit <span class="hlt">suggest</span> their association with magnetosheath flow <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> observed in the magnetosheath prior to magnetopause crossing.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vaisberg, O. L.; Burch, J. L.; Smirnov, V. N.; Avanov, L. A.; Moore, T. E.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Skalsky, A. A.; Borodkova, N. L.; Coffey, V. N.; Gallagher, D. L.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">134</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56254868"> <span id="translatedtitle">Edge detection of magnetic body using horizontal gradient of pseudogravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> field methods are used extensively in mineral exploration. These methods also are used as reconnaissance method in oil and gas exploration. In Contrast with gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> the magnetic surveying produces dipolar <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> which is caused complicated interpretation rather than gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The observation magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in each location other than magnetic poles has displacement rather than causative body. Several</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">K. Alamdar; A. H. Ansari; A. Ghorbani</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">135</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.balkangeophysoc.gr/online-journal/2000_V3/aug2000/v3-3-1.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Interpretation of gravity and aeromagnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the Konya Region, South Central Turkey</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Some 100 km southwest of Tuz Lake in central Turkey there are strong gravity and magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> oriented in a NW-SE direction. The surface geology does not <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a cause for the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> although there are some small exposures of mafic and ultramafic rocks. The gravity and aeromagnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> fields are separated into regional and residual <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> by graphical and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Ates; P. Kearey</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">136</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040171195&hterms=stream+composition&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dstream%2Bcomposition"> <span id="translatedtitle">Identification of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections at 1 AU Using Multiple Solar Wind Plasma Composition <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigate the use of multiple simultaneous solar wind plasma compositional <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, relative to the composition of the ambient solar wind, for identifying interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) plasma. We first summarize the characteristics of several solar wind plasma composition signatures (O(+7)/O(+6), Mg/O, Ne/O, Fe charge states, He/p) observed by the ACE and WIND spacecraft within the ICMEs during 1996 - 2002 identsed by Cane and Richardson. We then develop a set of simple criteria that may be used to identify such compositional <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and hence <span class="hlt">potential</span> ICMEs. To distinguish these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from the normal variations seen in ambient solar wind composition, which depend on the wind speed, we compare observed compositional signatures with those 'expected' in ambient solar wind with the same solar wind speed. This method identifies <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> more effectively than the use of fixed thresholds. The occurrence rates of individual composition <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> within ICMEs range from approx. 70% for enhanced iron and oxygen charge states to approx. 30% for enhanced He/p (> 0.06) and Ne/O, and are generally higher in magnetic clouds than other ICMEs. Intervals of multiple <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are usually associated with ICMEs, and provide a basis for the identification of the majority of ICMEs. We estimate that Cane and Richardson, who did not refer to composition data, probably identitied approx. 90% of the ICMEs present. However, around 10% of their ICMEs have weak compositional <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that the presence of such signatures does not provide a necessary requirement for an ICME. We note a remarkably similar correlation between the Mg/O and O(7)/O(6) ratios in hourly-averaged data both within ICMEs and the ambient solar wind. This 'universal' relationship <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that a similar process (such as minor ion heating by waves inside coronal magnetic field loops) produces the first-ionization <span class="hlt">potential</span> bias and ion freezing-in temperatures in the source regions of both ICMEs and the ambient solar wind.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">137</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=TOE&pg=5&id=EJ346869"> <span id="translatedtitle">Open to <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Offers (1) <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for improving college students' study skills; (2) a system for keeping track of parent, teacher, and community contacts; (3) <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for motivating students using tic tac toe; (4) <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for using etymology to improve word retention; (5) a word search grid; and (6) <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for using postcards in remedial reading…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Journal of Reading, 1987</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">138</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/860768"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> on orbifolds</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We discuss the form of the chiral <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> on an S1/Z2 orbifold with chiral boundary conditions. We find that the 4-divergence of the higher-dimensional current evaluated at a given point in the extra dimension is proportional to the probability of finding the chiral zero mode there. Nevertheless the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, appropriately defined as the five dimensional divergence of the current, lives entirely on the orbifold fixed planes and is independent of the shape of the zero mode. Therefore long distance four dimensional <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> cancellation ensures the consistency of the higher dimensional orbifold theory.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Cohen, Andrew G.; Georgi, Howard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-03-16</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">139</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23878335"> <span id="translatedtitle">Response of African humid tropical forests to recent rainfall <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During the last decade, strong negative rainfall <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> resulting from increased sea surface temperature in the tropical Atlantic have caused extensive droughts in rainforests of western Amazonia, exerting persistent effects on the forest canopy. In contrast, there have been no significant impacts on rainforests of West and Central Africa during the same period, despite large-scale droughts and rainfall <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> during the same period. Using a combination of rainfall observations from meteorological stations from the Climate Research Unit (CRU; 1950-2009) and satellite observations of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM; 1998-2010), we show that West and Central Africa experienced strong negative water deficit (WD) <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over the last decade, particularly in 2005, 2006 and 2007. These <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were a continuation of an increasing drying trend in the region that started in the 1970s. We monitored the response of forests to extreme rainfall <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the past decade by analysing the microwave scatterometer data from QuickSCAT (1999-2009) sensitive to variations in canopy water content and structure. Unlike in Amazonia, we found no significant impacts of extreme WD events on forests of Central Africa, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> adaptability of these forests to short-term severe droughts. Only forests near the savanna boundary in West Africa and in fragmented landscapes of the northern Congo Basin responded to extreme droughts with widespread canopy disturbance that lasted only during the period of WD. Time-series analyses of CRU and TRMM data show most regions in Central and West Africa experience seasonal or decadal extreme WDs (less than -600 mm). We hypothesize that the long-term historical extreme WDs with gradual drying trends in the 1970s have increased the adaptability of humid tropical forests in Africa to droughts. PMID:23878335</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Asefi-Najafabady, Salvi; Saatchi, Sassan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">140</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2261278"> <span id="translatedtitle">Short root <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A case of generalised short root <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is described. All permanent teeth had abnormally short roots, associated with microdontia, hypodontia and a dens invaginatus. Members of the patient's family were similarly affected. PMID:2261278</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Edwards, D M; Roberts, G J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-11-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">141</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24891214"> <span id="translatedtitle">The chlamydial <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> clarified?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Getting visible: A new method to label bacterial cell walls shows the presence of functional peptidoglycan in the important pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis. This might clarify the long-standing paradox of the "chlamydial <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>". PMID:24891214</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mohammadi, Tamimount; Breukink, Eefjan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">142</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23369940"> <span id="translatedtitle">Orbital Congestion Complicating Treatment of Cerebral Vascular <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">BACKGROUND: The decision between conservative management and invasive treatment of juxtaorbital intracranial vascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> can be challenging. Whereas arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) can lead to vision loss and are <span class="hlt">potentially</span> life-threatening if they rupture, invasive endovascular and surgical procedures also carry risks. CASE DESCRIPTIONS: Two patients developed blinding orbital congestion soon after they were treated successfully for cerebral vascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The first patient, a 36 year-old man, underwent partial embolization followed by resection of a congenital frontal-lobe AVM. The second patient, a 62 year-old woman, underwent embolization of a periorbital/skull base dural arteriovenous malformation. After intervention, both patients developed unilateral vision loss proptosis, chemosis, complete ophthalmoplegia, and increased intraocular pressure. The first patient suffered from acute orbital compartment syndrome in the absence of any acute localized hemorrhage or thrombosis. The second patient experienced refractory acute glaucoma from orbital congestion, secondary hyphema, and angle closure caused by superior ophthalmic vein and cavernous sinus thromboses. CONCULSIONS: These cases highlight the <span class="hlt">potential</span> for orbital congestion to worsen acutely after invasive treatment of juxtaorbital cerebral vascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and <span class="hlt">suggest</span> diverse mechanisms of resultant visual and orbital compromise. The first case represents the first report of orbital compartment syndrome after resection of a congenital AVM. PMID:23369940</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Levin, Marc H; Moss, Heather E; Pineles, Stacy L; Bagley, Linda J; Heuer, Gregory G; Zager, Eric L; Balcer, Laura J; Galetta, Steven L; Vagefi, M Reza</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-28</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">143</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=JPRS65447"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hypnosis and <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The report contains a description of the use of hypnosis and <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> and examines the physiological foundation. It includes a determination of the degree of susceptibility to <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> and hypnosis, the techniques to hypnosis, and the reactions of pat...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. I. Bul</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">144</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005ESASP.591..125W"> <span id="translatedtitle">SADM potentiometer <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> investigations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During the last 3 years Contraves Space have been developing a Low Power (1-2kW) Solar Array Drive Mechanism (SADM) aimed at small series production. The mechanism was subjected to two test programmes in order to qualify the SADM to acceptable levels. During the two test programmes, <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were experienced with the Potentiometers provided by Eurofarad SA and joint investigations were undertaken to resolve why these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> had occurred. This paper deals with the lessons learnt from the failure investigation on the two Eurofarad (rotary) Potentiometer <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The Rotary Potentiometers that were used were fully redundant; using two back to back mounted "plastic tracks". It is a pancake configuration mounted directly to the shaft of the Slip Ring Assembly at the extreme in-board end of the SADM. It has no internal bearings. The <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> initially manifested itself as a loss of performance in terms of linearity, which was first detected during Thermal Vacuum testing. A subsequent <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> manifested itself by the complete failure of the redundant potentiometer again during thermal vacuum testing. This paper will follow and detail the chain of events following this <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and identifies corrective measures to be applied to the potentiometer design and assembly process.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wood, Brian; Mussett, David; Cattaldo, Olivier; Rohr, Thomas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">145</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.alzinfo.org/12/alz-guide/suggest-memory-screening"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggesting</span> a Memory Screening</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Suggesting</span> a Memory Screening... Text Size: Email This Post Print This Post <span class="hlt">Suggesting</span> a Memory Screening By Kevin Gault It can be a ... cognitive abilities, want to <span class="hlt">suggest</span> screening for possible memory deficit, but aren’t sure how to go ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">146</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002AGUFM.S21C..04B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cascadia Gravity and Magnetic <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> Delineate Hydrated Forearc Mantle</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Very high-amplitude magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> along the eastern margin of the Oregon forearc have no comparable gravity signature and lie directly above a low-velocity wedge observed in controlled-source and local and teleseismic earthquake data. The wedge is presumed to be hydrated forearc mantle. We speculate that these unusual high-amplitude magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are caused in part by serpentinite lying within the hydrated mantle wedge and above the Curie-temperature isotherm for magnetite, a common accessory mineral in serpentinite. To test this idea, we constructed "characteristic" gravity, magnetic, pseudogravity, and topographic/bathymetric profiles across the Oregon portion of the Cascadia subduction zone: We extracted 11 east-west profiles, linearly interpolated each to a common sample interval using the deformation front offshore and the axis of the Cascade arc onshore as tie points, and stacked them to attenuate <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> due to three-dimensional sources. We then modeled the characteristic gravity and magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> using published seismic velocity and thermal models and density values as constraints. The forearc portion of the model includes a thick Siletzia (>12 km) section underlain by lower crust, upper mantle, and subducting lithosphere. The gravity and magnetic profiles and modeled crustal geology are compatible with a low-density (2700 kg/m3), high-magnetization (2.7 A/m) wedge corresponding in shape, location, and depth range (35 to 55 km) to the low-velocity zone identified in seismic models. We interpret the <span class="hlt">potential</span>-field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> as evidence for serpentinized forearc mantle at depths above the Curie-temperature isotherm. Thus determined, magnetic and pseudogravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> allow us to map the presence of serpentinized mantle along the length of the Cascadia subduction zone. Serpentinized mantle is best expressed geophysically in Oregon, along a narrow swath from the Klamath Mountains to the Columbia River, a region with a dearth of both upper- and lower-plate earthquakes. We speculate that a well-developed serpentinite wedge beneath the Oregon forearc reduces friction on the downgoing slab and reduces margin-normal stress on the upper plate. The lack of high-amplitude magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Washington <span class="hlt">suggests</span> either that hydrated mantle is not as well developed in Washington, or that it lies deeper than the Curie-temperature isotherm.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Blakely, R. J.; Brocher, T. M.; Wells, R. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">147</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009IAU...261.0702A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Astrometric Solar-System <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">There are four unexplained <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> connected with astrometric data. Perhaps the most disturbing is the fact that when a spacecraft on a flyby trajectory approaches the Earth within 2000 km or less, it experiences a gain in total orbital energy per unit mass (Anderson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 091102). This amounts to a net velocity increase of 13.5 mm/s for the NEAR spacecraft at a closest approach of 539 km, 3.9 mm/s for the Galileo spacecraft at 960 km, and 1.8 mm/s for the Rosetta spacecraft at 1956 km. Next, I <span class="hlt">suggest</span> the change in the astronomical unit AU is definitely a concern. It is increasing by about 15 cm/yr (Krasinsky and Brumberg, Celes. Mech. & Dynam. Astron. 90, 267). The other two <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are perhaps less disturbing because of known sources of nongravitational acceleration. The first is an apparent slowing of the two Pioneer spacecraft as they exit the solar system in opposite directions (Anderson et al., Phys. Rev. D 65, 082004). Some, including me, are convinced this effect is of concern, but many are convinced it is produced by a nearly identical thermal emission from both spacecraft, in a direction away from the Sun, thereby producing acceleration toward the Sun. The fourth <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is a measured increase in the eccentricity of the Moon's orbit. Here again, an increase is expected from tidal friction in both the Earth and Moon. However, there is a reported increase that is about three times larger than expected (J. G. Williams, DDA/AAS Brouwer Award Lecture, Halifax, Nova Scotia 2006). We suspect that all four <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> have mundane explanations. However, the possibility that they will be explained by a new theory of gravitation is not ruled out, perhaps analogous to Einstein's 1916 explanation of the excess precession of Mercury's perihelion.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Anderson, John D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">148</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=motivating+AND+reluctant+AND+student&pg=2&id=EJ277928"> <span id="translatedtitle">Open to <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Offers <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for (1) using microcomputer programs for reading and spelling instruction, (2) helping students analyze multiple-choice tests, and (3) motivating reluctant readers through sports. (AEA)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Journal of Reading, 1983</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">149</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991gcai.rept.....G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> located in Lower Bayou Teche, St. Mary Parish, Louisiana</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report presents results of testing and assessment of eleven previously recorded magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> located in Lower Bayou Teche, St. Mary Parish, Louisiana. Maintenance dredging of Lower Bayou Teche may impact several of the eight <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> evaluated in this study. Objectives of the study were to conduct detailed surveys and assessments of eight previously located <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. These were <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> 8, 13, 24a, 29, 30, 31, 33, and 58. Three orther <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> nos. 23, 24b, and 55 were also briefly examined. Methods used during survey included relocation of each <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> with a magnetometer; informal magnetic and fathometer survey of each <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and its vicinity, physical search of the river bottom at each <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> location; use of a metal detector to assess the depth of the magnetic source of each <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>; probing of the river bottom to locate buried structures; and limited excavation with a jet probe to document the source, nature, and research <span class="hlt">potential</span> of each of the eight <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Two of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> nos. 30 and 58 could not be relocated. Four of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> apparently are associated with modern debris: <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> nos. 8, 13, 29, and 31. <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> no. 33 appears to be an isolated object. Evidence of structure was observed 14 to 15 ft below water surface, however, it occurs below the project impact zone. One archeological site, the <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> no. 23/24 Complex (Site 16SMY76) was defined. It consists of two wooden barges and some twentieth century bridge remains.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Goodwin, R. Christopher; Athens, William P.; Saltus, Allen R., Jr.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">150</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/43145995"> <span id="translatedtitle">Stellar Coronal Abundances. VI. The First Ionization <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Effect and XI Bootis A: Solar-like <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> at Intermediate-Activity Levels</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Lines from different elements in the Extreme-Ultraviolet Explorer spectra of the corona of the intermediate-activity star xi Bootis A have been analyzed. Assuming that a photospheric composition for the plasma is responsible for the observed coronal emission, emission measures derived from lines of elements with low first ionization <span class="hlt">potentials</span> (FIPs) are systematically higher than emission measures derived from lines formed</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. Martin Laming; Jeremy J. Drake</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">151</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=ac+AND+dc+AND+current&pg=2&id=ED245913"> <span id="translatedtitle">Chemistry Curricula. Course <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Listings of <span class="hlt">suggested</span> topics aimed at helping university and college faculties plan courses in the main areas of the chemistry curricula are provided. The <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> were originally offered as appendices to the American Chemical Society's (ACS) Committee on Professional Training's 1983 guidelines for ACS-approved schools. The course data included…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">American Chemical Society, Washington, DC.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">152</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jb/jb0910/2008JB006154/2008JB006154.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dipolar self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> associated with carbon dioxide and radon flux at Syabru-Bensi hot springs in central Nepal</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Syabru-Bensi hot springs are located at the Main Central Thrust (MCT) zone in central Nepal. High carbon dioxide and radon exhalation fluxes (reaching 19 kg m?2 d?1 and 5 Bq m?2 s?1, respectively) are associated with these hot springs, making this site a promising case to study the relationship between self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> and fluids (gas and water) exhalation along a</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. Byrdina; A. Revil; S. R. Pant; B. P. Koirala; P. L. Shrestha; D. R. Tiwari; U. P. Gautam; K. Shrestha; S. N. Sapkota; S. Contraires; F. Perrier</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">153</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6186204"> <span id="translatedtitle">Short-term climatic fluctuations forced by thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A two-level, global, spectral model was used to test the effects of thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the coupled sea surface temperature <span class="hlt">anomalie</span> (SSTA) pattern in the Pacific Ocean is capable of producing the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> geopotential heights given by Horel and Wallace (1981). The coupled SSTA is inclined to produce quasi-permanent responses, such as blocking, in contrast with the single SSTA in which the transient activity increases. 14 refs., 7 figs. (ACR)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hanna, A.F.; Reiter, E.R.; Stevens, D.E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">154</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22hexagonal%22&pg=4&id=EJ100730"> <span id="translatedtitle">Research <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for Students</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Describes how to perform accurate research. Also includes <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for specific research projects under such headings as: (1) types; (2) environments; (3) interactions; (4) classification; (5) hexagonal model; and (6) differentiation. (HMV)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Holland, John L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1974-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">155</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=joining+AND+special&pg=6&id=ED109896"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> on Japanese Materials.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">After commenting briefly on the current state of instructional materials available to students and teachers of Japanese at a college level, the paper underlines the need for materials that deal specifically with aspects of Japanese culture, and outlines <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for possible materials. Graded intermediate materials that stress particularly the…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Miller, Roy Andrew</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">156</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5506860"> <span id="translatedtitle">Superstrings, <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and unification</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This volume contains the lectures covering the main lines of developments in the presently most active field of particle physics: string field theory, <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, unification and physics beyond the Planck length. The lectures are generally pedagogical in style, designed at the postdoctoral level, but at the same time they introduce one to the most recent results in the field.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Martinis, M.; Andric, I.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">157</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040171626&hterms=ARN&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3D%2522ARN%2522"> <span id="translatedtitle">Paleo-Pole Positions from Martian Magnetic <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Data</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Magnetic component <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> maps were made from five mapping cycles of the Mars Global Surveyor's magnetometer data. Our goal was to find and isolate positive and negative <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> pairs which would indicate magnetization of a single source body. From these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> we could compute the direction of the magnetizing vector and subsequently the location of the magnetic pole existing at the time of magnetization. We found nine suitable <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> pairs and from these we computed paleo-poles that were nearly equally divided between north, south and mid-latitudes. These results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that during the existence of the martian main magnetic field it experienced several reversals and excursions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Frawley, James J.; Taylor, Patrick T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">158</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20030112411&hterms=vector+fluxgate+magnetometer&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dvector%2Bfluxgate%2Bmagnetometer"> <span id="translatedtitle">Paleo-Pole Positions from Martian Magnetic <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Data</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Magnetic component <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> maps were made from five mapping cycles of the Mars Global Surveyor s magnetometer data. Our goal was to find and isolate positive and negative <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> pairs which would indicate magnetization of a single source body. From these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> we could compute the direction of the magnetizing vector and subsequently the location of the magnetic pole existing at the time of magnetization. We found nine suitable <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> pairs and from these we computed four North and 3 South poles with two at approximately 60 degrees north latitude. These results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that during the existence of the Martian main magnetic field it experienced several reversals.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Taylor, Patrick T.; Frawley, James J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">159</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2011110843"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nondestructive Evaluation of Manufacturing-Induced <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Anomalous machining events can occur that result in damage and/or <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that lead to catastrophic failure of jet engine components. A number of <span class="hlt">potential</span> anomalous machining-induced damages may result depending on the machining process, the alloy, the...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. Lo C. Meyer D. Eisenmann D. Enyart D. Ryan F. Margetan J. Pfeiffer J. Umbach L. Brasche R. Raulerson S. Singh T. Jensen T. Patton</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">160</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20060031802&hterms=deutsch&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Ddeutsch"> <span id="translatedtitle">Resolving the Cassini/Huygens relay <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A test using NASA's DSN to mimic the probe's signal was performed in 2000 and uncovered an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> that, unchecked, would result in nearly complete loss of the Huygens mission. This led to a <span class="hlt">suggested</span> modification to the Cassini trajectory that will result in nearly complete data return for Huygens with minimal impact on Cassini.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Deutsch, L. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">161</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA430829"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ferret Workflow <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection System.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Ferret workflow <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection system project 2003-2004 has provided validation and <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection in accredited workflows in secure knowledge management systems through the use of continuous, automated audits. A workflow, process, or procedure,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. J. Smith S. Bryant</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">162</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54155264"> <span id="translatedtitle">Space Weather and Satellite <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Results of the Satellite <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Project, which aims to improve the methods of safeguarding satellites in the Earth's magnetosphere from the negative effects of the space environment, are presented. <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> data from the \\</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lev Dorman; N. Iucci; A. E. Levitin; A. V. Belov; E. A. Eroshenko; N. G. Ptitsyna; G. Villoresi; G. V. Chizhenkov; L. I. Gromova; M. Parisi; M. I. Tyasto; V. G. Yanke</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">163</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE87753204"> <span id="translatedtitle">Algebraic Structure of Chiral <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">I will describe first the algebraic aspects of chiral <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, exercising however due care about the topological delicacies. I will illustrate the structure and methods in the context of gauge <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and will eventually make contact with results obta...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Stora</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">164</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19890035505&hterms=Hydrogeology&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3DHydrogeology"> <span id="translatedtitle">The source of marine magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Vine-Matthews hypothesis (1963) is examined. This hypothesis <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that oceanic rocks become polarized in the direction of the magnetic field at the time of their formation, thus recording the polarity history of the earth's magnetic field. This produces the lineated magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on either side of the midoceanic ridge crests. The strength of these magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is studied to determine the strength of magnetization. Indirect determinations of the magnetization intensity of the oceanic crust and direct observations of the oceanic crust are compared. It is found that the average magnetization of a 6-km thick oceanic crust is 1.18 A/m.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harrison, Christopher G. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">165</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/analysis_monitoring/GLOB_CLIM/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Global Climate Highlights and <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">NOAA's Global Climate Highlights and <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> page offers weekly summaries of global climate highlights and <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (warm, cold, wet, dry). Areas experiencing climate <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are color-marked on a global map, followed by written summaries of each region's climate conditions. All weeks are posted for the year 2000 (to present), and a link points users to the complete 1999 archive.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">166</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JHEP...02..069D"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> mediation in local effective theories</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The phenomenon known as "<span class="hlt">anomaly</span> mediation" can be understood in a variety of ways. Rather than an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, certain gaugino bilinear terms are required by local supersymmetry and gauge invariance (the derivation of these terms is in some cases related to <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in scale invariance or R symmetries). We explain why the gaugino bilinear is required in supersymmetric gauge theories with varying number of colors and flavors. By working in the Higgs phase, gauging a flavor group, or working below the scale of gaugino condensation, each of these theories has a local effective description in which we can identify the bilinear term, establishing its necessity in the microscopic theory. For example, in theories that exhibit gaugino condensation, the <span class="hlt">potential</span> in the very low energy theory is supersymmetric precisely due to the relation between the nonperturbative superpotential and the gaugino bilinear terms. Similarly, the gravitino mass appears from its coupling to the gaugino bilinear.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dine, Michael; Draper, Patrick</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">167</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JGRD..119..385M"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> patterns about strong convective events in the tropics and midlatitudes: Observations from radiosondes and surface weather stations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">use 13 years (1998-2010) of rainfall estimates from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission to identify high rain events located close to radiosondes. This is done in four regions: the Western Tropical Pacific, Tropical Brazil, Southeast China, and Southeast U.S. We then construct composite <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> patterns of temperature, relative humidity, surface pressure, convective available <span class="hlt">potential</span> energy (CAPE), geopotential height, mass divergence, relative vorticity, and <span class="hlt">potential</span> vorticity about these high rain events. One motivation of this analysis is to identify regional differences in the interaction between strong convective events and the background atmosphere. We find, overall, that the changes in meteorological variables which occur during the evolution of strong convective events in midlatitudes are similar to the changes that occur in the tropics. In midlatitudes, however, strong convective events are associated with stronger <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in surface pressure and geopotential height and exhibit a warm <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the lower troposphere prior to peak rainfall. In the Southeast U.S., the near-surface layer of positive CAPE that occurs prior to high rain events is thicker than in the Western Tropical Pacific. In the two midlatitude regions, the midlevel <span class="hlt">potential</span> vorticity maximum that develops during the growth stage of high rain events acquires a downward tilt toward the surface during the decay stage, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> downward transport toward the surface. A conceptual model previously used to interpret the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> patterns of the 2 day equatorial wave is used to interpret the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> patterns associated with more general types of high rain events in the tropics.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mitovski, Toni; Folkins, Ian</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">168</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23775463"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection and Localization in Crowded Scenes.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The detection and localization of anomalous behaviors in crowded scenes is considered, and a joint detector of temporal and spatial <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is proposed. The proposed detector is based on a video representation that accounts for both appearance and dynamics, using a set of mixture of dynamic textures models. These models are used to implement 1)~a center-surround discriminant saliency detector that produces spatial saliency scores, and 2)~a model of normal behavior that is learned from training data and produces temporal saliency scores. Spatial and temporal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> maps are then defined at multiple spatial scales, by considering the scores of these operators at progressively larger regions of support. The multi-scale scores act as <span class="hlt">potentials</span> of a conditional random field that guarantees global consistency of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> judgments. A dataset of densely crowded pedestrian walkways is introduced and used to evaluate the proposed <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detector. Experiments on this and other datasets show that the latter achieves state-of-the-art <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection results. PMID:23775463</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Li, Weixin; Mahadevan, Vijay; Vasconcelos, Nuno</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-12</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">169</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24231863"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> detection and localization in crowded scenes.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The detection and localization of anomalous behaviors in crowded scenes is considered, and a joint detector of temporal and spatial <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is proposed. The proposed detector is based on a video representation that accounts for both appearance and dynamics, using a set of mixture of dynamic textures models. These models are used to implement 1) a center-surround discriminant saliency detector that produces spatial saliency scores, and 2) a model of normal behavior that is learned from training data and produces temporal saliency scores. Spatial and temporal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> maps are then defined at multiple spatial scales, by considering the scores of these operators at progressively larger regions of support. The multiscale scores act as <span class="hlt">potentials</span> of a conditional random field that guarantees global consistency of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> judgments. A data set of densely crowded pedestrian walkways is introduced and used to evaluate the proposed <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detector. Experiments on this and other data sets show that the latter achieves state-of-the-art <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection results. PMID:24231863</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Li, Weixin; Mahadevan, Vijay; Vasconcelos, Nuno</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">170</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850023286&hterms=PangeA&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DPangeA"> <span id="translatedtitle">Continental magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> constraints on continental reconstruction</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Crustal magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> mapped by the MAGSAT satellite for North and South America, Europe, Africa, India, Australia and Antarctica and adjacent marine areas were adjusted to a common elevation of 400 km and differentially reduced to the radial pole of intensity 60,000 nT. These radially polarized <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are normalized for differential inclination, declination and intensity effects of the geomagnetic field, so that in principle they directly reflected the geometric and magnetic polarization attributes of sources which include regional petrologic variations of the crust and upper mantle, and crustal thickness and thermal perturbations. Continental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> demonstrate remarkably detailed correlation of regional magnetic sources across rifted margins when plotted on a reconstruction of Pangea. Accordingly, they <span class="hlt">suggest</span> further fundamental constraints on the geologic evolution of the continents and their reconstructions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.; Olivier, R.; Bentley, C. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">171</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20090010275&hterms=virial+theorem&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dvirial%2Btheorem"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hyperbolic Orbits and the Planetary Flylby <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Space probes in the Solar System have experienced unexpected changes in velocity known as the flyby <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> [1], as well as shifts in acceleration referred to as the Pioneer <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> [2-4]. In the case of Earth flybys, ESA s Rosetta spacecraft experienced the flyby effect and NASA s Galileo and NEAR satellites did the same, although MESSENGER did not possibly due to a latitudinal property of gravity assists. Measurements indicate that both <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> exist, and explanations have varied from the unconventional to <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> that new physics in the form of dark matter might be the cause of both [5]. Although dark matter has been studied for over 30 years, there is as yet no strong experimental evidence supporting it [6]. The existence of dark matter will certainly have a significant impact upon ideas regarding the origin of the Solar System. Hence, the subject is very relevant to planetary science. We will point out here that one of the fundamental problems in science, including planetary physics, is consistency. Using the well-known virial theorem in astrophysics, it will be shown that present-day concepts of orbital mechanics and cosmology are not consistent for reasons having to do with the flyby <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Therefore, the basic solution regarding the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> should begin with addressing the inconsistencies first before introducing new physics.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wilson, T.L.; Blome, H.J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">172</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23989523"> <span id="translatedtitle">Complex vascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The classification system for vascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> now used by experts worldwide comprises two distinct disease entities that differ in their biologic and pathologic features: vascular tumors and vascular malformations. Vascular tumors include infantile and congenital hemangiomas, tufted angiomas, and kaposiform hemangioendotheliomas. Infantile hemangiomas, the most common vascular <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, generally have a predetermined life cycle (proliferation and subsequent involution). GLUT-1, a glucose transporter, is a marker for these specific lesions during all phases of development. Vascular malformations are classified according to their vascular tissue of origin and include capillary, venous, arteriovenous, lymphatic, and mixed malformations. Complex lymphatic malformations and complex mixed malformations, which may have most vascular components, are the most difficult vascular malformations to successfully treat. These lesions are present at birth and often expand or grow in response to trauma, infection, or hormonal changes. Imaging advancements have enabled more accurate assessments and improved management of vascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. In addition, many lesions are now being managed with targeted pharmacologic therapy. Propranolol and steroids are used for complex or disfiguring tumors, and new anti-angiogenesis inhibitors such as sirolimus are selectively used to treat lymphatic and venous lymphatic malformations that are poorly responsive to sclerotherapy, embolization, and surgical excision. Multimodal therapies are often essential for complex lesions and require the combined expertise of an interdisciplinary team. PMID:23989523</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Azizkhan, Richard G</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">173</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3031181"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pathogenesis of Vascular <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Vascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are localized defects of vascular development. Most of them occur sporadically, i.e. there is no familial history of lesions, yet in a few cases clear inheritance is observed. These inherited forms are often characterized by multifocal lesions that are mainly small in size and increase in number with patient’s age. On the basis of these inherited forms, molecular genetic studies have unraveled a number of inherited mutations giving direct insight into the pathophysiological cause and the molecular pathways that are implicated. Genetic defects have been identified for hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), inherited cutaneomucosal venous malformation (VMCM), glomuvenous malformation (GVM), capillary malformation - arteriovenous malformation (CM-AVM), cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) and some isolated and syndromic forms of primary lymphedema. We focus on these disorders, the implicated mutated genes and the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. We also call attention to the concept of Knudson’s double-hit mechanism to explain incomplete penetrance and the large clinical variation in expressivity of inherited vascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. This variability renders the making of correct diagnosis of the rare inherited forms difficult. Yet, the identification of the pathophysiological causes and pathways involved in them has had an unprecedented impact on our thinking of their etiopathogenesis, and has opened the doors towards a more refined classification of vascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. It has also made it possible to develop animal models that can be tested for specific molecular therapies, aimed at alleviating the dysfunctions caused by the aberrant genes and proteins.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Boon, Laurence M.; Ballieux, Fanny; Vikkula, Miikka</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">174</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFM.H51F0812A"> <span id="translatedtitle">INVESTIGATING THE SOURCE OF THERMAL <span class="hlt">ANOMALIES</span> IN THE NORTHERN UNITED ARAB EMIRATES (UAE) DESERT USING GEOPHYSICAL METHODS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We conducted geophysical surveys to investigate the source of thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and to delineate any <span class="hlt">potential</span> water transport pathways from the recharge zones in the Oman Mountains to the location of the temporal thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> within the desert plain of the United Arab Emirates (UAE). In the visible region of the spectrum of both ASTER and MODIS satellite images, the desert plain of the UAE appears as a bare sandy surface. However, detailed examination of these images in the thermal bands reveal cooler thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> within the desert plain following major rainfall events. This <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> has a cooler surface of approximately 20 °C lower than the surroundings with a lifespan of several days. It has been hypothesized that moist surfaces, following rainfall events in an arid hot desert could be an indirect indication of locations with groundwater accumulation. Two regional fault zones, Dibba (NE-SW) and Hatta (NW-SE) were traced from ASTER satellite images and SRTM (~90 m) elevation data, but it remained unclear whether they extend into the thermal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> area. Control Source Audiomagnetotelluric (CSAMT) and ground magnetic data were acquired to verify the possible extension of these fault zones into the thermal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> area. CSAMT data were acquired along profiles positioned perpendicular to the Dibba and Hatta fault trends and over a 3-D survey grid covering the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> area. The ground magnetic survey delineated the extension of both fault zones into the gravel plains area but not into the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> area probably due to the thicker sand cover. 2D CSAMT apparent resistivity sections show a low resistivity structure coincident with the thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that parallel the Dibba Fault zone trend. A conductive structure over the thermal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> area, coincident with the extension of the Hatta Fault zone, was characterized from CSAMT 2-D inversions. The results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the Hatta and Dibba fault zones extend from the recharge areas in the mountain into the desert plains. The results also <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that these faults play a vital role in transmitting infiltrated rainwater from the Oman Mountains into the desert plain of the UAE where freshwater accumulates after rainfall events causing the thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Al Bloushi, K. M.; Atekwana, E. A.; Meju, M.; Ghoneim, E.; El-Baz, F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">175</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21583314"> <span id="translatedtitle">Semiclassical <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the quantum mechanical systems and their modifications for the asymptotic matching</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">JWKB solutions to the Initial Value Problems (IVPs) of the Time Independent Schrodinger's Equation (TISE) for the Simple Linear <span class="hlt">Potentials</span> (SLPs) with a turning point parameter have been studied according to the turning points by graphical analysis to test the results of the JWKB solutions and <span class="hlt">suggested</span> modifications. The <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> happening in the classically inaccessible region where the SLP function is smaller than zero and the results of the <span class="hlt">suggested</span> modifications, which are in consistent with the quantum mechanical theories, to remove these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in this region have been presented. The origins of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and verifications of the <span class="hlt">suggested</span> modifications showing a great success in the results have also been studied in terms of a <span class="hlt">suggested</span> M{sub ij}=S{sup {approx}}{sub i-1,j} matrix elements made up of the JWKB expansion terms, S{sub i-1,j} (where i = 1, 2, 3 and j 1, 2). The results of the modifications for the IVPs and their application to the Bound State Problems (BSPs) with an example application of the Harmonic Oscillator (HO) have been presented and their generalization for any <span class="hlt">potential</span> function have been discussed and classified accordingly.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Deniz, Coskun, E-mail: coskun.deniz@ege.edu.tr [Ege University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Bornova 35100, Izmir (Turkey)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-08-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">176</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5984454"> <span id="translatedtitle">Investigations of low-temperature geothermal <span class="hlt">potential</span> in New York State</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Temperature gradient map and published heat flow data indicate a possible <span class="hlt">potential</span> for a geothermal resource in western and central New York State. A new analysis of bottom-hole temperature data for New York State confirms the existence of three positive gradient <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: the East Aurora, Cayuga, and Elmira <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, with gradients as high as 32/sup 0/C/km, 36/sup 0/C/km, and 36/sup 0/C/km, respectively. Ground waters from two of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are enriched in silica relative to surrounding areas. Heat flows based on silica geothermometry are 50 to 70 mWm/sup -2/ for the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and 41.4 mWm/sup -2/ for bordering regional flux. A correlation between Bouguer gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the temperature gradient map <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the geothermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may occur above radioactive granites in the basement.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hodge, D.S.; De Rito, R.; Hifiker, K.; Morgan, P.; Swanberg, C.A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">177</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850038956&hterms=subduction&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dsubduction"> <span id="translatedtitle">Satellite magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over subduction zones - The Aleutian Arc <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Positive magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> seen in MAGSAT average scalar <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data overlying some subduction zones can be explained in terms of the magnetization contrast between the cold subducted oceanic slab and the surrounding hotter, nonmagnetic mantle. Three-dimensional modeling studies show that peak <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> amplitude and location depend on slab length and dip. A model for the Aleutian Arc <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> matches the general trend of the observed MAGSAT <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> if a slab thickness of 7 km and a relatively high (induced plus viscous) magnetization contrast of 4 A/m are used. A second source body along the present day continental margin is required to match the observed <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in detail, and may be modeled as a relic slab from subduction prior to 60 m.y. ago.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Clark, S. C.; Frey, H.; Thomas, H. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">178</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18517937"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hypercharged <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> mediation.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We show that, in string models with the minimal supersymmetric standard model residing on D-branes, the bino mass can be generated in a geometrically separated hidden sector. Hypercharge mediation thus naturally teams up with <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> mediation. The mixed scenario predicts a distinctive yet viable superpartner spectrum, provided that the ratio alpha between the bino and gravitino mass lies in the range 0.05 < or = |alpha| < or = 0.25 and m(3/2) > or = 35 TeV. We summarize some of the experimental signatures of this scenario. PMID:18517937</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dermísek, Radovan; Verlinde, Herman; Wang, Lian-Tao</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">179</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18489895"> <span id="translatedtitle">[First branchial cleft <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">First branchial cleft <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are congenital rare lesions that can sometimes be difficult to diagnose. During the normal embryonic development the outer ear canal derives from the first branchial cleft. Abnormal development can result in production of a cyst, sinus or fistula with recurring infections. Early and correct diagnosis is necessary for the correct choice of surgical set-up in which identification and preservation of the facial nerve is an important step. A case of first branchial cleft sinus is presented with further discussion of classification, diagnostics and treatment. PMID:18489895</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nikoghosyan, Gohar; Krogdahl, Annelise; Godballe, Christian</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-05-12</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">180</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23916956"> <span id="translatedtitle">Expression and/or activity of the SVCT2 ascorbate transporter may be decreased in many aggressive cancers, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> utility for sodium bicarbonate and dehydroascorbic acid in cancer therapy.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a heterodimer transcription factor whose elevated activity in many cancers helps them to survive under hypoxic conditions and enhances their capacity to grow invasively, establish metastases, and survive chemo- or radiotherapy. Optimal intracellular levels of ascorbate suppress the level and transcriptional activity of HIF-1under normoxic or mildly hypoxic conditions by supporting the activity of proly and asparagyl hydroxylases that target HIF-1alpha. High intracellular ascorbate can also work in various ways to down-regulate activation of NF-kappaB which, like HIF-1 is constitutively active in many cancers and promotes aggressive behavior - in part by promoting transcription of HIF-1alpha. Yet recent evidence <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that, even in the context of adequate ascorbate nutrition, the intracellular ascorbate content of many aggressive cancers may be supoptimal for effective HIF-1 control. This likely reflects low expression or activity of the SVCT2 ascorbate transporter. The expression of SVCT2 in cancers has so far received little study; but the extracellular acidity characteristic of many tumors would be expected to reduce the activity of this transporter, which has a mildly alkaline pH optimum. Unfortunately, since SVCT2 has a high affinity for ascorbate, and its activity is nearly saturated at normal healthy serum levels of this vitamin, increased oral administration of ascorbate would be unlikely to have much impact on the intracellular ascorbate content of tumors. However, cancers in which HIF-1 is active express high levels of glucose transporters such as GLUT-1, and these transporters can promote influx of dehydroascorbic acid (DHA) via facilitated diffusion; once inside the cell, DHA is rapidly reduced to ascorbate, which effectively is "trapped" within the cell. Hence, episodic intravenous infusions of modest doses of DHA may have <span class="hlt">potential</span> for optimizing the intracellular ascorbate content of cancers, <span class="hlt">potentially</span> rendering them less aggressive. Indeed, several published studies have concluded that parenteral DHA--sometimes in quite modest doses--can retard the growth of transplanted tumors in rodents. As an alternative or adjunctive strategy, oral administration of sodium bicarbonate, by normalizing the extracellular pH of tumors, has the <span class="hlt">potential</span> to boost the activity of SCTV2 in tumor cells, thereby promoting increased ascorbate uptake. Indeed, the utility of oral sodium bicarbonate for suppressing metastasis formation in nude mice xenografted with a human breast cancer has been reported. Hence, oral sodium bicarbonate and intravenous DHA may have the <span class="hlt">potential</span> to blunt the aggressiveness of certain cancers in which suboptimal intracellular ascorbate levels contribute to elevated HIF-1 activity. PMID:23916956</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McCarty, Mark F</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">181</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMNS23A1652S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Integrated geophysical investigations for the delineation of source and subsurface structure associated with hydro-uranium <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>: A case study from South Purulia Shear Zone (SPSZ), India</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">South Purulia Shear Zone (SPSZ) is an important region for prospecting of uranium mineralization. Geological studies and hydro-uranium <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> <span class="hlt">suggest</span> the presence of Uranium deposit around Raghunathpur village which lies about 8 km north of SPSZ. However, detailed geophysical investigations have not been carried out in this region for investigation of uranium mineralization. Since surface signature of uranium mineralization is not depicted near the location, a deeper subsurface source is expected for hydro uranium <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. To delineate the subsurface structure and to investigate the origin of hydro-uranium <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> present in the area, Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) using Schlumberger array and Gradient Resistivity Profiling (GRP) were performed at different locations along a profile perpendicular to the South Purulia Shear Zone. Apparent resistivity computed from the measured sounding data at various locations shows a continuously increasing trend. As a result, conventional apparent resistivity data is not able to detect the possible source of hydro uranium <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. An innovative approach is applied which depicts the apparent conductivity in the subsurface revealed a possible connection from SPSZ to Raghunathpur. On the other hand resistivity profiling data <span class="hlt">suggests</span> a low resistive zone which is also characterized by low Self-<span class="hlt">Potential</span> (SP) <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> zone. Since SPSZ is characterized by the source of uranium mineralization; hydro-uranium <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> at Raghunathpur is connected with the SPSZ. The conducting zone has been delineated from SPSZ to Raghunathpur at deeper depths which could be uranium bearing. Since the location is also characterized by a low gravity and high magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> zone, this conducting zone is likely to be mineralized zone. Keywords: Apparent resistivity; apparent conductivity; Self <span class="hlt">Potential</span>; Uranium mineralization; shear zone; hydro-uranium <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sharma, S. P.; Biswas, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">182</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012IEITC..95.2034H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Online <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Prediction for Real-Time Stream Processing</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">With the consideration of real-time stream processing technology, it's important to develop high availability mechanism to guarantee stream-based application not interfered by faults caused by <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. In this paper, we present a novel online prediction technique for predicting some <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> which may occur in the near future. Concretely, we first present a value prediction which combines the Hidden Markov Model and the Mixture of Expert Model to predict the values of feature metrics in the near future. Then we employ the Support Vector Machine to do <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> identification, which is a procedure to identify the kind of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> that we are about to alarm. The purpose of our approach is to achieve a tradeoff between fault penalty and resource cost. The experiment results show that our approach is of high accuracy for common <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> prediction and low runtime overhead.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huang, Yuanqiang; Luan, Zhongzhi; Qian, Depei; Du, Zhigao; Chen, Ting; Bai, Yuebin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">183</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996SeScT..11..437T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Orientation <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in plating thickness measurements from advanced packaging substrates</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Experiments show that serious <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> arise in the measurement by XRF of film thickness in bond fingers on packages. The <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> can be exposed as a package orientation dependence in the film thickness measurement. The orientation <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> occur on translation of the specimen between rows of bond fingers. The <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are due to either primary fluorescence or to scattered radiation from the substrate with an escape path to the detector. In bond fingers consisting of Au, Ni and Cu, primary fluorescence of substrate Br enhances the Au signal, while scattering of W characteristic lines enhances the Ni signal. The <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> can be overcome by ensuring that the bond finger lies in the plane containing the x-ray source and the proportional counter detector so that substrate emissions are buried. Instrumental improvements are also <span class="hlt">suggested</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tan, N. X.; Lee, A. J. Y.; Bourdillon, A. J.; Tan, C. Y. S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">184</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUFMMR44A..06W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Imaging the East Asian lower mantle water <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using the first global whole-mantle 3D model of shear quality factor, we identify a large region at the top of Earth's lower mantle with unusually high seismic attenuation. This <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, found down-dip of western Pacific subduction zones 700-1500 km beneath eastern Asia, is best explained by a 10-fold increase in water content. The <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> occupies ~1.8×1010 km3 with quality factor variations bordering on asthenospheric (Q?=101) when compared to typical lower mantle quality factor (Q?=311). A slab-like high quality factor <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, hypothesized to be subducting lithosphere, bounds the eastern and bottom side of the low quality factor <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> resides in a region having very high resolution, making it a robust feature. The small amplitudes of low-velocity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> found in the same region <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is not thermal. Additionally, a thermal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of this magnitude would require a source to rise from the core mantle boundary through or around a thick sheet-like slab bounding the east and bottom side. We ruled out chemical and grain size <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> based on the strength of the attenuation <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. It has previously been hypothesized that water, in the form of dense hydrous magnesium phase D, could dehydrate from cold slabs at 1100-1500 km depth. This depth range corresponds with the bottom of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, where free water would be highly unstable and possibly rise quickly through the lower mantle. Due to the low solubility of the expected mineral assemblages at lower mantle pressures, it only takes a small amount of water to drastically change mineral properties such as melting temperature, attenuation, and viscosity. The observation of water in the lower mantle above subducted oceanic lithosphere has significant implications for the processes of mantle convection, the dynamics of plate tectonics, the mixing of the mantle, and the thermal evolution of the Earth.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wysession, M. E.; Lawrence, J. F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">185</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6344167"> <span id="translatedtitle">Supergravity theories, <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and compactification</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This book is a collection of reprints on the structure of Poincare, anti-de Sitter and conformal supergravity theories in one to eleven dimensions, their <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and compactification. Each chapter contains introductory comments and an extensive list of references. Contents: Vol. 1: Representations of Supersymmetry in Various Dimensions; Poincare and ADS Supergravity Theories in Various Dimensions; <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Supergravity Theories. Vol. 2: Compactification of Supergravity Theories; Conformal Supergravity Theories in Various Dimensions; <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Conformal Supergravity Theories.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Salam, A.; Sezgin, E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">186</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20142648"> <span id="translatedtitle">Vaginal surgery for congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the vagina may be isolated to the vagina or be part of a more complex Mullerian tract <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> with possible fertility concerns. Patient age, complete assessment of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> before surgery, and the psychologic implications for the patient are important components of the initial evaluation and treatment planning. Imaging, including magnetic resonance imaging, should be used to assess the extent of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and possibly other organ systems involved. Surgeries for imperforate hymen, longitudinal septum, and low thin transverse septum are relatively straightforward. More complicated surgeries should be performed by a specialized surgical team. PMID:20142648</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Quint, Elisabeth H; McCarthy, Jenifer D; Smith, Yolanda R</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">187</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3075271"> <span id="translatedtitle">Turtle Carapace <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>: The Roles of Genetic Diversity and Environment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background Phenotypic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are common in wild populations and multiple genetic, biotic and abiotic factors might contribute to their formation. Turtles are excellent models for the study of developmental instability because <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are easily detected in the form of malformations, additions, or reductions in the number of scutes or scales. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we integrated field observations, manipulative experiments, and climatic and genetic approaches to investigate the origin of carapace scute <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> across Iberian populations of the European pond turtle, Emys orbicularis. The proportion of anomalous individuals varied from 3% to 69% in local populations, with increasing frequency of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in northern regions. We found no significant effect of climatic and soil moisture, or climatic temperature on the occurrence of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. However, lower genetic diversity and inbreeding were good predictors of the prevalence of scute <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> among populations. Both decreasing genetic diversity and increasing proportion of anomalous individuals in northern parts of the Iberian distribution may be linked to recolonization events from the Southern Pleistocene refugium. Conclusions/Significance Overall, our results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that developmental instability in turtle carapace formation might be caused, at least in part, by genetic factors, although the influence of environmental factors affecting the developmental stability of turtle carapace cannot be ruled out. Further studies of the effects of environmental factors, pollutants and heritability of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> would be useful to better understand the complex origin of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in natural populations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Velo-Anton, Guillermo; Becker, C. Guilherme; Cordero-Rivera, Adolfo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">188</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5297803"> <span id="translatedtitle">Earthquake prediction: Criterion for a tilt <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A current approach to the problem of defining and detecting anomalous tilt behavior is presented. To establish what is considered to be normal tilt behavior, we isolate systematic signals such as hydrologic, thermal, tidal, cultural, and equipment-related effects from the tilt data. The kinds of tilt signals which remain after rejection of the systematic signals are designated by ourselves as residual tilt. Residual tilt consists of asystematic random noise and anomalous tilts. To affirm or deny the contention that an anomalous tilt is present in the data requires the formulation of a statistically valid judgment criteria. Our approach adopts the hypothesis that the random walk model is not significantly different from the residual tilt and allows the application of standard statistical tests to the problem of detecting anomalous varia ions in random noise. In our study of the data analyzed so far, we find that the boundary for detectability is inverse frequency dependent, and this limits the way in which <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> can be treated. The fact that the magnitude of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> decreases as the tilt data span increases <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that further criterion development is necessary and tends to imply that longer <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> will not be detected unless there is a correspondingly larger amplitude. From our studies of three earthquake-association <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> this does not appear to be the case.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Buckley, C.P.; Kohlenberger, C.W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-07-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">189</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24843177"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in bulk supercooled water at negative pressure.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Water <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> still defy explanation. In the supercooled liquid, many quantities, for example heat capacity and isothermal compressibility [Formula: see text], show a large increase. The question arises if these quantities diverge, or if they go through a maximum. The answer is key to our understanding of water <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. However, it has remained elusive in experiments because crystallization always occurred before any extremum is reached. Here we report measurements of the sound velocity of water in a scarcely explored region of the phase diagram, where water is both supercooled and at negative pressure. We find several <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: maxima in the adiabatic compressibility and nonmonotonic density dependence of the sound velocity, in contrast with a standard extrapolation of the equation of state. This is reminiscent of the behavior of supercritical fluids. To support this interpretation, we have performed simulations with the 2005 revision of the transferable interaction <span class="hlt">potential</span> with four points. Simulations and experiments are in near-quantitative agreement, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> the existence of a line of maxima in [Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text]). This [Formula: see text] could either be the thermodynamic consequence of the line of density maxima of water [Sastry S, Debenedetti PG, Sciortino F, Stanley HE (1996) Phys Rev E 53:6144-6154], or emanate from a critical point terminating a liquid-liquid transition [Sciortino F, Poole PH, Essmann U, Stanley HE (1997) Phys Rev E 55:727-737]. At positive pressure, the [Formula: see text] has escaped observation because it lies in the "no man's land" beyond the homogeneous crystallization line. We propose that the [Formula: see text] emerges from the no man's land at negative pressure. PMID:24843177</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pallares, Gaël; El Mekki Azouzi, Mouna; González, Miguel A; Aragones, Juan L; Abascal, José L F; Valeriani, Chantal; Caupin, Frédéric</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">190</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39261291"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> detection in crowded scenes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A novel framework for <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection in crowded scenes is presented. Three properties are identified as important for the design of a localized video representation suitable for <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection in such scenes: (1) joint modeling of appearance and dynamics of the scene, and the abilities to detect (2) temporal, and (3) spatial abnormalities. The model for normal crowd behavior is</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vijay Mahadevan; Weixin Li; Viral Bhalodia; Nuno Vasconcelos</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">191</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60277025"> <span id="translatedtitle">Supergravity theories, <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and compactification</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This book is a collection of reprints on the structure of Poincare, anti-de Sitter and conformal supergravity theories in one to eleven dimensions, their <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and compactification. Each chapter contains introductory comments and an extensive list of references. Contents: Vol. 1: Representations of Supersymmetry in Various Dimensions; Poincare and ADS Supergravity Theories in Various Dimensions; <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Supergravity Theories. Vol.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Salam; E. Sezgin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">192</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900011231&hterms=gangs&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dgangs"> <span id="translatedtitle">Determination of mean gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the Taiwan Island</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The fitting and proper regression coefficients were made of one hundred seventeen 10 x 10' blocks with observed gravity data and corresponding elevation in the Taiwan Island. To compare five different predicted models, and the proper one for the mean gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were determined. The predicted gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the non-observed gravity blocks were decided when the coefficients obtained through the model with the weighted mean method. It was <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that the mean gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of 10 x 10' blocks should be made when comprehensive the observed and predicted data.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chang, Ruey-Gang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">193</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6285490"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Radiological <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the Noonan syndrome (author's transl)].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the Noonan syndrome various <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> can be demonstrated radiologically. Of particular interest are cardiovascular lesions, such as atypical pulmonary stenosis, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and the lymphangiectasias. Skeletal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> can be found, including retardation of bone maturation and sternal abnormalities. Other <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> concern the urinary tract (pyeloureteral stenosis) and the digestive system. Radiological diagnostic procedures allow to disclose various elements of this polymalformative syndrome. They should be performed whenever <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> clinical signs are present, e.g. hypertelorism, gonadal dysgenesis, down-slanting palpebral fissures and shield-like chest. PMID:6285490</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hoeffel, J C; Juncker, P; Delgoffe, C; Pernot, C</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">194</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3540475"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> detection in clinical processes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Meaningful <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in clinical processes may be related to caring performance or even the patient survival. It is imperative that the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> be timely detected such that useful and actionable knowledge of interest could be extracted to clinicians. Many previous approaches assume prior knowledge about the structure of clinical processes, using which <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are detected in a supervised manner. For a majority of clinical settings, however, clinical processes are complex, ad hoc, and even unknown a prior. In this paper, we investigate how to facilitate detection of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in an unsupervised manner. An <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection model is presented by applying a density-based clustering method on patient careflow logs. Using the learned model, it is possible to detect whether a particular patient careflow trace is anomalous with respect to normal traces in the logs. The approach has been validated over real data sets collected from a Chinese hospital.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huang, Zhengxing; Lu, Xudong; Duan, Huilong</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">195</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007APS..MARW28012S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Kohn <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and non-adiabaticity in doped carbon nanotubes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The tangential vibrational modes of metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are thought to be characterized by Kohn <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> resulting from the combination of their intrinsic one-dimensional nature and a significant electron- phonon coupling. These properties are modified by the doping- induced tuning of the Fermi energy level ?F, obtained through the intercalation of SWNTs with alkali atoms or the application of a gate <span class="hlt">potential</span>. We present a Density- Functional Theory (DFT) study of the vibrational properties of a (n,n) metallic SWNT as a function of electronic doping. For such study, we use, as in standard DFT calculations of vibrational properties, the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation, but we also use time-dependent perturbation theory to explore non-adiabatic effects beyond this approximation. We compare our results with existing measurements and <span class="hlt">suggest</span> features to be explored in future experiments.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Saitta, A. Marco; Caudal, Nicolas; Lazzeri, Michele; Mauri, Francesco</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">196</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24893182"> <span id="translatedtitle">Multiple congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: issues for birth defects surveillance.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Approximately 1 in 200 individuals and 20 percent to 30 percent of those in whom any major structural malformation is found will have 2 or more serious and <span class="hlt">potentially</span> unrelated birth defects. In addition to the challenges that multiple malformations create for affected persons, their families, and the health care system, appropriate surveillance of such complex patterns can be a concern for birth defects registries. This paper provides examples of how monitoring of multiple <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> can be beneficial from clinical and public health perspectives; presents a staged approach to documentation of such defects, including <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for their coding; describes the types of patterns in which they occur; and discusses some of the unique issues that arise with respect to statistical analysis of multiple versus isolated birth defects. PMID:24893182</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Evans, Jane A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">197</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/257023a0"> <span id="translatedtitle">A major geothermal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the Gulf of California</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have mapped a 3-km wide, high heat flow <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> with a maximum value of 30 ??calorie cm -2 s-1 within a zone of seafloor extension in the central Gulf of California. From seismic reflection data and thermal modelling we <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is caused by a 1-km wide basaltic intrusion which is roughly 100 m deep and less than 18,000 yr old. ?? 1975 Nature Publishing Group.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lawver, L. A.; Williams, D. L.; Von Herzen, R. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">198</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhRvD..88b5042X"> <span id="translatedtitle">QCD flux tubes and <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> inflow</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We apply the Callan-Harvey <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-inflow mechanism to the study of QCD (chromoelectric) flux tubes, quark (pair) creation, and the chiral magnetic effect, using new variables from the Cho-Faddeev-Niemi decomposition of the gauge <span class="hlt">potential</span>. A phenomenological description of chromoelectric flux tubes is obtained by studying a gauged Nambu-Jona-Lasinio effective Lagrangian, derived from the original QCD Lagrangian. At the quantum level, quark condensates in the QCD vacuum may form a vortexlike structure in a chromoelectric flux tube. Quark zero modes trapped in the vortex are chiral and lead to a two-dimensional gauge <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. To cancel it, an effective Chern-Simons coupling is needed and, hence, a topological charge density term naturally appears.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xiong, Chi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">199</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1050190"> <span id="translatedtitle">Holographic models and the QCD trace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Five dimensional dilaton models are considered as possible holographic duals of the pure gauge QCD vacuum. In the framework of these models, the QCD trace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> equation is considered. Each quantity appearing in that equation is computed by holographic means. Two exact solutions for different dilaton <span class="hlt">potentials</span> corresponding to perturbative and non-perturbative {beta}-functions are studied. It is shown that in the perturbative case, where the {beta}-function is the QCD one at leading order, the resulting space is not asymptotically AdS. In the non-perturbative case, the model considered presents confinement of static quarks and leads to a non-vanishing gluon condensate, although it does not correspond to an asymptotically free theory. In both cases analyses based on the trace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and on Wilson loops are carried out.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jose L. Goity, Roberto C. Trinchero</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">200</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21537700"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reactor antineutrino <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recently, new reactor antineutrino spectra have been provided for {sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Pu, and {sup 238}U, increasing the mean flux by about 3%. To a good approximation, this reevaluation applies to all reactor neutrino experiments. The synthesis of published experiments at reactor-detector distances <100 m leads to a ratio of observed event rate to predicted rate of 0.976{+-}0.024. With our new flux evaluation, this ratio shifts to 0.943{+-}0.023, leading to a deviation from unity at 98.6% C.L. which we call the reactor antineutrino <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The compatibility of our results with the existence of a fourth nonstandard neutrino state driving neutrino oscillations at short distances is discussed. The combined analysis of reactor data, gallium solar neutrino calibration experiments, and MiniBooNE-{nu} data disfavors the no-oscillation hypothesis at 99.8% C.L. The oscillation parameters are such that |{Delta}m{sub new}{sup 2}|>1.5 eV{sup 2} (95%) and sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub new})=0.14{+-}0.08 (95%). Constraints on the {theta}{sub 13} neutrino mixing angle are revised.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mention, G.; Fechner, M. [CEA, Irfu, SPP, Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Lasserre, Th.; Cribier, M. [CEA, Irfu, SPP, Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Astroparticule et Cosmologie APC, 10 rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet, 75205 Paris cedex 13 (France); Mueller, Th. A.; Lhuillier, D.; Letourneau, A. [CEA, Irfu, SPhN, Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">201</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JHEP...05..134J"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> inflow and thermal equilibrium</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> inflow mechanism, we compute the flavor/Lorentz non-invariant contribution to the partition function in a background with a U(1) isometry. This contribution is a local functional of the background fields. By identifying the U(1) isometry with Euclidean time we obtain a contribution of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> to the thermodynamic partition function from which hydrostatic correlators can be efficiently computed. Our result is in line with, and an extension of, previous studies on the role of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in a hydrodynamic setting. Along the way we find simplified expressions for Bardeen-Zumino polynomials and various transgression formulae.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jensen, Kristan; Loganayagam, R.; Yarom, Amos</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">202</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16950683"> <span id="translatedtitle">Types of <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>: Relationships among compliance, indirect, and direct <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is commonly believed that direct <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>, referring to overt influence, and indirect <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>, in which the intention to influence is hidden, correlate poorly. This study demonstrates that they are substantially related, provided that they tap similar areas of influence. Test results from 103 students, 55 women and 48 men, were entered into regression analyses. Indirect <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>, as measured by the Sensory <span class="hlt">Suggestibility</span> Scale for Groups, and compliance, measured by the Gudjonsson Compliance Scale, were predictors of direct <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>, assessed with the Barber <span class="hlt">Suggestibility</span> Scale. Spectral analyses showed that indirect <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> is more related to difficult tasks on the BSS, but compliance is more related to easy tasks on this scale. PMID:16950683</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Polczyk, Romuald; Pasek, Tomasz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">203</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMSM13A2332S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Structure of Hot Flow <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Hot Flow <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> (HFAs) were first discovered in 1980s. These are active processes of hot plasma bulks formation that usually occur at planetary bow shocks. Though HFA were studied for long time it is still not clear if they are reforming structures and what defines particular internal structure of HFA. Our study is based on the Interball Tail Probe data. We used 10-sec measurements of complex plasma analyzer SCA-1 and 1-second magnetic field measurements, and ELECTRON spectrometer 2-dimensional measurements with 3,75-sec temporal resolution. Five <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that were observed on the basis of well resolved structure for which we obtained displacement velocity along bow shock, flow velocities within HFA, and estimated the size. We checked if main criteria of HFA formation were fulfilled for each case. The following criteria were satisfied: motional electric field direction was directed toward current sheet at least at one side of it, bow shock was quasi-perpendicular at least at one side of HFA, and angle between current sheet normal and solar wind velocity was large. Convection velocities of plasma within HFA were calculated by subtracting average velocity from measured ion convection velocities along spacecraft trajectory through <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. These convection velocities viewed in coordinate system of shock normal and calculated IMF current sheet normal clearly show separation of HFA region in 3 parts: leading part, narrow central part, and trailing part. Ion velocity distributions confirm this triple structure of HFA. Thomsen et al. [1986] identified the region within HFA that they called "internal recovery". It looks like central region that we call narrow central part. Vaisberg et al. [1999] discussed separation of HFA into 2 distinct parts that correspond to leading and trailing parts. Judging from plasma convection pattern within HFAs we assumed that "internal recovery" region is the source of energy and momentum around interplanetary current sheet crossing. HFA formation mechanisms presume that HFA is formed when particles are reflected on bow shock, get swept by motional electric field and are injected back into the area. We tried to calculate the balance of energy in solar wind and within HFA to estimate what amount of reflected particles is needed for "internal recovery" area to be the real energy source. These estimations <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that this energy balance is nearly fulfilled in 4 of 5 analyzed HFAs, and does not hold for one HFA. This energy balance may be in favor of quasi-stationary nature of HFA structure. References Thomsen, M. F., J. T. Gosling, S. A. Fuselier, S. J. Bame, and C. T. Russell (1986), Hot, diamagnetic cavities upstream from the Earth's bow shock, J. Geophys. Res., 91(A3), 2961-2973, doi:10.1029/JA091iA03p02961. Vaisberg, O.L., J.H.Waite, L.Avanov, V.N.Smirnov, D.Dempsey J.L.Burch and A.A.Skalsky, HFA-like signatures observed with Interball-Tail spacecraft, in: Solar Wind Nine, ed. By S.R.Habbal, R.Esser, J.V.Hollweg, and P.A.Isenberg, AIP 1-56396-865-7, 1999, pp. 551-554.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shestakov, A.; Vaisberg, O. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">204</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=JPRS59163"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experimental Studies of Mental <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The report contains a survey of studies of mental (nonverbal) <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>. It includes problems related to <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> of motor acts, visual images and sensations, sleep and waking. Fundamentals of the electromagnetic theory of mental <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> are examine...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">L. L. Vasilev</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1973-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">205</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a000000/a002700/a002793/index.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pacific Temperature <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> with Graph</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This animation shows the El Nino-La Nina Sea Surface Temperature <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> from January 1997 through July 1999. A graph inset shows the global average sea surface temperature fluctuation during this time period.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shirah, Greg; Bridgman, Tom; Starr, Cindy; Busalacchi, Antonio; Schultz, Peter</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-08-30</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">206</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1994STIN...9433262K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spacecraft environmental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> expert system</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An expert system has been developed by The Aerospace Corporation, Space and Environment Technology Center for use in the diagnosis of satellite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> caused by the space environment. The expert system is designed to determine the probable cause of an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> from the following candidates: surface charging, bulk charging, single-event effects, total radiation dose, and space-plasma effects. Such <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> depend on the orbit of the satellite, the local plasma and radiation environment (which is highly variable), the satellite-exposure time, and the hardness of the circuits and components in the satellite. The expert system is a rule-based system that uses the Texas Instrument's Personal Consultant Plus expert-system shell. The expert system's knowledgebase includes about 200 rules, as well as a number of databases that contain information on spacecraft and their orbits, previous spacecraft <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and the environment.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Koons, Harry C.; Groney, David J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">207</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.urologyhealth.org/urology/index.cfm?article=51"> <span id="translatedtitle">Vaginal <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>: Fusion and Duplication</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Vaginal Abnormalities: Fusion and Duplication Having two of everything may be ... if your child's doctor diagnoses an "<span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of fusion and duplication." What causes vaginal fusion and duplication? ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">208</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5880430"> <span id="translatedtitle">Obstetric consequences of uterovaginal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This review discusses the diagnosis and classification of utero-vaginal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> as well as obstetric considerations in their management. Diagnosis is usually made by hysterosalpingography antepartum. Ultrasonography is also recommended. 40 references, 10 figures, 9 tables.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rock, J.A.; Schlaff, W.D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">209</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997PhDT.......100T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Chiral <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and dynamical electroweak-symmetry breaking</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We explore some of the phenomenological consequences of dynamical electro-weak-symmetry breaking, where fermionic bound-states, instead of elementary scalar fields, induce the breaking. In particular, we consider processes generated by chiral <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with global- symmetry currents in <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-free gauge theories, as experimental studies of such processes have the <span class="hlt">potential</span> for revealing some of the details of the mechanism responsible for the symmetry breaking. Two investigations are conducted employing simple technicolor models. The first one deals with the way that the equivalence theorem, which relates observable longitudinal gauge- bosons to the corresponding unphysical Goldstone-bosons, is satisfied in cases where the latter bosons have <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-generated couplings. In the second investigation, we study the production and detection of the techni- ?sp/prime, which decays via the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> to two photons much as the ordinary ?sp/prime does, at a high-energy photon collider.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tandean, Jusak</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">210</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFMSM33D..08S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Plasma structure over dayside lunar magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is well-known that the Moon has neither global intrinsic magnetic field nor thick atmosphere. Different from the Earth’s case where the intrinsic global magnetic field prevents the solar wind from penetrating into the magnetosphere, solar wind directly impacts the lunar surface. Since the discovery of the lunar crustal magnetic field in 1960s, several papers have been published concerning the interaction between the solar wind and the lunar magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> including both numerical simulations and observation by lunar orbiters. MAG/ER on Lunar Prospector found heating of the solar wind electrons presumably due to the interaction between the solar wind and the lunar magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the existence of the mini-magnetosphere was <span class="hlt">suggested</span>. However, the detailed mechanism of the interaction has been unclear mainly due to the lack of the in-situ observed low energy ion data. MAgnetic field and Plasma experiment - Plasma energy Angle and Composition Experiment (MAP-PACE) on Kaguya (SELENE) completed its ˜1.5-year observation of the low energy charged particles around the Moon on 10 June 2009. MAP-PACE made observations at a circular lunar polar orbit of 100km altitude for about 1 year between January 2008 and December 2008. During the last 5 months, the orbit was lowered to ˜50km-altitude between January 2009 and April 2009, and some orbits had further lower perilune altitude of ˜10km after April 2009. When Kaguya flew over strong magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, deceleration of the solar wind ions, acceleration of the solar wind electrons, and ions reflected by magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were observed. The deceleration of the solar wind ions was observed for both two major solar wind ion components: protons and alpha particles. Deceleration of the solar wind had the same ? E/q (? E : deceleration energy, q: charge) for both protons and alpha particles. In addition, the acceleration energy of the electrons was the same as the deceleration energy of the ions. It indicates the existence of DC electric field over Kaguya spacecraft. Since the gyro-radius of the electrons was smaller than the size of the magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, incident electrons were mirror reflected back. On the other hand, the gyro-radius of the ions was much larger than the size of the magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Therefore the incident ions could penetrate deeper into the magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. As a result, DC electric field was generated over dayside magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The reflected ions were observed in much larger area than the area where strong magnetic field was observed. Mass profile of the reflected ions showed existence of reflected alpha particles as expected from the magnetic mirror reflection. However, the energy of the reflected alpha particles was found to be lower than that of the alpha particles in the incident solar wind. In addition, the reflected protons also had lower energy and higher temperature than those of the incident solar wind protons. It clearly indicates the existence of a non-adiabatic interaction between solar wind ions and lunar magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Saito, Y.; Nishino, M. N.; Yamamoto, T.; Uemura, K.; Yokota, S.; Asamura, K.; Tsunakawa, H.; Kaguya Map Team</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">211</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19830010869&hterms=magnetic+anomaly+map&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dmagnetic%2Banomaly%2Bmap"> <span id="translatedtitle">Satellite elevation magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> maps</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The problem of inverting 2 deg average MAGSAT scalar <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for the region 80 W, 60 E longitude and 40 S, 70 N latitude was attempted on the LARS computer; however, the effort was aborted due to insufficient allocation of CPU-time. This problem is currently being resubmitted and should be implemented shortly for quantitative comparison with free-air gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, geothermal, and tectonic data.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Braile, L. W.; Hinze, W. J. (principal investigators)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">212</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/pg3m4382284p55m1.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mullerian duct <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: MR imaging</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Mullerian duct <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (MDAs) are rare, affecting approximately 1% of all women and about 3% of women with poor reproductive\\u000a outcomes. These congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> usually result from one of the following categories of abnormalities of the mullerian\\u000a ducts: failure of formation (no development or underdevelopment) or failure of fusion of the mullerian ducts. The American\\u000a Fertility Society (AFS) classification of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Leonardo Marcal; Maria Angela Nothaft; Francisco Coelho; Richard Volpato; Revathy Iyer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">213</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860029300&hterms=maple+tree&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dmaple%2Btree"> <span id="translatedtitle">Remote detection of geobotanical <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with hydrocarbon microseepage</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">As part of the continuing study of the Lost River, West Virginia NASA/Geosat Test Case Site, an extensive soil gas survey of the site was conducted during the summer of 1983. This soil gas survey has identified an order of magnitude methane, ethane, propane, and butane <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> that is precisely coincident with the linear maple <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> reported previously. This and other maple <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were previously <span class="hlt">suggested</span> to be indicative of anaerobic soil conditions associated with hydrocarbon microseepage. In vitro studies support the view that anomalous distributions of native tree species tolerant of anaerobic soil conditions may be useful indicators of methane microseepage in heavily vegetated areas of the United States characterized by deciduous forest cover. Remote sensing systems which allow discrimination and mapping of native tree species and/or species associations will provide the exploration community with a means of identifying vegetation distributional <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> indicative of microseepage.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rock, B. N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">214</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JHEP...12..110C"> <span id="translatedtitle">The reactor <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> after Daya Bay and RENO</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Gallium and short baseline reactor neutrino experiments indicate a short- distance anomalous disappearance of electron antineutrinos which, if interpreted in terms of neutrino oscillations, would lead to a sterile neutrino mass inconsistent with standard cosmological models. This <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is difficult to measure at 1 km baseline experiments because its disappearance effects are degenerate with that of ? 13. The flux normalization independent measurement of ? 13 at Daya Bay breaks this degeneracy, allowing an unambiguous differentiation of 1-3 neutrino oscillations and the anomalous disappearance at Double Chooz and RENO. The resulting <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is consistent with that found at very short baselines and <span class="hlt">suggests</span> a downward revision of RENO's result for ? 13. A MCMC global analysis of current cosmological data shows that a quintom cosmology is just compatible at 2 ? with a sterile neutrino with the right mass to reproduce the reactor <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and to a lesser extent the gallium and LSND/MiniBooNE <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ciuffoli, Emilio; Evslin, Jarah; Li, Hong</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">215</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19940019391&hterms=recovery+plan&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3D%2522recovery%2Bplan%2522"> <span id="translatedtitle">Galileo spacecraft <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and safing recovery</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A high-level <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> recovery plan which identifies the steps necessary to recover from a spacecraft 'Safing' incident was developed for the Galileo spacecraft prior to launch. Since launch, a total of four in-flight <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> have lead to entry into a system fault protection 'Safing' routine which has required the Galileo flight team to refine and execute the recovery plan. These failures have allowed the flight team to develop an efficient recovery process when permanent spacecraft capability degradation is minimal and the cause of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is quickly diagnosed. With this previous recovery experience and the very focused boundary conditions of a specific <span class="hlt">potential</span> failure, a Gaspra asteroid recovery plan was designed to be implemented in as quickly as forty hours (desired goal). This paper documents the work performed above, however, the Galileo project remains challenged to develop a generic detailed recovery plan which can be implemented in a relatively short time to configure the spacecraft to a nominal state prior to future high priority mission objectives.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Basilio, Ralph R.; Durham, David M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">216</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993gdss.proc..203B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Galileo spacecraft <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and safing recovery</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A high-level <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> recovery plan which identifies the steps necessary to recover from a spacecraft 'Safing' incident was developed for the Galileo spacecraft prior to launch. Since launch, a total of four in-flight <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> have lead to entry into a system fault protection 'Safing' routine which has required the Galileo flight team to refine and execute the recovery plan. These failures have allowed the flight team to develop an efficient recovery process when permanent spacecraft capability degradation is minimal and the cause of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is quickly diagnosed. With this previous recovery experience and the very focused boundary conditions of a specific <span class="hlt">potential</span> failure, a Gaspra asteroid recovery plan was designed to be implemented in as quickly as forty hours (desired goal). This paper documents the work performed above, however, the Galileo project remains challenged to develop a generic detailed recovery plan which can be implemented in a relatively short time to configure the spacecraft to a nominal state prior to future high priority mission objectives.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Basilio, Ralph R.; Durham, David M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">217</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23579825"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in GLDAS-1996 dataset.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) data are widely used for land-surface flux simulations. Therefore, the simulation accuracy using GLDAS dataset is largely contingent upon the accuracy of the GLDAS dataset. It is found that GLDAS land-surface model simulated runoff exhibits strong <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for 1996. These <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are investigated by evaluating four GLDAS meteorological forcing data (precipitation, air temperature, downward shortwave radiation and downward longwave radiation) in six large basins across the world (Danube, Mississippi, Yangtze, Congo, Amazon and Murray-Darling basins). Precipitation data from the Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) are also compared with GLDAS forcing precipitation data. Large errors and lack of monthly variability in GLDAS-1996 precipitation data are the main sources for the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the simulated runoff. The impact of the precipitation data on simulated runoff for 1996 is investigated with the Community Atmosphere Biosphere Land Exchange (CABLE) land-surface model in the Yangtze basin, for which area high-quality local precipitation data are obtained from the China Meteorological Administration (CMA). The CABLE model is driven by GLDAS daily precipitation data and CMA daily precipitation, respectively. The simulated daily and monthly runoffs obtained from CMA data are noticeably better than those obtained from GLDAS data, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that GLDAS-1996 precipitation data are not so reliable for land-surface flux simulations. PMID:23579825</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhou, Xinyao; Zhang, Yongqiang; Yang, Yonghui; Yang, Yanmin; Han, Shumin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">218</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19717681"> <span id="translatedtitle">A strong magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> affects pigeon navigation.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Pigeons were released in a strong magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> with fast changes in intensity and gradients directions, about 60 km from their loft, and, for comparison, at the border of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and at a control site. The vanishing bearings were found to be closely related to the home direction, but unrelated to the local gradient directions. The vector lengths and the vanishing intervals, however, were significantly correlated with the maximum difference in intensity within a 2.5 km radius around the release site. This correlation was negative for the vector lengths and positive for the vanishing intervals, indicating that steep local gradients increase scatter between pigeons and delay their departure. These findings <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that an irregular, fast changing magnetic field as found in the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> leads to confusion during the navigational processes. This, in turn, implies that pigeons can sense the respective changes in magnetic intensity. Magnetic cues seem to be included in the normal navigational processes that determine the departure direction. PMID:19717681</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wiltschko, Roswitha; Schiffner, Ingo; Wiltschko, Wolfgang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-09-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">219</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMDI33B2250Y"> <span id="translatedtitle">Origin of conductivity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the asthenosphere</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Electrical conductivity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with anisotropy parallel to the plate motion have been observed beneath the oceanic lithosphere by electromagnetic studies (e.g., Evans et al., 2005; Baba et al., 2010; Naif et al., 2013). Electrical conductivity of the oceanic asthenosphere at ~100 km depth is very high, about 10-2 to 10-1 S/m. This zone is also known in seismology as the low velocity zone. Since Karato (1990) first <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that electrical conductivity is sensitive to water content in NAMs, softening of asthenosphere has been regarded as a good indicator for constraining the distribution of water. There are two difficulties to explain the observed conductivity features in the asthenosphere. Recent publications on electrical conductivity of hydrous olivine <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that olivine with the maximum soluble H2O content at the top of the asthenosphere has much lower conductivity less than 0.1 S/m (e.g., Yoshino et al., 2006; 2009a; Poe et al., 2010; Du Frane and Tyburczy, 2012; Yang, 2012), which is a typical value of conductivity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> observed in the oceanic mantle. Partial melting has been considered as an attractive agent for substantially raising the conductivity in this region (Shankland and Waff, 1977), because basaltic melt has greater electrical conductivity (> 100.5 S/m) and high wetting properties. However, dry mantle peridotite cannot reach the solidus temperature at depth 100 km. Volatile components can dramatically reduce melting temperature, even if its amount is very small. Recent studies on conductivity measurement of volatile-bearing melt <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that conductivity of melt dramatically increases with increasing volatile components (H2O: Ni et al., 2010a, b; CO2: Gaillard et al., 2008; Yoshino et al., 2010; 2012a). Because incipient melt includes higher amount of volatile components, conductivity enhancement by the partial melt is very effective at temperatures just above that of the volatile-bearing peridotite solidus. In this study, the electrical conductivity of peridotite with trace amount of volatile phases was measured in single crystal olivine capsule to protect escape of water from the sample at 3 GPa. The conductivity values were significantly higher than those of dry peridotite, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that the observed conductivity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at the asthenosphere are caused by a presence of trace amount of volatile component in fluid or melt. On the other hand, conductivity of partial molten peridotite measured under shear showed that the conductivity parallel to the shear direction becomes one order of magnitude higher than that normal direction. These observations <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that partial melting can explain softening and the observed geophysical <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of asthenosphere.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yoshino, T.; Zhang, B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">220</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002PhRvE..66c1509W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Phase behavior and thermodynamic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of core-softened fluids</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report extensive simulation studies of phase behavior in single component systems of particles interacting via a core-softened interparticle <span class="hlt">potential</span>. Two recently proposed examples of such <span class="hlt">potentials</span> are considered; one in which the hard core exhibits a shoulder [Sadr-Lahijany et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 4895 (1998)], and the other in which the softening takes the form of a linear ramp [Jagla, Phys. Rev. E 63, 061501 (2001)]. Using a combination of state-of-the-art Monte Carlo methods, we obtain the gas, liquid, and solid phase behavior of the shoulder model in two dimensions. We then focus on the thermodynamic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the liquid phase, namely, maxima in the density and compressibility as a function of temperature. Analysis of the finite-size behavior of these maxima <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that, rather than stemming from a metastable liquid-liquid critical point, as previously supposed, they are actually induced by the quasicontinuous nature of the two dimensional freezing transition. For the ramp model in three dimensions, we confirm the existence of a stable liquid-liquid (``second'') critical point occurring at higher pressure and lower temperature than the liquid-gas critical point. Both these critical points and portions of their associated coexistence curves are located to high precision. In contrast to the shoulder model, the observed thermodynamic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of this model are found to be authentic, i.e., they are not engendered by an incipient new phase. We trace the locus of density and compressibility maxima, the former of which appears to terminate close to the second critical point.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wilding, Nigel B.; Magee, James E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> 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showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">221</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19820016723&hterms=atlantic+drift+continental&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Datlantic%2Bdrift%2Bcontinental"> <span id="translatedtitle">MAGSAT <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map and continental drift</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> maps of high quality are needed to display unambiguously the so called long wave length <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were analyzed in terms of continental drift and the nature of their sources is discussed. The map presented confirms the thinness of the oceanic magnetized layer. Continental magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are characterized by elongated structures generally of east-west trend. Paleomagnetic reconstruction shows that the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> found in India, Australia, and Antarctic exhibit a fair consistency with the African <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. It is also shown that <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are locked under the continents and have a fixed geometry.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lemouel, J. L. (principal investigator); Galdeano, A.; Ducruix, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">222</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFM.V13B0662O"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evidence for broad hotspot melting <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Mantle plumes are widely portrayed as mushroom-like `head` and thin `tail` structures that rise from a deep thermal boundary layer, generally depicted as the core-mantle boundary. This `classic` plume model has been highly successful in explaining age-progressive seamount chains as a reflection of lithospheric plate motion over thin plume `tails`. Much effort has also been spent examining evidence that may link age-progressive seamount chains to Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs), the latter being interpreted as relic plume 'head' structures. However, recent numerical modeling of thermo-chemical plumes indicates that not all plumes have simple `head` and `tail` structures (e.g., Farnetani and Samuel, 2006; Lin and van Keken, 2004, 2006). Plumes may be impinging against the base of the lithosphere in a variety of shapes and sizes, possibly episodically. Similarly, our direct age dating of the Foundation Seamount Chain, SE Pacific, <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the narrowness of seamount chains might mask far broader underlying hotspots. Furthermore, our geochronological data show that the Galapagos Volcanic Province (GVP) developed via the progression of broad regions of concurrent dispersed volcanism that we link to a correspondingly broad mantle melting <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Evidence from numerical modelling and direct dating of the volcanic record is therefore <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that hotspot melting <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> might be much broader than commonly inferred from seamount chains. Thus, the criteria for sampling the volcanic record as a test of the plume hypothesis may require modification. We present a revised approach based on multiple seamount chains that stretch across broad regions of seafloor. These investigations test 1) the new thinking that plumes differ from the classic `head-tail` structure and 2) the inference from recent dating of Pacific seamount chains that hotspot melting <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are much broader than <span class="hlt">suggested</span> by the dimensions of individual chains of seamounts and ridges.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">O'Connor, J. M.; Stoffers, P.; Wijbrans, J. R.; Worthington, T. J.; Jokat, W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">223</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21250855"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> freedom in perturbative loop quantum gravity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A fully consistent linear perturbation theory for cosmology is derived in the presence of quantum corrections as they are <span class="hlt">suggested</span> by properties of inverse volume operators in loop quantum gravity. The underlying constraints present a consistent deformation of the classical system, which shows that the discreteness in loop quantum gravity can be implemented in effective equations without spoiling space-time covariance. Nevertheless, nontrivial quantum corrections do arise in the constraint algebra. Since correction terms must appear in tightly controlled forms to avoid <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, detailed insights for the correct implementation of constraint operators can be gained. The procedures of this article thus provide a clear link between fundamental quantum gravity and phenomenology.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bojowald, Martin; Hossain, Golam Mortuza; Kagan, Mikhail; Shankaranarayanan, S. [Institute for Gravitational Physics and Geometry, Pennsylvania State University, 104 Davey Lab, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Institute for Gravitational Physics and Geometry, Pennsylvania State University, 104 Davey Lab, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States) and Department of Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, Abington, Pennsylvania 19001 (United States); Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Mercantile House, Portsmouth P01 2EG (United Kingdom)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-09-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">224</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1451275"> <span id="translatedtitle">Alberta Congenital <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> Surveillance System.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Alberta Congenital <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> Surveillance System was started in 1966 in response to the thalidomide tragedy earlier in the decade. It was one of four provincial surveillance systems on which the federal government relied for baseline statistics of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The government now collects data from six provinces and one territory. The Alberta Congenital <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Surveillance System originally depended on three types of notification to the Division of Vital Statistics, Department of Health, Government of Alberta: birth notice and certificates of death and stillbirth; increased sources of ascertainment have greatly improved data quality. We present the data for 1980-86 and compare the prevalence rates of selected <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with the rates from three other surveillance systems. Surveillance systems do not guarantee that a new teratogen will be detected, but they are extremely valuable for testing hypotheses regarding causation. At the very least they provide baseline data with which to compare any deviation or trend. For many, if not most, congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> total prevention is not possible; however, surveillance systems can be used to measure progress in prevention.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lowry, R B; Thunem, N Y; Anderson-Redick, S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">225</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008PhDT........81R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Algorithm development for hyperspectral <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This dissertation proposes and evaluates a novel <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection algorithm suite for ground-to-ground, or air-to-ground, applications requiring automatic target detection using hyperspectral (HS) data. Targets are manmade objects in natural background clutter under unknown illumination and atmospheric conditions. The use of statistical models herein is purely for motivation of particular formulas for calculating <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> output surfaces. In particular, formulas from semiparametrics are utilized to obtain novel forms for output surfaces, and alternative scoring algorithms are proposed to calculate output surfaces that are comparable to those of semiparametrics. Evaluation uses both simulated data and real HS data from a joint data collection effort between the Army Research Laboratory and the Army Armament Research Development & Engineering Center. A data transformation method is presented for use by the two-sample data structure univariate semiparametric and nonparametric scoring algorithms, such that, the two-sample data are mapped from their original multivariate space to an univariate domain, where the statistical power of the univariate scoring algorithms is shown to be improved relative to existing multivariate scoring algorithms testing the same two-sample data. An exhaustive simulation experimental study is conducted to assess the performance of different HS <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection techniques, where the null and alternative hypotheses are completely specified, including all parameters, using multivariate normal and mixtures of multivariate normal distributions. Finally, for ground-to-ground <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection applications, where the unknown scales of targets add to the problem complexity, a novel global <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection algorithm suite is introduced, featuring autonomous partial random sampling (PRS) of the data cube. The PRS method is proposed to automatically sample the unknown background clutter in the test HS imagery, and by repeating multiple times this process, one can achieve a desirably low cumulative probability of taking target samples by chance and using them as background samples. This probability is modeled by the binomial distribution family, where the only target related parameter---the proportion of target pixels <span class="hlt">potentially</span> covering the imagery---is shown to be robust. PRS requires a suitable scoring algorithm to compare samples, although applying PRS with the new two-step univariate detectors is shown to outperform existing multivariate detectors.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rosario, Dalton S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">226</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JHEP...01..010B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Second order transport from <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study parity odd transport at second order in derivative expansion for a non-conformal charged fluid. We see that there are 27 parity odd transport coefficients, of which 12 are non-vanishing in equilibrium. We use the equilibrium partition function method to express 7 of these in terms of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, shear viscosity, charge diffusivity and thermodynamic functions. The remaining 5 are constrained by 3 relations which also involve the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. We derive Kubo formulae for 2 of the transport coefficients and show these agree with that derived from the equilibrium partition function.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bhattacharyya, Sayantani; David, Justin R.; Thakur, Somyadip</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">227</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19810015994&hterms=network+politics&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dnetwork%2Bpolitics"> <span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of DSN software <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A categorized data base of software errors which were discovered during the various stages of development and operational use of the Deep Space Network DSN/Mark 3 System was developed. A study team identified several existing error classification schemes (taxonomies), prepared a detailed annotated bibliography of the error taxonomy literature, and produced a new classification scheme which was tuned to the DSN <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> reporting system and encapsulated the work of others. Based upon the DSN/RCI error taxonomy, error data on approximately 1000 reported DSN/Mark 3 <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were analyzed, interpreted and classified. Next, error data are summarized and histograms were produced highlighting key tendencies.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Galorath, D. D.; Hecht, H.; Hecht, M.; Reifer, D. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">228</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22842952"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comparison of the proportion of patients <span class="hlt">potentially</span> treated with an anti-osteoporotic drug using the current criteria of the Belgian national social security and the new <span class="hlt">suggested</span> FRAX criteria.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">To assess the number of anti-osteoporosis treatments that would be reimbursed by the Belgian social security if either FRAX or the current criteria were used to determine access to reimbursement. This is a retrospective study based on data from 1,000 women randomly selected from an outpatient hospital specialized in bone metabolism in Belgium. Proportions of <span class="hlt">potentially</span> refunded treatments between FRAX and current criteria were compared. Out of the 1,000 women files, 890 have sufficient information to assess FRAX. In Belgium, current criteria include a bone mineral density (BMD) T score below -2.5 at the lumbar spine, the femoral neck or the total hip and/or at least a prevalent vertebral fracture. Using these criteria, 167 women (18.8 %) would have access to reimbursement. Using the criteria based on the validated Belgian FRAX tool, only 116 women (13.0 %) would have access to reimbursement, meaning that access to reimbursement based on FRAX criteria would reduce by 30 % the anti-osteoporosis drug expenses covered by the national social security. Interestingly, only 65 women out of the 116 (56.0 %) selected with the FRAX criteria were also selected with the current criteria of the national social security. A substantial proportion of individuals that would <span class="hlt">potentially</span> receive a reimbursement for their treatment using the FRAX criteria do not have access to any refund for their treatment with the current criteria. Since patients identified with the FRAX tool are those with the highest risk profile for future fractures, reappraisals of treatment reimbursement guidelines are expected in Belgium. PMID:22842952</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bruyère, O; Fossi, M; Zegels, B; Leonori, L; Hiligsmann, M; Neuprez, A; Reginster, J-Y</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">229</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24458548"> <span id="translatedtitle">Scoliosis and vertebral <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: Additional abnormal phenotypes associated with chromosome 16p11.2 rearrangement.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The typical chromosome 16p11.2 rearrangements are estimated to occur at a frequency of approximately 0.6% of all samples tested clinically and have been identified as a major cause of autism spectrum disorders, developmental delay, behavioral abnormalities, and seizures. Careful examination of patients with these rearrangements revealed association with abnormal head size, obesity, dysmorphism, and congenital abnormalities. In this report, we extend this list of phenotypic abnormalities to include scoliosis and vertebral <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. We present detailed characterization of phenotypic and radiological data of 10 new patients, nine with the 16p11.2 deletion and one with the duplication within the coordinates chr16:29,366,195 and 30,306,956 (hg19) with a minimal size of 555?kb. We discuss the phenotypical and radiological findings in our patients and review 5 previously reported patients with 16p11.2 rearrangement and similar skeletal abnormalities. Our data <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that patients with the recurrent 16p11.2 rearrangement have increased incidence of scoliosis and vertebral <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. However, additional studies are required to confirm this observation and to establish the incidence of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. We discuss the <span class="hlt">potential</span> implications of our findings on the diagnosis, surveillance and genetic counseling of patients with 16p11.2 rearrangement. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24458548</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Al-Kateb, Hussam; Khanna, Geetika; Filges, Isabel; Hauser, Natalie; Grange, Dorothy K; Shen, Joseph; Smyser, Christopher D; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Shinawi, Marwan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">230</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=AA+AND+meetings&pg=2&id=ED140216"> <span id="translatedtitle">Practical <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for Remedial Teachers.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper presents a series of practical <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for remedial reading teachers, particularly those who are newly appointed or who have been assigned to a new school setting. The <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> are organized into five main sections: structuring the job, planning for efficient use of the remedial teacher's time, developing relationships with…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harris, Albert J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">231</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE85702711"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dispersive Derivation of Triangle <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A straightforward generalization of the results of some previous treatments, in which the Adler-Bell-Jachiw triangle <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> has been recovered with the help of dispersion relation is presented. The absorptive part of the VVA triangle diagram with the ext...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. Horejsi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">232</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013SPIE.8871E..0CC"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>-specified virtual dimensionality</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Virtual dimensionality (VD) has received considerable interest where VD is used to estimate the number of spectral distinct signatures, denoted by p. Unfortunately, no specific definition is provided by VD for what a spectrally distinct signature is. As a result, various types of spectral distinct signatures determine different values of VD. There is no one value-fit-all for VD. In order to address this issue this paper presents a new concept, referred to as <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-specified VD (AS-VD) which determines the number of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of interest present in the data. Specifically, two types of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection algorithms are of particular interest, sample covariance matrix K-based <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detector developed by Reed and Yu, referred to as K-RXD and sample correlation matrix R-based RXD, referred to as R-RXD. Since K-RXD is only determined by 2nd order statistics compared to R-RXD which is specified by statistics of the first two orders including sample mean as the first order statistics, the values determined by K-RXD and R-RXD will be different. Experiments are conducted in comparison with widely used eigen-based approaches.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chen, Shih-Yu; Paylor, Drew; Chang, Chein-I.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">233</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=N8319140"> <span id="translatedtitle">Satellite Elevation Magnetic <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Maps.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The problem of inverting 2 deg average MAGSAT scalar <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for the region 80 W, 60 E longitude and 40 S, 70 N latitude was attempted on the LARS computer; however, the effort was aborted due to insufficient allocation of CPU-time. This problem is curr...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">L. W. Braile W. J. Hinze</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">234</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=N7420982"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Global Magnetic <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> MAP.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A subset of POGO satellite magnetometer data has been formed that is suitable for analysis of crustal magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Using a thirteenth order field model, fit to these data, magnetic residuals have been calculated over the world to latitude limits of...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. D. Regan W. M. Davis J. C. Cain</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1974-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">235</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/1904998"> <span id="translatedtitle">Factor Analysis Based <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We propose a novel <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection algorithm based on factor analysis and Mahalanobis distance. Factor analysis is used to uncover the latent structure (dimensions) of a set of variables. It reduces attribute space from a larger number of variables to a smaller number of factors. The Mahalanobis distance is used to determine the \\</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ningning Wu; Jing Zhang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">236</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55198647"> <span id="translatedtitle">Astrometric Solar-System <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">There are four unexplained <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> connected with astrometric data. Perhaps the most disturbing is the fact that when a spacecraft on a flyby trajectory approaches the Earth within 2000 km or less, it experiences a gain in total orbital energy per unit mass (Anderson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 091102). This amounts to a net velocity increase of 13.5</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">John D. Anderson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">237</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/105651"> <span id="translatedtitle">Numerical <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> mimicking physical effects</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Numerical simulations of flows with shock waves typically use finite-difference shock-capturing algorithms. These algorithms give a shock a numerical width in order to generate the entropy increase that must occur across a shock wave. For algorithms in conservation form, steady-state shock waves are insensitive to the numerical dissipation because of the Hugoniot jump conditions. However, localized numerical errors occur when shock waves interact. Examples are the ``excess wall heating`` in the Noh problem (shock reflected from rigid wall), errors when a shock impacts a material interface or an abrupt change in mesh spacing, and the start-up error from initializing a shock as a discontinuity. This class of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> can be explained by the entropy generation that occurs in the transient flow when a shock profile is formed or changed. The entropy error is localized spatially but under mesh refinement does not decrease in magnitude. Similar effects have been observed in shock tube experiments with partly dispersed shock waves. In this case, the shock has a physical width due to a relaxation process. An entropy <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> from a transient shock interaction is inherent in the structure of the conservation equations for fluid flow. The <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> can be expected to occur whenever heat conduction can be neglected and a shock wave has a non-zero width, whether the width is physical or numerical. Thus, the numerical <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> from an artificial shock width mimics a real physical effect.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Menikoff, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">238</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=233766"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coral can have growth <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Coral growth <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (GAs) are changes in the coral cells that deposit the calcium carbonate skeleton. They usually appear as raised areas of the skeleton and tissue that are different from the surrounding normal areas on the same colony. The features include abnormal shape a...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">239</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/4344678"> <span id="translatedtitle">Monitoring smartphones for <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper we demonstrate how to monitor a smartphone running Symbian OS in order to extract features that de- scribe the state of the device and can be used for <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection. These features are sent to a remote server, be- cause running a complex intrusion detection system (IDS) on this kind of mobile device still is not feasible,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Aubrey-derrick Schmidt; Frank Peters; Florian Lamour; Sahin Albayrak</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">240</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.scientificexploration.org/journal/jse_02_2_richards.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Archaeological <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in the Bahamas</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Controversial claims have been made for the presence of anom- alous underwater archaeological sites in the Bahamas by a number of in- vestigators. The proponents emphasize extraordinary explanations for the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and tend to bypass the scientific journals in favor of popular presentations with little scientific rigor. The skeptics debunk selected claims for some of the sites, do not adequately</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">DOUGLAS G. RICHARDS</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">241</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EPJST.216..165F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Inversion of sequence of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in core-softened systems with attraction</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper we present a simulation study of water-like <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in a purely repulsive core-softened system and in a system with attraction described in our previous publications. We investigate the anomalous regions for systems with the same functional form of the <span class="hlt">potentials</span> but with different parameters and show that the order of the region of anomalous diffusion and the region of density <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is inverted with increasing the width of the repulsive shoulder and the depth of the attractive well. It is shown that while the density <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is always inside the region of the structural <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, the diffusion <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> can change its location depending on the parameters of the <span class="hlt">potential</span>. In the presence of the attraction in the <span class="hlt">potential</span>, the system demonstrates the silica-like behavior.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fomin, Yu. D.; Tsiok, E. N.; Ryzhov, V. N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">242</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24398260"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestion</span> overrides automatic audiovisual integration.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Cognitive scientists routinely distinguish between controlled and automatic mental processes. Through learning, practice, and exposure, controlled processes can become automatic; however, whether automatic processes can become deautomatized - recuperated under the purview of control - remains unclear. Here we show that a <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> derails a deeply ingrained process involving involuntary audiovisual integration. We compared the performance of highly versus less hypnotically <span class="hlt">suggestible</span> individuals (HSIs versus LSIs) in a classic McGurk paradigm - a perceptual illusion task demonstrating the influence of visual facial movements on auditory speech percepts. Following a posthypnotic <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> to prioritize auditory input, HSIs but not LSIs manifested fewer illusory auditory perceptions and correctly identified more auditory percepts. Our findings demonstrate that a <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> deautomatized a ballistic audiovisual process in HSIs. In addition to guiding our knowledge regarding theories and mechanisms of automaticity, the present findings pave the road to a more scientific understanding of top-down effects and multisensory integration. PMID:24398260</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Déry, Catherine; Campbell, Natasha K J; Lifshitz, Michael; Raz, Amir</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">243</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://learningcenter.nsta.org/product_detail.aspx?id=10.2505/4/ss09_032_09_38"> <span id="translatedtitle">Current Research: Summer Reading <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">To supplement your summer reading, NSTA's affiliates would like to <span class="hlt">suggest</span> some recent articles on education research. These articles cover a variety of topics that include diversity, technology, and science teacher retention. The abstracts of these impor</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">244</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.usgs.gov/circ/1968/0595/report.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Geochemical and geophysical <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the western part of the Sheep Creek Range, Lander County, Nevada</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Extensive geochemical <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are present along the west side of the Sheep Creek Range in Lander County, Nev. Anomalous concentrations of zinc, arsenic, mercury, silver, copper, lead, and to some extent gold, molybdenum, and antimony occur in iron-rich material along fracture planes and in quartz veins in Paleozoic formations. A magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> occurs over a pediment at the southern part of the range, close to one of the geochemical <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Gravity and electrical resistivity measurements <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is caused by an intrusive igneous mass rather than by a block of downfaulted basalt. A limited amount of shallow drilling would clarify the geochemical and geophysical data.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gott, Garland Bayard; Zablocki, Charles J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1968-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">245</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19970017188&hterms=balancer&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dbalancer"> <span id="translatedtitle">Polar Spin Axis <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Global Geospace Science (GGS) Polar Plasma Laboratory (POLAR) spacecraft was launched on February 24, 1996, by a Delta 2. The spacecraft, a major axis spinner, appeared to function nominally throughout the early mission phase, which included several deployments, and orbit and attitude maneuvers. Of particular interest is the fact that the spacecraft was launched with a deliberate dynamic imbalance. During a segment of early orbit operations, a pair of Lanyard Deployed Booms (LDB) were extended. These booms were not identical; the intent was that the spacecraft would be nearly dynamically balanced after they were deployed. The spacecraft contained two dynamic balance mechanisms intended to fine tune the balance on orbit. However, subsequent images taken by the science instruments on the Despun Platform during the dynamic balancing segment indicated an offset of the principal spin axis from the geometric axis. This offset produced a sinusoidal blurring of the science images sufficiently large to degrade science data below mission requirement specifications. In the end, the imbalance encountered in flight was significantly outside the correction capability of the balances. The purpose of this paper is to examine the flight data during the various deployment and maneuver stages of the early orbit operations coupled with analytical simulations to discuss some of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> causes of the resultant imbalance.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Crouse, Patrick L.; Flatley, Thomas W.; Morgenstern, Wendy M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">246</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1981GeoRL...8..441T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Correlation of groundwater radon <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with earthquakes in the Greater Palmdale Bulge Area</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent measurements in the Central Transverse Ranges of southern California <span class="hlt">suggest</span> possible correlations of changes in groundwater radon content with occurrences of nearby earthquakes. Since measurements began in 1974, three radon <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> have been accompanied by subsequent nearby seismic events. Two of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were associated with moderate-sized earthquakes and one with a swarm. Within a 60-day window prior to the seismicity, groundwater radon increased in each case at sites close to the earthquake epicenters. Before the Big Bear earthquake of June 30, 1979 (M=4.8), radon <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were found at three nearby monitoring sites. Groundwater radon content at one site near the January 1, 1979 Malibu earthquake (M=5.0) showed negative as well as positive <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> both prior to and following the earthquake. A radon <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> occurred at a nearby spring prior to the fall 1976 Palmdale swarm. The observed pattern is similar to pre-earthquake <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> reported from Russia, China and Japan.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Teng, Ta-liang; Sun, Liang-fang; McRaney, John K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">247</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/27789492"> <span id="translatedtitle">Zero-point energies and the multiplicative <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">For the case of a relativistic scalar field at finite temperature with a chemical <span class="hlt">potential</span>, we calculate an exact expression for the one-loop effective action using the full fourth order determinant and zeta-function regularisation. We find that it agrees with the exact expression for the factored operator and thus there appears to be no mulitplicative <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The appearance of the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. J. McKenzie-Smith; D. J. Toms</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">248</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21293372"> <span id="translatedtitle">Field Theory Model of the Flyby <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Precision tracking of spacecraft on interplanetary missions has turned up several anomalous deviations from predictions of general relativity. The Flyby <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>, wherein spacecraft gain or lose energy in an earth-centric frame after an encounter with earth, is clearly associated with the rotation of the earth. The possibility that the missing ingredient is a new type of <span class="hlt">potential</span> field surrounding the earth is assessed in this write-up. A scalar field with the kinetic energy distribution of the earth as a source is evaluated numerically, with an amplitude parameter adjusted to match the data of Anderson et al.(2008). The new field can be interpreted as a coupling between kinetic energies of objects, a field analogous to fluid mechanics, or a field coupled to acceleration. The <span class="hlt">potential</span> field violates various aspects of standard physics, such as energy non-conservation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lewis, R. A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-03-16</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">249</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42030664"> <span id="translatedtitle">Correlation of groundwater radon <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with earthquakes in the greater Palmdale bulge area</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent measurements in the Central Transverse Ranges of southern California <span class="hlt">suggest</span> possible correlations of changes in groundwater radon content with occurences of nearby earthquakes. Since measurements began in 1974, three radon <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> have been accompanied by subsequent nearby seismic events. Two of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were associated with moderate-sized earthquakes and one with a swarm. Within a 60-day window prior to</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ta-liang Teng; Liang-fang Sun; John K. McRaney</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">250</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011GeoJI.187...85S"> <span id="translatedtitle">The North German Conductivity <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> revisited</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The North German Conductivity <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> was detected already in the early years of electromagnetic deep sounding. It refers to the reversal of induction arrows (as a graphical representation of the tipper transfer function, the ratio of vertical to horizontal magnetic field variations) at the northern and southern margins of the North German Basin. In spite of the many experiments carried out so far, its origin has remained ambiguous; explanations encompass a deep-crustal or even mantle source as well as the simple response to deepening of sedimentary sequences in the centre of the basin. Here, we report on modelling of new long-period magnetotelluric data collected along two profiles in NE Germany and S Sweden, with one transect crossing the Sorgenfrei-Tornquist Zone as the main boundary between Precambrian Baltica and the Palaeozoic belts of central Europe. With the exception of a few sites probably influenced by 3-D salt domes, the data allow a 2-D analysis. Resolution is reduced for large depths due to a well-conducting, saline aquifer, extending across the entire basin. The main result is that the reversal of induction arrows can largely be explained by the resistivity contrast between crystalline basement and sedimentary basin fill. Beneath Rügen island, a southward dipping conductor is interpreted to reflect an alum shale layer in Middle Cambrian-Lower Ordovician sediments. Beneath the southern basin, a moderately conductive upper mantle is modelled (although not very well resolved) which may reflect the thinning of the lithosphere as implied by seismic tomography. As the main anomalously inductive effect is primarily explained by the basin edges and numerous other <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> exist inside the basin, we <span class="hlt">suggest</span> not using the term 'North German Conductivity <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>' any longer.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schäfer, A.; Houpt, L.; Brasse, H.; Hoffmann, N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">251</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/10459181"> <span id="translatedtitle">Congenital urological <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> diagnosed in adulthood – Management considerations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">ObjectiveDespite worldwide availability of prenatal ultrasound, many patients are diagnosed in adult life with congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> such as ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO), undescended testicle (UDT), ureterocele, hypospadias, vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) and primary obstructing megaureter (POM). The aim of this review was to describe these clinical conditions and their <span class="hlt">suggested</span> management based on the available medical literature.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sarel Halachmi; Giora Pillar</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">252</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2005103001"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ferret Workflow <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection System, Final Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Ferret workflow <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection system project (203-2044) has provided validation and <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection in accredited workflows in secure knowledge management systems through the use of continuous automated audits. A workflow, process, or procedure ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. J. Smith S. Bryant</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">253</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA570889"> <span id="translatedtitle">Semiparametric Model for Hyperspectral <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using hyperspectral (HS) technology, this paper introduces an autonomous scene <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection approach based on the asymptotic behavior of a semiparametric model under a multisample testing and minimum-order statistic scheme. Scene <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection ha...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. Rosario</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">254</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23515395"> <span id="translatedtitle">Neural mechanisms of rapid sensitivity to syntactic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent psycholinguistic models hypothesize that anticipatory processing can speed the response to linguistic input during language comprehension by pre-activating representations necessary for word recognition. We investigated the neurocognitive mechanisms of anticipatory processing by recording event-related <span class="hlt">potentials</span> (ERPs) to syntactically anomalous (The thief was caught by for police) and well-formed (e.g., The thief was caught by the police) sentences. One group of participants saw <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> elicited by the same word in every instance (e.g., for; low-variability stimuli), providing high affordances for predictions about the word-form appearing in the critical position. A second group saw <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> elicited by seven different prepositions (at, of, on, for, from, over, with; high-variability stimuli) across the study, creating a more difficult prediction task. Syntactic category <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> enhanced the occipital-temporal N170 component of the ERP, indicating rapid sensitivity - within 200?ms of word-onset - to syntactic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. For low-variability but not the high-variability stimuli, syntactic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> also enhanced the earlier occipital-temporal P1 component, around 130?ms after word-onset, indicating that affordances for prediction engendered earlier sensitivity to syntactic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Independent components analysis revealed three sources within the ERP signal whose functional dynamics were consistent with predictive processing and early responses to syntactic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Distributed neural source modeling (sLORETA) of these early active sources produced a candidate network for early responses to words during reading in the right posterior occipital, left occipital-temporal, and medial parietal cortex. PMID:23515395</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kim, Albert E; Gilley, Phillip M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">255</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3600774"> <span id="translatedtitle">Neural Mechanisms of Rapid Sensitivity to Syntactic <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent psycholinguistic models hypothesize that anticipatory processing can speed the response to linguistic input during language comprehension by pre-activating representations necessary for word recognition. We investigated the neurocognitive mechanisms of anticipatory processing by recording event-related <span class="hlt">potentials</span> (ERPs) to syntactically anomalous (The thief was caught by for police) and well-formed (e.g., The thief was caught by the police) sentences. One group of participants saw <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> elicited by the same word in every instance (e.g., for; low-variability stimuli), providing high affordances for predictions about the word-form appearing in the critical position. A second group saw <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> elicited by seven different prepositions (at, of, on, for, from, over, with; high-variability stimuli) across the study, creating a more difficult prediction task. Syntactic category <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> enhanced the occipital-temporal N170 component of the ERP, indicating rapid sensitivity – within 200?ms of word-onset – to syntactic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. For low-variability but not the high-variability stimuli, syntactic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> also enhanced the earlier occipital-temporal P1 component, around 130?ms after word-onset, indicating that affordances for prediction engendered earlier sensitivity to syntactic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Independent components analysis revealed three sources within the ERP signal whose functional dynamics were consistent with predictive processing and early responses to syntactic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Distributed neural source modeling (sLORETA) of these early active sources produced a candidate network for early responses to words during reading in the right posterior occipital, left occipital-temporal, and medial parietal cortex.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kim, Albert E.; Gilley, Phillip M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">256</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24751751"> <span id="translatedtitle">Eustachian tube duplication: a unique <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Very few eustachian tube <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> have been published in the literature and have consisted of descriptions of diverticula, hypoplasia/aplasia, fistula, or aberrant associated musculature. We present a girl with a novel <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> consisting of a eustachian tube duplication that originates in the nasopharynx and exits posterior to a microtic and atretic ear. We review the literature on eustachian tube <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and also consider the derivation of this <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. PMID:24751751</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hoesli, Rebecca Chow; Johnson, Jason; Meyer, Anna; Green, Glenn</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">257</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900025644&hterms=bouguer+anomaly+gravity&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dbouguer%2Banomaly%2Bgravity"> <span id="translatedtitle">Constraints on the deep structure and dynamic processes beneath the Alps and adjacent regions from an analysis of gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over the Alps and the Molasse Basin are examined, focusing on the relationship between the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the tectonic processes beneath the region. Bouguer gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> measured in France, Germany, Italy, and Switzerland are analyzed. No large isostatic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are observed over the Alps and an elastic model is unable to account for gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over the Molasse Basin. These results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the dynamic processes that flexed the European plate down, forming the Molasse Basin and building the Alpine chain, have waned. It is proposed that the late Cenozoic uplift of the region may be due to a diminution or termination of downwelling of mantle material.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lyon-Caen, Helene; Molnar, Peter</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">258</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=cyberbullying&pg=6&id=EJ868107"> <span id="translatedtitle">Prevent Cyberbullying: <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for Parents</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The school, playground, and neighborhood often come to mind when one thinks about bullying that occurs among children and teens. However, given the significant role technology plays in the lives of today's youth, the <span class="hlt">potential</span> of these media to function as a venue for social interaction that includes victimization, or cyberbullying, also needs to…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Demaray, Michelle K.; Brown, Christina F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">259</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.S52A..08J"> <span id="translatedtitle">Geophysical <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> and Earthquake Prediction</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Finding <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is easy. Predicting earthquakes convincingly from such <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is far from easy. Why? Why have so many beautiful geophysical abnormalities not led to successful prediction strategies? What is earthquake prediction? By my definition it is convincing information that an earthquake of specified size is temporarily much more likely than usual in a specific region for a specified time interval. We know a lot about normal earthquake behavior, including locations where earthquake rates are higher than elsewhere, with estimable rates and size distributions. We know that earthquakes have power law size distributions over large areas, that they cluster in time and space, and that aftershocks follow with power-law dependence on time. These relationships justify prudent protective measures and scientific investigation. Earthquake prediction would justify exceptional temporary measures well beyond those normal prudent actions. Convincing earthquake prediction would result from methods that have demonstrated many successes with few false alarms. Predicting earthquakes convincingly is difficult for several profound reasons. First, earthquakes start in tiny volumes at inaccessible depth. The power law size dependence means that tiny unobservable ones are frequent almost everywhere and occasionally grow to larger size. Thus prediction of important earthquakes is not about nucleation, but about identifying the conditions for growth. Second, earthquakes are complex. They derive their energy from stress, which is perniciously hard to estimate or model because it is nearly singular at the margins of cracks and faults. Physical properties vary from place to place, so the preparatory processes certainly vary as well. Thus establishing the needed track record for validation is very difficult, especially for large events with immense interval times in any one location. Third, the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are generally complex as well. Electromagnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in particular require some understanding of their sources and the physical properties of the crust, which also vary from place to place and time to time. <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> are not necessarily due to stress or earthquake preparation, and separating the extraneous ones is a problem as daunting as understanding earthquake behavior itself. Fourth, the associations presented between <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and earthquakes are generally based on selected data. Validating a proposed association requires complete data on the earthquake record and the geophysical measurements over a large area and time, followed by prospective testing which allows no adjustment of parameters, criteria, etc. The Collaboratory for Study of Earthquake Predictability (CSEP) is dedicated to providing such prospective testing. Any serious proposal for prediction research should deal with the problems above, and anticipate the huge investment in time required to test hypotheses.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jackson, D. D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">260</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=salton&pg=3&id=EJ203536"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for Library Network Design.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Various approaches to the design of automatic library systems are described, <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for the design of rational and effective automated library processes are posed, and an attempt is made to assess the importance and effect of library network systems on library operations and library effectiveness. (Author/CWM)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Salton, Gerald</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1979-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return 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<a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">261</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=humor+AND+styles&pg=2&id=EJ891901"> <span id="translatedtitle">10 <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for Enhancing Lecturing</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Criticism of the lecture method remains a staple of discussion and writing in academia--and most of the time it's deserved! Those interested in improving this aspect of their teaching might wish to consider some or all of the following <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for enhancing lectures. These include: (1) Lectures must start with a "grabber"; (2) Lectures must be…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Heitzmann, Ray</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">262</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=AD643591"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous and <span class="hlt">Suggested</span> Posthypnotic Amnesia.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The investigation was carried out to obtain comparable figures on the prevalence of spontaneous and <span class="hlt">suggested</span> posthypnotic amnesia. Ninety-one introductory psychology students were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups, and were required to serve as Ss for t...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">E. R. Hilgard L. M. Cooper</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1965-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">263</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/4243008"> <span id="translatedtitle">Query <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> using hitting time</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Generating alternative queries, also known as query sugges- tion, has long been proved useful to help a user explore and express his information need. In many scenarios, such sug- gestions can be generated from a large scale graph of queries and other accessory information, such as the clickthrough. However, how to generate <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> while ensuring their semantic consistency with the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Qiaozhu Mei; Dengyong Zhou; Kenneth Ward Church</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">264</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20100036651&hterms=MIRT&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DMIRT"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Resolution in the International Space Station</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Topics include post flight 2A status, groundrules, <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> resolution, Early Communications Subsystem <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and resolution, Logistics and Maintenance plan, case for obscuration, case for electrical short, and manual fault isolation, and post mission analysis. Photographs from flight 2A.1 are used to illustrate <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Evans, William A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">265</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=AD777090"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bouger Gravity <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Map of South America.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Bouguer <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Map of South America is a contoured representation of one degree x one degree mean Bouguer gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> values. Some of these mean <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> values are computed directly using observed gravity data held by the DOD Gravity Library. Oth...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. W. Beierle G. L. Breville J. R. Sanders J. T. Voss L. E. Wilcox</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1973-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">266</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55444805"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lunar Bouguer gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> - Imbrian age craters</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Bouguer gravity of mass <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with four Imbrian age craters, analyzed in the present paper, are found to differ considerably from the values of the mass <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with some young lunar craters. Of the Imbrian age craters, only Piccolomini exhibits a negative gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (i.e., a low density region) which is characteristic of the young craters studied.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. Dvorak; R. J. Phillips</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1978-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">267</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52210824"> <span id="translatedtitle">Local gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> produced by dislocation sources</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Rundle (1979) and Walsh and Rice (1979) have shown that the change in the vertical component of gravity is proportional to uplift for a spherical source of dilation and for slip on an infinitely long dip-slip fault. In the first case, no free air gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is produced and in the second case no Bouguer gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> due</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. C. Savage</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">268</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3758712"> <span id="translatedtitle">Limb Body Wall Complex: A Rare <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present autopsy findings of a case of limb body wall complex (LBWC). The fetus had encephalocele, genitourinary agenesis, skeletal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and body wall defects. The rare finding in our case is the occurrence of both cranial and urogenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The presence of complex <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in this fetus, supports embryonal dysplasia theory of pathogenesis for LBWC.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chikkannaiah, Panduranga; Dhumale, Hema; Kangle, Ranjit; Shekar, Rosini</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">269</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24014975"> <span id="translatedtitle">Limb body wall complex: a rare <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present autopsy findings of a case of limb body wall complex (LBWC). The fetus had encephalocele, genitourinary agenesis, skeletal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and body wall defects. The rare finding in our case is the occurrence of both cranial and urogenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The presence of complex <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in this fetus, supports embryonal dysplasia theory of pathogenesis for LBWC. PMID:24014975</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chikkannaiah, Panduranga; Dhumale, Hema; Kangle, Ranjit; Shekar, Rosini</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">270</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.atmos.ucla.edu/~csi/REF/pdfs/troprec.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Scatter in Tropical Average Precipitation <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Tropical mean precipitation <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> ^P9& for 3-month averages appear quite scattered in relation to tropical average sea surface temperature (SST) <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> ^& , based on examination of a number of observational T9 s datasets and of atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) results. Even though SST is locally important for determining precipitation, for a given warm SST <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, the tropical average</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">HUI S UA; NDJ. DAVID NEELIN</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">271</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/30539983"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spectrum of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Fanconi anaemia</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The frequency of various <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> was compared in probands with Fanconi anaemia and their affected sibs. As probands are usually ascertained because of a 'characteristic' array of physical <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, the frequencies of these specific <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may be overestimated in probands, whereas their affected sibs may provide a more accurate estimate. The frequencies of growth retardation, skin hyperpigmentation, radial ray deformities,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A Glanz; F C Fraser</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">272</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24765765"> <span id="translatedtitle">Developmental venous <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>: MR and angiographic features.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Developmental venous <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (DVA) is probably the most common <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of the intracranial vasculature. DVAs consist of multiple, radially oriented dilated medullary veins that converge into a transcerebral vein. We describe the imaging findings of this vascular <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in different patients and the role of different imaging modalities. PMID:24765765</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Faure, M; Voormolen, M; Van der Zijden, T; Parizel, P M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">273</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/1238162"> <span id="translatedtitle">Diagnosing network-wide traffic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> are unusual and significant changes in a network's traffic levels, which can often span multiple links. Diagnosing <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is critical for both network operators and end users. It is a difficult problem because one must extract and interpret anomalous patterns from large amounts of high-dimensional, noisy data.In this paper we propose a general method to diagnose <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. This method</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Anukool Lakhina; Mark Crovella; Christophe Diot</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">274</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/50493"> <span id="translatedtitle">A signal analysis of network traffic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Identifying <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> rapidly and accurately is critical to the efficient operation of large computer networks. Accurately characterizing important classes of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> greatly facilitates their identification; however, the subtleties and complexities of anomalous traffic can easily confound this process. In this paper we report results of signal analysis of four classes of network traffic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: outages, flash crowds, attacks and measurement</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paul Barford; Jeffery Kline; David Plonka; Amos Ron</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">275</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19950017263&hterms=information+overload&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Dinformation%2Boverload"> <span id="translatedtitle">Attention focusing and <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection in systems monitoring</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Any attempt to introduce automation into the monitoring of complex physical systems must start from a robust <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection capability. This task is far from straightforward, for a single definition of what constitutes an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is difficult to come by. In addition, to make the monitoring process efficient, and to avoid the <span class="hlt">potential</span> for information overload on human operators, attention focusing must also be addressed. When an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> occurs, more often than not several sensors are affected, and the partially redundant information they provide can be confusing, particularly in a crisis situation where a response is needed quickly. The focus of this paper is a new technique for attention focusing. The technique involves reasoning about the distance between two frequency distributions, and is used to detect both anomalous system parameters and 'broken' causal dependencies. These two forms of information together isolate the locus of anomalous behavior in the system being monitored.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Doyle, Richard J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">276</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/445629"> <span id="translatedtitle">Correlation of cerium <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with indicators of paleoenvironment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Among 21 whole-rock samples of the Upper Cretaceous Niobrara Formation from Colorado, the abundance of cerium relative to other rate earth elements (Ce <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>), the weight percent organic carbon (%C{sub org}), and the intensity of bioturbation all covary. This covariation is provocative because %C{sub org} and intensity of bioturbation track changes in the concentration of oxygen in the local water column at the time of deposition (Savrda and Bottjer 1989). Ce <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in apatite-rich fractions of the Maastrichtian Zumaya-Algorta Formation from France and Spain and the Miocene Monterey Formation from California show changes that also may coincide with changes in ancient oxygen levels. Results for the Niobrara samples are the closest correspondence demonstrated between paleo-redox conditions and Ce <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, but the authors cannot yet determine whether the correspondence reflects a cause-and-effect relationship. Variation in Ce <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is influenced by a number of factors, including terrigenous input, depositional environment, and diagenetic conditions. <span class="hlt">Potential</span> interplay of these factors prevents a unique interpretation of the whole-rock data; dissecting whole-rock Ce <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> through analysis of isolated sedimentary components, though, is a promising avenue of research.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">MacLeod, K.G. [Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC (United States). Dept. of Paleobiology; Irving, A.J. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">277</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5026785"> <span id="translatedtitle">Iridium <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> approximately synchronous with terminal eocene extinctions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An iridium <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> has been found in coincidence with the known microtektite level in cores from Deep Sea Drilling Project site 149 in the Caribbean Sea. The iridium was probably not in the microtektites but deposited simultaneously with them; this could occur if the iridium was deposited from a dust cloud resulting from a bolide impact, as <span class="hlt">suggested</span> for the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> associated with the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary. Other workers have deduced that the microtektites are part of the North American strewn tektite field, which is dated at about 34 million years before present, and that the microtektite horizon in deep-sea cores is synchronous with the extinction of five radiolarian species. Mass extinctions also occur in terrestrial mammals within 4 million years of this time. The iridium <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and the tektites and microtektites are supportive of a major bolide impact about 34 million years ago.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alvarez, W. (Univ. of California, Berkeley); Asaro, F.; Michel, H.V.; Alvarez, L.W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-05-21</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">278</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19790039448&hterms=Samarium&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DSamarium"> <span id="translatedtitle">On isotopic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in samarium. [in Allende meteorite</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The solar isotopic composition of Sm is decomposed into s, r, and p components. The <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> pattern discovered by Lugmair et al. (1978) in EK1-04 Allende inclusion can be presented as a fractionation of the average s-pattern from the average r-pattern. This representation requires a fractionation of 0.029%/(amu) and either (1) a 0.42% deficiency of s relative to r and a 0.15% deficiency of p relative to r, or (2) a 0.42% excess of r relative to s and a 0.27% excess of p relative to s. The nature of this <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a systematic physical fractionation of r, s, and p nuclei from each other in the initial condition leading to EK1-04. A neighboring supernova injection would not be expected to produce this <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Clayton, D. D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1979-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">279</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19770049816&hterms=Anomalies+sun&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DAnomalies%2Bnear%2Bsun"> <span id="translatedtitle">Isotopic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and proton irradiation in the early solar system</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Nuclear cross sections relevant to the various isotopic-abundance <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> found in solar-system objects are evaluated in an attempt to set constraints on the hypothesized mechanism of irradiation of forming planetesimals by energetic protons from the young sun. A power-law proton spectrum is adopted, attention is restricted to proton energies less than about 20 MeV, and average cross sections are calculated for several reactions that might be expected to lead to the observed <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The following specific <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are examined in detail: Al-26, Na-22, Xe-126, I-129, Kr-80, V-50, Nb-92, La-138, Ta-180, Hg-196, K-40, Ar-36, O-17, O-18, N-15, C-13, Li, Be, and B. It is <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that the picture of presolar-grain carriers accounts for the facts more naturally than do irradiation models.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Clayton, D. D.; Dwek, E.; Woosley, S. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1977-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">280</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007ApOpt..46.7275B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lidar detection algorithm for time and range <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new detection algorithm for lidar applications has been developed. The detection is based on hyperspectral <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection that is implemented for time <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> where the question "is a target (aerosol cloud) present at range R within time t1 to t2" is addressed, and for range <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> where the question "is a target present at time t within ranges R1 and R2" is addressed. A detection score significantly different in magnitude from the detection scores for background measurements <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (interpreted as the presence of a target signal in space/time) exists. The algorithm employs an option for a preprocessing stage where undesired oscillations and artifacts are filtered out with a low-rank orthogonal projection technique. The filtering technique adaptively removes the one over range-squared dependence of the background contribution of the lidar signal and also aids visualization of features in the data when the signal-to-noise ratio is low. A Gaussian-mixture probability model for two hypotheses (<span class="hlt">anomaly</span> present or absent) is computed with an expectation-maximization algorithm to produce a detection threshold and probabilities of detection and false alarm. Results of the algorithm for CO2 lidar measurements of bioaerosol clouds Bacillus atrophaeus (formerly known as Bacillus subtilis niger, BG) and Pantoea agglomerans, Pa (formerly known as Erwinia herbicola, Eh) are shown and discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ben-David, Avishai; Davidson, Charles E.; Vanderbeek, Richard G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" 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showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">281</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013IJEaS.102..591O"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the Eastern Caribbean</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Despite the many different studies on the origin and evolution of the Caribbean Plate, no proposal has been widely accepted so far. A key element within this field of research is the characterization of the plate subsurface oceanic crust, as it would clarify the conditions in which it originated, the geological period when it formed and its possible geographical location at this first evolution stage. Based on partial results of this research work, we can say that the conclusions of previous studies are valid to a great extent, namely the NE-SW orientation of the striped magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the Venezuelan Basin's western section and the existence of W-E preferentially oriented stripes parallel to the Leeward Antilles. The magnetic response of the triangular section in the southeast of the Venezuelan Basin represents cretaceous magnetic quiet zone (CMQZ) and therefore shows a considerable attenuation of the stripe pattern, indicating that the whole East Caribbean subsurface features oceanic crustal material. As for the period recorded by the Caribbean magnetic stripes, we propose the interval between chrons M23 and M0, and part of CMQZ. The wavelengths of the identified <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the ridge associated with the formation of Caribbean ocean floor was slow-spreading when compared to average currently active ridges.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Orihuela Guevara, Nuris; García, Andreína; Arnaiz, Mariano</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">282</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011EOSTr..92Q.256S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Seasonal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the Canary Current</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Along the northwestern coast of Africa lies an important fishery, stimulated by an upwelling of cold, nutrient-rich, deep-ocean water. Driven by a complex convergence of ocean currents, the waters between the coast, the Portuguese island of Madeira, and the Canary Islands are known to vary dramatically throughout the year, seeing coastal current reversals near the shore and the location of the large-scale Canary Current drifting seasonally, moving offshore in the winter before returning toward the coast in the summer. To sort out the trigger for this seasonal drift, Mason et al. produced a high-resolution model of the Canary Current that captures details of its interaction with the coastal region where the deep water upwelling occurs. The authors found a pair of circular seasonal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that they <span class="hlt">suggest</span> control the strength and location of the Canary Current. The first, formed in late autumn, is a persistent, clockwise-spinning region of elevated sea surface height and increased flow rates. Its counterpart, a counterclockwise-rotating sea surface depression, is formed in the spring. Both <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> spawn near the African coast and meander westward at around 2.6 kilometers per day, pushing their way out of the region over the course of a year. (Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans, doi:10.1029/2010JC006665, 2011)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schultz, Colin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">283</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFMSA22A..08A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Antarctic Mesospheric Temperature <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> in 2007 (Invited)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper we present mesospheric temperatures at high Southern latitudes during the 2006-2008 period, showing anomalously high temperatures during the 2007 Austral winter coincident with increased planetary wave activity in the stratosphere. OH rotational temperatures observed in Antarctica from South Pole and Davis Stations and mesospheric temperatures measured from the NASA Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite have been used here to highlight unusually high temperatures during the 2007 Austral winter. OH temperatures have been shown to be influenced by the F10.7 solar flux. Over the 2006-2008 period, the solar flux was in its declining phase and therefore one would expect MLT temperatures to be lower in the consecutive years as the solar flux declines. However, both the airglow and satellite measurements show 2007 temperatures to be aberrantly higher than the average wintertime temperatures from 2006 and 2008. These temperature enhancements are not limited to the middle atmosphere as the NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis data also reveals the 2007 temperature <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> at stratospheric heights. Analyses of NCEP and Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System - Advanced Level Physics High-Altitude (NOGAPS-ALPHA) data show that the 2007 temperature <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> occurred during periods of large planetary wave activity. NOGAPS-ALPHA Eliassen-Palm (EP) cross sections show a correlation between temperature enhancements and flux divergence which <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that adiabatic warming might be responsible for the elevated temperatures presented in this paper.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Azeem, S. I.; French, W. J.; Siskind, D. E.; Talaat, E. R.; Sivjee, G. G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">284</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009SPIE.7334E..57D"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> clustering in hyperspectral images</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The topological <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection algorithm (TAD) differs from other <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection algorithms in that it uses a topological/graph-theoretic model for the image background instead of modeling the image with a Gaussian normal distribution. In the construction of the model, TAD produces a hard threshold separating anomalous pixels from background in the image. We build on this feature of TAD by extending the algorithm so that it gives a measure of the number of anomalous objects, rather than the number of anomalous pixels, in a hyperspectral image. This is done by identifying, and integrating, clusters of anomalous pixels via a graph theoretical method combining spatial and spectral information. The method is applied to a cluttered HyMap image and combines small groups of pixels containing like materials, such as those corresponding to rooftops and cars, into individual clusters. This improves visualization and interpretation of objects.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Doster, Timothy J.; Ross, David S.; Messinger, David W.; Basener, William F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">285</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/979362"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> and Discrete Chiral Symmetries</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The quantum <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> that breaks the U(1) axial symmetry of massless multi-flavored QCD leaves behind a discrete flavor-singlet chiral invariance. With massive quarks, this residual symmetry has a close connection with the strong CP-violating parameter theta. One result is that if the lightest quarks are degenerate, then a first order transition will occur when theta passes through pi. The resulting framework helps clarify when the rooting prescription for extrapolating in the number of flavors is valid.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Creutz, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-09-07</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">286</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3737673"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cloacal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> with bladder tumor</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A rare case of squamous cell carcinoma of bladder occurring in a 36-year-old female with persistent cloacal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> who presented with frequency, urgency, dysuria, and recurrent urinary tract infection is reported. Contrast Enhanced Computed Tomography with three dimensional reconstruction showed presence of bladder tumor and persistent cloaca. She underwent pelvic exenteration and wet colostomy. Histopathologic findings revealed locally advanced moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Seth, Amlesh; Ram, Ishwar</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">287</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/31973772"> <span id="translatedtitle">Surgical treatment of cloacal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">From 1989–1998 14 patients were treated with cloacal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: 5 typical cloacas (PC), 5 posterior cloacas, and 4 cloacal\\u000a exstrophies (CE); 12 underwent surgery. Four typical cloacas were resolved with posterior sagittal anorectovagino-urethroplasty\\u000a (PSARVUP), whereas in the 5th total urogenital mobilization (TUM) was used. Three PCs were managed with transanorectal TUM\\u000a and 2 with anterior TUM without opening the anal</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Z. D. Krstic; M. Lukac; R. Lukac; Z. Smoljanic; V. Vukadinovic; D. Varinac</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">288</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/6081983"> <span id="translatedtitle">Monitoring Smartphones for <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper we demonstrate how to monitor a smartphone running Symbian operating system and Windows Mobile in order to extract\\u000a features for <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection. These features are sent to a remote server because running a complex intrusion detection system\\u000a on this kind of mobile device still is not feasible due to capability and hardware limitations. We give examples on</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Aubrey-derrick Schmidt; Frank Peters; Florian Lamour; Christian Scheel; Seyit Ahmet Çamtepe; Sahin Albayrak</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">289</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.T23G2679K"> <span id="translatedtitle">The early break-up phase of the South Atlantic - magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, volcanism and kinematics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The South Atlantic has been generally recognized as a prime example for continental break-up with accompanying volcanic activity reflected today in massive seaward dipping reflector sequences (SDRS) in reflection as well as high velocity lower crust in refraction seismic data. The early history of the South Atlantic passive margin evolution is investigated in the view of interlaced magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> related to seafloor spreading lineations and <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> caused by seaward-dipping reflector sequences (SDRS). As the Atlantic opened from South to North, the magma-poor segments of the southernmost South Atlantic are also the oldest segments of the Ocean. Therefore, the magma-poor segments on the conjugated margins must be considered crucial in the understanding of the initial phase of spreading and rifting concluding in the opening of the South Atlantic. The interpretation of pre-M5n lineations define timing of the termination of excess breakup related volcanic activity and the transition to 'normal' seafloor spreading. Termination of magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> within SDR wedges point towards a scissor-like succession in volcanic activity from south to north, following the opening of the South Atlantic. Reflection, refraction seismic and <span class="hlt">potential</span> field data show that while the two conjugated margins share much of their structural features such as segmentation and abundant volcanism, they are by no means perfectly symmetrical. This is for example shown in shelf width, strength of the magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> or orientation of break-up related sedimentary basins. From our data, we <span class="hlt">suggest</span> changes in spreading and later rifting direction to be the cause of for these asymmetries. This directional change is also <span class="hlt">suggested</span> to be responsible for the change in margin character from magma-poor to volcanic rather than solely a spontaneous change in crustal melt-generation. New models for the magnetic response of SDRS reveal a high variability within the wedges on either side of the Atlantic and between the conjugated margins. Former identifications of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> M11r off Cape Town have already been questioned and can now be shown to be caused by structural or magnetization variations within SDRS.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Koopmann, H.; Schreckenberger, B.; Franke, D.; Becker, K.; Schnabel, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">290</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23065173"> <span id="translatedtitle">Imaging of müllerian duct <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The müllerian ducts are paired embryologic structures that undergo fusion and resorption in utero to give rise to the uterus, fallopian tubes, cervix, and upper two-thirds of the vagina. Interruption of normal development of the müllerian ducts can result in formation of müllerian duct <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (MDAs). MDAs are a broad and complex spectrum of abnormalities that are often associated with primary amenorrhea, infertility, obstetric complications, and endometriosis. MDAs are commonly associated with renal and other <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>; thus, identification of both kidneys is important. However, MDAs are not associated with ovarian <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Hysterosalpingography (HSG) is routinely used in evaluation of infertility. Because a key component of MDA characterization is the external uterine fundal contour, HSG is limited for this purpose. Patients suspected of having an MDA are often initially referred for pelvic ultrasonography (US). Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is typically reserved for complex or indeterminate cases. MR imaging is the imaging standard of reference because it is noninvasive, does not involve ionizing radiation, has multiplanar capability, allows excellent soft-tissue characterization, and permits a greater field of interrogation than does US. Use of MR imaging for evaluation of MDAs reduces the number of invasive procedures and related costs by guiding management decisions. PMID:23065173</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Behr, Spencer C; Courtier, Jesse L; Qayyum, Aliya</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">291</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20110011710&hterms=hhh&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dhhh"> <span id="translatedtitle">Columbus Payloads Flow Rate <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Columbus Active Thermal Control System (ATCS) is the main thermal bus for the pressurized racks working inside the European laboratory. One of the ATCS goals is to provide proper water flow rate to each payload (P/L) by controlling actively the pressure drop across the common plenum distribution piping. Overall flow measurement performed by the Water Pump Assembly (WPA) is the only flow rate monitor available at system level and is not part of the feedback control system. At rack activation the flow rate provided by the system is derived on ground by computing the WPA flow increase. With this approach, several <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were raised during these 3 years on-orbit, with the indication of low flow rate conditions on the European racks FSL, BioLab, EDR and EPM. This paper reviews the system and P/Ls calibration approach, the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> occurred, the engineering evaluation on the measurement approach and the accuracy improvements proposed, the on-orbit test under evaluation with NASA and finally discusses possible short and long term solutions in case of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> confirmation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Quaranta, Albino; Bufano, Gaetana; DePalo, Savino; Holt, James M.; Szigetvari, Zoltan; Palumberi, Sergio; Hinderer, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">292</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..11.4082A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Edge detection of magnetic body using horizontal gradient of pseudogravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> field methods are used extensively in mineral exploration. These methods also are used as reconnaissance method in oil and gas exploration. In Contrast with gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> the magnetic surveying produces dipolar <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> which is caused complicated interpretation rather than gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The observation magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in each location other than magnetic poles has displacement rather than causative body. Several methods are used to overcome to this problem such as reduction to the pole (RTP) that an asymmetric <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is converted to symmetrical <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Boundary analysis is another method to distinguish causative magnetic body from observed magnetic data directly. One of the applicable methods in boundary detection of local scale magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is total gradient of pseudogravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. In this method, pseudogravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is calculated in the first step. Pseudogravity converts the magnetic field into gravity field that would be observed if the magnetization distribution were to be replaced with an identical density distribution. This filter is a linear filter that is created in the frequency domain. Poisson's relationship between magnetic and gravity <span class="hlt">potential</span> can be used for magnetic and gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> transformation to each other. Pseudogravity transformation is done in 3 steps (1) Fourier transform of magnetic data to frequency domain. (2) Multiplying the result of step (1) on to pseudogravity filter expression. (3) Inverse Fourier transform to space domain. It is a useful technique for the interpretation of major magneto- tectonic provinces as it simplifies <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> patterns and focuses on large scale features rather than local details. After this process the horizontal gradient of calculated pseudogravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is computed and mapped in surveying scale. In this image maximum value of total horizontal gradient determines magnetic body edge. In this work we applied this method to synthetic magnetic data from prismatic model and also in magnetic data from Gol-Gohar mining area from Iran. This area is one of the iron ore in Iran and located in 1:250000 map in Neyriz geological block. For implementation the described method to studied area observation magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> was transformed to pseudogravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> at the first step. Then horizontal gradient of this <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> was calculated and mapped. Maximum value of horizontal gradient of psedogravity as form of two bands located in magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> trend direction. Field observations show an iron vein with 30m width that using described technique as a boundary detection method, confirms this feature. Keywords: Magnetization, Edge detection, Reduction to the pole, pseudogravity, Poisson's relationship, Horizontal gradient, Gol-Gohar.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alamdar, K.; Ansari, A. H.; Ghorbani, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">293</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19820047251&hterms=Global+Platform&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3DGlobal%2BPlatform"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magsat scalar <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> distribution - The global perspective</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is established that geographic coincidences exist between high-altitude Magsat scalar <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and major geologic and tectonic structures, with oceanic abyssal plains overlain by negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> agreeing well in spatial extent and position and submarine platforms lying beneath positive scalar <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. In addition, geographic coincidence is found in the continents between many high-latitude positive <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and shields and cratons in North America, Eurasia and Australia. While these correlations are qualitative, they serve to identify regions for detailed study. The global distribution of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> provides a basis for comparative study which will be enhanced when reduced-to-pole versions of the Magsat data become available.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Frey, H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">294</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999PhLB..457..127E"> <span id="translatedtitle">Regularization schemes and the multiplicative <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Elizalde, Vanzo, and Zerbini have shown that the effective action of two free Euclidean scalar fields in flat space contains a `multiplicative <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>' when ?-function regularization is used. This is related to the Wodzicki residue. I show that there is no <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> when using a wide range of other regularization schemes and that the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> can be removed by an unusual choice of renormalization scales. I define new types of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and show that they have similar properties. Thus multiplicative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> encode no novel physics. They merely illustrate some dangerous aspects of ?-function and Schwinger proper time regularization schemes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Evans, T. S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">295</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20120014250&hterms=xxx&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dxxx"> <span id="translatedtitle">Characterization of NPP Visible/Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Reflective Solar Bands Dual Gain <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Visible/Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) contains six dual gain bands in the reflective solar spectrum. The dual gain bands are designed to switch gain mode at pre-defined thresholds to achieve high resolution at low radiances while maintaining the required dynamic range for science. During pre-launch testing, an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the electronic response before transitioning from high to low gain was discovered and characterized. On-orbit, the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> was confirmed using MODIS data collected during Simultaneous Nadir Overpasses (SNOs). The analysis of the Earth scene data shows that dual gain <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> can be determined at the orbital basis. To characterize the dual gain <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region and electronic offsets were tracked per week during the first 8 month of VIIRS operation. The temporal analysis shows the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region can drift 20 DN and is impacted by detectors DC Restore. The estimated <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> flagging regions cover 2.5 % of the high gain dynamic range and are consistent with prelaunch and on-orbit LUT. The prelaunch results had a smaller <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> range (30-50 DN) and are likely the results of more stable electronics from the shorter data collection time. Finally, this study <span class="hlt">suggests</span> future calibration efforts to focus on the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>'s impact on science products and possible correction method to reduce uncertainties.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lee, Shihyan; McIntire, Jeff; Oudari, Hassan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">296</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20030025663&hterms=electrical+shock&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3D%2522electrical%2Bshock%2522"> <span id="translatedtitle">Satellite GN and C <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Trends</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">On-orbit <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> records for satellites launched from 1990 through 2001 are reviewed to determine recent trends of un-manned space mission critical failures. <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> categorized by subsystems show that Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) subsystems have a high number of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that result in a mission critical failure when compared to other subsystems. A mission critical failure is defined as a premature loss of a satellite or loss of its ability to perform its primary mission during its design life. The majority of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are shown to occur early in the mission, usually within one year from launch. GN&C <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are categorized by cause and equipment type involved. A statistical analysis of the data is presented for all <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> compared with the GN&C <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for various mission types, orbits and time periods. Conclusions and recommendations are presented for improving mission success and reliability.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Robertson, Brent; Stoneking, Eric</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">297</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19890014165&hterms=time+trend+study&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dtime%2Btrend%2Bstudy"> <span id="translatedtitle">Trends in environmentally induced spacecraft <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Spacecraft <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Data Base was useful in identifying trends in <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> occurrence. Trends alone do not provide quantitative testimony to a spacecraft's reliability, but they do indicate areas that command closer study. An in-depth analysis of a specific <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> can be expensive and difficult without access to the spacecraft. Statistically verified <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> trends can provide a good reference point to begin <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> analysis. Many spacecraft experience an increase in <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> during the period of several days centered on the solar equinox, a period that is also correlated with sun eclipse at geostationary altitude and an increase in major geomagnetic storms. Increase <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> occurrence can also be seen during the local time interval between midnight and dawn. This local time interval represents a region in Earth's near space that experiences an enhancement in electron plasma density due to a migration from the magnetotail during or following a geomagnetic substorm.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wilkinson, Daniel C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">298</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/971154"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> detection and diagnosis in Grid environments.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Identifying and diagnosing <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in application behavior is critical to delivering reliable application-level performance. In this paper we introduce a strategy to detect <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and diagnose the possible reasons behind them. Our approach extends the traditional window-based strategy by using signal-processing techniques to filter out recurring, background fluctuations in resource behavior. In addition, we have developed a diagnosis technique that uses standard monitoring data to determine which related changes in behavior may cause <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. We evaluate our <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection and diagnosis technique by applying it in three contexts when we insert <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> into the system at random intervals. The experimental results show that our strategy detects up to 96% of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> while reducing the false positive rate by up to 90% compared to the traditional window average strategy. In addition, our strategy can diagnose the reason for the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> approximately 75% of the time.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yang, L.; Liu, C.; Schopf, J. M.; Foster, I.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Chicago; Microsoft Corp.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">299</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3136631"> <span id="translatedtitle">Congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the baboon (Papio spp.)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background A comprehensive survey of the prevalence of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in baboons has not been previously reported. We report the congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> observed over a 26-year period in a large captive baboon colony. Methods A computer search was performed for all baboon congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> identified at necropsy and recorded on necropsy submissions. Results We identified 198 congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in 166 baboons from 9,972 necropsies (1.66% of total necropsies). The nervous, urogenital, musculoskeletal, and cardiovascular systems were most commonly affected. The most common organs affected were the brain, bone, heart, testicle, kidney, penis, aorta, and skeletal muscle. The most frequent congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were blindness, seizures, and hydrocephalus. Conclusions The baboon has an overall frequency of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> similar to humans and other nonhuman primates. Although the most frequently affected systems are similar, congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> involving the digestive system appear to be less common in the baboon.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fox, Benjamin; Owston, Michael A.; Kumar, Shyamesh; Dick, Edward J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">300</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013APS..MARG32008S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Structure and Transport <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Soft Colloids</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present structure, dynamics and rheology measurements for model nanoparticle suspensions comprising of silica nanoparticles, densely grafted with oligomeric polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains and suspended in similar PEG oligomers. Small angle X-ray scattering reveals anomalous structural trends wherein the particle-particle correlations are found to decrease as the particle volume fraction rises beyond the point of particle overlap. Upon further increase in the particle loading, investigation of the particle dynamics through X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy points towards an unusual speeding up of the nanoparticles. Analogous ``cascade of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>'' are observed in systems including complex molecular fluids like water and silica as well as in systems interacting via soft repulsive <span class="hlt">potentials</span>, and similar forces are expected to lead to the origin of these anomalous trends in all the cases.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Srivastava, Samanvaya; Archer, Lynden</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" 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href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">301</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=N8423005"> <span id="translatedtitle">Use of MAGSAT <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Data for Crustal Structure and Mineral Resources in the US Midcontinent.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Magnetic field data acquired by NASA's MAGSAT satellite is used to construct a long-wavelength magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map for the U.S. midcontinent. This aids in interpretation of gross crustal geology (structure, lithologic composition, resource <span class="hlt">potential</span>) of ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. S. Carmichael</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">302</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998AIPC..455..310F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nolen-Schiffer <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and atomic masses</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new form of the nuclear energy-density functional for describing the ground state properties of finite nuclei up to the drip lines and beyond is proposed. The surface energy-density term has a fractional form containing (??)2 both in the numerator and in the denominator. An effective ?-dependent Coulomb-nuclear correlation term is added. A fit to the nuclear masses and radii shows that the latter term gives contribution of the same order of magnitude as the Nolen-Schiffer <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in Coulomb displacement energy. The self-consistent run with the <span class="hlt">suggested</span> functional, performed for about 100 spherical nuclei, has given the rms deviations from the experiment of ~1.2 Mev in masses and ~0.01 fm in radii. The extrapolation to the drip lines goes in between the ETFSI and the macroscopic-microscopic model predictions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fayans, S. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">303</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.P13B1759L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Optical effects of space weathering in lunar crustal magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> regions based on CE-1 observations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The discovery of mini-magnetospheres above the lunar surface <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that magnetic shielding could have led to anomalous space weathering (little darkening with limited reddening) in magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> regions. Using spectral data from Chang'E 1 Imaging Interferometer (IIM) and data from Lunar Prospector's magnetometer, we instigate the relationship between lunar crustal magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the optical effects in those areas in association with space weathering. The IIM onboard China's Chang'E 1 (CE-1) spacecraft is a Fourier transform Sagnac imaging spectrometer operating in the visible to near infrared (0.48-0.96 ?m) spectral range, with 32 channels at spectral intervals of 325.5 cm-1. We selected four regions with crustal magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to study their albedo properties: three lunar swirls (Gerasimovich, Mare Marginis, and Reiner Gamma) and the area antipodal to Herzsprung. We found that all three of the anomalous albedo areas are associated with magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, however, no anomalous albedo feature is found in the last magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> area. In addition, we also studied the correlation between magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> strength and albedo <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> on a global scale. Our initial analysis <span class="hlt">suggests</span> an overall tread of less darkening with increased magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Li, H.; Wang, X.; Cui, J.; Fu, X.; Zhang, G.; Yao, M.; Liu, B.; Liu, J.; Li, C.; Ouyang, Z.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">304</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22774684"> <span id="translatedtitle">Building false memories without <span class="hlt">suggestions</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">People can come to remember doing things they have never done. The question we asked in this study is whether people can systematically come to remember performing actions they never really did, in the absence of any <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> from the experimenter. People built LEGO vehicles, performing some steps but not others. For half the people, all the pieces needed to assemble each vehicle were laid out in order in front of them while they did the building; for the other half, the pieces were hidden from view. The next day, everyone returned for a surprise recognition test. People falsely and confidently remembered having carried out steps they did not; those who saw all the pieces while they built each vehicle were more likely to correctly remember performing steps they did perform but equally likely to falsely remember performing steps they did not. We explain our results using the source monitoring framework: People used the relationships between actions to internally generate the missing, related actions, later mistaking that information for genuine experience. PMID:22774684</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Foster, Jeffrey L; Garry, Maryanne</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">305</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.T21B2559P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Monitoring of Shallow Subsurface <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> With Seismic Waves</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Human activity, such as extraction/injection of fluids or heat producing operations can cause significant changes in shallow subsurface. Monitoring of those changes is necessary for evaluation of the overall environmental impact and prevention of the unwanted scenarios. The existing seismic methods utilize surface waves for evaluating the elastic properties of the ground are based on 1D model and not capable to provide a suitable lateral resolution for imaging of contrast <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, which require a high resolution imaging. Contrast <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> generate not just surface waves but also all kinds of scattered waves, which should be accounted for in the inversion process. A significant advancement in an imaging technology can be done using the full waveform inversion in the Fourier domain. For investigation of a sensitivity and resolution of the full waveform inversion we performed 3D modeling of elastic wave propagation in the media with a few vertical <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at different depths. The source of seismic signal is on the earth surface. The numerical simulation uses the three dimensional staggered-grid finite-difference method (Petrov and Newman, 2010). We consider scattering fields for a few configurations of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and compute the response at different frequencies. Amplitude <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> show much higher relative response compare to phase <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the full waveform inversion in the Fourier domain should provide higher resolution and sensitivity than the existing 1D approaches. References. Petrov, P.V., G. A. Newman (2010), Using 3D Simulation of Elastic Wave Propagation in Laplace Domain for Electromagnetic-Seismic Inverse Modeling, Abstract T21A-2140 presented at 2010 Fall Meeting, AGU, San Francisco, Calif., 13-17 Dec.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Petrov, P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">306</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1719557"> <span id="translatedtitle">Survival of children born with congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aim: To describe the survival to age 5 years of children born with congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Methods: Between 1980 and 1997, 6153 live born cases of congenital <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> were diagnosed and registered by the population based Glasgow Register of Congenital <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>. They were retrospectively followed to assess their survival status from birth up to the age of 5 years. Results: The proportions of all live born infants with congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> surviving to the end of the first week, and first and fifth year were 94%, 89%, and 88%, respectively. Survival to age 5, the end point of follow up, was significantly poorer for infants with chromosomal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (48%) compared to neural tube defects (72%), respiratory system <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (74%), congenital heart disease (75%), nervous system <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (77%), and Down's syndrome (84%). Conclusion: Although almost 90% of all live born infants with congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> survive to 5 years, there are notable variations in survival between <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> types. Our findings should be useful for both clinicians and geneticists to assess the prognosis of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. This information is also important for affected families and for the planning of health care needs for this high risk population.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dastgiri, S; Gilmour, W; Stone, D</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">307</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22857826"> <span id="translatedtitle">Prenatal ultrasound and urological <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Prenatal ultrasound is an integral part of caring for pregnant women in the United States. Although surprisingly few data exist to support the clinical benefit of screening ultrasound during pregnancy, its use continues to rise. Urologic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are among the most commonly identified, with overall detection sensitivity approaching 90%. Prenatal hydronephrosis is the most frequently identified finding and predicting postnatal pathology based on its presence can be difficult. As the degree of fetal hydronephrosis increases so does the risk of true urinary tract pathology. Diagnoses that require more urgent care include causes of lower urinary tract obstruction and bladder and cloacal exstrophy. PMID:22857826</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Clayton, Douglass B; Brock, John W</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">308</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3706049"> <span id="translatedtitle">Congenital <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> of the Breast</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Poland syndrome is a combination of chest wall deformity and absent or hypoplastic pectoralis muscle and breast associated with shortening and brachysyndactyly of the upper limb. Clinical presentation varies widely; therefore, reconstructive procedures have to be adapted to the deformity, ranging from chest wall stabilization or augmentation, dynamic muscle transfer, nipple and areola repositioning, and breast augmentation using prosthesis or autologous tissue transfer. Other congenital breast <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> include supernumerary nipple and areola (polythelia) and breast (polymastia), which can generally be found on the embryonic mammary ridge. Absence of the nipple, areola (athelia), or the breast tissue (amastia) is less frequent.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Caouette-Laberge, Louise; Borsuk, Daniel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">309</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20140002250&hterms=hot&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dhot"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hot Flow <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> at Venus</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a multi-instrument study of a hot flow <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (HFA) observed by the Venus Express spacecraft in the Venusian foreshock, on 22 March 2008, incorporating both Venus Express Magnetometer and Analyzer of Space Plasmas and Energetic Atoms (ASPERA) plasma observations. Centered on an interplanetary magnetic field discontinuity with inward convective motional electric fields on both sides, with a decreased core field strength, ion observations consistent with a flow deflection, and bounded by compressive heated edges, the properties of this event are consistent with those of HFAs observed at other planets within the solar system.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Collinson, G. A.; Sibeck, David Gary; Boardsen, Scott A.; Moore, Tom; Barabash, S.; Masters, A.; Shane, N.; Slavin, J.A.; Coates, A.J.; Zhang, T. L.; Sarantos, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">310</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040200918&hterms=inversion&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dinversion"> <span id="translatedtitle">Topographic Change of the Dichotomy Boundary <span class="hlt">Suggested</span> by Crustal Inversion</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Linear negative gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Acidalia Planitia along the eastern edge of Tempe Terra and along the northern edge of Arabia Terra have been noted in Mars Global Surveyor gravity fields. Once proposed to represent buried fluvial channels, it is now believed that these gravity troughs mainly arise from partial compensation of the hemispheric dichotomy topographic scarp. A recent inversion for crustal structure finds that mantle compensation of the scarp is offset from the present-day topographic expression of the dichotomy boundary. The offset <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that erosion or other forms of mass wasting occurred after lithosphere thickened and no longer accomodated topographic change through viscous relaxation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Neumann, G. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">311</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/31461572"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">potential</span> role of stereolithography in the study of facial aging</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">potential</span> role of high-resolution stereolithography for the study of facial aging was evaluated. Stereolithography has been used extensively in the engineering sciences to create model replicas prior to full production. More recently, stereolithography has found a role in the preoperative planning of complex dentofacial <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Previous work has <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that continued differential growth of the maxilla may occur throughout</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Joel E. Pessa</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">312</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1989E%26PSL..92....1E"> <span id="translatedtitle">Chromium isotopic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the Murchison meteorite</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The abundances of chromium isotopes, in refractory inclusions from the Allende meteorite, show wide-spread <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The chromium isotope <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are similar in pattern to the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> discovered in Ca and Ti. The largest effects occur at the neutron-rich isotopes Ca-48, Ti-50 and Cr-54. Individual Cr-rich pink spinels, from the Murchison meteorite, exhibit large and variable excesses in Cr-53 and Cr-54 including the largest Cr-53 <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> so far reported. Magnesium isotopes, in Murchison Cr-poor blue spinels, also show variable <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Mg-26 including mass-dependent fractionation favoring the lighter isotopes. The Cr-53, Cr-54 and Mg-26 <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Murchison spinels are indicative of a heterogeneous distribution of magnesium and chromium isotopes in the early solar nebula and require a contribution from several nucleosynthetic components in addition to physicochemical processing.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Esat, T. M.; Ireland, T. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">313</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.1177S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Crustal Magnetic Field <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> and Global Tectonics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A wide variety of evidence <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the ruling isochron (geomagnetic polarity versus age) hypothesis of marine magnetic lineations has no merit - undermining therefore one of the central tenets of plate tectonics. Instead, variable induction by the ambient geomagnetic field is likely to be the principal agent for mega-scale crustal magnetic features - in both oceanic and continental settings. This revitalizes the fault-controlled susceptibility-contrast model of marine magnetic lineations, originally proposed in the late 1960s. Thus, the marine magnetic 'striping' may be ascribed to tectonic shearing and related, but variable, disintegration of the original iron-oxide mineralogy, having developed primarily along one of the two pan-global sets of orthogonal fractures and faults. In this way, fault zones (having the more advanced mineral alteration) would be characterized by relatively low susceptibility, while more moderately affected crustal sections (located between principal fault zones) would be likely to have less altered oxide mineralogy and therefore higher magnetic susceptibility. On this basis, induction by the present geomagnetic field is likely to produce oscillating magnetic field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with axis along the principal shear grain. The modus operandi of the alternative magneto-tectonic interpretation is inertia-driven wrenching of the global Alpine age palaeo-lithosphere - triggered by changes in Earth's rotation. Increasing sub-crustal loss to the upper mantle during the Upper Mesozoic had left the ensuing Alpine Earth in a tectonically unstable state. Thus, sub-crustal eclogitization and associated gravity-driven delamination to the upper mantle led to a certain degree of planetary acceleration which in turn gave rise to latitude-dependent, westward inertial wrenching of the global palaeo-lithosphere. During this process, 1) the thin and mechanically fragile oceanic crust were deformed into a new type of broad fold belts, and 2) the continents were subjected to relative 'in situ' rotations (mostly moderate). Examples of marine magnetic lineations with landward continuation along prominent transcurrent fault zones, and the fact that striped marine magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may display orthogonal networks - concordant with the ubiquitous system of rectilinear fractures, faults and joints - corroborate the wrench tectonic interpretation of crustal field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Storetvedt, Karsten</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">314</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/nu9g3led12q8pmk2.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> associated with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background: To detect the associated <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in patients with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome is clinically important, because\\u000a early treatment for such <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is crucial to both visual and systemic development. This study was conducted to clarify\\u000a the associated <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the syndrome.? Methods: We evaluated 21 patients with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome encountered at\\u000a Nagoya City University Hospital over a 16-year period. Patients who</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hironori Ozeki; Shoichiro Shirai; Kozo Ikeda; Yuichiro Ogura</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">315</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4081266"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pancake kidney: A rare developmental <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">There are many developmental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the kidney. Pancake kidney is one of the rarest types of renal ectopia. We report a case of pancake kidney which was detected incidentally while treating a female patient for a urinary tract infection. Although urinary system <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> often coexist with malformations of other organs and systems, no associated <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> could be detected in this case. Pancake kidney is usually managed by surgery, but this case was managed conservatively without any complication.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tiwari, Alok Kumar; Choudhary, Anil Kumar; Khowal, Hemant; Chaudhary, Poras; Arora, Mohinder. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">316</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57641384"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bouguer <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map of New Zealand</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Bouguer map of New Zealand exhibits two major negative gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The Rangitikei-Waiapu <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>, which intersects tne axial ranges of the North Island, indicates a crustal downwarp which is not in isostatic equilibrium. This <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is closely parallel to the zone of intense seismicity, to the Taupo-White Island volcanic belt, to the Kaimanawa-Huiarau-Raukumara Ranges, to the thick Upper Pliocene</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">E. I. Robertson; W. I. Reilly</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1958-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">317</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20060044140&hterms=flash&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Dflash"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Mars Rover Spirit FLASH <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Mars Exploration Rover 'Spirit' suffered a debilitating <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> that prevented communication with Earth for several anxious days. With the eyes of the world upon us, the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> team used each scrap of information, our knowledge of the system, and sheer determination to analyze and fix the problem, then return the vehicle to normal operation. This paper will discuss the Spirit FLASH <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, including the drama of the investigation, the root cause and the lessons learned from the experience.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Reeves, Glenn E.; Neilson, Tracy C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">318</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21041339"> <span id="translatedtitle">Uhl's <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in a domestic shorthair cat.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 2-year-old, neutered male, domestic shorthair cat was presented for investigation of dyspnea and episodic weakness. Clinical and ultrasonographic features were consistent with right ventricular cardiomyopathy. Pathological findings documented Uhl's <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Although rare, Uhl's <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> should be a differential diagnosis for cats with right-sided congestive heart failure. In particular, Uhl's <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> could be misdiagnosed as arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy due to the similarity of clinical and echocardiographic findings. PMID:21041339</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Quintavalla, Cecilia; Bossolini, Elena; Rubini, Giuseppe; Tursi, Massimiliano</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">319</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5937493"> <span id="translatedtitle">Chiral and gravitational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in any dimension</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Gravitational contributions to the chiral <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in 4N space-time dimensions as well as the purely gravitational <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in 4N-2 dimensions are expressed in terms of the Riemann--Christoffel tensor. Using this formula, we give a simple proof that if N > or = 4 there is no way to cancel the gravitational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> using fields of spin- 1/2 , - (3)/(2) , and -1.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Delbourgo, R.; Matsuki, T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">320</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19790011349&hterms=Temporal+anomaly&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3DTemporal%2Banomaly"> <span id="translatedtitle">The magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of the Ivreazone</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A magnetic field survey was made in the Ivreazone in 1969/70. The results were: significant <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of the vertical intensity is found. It follows the basic main part of the Ivrea-Verbano zone and continues to the south. The width of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is about 10 km, the maximum measures about +800 gamma. The model interpretation shows that possibly the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> belongs to an amphibolitic body, which in connection with the Ivrea-body was found by deep seismic sounding. Therefore, the magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> provides further evidence for the conception that the Ivrea-body has to be regarded as a chip of earthmantle material pushed upward by tectonic processes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Albert, G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1979-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous 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showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">321</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22037089"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dysmenorrhea due to a rare müllerian <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Müllerian duct <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may produce reproductive failure like abortion and preterm birth, or obstetric problems like malpresentation, retained placenta, etc., or they may be asymptomatic. Unicornuate uterus with a noncommunicating functional rudimentary horn is a type of müllerian <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> that results in obstruction to menstrual blood flow, leading to endometriosis and dysmenorrhea. Though the majority of cases of dysmenorrhea in adolescents are primary in nature and require only reassurance and symptomatic management, it is important to be aware of rare causes such as müllerian <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> so that these cases can be properly managed. Hence, we present this case report, with interesting illustrations, so as to increase awareness regarding these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. PMID:22037089</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Agarwal, M; Das, A; Singh, A S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">322</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19820047249&hterms=magnetic+anomaly+map&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dmagnetic%2Banomaly%2Bmap"> <span id="translatedtitle">Initial scalar magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map from Magsat</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Magsat data acquired during the November 1979-June 1980 mission was used to derive a scalar magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map covering +50 to -50 deg geographic latitude, and the separation of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> fields from core and external fields was accomplished by techniques developed for POGO satellite data. Except in the Atlantic and Pacific at latitudes south of -15 deg, comparison of the Magsat map with its POGO data-derived counterpart shows basic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> patterns to be reproducible, and higher resolution due to Magsat's lower measurement altitude. Color-coded scalar <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> maps are presented for both satellites.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Langel, R. A.; Phillips, J. D.; Horner, R. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">323</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/878950"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>-free sets of fermions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present new techniques for finding <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-free sets of fermions. Although the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> cancellation conditions typically include cubic equations with integer variables that cannot be solved in general, we prove by construction that any chiral set of fermions can be embedded in a larger set of fermions which is chiral and <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-free. Applying these techniques to extensions of the Standard Model, we find <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-free models that have arbitrary quark and lepton charges under an additional U(1) gauge group.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Batra, Puneet; /Argonne; Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; /Fermilab; Spivak, David; /UC, Berkeley, Math. Dept.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">324</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.1761C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of Solar Irradiation <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Long Term Over India</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">India has a high <span class="hlt">potential</span> for solar energy applications due to its geographic position within the Sun Belt and the large number of cloudless days in many regions of the country. However, certain regions of India, particularly those largely populated, can exhibit large aerosol loading in the atmosphere as a consequence of anthropogenic emissions that could have a negative feedback in the solar resource <span class="hlt">potential</span>. This effect, named as solar dimming, has already been observed in India, and in some other regions in the world, by some authors using ground data from the last two decades. The recent interest in the promotion of solar energy applications in India highlights the need of extending and improving the knowledge of the solar radiation resources in this country, since most of the long term measurements available correspond to global horizontal radiation and most of them are also located big cities or highly populated areas. In addition, accurate knowledge on the aerosol column quantification and on its dynamical behavior with high spatial resolution is particularly important in the case of India, due to their impact on direct normal irradiation. Long term studies of solar irradiation over India can be performed using monthly means of global hemispheric irradiation measurements from the Indian Meteorological Department. Ground data are available from 1964 till today through the World Radiation Data Centre that publish these values in the web. This work shows a long term analysis of solar irradiation in India using <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> techniques and trends in ten places over India. Most of the places have exhibit a decreasing trend and negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> confirming thus the darkening effect already reported by solar dimming studies. The analysis of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> has also found two periods of different behavior. From 1964 till 1988 the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> observed were positive and the last 20 years seems to be a period of negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. This observation is also consequent with solar dimming effect, apparently increased during the last two decades due to the increase of aerosol loading in the atmosphere. These results remark the important of having accurate knowledge of atmospheric aerosol loading and its dynamics over India with high spatial resolution in the framework of solar energy deployment in the country. It is worth to mention that greater <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and a noticeable decreasing trend found in Calcutta could be correlated with the highly population rate, and thus the greater the population density of the area the greater the negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the decreasing trend of solar irradiation monthly means.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cony, M.; Polo, J.; Martin, L.; Navarro, A.; Serra, I.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">325</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1613849C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Global Horizontal Irradiance <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Long Term Series Over India</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">India has a high <span class="hlt">potential</span> for solar energy applications due to its geographic position within the Sun Belt and the large number of cloudless days in many regions of the country. However, certain regions of India, particularly those largely populated, can exhibit large aerosol loading in the atmosphere as a consequence of anthropogenic emissions that could have a negative feedback in the solar resource <span class="hlt">potential</span>. This effect, named as solar dimming, has already been observed in India, and in some other regions in the world, by some authors using ground data from the last two decades. The recent interest in the promotion of solar energy applications in India highlights the need of extending and improving the knowledge of the solar radiation resources in this country, since most of the long term measurements available correspond to global horizontal radiation (GHI) and most of them are also located big cities or highly populated areas. In addition, accurate knowledge on the aerosol column quantification and on its dynamical behavior with high spatial resolution is particularly important in the case of India, due to their impact on direct normal irradiation. Long term studies of solar irradiation over India can be performed using monthly means of GHI measurements from the Indian Meteorological Department. Ground data are available from 1964 till today through the World Radiation Data Centre that publish these values in the web. This work shows a long term analysis of GHI using <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> techniques over ten different sites over India. Besides, techniques of linear trends have been applied for to show the evolution over this period. The analysis of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> has also found two periods of different behavior. From 1964 till 1988 the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> observed were positive and the last 20 years seems to be a period of negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The results exhibit a decreasing trend and negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> confirming thus the darkening effect already reported by solar dimming studies. This observation is also consequent with solar dimming effect, apparently increased during the last two decades due to the increase of aerosol loading in the atmosphere. These results remark the important of having accurate knowledge of atmospheric aerosol loading and its dynamics over India with high spatial resolution in the framework of solar energy deployment in the country. It is worth to mention that greater <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and a noticeable decreasing trend found in Calcutta could be correlated with the highly population rate, and thus the greater the population density of the area the greater the negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the decreasing trend of solar irradiation monthly means.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cony, Marco; Liria, Juan; Weisenberg, Ralf; Serrano, Enrique</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">326</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/963957"> <span id="translatedtitle">A RE-INTRODUCTION TO <span class="hlt">ANOMALIES</span> OF CRITICALITY</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In 1974, a small innocuous document was submitted to the American Nuclear Society's Criticality Safety Division for publication that would have lasting impacts on this nuclear field The author was Duane Clayton, manager of the Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Critical Mass Lab, the world's preeminent reactor critical experimenter with plutonium solutions. The document was entitled, '<span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> of Criticality'. '<span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>...' was a compilation of more than thirty separate and distinct examples of departures from what might be commonly expected in the field of nuclear criticality. Mr. Clayton's publication was the derivative of more than ten thousand experiments and countless analytical studies conducted world-wide on every conceivable reactor system imaginable: from fissile bearing solutions to solids, blocks to arrays of fuel rods, low-enriched uranium oxide systems to pure plutonium and highly enriched uranium systems. After publication, the document was commonly used within the nuclear fuel cycle and reactor community to train <span class="hlt">potential</span> criticality/reactor analysts, experimenters and fuel handlers on important things for consideration when designing systems with critically 'safe' parameters in mind The purpose of this paper is to re-introduce '<span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> of Criticality' to the current Criticality Safety community and to add new '<span class="hlt">anomalies</span>' to the existing compendium. By so doing, it is the authors' hope that a new generation of nuclear workers and criticality engineers will benefit from its content and might continue to build upon this work in support of the nuclear renaissance that is about to occur.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">PUIGH RJ</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-09-09</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">327</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUSMNH42A..06P"> <span id="translatedtitle">TIR <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> Scaling Using the Earthquake Preparation Area Concept</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Surface Thermal Infrared (TIR) satellite observations in seismogenic areas demonstrated their <span class="hlt">potential</span> in the short-term earthquake prediction applications. Different types of Robust Satellite data analysis Technique (RST) were proposed which provides a statistically based definition of "TIR <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>" and a suitable method for their identification even in very different local (e.g. related to atmosphere and/or surface) and observational (e.g. related to time/season, but also to solar and satellite zenithal angles) conditions. It was discovered that the spatial scale of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> has relation with the magnitude of upcoming seismic event. At the same time the concept of earthquake preparation area (or earthquake activation zone) exist for more than 40 years in different formulations (for example, Dobrovolsky et al., 1979, and Bowman et al., 1998). In this study we compared the size of surface TIR <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the form of RETIRA index with the size of earthquake preparation area for several earthquakes in different areas of the globe with different magnitude and found that their size and spatial distribution perfectly fit to the earthquake preparation area except smaller earthquakes M<5 where the observed TIR <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is larger in size than the formal determination.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pulinets, S. A.; Tramutoli, V.; Genzano, N.; Yudin, I.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">328</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012SPIE.8510E..17L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Characterization of Suomi-NPP VIIRS reflective solar bands dual gain <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Visible/Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) contains six dual gain bands in the reflective solar spectrum. The dual gain bands are designed to switch gain mode at pre-defined thresholds to achieve high resolution at low radiances while maintaining the required dynamic range for science. During pre-launch testing, an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the electronic response before transitioning from high to low gain was discovered and was characterized. This <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> has been confirmed using MODIS data collected during Simultaneous Nadir Overpasses (SNOs). The analysis of the Earth scene data shows that this dual gain <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> can be characterized using sensor earth-view observations. To help understand this dual gain artifact, the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region and electronic offsets were tracked during the first 8 months of VIIRS operation. The temporal analysis shows the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region can drift ~20 DN and is impacted by a detector's DC Restore. The estimated <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> flagging regions cover ~2.5 % of the high gain dynamic range and are consistent with prelaunch analysis and the on-orbit flagging LookUp Table. The prelaunch results had a smaller <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> range, likely due to more stable electronics over a shorter data collection time. Finally, this study <span class="hlt">suggests</span> future calibration efforts to focus on the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>'s impact on science products and a possible correction method to reduce uncertainties.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lee, Shihyan; McIntire, Jeff; Oudrari, Hassan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">329</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20000085910&hterms=Thermohaline+Circulation&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3D%2522Thermohaline%2BCirculation%2522"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Effect of Ocean Currents on Sea Surface Temperature <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigate regional and global-scale correlations between observed <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in sea surface temperature and height. A strong agreement between the two fields is found over a broad range of latitudes for different ocean basins. Both time-longitude plots and wavenumber-frequency spectra <span class="hlt">suggest</span> an advective forcing of SST <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> by a first-mode baroclinic wave field on spatial scales down to 400 km and time scales as short as 1 month. Even though the magnitude of the mean background temperature gradient is determining for the effectiveness of the forcing, there is no obvious seasonality that can be detected in the amplitudes of SST <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Instead, individual wave signatures in the SST can in some cases be followed over periods of two years. The phase relationship between SST and SSH <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is dependent upon frequency and wavenumber and displays a clear decrease of the phase lag toward higher latitudes where the two fields come into phase at low frequencies. Estimates of the damping coefficient are larger than generally obtained for a purely atmospheric feedback. From a global frequency spectrum a damping time scale of 2-3 month was found. Regionally results are very variable and range from 1 month near strong currents to 10 month at low latitudes and in the sub-polar North Atlantic. Strong agreement is found between the first global EOF modes of 10 day averaged and spatially smoothed SST and SSH grids. The accompanying time series display low frequency oscillations in both fields.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stammer, Detlef; Leeuwenburgh, Olwijn</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">330</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19830006295&hterms=UINTA+BASIN&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3D%2522UINTA%252BBASIN%2522"> <span id="translatedtitle">MAGSAT <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> field inversion and interpretation for the US</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Long wavelength <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the total magnetic field measured by MAGSAT over the United States and adjacent areas are inverted to an equivalent layer crustal magnetization distribution. The model is based on an equal area dipole grid at the Earth's surface. Model resolution, defined as the closest dipole spacing giving a solution having physical significance, is about 220 km for MAGSAT data in the elevation range 300-500 km. The magnetization contours correlate well with large scale tectonic provinces. A higher resolution (200 km) model based on relatively noise free synthetic "pseudodata" is also presented. Magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> component data measured by MAGSAT is compared with synthetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> component fields arising from an equivalent source dipole array at the Earth's surface generated from total field <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data alone. An excellent inverse correlation between apparent magnetization and heat flow in the western U.S. is demonstrated. A regional heat flow map which is presented and compared with published maps, predicts high heat flow in Nebraska and the Dakotas, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> the presence of a "blind" geothermal area of regional extent.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mayhew, M. A. (principal investigator)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">331</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9642641"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pseudopapilledema and congenital disc <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in growth hormone deficiency.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Optic nerve hypoplasia is a congenital disc <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> associated with growth hormone deficiency (GHD). Pseudotumor cerebri is an adverse event associated with growth hormone treatment (hGH) and manifested by increased intracranial pressure and papilledema. Pseudopapilledema is a generic ophthalmologic term encompassing several conditions, including congenital disc <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. It is benign and can be distinguished from papilledema by physical examination. The objective of this report is to document that congenital disc abnormalities, which can be confused with papilledema, occur in children with GHD. Three patients with GHD had fundoscopic examinations <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> of papilledema and possibly pseudotumor cerebri. The abnormal optic nerves were characteristic of pseudo-papilledema, and appear to be a variant of optic nerve hypoplasia. The finding of optic disc abnormality during hGH may reflect pseudo-papilledema and not pseudotumor cerebri. Of equal importance, the reported patients indicate that the finding of pseudopapilledema in short children should <span class="hlt">suggest</span> the possibility of GHD. PMID:9642641</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Collett-Solberg, P F; Liu, G T; Satin-Smith, M; Katz, L L; Moshang, T</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">332</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMGP13A1135P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spectral Methods for Magnetic <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spectral methods, that is, those based in the Fourier transform, have long been employed in the analysis of magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. For example, Schouten and MaCamy's Earth filter is used extensively to map patterns to the pole, and Parker's Fourier transform series facilitates forward modeling and provides an efficient algorithm for inversion of profiles and surveys. From a different, and perhaps less familiar perspective, magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> can be represented as the realization of a stationary stochastic process and then statistical theory can be brought to bear. It is vital to incorporate the full 2-D power spectrum, even when discussing profile data. For example, early analysis of long profiles failed to discover the small-wavenumber peak in the power spectrum predicted by one-dimensional theory. The long-wavelength excess is the result of spatial aliasing, when energy leaks into the along-track spectrum from the cross-track components of the 2-D spectrum. Spectral techniques may be used to improve interpolation and downward continuation of survey data. They can also evaluate the reliability of sub-track magnetization models both across and and along strike. Along-strike profiles turn out to be surprisingly good indicators of the magnetization directly under them; there is high coherence between the magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and the magnetization over a wide band. In contrast, coherence is weak at long wavelengths on across-strike lines, which is naturally the favored orientation for most studies. When vector (or multiple level) measurements are available, cross-spectral analysis can reveal the wavenumber interval where the geophysical signal resides, and where noise dominates. One powerful diagnostic is that the phase spectrum between the vertical and along-path components of the field must be constant 90 degrees. To illustrate, it was found that on some very long Project Magnetic lines, only the lowest 10% of the wavenumber band contain useful geophysical signal. In this case the spectra and cross spectra show that the source of the noise is instability in the gyro platform. Spectral techniques should always be applied to vector data in order to avoid overinterpretation of short-wavelength features.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Parker, R. L.; Gee, J. S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">333</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008PhyB..403.3211R"> <span id="translatedtitle">On Debye temperature <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> observed in Ge Se Ag glasses</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Anomalous values of Debye temperature have been obtained from recoil free factor measurements Ge-Se-Ag glasses recently [B. Arcondo, M.A. Urena, A. Piarristeguy, A. Pradel, M. Fontana, Physica B 389 (2007) 77]. In the present paper we show that this <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> may arise due to the presence of anharmonic <span class="hlt">potential</span> at the high spin ferrous site. We use q Lamb Mossbauer factor and anharmonic Lamb Mossbauer factor to study this anharmonicity.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Razdan, Ashok</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">334</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39227075"> <span id="translatedtitle">MAWILab: combining diverse <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detectors for automated <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> labeling and performance benchmarking</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Evaluating <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detectors is a crucial task in traffic monitoring made particularly difficult due to the lack of ground truth. The goal of the present article is to assist researchers in the evaluation of detectors by providing them with labeled <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> traffic traces. We aim at automatically finding <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the MAWI archive using a new methodology that combines different</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Romain Fontugne; Pierre Borgnat; Patrice Abry; Kensuke Fukuda</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">335</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70016776"> <span id="translatedtitle">The longevity of the South Pacific isotopic and thermal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The South Pacific is anomalous in terms of the Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope ratios of its hot spot basalts, a thermally enhanced lithosphere, and possibly a hotter mantle. We have studied the Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope characteristics of 12 Cretaceous seamounts in the Magellans, Marshall and Wake seamount groups (western Pacific Ocean) that originated in this South Pacific Isotopic and Thermal <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> (SOPITA). The range and values of isotope ratios of the Cretaceous seamount data are similar to those of the island chains of Samoa, Tahiti, Marquesas and Cook/Austral in the SOPITA. These define two major mantle components <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that isotopically extreme lavas have been produced at SOPITA for at least 120 Ma. Shallow bathymetry, and weakened lithosphere beneath some of the seamounts studied <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that at least some of the thermal effects prevailed during the Cretaceous as well. These data, in the context of published data, <span class="hlt">suggest</span>: 1. (1)|SOPITA is a long-lived feature, and enhanced heat transfer into the lithosphere and isotopically anomalous mantle appear to be an intrinsic characteristic of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. 2. (2)|The less pronounced depth <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> during northwesterly plate motion <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that some of the expressions of SOPITA may be controlled by the direction of plate motion. Motion parallel to the alignment of SOPITA hot spots focusses the heat (and chemical input into the lithosphere) on a smaller cross section than oblique motion. 3. (3)|The lithosphere in the eastern and central SOPITA appears to have lost its original depleted mantle characteristics, probably due to enhanced plume/lithosphere interaction, and it is dominated by isotopic compositions derived from plume materials. 4. (4)|We speculate (following D.L. Anderson) that the origin of the SOPITA, and possibly the DUPAL <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is largely due to focussed subduction through long periods of the geological history of the earth, creating a heterogeneous distribution of recycled components in the lower mantle. ?? 1991.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Staudigel, H.; Park, K. -H.; Pringle, M.; Rubenstone, J. L.; Smith, W. H. F.; Zindler, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">336</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1015953"> <span id="translatedtitle">Oculoauriculovertebral spectrum and cerebral <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report on three Dutch children with a clinical diagnosis of oculoauriculovertebral spectrum (OAVS) and hydrocephalus. The clinical features are compared to 15 published cases of OAVS and hydrocephalus. Several other cerebral abnormalities were present in the whole group. About half of the cases had cleft lip/palate, anophthalmia/microphthalmia, or a cardiac defect. Mental retardation was found in five of the surviving 11 patients and early death occurred in one-third. We compared the cases with OAVS and hydrocephalus with published reports of OAVS and other cerebral <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and found no significant clinical differences. However, the clinical characteristics were clearly more severely expressed than generally found in patients with OAVS. Children with OAVS and more severe clinical features, especially anophthalmia/microphthalmia and cleft lip/palate, seem to be at an increased risk for cerebral malformations and for mental retardation. Images</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schrander-Stumpel, C T; de Die-Smulders, C E; Hennekam, R C; Fryns, J P; Bouckaert, P X; Brouwer, O F; da Costa, J J; Lommen, E J; Maaswinkel-Mooy, P D</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">337</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013GeoJI.193.1277S"> <span id="translatedtitle">On the isostatic gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and disturbance and their applications to Vening Meinesz-Moritz gravimetric inverse problem</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this study, we show that the traditionally defined Bouguer gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> needs a correction to become `the no-topography gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>' and that the isostatic gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is better defined by the latter <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> plus a gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> compensation effect than by the Bouguer gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> plus a gravitational compensation effect. This is because only the new isostatic gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> completely removes and compensates for the topographic effect. F. A. Vening Meinesz' inverse problem in isostasy deals with solving for the Moho depth from the known external gravity field and mean Moho depth (known, e.g. from seismic reflection data) by a regional isostatic compensation using a flat Earth approximation. H. Moritz generalized the problem to that of a global compensation with a spherical mean Earth approximation. The problem can be formulated mathematically as that of solving a non-linear Fredholm integral equation. The solutions to these problems are based on the condition of isostatic balance of the isostatic gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, and, theoretically, this assumption cannot be met by the old definition of the isostatic gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. We show how the Moho geometry can be solved for the gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, gravity disturbance and disturbing <span class="hlt">potential</span>, etc., and, from a theoretical point of view, all these solutions are the same.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sjöberg, Lars E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">338</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/gl/v023/i024/96GL03471/96GL03471.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Resolving Bouguer <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in continents—A new approach</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Nature of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> present in free air gravity and their corresponding <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Bouguer gravity over continents are analysed in light of isostatic compensation of topographic masses. These <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are classified into regional, residual and local and criteria are evolved to identify them. The regional <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> corresponds to regional topography that is compensated. The local <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is related to local</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. V. Subba Rao</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">339</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55467723"> <span id="translatedtitle">Resolving Bouguer <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in continents-A new approach</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Nature of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> present in free air gravity and their corresponding <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Bouguer gravity over continents are analyzed in light of isostatic compensation of topographic masses. These <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are classified into regional, residual and local and criteria are evolved to identify them. The regional <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> corresponds to regional topography that is compensated. The local <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is related to local</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. V. Subba Rao</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">340</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/172094"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection over Noisy Data using Learned Probability Distributions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Traditional <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection techniques focus on detecting <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in new data after training on normal (or clean) data. In this paper we present a technique for detecting <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> without training on normal data. We present a method for detecting <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> within a data set that contains a large number of normal elements and relatively few <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. We present a mixture</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eleazar Eskin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return 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<a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">341</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=AD777089"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bouguer Gravity <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Map of Africa.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A Bouguer Gravity <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Map of Africa has been compiled using only terrestrial data. The map is a contoured representation of one degree x one degree mean <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> values. Some one degree x one degree values are computed by conventional or statistical me...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. R. Sanders L. E. Wilcox R. L. Slettene R. S. Blouse</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1973-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">342</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jb/v089/iB03/JB089iB03p01945/JB089iB03p01945.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Local Gravity <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> Produced by Dislocation Sources</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> due to other dislocation sources in three dimensions are as follows: For strike-slip faulting the ratio of the gravity change to uplift depends upon position; however, the gravity change contours are roughly similar to those corresponding to a zero free air gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Nor is the ratio constantfor dip-slip faulting except for the two special cases of dip</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. C. Savage</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">343</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60599504"> <span id="translatedtitle">A REINTRODUCTION TO <span class="hlt">ANOMALIES</span> OF CRITICALITY</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In 1974, a small innocuous document was submitted to the American Nuclear Society's Criticality Safety Division for publication that would have lasting impacts on this nuclear field The author was Duane Clayton, manager of the Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Critical Mass Lab, the world's preeminent reactor critical experimenter with plutonium solutions. The document was entitled, '<span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> of Criticality'. '<span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>...'</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">PUIGH RJ</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">344</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=N8923536"> <span id="translatedtitle">Trends in Environmentally Induced Spacecraft <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Spacecraft <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Data Base was useful in identifying trends in <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> occurrence. Trends alone do not provide quantitative testimony to a spacecraft's reliability, but they do indicate areas that command closer study. An in-depth analysis of a spec...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. C. Wilkinson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">345</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=AD620036"> <span id="translatedtitle">On Gravity Prediction Using Mean <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The efficiency of prediction of mean gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for areas of 1 degree x 1 degree, 2 degree x 2 degree, 5 degree x 5 degree, and 10 degree x 10 degree from known mean <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is studied. The least standard prediction error is found to be about 1/2...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">E. Groten</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1965-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">346</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/37406770"> <span id="translatedtitle">American depository receipts and calendar <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This is the first study to examine the presence of calendar <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in American Depository Receipts (ADR) returns. Existing literature has documented several calendar <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in US and foreign markets. ADRs, however, represent a unique class of securities because they represent the ownership of stock of a foreign firm, but they are traded on US markets. We use the Standard</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Janie Casello Bouges; Ravi Jain; Yash R. Puri</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">347</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/19954014"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fermi Surface of Lead from Kohn <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The dispersion relations for phonons in lead determined by neutron spectrometry exhibit a large number of Kohn <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, which may all be related to the Fermi surface in a consistent manner by considering both electron transitions diametrically across the Fermi surface and nondiametral transitions between points with parallel tangent planes. Factors affecting the size and shape of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are reviewed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Stedman; L. Almqvist; G. Nilsson; G. Raunio</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1967-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">348</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.cs.utexas.edu/~yzhang/Teaching/cs386m-f9/Readings/sigc05-mining-anomalies.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mining <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> using traffic feature distributions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The increasing practicality of large-scale flow capture makes it possible to conceive of traffic analysis methods that detect and identify a large and diverse set of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. However the challenge of effectively analyzing this massive data source for <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> diagnosis is as yet unmet. We argue that the distributions of packet features (IP addresses and ports) observed in flow traces</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Anukool Lakhina; Mark Crovella; Christophe Diot</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">349</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/972533"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> of Nuclear Criticality, Revision 6</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report is revision 6 of the <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> of Nuclear Criticality. This report is required reading for the training of criticality professionals in many organizations both nationally and internationally. This report describes many different classes of nuclear criticality <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that are different than expected.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Clayton, E. D.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Durst, Bonita E.; Erickson, David; Puigh, Raymond J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-02-19</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">350</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17779374"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lunar eclipse: infrared images and an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of possible internal origin.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Infrared images of the lunar eclipse of 13 April 1968 were obtained and compared with infrared images of the 19 December 1964 eclipse. A similarity of apparent strength and distribution of most thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on the maria is evident from inspection of these images, indicating that these features are not ephemeral. One new linear thermal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> was discovered, which is thermally enhanced during the lunar afternoon. Its close relation to a lunar crustal fracture line and other features of probable internal origin <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that this <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> may be of internal origin. PMID:17779374</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hunt, G R; Salisbury, J W; Vincent, R K</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1968-10-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">351</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850023287&hterms=Paleoclimatology&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DPaleoclimatology"> <span id="translatedtitle">Regional magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> constraints on continental rifting</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Radially polarized MAGSAT <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of North and South America, Europe, Africa, India, Australia and Antarctica demonstrate remarkably detailed correlation of regional magnetic lithospheric sources across rifted margins when plotted on a reconstruction of Pangea. These major magnetic features apparently preserve their integrity until a superimposed metamorphoric event alters the magnitude and pattern of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The longevity of continental scale magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> contrasts markedly with that of regional gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> which tend to reflect predominantly isostatic adjustments associated with neo-tectonism. First observed as a result of NASA's magnetic satellite programs, these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> provide new and fundamental constraints on the geologic evolution and dynamics of the continents and oceans. Accordingly, satellite magnetic observations provide a further tool for investigating continental drift to compliment other lines of evidence in paleoclimatology, paleontology, paleomagnetism, and studies of the radiometric ages and geometric fit of the continents.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.; Olivier, R.; Bentley, C. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">352</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18278307"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in patients with Down syndrome.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the incidence of dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Brazilian patients with Down syndrome. A sample with 49 panoramic x-rays of syndromic patients aged 3 to 33 years (22 male and 27 female) was used. The characteristics of dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were observed in the panoramic radiographs in both the primary and permanent dentition, according to the ICD (International Classification of Diseases). The corresponding tables and percentile analysis were elaborated. There was a high incidence of syndromic patients with different types of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, such as taurodontism (50%), proven anodontia (20.2%), suspected anodontia (10.7%), conic teeth (8.3%) and impacted teeth (5.9%). In conclusion, patients with Down syndrome presented a high incidence of dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and, in most cases, the same individual presented more than one dental <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. PMID:18278307</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">de Moraes, Mari Eli Leonelli; de Moraes, Luiz Cesar; Dotto, Gustavo Nogara; Dotto, Patrícia Pasquali; dos Santos, Luis Roque de Araújo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">353</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17625563"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spreading rate dependence of gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> along oceanic transform faults.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Mid-ocean ridge morphology and crustal accretion are known to depend on the spreading rate of the ridge. Slow-spreading mid-ocean-ridge segments exhibit significant crustal thinning towards transform and non-transform offsets, which is thought to arise from a three-dimensional process of buoyant mantle upwelling and melt migration focused beneath the centres of ridge segments. In contrast, fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges are characterized by smaller, segment-scale variations in crustal thickness, which reflect more uniform mantle upwelling beneath the ridge axis. Here we present a systematic study of the residual mantle Bouguer gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of 19 oceanic transform faults that reveals a strong correlation between gravity signature and spreading rate. Previous studies have shown that slow-slipping transform faults are marked by more positive gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> than their adjacent ridge segments, but our analysis reveals that intermediate and fast-slipping transform faults exhibit more negative gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> than their adjacent ridge segments. This finding indicates that there is a mass deficit at intermediate- and fast-slipping transform faults, which could reflect increased rock porosity, serpentinization of mantle peridotite, and/or crustal thickening. The most negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> correspond to topographic highs flanking the transform faults, rather than to transform troughs (where deformation is probably focused and porosity and alteration are expected to be greatest), indicating that crustal thickening could be an important contributor to the negative gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> observed. This finding in turn <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that three-dimensional magma accretion may occur near intermediate- and fast-slipping transform faults. PMID:17625563</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gregg, Patricia M; Lin, Jian; Behn, Mark D; Montési, Laurent G J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-07-12</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">354</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.A44B..01S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Atmospheric and Surface Forcings on Recent Arctic Temperature <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Arctic has seen outsized warming over the past decade (2000-2009) relative to lower latitudes. This reflects the combined effects of: 1) a general background warming interpreted as part of the planet’s response to positive radiative forcing; 2) <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in atmospheric circulation; 3) changes in characteristics of the surface, in particular, reduced sea ice concentration and higher SSTs compared to climatology. Background radiative forcing is <span class="hlt">suggested</span> from the widespread warming that is present for all seasons and for temperature <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> stratified by each of the four cardinal wind directions. <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in atmospheric circulation introduce spatial structure to seasonal temperature <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> patterns. For example, strong positive <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> centered between Svalbard and Novaya Zemlya in winter owe their existence in part to an anomalous southerly wind component. Circulation also explains local cooling, such as seen during spring over the quadrant from to date line eastward to 90 deg.W. The effects of reduced ice concentration are most apparent as regional “hot spots” in the temperature <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> field. Surface forcing is evident from the stronger warming at the surface compared to the 925 hPa level. Processes can be mutually supporting. The best example is the region of positive temperature <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> between Svalbard and Novaya Zemlya in winter - while both wind stress and warmth associated with anomalous southerly winds help to maintain open water, vertical heat fluxes from the open water help to keep the atmosphere warm. With regard to the trajectory of the Arctic system through the 21st century, an important issue is how the effects of atmospheric warming due to reduced sea ice concentration and higher SSTs will be spread out by winds to affect surrounding regions, acting as a feedback to foster more ice melt and reduce ice growth, or leading to enhanced warming over land affecting vegetation and soil temperature regimes. For the period 2000-2009, effects of winds in “spreading out the heat” are most apparent over the Atlantic side of the Arctic in winter and over the central Arctic Ocean in autumn.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Serreze, M. C.; Barrett, A. P.; Cassano, J. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">355</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013A%26A...557A..32R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Removal of two large-scale cosmic microwave background <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> after subtraction of the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Context. Although there is currently a debate over the significance of the claimed large-scale <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the cosmic microwave background (CMB), their existence is not totally dismissed. In parallel to the debate over their statistical significance, recent work has also focussed on masks and secondary anisotropies as <span class="hlt">potential</span> sources of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Aims: In this work we investigate simultaneously the impact of the method used to account for masked regions as well as the impact of the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect, which is the large-scale secondary anisotropy most likely to affect the CMB <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. In this sense, our work is an update of previous works. Our aim is to identify trends in CMB data from different years and with different mask treatments. Methods: We reconstruct the ISW signal due to 2 Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) and NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) galaxies, effectively reconstructing the low-redshift ISW signal out to z ~ 1. We account for regions of missing data using the sparse inpainting technique. We test sparse inpainting of the CMB, large scale structure and ISW and find that it constitutes a bias-free reconstruction method suitable to study large-scale statistical isotropy and the ISW effect. Results: We focus on three large-scale CMB <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: the low quadrupole, the quadrupole/octopole alignment, and the octopole planarity. After sparse inpainting, the low quadrupole becomes more anomalous, whilst the quadrupole/octopole alignment becomes less anomalous. The significance of the low quadrupole is unchanged after subtraction of the ISW effect, while the trend amongst the CMB maps is that both the low quadrupole and the quadrupole/octopole alignment have reduced significance, yet other hypotheses remain possible as well (e.g. exotic physics). Our results also <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that both of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may be due to the quadrupole alone. While the octopole planarity significance is reduced after inpainting and after ISW subtraction, however, we do not find that it was very anomalous to start with. In the spirit of participating in reproducible research, we make all codes and resulting products which constitute main results of this paper public here: http://www.cosmostat.org/<span class="hlt">anomalies</span>CMB.html</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rassat, A.; Starck, J.-L.; Dupé, F.-X.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">356</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JChPh.135w4502F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Inversion of sequence of diffusion and density <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in core-softened systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper we present a simulation study of water-like <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in core-softened system introduced in our previous papers. We investigate the anomalous regions for a system with the same functional form of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> but with different parameters and show that the order of the region of anomalous diffusion and the region of density <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is inverted with increasing the width of the repulsive shoulder.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fomin, Yu. D.; Tsiok, E. N.; Ryzhov, V. N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">357</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhyA..404..150B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Phase diagram and thermodynamic and dynamic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in a pure repulsive model</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using Monte Carlo simulations a lattice gas model with only repulsive interactions was checked for the presence of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. We show that this system exhibits the density (temperature of maximum density—TMD) and diffusion <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> as present in liquid water. These anomalous behaviors exist in the region of the chemical <span class="hlt">potential</span> vs temperature phase diagram where two structured phases are present. A fragile-to-strong dynamic transition is also observed in the vicinity of the TMD line.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bertolazzo, Andressa A.; Barbosa, Marcia C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">358</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20120010487&hterms=precipitation+isotope&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dprecipitation%2Bisotope"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Impact of Devegetated Dune Fields on North American Climate During the Late Medieval Climate <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During the Medieval Climate <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>, North America experienced severe droughts and widespread mobilization of dune fields that persisted for decades. We use an atmosphere general circulation model, forced by a tropical Pacific sea surface temperature reconstruction and changes in the land surface consistent with estimates of dune mobilization (conceptualized as partial devegetation), to investigate whether the devegetation could have exacerbated the medieval droughts. Presence of devegetated dunes in the model significantly increases surface temperatures, but has little impact on precipitation or drought severity, as defined by either the Palmer Drought Severity Index or the ratio of precipitation to <span class="hlt">potential</span> evapotranspiration. Results are similar to recent studies of the 1930s Dust Bowl drought, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> bare soil associated with the dunes, in and of itself, is not sufficient to amplify droughts over North America.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cook, B. I.; Seager, R.; Miller, R. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">359</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011GeoRL..3814704C"> <span id="translatedtitle">The impact of devegetated dune fields on North American climate during the late Medieval Climate <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During the Medieval Climate <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>, North America experienced severe droughts and widespread mobilization of dune fields that persisted for decades. We use an atmosphere general circulation model, forced by a tropical Pacific sea surface temperature reconstruction and changes in the land surface consistent with estimates of dune mobilization (conceptualized as partial devegetation), to investigate whether the devegetation could have exacerbated the medieval droughts. Presence of devegetated dunes in the model significantly increases surface temperatures, but has little impact on precipitation or drought severity, as defined by either the Palmer Drought Severity Index or the ratio of precipitation to <span class="hlt">potential</span> evapotranspiration. Results are similar to recent studies of the 1930s Dust Bowl drought, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> bare soil associated with the dunes, in and of itself, is not sufficient to amplify droughts over North America.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cook, B. I.; Seager, R.; Miller, R. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">360</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70016136"> <span id="translatedtitle">Enzyme leaching of surficial geochemical samples for detecting hydromorphic trace-element <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with precious-metal mineralized bedrock buried beneath glacial overburden in northern Minnesota</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">One objective of the International Falls and Roseau, Minnesota, CUSMAP projects was to develop a means of conducting regional-scale geochemical surveys in areas where bedrock is buried beneath complex glacially derived overburden. Partial analysis of B-horizon soils offered hope for detecting subtle hydromorphic trace-element dispersion patterns. An enzyme-based partial leach selectively removes metals from oxide coatings on the surfaces of soil materials without attacking their matrix. Most trace-element concentrations in the resulting solutions are in the part-per-trillion to low part-per-billion range, necessitating determinations by inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry. The resulting data show greater contrasts for many trace elements than with other techniques tested. Spatially, many trace metal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are locally discontinuous, but anomalous trends within larger areas are apparent. In many instances, the source for an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> seems to be either basal till or bedrock. Ground water flow is probably the most important mechanism for transporting metals toward the surface, although ionic diffusion, electrochemical gradients, and capillary action may play a role in <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> dispersal. Sample sites near the Rainy Lake-Seine River fault zone, a regional shear zone, often have anomalous concentrations of a variety of metals, commonly including Zn and/or one or more metals which substitute for Zn in sphalerite (Cd, Ge, Ga, and Sn). Shifts in background concentrations of Bi, Sb, and As show a trend across the area indicating a possible regional zoning of lode-Au mineralization. Soil <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of Ag, Co, and Tl parallel basement structures, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> areas that may have <span class="hlt">potential</span> for Cobalt/Thunder Baytype silver viens. An area around Baudette, Minnesota, which is underlain by quartz-chlorite-carbonate-altered shear zones, is anomalous in Ag, As, Bi, Co, Mo, Te, Tl, and W. <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> of Ag, As, Bi, Te, and W tend to follow the fault zones, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> for lode-Au deposits. Soil <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of Co, Mo, and Tl appear to follow northwest-striking structures that cross the shear zones, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that Thunder Bay-type mineralization may have overprinted earlier mineralization along the shear zones.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Clark, Robert, J.; Meier, A. L.; Riddle, G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">361</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24821302"> <span id="translatedtitle">Associated nonurinary congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> among infants with congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Infants with congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) often have other associated <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the prevalence and the types of associated <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in CAKUT in a defined population from northeastern France. The associated <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in CAKUT were collected in all livebirths, stillbirths and terminations of pregnancy during 26 years in 346,831 consecutive births of known outcome in the area covered by our population based registry of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Of the 1678 infants with CAKUT born during this period (prevalence at birth of 48.4 per 10,000), 563 (34%) had associated <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. There were 119 (7%) patients with chromosomal abnormalities including 33 trisomies 18 (2%), and 168 (10%) nonchromosomal recognized dysmorphic conditions. There were no predominant recognized dysmorphic conditions, but VA(C)TER(L) association (3%). However, other recognised dysmorphic conditions were registered including Meckel-Gruber syndrome (2%), and prune belly syndrome (1%). Two hundred seventy six (16%) of the patients had multiple congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, non syndromic, non chromosomal (MCA). <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in the musculoskeletal, the digestive, the cardiovascular and the central nervous systems were the most common other <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Prenatal diagnosis was obtained in 71% of dysmorphic syndromes with CAKUT. In conclusion the overall prevalence of associated <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, which was one in three infants, emphasizes the need for a thorough investigation of infants with CAKUT. The most commonly associated major nonurinary <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> involved the musculoskeletal system, followed by the digestive, the cardiovascular and the central nervous systems. A routine screening for other <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may be considered in infants and in fetuses with CAKUT. One should be aware that the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with CAKUT can be classified into a recognizable <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> syndrome or pattern in one out of six infants with CAKUT. PMID:24821302</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stoll, Claude; Dott, Beatrice; Alembik, Yves; Roth, Marie-Paule</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">362</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/mwm3513655231j28.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Stock Market <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>: What Can We Learn from Repurchases and Insider Trading?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We examine whether managers’ trading decisions (both at a firm and personal level) are correlated with trading strategies\\u000a <span class="hlt">suggested</span> by the operating accruals and the post-earnings announcement drift (SUE) <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. We discuss advantages and disadvantages\\u000a of the use of managerial trading activity to infer managers’ private valuation about their own securities. Our results provide\\u000a corroborative evidence for the accruals <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">John E. Core; Wayne R. Guay; Scott A. Richardson; Rodrigo S. Verdi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">363</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/443768"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hydrocephalus, skeletal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and mental disturbances in a mother and three daughters: A new syndrome</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report on a family in which a mother and her 3 daughters have delayed psychomotor development and/or psychosis, hydrocephalus with white matter alterations, arachnoid cysts, skeletal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> consisting of brachydactyly, and Sprengel <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Biochemical and cytogenetic analyses were normal on all 4 patients. The pattern of inheritance, clinical manifestations, and variability of expression <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that this is a new hydrocephalus syndrome possibly transmitted as an X-linked dominant trait. 24 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ferlini, A.; Zanetti, A.; Milan, M.; Calzolari, E. [Universita di Ferrara, London (United Kingdom)] [and others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-12-04</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">364</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFMGP11B0076R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Uncertainty in magnetization directions derived from planetary magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in view of numerical experiments with coalesced <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from Earth</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Martian magnetization vectors and paleopole locations determined by different investigators using different methodologies are contradictory. I <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that one of the reasons for this is that the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that are assumed to be caused by a homogeneously magnetized source may actually be due to coalescence of multiple crustal sources that may be magnetically coherently or incoherently magnetized and whose coalescence effects at higher observation altitudes lead to derived magnetization directions that are completely different than the ones perceived from lower altitudes. To demonstrate the deleterious effect of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> coalescence, I chose marine magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over a small 4 degree by 4 degree area gridded at 0.1 degree spacing in the NW Atlantic Ocean and computed by inverse techniques magnetization vectors at surface, 10 km, 20 km, and 50 km altitudes. The analysis considered many indicators of the numerical stability in the inversion of magnetization through the equivalent source method, namely the source spacing, the source to observation distance, the mathematical condition number and the rank of the matrix, and also visual characteristics of the observed field and the derived magnetization intensity, inclination, and declination. A comparison of the stable solutions at each altitude shows that the derived solutions are completely different from one another. The lowest altitude Mars magnetic data are at close to 100 km elevation, but has many gaps, and the cleanest and the most complete magnetic data are at close to 400 km elevation. Since it was not even possible to recover similar magnetic directions from the surface and 10 km altitude <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, it should be clear that, unless the Martian <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are all created by homogeneously magnetized contiguous sources whose geometries are known a priori (as in the well-known seamount magnetization problem), deriving meaningful magnetization directions from the coalesced observed <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is impossible. While the prospect of understanding the tectonic framework of Mars through the paleomagnetism of its tectonic terranes is tantalizing, the impossibility obtaining meaningful magnetic directions from coalesced <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is reflected in the scattered magnetic pole locations obtained by different researchers using different methods.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ravat, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">365</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA034833"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Correlation Study Relating Spacecraft <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> to Environmental Data.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An environmental data program was initiated so that the operational environment for geosynchronous orbiting DSCS satellites could be specified at times of satellite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> studied included uncommanded logic reset <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, spinup anomal...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. P. Pike M. H. Bunn</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">366</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..12.3844N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Strong impacts of the Gulf Stream <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on the large-scale atmospheric state</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Geological data and climate simulation models <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) that plays a critical role in the global thermohaline circulation may have gone through major fluctuations in the past, bringing with them major climatic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> around the basin. A future collapse of the NADW formation has been a concern, as theories and climate simulation models <span class="hlt">suggest</span> freshening of the North Atlantic as a result of the carbon dioxide increase in the atmosphere. Meanwhile, attempts to find strong impacts of SST <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the North Atlantic on the large-scale atmospheric state in the data and simulation experiments had not been very successful, casting some doubt on the extent to which the thermohaline circulation fluctuations affect the Northern Hemispheric climate. In an attempt to find evidence of strong impacts of the SST <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> along the Gulf Stream on the regional and Northern Hemispheric climates, we analyzed the ERA40 reanalysis data and Hadley Centre SST data with the near-surface baroclinicity as the key parameter that connects the extra-tropical SST <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with the large-scale atmospheric <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. We first calculated EOFs of the near-surface baroclinicity for the domain that covers the North Atlantic storm track for each month. We then compiled <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> composites of the SST, net surface heat flux, and various atmospheric fields for the positive and negative phases of the first two EOFs for each month. We also compiled composites of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for the preceding and following months for the first two EOFs. From the above diagnoses, we identified strong impacts of the SST <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the vicinity of the Gulf Stream on the large-scale atmospheric state, mostly in cold months. The scale of the atmospheric <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> generated is very large, on the order of 1000km to 10000km, spanning the entire hemisphere. Roughly speaking, there are two patterns of atmospheric <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. One is characterized by a meridional shift in the subtropical jet core and storm track, while the other is characterized by an enhancement or suppression of the jet and storm track. The anomalous surface temperature pattern that accompanies the events of a meridionally-shifted jet is the pattern found for the Arctic Oscillation. The SST <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> found in the composites often show large values along the Gulf Stream, and appear to have a direct impact on the near-surface baroclinicity. Composited <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the net surface heat flux and surface wind in the preceding months strongly <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the SST <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are not the direct product of the anomalous atmospheric forcing, and that the anomalous Gulf Stream is likely to be responsible for generating the major large-scale <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the atmosphere. It implies that even larger SST <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the vicinity of the Gulf Stream expected in the event of the NADW formation collapse will likely have dramatic impacts on the Northern Hemisphere. We note, however, that major <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the atmosphere is not necessarily guaranteed when there are large SST <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> along the Gulf Stream. The atmosphere responds to the SST <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> only when the near-surface baroclinicity is modified in such a way that the modified baroclinicity favors generation of the atmospheric response.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nakamura, Mototaka; Yamane, Shozo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">367</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JHEP...11..205L"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> and the helicity of the thermal state</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the thermal expectation value of the following observeable at finite temperature T and chemical <span class="hlt">potential</span> ?: < > where denote the angular momenta, and denotes the spatial momentum in d spacetime dimensions with d even. We call this observeable the thermal helicity. Using a variety of arguments, we motivate the surprising assertion that thermal helicity per unit volume is a polynomial in T and ?. Further, in field theories without chiral gravitino, we conjecture that this polynomial can be derived from the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> polynomial of the theory. We show that this conjecture is related to the recent conjecture on gravitational <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> induced transport made in arXiv:1201.2812. We support these statements by various sphere partition function computations in free theories.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Loganayagam, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">368</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4054024"> <span id="translatedtitle">Esthetic dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> as motive for bullying in schoolchildren</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Facial esthetics, including oral esthetics, can severely affect children's quality-of-life, causing physical, social and psychological impairment. Children and adolescents with esthetic-related dental malformations are <span class="hlt">potential</span> targets for bullies. This study was aimed to present and discuss patients who suffered from bullying at school and family environment due to esthetic-related teeth <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Providing an adequate esthetic dental treatment is an important step in their rehabilitation when the lack of esthetic is the main source of bullying. After dental treatment, we noted significant improvement in self-esteem, self-confidence, socialization and academic performance of all patients and improvement in parental satisfaction regarding the appearance of their children. It is imperative that both family and school care providers be constantly alert about bullying in order to prevent or interrupt aggressive and discriminatory practices against children and adolescents. Clearly, dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may be a motive for bullying.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Scheffel, Debora Lopes Salles; Jeremias, Fabiano; Fragelli, Camila Maria Bullio; dos Santos-Pinto, Lourdes Aparecida Martins; Hebling, Josimeri; de Oliveira, Osmir Batista</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">369</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24966759"> <span id="translatedtitle">Esthetic dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> as motive for bullying in schoolchildren.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Facial esthetics, including oral esthetics, can severely affect children's quality-of-life, causing physical, social and psychological impairment. Children and adolescents with esthetic-related dental malformations are <span class="hlt">potential</span> targets for bullies. This study was aimed to present and discuss patients who suffered from bullying at school and family environment due to esthetic-related teeth <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Providing an adequate esthetic dental treatment is an important step in their rehabilitation when the lack of esthetic is the main source of bullying. After dental treatment, we noted significant improvement in self-esteem, self-confidence, socialization and academic performance of all patients and improvement in parental satisfaction regarding the appearance of their children. It is imperative that both family and school care providers be constantly alert about bullying in order to prevent or interrupt aggressive and discriminatory practices against children and adolescents. Clearly, dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may be a motive for bullying. PMID:24966759</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Scheffel, Débora Lopes Salles; Jeremias, Fabiano; Fragelli, Camila Maria Bullio; Dos Santos-Pinto, Lourdes Aparecida Martins; Hebling, Josimeri; de Oliveira, Osmir Batista</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">370</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007SPIE.6565E...2S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hyperspectral <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection beyond RX</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The basic multivariate <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detector ("the RX algorithm") of Kelly and Reed remains little altered after nearly 30 years and performs reasonably well with hyperspectral imagery. However, better performance can be achieved in spectral applications by recognizing a deficiency in the hypothesis test that generates RX. The problem is commonly associated with the improved performance that results from deleting several high-variance clutter dimensions before applying RX, a procedure not envisioned in the original algorithm. There is, moreover, a better way to enhance detection than simply deleting the offending subspace. Instead of invoking the "additive target" model, one can exploit expected differences in spectral variability between target and background signals in the clutter dimensions. Several methods are discussed for achieving detection gain using this principle. Two of these are based on modifications to the RX hypothesis test. One results in Joint Subspace Detection, the other in an algorithm with a similar form but which does not postulate a clutter subspace. Each of these modifies the RX algorithm to incorporate clutter-dependent weights, including "anti-RX" terms in the clutter subspace. A newer approach is also described, which effects a nonlinear suppression of false alarms that are detected by an RX-type algorithm, employed as a preprocessor. Both techniques rely ultimately on the incorporation of simple spectral phenomenology into the detection process.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schaum, A. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">371</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10409558"> <span id="translatedtitle">The free-convective <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Persons exposed to high temperature, or to equivalent environmental factors, have quantifiable reactions, such as reducing the resistance to both heat and moisture flow in skin tissues and clothing needed to maintain thermal equilibrium. The one-to-one relationship between this resistance in the walking person and temperature, with the other factors neutral, is the basis for the apparent temperature scale and the derived heat index. When this approach is taken to assess the thermal environment for a still person exposed to heat in still air, there is a zone of ambient conditions in which there are three solutions to the heat-balance equation. Extraordinary thermal stress occurs, depending slightly on other conditions, at ambient temperatures near 41 degrees C, especially at high humidity, because of the difficulty in carrying sweat vapor from the person when free convection is minimal. This <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is examined for a range of ambient vapor pressures and extra radiation. The rapid rise in heat stress when ambient temperature just exceeds body temperature in still conditions may explain the severity of some observed distress. PMID:10409558</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Steadman, R G</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">372</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20130011182&hterms=pla&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3D%2522pla%2522"> <span id="translatedtitle">Data Mining for <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Vehicle Integrated Prognostics Reasoner (VIPR) program describes methods for enhanced diagnostics as well as a prognostic extension to current state of art Aircraft Diagnostic and Maintenance System (ADMS). VIPR introduced a new <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection function for discovering previously undetected and undocumented situations, where there are clear deviations from nominal behavior. Once a baseline (nominal model of operations) is established, the detection and analysis is split between on-aircraft outlier generation and off-aircraft expert analysis to characterize and classify events that may not have been anticipated by individual system providers. Offline expert analysis is supported by data curation and data mining algorithms that can be applied in the contexts of supervised learning methods and unsupervised learning. In this report, we discuss efficient methods to implement the Kolmogorov complexity measure using compression algorithms, and run a systematic empirical analysis to determine the best compression measure. Our experiments established that the combination of the DZIP compression algorithm and CiDM distance measure provides the best results for capturing relevant properties of time series data encountered in aircraft operations. This combination was used as the basis for developing an unsupervised learning algorithm to define "nominal" flight segments using historical flight segments.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Biswas, Gautam; Mack, Daniel; Mylaraswamy, Dinkar; Bharadwaj, Raj</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">373</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24593866"> <span id="translatedtitle">Four miniature kidneys: supernumerary kidney and multiple organ system <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">More than 350 years after Martius's first reported case in 1656, supernumerary kidney (SNK) continues to fascinate the world of medicine, generating new ideas in the domain of embryogenesis. Association of a normal kidney with a second or third ipsilateral smaller kidney is an extremely rare <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> with only a total of 81 cases reported until today. We are reporting a case of SNK, clinically diagnosed as right hydronephrosis, associated with an ipsilateral ectopic ureter, a contralateral partially duplicated ureter, and a multiseptate gallbladder. Pathologic examination of the nephrectomy revealed 4 miniature kidneys, joining a dilated ureter through 4 separate conduits. Our patient is the first reported case of SNK with absent ipsilateral normal kidney, presence of more than 3 kidneys on 1 side, and associated <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the gallbladder. This case represents a unique combination of rarities, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> insights in the domain of molecular embryology. PMID:24593866</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Afrouzian, Marjan; Sonstein, Joseph; Dadfarnia, Tahereh; Sreshta, J Nicholas; Hawkins, Hal K</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">374</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhRvD..86f4023A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Brans-Dicke theory and the Pioneer <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Scalar-tensor theory offers the possibility of a modification of Newtonian gravity due to the presence of a 4d scalar dilaton field. The prototypical version of such a theory, massless Brans-Dicke theory, is considered here in the Einstein frame representation. The acceleration of a test mass is obtained from the exact 4d Xanthopoulos-Zannias solutions with spherical symmetry. The deviation of this acceleration from the pure Newtonian gravitational acceleration is examined to see if it can account for the anomalous Pioneer acceleration, while satisfying solar system constraints. Theoretical considerations, along with limits inferred from Pioneer 10 data, <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that Brans-Dicke gravity could account for no more than a small fraction of the Pioneer <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, so that a complete explanation of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> must lie elsewhere.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Anderson, John D.; Morris, J. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">375</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3892239"> <span id="translatedtitle">Prevalence of dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Indian population</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Objectives: Developmental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the dentition are not infrequently observed by the dental practitioner. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the Indian population. Study Design: A retrospective study of 4133 panoramic radiographs of patients, who attended the Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Jodhpur Dental College General Hospital between September 2008 to December 2012 was done. The ages of the patients ranged from 13 to 38 years with a mean age of 21.8 years. The orthopantomographs (OPGs) and dental records were examined for any unusual finding such as congenitally missing teeth, impactions, ectopic eruption, supernumerary teeth, odontoma, dilacerations, taurodontism, dens in dente, germination and fusion, among others. Results: 1519 (36.7%) patients had at least one dental <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The congenitally missing teeth 673 (16.3%) had the highest prevalence, followed by impacted teeth 641 (15.5%), supernumerary teeth 51 (1.2%) and microdontia 41 (1.0%). Other <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were found at lower prevalence ranging from transposition 7 (0.1%) to ectopic eruption 30 (0.7%). Conclusion: The most prevalent <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the Indian population was congenitally missing teeth (16.3%), and the second frequent <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> was impacted teeth (15.5%), whereas, macrodontia, odontoma and transposition were the least frequent <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, with a prevalence of 0.2%, 0.2% and 0.1% respectively. While the overall prevalence of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may be low, the early diagnosis is imperative for the patient management and treatment planning. Key words:Dental <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, prevalence, panoramic radiography.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Doni, Bharati; Kaswan, Sumita; Rahman, Farzan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">376</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3806762"> <span id="translatedtitle">Altered Orientation and Flight Paths of Pigeons Reared on Gravity <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>: A GPS Tracking Study</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The mechanisms of pigeon homing are still not understood, in particular how they determine their position at unfamiliar locations. The “gravity vector” theory holds that pigeons memorize the gravity vector at their home loft and deduct home direction and distance from the angular difference between memorized and actual gravity vector. However, the gravity vector is tilted by different densities in the earth crust leading to gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. We predicted that pigeons reared on different gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> would show different initial orientation and also show changes in their flight path when crossing a gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. We reared one group of pigeons in a strong gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> with a north-to-south gravity gradient, and the other group of pigeons in a normal area but on a spot with a strong local <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> with a west-to-east gravity gradient. After training over shorter distances, pigeons were released from a gravitationally and geomagnetically normal site 50 km north in the same direction for both home lofts. As expected by the theory, the two groups of pigeons showed divergent initial orientation. In addition, some of the GPS-tracked pigeons also showed changes in their flight paths when crossing gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. We conclude that even small local gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at the birth place of pigeons may have the <span class="hlt">potential</span> to bias the map sense of pigeons, while reactivity to gravity gradients during flight was variable and appeared to depend on individual navigational strategies and frequency of position updates.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Blaser, Nicole; Guskov, Sergei I.; Meskenaite, Virginia; Kanevskyi, Valerii A.; Lipp, Hans-Peter</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">377</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8986284"> <span id="translatedtitle">Family with branchial arch <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, hearing loss, ear and commissural lip pits, and rib <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. A new autosomal recessive condition: branchio-oto-costal syndrome?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report on a family in which 3 sibs were affected with conductive deafness, bilateral preauricular and commissural lip pits, monolateral branchial fistula, and rib <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. On the basis of parental consanguinity, lack of clinical variability and affected subjects of both sexes, this condition seems to be inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that these findings comprise a new autosomal recessive entity of branchial, auricular and costal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, for which we <span class="hlt">suggest</span> the acronym BOC (branchio-oto-costal) syndrome. PMID:8986284</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Clementi, M; Mammi, I; Tenconi, R</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">378</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5587891"> <span id="translatedtitle">Regional magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> constraints on continental breakup</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Continental lithosphere magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> mapped by the Magsat satellite are related to tectonic features associated with regional compositional variations of the crust and upper mantle and crustal thickness and thermal perturbations. These continental-scale <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> patterns when corrected for varying observation elevation and the global change in the direction and intensity of the geomagnetic field show remarkable correlation of regional lithospheric magnetic sources across rifted continental margins when plotted on a reconstruction of Pangea. Accordingly, these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> provide new and fundamental constraints on the geologic evolution and dynamics of the continents and oceans.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">von Frese, R.R.B.; Hinze, W.J.; Olivier, R.; Bentley, C.R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">379</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003SPIE.5079..184J"> <span id="translatedtitle">Visual <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and display night vision goggles</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A brief study has been conducted to investigate several visual <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> reported by test pilots using a Display Night Vision Goggle (DNVG) that superimposed symbols onto the intensified image seen by the right eye. A survey of relevant research <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that one oddity, an apparent focus mis-match between the scene image and the injected symbols, is an irremovable facet of the perception of bright, contrasting, overlaid symbols. A second oddity, an uncomfortable and distracting blurring of the under-stimulated left eye during periods of flight in cloud, was eventually experienced by several people in a laboratory simulation, the effect being more noticeable if the under-stimulated eye was the dominant eye. A subsequent apparent enlargement of the HUD symbols and a post-flight focussing delay by the left eye seemed to be after-effects of whatever caused the ocular discomfort. As about 30% of the population are left eye dominant, the disturbing discomfort and aftermath could affect this proportion of pilots using a right-eye DNVG. Although further work is needed to understand the phenomena, it would be wise to warn aircrew and enable the symbol injection unit to be fitted to either channel of the DNVG.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jarrett, Donald N.; Ineson, Judith; Cheetham, Mark</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">380</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.V53A2238T"> <span id="translatedtitle">New experimental constraints for Hadean zircon source melts from Ce and Eu <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in zircon</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A common feature of zircon rare earth element profiles is that they often have enriched chondrite normalized Ce abundances relative to bracketing rare earth elements (REEs) La and Pr. The magnitude of a zircon Ce <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is generally attributed to an increase in Ce4+/Ce3+ of the crystallizing medium (Ce4+ is more compatible than Ce3+ in zircon), which is associated with more oxidizing environments. Zircons may also have depleted chondrite normalized Eu abundances relative to Sm and Gd. A negative Eu <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> may be indicative of more reducing conditions (Eu2+ is incompatible in zircon) or depletion of Eu in the melt from plagioclase prior to or during zircon crystallization. We report experimental data from zircons crystallized in hydrous peralkaline, metaluminous, and peraluminous melts (800-1300oC; 10 kbar) with the oxygen fugacity buffered from ~IW to HM+1 in order to constrain magnitude of zircon Ce and Eu <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Zircon Ce <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> increase in magnitude with higher oxygen fugacities and lower crystallization temperatures; Eu <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are more negative at ~IW vs. NNO for the same temperature and melt composition. Our experiments also show that with the oxygen fugacity buffered at NNO, zircons may have both positive Ce <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and negative Eu <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Thus, Eu2+ and Ce4+ may co-exist in terrestrial melts; furthermore, melt depletion of Eu by plagioclase fractionation prior to (or during) zircon crystallization may not be a requisite for the presence of zircon Eu <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in (Hadean) zircons. The magnitude of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is also a function of the melt composition; peraluminous melts yield the largest positive Ce (or negative Eu) <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at a given oxygen fugacity and temperature. Extrapolation of our preliminary empirical calibration to the crystallization temperatures of the Jack Hills Hadean zircons (~700oC) <span class="hlt">suggests</span> the magnitude of Ce <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in approximately half of the Hadean zircons cannot be produced in metaluminous or peralkaline melts, even at oxygen fugacities as high as HM+1. However, the magnitude of Ce <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Hadean zircons is within the range of predicted <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of our experiments for peraluminous melts, implying that a significant portion of the Hadean zircon population may be derived from peraluminous melts. This result is consistent with muscovite inclusion mineralogy in Hadean zircons (e.g., Hopkins et al., 2008), but does not preclude the possibility of other, less evolved peraluminous source rocks, or some process which leads to significant Ce enrichment (relative to La and/or Pr) in the melt at the time of zircon crystallization.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Trail, D.; Watson, E. B.; Tailby, N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">381</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22229671"> <span id="translatedtitle">Case report: a prototypical experience of 'poltergeist' activity, conspicuous quantitative electroencephalographic patterns, and sLORETA profiles - <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for intervention.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">People who report objects moving in their presence, unusual sounds, glows around other people, and multiple sensed presences but do not meet the criteria for psychiatric disorders have been shown to exhibit electrical <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over the right temporal lobes. This article reports the striking quantitative electroencephalography, sLORETA results, and experimental elicitation of similar subjective experiences in a middle-aged woman who has been distressed by these classic phenomena that began after a head injury. She exhibited a chronic electrical <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> over the right temporoinsular region. The rotation of a small pinwheel near her while she 'concentrated' upon it was associated with increased coherence between the left and right temporal lobes and concurrent activation of the left prefrontal region. The occurrence of the unusual phenomena and marked 'sadness' was associated with increased geomagnetic activity; she reported a similar mood when these variations were simulated experimentally. Our quantitative measurements <span class="hlt">suggest</span> people displaying these experiences and possible anomalous energies can be viewed clinically and <span class="hlt">potentially</span> treated. PMID:22229671</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Roll, William G; Saroka, Kevin S; Mulligan, Bryce P; Hunter, Mathew D; Dotta, Blake T; Gang, Noa; Scott, Mandy A; St-Pierre, Linda S; Persinger, Michael A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">382</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993NuPhA.555..606S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Threshold <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in 16O + 209Bi system</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Elastic-scattering angular distributions for the 16O + 209Bi system have been measured at laboratory energies of 80, 83, 90,95, 98 and 100 MeV. The present data along with the data available from the literature for this system, have been analysed using the optical model, employing both the phenomenological and the microscopic <span class="hlt">potentials</span>. Evidence is found for a marked energy dependence of the real part of the optical <span class="hlt">potential</span> — threshold <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> — around the Coulomb barrier. The application of the dispersion relation proposed by Mahaux et al. to the energy variation of the imaginary part of the <span class="hlt">potential</span>, reproduces the observed energy dependence of the real <span class="hlt">potential</span>. Further it is demonstrated by a calculation that the "threshold <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>" determined from elastic-scattering analysis is consistent with the enhancement of the fusion cross section observed at sub-barrier energies. It is also observed that the dispersive correction to the real <span class="hlt">potential</span> already reported for 16O + 208Pb is similar to that found here for 16O + 209Bi which has an extra proton.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Singh, P.; Kailas, S.; Chatterjee, A.; Kerekatte, S. S.; Navin, A.; Nijasure, A.; John, B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">383</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6888236"> <span id="translatedtitle">A source for the New York-Alabama magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in eastern Tennessee: Felsic intrusions concealed beneath the Paleozoic shelf strata</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Several vibroseis industry seismic lines have been reprocessed and recorrelated to obtain images from the deep crust. These lines straddle the New York-Alabama magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and intersect it at approximately right angles. Beneath the Paleozoic shelf rocks within the crystalline crust a distinct wedge-shaped geometry appears in the data that opens up to the northeast and tapers to an apex near the steepest part of the magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Two parallel reflection seismic profiles indicate that the wedge-shaped feature extends for at least 25 km in a NE-SW direction along the New York-Alabama magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The data image a geometry that is bounded above by the Paleozoic rocks of the Cumberland plateau and Valley and Ridge provinces, and below by a west dipping contact between the interpreted felsic intrusion and adjacent rocks. The intrusion exhibits overall low reflectivity with faintly visible subhorizontal reflections. The crust southeast and beneath the body is characterized by high reflectivity and a strong west-dipping fabric. The contrast between the wedge and adjacent crust could result from the emplacement of the body following events that produced the west-dipping fabric. The gravity signature requires a negative density contrast between the interpreted felsic wedge and the adjacent crust, the density of the wedge being lower. The magnetic signature can be interpreted to indicate that the wedge has a higher susceptibility than adjacent crust. The <span class="hlt">potential</span> field data are consistent with the interpretation of a granitic wedge that is accompanied by a contact aureole of even higher magnetic susceptibility. The authors propose that felsic intrusions, possibly with contact aureoles, are responsible for at least part of the strong New York-Alabama magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The striking linearity of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> <span class="hlt">suggests</span> tectonic control on the emplacement of the intrusions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hopkins, D.L.; Costain, J.K. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences); Zietz, I. (George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (United States). Inst. of Geography and Geology)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">384</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/36515757"> <span id="translatedtitle">Developmental Differences in Eyewitness <span class="hlt">Suggestibility</span> and Memory for Source</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">To what extent do children who report <span class="hlt">suggested</span> information believe they actually remember seeing the <span class="hlt">suggested</span> details they report? Asking whether children misremember seeing <span class="hlt">suggested</span> items is in essence a question about children?s ability to monitor the source of their memories. The current study reports the results of two experiments designed to assess <span class="hlt">potential</span> age-related changes in subjects? ability to</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jennifer K. Ackil; Maria S. Zaragoza</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">385</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a000000/a002800/a002889/index.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pacific Temperature <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> with Color Key</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This animation shows the El Nino-La Nina Sea Surface Temperature <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> from January 1997 through July 1999. A color bar is displayed below the data. This animation is a minor revision of animation ID 790.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shirah, Greg; Starr, Cindy; Busalacchi, Antonio; Schultz, Peter</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-02-09</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">386</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012Ap%26SS.337..483G"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Pioneer <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and the holographic scenario</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper we discuss the recently obtained relation between the Verlinde's holographic model and the first phenomenological Modified Newtonian dynamics. This gives also a promising possible explanation to the Pioneer <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Giné, Jaume</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">387</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19840056025&hterms=Central+Africa&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3D%2522Central%2BAfrica%2522"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reduction of satellite magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Analysis of global magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> maps derived from satellite data is facilitated by inversion to the equivalent magnetization in a constant thickness magnetic crust or, equivalently, by reduction to the pole. Previous inversions have proven unstable near the geomagnetic equator. The instability results from magnetic moment distributions which are admissible in the inversion solution but which make only small contribution to the computed values of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> field. Their admissibility in the solution could result from noisy or incomplete data or from small poorly resolved <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The resulting magnetic moments are unrealistically large and oscillatory. Application of the method of principal components (e.g. eigenvalue decomposition and selective elimination of less significant eigenvectors) is proposed as a way of overcoming the instability and the method is demonstrated by applying it to the region around the Bangui <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in Central Africa.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Slud, E. V.; Smith, P. J.; Langel, R. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">388</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/891727"> <span id="translatedtitle">Design and Implementation of an <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detector</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper describes the design and implementation of a general-purpose <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detector for streaming data. Based on a survey of similar work from the literature, a basic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detector builds a model on normal data, compares this model to incoming data, and uses a threshold to determine when the incoming data represent an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Models compactly represent the data but still allow for effective comparison. Comparison methods determine the distance between two models of data or the distance between a model and a point. Threshold selection is a largely neglected problem in the literature, but the current implementation includes two methods to estimate thresholds from normal data. With these components, a user can construct a variety of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection schemes. The implementation contains several methods from the literature. Three separate experiments tested the performance of the components on two well-known and one completely artificial dataset. The results indicate that the implementation works and can reproduce results from previous experiments.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bagherjeiran, A; Cantu-Paz, E; Kamath, C</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-07-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">389</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22Tectonic+Plates%22&pg=4&id=EJ386135"> <span id="translatedtitle">Understanding Magnetic <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> and Their Significance.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Describes a laboratory exercise testing the Vine-Matthews-Morley hypothesis of plate tectonics. Includes 14 questions with explanations using graphs and charts. Provides a historical account of the current plate tectonic and magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> theory. (MVL)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shea, James H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">390</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA580327"> <span id="translatedtitle">Compressive Hyperspectral Imaging and <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have developed and applied successfully new algorithms for hyperspectral imagery. These include compressive sensing, <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection, target detection, endmember detection, unmixing and change detection. These were tested on data provided by AFRL wit...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">K. Kelly P. Thiyanarantnam S. Chen S. Osher W. Yin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">391</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993Metic..28R.317A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Wolf-Rayet Stars and the Isotopic <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Connection</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Isotopic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are now known to be carried by high-temperature inclusions of primitive meteorites that formed from solar reservoirs out of equilibrium with the rest of the solar nebula, as well as by various types of grains (diamond, graphite, SiC) that are considered to be of circumstellar origin, and have survived the process of incorporation into the solar system (see e.g. [1] for a recent review). Such <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> provide new clues to many important astrophysical problems, and raise the question of their nucleosynthetic origin. In fact, they offer the exciting perspective of confronting abundance observations with nucleosynthesis models for a very limited number of events, even possibly a single one. This situation is in marked contrast with the one encountered when trying to understand the bulk solar system composition. Up to now, Red Giant stars, massive mass loosing objects (of the Wolf-Rayet type), novae or supernovae have been proposed as possible contributors to the observed <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. In this paper, we revisit the role that could possibly be played in that respect by Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars. Wolf-Rayet stars are appealing isotopic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> contributors for many reasons. In particular (1) they are observed to loose mass at very large rates that can exceed 10^-5M solar masses yr^-l, the ejected material being contaminated with the products of hydrogen and helium burning, and (2) certain WR stars are known to make dust episodically in their winds [e.g., 2]. In addition, the role of WR stars would be well in line with the "bing-bang" model for the isotopic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> promoted by Reeves [3]. The aim of this contribution is to extent and update previous calculations [4,5] of the isotopic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that could be carried by the wind of WR stars of various masses and initial compositions during different phases of their evolution, those <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> possibly loading circumstellar WR grains. The calculation of the WR wind composition is performed on grounds of detailed stellar evolutionary models that incorporate extended nuclear reaction networks, as well as recent improvements in our knowledge of various basic physical ingredients, like mass loss rates, opacities, or nuclear reaction rates. Results will be presented for various radionuclides with lifetimes in excess of ~10^5 yr, which are considered to be responsible for certain observed <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, or which could lead to <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that remain unobserved at present. Isotopic patterns for the elements ranging from carbon to lead will also be presented. Those predictions will be confronted with existing data, or will help unravel cases of <span class="hlt">potential</span> interest for further laboratory quest. References: [1] Harper C. L. Jr. (1992) In Nuclei in the Cosmos II (F. Kappeler and K. Wisshak, eds.), 113-126, IOP Publ. Co. [2] Williams P. M. et al. (1992) Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc., 258, 461-475. [3] Reeves H. (1978) In Protostars and Planets (T. Gehrels, ed.), 339-426, Univ. of Arizona. [4] Arnould M. and Prantzos N. (1986) In Nucleosynthesis and Its Implications on Nuclear and Particle Physics, (J. Audouze and N. Mathieu, eds.), 363-372, Reidel. [5] Meynet G. and Arnould M. (1993) In Origin and Evolution of the Elements (N. Prantzos et al., eds.), Cambridge, in press.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Arnould, M.; Paulus, G.; Meynet, G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">392</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20060037774&hterms=information+overload&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Dinformation%2Boverload"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Distance Measure for Attention Focusing and <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection in Systems Monitoring</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Any attempt to introduce automation into the monitoring of complex physical systems must start from a robust <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection capability. This task is far from straightforward, for a single definition of what constitutes an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is difficult to come by. In addition, to make the monitoring process efficient, and to avoid the <span class="hlt">potential</span> for information overload on human operators, attention focusing must also be addressed. When an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> occurs, more often than not several sensors are affected, and the partially redundant information they provide can be confusing, particularly in a crisis situation where a response is needed quickly. Previous results on extending traditional <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection techniques are summarized. The focus of this paper is a new technique for attention focusing.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Doyle, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">393</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012RaSc...47.4006J"> <span id="translatedtitle">Long-term ionospheric <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> monitoring for ground based augmentation systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Extreme ionospheric <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> can pose a <span class="hlt">potential</span> integrity threat to ground-based augmentation of the Global Positioning System (GPS), and thus the development of ionospheric <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> threat models for each region of operation is essential for system design and operation. This paper presents a methodology for automated long-term ionospheric <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> monitoring, which will be used to build an ionospheric <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> threat model, evaluate its validity over the life cycle of the system, continuously monitor ionospheric <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and update the threat model if necessary. This procedure automatically processes GPS data collected from external networks and estimates ionospheric gradients at regular intervals. If ionospheric gradients large enough to be <span class="hlt">potentially</span> hazardous to users are identified, manual data examination is triggered. This paper also develops a simplified truth processing method to create precise ionospheric delay estimates in near real-time, which is the key to automating the ionospheric monitoring procedure. The performance of the method is examined using data from the 20 November 2003 and 9 November 2004 ionospheric storms. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of simplified truth processing within long-term ionosphere monitoring. From the case studies, the automated procedure successfully identified extreme ionospheric <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, including the two worst ionospheric gradients observed and validated previously based on manual analysis. The automation of data processing enables us to analyze ionospheric data continuously going forward and to more accurately categorize ionospheric behavior under both nominal and anomalous conditions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jung, Sungwook; Lee, Jiyun</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">394</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/2378744"> <span id="translatedtitle">Principal Component-based <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection Scheme</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this chapter, a novel <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection scheme that uses a robust principal component classifier (PCC) to handle computer\\u000a network security problems is proposed. An intrusion predictive model is constructed from the major and minor principal components\\u000a of the normal instances, where the difference of an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> from the normal instance is the distance in the principal component\\u000a space. The</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mei-ling Shyu; Shu-ching Chen; Kanoksri Sarinnapakorn; Liwu Chang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">395</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3029568"> <span id="translatedtitle">Potter syndrome with an unusual cardiac <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Potter syndrome is a congenital <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> characterised by bilateral renal agenesis, pulmonary hypoplasia, cardiac, skeletal abnormalities and maternal oligohydramnios. Here we report a case of Potter syndrome with bilateral renal agenesis, pulmonary hypoplasia and complete transposition of the great vessels, which had been identified during a post-mortem examination. Although cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are known to exist with Potter syndrome, complete transposition of the great vessels has not been reported in the literature.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Prabhu, Savit; Sigamani, Elanthenral; Das, Prasenjit; Sasi, Arun; Safaya, Rajni</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">396</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ece.msstate.edu/~fowler/Publications/Papers/DZF2008.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">ANOMALY</span>-BASED HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGE COMPRESSION</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We propose a new lossy compression algorithm for hyperspectral images, which is based on spectral principal component analysis (PCA), followed by JPEG2000 (JP2K). The approach employs an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-removal model in the compression process to preserve anomalous pixels. Results on two different hyperspectral image scenes show that the new algorithm not only provides good post-compression <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-detection performance but also improves rate-</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Qian Du; Wei Zhu; James E. Fowler</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">397</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39297105"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>-Based Hyperspectral Image Compression</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We propose a new lossy compression algorithm for hyperspectral images, which is based on spectral principal component analysis (PCA), followed by JPEG2000 (JP2K). The approach employs an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-removal model in the compression process to preserve anomalous pixels. Results on two different hyperspectral image scenes show that the new algorithm not only provides good post-compression <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-detection performance but also improves rate-distortion</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Qian Du; Wei Zhu; James E. Fowler</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">398</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/3162393"> <span id="translatedtitle">“Great Salinity <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>” in the North Atlantic</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We revisited the “Great Salinity <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>” of the 1970s (GSA'70s; Dickson et al., 1988) and documented the newly identified “Great Salinity <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>” of the 1980s (hence termed GSA'80s), both propagated around the North Atlantic in a similar fashion. The advective mechanism, initially proposed to explain the observed sequence of low-salinity, low-temperature events during the GSA'70s, apparently holds also for the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Igor M. Belkin; Sydney Levitus; John Antonov; Svend-Aage Malmberg</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">399</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhRvD..88d5013W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Classifying gauge <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> through symmetry-protected trivial orders and classifying gravitational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> through topological orders</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, we systematically study gauge <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in bosonic and fermionic weak-coupling gauge theories with gauge group G (which can be continuous or discrete) in d space-time dimensions. We show a very close relation between gauge <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for gauge group G and symmetry-protected trivial (SPT) orders (also known as symmetry-protected topological (SPT) orders) with symmetry group G in one-higher dimension. The SPT phases are classified by group cohomology class Hd+1(G,R/Z). Through a more careful consideration, we argue that the gauge <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are described by the elements in Free[Hd+1(G,R/Z)]?H??d+1(BG,R/Z). The well known Adler-Bell-Jackiw <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are classified by the free part of Hd+1(G,R/Z) (denoted as Free[Hd+1(G,R/Z)]). We refer to other kinds of gauge <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> beyond Adler-Bell-Jackiw <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> as non-ABJ gauge <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, which include Witten SU(2) global gauge <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. We introduce a notion of ?-cohomology group, H??d+1(BG,R/Z), for the classifying space BG, which is an Abelian group and include Tor[Hd+1(G,R/Z)] and topological cohomology group Hd+1(BG,R/Z) as subgroups. We argue that H??d+1(BG,R/Z) classifies the bosonic non-ABJ gauge <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and partially classifies fermionic non-ABJ <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Using the same approach that shows gauge <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to be connected to SPT phases, we can also show that gravitational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are connected to topological orders (i.e., patterns of long-range entanglement) in one-higher dimension.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wen, Xiao-Gang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">400</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1987JAtS...44..877M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Statistics and Dynamics of Persistent <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Persistent <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with recurrent spatial patterns play an important role in the atmosphere's low-frequency variability. We establish a connection between statistical and dynamical methods of description and prediction of persistent <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. This is done by computing and analyzing the empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) in a simple deterministic model, on the one hand, and in Southern Hemisphere geopotential heights, on the other.The dynamical model is governed by the fully nonlinear, equivalent-barotropic vorticity equation on the sphere, with simplified forcing, dissipation and topography. Model solutions exhibit persistent <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> identifiable with blocked, zonal and wave-train <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Northern Hemisphere atmospheric data. Flow structures similar to the patterns above occur as high-variance EOFs of this nonlinear model.The Southern Hemisphere data we analyze consist in gridded daily maps of 500 mb heights from June 1972 to July 1983. Two types of persistent <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> appear in this time series, both having a strong wavenumber-three component; they differ by the value of the constant phase of this wave and by the strength of the wavenumber-one component. The first two EOFs bear a striking resemblance to these two patterns.We conclude that the dynamical interpretation of EOFs is their pointing from the time mean to the most populated regions of the system's phase space. Pursuing this interpretation, we introduce a Markov-chain formulation of transitions from one persistent <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> regime to another, and discuss the implications for long-range forecasting.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mo, Kingtse C.; Ghil, Michael</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" 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showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">401</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20060053332&hterms=clustering&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dclustering"> <span id="translatedtitle">Clustering and Recurring <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Identification: Recurring <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection System (ReADS)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This viewgraph presentation reviews the Recurring <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection System (ReADS). The Recurring <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection System is a tool to analyze text reports, such as aviation reports and maintenance records: (1) Text clustering algorithms group large quantities of reports and documents; Reduces human error and fatigue (2) Identifies interconnected reports; Automates the discovery of possible recurring <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>; (3) Provides a visualization of the clusters and recurring <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> We have illustrated our techniques on data from Shuttle and ISS discrepancy reports, as well as ASRS data. ReADS has been integrated with a secure online search</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McIntosh, Dawn</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">402</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006PhDT........75G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Claycap <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection using hyperspectral remote sensing and lidargrammetric techniques</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Clay capped waste sites are a common method to dispose of the more than 40 million tons of hazardous waste produced in the United States every year (EPA, 2003). Due to the <span class="hlt">potential</span> threat that hazardous waste poses, it is essential to monitor closely the performance of these facilities. Development of a monitoring system that exploits spectral and topographic changes over hazardous waste sites is presented. Spectral <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection is based upon the observed changes in absolute reflectance and spectral derivatives in centipede grass (Eremochloa ophiuroides) under different irrigation levels. The spectral features that provide the best separability among irrigation levels were identified using Stepwise Discriminant Analyses. The Red Edge Position was selected as a suitable discriminant variable to compare the performance of a global and a local <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection algorithm using a DAIS 3715 hyperspectral image. Topographical <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection is assessed by evaluating the vertical accuracy of two LIDAR datasets acquired from two different altitudes (700 m and 1,200 m AGL) over a clay-capped hazardous site at the Savannah River National Laboratory, SC using the same Optech ALTM 2050 and Cessna 337 platform. Additionally, a quantitative comparison is performed to determine the effect that decreasing platform altitude and increasing posting density have on the vertical accuracy of the LIDAR data collected.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Garcia Quijano, Maria Jose</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">403</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19870007985&hterms=PangeA&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3DPangeA"> <span id="translatedtitle">Improving the geological interpretation of magnetic and gravity satellite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Quantitative analysis of the geologic component of observed satellite magnetic and gravity fields requires accurate isolation of the geologic component of the observations, theoretically sound and viable inversion techniques, and integration of collateral, constraining geologic and geophysical data. A number of significant contributions were made which make quantitative analysis more accurate. These include procedures for: screening and processing orbital data for lithospheric signals based on signal repeatability and wavelength analysis; producing accurate gridded <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> values at constant elevations from the orbital data by three-dimensional least squares collocation; increasing the stability of equivalent point source inversion and criteria for the selection of the optimum damping parameter; enhancing inversion techniques through an iterative procedure based on the superposition theorem of <span class="hlt">potential</span> fields; and modeling efficiently regional-scale lithospheric sources of satellite magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. In addition, these techniques were utilized to investigate regional <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> sources of North and South America and India and to provide constraints to continental reconstruction. Since the inception of this research study, eleven papers were presented with associated published abstracts, three theses were completed, four papers were published or accepted for publication, and an additional manuscript was submitted for publication.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hinze, William J.; Braile, Lawrence W.; Vonfrese, Ralph R. B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">404</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JGRE..116.2002B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lunar swirls: Examining crustal magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and space weathering trends</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have used multispectral images from Clementine and data from Lunar Prospector's magnetometer to conduct a survey of lunar crustal magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, prominent lunar swirls, and lesser known swirl markings to provide new information on the nature of swirls and their association with magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. We find that all swirls and swirl-like albedo patterns are associated with areas of magnetized crust, but not all areas of magnetized crust are colocated with swirl-like albedo <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. All observed swirls exhibit spectral characteristics similar to immature material and generally have slightly lower FeO values compared with their surroundings as determined with a multispectral iron-mapping method. We discuss these results in relation to the various hypotheses for swirl formation. The comet impact hypothesis for lunar swirls would not predict a difference in the spectrally determined FeO content between swirls and nearby ordinary surfaces. The compositional difference could be explained as a consequence of (1) magnetic shielding of the surface from the solar wind, which could produce anomalous space weathering (little darkening with limited reddening) and <span class="hlt">potentially</span> alter the predictions of the multispectral iron-mapping algorithm while the compositional contrast could be enhanced by delivery of lower-FeO ejecta from outside the swirl; and (2) accumulation of fine plagioclase-rich dust moving under the influence of electric fields induced by solar wind interactions with a magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Therefore, we cannot at present clearly distinguish between the solar wind shielding and electrostatic dust accumulation models for swirl formation. We describe future measurements that could contribute to solution of the puzzle of swirl origin.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Blewett, David T.; Coman, Ecaterina I.; Hawke, B. Ray; Gillis-Davis, Jeffrey J.; Purucker, Michael E.; Hughes, Christopher G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">405</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://karel.troja.mff.cuni.cz/papers2.bin/a04zm3.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">New views of the spherical Bouguer gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper presents a number of new concepts concerning the gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. First, it identifies a distinct difference between a surface (2-D) gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (the difference between actual gravity on one surface and normal gravity on another surface) and a solid (3-D) gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> defined in the fundamental gravimetric equation. Second, it introduces the `no topography' gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (which turns</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. Vanícek; R. Tenzer; L. E. Sjöberg; Z. Martinec; W. E. Featherstone</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">406</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860042311&hterms=temporal+anomaly&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dtemporal%2Banomaly"> <span id="translatedtitle">Persistent <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the extratropical Northern Hemisphere wintertime circulation - Structure</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A study identifying horizontal and vertical structures of low patterns occurring with persistent 500 mb height <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the central North Pacific, eastern North Atlantic, and northern Soviet Union regions is presented. The flow patterns of positive and negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are compared. The relationship between persistent <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and small recurrent <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> patterns is examined. The temporal fluctuations of the persistent patterns are analyzed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dole, R. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">407</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.H44B..07S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Inversion of Pressure <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Data for CO2 Leakage Detection at Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Leakage from abandoned wells and geologic faults represents one of the greatest risks to the integrity of geologic CO2 sequestration sites. Ensuring timely detection and mitigation of CO2 leakage is thus of great interest to regulators, operators, and the public. So far model-based CO2 leakage detection has not been widely tested or used. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of source identification algorithms for recovering both leakage locations and rates in the above-zone monitoring intervals by using observed pressure <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data. For leakage rate inversion, we used ordinary least squares (OLS), truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD), and minimum relative entropy algorithm (MRE). When the leakage location(s) is unknown, inversion becomes more challenging. We coupled OLS with simulated annealing (SA) for simultaneous leakage rate and location recovery. The performance of inversion algorithms was compared while considering effects such as data noise and spatial heterogeneity. Our tests show that both OLS and TSVD can be used to recover leakage rates. TSVD is more robust than OLS and can handle large observation errors well. When the actual leaky location is unknown but is known to belong to a pool of <span class="hlt">potentially</span> leaky wells, MRE can be used to identify the actual leakage rates and leaky locations. Finally if prior information is insufficient to isolate a group of <span class="hlt">potentially</span> leaky wells, the combination of SA and OLS can be used to identify source locations among all existing wells. Our results are promising and <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the pressure-<span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-based leakage detection can be readily incorporated into existing CO2 sequestration risk management frameworks.roblem setup bservations and identified leakage rates</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sun, A. Y.; Nicot, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">408</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA004426"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hypnosuggestive Therapy (Treatment by <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span> in Hypnosis).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Contents: A brief history of hypnosis; The theoretical foundations of hypnosis; The method of hypnotizing and verbal <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> in hypnosis; Indications for treatment by hypnotic <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>; Clinical observations; The role of hypno <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> therapy in e...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">K. M. Varshavskii</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1974-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">409</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12592127"> <span id="translatedtitle">Radionuclide imaging of rare congenital renal fusion <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Demonstration of a congenital renal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> plays an important role in the treatment of patients with renal infection. These patients are prone to infections because of coexisting urinary tract <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> such as duplicated ureter, ureter opening <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and urinary stasis. Assessment of renal parenchymal damage resulting from acute or chronic renal infection is the primary indication for radionuclide imaging with Tc-99m DMSA. In addition, this technique allows congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to be identified. The authors review congenital renal fusion <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> identified in children through Tc-99m DMSA imaging. They conclude that Tc-99m DMSA imaging can reveal important diagnostic information about various congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, including fusion <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. PMID:12592127</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Volkan, Bilge; Ceylan, Emel; Kiratli, Pinar Ozgen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">410</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JAESc..62..616S"> <span id="translatedtitle">High-resolution residual geoid and gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data of the northern Indian Ocean - An input to geological understanding</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Geoid data are more sensitive to density distributions deep within the Earth, thus the data are useful for studying the internal processes of the Earth leading to formation of geological structures. In this paper, we present much improved version of high resolution (1' × 1') geoid <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map of the northern Indian Ocean generated from the altimeter data obtained from Geodetic Missions of GEOSAT and ERS-1 along with ERS-2, TOPEX/POSIDEON and JASON satellites. The geoid map of the Indian Ocean is dominated by a significant low of -106 m south of Sri Lanka, named as the Indian Ocean Geoid Low (IOGL), whose origin is not clearly known yet. The residual geoid data are retrieved from the geoid data by removing the long-wavelength core-mantle density effects using recent spherical harmonic coefficients of Earth Gravity Model 2008 (EGM2008) up to degree and order 50 from the observed geoid data. The coefficients are smoothly rolled off between degrees 30-70 in order to avoid artifacts related to the sharp truncation at degree 50. With this process we observed significant improvement in the residual geoid data when compared to the previous low-spatial resolution maps. The previous version was superposed by systematic broad regional highs and lows (like checker board) with amplitude up to ±12 m, though the trends of geoid in general match in both versions. These methodical artifacts in the previous version may have arisen due to the use of old Rapp's geo-<span class="hlt">potential</span> model coefficients, as well as sharp truncation of reference model at degree and order 50. Geoid <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are converted to free-air gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and validated with cross-over corrected ship-borne gravity data of the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal. The present satellite derived gravity data matches well with the ship-borne data with Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) of 5.1-7.8 mGal, and this is found to be within the error limits when compared with other globally available satellite data. Spectral analysis of ship-borne and satellite data <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that the satellite gravity data have a resolution down to 16-18 km. Further, the geoid, residual geoid and gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are integrated with seismic data along two profiles in the Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea, and inferences have been made in terms of density distributions at different depths. The new residual geoid <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map shows excellent correlation with regional tectonic features such as Sunda subduction zone, volcanic traces (Chagos-Laccadive, Ninetyeast and 85°E ridges) and mid-ocean ridge systems (Central Indian and Carlsberg ridges).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sreejith, K. M.; Rajesh, S.; Majumdar, T. J.; Srinivasa Rao, G.; Radhakrishna, M.; Krishna, K. S.; Rajawat, A. S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">411</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EPJST.216...83M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Vibrational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and marginal stability of glasses</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The experimentally measured vibrational spectrum of glasses strongly deviates from that expected in Debye's elasticity theory: The density of states deviates from Debye's ?2 law ("boson peak"), the sound velocity shows a negative dispersion in the boson-peak frequency regime, and there is a strong increase in the sound attenuation near the boson-peak frequency. A generalized elasticity theory is presented, based on the model assumption that the shear modulus of the disordered medium fluctuates randomly in space. The fluctuations are assumed to be uncorrelated and have a certain distribution (Gaussian or otherwise). Using field-theoretical techniques one is able to derive mean-field theories for the vibrational spectrum of a disordered system. The theory based on a Gaussian distribution uses a self-consistent Born approximation (SCBA),while the theory for non-Gaussian distributions is based on a coherent-<span class="hlt">potential</span> approximation (CPA). Both approximate theories appear to be saddle-point approximations of effective replica field theories. The theory gives a satisfactory explanation of the vibrational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in glasses. Excellent agreement of the SCBA theory with simulation data on a soft-sphere glass is reached. Since the SCBA is based on a Gaussian distribution of local shear moduli, including negative values, this theory describes a shear instability as a function of the variance of shear fluctuations. In the vicinity of this instability, a fractal frequency dependence of the density of states and the sound attenuation ? ?1+ a is predicted with a ? 1/2. Such a frequency dependence is indeed observed both in simulations and in experimental data. We argue that the observed frequency dependence stems from marginally stable regions in a glass and discuss these findings in terms of rigidity percolation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Marruzzo, Alessia; Köhler, Stephan; Fratalocchi, Andrea; Ruocco, Giancarlo; Schirmacher, Walter</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">412</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009cip3.conf..139S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Using Physical Models for <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection in Control Systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems are increasingly used to operate critical infrastructure assets. However, the inclusion of advanced information technology and communications components and elaborate control strategies in SCADA systems increase the threat surface for external and subversion-type attacks. The problems are exacerbated by site-specific properties of SCADA environments that make subversion detection impractical; and by sensor noise and feedback characteristics that degrade conventional <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection systems. Moreover, <span class="hlt">potential</span> attack mechanisms are ill-defined and may include both physical and logical aspects.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Svendsen, Nils; Wolthusen, Stephen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">413</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.S41A2402P"> <span id="translatedtitle">TIME SERIES ANALYSIS OF REMOTELY-SENSED TIR EMISSION: linking <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to physical processes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the last 15 years, remote sensing has been evaluated for detecting thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> as precursor to earthquakes. Important issues that need yet to be tackled include definition of: (a) thermal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, taking into account weather conditions, observation settings and ';natural' variability caused by background sources (b) the length of observations required for this purpose; and (c) the location of detected <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, which should be physically related to the tectonic activity. To determine whether thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are statistical noise, mere meteorological conditions, or actual earthquake-related phenomena, we apply a novel approach. We use brightness temperature (top-of-atmosphere) data from thermal infrared imagery acquired at a hypertemporal (sub-hourly) interval, from geostationary weather satellites over multiple years. The length of the time series allows for analysis of meteorological effects (diurnal, seasonal or annual trends) and background variability, through the application of a combined spatial and temporal filter to distinguish extreme occurrences from trends. The definition of <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is based on statistical techniques, taking into account published (geo)physical characteristics of earthquake related thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. We use synthetic data to test the performance of the proposed detection method and track <span class="hlt">potential</span> factors affecting the results. Subsequently, we apply the method on original data from Iran and Turkey, in quiescent and earthquake-struck periods alike. We present our findings with main focus to assess resulting <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in relation to physical processes thereby considering: (a) meteorological effects, (b) the geographical, geological and environmental settings, and (c) physically realistic distances and <span class="hlt">potential</span> physical relations with the activity of causative faults.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pavlidou, E.; van der Meijde, M.; Hecker, C.; van der Werff, H.; Ettema, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">414</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/l216107454673v3j.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Aggregation and Thresholding Schemes for <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>-Based Approaches</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>-based approaches often require multiple profiles and models in order to characterize different aspects of normal behaviors.\\u000a In particular, <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> scores of audit events are obtained by aggregating several local <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> scores. Remarkably, most works\\u000a focus on profile\\/model definition while critical issues of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> measuring, aggregating and thresholding are dealt with\\u000a ”simplistically”. This paper addresses the issue of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> scoring</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Salem Benferhat; Karim Tabia</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">415</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S31A2484B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, forearc morphology and seismicity in subduction zones</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We apply spectral averaging techniques to isolate and remove the long-wavelength large-amplitude trench-normal topographic and free-air gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> "high" and "low" associated with subduction zones. The residual grids generated illuminate the short-wavelength structure of the forearc. Systematic analysis of all subduction boundaries on Earth has enabled a classification of these grids with particular emphasis placed on topography and gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> observed in the region above the shallow seismogenic portion of the plate interface. The isostatic compensation of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is investigated using 3D calculations of the gravitational admittance and coherence. In the shallow region of the megathrust, typically within 100 km from the trench, isolated residual <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with amplitudes of up to 2.5 km and 125 mGal are generally interpreted as accreted/subducting relief in the form of seamounts and other bathymetric features. While most of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, which have radii < 50km, are correlated with areas of reduced seismicity, several in regions such as Japan and Java appear to have influenced the nucleation and/or propagation of large magnitude earthquakes. Long-wavelength (500 - >1000 km) trench-parallel forearc ridges with residual <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of up to 1.5 km and 150 mGal are identified in approximately one-third of the subduction zones analyzed. Despite great length along strike, these ridges are less than 100 km wide and several appear uncompensated. A high proportion of arc-normal structure and the truncation/morphological transition of trench-parallel forearc ridges is explained through the identification and tracking of pre-existing structure on the over-riding and subducting plates into the seismogenic portion of the plate boundary. Spatial correlations between regions with well-defined trench-parallel forearc ridges and the occurrence of large magnitude interplate earthquakes, in addition to the uncompensated state of these ridges, <span class="hlt">suggest</span> links between the morphology of the forearc and the peak earthquake stress drop on the subduction megathrust. We present our classification of residual bathymetric and gravitational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> using examples from Sumatra, Kuril-Kamchatka, Mariana, Peru-Chile and the Tonga-Kermadec margin. We reassess proposed links between trench-parallel residual topography and gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and subduction zone seismicity using global earthquake catalogs and a new compilation of published aftershock locations and distributed slip models from over 200 of the largest subduction zone earthquakes. Our results highlight the role of pre-existing structure in both the over-riding and subducting plates in modulating the along- and across-strike segmentation of subduction zones. Understanding the genesis of long-wavelength trench-parallel forearc ridges may provide further insights into links between forearc morphology, the rheology of the overriding and subducting plates and seismicity in subduction zones.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bassett, D.; Watts, A. B.; Das, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">416</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9378919"> <span id="translatedtitle">The thick tail mutation contains <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the axial skeleton.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Analysis of the skeletal effects of thick tail (Tht), a radiation-induced mutation, has revealed numerous <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the axial skeleton. The affected regions include the atlantal-occipital region as well as the lumbar (Lu) and caudal (Ca) vertebrae in which the ossified adult structures are either missing or reduced in size. Skeletons of juvenile Tht heterozygotes exhibit a malformed occipital bone, atlas, smaller Ca vertebrae, and delayed ossification of the affected adult structures. The diminished amount of cartilage and bone <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the Tht gene may be functioning during the formation of these tissues. PMID:9378919</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schrick, J J; Selby, P B</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">417</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15533986"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bifid mandibular condyle: archaeological case report of a rare <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, an archaeological case of unilateral bifid mandibular condyle is presented. This uncommon <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is characterized by a division of the mandibular condylar head. In this case, the left condyle was divided into two articulating surfaces oriented mediolaterally; two articular facets on the anterior wall of the glenoid fossa for the double condyle were observed. The morphological and radiological analysis do not show any evidence of injuries or degenerative pathology. Taking into account the two main causes of bifid condyle <span class="hlt">suggested</span> in the literature (traumatic and developmental), an embryopathy by teratogenic agents is proposed as a possible aetiology of the bifid condyle reported here. PMID:15533986</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jordana, X; García, C; Palacios, M; Chimenos, E; Malgosa, A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">418</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JETPL..98...88S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Analog of fishtail <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in plastically deformed graphene</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">By introducing a strain rate generated pseudo-electric field E {/x d } ? ?, we discuss a magnetic response of a plastically deformed graphene. Our results demonstrate the appearance of dislocation induced paramagnetic moment in a zero applied magnetic field. More interestingly, it is shown that in the presence of the magnetoplastic effect, the resulting magnetization exhibits typical features of the so-called fishtail <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The estimates of the model parameters <span class="hlt">suggest</span> quite an optimistic possibility to experimentally realize the predicted phenomena in plastically deformed graphene.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sergeenkov, S.; Araujo-Moreira, F. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">419</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013LMaPh.103..817K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Holomorphic <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> in Gauge Theory on ALE space</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We consider four-dimensional ?-deformed {{N} = 2} supersymmetric SU(2) gauge theory on A 1 space and its lift to five dimensions. We find that the partition functions can be reproduced via special geometry and the holomorphic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> equation. Schwinger-type integral expressions for the boundary conditions at the monopole/dyon point in moduli space are inferred. The interpretation of the five-dimensional partition function as the partition function of a refined topological string on A 1 × (local {{P}1 × {P}^1}) is <span class="hlt">suggested</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Krefl, Daniel; Shih, Sheng-Yu Darren</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">420</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25062187"> <span id="translatedtitle">New type of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in turbulence.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The turbulent energy flux through scales, ?[over ¯], remains constant and nonvanishing in the limit of zero viscosity, which results in the fundamental <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of time irreversibility. It was considered straightforward to deduce from this the Lagrangian velocity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, ?du^{2}/dt?=-4?[over ¯] at t=0, where u[over ?] is the velocity difference of a pair of particles, initially separated by a fixed distance. Here we demonstrate that this assumed first taking the limit t?0 and then ??0, while a zero-friction <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> requires taking viscosity to zero first. We find that the limits t?0 and ??0 do not commute if particles deplete (accumulate) in shocks backward (forward) in time on the viscous time scale. We compute analytically the resultant Lagrangian <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> for one-dimensional Burgers turbulence and find it completely altered: ?du^{2}/dt? has different values forward and backward in time. For incompressible flows, on the other hand, we show that the limits commute and the Lagrangian <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is still induced by the flux law, apparently due to a homogeneous distribution of fluid particles at all times. PMID:25062187</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Frishman, Anna; Falkovich, Gregory</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='