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Sample records for anomalies suggest potential

  1. Developing global climate anomalies suggest potential disease risks for 2006 2007

    PubMed Central

    Anyamba, Assaf; Chretien, Jean-Paul; Small, Jennifer; Tucker, Compton J; Linthicum, Kenneth J

    2006-01-01

    Background El Nio/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) related climate anomalies have been shown to have an impact on infectious disease outbreaks. The Climate Prediction Center of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA/CPC) has recently issued an unscheduled El Nio advisory, indicating that warmer than normal sea surface temperatures across the equatorial eastern Pacific may have pronounced impacts on global tropical precipitation patterns extending into the northern hemisphere particularly over North America. Building evidence of the links between ENSO driven climate anomalies and infectious diseases, particularly those transmitted by insects, can allow us to provide improved long range forecasts of an epidemic or epizootic. We describe developing climate anomalies that suggest potential disease risks using satellite generated data. Results Sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the equatorial east Pacific ocean have anomalously increased significantly during July October 2006 indicating the typical development of El Nio conditions. The persistence of these conditions will lead to extremes in global-scale climate anomalies as has been observed during similar conditions in the past. Positive Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR) anomalies, indicative of severe drought conditions, have been observed across all of Indonesia, Malaysia and most of the Philippines, which are usually the first areas to experience ENSO-related impacts. This dryness can be expected to continue, on average, for the remainder of 2006 continuing into the early part of 2007. During the period November 2006 January 2007 climate forecasts indicate that there is a high probability for above normal rainfall in the central and eastern equatorial Pacific Islands, the Korean Peninsula, the U.S. Gulf Coast and Florida, northern South America and equatorial east Africa. Taking into consideration current observations and climate forecast information, indications are that the following regions are at increased risk for disease outbreaks: Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand and most of the southeast Asia Islands for increased dengue fever transmission and increased respiratory illness; Coastal Peru, Ecuador, Venezuela, and Colombia for increased risk of malaria; Bangladesh and coastal India for elevated risk of cholera; East Africa for increased risk of a Rift Valley fever outbreak and elevated malaria; southwest USA for increased risk for hantavirus pulmonary syndrome and plague; southern California for increased West Nile virus transmission; and northeast Brazil for increased dengue fever and respiratory illness. Conclusion The current development of El Nio conditions has significant implications for global public health. Extremes in climate events with above normal rainfall and flooding in some regions and extended drought periods in other regions will occur. Forecasting disease is critical for timely and efficient planning of operational control programs. In this paper we describe developing global climate anomalies that suggest potential disease risks that will give decision makers additional tools to make rational judgments concerning implementation of disease prevention and mitigation strategies. PMID:17194307

  2. Anomalies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1999

    1999-01-01

    This theme issue on anomalies includes Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, and additional resources for elementary and junior high school students. Pertinent activities are suggested, and sidebars discuss UFOs, animal anomalies, and anomalies from nature; and resources covering unexplained phenonmenas like crop circles, Easter Island,…

  3. Anomalies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1999

    1999-01-01

    This theme issue on anomalies includes Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, and additional resources for elementary and junior high school students. Pertinent activities are suggested, and sidebars discuss UFOs, animal anomalies, and anomalies from nature; and resources covering unexplained phenonmenas like crop circles, Easter Island,

  4. Singularity analysis of potential fields to enhance weak anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G.; Cheng, Q.; Liu, T.

    2013-12-01

    Geoanomalies generally are nonlinear, non-stationary and weak, especially in the land cover areas, however, the traditional methods of geoanomaly identification are usually based on linear theory. In past two decades, many power-law function models have been developed based on fractal concept in mineral exploration and mineral resource assessment, such that the density-area (C-A) model and spectrum-area model (S-A) suggested by Qiuming Cheng have played important roles in extracting geophysical and geochemical anomalies. Several power-law relationships are evident in geophysical potential fields, such as field value-distance, power spectrum-wave number as well as density-area models. The singularity index based on density-area model involves the first derivative transformation of the measure. Hence, we introduce the singularity analysis to develop a novel high-pass filter for extracting gravity and magnetic anomalies with the advantage of scale invariance. Furthermore, we suggest that the statistics of singularity indices can provide a new edge detection scheme for the gravity or magnetic source bodies. Meanwhile, theoretical magnetic anomalies are established to verify these assertions. In the case study from Nanling mineral district in south China and Qikou Depression in east China, compared with traditional geophysical filtering methods including multiscale wavelet analysis and total horizontal gradient methods, the singularity method enhances and extracts the weak anomalies caused by buried magmatic rocks more effectively, and provides more distinct boundary information of rocks. Moreover, the singularity mapping results have good correspondence relationship with both the outcropping rocks and known mineral deposits to support future mineral resource exploration. The singularity method based on fractal analysis has potential to be a new useful theory and technique for processing gravity and magnetic anomaly data.

  5. Streaming electrical potential anomaly along faults in geothermal areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revil, A.; Pezard, P. A.

    Electrical potential anomalies are often measured associated with geothermal areas and volcanoes. In these systems, fluid flow is usually mostly restricted to faults and fracture networks. An equation describing electrical potential anomalies of electrokinetic nature associated with fluid upflow induced by a thermal source along faults is derived. The electrical potential anomaly is related to the depth of the thermal reservoir, the temperature difference between the surface and the reservoir of the geothermal area, the thermal expansion of water, and the streaming electrical potential coupling coefficient in the fault zone. A quantitative calculation of the electrokinetic anomaly is provided by comparing this model to a self-potential survey of the Cerro-Prieto geothermal field [Fitterman and Corwin, 1982]. The predictions of the model agree well with the field measurements.

  6. Thermodynamic, dynamic, and structural anomalies for shoulderlike potentials.

    PubMed

    Barraz, Ney M; Salcedo, Evy; Barbosa, Marcia C

    2009-09-01

    Using molecular dynamic simulations we study a family of continuous core-softened potentials consisting of a hard core, a shoulder at closest distances, and an attractive well at further distance. The repulsive shoulder and the well distances represent two length scales. We show that if the first scale, the shoulder, is repulsive or has a small well, the potential has a region in the pressure-temperature phase diagram with density, diffusion, and structural anomalies. However, if the closest scale becomes a deep well, the regions in the pressure-temperature phase diagram where the three anomalies are present shrink and disappear. This result helps in defining two length scales potentials that exhibit anomalies. PMID:19739858

  7. The Age Specific Incidence Anomaly Suggests that Cancers Originate During Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brody, James P.

    The accumulation of genetic alterations causes cancers. Since this accumulation takes time, the incidence of most cancers is thought to increase exponentially with age. However, careful measurements of the age-specific incidence show that the specific incidence for many forms of cancer rises with age to a maximum, and then decreases. This decrease in the age-specific incidence with age is an anomaly. Understanding this anomaly should lead to a better understanding of how tumors develop and grow. Here we derive the shape of the age-specific incidence, showing that it should follow the shape of a Weibull distribution. Measurements indicate that the age-specific incidence for colon cancer does indeed follow a Weibull distribution. This analysis leads to the interpretation that for colon cancer two subpopulations exist in the general population: a susceptible population and an immune population. Colon tumors will only occur in the susceptible population. This analysis is consistent with the developmental origins of disease hypothesis and generalizable to many other common forms of cancer.

  8. The Age Specific Incidence Anomaly Suggests that Cancers Originate During Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brody, James P.

    2014-05-01

    The accumulation of genetic alterations causes cancers. Since this accumulation takes time, the incidence of most cancers is thought to increase exponentially with age. However, careful measurements of the age-specific incidence show that the specific incidence for many forms of cancer rises with age to a maximum, and then decreases. This decrease in the age-specific incidence with age is an anomaly. Understanding this anomaly should lead to a better understanding of how tumors develop and grow. Here we derive the shape of the age-specific incidence, showing that it should follow the shape of a Weibull distribution. Measurements indicate that the age-specific incidence for colon cancer does indeed follow a Weibull distribution. This analysis leads to the interpretation that for colon cancer two subpopulations exist in the general population: a susceptible population and an immune population. Colon tumors will only occur in the susceptible population. This analysis is consistent with the developmental origins of disease hypothesis and generalizable to many other common forms of cancer.

  9. Precise Synaptic Efficacy Alignment Suggests Potentiation Dominated Learning

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Christoph; Miner, Daniel C.; Triesch, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that parallel synapses from the same axonal branch onto the same dendritic branch have almost identical strength. It has been proposed that this alignment is only possible through learning rules that integrate activity over long time spans. However, learning mechanisms such as spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) are commonly assumed to be temporally local. Here, we propose that the combination of temporally local STDP and a multiplicative synaptic normalization mechanism is sufficient to explain the alignment of parallel synapses. To address this issue, we introduce three increasingly complex models: First, we model the idealized interaction of STDP and synaptic normalization in a single neuron as a simple stochastic process and derive analytically that the alignment effect can be described by a so-called Kesten process. From this we can derive that synaptic efficacy alignment requires potentiation-dominated learning regimes. We verify these conditions in a single-neuron model with independent spiking activities but more realistic synapses. As expected, we only observe synaptic efficacy alignment for long-term potentiation-biased STDP. Finally, we explore how well the findings transfer to recurrent neural networks where the learning mechanisms interact with the correlated activity of the network. We find that due to the self-reinforcing correlations in recurrent circuits under STDP, alignment occurs for both long-term potentiation- and depression-biased STDP, because the learning will be potentiation dominated in both cases due to the potentiating events induced by correlated activity. This is in line with recent results demonstrating a dominance of potentiation over depression during waking and normalization during sleep. This leads us to predict that individual spine pairs will be more similar after sleep compared to after sleep deprivation. In conclusion, we show that synaptic normalization in conjunction with coordinated potentiation—in this case, from STDP in the presence of correlated pre- and post-synaptic activity—naturally leads to an alignment of parallel synapses. PMID:26793070

  10. Potential Mars 2001 Sites Coincident with Magnetic Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, M. S.

    1999-06-01

    Of the areas that meet the engineering criteria for MSP 01, only two are coincident with magnetic anomalies measured by the MAG/ER instrument on MGS. Area A is centered on about 10 deg S, 202 deg W and extends from about 7.5 deg S to 15 S. This area is associated with three bands of magnetic anomalies, two with positive values surrounding an area with negative values. Area B corresponds with a circular high positive magnetic anomaly and is centered at 13.5 deg S, 166 deg W. In addition to magnetic anomalies, the proposed sites have other attributes that make then attractive from of standpoint of meeting the objectives of the Mars Program. The landing site candidates meet the engineering requirements outlined on the Mars '01 landing site page htip://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/2001/landingsite. These are (source of data in parentheses): latitude between 3 deg N and 12 deg S, rock abundance between 5-10% (IRTM), fine-component thermal inertia > 4 cgs units (IRTM), topography < 2.5 km (MOLA). There are three exceptions: 1) Area B contains sites that lie up to about 15 deg S, 2) some sites are considered that have rock abundance values of 3-13%. 3) High resolution Viking coverage may not be available. These exceptions will be noted.

  11. Potential Mars 2001 Sites Coincident with Magnetic Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilmore, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    Of the areas that meet the engineering criteria for MSP 01, only two are coincident with magnetic anomalies measured by the MAG/ER instrument on MGS. Area A is centered on about 10 deg S, 202 deg W and extends from about 7.5 deg S to 15 S. This area is associated with three bands of magnetic anomalies, two with positive values surrounding an area with negative values. Area B corresponds with a circular high positive magnetic anomaly and is centered at 13.5 deg S, 166 deg W. In addition to magnetic anomalies, the proposed sites have other attributes that make then attractive from of standpoint of meeting the objectives of the Mars Program. The landing site candidates meet the engineering requirements outlined on the Mars '01 landing site page htip://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/2001/landingsite. These are (source of data in parentheses): latitude between 3 deg N and 12 deg S, rock abundance between 5-10% (IRTM), fine-component thermal inertia > 4 cgs units (IRTM), topography < 2.5 km (MOLA). There are three exceptions: 1) Area B contains sites that lie up to about 15 deg S, 2) some sites are considered that have rock abundance values of 3-13%. 3) High resolution Viking coverage may not be available. These exceptions will be noted.

  12. Simulations suggest pharmacological methods for rescuing long-term potentiation.

    PubMed

    Smolen, Paul; Baxter, Douglas A; Byrne, John H

    2014-11-01

    Congenital cognitive dysfunctions are frequently due to deficits in molecular pathways that underlie the induction or maintenance of synaptic plasticity. For example, Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS) is due to a mutation in cbp, encoding the histone acetyltransferase CREB-binding protein (CBP). CBP is a transcriptional co-activator for CREB, and induction of CREB-dependent transcription plays a key role in long-term memory (LTM). In animal models of RTS, mutations of cbp impair LTM and late-phase long-term potentiation (LTP). As a step toward exploring plausible intervention strategies to rescue the deficits in LTP, we extended our previous model of LTP induction to describe histone acetylation and simulated LTP impairment due to cbp mutation. Plausible drug effects were simulated by model parameter changes, and many increased LTP. However no parameter variation consistent with a effect of a known drug class fully restored LTP. Thus we examined paired parameter variations consistent with effects of known drugs. A pair that simulated the effects of a phosphodiesterase inhibitor (slowing cAMP degradation) concurrent with a deacetylase inhibitor (prolonging histone acetylation) restored normal LTP. Importantly these paired parameter changes did not alter basal synaptic weight. A pair that simulated the effects of a phosphodiesterase inhibitor and an acetyltransferase activator was similarly effective. For both pairs strong additive synergism was present. The effect of the combination was greater than the summed effect of the separate parameter changes. These results suggest that promoting histone acetylation while simultaneously slowing the degradation of cAMP may constitute a promising strategy for restoring deficits in LTP that may be associated with learning deficits in RTS. More generally these results illustrate how the strategy of combining modeling and empirical studies may provide insights into the design of effective therapies for improving long-term synaptic plasticity and learning associated with cognitive disorders. PMID:25034337

  13. A new method of interpreting self-potential anomalies of two-dimensional inclined sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishna Murthy, I. V.; Sudhakar, K. S.; Rama Rao, P.

    2005-06-01

    A new method of interpreting self-potential anomalies of inclined sheet-like bodies of infinite strike length is presented in this study. In contrast to conventional schemes, the method does not explicitly make use of the magnitudes of the anomaly values during inversion. But, positions of a pair of points, at which the anomaly values differ from each other by a constant magnitude, are selected to construct some linear equations. The coefficients of these equations are functions of the model parameters, and hence the latter are solved from these coefficients. The method can be extended to gravity and magnetic anomalies of various models of simple geometry.

  14. Water-like Anomalies and Phase Behavior of a Pair Potential that Stabilizes Diamond.

    PubMed

    Bertolazzo, Andressa A; Kumar, Abhinaw; Chakravarty, Charusita; Molinero, Valeria

    2016-03-01

    Water, silicon, silica, and other liquids that favor tetrahedral order display thermodynamic, dynamic, and structural anomalies in the pressure range in which they form tetrahedrally coordinated crystals. The tetrahedral order in these liquids is induced by anisotropic hydrogen bonding or covalent interactions, or, in ionic melts, by an appropriate size ratio of the ions. Simple isotropic two-length scale models have been extensively used to understand the origin of anomalies in complex liquids. However, single-component isotropic liquids characterized to date generally do not stabilize tetrahedral crystals, and in the few cases that they do, it was found that the liquids do not display anomalies in the region of the tetrahedral crystal. This poses the question of whether it is possible for isotropic pair potentials to display water-like phase behavior and anomalies. In this work, we use molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the phase behavior and the existence and loci of anomalies of a single-component purely repulsive isotropic pair potential that stabilizes diamond in the ground state over a wide range of pressures. We demonstrate that, akin to water, silica, and silicon, the isotropic potential of Marcotte, Stillinger, and Torquato (MST) presents structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic anomalies in the region of stability of the tetrahedral crystal. The regions of anomalies of MST are nested in the T-p plane following the same hierarchy as in silica: the region of diffusional anomalies encloses the region of structural anomalies, which in turn contains the region of thermodynamic anomalies. To our knowledge, MST is the first example of pair potential for which water-like anomalies are associated with the formation of tetrahedral order. PMID:26426477

  15. Sensitivity of the International Skating Union's Mathematical Criteria to Flag Potential Scoring Anomalies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Looney, Marilyn A.; Howell, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the "mathematical criteria" employed by the International Skating Union (ISU) to identify potential judging anomalies within competitive figure skating. The mathematical criteria have greater sensitivity to identify scoring anomalies for technical element scores than for the program component scores. This article…

  16. Evaluating Cenozoic equatorial sediment deposition anomalies for potential paleoceanographic and Pacific plate motion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Neil C.; Dubois, Nathalie

    2014-03-01

    If equatorial sediments form characteristic deposits around the equator, they may help to resolve the amount of northwards drift of the Pacific tectonic plate. Relevant to this issue, it has been shown that 230Th has been accumulating on the equatorial seabed faster than its production from radioactive decay in the overlying water column during the Holocene (Marcantonio et al. in Paleoceanography 16:260-267, 2001). Some researchers have argued that this reflects the deposition of particles with adsorbed 230Th carried by bottom currents towards the equator ("focusing"). If correct, this effect may combine with high pelagic productivity, which is also centered on the equator, to yield a characteristic signature of high accumulation rates marking the paleoequator in older deposits. Here we evaluate potential evidence that such an equatorial feature existed in the geological past. Seismic reflection data from seven meridional transects suggest that a band of equatorially enhanced accumulation of restricted latitude was variably developed, both spatially and temporally. It is absent in the interval 14.25-20.1 Ma but is well developed for the interval 8.55-14.25 Ma. We also examined eolian dust accumulation rate histories generated from scientific drilling data. A dust accumulation rate anomaly near the modern equator, which is not obviously related to the inter-tropical convergence zone, is interpreted as caused by focusing. Accumulation rates of Ba and P2O5 (proxies of export production) reveal a static equatorial signature, which suggests that the movement of the Pacific plate over the period 10-25 Ma was modest. The general transition from missing to well-developed focusing signatures around 14.25 Ma in the seismic data coincides with the mid-Miocene development of the western boundary current off New Zealand. This current supplies the Pacific with deep water from Antarctica, and could therefore imply a potential paleoceanographic or paleoclimatic origin. At 10.05-14.25 Ma, the latitudes of the seismic anomalies are up to ~2 different from the paleoequator predicted by Pacific plate-hotspot models, suggesting potentially a small change in the hotspot latitudes relative to the present day (although this inference depends on the precise form of the deposition around the equator). The Ba and P2O5 anomalies, on the other hand, are broadly compatible with plate models predicting slow northward plate movement over 10-25 Ma.

  17. EVAREST - Evaluation of geological models by joint interpretation of potential field anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skiba, Peter; Gabriel, Gerald; Krawczyk, CharLotte M.

    2014-05-01

    Structural geological models are often based on the integration of different geophysical datasets. During the last years an increasing interest in the potential field methods, i.e. gravimetry and magnetic, can be observed, even though data acquisition can cause considerable costs and logistic effort. Therefore, the specific advantages and disadvantages of the different methods were analyzed. In a case study, which was conducted in cooperation with RWE Dea and which is located in northern Germany, it was studied to which level of detail gravity and magnetic anomalies can be interpreted jointly by 3D forward modelling. Special attention was paid to the individual residuals, i.e. those parts of the gravity and magnetic anomalies which could not be interpreted satisfactorily by the joint structural / physical model. In a subsequent stage of the workflow this information was analyzed individually for each dataset to improve the geological interpretation and to identify and localize the sources of the anomalies in more detail. For the discussed study several potential field datasets of different resolution were available, which were first analyzed by means of field transformation. While the gravity anomalies are mainly related to the occurrence of salt structures, the magnetic anomalies seem to be controlled by deep structures, most probably by the magnetic basement. Some local magnetic anomalies with amplitudes of less than 10 nT can be related to the rim synclines of the salt structures as well as to buried Pleistocene subglacial valleys. 3D forward models, constrained by existing structural information and rock physical data, have shown that, e.g., a common fitting of both anomaly fields is not possible if homogenous densities and magnetizations are assigned to the different lithological units and while considering the geometry of the source bodies to be the same for both potential field anomalies. To explain the magnetic anomalies a more detailed differentiation of the source bodies in terms of thin layers is required, while for the interpretation of the gravity anomalies vertical density gradients must be considered for specific lithologies. Furthermore, from the magnetic anomalies ideas about the maximum depth of source bodies can be derived.

  18. Developing Global Climate Anomalies Suggest Potential Disease Risks For 2006 – 2007

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Climate has a demonstrated impact on infectious diseases and increased disease transmission has been linked to the El Niño/southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon. The Climate Prediction Center of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has recently issued an unscheduled El Niño advisory,...

  19. Nonrelativistic inverse square potential, scale anomaly, and complex extension

    SciTech Connect

    Moroz, Sergej Schmidt, Richard

    2010-02-15

    The old problem of a singular, inverse square potential in nonrelativistic quantum mechanics is treated employing a field-theoretic, functional renormalization method. An emergent contact coupling flows to a fixed point or develops a limit cycle depending on the discriminant of its quadratic beta function. We analyze the fixed points in both conformal and nonconformal phases and perform a natural extension of the renormalization group analysis to complex values of the contact coupling. Physical interpretation and motivation for this extension is the presence of an inelastic scattering channel in two-body collisions. We present a geometric description of the complex generalization by considering renormalization group flows on the Riemann sphere. Finally, using bosonization, we find an analytical solution of the extended renormalization group flow equations, constituting the main result of our work.

  20. Remote energetic neutral atom imaging of electric potential over a lunar magnetic anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futaana, Y.; Barabash, S.; Wieser, M.; Lue, C.; Wurz, P.; Vorburger, A.; Bhardwaj, A.; Asamura, K.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract<p label="1">The formation of electric <span class="hlt">potential</span> over lunar magnetized regions is essential for understanding fundamental lunar science, for understanding the lunar environment, and for planning human exploration on the Moon. A large positive electric <span class="hlt">potential</span> was predicted and detected from single point measurements. Here, we demonstrate a remote imaging technique of electric <span class="hlt">potential</span> mapping at the lunar surface, making use of a new concept involving hydrogen neutral atoms derived from solar wind. We apply the technique to a lunar magnetized region using an existing dataset of the neutral atom energy spectrometer SARA/CENA on Chandrayaan-1. Electrostatic <span class="hlt">potential</span> larger than +135 V inside the Gerasimovic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is confirmed. This structure is found spreading all over the magnetized region. The widely spread electric <span class="hlt">potential</span> can influence the local plasma and dust environment near the magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li class="active"><span>1</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_1 --> <div id="page_2" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>1</a></li> <li class="active"><span>2</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="21"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22253163','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22253163"><span id="translatedtitle">Effect of attractive interactions on the water-like <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of a core-softened model <span class="hlt">potential</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Pant, Shashank; Gera, Tarun; Choudhury, Niharendu E-mail: niharc2002@yahoo.com</p> <p>2013-12-28</p> <p>It is now well established that water-like <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> can be reproduced by a spherically symmetric <span class="hlt">potential</span> with two length scales, popularly known as core-softened <span class="hlt">potential</span>. In the present study we aim to investigate the effect of attractive interactions among the particles in a model fluid interacting with core-softened <span class="hlt">potential</span> on the existence and location of various water-like <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the temperature-pressure plane. We employ extensive molecular dynamic simulations to study anomalous nature of various order parameters and properties under isothermal compression. Order map analyses have also been done for all the <span class="hlt">potentials</span>. We observe that all the systems with varying depth of attractive wells show structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. As many of the previous studies involving model water and a class of core softened <span class="hlt">potentials</span> have concluded that the structural <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region encloses the diffusion <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region, which in turn, encloses the density <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region, the same pattern has also been observed in the present study for the systems with less depth of attractive well. For the systems with deeper attractive well, we observe that the diffusion <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region shifts toward higher densities and is not always enclosed by the structural <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region. Also, density <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region is not completely enclosed by diffusion <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region in this case.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24430337','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24430337"><span id="translatedtitle">Helium <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a fluid pathway from mantle to trench during the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sano, Yuji; Hara, Takahiro; Takahata, Naoto; Kawagucci, Shinsuke; Honda, Makio; Nishio, Yoshiro; Tanikawa, Wataru; Hasegawa, Akira; Hattori, Keiko</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Geophysical evidence <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that fluids along fault planes have an important role in generating earthquakes; however, the nature of these fluids has not been well defined. The 2011 magnitude 9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake ruptured the interface between the subducting Pacific plate and the overlying Okhotsk plate. Here we report a sharp increase in mantle-derived helium in bottom seawater near the rupture zone 1 month after the earthquake. The timing and location indicate that fluids were released from the mantle on the seafloor along the plate interface. The movement of the fluids was rapid, with a velocity of ~4?km per day and an uncertainty factor of four. This rate is much faster than what would be expected from pressure-gradient propagation, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that over-pressurized fluid is discharged along the plate interface. PMID:24430337</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JAESc.114..327C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JAESc.114..327C"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> relationships between seismo-deformation and seismo-conductivity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chen, Chieh-Hung; Lin, Cheng-Horng; Wang, Chung-Ho; Liu, Jann-Yenq; Yeh, Ta-Kang; Yen, Horng-Yuan; Lin, Tzu-Wei</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>This study examines the relationships between seismo-deformation and seismo-conductivity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> during two M6 earthquakes that occurred on March 27th and June 2nd, 2013 in Taiwan. The Hilbert-Huang Transform is applied on surface displacement data to remove the effects of noise, semi-annual and annual cycles, and the long-term plate movements. The residual displacements have similar orientations when earthquake-related stress accumulates in the crust. Once the accumulated stress approaches the threshold for fault rupture, the orientations of the residual displacements generally become random, except in a small region near the epicenter. Interestingly, high-conductivity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, which can be detected from the 3-component magnetic data via the magnetic transfer function, exist in places very close to this small region near the epicenter. Spatial and temporal correlations between the high-conductivity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the small region of seismo-deformation <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that electric charges may migrate and become trapped in the region during seismogenic processes due to differential stress accumulation. These electric charges form a high-conductivity material that affects the Parkinson vector of the geomagnetic field.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.P43F..06W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.P43F..06W"><span id="translatedtitle">Laboratory studies of magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> effects on electric <span class="hlt">potential</span> distributions near the lunar surface</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wang, X.; Robertson, S. H.; Horanyi, M.; NASA Lunar Science Institute: Colorado CenterLunar Dust; Atmospheric Studies</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>The Moon does not have a global magnetic field, unlike the Earth, rather it has strong crustal magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Data from Lunar Prospector and SELENE (Kaguya) observed strong interactions between the solar wind and these localized magnetic fields. In the laboratory, a configuration of a horseshoe permanent magnet below an insulating surface is used as an analogue of lunar crustal magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Plasmas are created above the surface by a hot filament discharge. <span class="hlt">Potential</span> distributions are measured with an emissive probe and show complex spatial structures. In our experiments, electrons are magnetized with gyro-radii r smaller than the distance from the surface d (r < d) and ions are un-magnetized with r > d. Unlike negative charging on surfaces with no magnetic fields, the surface <span class="hlt">potential</span> at the center of the magnetic dipole is found close to the plasma bulk <span class="hlt">potential</span>. The surface charging is dominated by the cold unmagnetized ions, while the electrons are shielded away. A <span class="hlt">potential</span> minimum is formed between the center of the surface and the bulk plasma, most likely caused by the trapped electrons between the two magnetic mirrors at the cusps. The value of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> minimum with respect to the bulk plasma <span class="hlt">potential</span> decreases with increasing plasma density and neutral pressure, indicating that the mirror-trapped electrons are scattered by electron-electron and electron-neutral collisions. The <span class="hlt">potential</span> at the two cusps are found to be more negative due to the electrons following the magnetic field lines onto the surface.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ExG....46..320R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ExG....46..320R"><span id="translatedtitle">Laboratory modelling of self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> due to spherical bodies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Roudsari, Mohamad Sadegh; Beitollahi, Ali</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>The relationship between the self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> (SP) produced by a polarised sphere and its depth was studied in a laboratory experiment. This was carried out by using a sphere made up of two hemispheres of different materials: one copper and the other zinc. Self-<span class="hlt">potentials</span> were measured by placing the sphere at a given depth in a rectangular glass tank filled with water. The surface of the water was covered by a sheet with 684 brass electrodes. A sensitive, high impedance digital voltmeter was used to measure <span class="hlt">potentials</span> from each electrode to a `base'. We have measured the SP response of the metallic body and our work shows that SP signals of several millivolts are generated due to the sphere placed within water. The gridded SP data show a clear <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> over the sphere at shallow depths, and as the depth of the sphere increases, the measured SP signal due to the sphere decreases. An analytical formula is given to determine the maximum depth of the sphere at which the presence of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> can be detected. Responses from other geometries are examined as well.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4323421','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4323421"><span id="translatedtitle">Global Climate <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> and <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Infectious Disease Risks: 2014-2015</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Chretien, Jean-Paul; Anyamba, Assaf; Small, Jennifer; Britch, Seth; Sanchez, Jose L.; Halbach, Alaina C.; Tucker, Compton; Linthicum, Kenneth J.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Background: The El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a global climate phenomenon that impacts human infectious disease risk worldwide through droughts, floods, and other climate extremes. Throughout summer and fall 2014 and winter 2015, El Niño Watch, issued by the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, assessed likely El Niño development during the Northern Hemisphere fall and winter, persisting into spring 2015. Methods: We identified geographic regions where environmental conditions may increase infectious disease transmission if the predicted El Niño occurs using El Niño indicators (Sea Surface Temperature [SST], Outgoing Longwave Radiation [OLR], and rainfall <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>) and literature review of El Niño-infectious disease associations. Results: SSTs in the equatorial Pacific and western Indian Oceans were anomalously elevated during August-October 2014, consistent with a developing weak El Niño event. Teleconnections with local climate is evident in global precipitation patterns, with positive OLR <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (drier than average conditions) across Indonesia and coastal southeast Asia, and negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> across northern China, the western Indian Ocean, central Asia, north-central and northeast Africa, Mexico/Central America, the southwestern United States, and the northeastern and southwestern tropical Pacific. Persistence of these conditions could produce environmental settings conducive to increased transmission of cholera, dengue, malaria, Rift Valley fever, and other infectious diseases in regional hotspots as during previous El Niño events. Discussion and Conclusions: The current development of weak El Niño conditions may have significant <span class="hlt">potential</span> implications for global public health in winter 2014-spring 2015. Enhanced surveillance and other preparedness measures in predicted infectious disease hotspots could mitigate health impacts. PMID:25685635</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.T11D2494L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.T11D2494L"><span id="translatedtitle">Influence of Older Structure on Quaternary Faulting in Northeastern California <span class="hlt">Suggested</span> by <span class="hlt">Potential</span>-Field Data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Langenheim, V. E.; Jachens, R. C.; Clynne, M. A.; Muffler, L. J.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Interpretation of aeromagnetic and new gravity data supports the earlier hypothesis by Blakely et al. (1997) that Quaternary faulting is influenced by preexisting basement structure in the region between Mt. Shasta and Lassen Peak volcanoes. Analysis of aeromagnetic data and more than 800 new gravity measurements provide structural detail within the Hat Creek graben and along the northeast-striking gravity high located between the two volcanoes. Late Cenozoic volcanic rocks coincide with short-wavelength magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of both normal and reversed polarity, whereas a markedly smoother magnetic field overlies Paleozoic basement rocks and early Cenozoic cover. The boundary between the two magnetic patterns is roughly parallel to the southeast boundary of the gravity high, which coincides with a change in strike and distribution of Quaternary faults. The linear northeast-trending boundary of the magnetic pattern <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that no significant dextral shear (more than 2 km) associated with the Walker Lane has propagated from the southeast through this region. Although the magnetic field over the Cenozoic volcanic rocks is complex, the Hat Creek fault, which displaces basalt dated at 24 × 6 ka (Turrin et al., 2007) and which forms the eastern margin of the Hat Creek graben, is marked by the eastern edge of a 30-km-long north-trending magnetic high. The western edge of the magnetic high, however, does not coincide with the western margin of the graben, but instead bisects the down-dropped block. This pattern is mimicked in the gravity field, where the eastern part of the graben has gravity values 5-6 mGal higher than the western part of the graben. Preliminary modeling <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the Hat Creek fault may have as much as 2 km of near-vertical offset to account for the gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> across the fault. At the northern end of the graben at about latitude 41° 52.5'N, the Hat Creek fault is expressed by many short faults distributed between Burney and Pittville. Here both the gravity and magnetic character changes, with the disappearance of the gravity high along the eastern margin of the graben and a shift to the northeast in the strike of the magnetic high. The gravity low that spans the graben at this latitude coincides with the present topographic lowland, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that this area has been low-lying for as much as 1.5 million years, based on extensive diatomite lake beds (Page and Renne, 1994). This change in fault character coincides with a northeast-striking alignment of prominent, semicircular magnetic lows that we interpret as small calc-alkaline volcanoes erupted during reversed polarity epochs. These volcanoes appear to be concealed beneath younger volcanic flows. The distribution of these older volcanoes may have been influenced by the preexisting crustal structure delineated by the northeast-striking gravity high discussed by Blakely et al. (1997). This fundamental crustal change also may account for the westward jump of the 2-3 Ma Cascade arc axis to its present location.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=51063&keyword=erp&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=72502854&CFTOKEN=45375727','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=51063&keyword=erp&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=72502854&CFTOKEN=45375727"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">SUGGESTIONS</span> FOR COLLECTION AND REPORTING OF CHEMOSENSORY (OLFACTORY) EVENT-RELATED <span class="hlt">POTENTIALS</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Chemosensory event-related <span class="hlt">potentials</span> hold great promise for furthering understanding of the olfactory system and the processing of olfactory information. ollection of this type of data has been difficult and <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> are presented to aid investigators new to this field. ugges...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PApGe.170..895T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PApGe.170..895T"><span id="translatedtitle">An Approach for Interpretation of Self-<span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> due to Simple Geometrical Structures Using Fair Function Minimization</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tlas, M.; Asfahani, J.</p> <p>2013-05-01</p> <p>A quantitative interpretation method of self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> has been proposed. The method is designed and implemented for the estimation of center depth, electric dipole moment or magnitude of polarization, polarization angle, and geometric shape factor of a buried body from SP field data, related to simple geometric structures such as cylinders, spheres and sheet-like bodies. The proposed method is based on Fair function minimization and also on stochastic optimization modeling. This new technique was first tested on theoretical synthetic data randomly generated by a chosen statistical distribution from a known model with different random noise components. Such mathematical simulation shows a very close agreement between assumed and estimated model parameters. Being theoretically proven, it has been applied and tested on self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> field data taken from the United States, Germany, India and Turkey. The agreement between results obtained by the <span class="hlt">suggested</span> method and those obtained by other previous methods is good and comparable. Moreover, the depth obtained by this method is found to be in high accordance with that obtained from drilling information.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3585326','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3585326"><span id="translatedtitle">Sharing of <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Nest Sites by Etheostoma olmstedi Males <span class="hlt">Suggests</span> Mutual Tolerance in an Alloparental Species</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Stiver, Kelly A.; Wolff, Stephen H.; Alonzo, Suzanne H.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>When reproductive competitors tolerate or cooperate with one another, they may gain particular benefits, such as collectively guarding resources or attracting mates. Shared resources may be those essential to reproduction, such as a breeding site or nest. Using the tessellated darter, a species where males but not females compete over <span class="hlt">potential</span> nest sites, we examined site use and sharing under controlled conditions of differing competitor density. Sharing was observed even when competitor density was low and individuals could have each occupied a <span class="hlt">potential</span> nest site without same-sex sharing. Males were more likely to share a nest site with one other when the difference in size between them was larger rather than smaller. There was no evidence that female sharing was dependent on their relative size. Fish were generally more likely to use and share larger sites, in accordance with the greater relative surface area they offered. We discuss how one or both sharing males may <span class="hlt">potentially</span> benefit, and how male sharing of <span class="hlt">potential</span> nest sites could relate to female mating preferences. Tessellated darter males are known to provide alloparental care for eggs but this occurs without any social contact between the alloparent and the genetic father of the young. Thus, the <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> that they may also share sites and maintain social contact with reproductive competitors highlights the importance of increased focus on the <span class="hlt">potential</span> complexity of reproductive systems. PMID:23468853</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3980804','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3980804"><span id="translatedtitle">Event-related <span class="hlt">potential</span> evidence <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> voters remember political events that never happened</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Federmeier, Kara D.; Gonsalves, Brian D.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Voters tend to misattribute issue positions to political candidates that are consistent with their partisan affiliation, even though these candidates have never explicitly stated or endorsed such stances. The prevailing explanation in political science is that voters misattribute candidates’ issue positions because they use their political knowledge to make educated but incorrect guesses. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that voter errors can also stem from a different source: false memories. The current study examined event-related <span class="hlt">potential</span> (ERP) responses to misattributed and accurately remembered candidate issue information. We report here that ERP responses to misattributed information can elicit memory signals similar to that of correctly remembered old information—a pattern consistent with a false memory rather than educated guessing interpretation of these misattributions. These results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that some types of voter misinformation about candidates may be harder to correct than previously thought. PMID:23202775</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23202775','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23202775"><span id="translatedtitle">Event-related <span class="hlt">potential</span> evidence <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> voters remember political events that never happened.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Coronel, Jason C; Federmeier, Kara D; Gonsalves, Brian D</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>Voters tend to misattribute issue positions to political candidates that are consistent with their partisan affiliation, even though these candidates have never explicitly stated or endorsed such stances. The prevailing explanation in political science is that voters misattribute candidates' issue positions because they use their political knowledge to make educated but incorrect guesses. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that voter errors can also stem from a different source: false memories. The current study examined event-related <span class="hlt">potential</span> (ERP) responses to misattributed and accurately remembered candidate issue information. We report here that ERP responses to misattributed information can elicit memory signals similar to that of correctly remembered old information--a pattern consistent with a false memory rather than educated guessing interpretation of these misattributions. These results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that some types of voter misinformation about candidates may be harder to correct than previously thought. PMID:23202775</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=163236','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=163236"><span id="translatedtitle">Microtubule inhibitors: structure-activity analyses <span class="hlt">suggest</span> rational models to identify <span class="hlt">potentially</span> active compounds.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Callahan, H L; Kelley, C; Pereira, T; Grogl, M</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>Trifluralin, a dinitroaniline microtubule inhibitor currently in use as an herbicide, has been shown to inhibit the proliferation of Plasmodium falciparum, Trypanosoma brucei, and several species of Leishmania, in vitro. As a topical formulation, trifluralin is also effective in vivo (in BALB/c mice) against Leishmania major and Leishmania mexicana. Although trifluralin and other dinitroaniline herbicides show significant activity as antiparasitic compounds, disputed indications of <span class="hlt">potential</span> carcinogenicity will probably limit advanced development of these substances. However, researchers have <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that the activity of trifluralin is due to an impurity or contaminant, not to trifluralin itself. We have pursued this lead and identified the structure of the active impurity. This compound, chloralin, is 100 times more active than trifluralin. On the basis of its structure, we developed a rational structure-activity model for chloralin. Using this model, we have successfully predicted and tested active analogs in a Leishmania promastigote assay; thus, we have identified the putative mechanism of action of this class of drugs in Leishmania species. <span class="hlt">Potentially</span>, this will allow the design of noncarcinogenic, active drugs. PMID:8849257</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvB..91w5402S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvB..91w5402S"><span id="translatedtitle">Dependence of the 0.7 <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> on the curvature of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> barrier in quantum wires</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Smith, L. W.; Al-Taie, H.; Lesage, A. A. J.; Sfigakis, F.; See, P.; Griffiths, J. P.; Beere, H. E.; Jones, G. A. C.; Ritchie, D. A.; Hamilton, A. R.; Kelly, M. J.; Smith, C. G.</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>Ninety-eight one-dimensional channels defined using split gates fabricated on a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure are measured during one cooldown at 1.4 K. The devices are arranged in an array on a single chip and are individually addressed using a multiplexing technique. The anomalous conductance feature known as the "0.7 structure" is studied using statistical techniques. The ensemble of data shows that the 0.7 <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> becomes more pronounced and occurs at lower values as the curvature of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> barrier in the transport direction decreases. This corresponds to an increase in the effective length of the device. The 0.7 <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is not strongly influenced by other properties of the conductance related to density. The curvature of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> barrier appears to be the primary factor governing the shape of the 0.7 structure at a given T and B .</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=72355&keyword=prolactin&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=71347207&CFTOKEN=46128357','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=72355&keyword=prolactin&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=71347207&CFTOKEN=46128357"><span id="translatedtitle">PERINATAL EXPOSURE TO ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS: <span class="hlt">POTENTIAL</span> ROLE OF HORMONAL ALTERATIONS IN INITIATING ADULT REPRODUCTIVE <span class="hlt">ANOMALIES</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The primary hypothesis to be tested in this series of studies is whether or not exposure to environmental agents, during certain key periods of development, will increase the risk of specific <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the reproductive system. Embedded in this hypothesis is the assumption that...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3065424','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3065424"><span id="translatedtitle">Sexual and postmating reproductive isolation between allopatric Drosophila montana populations <span class="hlt">suggest</span> speciation <span class="hlt">potential</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Background Widely distributed species with populations adapted to different environmental conditions can provide valuable opportunities for tracing the onset of reproductive incompatibilities and their role in the speciation process. Drosophila montana, a D. virilis group species found in high latitude boreal forests in Nearctic and Palearctic regions around the globe, could be an excellent model system for studying the early stages of speciation, as a wealth of information concerning this species' ecology, mating system, life history, genetics and phylogeography is available. However, reproductive barriers between populations have hereto not been investigated. Results We report both pre- and postmating barriers to reproduction between flies from European (Finnish) and North American (Canadian) populations of Drosophila montana. Using a series of mate-choice designs, we show that flies from these two populations mate assortatively (i.e., exhibit significant sexual isolation) while emphasizing the importance of experimental design in these kinds of studies. We also assessed <span class="hlt">potential</span> postmating isolation by quantifying egg and progeny production in intra- and interpopulation crosses and show a significant one-way reduction in progeny production, affecting both male and female offspring equally. Conclusion We provide evidence that allopatric D. montana populations exhibit reproductive isolation and we discuss the <span class="hlt">potential</span> mechanisms involved. Our data emphasize the importance of experimental design in studies on premating isolation between recently diverged taxa and <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that postmating barriers may be due to postcopulatory-prezygotic mechanisms. D. montana populations seem to be evolving multiple barriers to gene flow in allopatry and our study lays the groundwork for future investigations of the genetic and phenotypic mechanisms underlying these barriers. PMID:21396136</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=175382','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=175382"><span id="translatedtitle">Ribotypes and virulence gene polymorphisms <span class="hlt">suggest</span> three distinct Listeria monocytogenes lineages with differences in pathogenic <span class="hlt">potential</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wiedmann, M; Bruce, J L; Keating, C; Johnson, A E; McDonough, P L; Batt, C A</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>A total of 133 Listeria monocytogenes isolates were characterized by ribotyping and allelic analysis of the virulence genes hly, actA, and inlA to uncover linkages between independent phylogenetic and specific virulence markers. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphisms revealed 8 hly, 11 inl4, and 2 actA alleles. The combination of these virulence gene alleles and ribotype patterns separated L. monocytogenes into three distinct lineages. While distinct hly and inlA alleles were generally found to cluster into these three lineages, actA alleles segregated independently. These three phylogenetic lineages were confirmed when 22 partial actA DNA sequences were analyzed. The clinical history of the L. monocytogenes strains showed evidence for differences in pathogenic <span class="hlt">potential</span> among the three lineages. Lineage I contains all strains isolated during epidemic outbreaks of listeriosis, while no human isolates were found in lineage III. Animal isolates were found in all three lineages. We found evidence that isolates from lineages I and III have a higher plaquing efficiency than lineage II strains in a cell culture assay. Strains from lineage III also seem to form larger plaques than strains from lineage II. A distinctive ribotype fragment and unique 16S rRNA gene sequences furthermore <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that lineage III might represent a L. monocytogenes subspecies. None of the 20 human isolates available but 11% of our animal isolates were grouped in this lineage, indicating that strains in this lineage might have reduced virulence for humans. PMID:9199440</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4683621','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4683621"><span id="translatedtitle">Identification of <span class="hlt">potential</span> mitochondrial CLPXP protease interactors and substrates <span class="hlt">suggests</span> its central role in energy metabolism</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Fischer, Fabian; Langer, Julian D.; Osiewacz, Heinz D.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Maintenance of mitochondria is achieved by several mechanisms, including the regulation of mitochondrial proteostasis. The matrix protease CLPXP, involved in protein quality control, has been implicated in ageing and disease. However, particularly due to the lack of knowledge of CLPXP’s substrate spectrum, only little is known about the pathways and mechanisms controlled by this protease. Here we report the first comprehensive identification of <span class="hlt">potential</span> mitochondrial CLPXP in vivo interaction partners and substrates using a combination of tandem affinity purification and differential proteomics. This analysis reveals that CLPXP in the fungal ageing model Podospora anserina is mainly associated with metabolic pathways in mitochondria, e.g. components of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and the tricarboxylic acid cycle as well as subunits of electron transport chain complex I. These data <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a possible function of mitochondrial CLPXP in the control and/or maintenance of energy metabolism. Since bioenergetic alterations are a common feature of neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and ageing, our data comprise an important resource for specific studies addressing the role of CLPXP in these adverse processes. PMID:26679294</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17886018','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17886018"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of advancing age on the processing of semantic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in adults: evidence from event-related brain <span class="hlt">potentials</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Faustmann, Anja; Murdoch, Bruce E; Finnigan, Simon P; Copland, David A</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Age-related changes in the processing of sentence-embedded semantic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were examined using auditory event-related <span class="hlt">potentials</span> (ERPs). Semantically incongruous words elicited an N400 effect in middle-aged (50s: 55.6 years) and elderly (60s: 64.1 years) subjects, whereas in older elderly adults (70s: 74.9 years) this effect approached significance. N400 peak latencies were not delayed with advancing age; however, there was a reliable linear decrease in mean and peak amplitude, with slopes being similar to those previously reported for the visual N400 effect. A P600 effect was obtained in response to semantic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and it was neither delayed in latency nor reduced in amplitude with advancing age. However, it was found to be larger over anterior sites in elderly and older elderly subjects. PMID:17886018</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19790020473','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19790020473"><span id="translatedtitle">Global accuracy estimates of point and mean undulation differences obtained from gravity disturbances, gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and <span class="hlt">potential</span> coefficients</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Jekeli, C.</p> <p>1979-01-01</p> <p>Through the method of truncation functions, the oceanic geoid undulation is divided into two constituents: an inner zone contribution expressed as an integral of surface gravity disturbances over a spherical cap; and an outer zone contribution derived from a finite set of <span class="hlt">potential</span> harmonic coefficients. Global, average error estimates are formulated for undulation differences, thereby providing accuracies for a relative geoid. The error analysis focuses on the outer zone contribution for which the <span class="hlt">potential</span> coefficient errors are modeled. The method of computing undulations based on gravity disturbance data for the inner zone is compared to the similar, conventional method which presupposes gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data within this zone.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>1</a></li> <li class="active"><span>2</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_2 --> <div id="page_3" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>1</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li class="active"><span>3</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="41"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4092145','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4092145"><span id="translatedtitle">Widespread Sequence Variations in VAMP1 across Vertebrates <span class="hlt">Suggest</span> a <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Selective Pressure from Botulinum Neurotoxins</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Peng, Lisheng; Adler, Michael; Demogines, Ann; Borrell, Andrew; Liu, Huisheng; Tao, Liang; Tepp, William H.; Zhang, Su-Chun; Johnson, Eric A.; Sawyer, Sara L.; Dong, Min</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT/A-G), the most potent toxins known, act by cleaving three SNARE proteins required for synaptic vesicle exocytosis. Previous studies on BoNTs have generally utilized the major SNARE homologues expressed in brain (VAMP2, syntaxin 1, and SNAP-25). However, BoNTs target peripheral motor neurons and cause death by paralyzing respiratory muscles such as the diaphragm. Here we report that VAMP1, but not VAMP2, is the SNARE homologue predominantly expressed in adult rodent diaphragm motor nerve terminals and in differentiated human motor neurons. In contrast to the highly conserved VAMP2, BoNT-resistant variations in VAMP1 are widespread across vertebrates. In particular, we identified a polymorphism at position 48 of VAMP1 in rats, which renders VAMP1 either resistant (I48) or sensitive (M48) to BoNT/D. Taking advantage of this finding, we showed that rat diaphragms with I48 in VAMP1 are insensitive to BoNT/D compared to rat diaphragms with M48 in VAMP1. This unique intra-species comparison establishes VAMP1 as a physiological toxin target in diaphragm motor nerve terminals, and demonstrates that the resistance of VAMP1 to BoNTs can underlie the insensitivity of a species to members of BoNTs. Consistently, human VAMP1 contains I48, which may explain why humans are insensitive to BoNT/D. Finally, we report that residue 48 of VAMP1 varies frequently between M and I across seventeen closely related primate species, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> a <span class="hlt">potential</span> selective pressure from members of BoNTs for resistance in vertebrates. PMID:25010769</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25010769','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25010769"><span id="translatedtitle">Widespread sequence variations in VAMP1 across vertebrates <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a <span class="hlt">potential</span> selective pressure from botulinum neurotoxins.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Peng, Lisheng; Adler, Michael; Demogines, Ann; Borrell, Andrew; Liu, Huisheng; Tao, Liang; Tepp, William H; Zhang, Su-Chun; Johnson, Eric A; Sawyer, Sara L; Dong, Min</p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT/A-G), the most potent toxins known, act by cleaving three SNARE proteins required for synaptic vesicle exocytosis. Previous studies on BoNTs have generally utilized the major SNARE homologues expressed in brain (VAMP2, syntaxin 1, and SNAP-25). However, BoNTs target peripheral motor neurons and cause death by paralyzing respiratory muscles such as the diaphragm. Here we report that VAMP1, but not VAMP2, is the SNARE homologue predominantly expressed in adult rodent diaphragm motor nerve terminals and in differentiated human motor neurons. In contrast to the highly conserved VAMP2, BoNT-resistant variations in VAMP1 are widespread across vertebrates. In particular, we identified a polymorphism at position 48 of VAMP1 in rats, which renders VAMP1 either resistant (I48) or sensitive (M48) to BoNT/D. Taking advantage of this finding, we showed that rat diaphragms with I48 in VAMP1 are insensitive to BoNT/D compared to rat diaphragms with M48 in VAMP1. This unique intra-species comparison establishes VAMP1 as a physiological toxin target in diaphragm motor nerve terminals, and demonstrates that the resistance of VAMP1 to BoNTs can underlie the insensitivity of a species to members of BoNTs. Consistently, human VAMP1 contains I48, which may explain why humans are insensitive to BoNT/D. Finally, we report that residue 48 of VAMP1 varies frequently between M and I across seventeen closely related primate species, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> a <span class="hlt">potential</span> selective pressure from members of BoNTs for resistance in vertebrates. PMID:25010769</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26308761','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26308761"><span id="translatedtitle">Preclinical Studies <span class="hlt">Suggest</span> Complex Nutraceutical Strategies May Have <span class="hlt">Potential</span> for Preventing and Managing Sepsis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>McCarty, Mark F</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>An analysis of signaling mechanisms triggered by toll receptor 4 (TLR4) in macrophages, as well as of pertinent cell-culture and rodent studies, <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that various nutraceuticals may have clinical <span class="hlt">potential</span> for preventing and treating Gram-negative sepsis. Endotoxin activation of TLR4 results in induction of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS); cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2); tissue factor (TF); and a range of proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin-1 β (IL-1β), and interleukin 6 (IL-6), that collaborate to generate the clinical picture of sepsis. Upstream activation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase contributes importantly to those effects by inducing superoxide production that promotes activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and nuclear factor (NF) κΒ. Bilirubin generated intracellularly by activation of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) functions to provide feedback inhibition of NAPDH-oxidase complexes. Exogenous bilirubin, or its precursor, biliverdin, is protective in rodent models of sepsis. One nutraceutical, phycocyanobilin (PhyCB), is a biliverdin derivative that functions as a light-gathering chromophore in cyanobacteria such as spirulina and can be converted intracellularly to a compound structurally homologous to bilirubin that likewise inhibits NADPH-oxidase complexes. In rodent studies, administration of phycocyanin, to which PhyCB is covalently attached, has likewise been shown to be protective in rodent models of sepsis. Other nutraceuticals provide benefits in counteracting the effects of TLR4. Phase 2-inductive nutraceuticals, such as lipoic acid, have the <span class="hlt">potential</span> to induce HO-1 activity in macrophages, promoting bilirubin production. They may also antagonize the upregulatory impact of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on macrophage signaling by boosting glutathione synthesis. Another nutraceutical, glycine, helps counter the TLR4-triggered calcium influx that occurs through voltage-sensitive calcium channels and contributes to NADPH-oxidase activation, and, via activation of Ca+2/calmodulin-dependent kinase 2, also promotes induction of proinflammatory cytokines and cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2). Elevations of serum glycine that are achievable through supplementation can block that calcium influx by activating membrane chloride channels in macrophages, inducing membrane hyperpolarization. Use of high-dose folate, another nutraceutical, has been shown to antagonize activation of endotoxin-mediated macrophages in cell cultures and in rodents. That result likely reflects the versatile, radical-scavenging activity of reduced intracellular folates, which in particular scavenge radicals derived from peroxynitrite, a key mediator of tissue damage in sepsis. Activators of adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated kinase (AMPK), such as the drug metformin or the nutraceutical berberine, have been shown to antagonize TLR4-mediated activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2), which contributes to the induction of TF and TNF-α. In rodent models of sepsis, lipoic acid, glycine, high-dose folate, metformin, berberine, and phycocyanin have all shown protective utility, yet none of those substances has been evaluated clinically in that regard. Because those agents are all well tolerated individually, complex nutraceuticals featuring several of those agents can be envisioned as possibly aiding prevention and control of sepsis. Clinical evaluation of such a strategy should be a high priority. That approach may also have the <span class="hlt">potential</span> for aiding survival in Ebola infection, the lethality of which is mediated by mechanisms quite analogous to those involved in sepsis. PMID:26308761</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ClDy...45.3461L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ClDy...45.3461L"><span id="translatedtitle">Two key parameters for the El Niño continuum: zonal wind <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and Western Pacific subsurface <span class="hlt">potential</span> temperature</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lai, Andy Wang-Chun; Herzog, Michael; Graf, Hans-F.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Different types of El Niño (EN) events have recently been discussed. Based on NCEP-NOAA reanalysis data this analysis explores a number of key parameters that cause a range of EN types over the period 1980-2013. EN events are divided into three types depending on the spatial and temporal evolution of the sea surface temperature <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (SSTA): Central Pacific (CPEN), Eastern Pacific (EPEN), and Hybrid (HBEN). We find that EN is a continuous spectrum of events with CPEN and EPEN as the end members. This spectrum mainly depends on two key parameters: the 130°E-160°E Western Pacific 5-250 m subsurface oceanic <span class="hlt">potential</span> temperature <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> about 1 year before the EN peak (typically January and February), and the 140°E-160°W cumulative zonal wind <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (ZWA) between onset and peak of the EN event. Using these two parameters, about 70 % of the total variance of the maximum SSTA realised in different Niño regions can already be explained up to 6 months before the maximum SSTA occurs. This offers a rather simple <span class="hlt">potential</span> for ENSO prediction. A necessary condition for the evolution of an EPEN, the Western Pacific is in the recharged state. Strong and sustained westerly wind <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Western Pacific can then trigger a Kelvin wave propagating to the eastern Pacific. Both parameters, <span class="hlt">potential</span> temperature and zonal wind <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, constructively interfere. For a CPEN, these parameters are much less important. Kelvin wave propagation is not involved in the evolution of the event. Instead, the Central Pacific warming is caused locally by a zonal advection feedback and local air-sea interaction as already demonstrated in previous studies. The HBEN occurs when both parameters interfere in different ways: (1) Western Pacific is weakly charged, but strong westerly ZWA are observed that reduce the equatorial upwelling in the Central Pacific while the triggered Kelvin wave is too weak to have a significant effect; (2) Western Pacific is strongly charged but only weak westerly ZWA develop, so that the resulting Kelvin wave cannot fully extend into the eastern-most Pacific.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.V31B2783H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.V31B2783H"><span id="translatedtitle">Magmatic reservoir modeling of the Azufral Volcano from interpreted <span class="hlt">potential</span> field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, Nariño, Colombia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hernandez, O.; Gomez, D.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>The Azufral Volcano is an active volcano located at 1 ° 5 'N, 77 ° 43'W, at 565 km from Bogotá, in the Southern Colombian Andes. The volcano has a semicircular crater that involves a lake and four generations of rhyodacitic domes. The crater lake has a width of 300 m and a length of 1 km approximately. Azufral is considered one of the most explosive volcanoes of Colombia, apparently with a valuable geothermal <span class="hlt">potential</span> . A gravity and magnetic survey was carried out in an area of approximately 600 km2, in the Volcano influence zone. Data reduction, data filtering and spectral analysis were applied in order to highlight details on the gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that allowed correlation analysis with the general geological setting of the area including the volcano. The Complete Bouguer <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> map shows in general, two large blocks NE-SW trend coincident with the general direction of the faults in the region, showing between these two sites a total absolute change of about 118 mGal. Spectral analysis, Euler Deconvolution showed that the region trend is that the bodies that generate the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are located in predominantly shallow crustal levels, less than 5 km above the volcano summit. Profile modeling in the WE direction and passing through the volcano, shows stratified deposits, typical for volcanic regions with vertical density variations from the basement, modeled at about 3 km over the summit, to shallow levels where are modeled ignimbrites, Lavas, moraines and lava domes located in the vicinity of the crater lake. In the crater lake area it is possible to outline the probable existence of an elongated zone, with a top at around 2 km deep, extending in depth about 2 km, that can be associated with an abnormal structure that is the causative body of a clear negative <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> on this particular zone.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.H11E0824R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.H11E0824R"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> bedrock source of groundwater arsenic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in northeastern Chihuahua City, Chihuahua, Mexico</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rodrigu, A.; Ren, M.; Goodell, P.</p> <p>2007-12-01</p> <p>Contaminant sources of arsenic are often very difficult to identify. It is rare that specific rock units can be identified to which groundwater <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> can be attributed. In this study, primary arsenic minerals, such as a Y-As bearing phase and a Sr-Al-As phase, have been identified in the Cenozoic volcanic tuff from El Mimbre area, at the northeast part of Tabalaopa Basin, the City of Chihuahua. Tabalaopa Basin is one of the sources for groundwater of the City of Chihuahua. The volcanic strata and the unconsolidated Quaternary deposit serve as the groundwater reservoir. The El Mimbre area demonstrates elevated groundwater arsenic concentrations, with 5 wells having values greater than 20 ppb. Small hills of Cenozoic volcanic tuff lie immediately up gradient to the northeast adjacent to the groundwater <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Electron microprobe elemental x-ray maps have been applied to detect arsenic distribution in the samples. The volcanic rocks are reddish welded ash flow tuff and rhyolite with mainly sanidine, quartz, and biotite. The Y-As phase (a possible hydrated chernovite YAsO4) exists as inclusions in the biotite. The Y-As phase could be the primary arsenic mineral formed in the crystallization stage of the magma. After the eruption, the vapor phase from the diagenetic welding of volcanic tuff formed the euhedral Sr-Al- As phase in the lithophysal cavities. The wavelength peak scan and quantitative analysis present that the euhedral arsenic minerals are mainly arsenogoyazite (SrAl3[(OH)5(AsO4)2])H2O. There are euhedral alkali feldspars and ilmenite co-existing with arsenogoyazite, so the arsenogoyazite could be the vapor phase derived. The arsenic mineral petrogenesis sequences can be 1) the formation of chernoviet, 2) vapor stage alteration and the precipitation of arsenogoyazite in the cavities. It is hypothesized that the relative soluble arsenogoyazite is leached by meteoric water and provides the arsenic in the nearby groundwater. Based on current study, the arsenic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the Tabalaopa Basin aquifer can be mainly from the arsenic minerals in the adjacent volcanic rocks.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvD..93h5017M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvD..93h5017M"><span id="translatedtitle">Stress tensor for a scalar field in a spatially varying background <span class="hlt">potential</span>: Divergences, "renormalization", <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and Casimir forces</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Milton, Kimball A.; Fulling, Stephen A.; Parashar, Prachi; Kalauni, Pushpa; Murphy, Taylor</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Motivated by a desire to understand quantum fluctuation energy densities and stress within a spatially varying dielectric medium, we examine the vacuum expectation value for the stress tensor of a scalar field with arbitrary conformal parameter, in the background of a given <span class="hlt">potential</span> that depends on only one spatial coordinate. We regulate the expressions by incorporating a temporal-spatial cutoff in the (imaginary) time and transverse-spatial directions. The divergences are captured by the zeroth- and second-order WKB approximations. Then the stress tensor is "renormalized" by omitting the terms that depend on the cutoff. The ambiguities that inevitably arise in this procedure are both duly noted and restricted by imposing certain physical conditions; one result is that the renormalized stress tensor exhibits the expected trace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The renormalized stress tensor exhibits no pressure <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, in that the principle of virtual work is satisfied for motions in a transverse direction. We then consider a <span class="hlt">potential</span> that defines a wall, a one-dimensional <span class="hlt">potential</span> that vanishes for z <0 and rises like zα, α >0 , for z >0 . Previously, the stress tensor had been computed outside of the wall, whereas now we compute all components of the stress tensor in the interior of the wall. The full finite stress tensor is computed numerically for the two cases where explicit solutions to the differential equation are available, α =1 and 2. The energy density exhibits an inverse linear divergence as the boundary is approached from the inside for a linear <span class="hlt">potential</span>, and a logarithmic divergence for a quadratic <span class="hlt">potential</span>. Finally, the interaction between two such walls is computed, and it is shown that the attractive Casimir pressure between the two walls also satisfies the principle of virtual work (i.e., the pressure equals the negative derivative of the energy with respect to the distance between the walls).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26361089','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26361089"><span id="translatedtitle">Differential uptake of silver, copper and zinc <span class="hlt">suggests</span> complementary species-specific phytoextraction <span class="hlt">potential</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Desjardins, D; Pitre, F E; Nissim, W Guidi; Labrecque, M</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>The aim of our study, conducted as a pot experiment, was to assess the <span class="hlt">potential</span> of willow (Salix miyabeana), alfalfa (Medicago sativa), tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea), and Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) to remediate two brownfield soils differentially contaminated with Ag, Cu and Zn (up to 113.60, 47.50, and 117.00 mg kg(-1) respectively). While aboveground Ag accumulation was highest in B. juncea (4.60 ± 2.58 mg kg(-1)), lower levels were also measured in M. sativa and F. arundinacea. Cu accumulation was observed in all species, but only in underground parts, and was highest in F. arundinacea (269.20 ± 74.75 mg kg(-1)), with a bioconcentration factor of 13.85. Salix miyabeana was found to have the highest Zn aerial tissue concentration (119.96 ± 20.04 mg kg(-1)). Because of its high Ag uptake, the remediation <span class="hlt">potential</span> of B. juncea should be evaluated more extensively on the site from which we excavated the soil for this study. Given the multiple forms of contamination on the site and the differential specie-related uptake evident in our findings, we hypothesize that an optimal plantation allowing expression of complementary remediation functions would include B. juncea for extraction of Ag, in combination with F. arundinacea for stabilization of Cu and S. miyabeana for extraction of Zn. PMID:26361089</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JChPh.143x4506I','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JChPh.143x4506I"><span id="translatedtitle">A new parameter-free soft-core <span class="hlt">potential</span> for silica and its application to simulation of silica <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Izvekov, Sergei; Rice, Betsy M.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>A core-softening of the effective interaction between oxygen atoms in water and silica systems and its role in developing anomalous thermodynamic, transport, and structural properties have been extensively debated. For silica, the progress with addressing these issues has been hampered by a lack of effective interaction models with explicit core-softening. In this work, we present an extension of a two-body soft-core interatomic force field for silica recently reported by us [S. Izvekov and B. M. Rice, J. Chem. Phys. 136(13), 134508 (2012)] to include three-body forces. Similar to two-body interaction terms, the three-body terms are derived using parameter-free force-matching of the interactions from ab initio MD simulations of liquid silica. The derived shape of the O-Si-O three-body <span class="hlt">potential</span> term affirms the existence of repulsion softening between oxygen atoms at short separations. The new model shows a good performance in simulating liquid, amorphous, and crystalline silica. By comparing the soft-core model and a similar model with the soft-core suppressed, we demonstrate that the topology reorganization within the local tetrahedral network and the O-O core-softening are two competitive mechanisms responsible for anomalous thermodynamic and kinetic behaviors observed in liquid and amorphous silica. The studied <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> include the temperature of density maximum locus and anomalous diffusivity in liquid silica, and irreversible densification of amorphous silica. We show that the O-O core-softened interaction enhances the observed <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> primarily through two mechanisms: facilitating the defect driven structural rearrangements of the silica tetrahedral network and modifying the tetrahedral ordering induced interactions toward multiple characteristic scales, the feature which underlies the thermodynamic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26723691','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26723691"><span id="translatedtitle">A new parameter-free soft-core <span class="hlt">potential</span> for silica and its application to simulation of silica <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Izvekov, Sergei; Rice, Betsy M</p> <p>2015-12-28</p> <p>A core-softening of the effective interaction between oxygen atoms in water and silica systems and its role in developing anomalous thermodynamic, transport, and structural properties have been extensively debated. For silica, the progress with addressing these issues has been hampered by a lack of effective interaction models with explicit core-softening. In this work, we present an extension of a two-body soft-core interatomic force field for silica recently reported by us [S. Izvekov and B. M. Rice, J. Chem. Phys. 136(13), 134508 (2012)] to include three-body forces. Similar to two-body interaction terms, the three-body terms are derived using parameter-free force-matching of the interactions from ab initio MD simulations of liquid silica. The derived shape of the O-Si-O three-body <span class="hlt">potential</span> term affirms the existence of repulsion softening between oxygen atoms at short separations. The new model shows a good performance in simulating liquid, amorphous, and crystalline silica. By comparing the soft-core model and a similar model with the soft-core suppressed, we demonstrate that the topology reorganization within the local tetrahedral network and the O-O core-softening are two competitive mechanisms responsible for anomalous thermodynamic and kinetic behaviors observed in liquid and amorphous silica. The studied <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> include the temperature of density maximum locus and anomalous diffusivity in liquid silica, and irreversible densification of amorphous silica. We show that the O-O core-softened interaction enhances the observed <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> primarily through two mechanisms: facilitating the defect driven structural rearrangements of the silica tetrahedral network and modifying the tetrahedral ordering induced interactions toward multiple characteristic scales, the feature which underlies the thermodynamic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. PMID:26723691</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3482292','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3482292"><span id="translatedtitle">Cervical spine <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Menkes disease: a radiologic finding <span class="hlt">potentially</span> confused with child abuse</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Hill, Suvimol C.; Dwyer, Andrew J.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Background Menkes disease is an X-linked recessive disorder of copper transport caused by mutations in ATP7A, a copper-transporting ATPase. Certain radiologic findings reported in this condition overlap with those caused by child abuse. However, cervical spine defects simulating cervical spine fracture, a known result of nonaccidental pediatric trauma, have not been reported previously in this illness. Objective To assess the frequency of cervical spine <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Menkes disease after discovery of an apparent C2 posterior arch defect in a child participating in a clinical trial. Materials and methods We examined cervical spine radiographs obtained in 35 children with Menkes disease enrolled in a clinical trial at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. Results Four of the 35 children with Menkes disease had apparent C2 posterior arch defects consistent with spondylolysis or incomplete/delayed ossification. Conclusion Defects in C2 were found in 11% of infants and young children with Menkes disease. Discovery of cervical spine defects expands the spectrum of radiologic findings associated with this condition. As with other skeletal abnormalities, this feature simulates nonaccidental trauma. In the context of Menkes disease, suspicions of child abuse should be considered cautiously and tempered by these findings to avoid unwarranted accusations. PMID:22825777</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ClDy...44.2557K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ClDy...44.2557K"><span id="translatedtitle">On the <span class="hlt">potential</span> of extratropical SST <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for improving climate predictions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kumar, Arun; Wang, Hui</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>Skill for initialized decadal predictions for atmospheric and terrestrial variability is posited to reside in successful prediction of sea surface temperatures (SSTs) associated with the low-frequency modes of coupled ocean-atmosphere variability, for example, Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) or Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation (AMO). So far, assessments of the skill of atmospheric and terrestrial variability in decadal predictions, however, have not been encouraging. Similarly, in the context of seasonal climate variability, teleconnections between SSTs associated with PDO and AMO and terrestrial climate have also been noted, but the same SST information used in predictive mode has failed to demonstrate convincing gains in skill. Are these results an artifact of model biases, or more a consequence of some fundamental property of coupled evolution of ocean-atmosphere system in extratropical latitudes, and the manner in which extratropical SST <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> modulate (or constrain) atmospheric variability? Based on revisiting an analysis of a simple model that replicates the essential characteristics of coupled ocean-atmosphere interaction in extratropical latitudes, it is demonstrated that lack of additional skill in predicting atmospheric and terrestrial variability is more a consequence of fundamental characteristics of coupled evolution of ocean-atmosphere system. The results based on simple models are also substantiated following an analysis of a set of seasonal hindcasts with a fully coupled model.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25365422','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25365422"><span id="translatedtitle">Self-propagative replication of Aβ oligomers <span class="hlt">suggests</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> transmissibility in Alzheimer disease.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kumar, Amit; Pate, Kayla M; Moss, Melissa A; Dean, Dexter N; Rangachari, Vijayaraghavan</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide and its deposition in parts of the brain form the central processes in the etiology of Alzheimer disease (AD). The low-molecular weight oligomers of Aβ aggregates (2 to 30 mers) are known to be the primary neurotoxic agents whose mechanisms of cellular toxicity and synaptic dysfunction have received substantial attention in the recent years. However, how these toxic agents proliferate and induce widespread amyloid deposition throughout the brain, and what mechanism is involved in the amplification and propagation of toxic oligomer species, are far from clear. Emerging evidence based on transgenic mice models indicates a transmissible nature of Aβ aggregates and implicates a prion-like mechanism of oligomer propagation, which manifests as the dissemination and proliferation of Aβ toxicity. Despite accumulating evidence in support of a transmissible nature of Aβ aggregates, a clear, molecular-level understanding of this intriguing mechanism is lacking. Recently, we reported the characterization of unique replicating oligomers of Aβ42 (12-24 mers) in vitro called Large Fatty Acid-derived Oligomers (LFAOs) (Kumar et al., 2012, J. Biol. Chem). In the current report, we establish that LFAOs possess physiological activity by activating NF-κB in human neuroblastoma cells, and determine the experimental parameters that control the efficiency of LFAO replication by self-propagation. These findings constitute the first detailed report on monomer - oligomer lateral propagation reactions that may constitute <span class="hlt">potential</span> mechanism governing transmissibility among Aβ oligomers. These data support the previous reports on transmissible mechanisms observed in transgenic animal models. PMID:25365422</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20070017836&hterms=INVESTMENT+HEALTH&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3DINVESTMENT%2BHEALTH','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20070017836&hterms=INVESTMENT+HEALTH&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3DINVESTMENT%2BHEALTH"><span id="translatedtitle">ISHM <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Lexicon for Rocket Test</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Schmalzel, John L.; Buchanan, Aubri; Hensarling, Paula L.; Morris, Jonathan; Turowski, Mark; Figueroa, Jorge F.</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Integrated Systems Health Management (ISHM) is a comprehensive capability. An ISHM system must detect <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, identify causes of such <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, predict future <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, help identify consequences of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for example, <span class="hlt">suggested</span> mitigation steps. The system should also provide users with appropriate navigation tools to facilitate the flow of information into and out of the ISHM system. Central to the ability of the ISHM to detect <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is a clearly defined catalog of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Further, this lexicon of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> must be organized in ways that make it accessible to a suite of tools used to manage the data, information and knowledge (DIaK) associated with a system. In particular, it is critical to ensure that there is optimal mapping between target <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the algorithms associated with their detection. During the early development of our ISHM architecture and approach, it became clear that a lexicon of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> would be important to the development of critical <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection algorithms. In our work in the rocket engine test environment at John C. Stennis Space Center, we have access to a repository of discrepancy reports (DRs) that are generated in response to squawks identified during post-test data analysis. The DR is the tool used to document <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the methods used to resolve the issue. These DRs have been generated for many different tests and for all test stands. The result is that they represent a comprehensive summary of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with rocket engine testing. Fig. 1 illustrates some of the data that can be extracted from a DR. Such information includes affected transducer channels, narrative description of the observed <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, and the steps used to correct the problem. The primary goal of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> lexicon development efforts we have undertaken is to create a lexicon that could be used in support of an associated health assessment database system (HADS) co-development effort. There are a number of significant byproducts of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> lexicon compilation effort. For example, (1) Allows determination of the frequency distribution of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to help identify those with the <span class="hlt">potential</span> for high return on investment if included in automated detection as part of an ISHM system, (2) Availability of a regular lexicon could provide the base <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> name choices to help maintain consistency in the DR collection process, and (3) Although developed for the rocket engine test environment, most of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are not specific to rocket testing, and thus can be reused in other applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005JPCM...17.7817S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005JPCM...17.7817S"><span id="translatedtitle">Dielectric anisotropy, volume <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the persistent Maxwellian equivalent body</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Simeonova, Margarita; Gimsa, Jan</p> <p>2005-12-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Potentially</span>, lipid membranes possess a high tangential conductivity and permittivity due to their surface charges and the in-plane orientation of the headgroup dipoles. Electrically, membranes exhibit a sandwich structure with a largely isotropic centre formed by the fatty acid chains and confined by two anisotropic headgroup layers. Accordingly, we described spherical vesicles by an aqueous core covered by three shells. For a theoretical comparison, models with an anisotropic single shell and anisotropic homogeneous spheres were also considered. Two effects can be clearly demonstrated. (1) High tangential conductivities or permittivities may lead to cyclic variations in the phase of the electric <span class="hlt">potential</span> in the radial direction, resulting in a hemi-shell structure of the electric <span class="hlt">potential</span> inside the objects with oppositely charged facets. The thickness of the anisotropic shell restricts the number of phase oscillations. (2) Despite the strong local field inhomogeneities, an isotropic homogeneous Maxwellian equivalent body with an identical external field distribution exists for any of the anisotropic models. Its properties can be found from a comparison of the numerically calculated surface <span class="hlt">potential</span> and the classical expression of the Clausius-Mossotti factor at any given frequency. The permittivity conductivity pairs obtained exhibit a sigmoidal-like frequency dependence.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19860012497','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19860012497"><span id="translatedtitle">Constraints on lithospheric structure from satellite <span class="hlt">potential</span> field data: Africa and Asia. Analysis and interpretation of MAGSAT <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over North Africa</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Phillips, R. J.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>Crustal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection with MAGSAT data is frustrated by the inherent resolving power of the data and by contamination from the external and core fields. The quality of the data might be tested by modeling specific tectonic features which produce <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that fall within the proposed resolution and crustal amplitude capabilities of the MAGSAT fields. To test this hypothesis, the north African hotspots associated with Ahaggar, Tibestia and Darfur have been modeled as magnetic induction <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> due solely to shallower depth to the Curie isotherm surface beneath these features. The MAGSAT data were reduced by subtracting the external and core fields to isolate the scalar and vertical component crustal signals. The predicted model magnetic signal arising from the surface topography of the uplift and the Curie isotherm surface was calculated at MAGSAT altitudes by the Fourier transform technique modified to allow for variable magnetization. In summary it is <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that the region beneath Ahaggar is associated with a strong thermal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and the predicted <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> best fits the associated MAGSAT <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> if the African plate is moving in a northeasterly direction.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21392310','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21392310"><span id="translatedtitle">IDENTIFYING <span class="hlt">ANOMALIES</span> IN GRAVITATIONAL LENS TIME DELAYS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Congdon, Arthur B.; Keeton, Charles R.; Nordgren, C. Erik E-mail: keeton@physics.rutgers.ed</p> <p>2010-02-01</p> <p>We examine the ability of gravitational lens time delays to reveal complex structure in lens <span class="hlt">potentials</span>. In a previous paper, we predicted how the time delay between the bright pair of images in a 'fold' lens scales with the image separation, for smooth lens <span class="hlt">potentials</span>. Here we show that the proportionality constant increases with the quadrupole moment of the lens <span class="hlt">potential</span>, and depends only weakly on the position of the source along the caustic. We use Monte Carlo simulations to determine the range of time delays that can be produced by realistic smooth lens models consisting of isothermal ellipsoid galaxies with tidal shear. We can then identify outliers as 'time delay <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>'. We find evidence for <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in close image pairs in the cusp lenses RX J1131 - 1231 and B1422+231. The <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in RX J1131 - 1231 provide strong evidence for substructure in the lens <span class="hlt">potential</span>, while at this point the apparent <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in B1422+231 mainly indicate that the time delay measurements need to be improved. We also find evidence for time delay <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in larger-separation image pairs in the fold lenses, B1608+656 and WFI 2033 - 4723, and the cusp lens RX J0911+0551. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are caused by some combination of substructure and a complex lens environment. Finally, to assist future monitoring campaigns we use our smooth models with shear to predict the time delays for all known four-image lenses.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22392665','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22392665"><span id="translatedtitle">Simulation <span class="hlt">Suggests</span> that medical group mergers won't undermine the <span class="hlt">potential</span> utility of health information exchanges.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rudin, Robert S; Schneider, Eric C; Volk, Lynn A; Szolovits, Peter; Salzberg, Claudia A; Simon, Steven R; Bates, David W</p> <p>2012-03-01</p> <p>Federal and state agencies are investing substantial resources in the creation of community health information exchanges, which are consortia that enable independent health care organizations to exchange clinical data. However, under pressure to form accountable care organizations, medical groups may merge and support private health information exchanges. Such activity could reduce the <span class="hlt">potential</span> utility of community exchanges-that is, the exchanges' capacity to share patient data across hospitals and physician practices that are independent. Simulations of care transitions based on data from ten Massachusetts communities <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that there would have to be many such mergers to undermine the <span class="hlt">potential</span> utility of health information exchanges. At the same time, because hospitals and the largest medical groups account for only 10-20 percent of care transitions in a community, information exchanges will still need to recruit a large proportion of the medical groups in a given community for the exchanges to maintain their usefulness in fostering information exchange across independent providers. PMID:22392665</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5513432','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5513432"><span id="translatedtitle">Holonomy <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Bagger, J.; Nemeschansky, D.; Yankielowicz, S.</p> <p>1985-05-01</p> <p>A new type of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is discussed that afflicts certain non-linear sigma models with fermions. This <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is similar to the ordinary gauge and gravitational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> since it reflects a topological obstruction to the reparametrization invariance of the quantum effective action. Nonlinear sigma models are constructed based on homogeneous spaces G/H. <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> arising when the fermions are chiral are shown to be cancelled sometimes by Chern-Simons terms. Nonlinear sigma models are considered based on general Riemannian manifolds. 9 refs. (LEW)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUFM.P43A0905H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUFM.P43A0905H"><span id="translatedtitle">Mapping Stratigraphy and <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Iron-Rich Volcanoclastics Using Ground-Penetrating Radar: <span class="hlt">Potential</span> for Subsurface Exploration on Mars</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Heggy, E.; Clifford, S.; Khan, S.; Fernandez, J.; Wiggs, E.; Gonzalez, S. L.; Wyrick, D.; Grimm, R.; Dinwiddie, C.; Pommerol, A.</p> <p>2004-12-01</p> <p>Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) studies conducted in iron-rich volcanoclastics can yield valuable information for interpreting the subsurface stratigraphy resulting from lava flows and intervening unconsolidated volcanic and sedimentary deposits with different compositions and ages. GPR is also valuable for mapping subsurface <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and structures, such as rifts and lava tubes. We performed a geophysical field survey in Craters of the Moon National Park to evaluate the <span class="hlt">potential</span> for using GPR to map local areas of the Martian subsurface for evidence of subsurface water. Craters of the Moon is located in the South Central portion of Idaho, and lies within the Eastern Snake River Plain; it is a composite of more than forty different lava flows, erupted from approximately twenty-five cinder cones and eruptive fissures over eight distinct eruptive periods ranging in age from Late Pleistocene to Holocene. We used a GPR operating at 16 and 100 MHz to perform structural mapping at several different locations. Radar studies were combined with transient electromagnetic soundings and infrared spectroscopy to assess the effect of soil conductivity and geochemistry on identification of subsurface structures. Our results show that, even with a relatively high amount of irons oxides (~14 %), GPR penetration depths of 50 m were achieved with the 100 MHz antenna and penetration depths of 150 m were achieved with the 16 MHz antenna. These depths of investigation may be attributable to the high porosity of the soil at the studied areas, which lowered the electrical losses, thus favoring a relatively deep penetration of the radar wave.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>1</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li class="active"><span>3</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_3 --> <div id="page_4" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li class="active"><span>4</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="61"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015NatSR...5E8940S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015NatSR...5E8940S"><span id="translatedtitle">Extensive phenotypic plasticity of a Red Sea coral over a strong latitudinal temperature gradient <span class="hlt">suggests</span> limited acclimatization <span class="hlt">potential</span> to warming</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sawall, Yvonne; Al-Sofyani, Abdulmoshin; Hohn, Sönke; Banguera-Hinestroza, Eulalia; Voolstra, Christian R.; Wahl, Martin</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>Global warming was reported to cause growth reductions in tropical shallow water corals in both, cooler and warmer, regions of the coral species range. This <span class="hlt">suggests</span> regional adaptation with less heat-tolerant populations in cooler and more thermo-tolerant populations in warmer regions. Here, we investigated seasonal changes in the in situ metabolic performance of the widely distributed hermatypic coral Pocillopora verrucosa along 12° latitudes featuring a steep temperature gradient between the northern (28.5°N, 21-27°C) and southern (16.5°N, 28-33°C) reaches of the Red Sea. Surprisingly, we found little indication for regional adaptation, but strong indications for high phenotypic plasticity: Calcification rates in two seasons (winter, summer) were found to be highest at 28-29°C throughout all populations independent of their geographic location. Mucus release increased with temperature and nutrient supply, both being highest in the south. Genetic characterization of the coral host revealed low inter-regional variation and differences in the Symbiodinium clade composition only at the most northern and most southern region. This <span class="hlt">suggests</span> variable acclimatization <span class="hlt">potential</span> to ocean warming of coral populations across the Red Sea: high acclimatization <span class="hlt">potential</span> in northern populations, but limited ability to cope with ocean warming in southern populations already existing at the upper thermal margin for corals.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20040081281','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20040081281"><span id="translatedtitle">Bangui <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Taylor, Patrick T.</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>Bangui <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is the name given to one of the Earth s largest crustal magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the largest over the African continent. It covers two-thirds of the Central African Republic and therefore the name derives from the capitol city-Bangui that is also near the center of this feature. From surface magnetic survey data Godivier and Le Donche (1962) were the first to describe this <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Subsequently high-altitude world magnetic surveying by the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office (Project Magnet) recorded a greater than 1000 nT dipolar, peak-to-trough <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> with the major portion being negative (figure 1). Satellite observations (Cosmos 49) were first reported in 1964, these revealed a 40nT <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> at 350 km altitude. Subsequently the higher altitude (417-499km) POGO (Polar Orbiting Geomagnetic Observatory) satellite data recorded peak-to-trough <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of 20 nT these data were added to Cosmos 49 measurements by Regan et al. (1975) for a regional satellite altitude map. In October 1979, with the launch of Magsat, a satellite designed to measure crustal magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, a more uniform satellite altitude magnetic map was obtained. These data, computed at 375 km altitude recorded a -22 nT <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (figure 2). This elliptically shaped <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is approximately 760 by 1000 km and is centered at 6%, 18%. The Bangui <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is composed of three segments; there are two positive <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> lobes north and south of a large central negative field. This displays the classic pattern of a magnetic anomalous body being magnetized by induction in a zero inclination field. This is not surprising since the magnetic equator passes near the center of this body.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.genome.gov/14514230','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="http://www.genome.gov/14514230"><span id="translatedtitle">Learning about Poland <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Poland <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> What is Poland <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>? What are the ... <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Additional Resources for Poland <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> What is Poland <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>? Named after Sir Alfred Poland, Poland <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> ( ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013NHESS..13.1077A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013NHESS..13.1077A"><span id="translatedtitle">A comparison of classical and intelligent methods to detect <span class="hlt">potential</span> thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> before the 11 August 2012 Varzeghan, Iran, earthquake (Mw = 6.4)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Akhoondzadeh, M.</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>In this paper, a number of classical and intelligent methods, including interquartile, autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA), artificial neural network (ANN) and support vector machine (SVM), have been proposed to quantify <span class="hlt">potential</span> thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> around the time of the 11 August 2012 Varzeghan, Iran, earthquake (Mw = 6.4). The duration of the data set, which is comprised of Aqua-MODIS land surface temperature (LST) night-time snapshot images, is 62 days. In order to quantify variations of LST data obtained from satellite images, the air temperature (AT) data derived from the meteorological station close to the earthquake epicenter has been taken into account. For the models examined here, results indicate the following: (i) ARIMA models, which are the most widely used in the time series community for short-term forecasting, are quickly and easily implemented, and can efficiently act through linear solutions. (ii) A multilayer perceptron (MLP) feed-forward neural network can be a suitable non-parametric method to detect the anomalous changes of a non-linear time series such as variations of LST. (iii) Since SVMs are often used due to their many advantages for classification and regression tasks, it can be shown that, if the difference between the predicted value using the SVM method and the observed value exceeds the pre-defined threshold value, then the observed value could be regarded as an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. (iv) ANN and SVM methods could be powerful tools in modeling complex phenomena such as earthquake precursor time series where we may not know what the underlying data generating process is. There is good agreement in the results obtained from the different methods for quantifying <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in a given LST time series. This paper indicates that the detection of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> derive credibility from the overall efficiencies and <span class="hlt">potentialities</span> of the four integrated methods.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3889806','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3889806"><span id="translatedtitle">Pathogenic rare copy number variants in community-based schizophrenia <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a <span class="hlt">potential</span> role for clinical microarrays</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Costain, Gregory; Lionel, Anath C.; Merico, Daniele; Forsythe, Pamela; Russell, Kathryn; Lowther, Chelsea; Yuen, Tracy; Husted, Janice; Stavropoulos, Dimitri J.; Speevak, Marsha; Chow, Eva W.C.; Marshall, Christian R.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Bassett, Anne S.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Individually rare, large copy number variants (CNVs) contribute to genetic vulnerability for schizophrenia. Unresolved questions remain, however, regarding the anticipated yield of clinical microarray testing in schizophrenia. Using high-resolution genome-wide microarrays and rigorous methods, we investigated rare CNVs in a prospectively recruited community-based cohort of 459 unrelated adults with schizophrenia and estimated the minimum prevalence of clinically significant CNVs that would be detectable on a clinical microarray. A blinded review by two independent clinical cytogenetic laboratory directors of all large (>500 kb) rare CNVs in cases and well-matched controls showed that those deemed to be clinically significant were highly enriched in schizophrenia (16.4-fold increase, P < 0.0001). In a single community catchment area, the prevalence of individuals with these CNVs was 8.1%. Rare 1.7 Mb CNVs at 2q13 were found to be significantly associated with schizophrenia for the first time, compared with the prevalence in 23 838 population-based controls (42.9-fold increase, P = 0.0002). Additional novel findings that will facilitate the future clinical interpretation of smaller CNVs in schizophrenia include: (i) a greater proportion of individuals with two or more rare exonic CNVs >10 kb in size (1.5-fold increase, P = 0.0109) in schizophrenia; (ii) the systematic discovery of new candidate genes for schizophrenia; and, (iii) functional gene enrichment mapping highlighting a differential impact in schizophrenia of rare exonic deletions involving diverse functions, including neurodevelopmental and synaptic processes (4.7-fold increase, P = 0.0060). These findings <span class="hlt">suggest</span> consideration of a <span class="hlt">potential</span> role for clinical microarray testing in schizophrenia, as is now the <span class="hlt">suggested</span> standard of care for related developmental disorders like autism. PMID:23813976</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ClDy...41.2511T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ClDy...41.2511T"><span id="translatedtitle">Predictability of large interannual Arctic sea-ice <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tietsche, Steffen; Notz, Dirk; Jungclaus, Johann H.; Marotzke, Jochem</p> <p>2013-11-01</p> <p>In projections of twenty-first century climate, Arctic sea ice declines and at the same time exhibits strong interannual <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Here, we investigate the <span class="hlt">potential</span> to predict these strong sea-ice <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> under a perfect-model assumption, using the Max-Planck-Institute Earth System Model in the same setup as in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). We study two cases of strong negative sea-ice <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: a 5-year-long <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> for present-day conditions, and a 10-year-long <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> for conditions projected for the middle of the twenty-first century. We treat these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the CMIP5 projections as the truth, and use exactly the same model configuration for predictions of this synthetic truth. We start ensemble predictions at different times during the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, considering lagged-perfect and sea-ice-assimilated initial conditions. We find that the onset and amplitude of the interannual <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are not predictable. However, the further deepening of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> can be predicted for typically 1 year lead time if predictions start after the onset but before the maximal amplitude of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The magnitude of an extremely low summer sea-ice minimum is hard to predict: the skill of the prediction ensemble is not better than a damped-persistence forecast for lead times of more than a few months, and is not better than a climatology forecast for lead times of two or more years. Predictions of the present-day <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> are more skillful than predictions of the mid-century <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Predictions using sea-ice-assimilated initial conditions are competitive with those using lagged-perfect initial conditions for lead times of a year or less, but yield degraded skill for longer lead times. The results presented here <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that there is limited prospect of predicting the large interannual sea-ice <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> expected to occur throughout the twenty-first century.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23634808','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23634808"><span id="translatedtitle">Identification of Plasmopara viticola genes <span class="hlt">potentially</span> involved in pathogenesis on grapevine <span class="hlt">suggests</span> new similarities between oomycetes and true fungi.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Luis, P; Gauthier, A; Trouvelot, S; Poinssot, B; Frettinger, P</p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>Plant diseases caused by fungi and oomycetes result in significant economic losses every year. Although phylogenetically distant, these organisms share many common features during infection. We identified genes in the oomycete Plasmopara viticola that are <span class="hlt">potentially</span> involved in pathogenesis in grapevine by using fungal databases and degenerate primers. Fragments of P. viticola genes encoding NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (PvNuo), laccase (PvLac), and invertase (PvInv) were obtained. PvNuo was overexpressed at 2 days postinoculation (dpi), during the development of the first hyphal structures and haustoria. PvLac was overexpressed at 5 dpi when genes related to pterostilbene biosynthesis were induced in grapevine. Transcript level for PvInv increased between 1 and 4 dpi before reaching a plateau. These results might <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a finely tuned strategy of infection depending on nutrition and plant response. Phylogenetic analyses of PvNuo showed that P. viticola clustered with other oomycetes and was associated with brown algae and diatoms, forming a typical Straminipila clade. Based on the comparison of available sequences for laccases and invertases, the group formed by P. viticola and other oomycetes tended to be more closely related to Opisthokonta than to Straminipila. Convergent evolution or horizontal gene transfer could explain the presence of fungus-like genes in P. viticola. PMID:23634808</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26111162','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26111162"><span id="translatedtitle">Degradation of Bunker C Fuel Oil by White-Rot Fungi in Sawdust Cultures <span class="hlt">Suggests</span> <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Applications in Bioremediation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Young, Darcy; Rice, James; Martin, Rachael; Lindquist, Erika; Lipzen, Anna; Grigoriev, Igor; Hibbett, David</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Fungal lignocellulolytic enzymes are promising agents for oxidizing pollutants. This study investigated degradation of Number 6 "Bunker C" fuel oil compounds by the white-rot fungi Irpex lacteus, Trichaptum biforme, Phlebia radiata, Trametes versicolor, and Pleurotus ostreatus (Basidiomycota, Agaricomycetes). Averaging across all studied species, 98.1%, 48.6%, and 76.4% of the initial Bunker C C10 alkane, C14 alkane, and phenanthrene, respectively were degraded after 180 days of fungal growth on pine media. This study also investigated whether Bunker C oil induces changes in gene expression in the white-rot fungus Punctularia strigosozonata, for which a complete reference genome is available. After 20 days of growth, a monokaryon P. strigosozonata strain degraded 99% of the initial C10 alkane in both pine and aspen media but did not affect the amounts of the C14 alkane or phenanthrene. Differential gene expression analysis identified 119 genes with ≥ log2(2-fold) greater expression in one or more treatment comparisons. Six genes were significantly upregulated in media containing oil; these genes included three enzymes with <span class="hlt">potential</span> roles in xenobiotic biotransformation. Carbohydrate metabolism genes showing differential expression significantly accumulated transcripts on aspen vs. pine substrates, perhaps reflecting white-rot adaptations to growth on hardwood substrates. The mechanisms by which P. strigosozonata may degrade complex oil compounds remain obscure, but degradation results of the 180-day cultures <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that diverse white-rot fungi have promise for bioremediation of petroleum fuels. PMID:26111162</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4308708','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4308708"><span id="translatedtitle">Unbalanced Activation of Glutathione Metabolic Pathways <span class="hlt">Suggests</span> <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Involvement in Plant Defense against the Gall Midge Mayetiola destructor in Wheat</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Liu, Xuming; Zhang, Shize; Whitworth, R. Jeff; Stuart, Jeffrey J.; Chen, Ming-Shun</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Glutathione, γ-glutamylcysteinylglycine, exists abundantly in nearly all organisms. Glutathione participates in various physiological processes involved in redox reactions by serving as an electron donor/acceptor. We found that the abundance of total glutathione increased up to 60% in resistant wheat plants within 72 hours following attack by the gall midge Mayetiola destructor, the Hessian fly. The increase in total glutathione abundance, however, is coupled with an unbalanced activation of glutathione metabolic pathways. The activity and transcript abundance of glutathione peroxidases, which convert reduced glutathione (GSH) to oxidized glutathione (GSSG), increased in infested resistant plants. However, the enzymatic activity and transcript abundance of glutathione reductases, which convert GSSG back to GSH, did not change. This unbalanced regulation of the glutathione oxidation/reduction cycle indicates the existence of an alternative pathway to regenerate GSH from GSSG to maintain a stable GSSG/GSH ratio. Our data <span class="hlt">suggest</span> the possibility that GSSG is transported from cytosol to apoplast to serve as an oxidant for class III peroxidases to generate reactive oxygen species for plant defense against Hessian fly larvae. Our results provide a foundation for elucidating the molecular processes involved in glutathione-mediated plant resistance to Hessian fly and <span class="hlt">potentially</span> other pests as well. PMID:25627558</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4482389','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4482389"><span id="translatedtitle">Degradation of Bunker C Fuel Oil by White-Rot Fungi in Sawdust Cultures <span class="hlt">Suggests</span> <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Applications in Bioremediation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Young, Darcy; Rice, James; Martin, Rachael; Lindquist, Erika; Lipzen, Anna; Grigoriev, Igor; Hibbett, David</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Fungal lignocellulolytic enzymes are promising agents for oxidizing pollutants. This study investigated degradation of Number 6 “Bunker C” fuel oil compounds by the white-rot fungi Irpex lacteus, Trichaptum biforme, Phlebia radiata, Trametes versicolor, and Pleurotus ostreatus (Basidiomycota, Agaricomycetes). Averaging across all studied species, 98.1%, 48.6%, and 76.4% of the initial Bunker C C10 alkane, C14 alkane, and phenanthrene, respectively were degraded after 180 days of fungal growth on pine media. This study also investigated whether Bunker C oil induces changes in gene expression in the white-rot fungus Punctularia strigosozonata, for which a complete reference genome is available. After 20 days of growth, a monokaryon P. strigosozonata strain degraded 99% of the initial C10 alkane in both pine and aspen media but did not affect the amounts of the C14 alkane or phenanthrene. Differential gene expression analysis identified 119 genes with ≥ log2(2-fold) greater expression in one or more treatment comparisons. Six genes were significantly upregulated in media containing oil; these genes included three enzymes with <span class="hlt">potential</span> roles in xenobiotic biotransformation. Carbohydrate metabolism genes showing differential expression significantly accumulated transcripts on aspen vs. pine substrates, perhaps reflecting white-rot adaptations to growth on hardwood substrates. The mechanisms by which P. strigosozonata may degrade complex oil compounds remain obscure, but degradation results of the 180-day cultures <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that diverse white-rot fungi have promise for bioremediation of petroleum fuels. PMID:26111162</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25627558','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25627558"><span id="translatedtitle">Unbalanced activation of glutathione metabolic pathways <span class="hlt">suggests</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> involvement in plant defense against the gall midge Mayetiola destructor in wheat.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Liu, Xuming; Zhang, Shize; Whitworth, R Jeff; Stuart, Jeffrey J; Chen, Ming-Shun</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Glutathione, γ-glutamylcysteinylglycine, exists abundantly in nearly all organisms. Glutathione participates in various physiological processes involved in redox reactions by serving as an electron donor/acceptor. We found that the abundance of total glutathione increased up to 60% in resistant wheat plants within 72 hours following attack by the gall midge Mayetiola destructor, the Hessian fly. The increase in total glutathione abundance, however, is coupled with an unbalanced activation of glutathione metabolic pathways. The activity and transcript abundance of glutathione peroxidases, which convert reduced glutathione (GSH) to oxidized glutathione (GSSG), increased in infested resistant plants. However, the enzymatic activity and transcript abundance of glutathione reductases, which convert GSSG back to GSH, did not change. This unbalanced regulation of the glutathione oxidation/reduction cycle indicates the existence of an alternative pathway to regenerate GSH from GSSG to maintain a stable GSSG/GSH ratio. Our data <span class="hlt">suggest</span> the possibility that GSSG is transported from cytosol to apoplast to serve as an oxidant for class III peroxidases to generate reactive oxygen species for plant defense against Hessian fly larvae. Our results provide a foundation for elucidating the molecular processes involved in glutathione-mediated plant resistance to Hessian fly and <span class="hlt">potentially</span> other pests as well. PMID:25627558</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013SGeo..tmp...50A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013SGeo..tmp...50A"><span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of Gravity and Aeromagnetic <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> for the Deep Structure and Possibility of Hydrocarbon <span class="hlt">Potential</span> of the Region Surrounding Lake Van, Eastern Anatolia, Turkey</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Aydemir, Attila; Ates, Abdullah; Bilim, Funda; Buyuksarac, Aydin; Bektas, Ozcan</p> <p>2013-11-01</p> <p>The North Anatolian Fault (NAF) is not observed on the surface beyond 40 km southeast of Karliova town toward the western shoreline of Lake Van. Various amplitudes of gravity and aeromagnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are observed around the lake and surrounding region. In the gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map, contour intensity is observed from the north of Mus city center toward Lake Van. There is a possibility that the NAF extends from here to the lake. Because there is no gravity data within the lake, the extension of the NAF is unknown and uncertain in the lake and to the east. Meanwhile, it is observed from the aeromagnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that there are several positive and negative amplitude <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> aligned around a slightly curved line in the east-west direction. The same curvature becomes much clearer in the analytic signal transformation map. The volcanic mountains of Nemrut and Suphan, and magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to the east of the Lake Van are all lined up and extended with this slightly curved line, provoking thoughts that a fault zone that was not previously mapped may exist. The epicenter of the major earthquake event that occurred on October 23, 2011 is located on this fault zone. The fault plane solution of this earthquake indicates a thrust fault in the east-west direction, consistent with the results of this study. Volcanic mountains in this zone are accepted as still being active because of gas seepages from their calderas, and magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are caused by buried causative bodies, probably magmatic intrusions. Because of its magmatic nature, this zone could be a good prospect for geothermal energy exploration. In this study, the basement of the Van Basin was also modelled three-dimensionally (3D) in order to investigate its hydrocarbon <span class="hlt">potential</span>, because the first oil production in Anatolia was recorded around the Kurzot village in this basin. According to the 3D modelling results, the basin is composed of three different depressions aligned in the N-S direction and many prospective structures were observed between and around these depressions where the depocenter depths may reach down to 10 km.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4669886','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4669886"><span id="translatedtitle">MEDICARE’S BUNDLED PAYMENTS FOR CARE IMPROVEMENT (BPCI) INITIATIVE: EXPANDING ENROLLMENT <span class="hlt">SUGGESTS</span> <span class="hlt">POTENTIAL</span> FOR LARGE IMPACT</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Chen, Lena M.; Meara, Ellen; Birkmeyer, John D.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Objectives Aiming to encourage care coordination and cost-efficiency, the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation (CMMI) launched the Bundled Payments for Care Improvement (BPCI) initiative in 2013. To help gauge the program’s <span class="hlt">potential</span> impact and generalizability, we describe early and current participants. Study Design We examined the cross-sectional association between BPCI participation and providers’ structural and cost characteristics. Methods Using data from October 2013 and June 2014, we quantified changes in BPCI participation. We described structural differences between participating and non-participating hospitals using t-tests and chi-square tests. We used the Cochrane-Armitage test to assess whether participants were more likely be in higher 90-day episode cost quintiles than their peers at baseline (2009–2010). Results Overall (risk-bearing and non-risk-bearing) participation in BPCI increased six-fold from 417 (October 2013) to 2,597 (June 2014), attributable in part to Model 2, the most comprehensive model. Model 2 hospitals increasingly resemble eligible but non-participating hospitals. For the most commonly chosen condition of hip replacement, Model 2 hospitals were not costlier than their peers. Hospitals used to make up 97% of Model 2 participants, but physician practices now comprise half. However, most BPCI participants have not yet begun to bear financial risk. Risk-bearing Model 2 hospitals are a smaller and less representative group, with higher baseline costs for hip replacement than their peers. Conclusions Growing participation in BPCI <span class="hlt">suggests</span> strong interest in bundled payments. The long-term impact of BPCI will depend on CMMI’s ability to persuade interested but non-risk-bearing participants to bear risk. PMID:26633254</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3544451','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3544451"><span id="translatedtitle">Molecular crosstalk between cancer cells and tumor microenvironment components <span class="hlt">suggests</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> targets for new therapeutic approaches in mobile tongue cancer</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Dayan, Dan; Salo, Tuula; Salo, Sirpa; Nyberg, Pia; Nurmenniemi, Sini; Costea, Daniela Elena; Vered, Marilena</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>We characterized tumor microenvironment (TME) components of mobile tongue (MT) cancer patients in terms of overall inflammatory infiltrate, focusing on the protumorigenic/anti-inflammatory phenotypes and on cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in order to determine their interrelations and associations with clinical outcomes. In addition, by culturing tongue carcinoma cells (HSC-3) on a three-dimensional myoma organotypic model that mimics TME, we attempted to investigate the possible existence of a molecular crosstalk between cancer cells and TME components. Analysis of 64 cases of MT cancer patients revealed that the overall density of the inflammatory infiltrate was inversely correlated to the density of CAFs (P = 0.01), but that the cumulative density of the protumorigenic/anti-inflammatory phenotypes, including regulatory T cells (Tregs, Foxp3+), tumor-associated macrophages (TAM2, CD163+), and <span class="hlt">potentially</span> Tregs-inducing immune cells (CD80+), was directly correlated with the density of CAFs (P = 0.01). The hazard ratio (HR) for recurrence in a TME rich in CD163+ Foxp3+ CD80+ was 2.9 (95% CI 1.03–8.6, P = 0.043 compared with low in CD163+ Foxp3+ CD80+). The HR for recurrence in a TME rich in CAFs was 4.1 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3–12.8, P = 0.012 compared with low in CAFs). In vitro studies showed cancer-derived exosomes, epithelial–mesenchymal transition process, fibroblast-to-CAF-like cell transdifferentiation, and reciprocal interrelations between different cytokines <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> the presence of molecular crosstalk between cancer cells and TME components. Collectively, these results highlighted the emerging need of new therapies targeting this crosstalk between the cancer cells and TME components in MT cancer. PMID:23342263</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25241096','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25241096"><span id="translatedtitle">Complex lymphatic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Trenor, Cameron C; Chaudry, Gulraiz</p> <p>2014-08-01</p> <p>Complex lymphatic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> include several diagnoses with overlapping patterns of clinical symptoms, anatomic location, imaging features, hematologic alterations, and complications. Lymphatic malformations likely arise through anomalous embryogenesis of the lymphatic system. Analysis of clinical, imaging, histologic, and hematologic features is often needed to reach a diagnosis. Aspiration of fluid collections can readily define fluid as chylous or not. The presence of chyle indicates dysfunction at the mesenteric or retroperitoneal level or above the cisterna chyli due to reflux. The imaging patterns of generalized lymphatic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (GLA) and Gorham-Stout disease have been segregated with distinctive bone lesions and peri-osseous features. More aggressive histology (spindled lymphatic endothelial cells), clinical progression, hemorrhage, or moderate hematologic changes should raise suspicion for kaposiform lymphangiomatosis. Biopsy may be needed for diagnosis, though avoidance of rib biopsy is advised to prevent iatrogenic chronic pleural effusion. Lymphangiography can visualize the anatomy and function of the lymphatic system and may identify dysfunction of the thoracic duct in central conducting lymphatic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Local control and symptom relief are targeted by resection, laser therapy, and sclerotherapy. Emerging data <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a role for medical therapies for complications of complex lymphatic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Outcomes include recurrent effusion, infection, pain, fracture, mortality, and rarely, malignancy. Complex lymphatic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> present significant diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Results from a phase 2 study of sirolimus in these and other conditions are expected in 2014. Improved characterization of natural history, predictors of poor outcomes, responses to therapy, and further clinical trials are needed for complex lymphatic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. PMID:25241096</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=CYTOLOGY&id=ED018056','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=CYTOLOGY&id=ED018056"><span id="translatedtitle">DOWN'S <span class="hlt">ANOMALY</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>PENROSE, L.S.; SMITH, G.F.</p> <p></p> <p>BOTH CLINICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL ASPECTS AND MATHEMATICAL ELABORATIONS OF DOWN'S <span class="hlt">ANOMALY</span>, KNOWN ALSO AS MONGOLISM, ARE PRESENTED IN THIS REFERENCE MANUAL FOR PROFESSIONAL PERSONNEL. INFORMATION PROVIDED CONCERNS (1) HISTORICAL STUDIES, (2) PHYSICAL SIGNS, (3) BONES AND MUSCLES, (4) MENTAL DEVELOPMENT, (5) DERMATOGLYPHS, (6) HEMATOLOGY, (7)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=cytology&id=ED018056','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=cytology&id=ED018056"><span id="translatedtitle">DOWN'S <span class="hlt">ANOMALY</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>PENROSE, L.S.; SMITH, G.F.</p> <p></p> <p>BOTH CLINICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL ASPECTS AND MATHEMATICAL ELABORATIONS OF DOWN'S <span class="hlt">ANOMALY</span>, KNOWN ALSO AS MONGOLISM, ARE PRESENTED IN THIS REFERENCE MANUAL FOR PROFESSIONAL PERSONNEL. INFORMATION PROVIDED CONCERNS (1) HISTORICAL STUDIES, (2) PHYSICAL SIGNS, (3) BONES AND MUSCLES, (4) MENTAL DEVELOPMENT, (5) DERMATOGLYPHS, (6) HEMATOLOGY, (7)…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMGC51D0444M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMGC51D0444M"><span id="translatedtitle">Spatio-Temporal Sensitivity of MODIS Land Surface Temperature <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> Indicates High <span class="hlt">Potential</span> for Large-Scale Land Cover Change Detection in Permafrost Landscapes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Muster, S.; Langer, M.; Abnizova, A.; Young, K. L.; Boike, J.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>The accelerated warming Arctic climate may alter the surface energy balance locally and regionally of which a changing land surface temperature (LST) is a key indicator. Modelling current and anticipated changes of the surface energy balance requires an understanding of the spatio-temporal interactions between LST and land cover. This paper investigated the accuracy of MODIS LST V5 1 km level 3 product and its spatio-temporal sensitivity to land cover properties in a Canadian High Arctic permafrost landscape. Land cover ranged from fully vegetated moss/segde grass tundra to sparsely vegetated bare soil and barren areas. Daily mean MODIS LST were compared to in-situ radiometer measurements over wet tundra for three summers and two winters in 2008, 2009, and 2010. MODIS LST showed an accuracy of 1.8°C and a RMSE of 3.8°C in the total observation period including both summer and winter. Agreement was lowest during summer 2009 and freeze-back periods which were associated with prevailing overcast conditions. A multi-year <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> analysis revealed robust spatio-temporal patterns taking into account the found uncertainty and different atmospheric conditions. Summer periods with regional mean LST larger than 5°C showed highest spatial diversity with four distinct <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> classes. Dry ridge areas heated up most whereas wetland areas and dry barren surfaces with high albedo were coolest. Mean inter-annual differences of LST <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for different land cover classes were less than 1°C. However, spatial pattern showed fewer positive <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in 2010 <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> differences in surface moisture due to inter­annual differences in the amount of end-of-winter snow. Presented summer LST <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> might serve as a baseline against which to evaluate past and future changes in land surface properties with regard to the surface energy balance. Sub-temporal heterogeneity due to snow or ice on/off as well as the effect of subpixel water bodies has to be taken into account. A multi-sensor approach combining thermal satellite measurements with high-resolution optical and radar imagery therefore promises to be an effective tool for a dynamic, process-based ecosystem monitoring scheme.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GeoRL..42.8605W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GeoRL..42.8605W"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> impacts of wintertime soil moisture <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from agricultural irrigation at low latitudes on regional and global climates</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wey, Hao-Wei; Lo, Min-Hui; Lee, Shih-Yu; Yu, Jin-Yi; Hsu, Huang-Hsiung</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>Anthropogenic water management can change surface energy budgets and the water cycle. In this study, we focused on impacts of Asian low-latitude irrigation on regional and global climates during boreal wintertime. A state-of-the-art Earth system model is used to simulate the land-air interaction processes affected by irrigation and the consequent responses in atmospheric circulation. Perturbed experiments show that wet soil moisture <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at low latitudes can reduce the surface temperature on a continental scale through atmospheric feedback. The intensity of prevailing monsoon circulation becomes stronger because of larger land-sea thermal contrast. Furthermore, anomalous upper level convergence over South Asia and midlatitude climatic changes indicate tropical-extratropical teleconnections. The wintertime Aleutian low is deepened and an anomalous warm surface temperature is found in North America. Previous studies have noted this warming but left it unexplained, and we provide plausible mechanisms for these remote impacts coming from the irrigation over Asian low-latitude regions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010ATel.2706....1H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010ATel.2706....1H"><span id="translatedtitle">Broadband Photometry of the <span class="hlt">Potentially</span> Hazardous Asteroid 1999 MN: <span class="hlt">Suggestive</span> of YORP and/or Tidal Spin-Up?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hicks, M.; Mayes, D.; McAuley, A.; Foster, J.</p> <p>2010-06-01</p> <p>1999 MN was discovered by Carl Hergenrother on behalf of the Catalina Sky Survey on June 22 1999 (MPEC 1999-M27) and identified as a <span class="hlt">Potentially</span> Hazardous Asteroid (PHA) by the Minor Planet Center. The object's low inclination and perihelion distance allows for frequent gravitational encounters with Mercury, Venus, and Earth. 1999 MN passed within 0.033 AU of the Earth on June 4.5 2010. Our Bessel BVRI observations at the JPL Table Mountain Observatory 0.6-m telescope, summarized in Table 1, were scheduled to support Arecibo radar observations obtained in 2004 and 2005.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li class="active"><span>4</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_4 --> <div id="page_5" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li class="active"><span>5</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="81"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4485834','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4485834"><span id="translatedtitle">High-Throughput Sequencing of miRNAs Reveals a Tissue Signature in Gastric Cancer and <span class="hlt">Suggests</span> Novel <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Biomarkers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Darnet, Sylvain; Moreira, Fabiano C; Hamoy, Igor G; Burbano, Rommel; Khayat, André; Cruz, Aline; Magalhães, Leandro; Silva, Artur; Santos, Sidney; Demachki, Samia; Assumpção, Monica; Assumpção, Paulo; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Gastric cancer has a high incidence and mortality rate worldwide; however, the use of biomarkers for its clinical diagnosis remains limited. The microRNAs (miRNAs) are biomarkers with the <span class="hlt">potential</span> to identify the risk and prognosis as well as therapeutic targets. We performed the ultradeep miRnomes sequencing of gastric adenocarcinoma and gastric antrum without tumor samples. We observed that a small set of those samples were responsible for approximately 80% of the total miRNAs expression, which might represent a miRNA tissue signature. Additionally, we identified seven miRNAs exhibiting significant differences, and, of these, hsa-miR-135b and hsa-miR-29c were able to discriminate antrum without tumor from gastric cancer regardless of the histological type. These findings were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results revealed that hsa-miR-135b and hsa-miR-29c are <span class="hlt">potential</span> gastric adenocarcinoma occurrence biomarkers with the ability to identify individuals at a higher risk of developing this cancer, and could even be used as therapeutic targets to allow individualized clinical management. PMID:26157332</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PApGe.168.1851A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PApGe.168.1851A"><span id="translatedtitle">Detection of High-<span class="hlt">Potential</span> Oil and Gas Fields Using Normalized Full Gradient of Gravity <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>: A Case Study in the Tabas Basin, Eastern Iran</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Aghajani, Hamid; Moradzadeh, Ali; Zeng, Hualin</p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>The normalized full gradient (NFG) represents the full gradient of the gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> at a point divided by the average of the full gradient at the same point. The NFG minimum between two maxima in an NFG section or a closed minimum surrounded by closed maxima on an NFG map may indicate density-deficient <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> closely related to possible oil-gas reservoirs. On a cross-section, closed minima can be used to estimate the depth to centers of possible hydrocarbon reservoirs. The NFG map can also be used to locate oil-gas exploratory wells for estimation of the depth of possible reservoirs. The objective of this paper is to use two and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) NFG on gravity data of the Tabas basin in Yazd province, eastern Iran. A hypothetical model is first considered to explore the NFG characteristics and their relationship with the geometry of the model. The physical properties of the model are then studied to simplify the interpretation of real data. Finally 2D and 3D NFG models are developed for real gravity data to predict the location of any possible high <span class="hlt">potential</span> oil-gas reservoirs. The results obtained indicate two zones in the northern and central parts of the Tabas basin suitable for hydrocarbon prospecting. However, the favorable zone located in the middle of the basin in which anticline E is detected at a depth of 5-7 km is more important for the purpose of hydrocarbon exploration.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3673149','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3673149"><span id="translatedtitle">Microtopography of the eye surface of the crab Carcinus maenas: an atomic force microscope study <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> a possible antifouling <span class="hlt">potential</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Greco, G.; Lanero, T. Svaldo; Torrassa, S.; Young, R.; Vassalli, M.; Cavaliere, A.; Rolandi, R.; Pelucchi, E.; Faimali, M.; Davenport, J.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Marine biofouling causes problems for technologies based on the sea, including ships, power plants and marine sensors. Several antifouling techniques have been applied to marine sensors, but most of these methodologies are environmentally unfriendly or ineffective. Bioinspiration, seeking guidance from natural solutions, is a promising approach to antifouling. Here, the eye of the green crab Carcinus maenas was regarded as a marine sensor model and its surface characterized by means of atomic force microscopy. Engineered surface micro- and nanotopography is a new mechanism found to limit biofouling, promising an effective solution with much reduced environmental impact. Besides giving a new insight into the morphology of C. maenas eye and its characterization, our study indicates that the eye surface probably has antifouling/fouling-release <span class="hlt">potential</span>. Furthermore, the topographical features of the surface may influence the wettability properties of the structure and its interaction with organic molecules. Results indicate that the eye surface micro- and nanotopography may lead to bioinspired solutions to antifouling protection. PMID:23635491</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25651890','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25651890"><span id="translatedtitle">Network analysis <span class="hlt">suggests</span> a <span class="hlt">potentially</span> 'evil' alliance of opportunistic pathogens inhibited by a cooperative network in human milk bacterial communities.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sam Ma, Zhanshan; Guan, Qiong; Ye, Chengxi; Zhang, Chengchen; Foster, James A; Forney, Larry J</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The critical importance of human milk to infants and even human civilization has been well established. Yet our understanding of the milk microbiome has been limited to cataloguing OTUs and computation of community diversity. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no report on the bacterial interactions within the milk microbiome. To bridge this gap, we reconstructed a milk bacterial community network based on Hunt et al. Our analysis revealed that the milk microbiome network consists of two disconnected sub-networks. One sub-network is a fully connected complete graph consisting of seven genera as nodes and all of its pair-wise interactions among the bacteria are facilitative or cooperative. In contrast, the interactions in the other sub-network of eight nodes are mixed but dominantly cooperative. Somewhat surprisingly, the only 'non-cooperative' nodes in the second sub-network are mutually cooperative Staphylococcus and Corynebacterium that include some opportunistic pathogens. This <span class="hlt">potentially</span> 'evil' alliance between Staphylococcus and Corynebacterium could be inhibited by the remaining nodes that cooperate with one another in the second sub-network. We postulate that the 'confrontation' between the 'evil' alliance and 'benign' alliance and the shifting balance between them may be responsible for dysbiosis of the milk microbiome that permits mastitis. PMID:25651890</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3749441','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3749441"><span id="translatedtitle">Combined analyses of kinship and FST <span class="hlt">suggest</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> drivers of chaotic genetic patchiness in high gene-flow populations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Iacchei, Matthew; Ben-Horin, Tal; Selkoe, Kimberly A; Bird, Christopher E; García-Rodríguez, Francisco J; Toonen, Robert J</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>We combine kinship estimates with traditional F-statistics to explain contemporary drivers of population genetic differentiation despite high gene flow. We investigate range-wide population genetic structure of the California spiny (or red rock) lobster (Panulirus interruptus) and find slight, but significant global population differentiation in mtDNA (ΦST = 0.006, P = 0.001; Dest_Chao = 0.025) and seven nuclear microsatellites (FST = 0.004, P < 0.001; Dest_Chao = 0.03), despite the species’ 240- to 330-day pelagic larval duration. Significant population structure does not correlate with distance between sampling locations, and pairwise FST between adjacent sites often exceeds that among geographically distant locations. This result would typically be interpreted as unexplainable, chaotic genetic patchiness. However, kinship levels differ significantly among sites (pseudo-F16,988 = 1.39, P = 0.001), and ten of 17 sample sites have significantly greater numbers of kin than expected by chance (P < 0.05). Moreover, a higher proportion of kin within sites strongly correlates with greater genetic differentiation among sites (Dest_Chao, R2 = 0.66, P < 0.005). Sites with elevated mean kinship were geographically proximate to regions of high upwelling intensity (R2 = 0.41, P = 0.0009). These results indicate that P. interruptus does not maintain a single homogenous population, despite extreme dispersal <span class="hlt">potential</span>. Instead, these lobsters appear to either have substantial localized recruitment or maintain planktonic larval cohesiveness whereby siblings more likely settle together than disperse across sites. More broadly, our results contribute to a growing number of studies showing that low FST and high family structure across populations can coexist, illuminating the foundations of cryptic genetic patterns and the nature of marine dispersal. PMID:23802550</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25450097','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25450097"><span id="translatedtitle">Applying species-tree analyses to deep phylogenetic histories: challenges and <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">suggested</span> from a survey of empirical phylogenetic studies.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lanier, Hayley C; Knowles, L Lacey</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>Coalescent-based methods for species-tree estimation are becoming a dominant approach for reconstructing species histories from multi-locus data, with most of the studies examining these methodologies focused on recently diverged species. However, deeper phylogenies, such as the datasets that comprise many Tree of Life (ToL) studies, also exhibit gene-tree discordance. This discord may also arise from the stochastic sorting of gene lineages during the speciation process (i.e., reflecting the random coalescence of gene lineages in ancestral populations). It remains unknown whether guidelines regarding methodologies and numbers of loci established by simulation studies at shallow tree depths translate into accurate species relationships for deeper phylogenetic histories. We address this knowledge gap and specifically identify the challenges and limitations of species-tree methods that account for coalescent variance for deeper phylogenies. Using simulated data with characteristics informed by empirical studies, we evaluate both the accuracy of estimated species trees and the characteristics associated with recalcitrant nodes, with a specific focus on whether coalescent variance is generally responsible for the lack of resolution. By determining the proportion of coalescent genealogies that support a particular node, we demonstrate that (1) species-tree methods account for coalescent variance at deep nodes and (2) mutational variance - not gene-tree discord arising from the coalescent - posed the primary challenge for accurate reconstruction across the tree. For example, many nodes were accurately resolved despite predicted discord from the random coalescence of gene lineages and nodes with poor support were distributed across a range of depths (i.e., they were not restricted to a particular recent divergences). Given their broad taxonomic scope and large sampling of taxa, deep level phylogenies pose several <span class="hlt">potential</span> methodological complications including difficulties with MCMC convergence and estimation of requisite population genetic parameters for coalescent-based approaches. Despite these difficulties, the findings generally support the utility of species-tree analyses for the estimation of species relationships throughout the ToL. We discuss strategies for successful application of species-tree approaches to deep phylogenies. PMID:25450097</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002EGSGA..27.6021S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002EGSGA..27.6021S"><span id="translatedtitle">Relationshipe Between Self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> and Hydraulic Flow In A Geothermal System: Application To Cerro-prieto, Baja California</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Saracco, G.; Revil, A.; Pessel, M.</p> <p></p> <p>The Cerro Prieto geothermal field is located in the alluvial plain of the Mexicali Valley, northern Baja California, Mexico, at about 35 km southeast of the city of Mexicali. The Cerro Prieto geothermal field is one of several high temperature water-dominated geothermal fields within the Salton Trough. We analyze here the self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> distri- bution at the ground surface in order to determine the pattern of fluid flow in te sub- surface of this geothermal field. Various methods of analysis of self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> anoma- lies are employed to reach this purpose. We use density probability tomography of monopolar and dipolar electrical sources and an Euler-type analysis. The hydraulic flow pattern found in this geothermal field is in agreement with that detemined from the heat flux inside the structure.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040055887&hterms=GM&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3DGM','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040055887&hterms=GM&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3DGM"><span id="translatedtitle">Mass <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> on Ganymede</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Schubert, G.; Anderson, J. D.; Jacobson, R. A.; Lau, E. L.; Moore, W. B.; Palguta, J.</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>Radio Doppler data from two Ganymede encounters (G1 and G2) on the first two orbits in the Galileo mission have been analyzed previously for gravity information . For a satellite in hydrostatic equilibrium, its gravitational field can be modeled adequately by a truncated spherical harmonic series of degree two. However, a fourth degree field is required in order to fit the second Galileo flyby (G2). This need for a higher degree field strongly <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that Ganymede s gravitational field is perturbed by a gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> near the G2 closest approach point (79.29 latitude, 123.68 west longitude). In fact, a plot of the Doppler residuals , after removal of the best-fit model for the zero degree term (GM) and the second degree moments (J2 and C22), <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that if an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> exists, it is located downtrack of the closest approach point, closer to the equator.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvE..92c2104G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvE..92c2104G"><span id="translatedtitle">Dispersion of overdamped diffusing particles in channel flows coupled to transverse acoustophoretic <span class="hlt">potentials</span>: Transport regimes and scaling <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Giona, Massimiliano; Garofalo, Fabio</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>We address the dispersion properties of overdamped Brownian particles migrating in a two-dimensional acoustophoretic microchannel, where a pressure-driven axial Stokes flow coexists with a transverse acoustophoretic <span class="hlt">potential</span>. Depending on the number and symmetries of the stable nodal points of the acoustophoretic force with respect to the axial velocity profile, different convection-enhanced dispersion regimes can be observed. Among these regimes, an anomalous scaling, for which the axial dispersion increases exponentially with the particle Peclét number, is observed whenever two or more stable acoustophoretic nodes are associated with different axial velocities. A theoretical explanation of this regime is derived, based on exact moment homogenization. Attention is also focused on transient dispersion, which can exhibit superballistic behavior <(x-<x > ) 2> ˜t3 ,x being the axial coordinate.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JGeod..89..141S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JGeod..89..141S"><span id="translatedtitle">Integral formulas for computing a third-order gravitational tensor from volumetric mass density, disturbing gravitational <span class="hlt">potential</span>, gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and gravity disturbance</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Šprlák, Michal; Novák, Pavel</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>A new mathematical model for evaluation of the third-order (disturbing) gravitational tensor is formulated in this article. Firstly, we construct corresponding differential operators for the components of the third-order (disturbing) gravitational tensor in a spherical local north-oriented frame. We show that the differential operators may efficiently be decomposed into an azimuthal and an isotropic part. The differential operators are even more simplified for a certain class of isotropic kernels. Secondly, the differential operators are applied to the well-known integrals of Newton, Abel-Poisson, Pizzetti and Hotine. In this way, 40 new integral formulas are derived. The new integral formulas allow for evaluation of the components of the third-order (disturbing) gravitational tensor from density distribution, disturbing gravitational <span class="hlt">potential</span>, gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and gravity disturbances. Thirdly, we investigate the behaviour of the corresponding integral kernels in the spatial domain. The new mathematical formulas extend the theoretical apparatus of geodesy, i.e. the well-known Meissl scheme, and reveal important properties of the third-order gravitational tensor. They may be exploited in geophysical studies, continuation of gravitational field quantities and analysing the gradiometric-geodynamic boundary value problem.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20040034236','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20040034236"><span id="translatedtitle">Reliability of CHAMP <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Continuations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>vonFrese, Ralph R. B.; Kim, Hyung Rae; Taylor, Patrick T.; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad F.</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>CHAMP is recording state-of-the-art magnetic and gravity field observations at altitudes ranging over roughly 300 - 550 km. However, <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> continuation is severely limited by the non-uniqueness of the process and satellite <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> errors. Indeed, our numerical <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> simulations from satellite to airborne altitudes show that effective downward continuations of the CHAMP data are restricted to within approximately 50 km of the observation altitudes while upward continuations can be effective over a somewhat larger altitude range. The great unreliability of downward continuation requires that the satellite geopotential observations must be analyzed at satellite altitudes if the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> details are to be exploited most fully. Given current <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> error levels, joint inversion of satellite and near- surface <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is the best approach for implementing satellite geopotential observations for subsurface studies. We demonstrate the power of this approach using a crustal model constrained by joint inversions of near-surface and satellite magnetic and gravity observations for Maude Rise, Antarctica, in the southwestern Indian Ocean. Our modeling <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the dominant satellite altitude magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are produced by crustal thickness variations and remanent magnetization of the normal polarity Cretaceous Quiet Zone.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.V41B2077W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.V41B2077W"><span id="translatedtitle">High-Resolution Distribution of Temperature, Particle and Oxidation/Reduction <span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> From a Submarine Hydrothermal System: Brothers Volcano, Kermadec Arc</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Walker, S. L.; Baker, E. T.; de Ronde, C. E.; Yoerger, D.; Embley, R. W.; Davy, B.; Merle, S. G.; Resing, J. A.; Nakamura, K.</p> <p>2008-12-01</p> <p>The complex relationships between geological setting and hydrothermal venting have, to date, largely been explored with ship-based surveys that effectively examine regional relationships, or with remotely operated vehicles (ROV) and manned submersibles which allow close examination of individual vent fields. Higher- resolution surveys than are possible with ship-based techniques and broader surveys than are practical with ROVs and manned submersibles are necessary for more thoroughly understanding hydrothermal systems and their impact on ocean ecosystems. Autonomous vehicles (AUVs), such as the WHOI Autonomous Benthic Explorer (ABE) can be programmed to conduct high-resolution surveys that systematically cover a broad area of seafloor. Brothers volcano, a hydrothermally active submarine caldera volcano located on the Kermadec arc northwest of New Zealand, was surveyed in July-August 2007 using ABE. Brothers caldera is ~3 km in diameter with a floor depth of 1850 m and walls that rise 290-530 m above the caldera floor. A dacite cone with a summit depth of ~1200 m sits within the caldera, partially merging with the southern caldera wall. Prior to the survey, active hydrothermal vents were known to be perched along the NW caldera wall and located at three sites on the cone. The enclosed caldera, presence of known vent fields with differing geochemical characteristics, and existence of at least one currently inactive site made Brothers volcano an ideal site for a high-resolution survey to explore in greater detail the mass, thermal and geochemical exchanges of hydrothermal systems. During our expedition, the caldera walls and dacite cone (~7 km2) were completely surveyed by ABE with 50-60 m trackline spacing at an altitude of 50 m above the seafloor. Hydrothermal plumes were mapped with ABE's integrated CTD (conductivity- temperature-depth) and sensors measuring optical backscatter (particle concentrations) and oxidation- reduction <span class="hlt">potential</span> (ORP; indicating the presence of reduced chemical species). This survey resulted in the first high-resolution map of temperature, particle and ORP <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> within a hydrothermally active submarine caldera. New details about the extent and structure of the known active vent fields were revealed, and a new area of active venting was discovered along the west caldera wall. Additionally, relationships between source vents, buoyant plumes, and neutrally buoyant regional plumes mapped using standard surface ship methods can be compared. Simultaneously acquired bathymetry and magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data show correlations between the geomorphology of the caldera, magnetic alterations and patterns of past and present hydrothermal venting.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/525996','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/525996"><span id="translatedtitle">Classifying sex biased congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Lubinsky, M.S.</p> <p>1997-03-31</p> <p>The reasons for sex biases in congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that arise before structural or hormonal dimorphisms are established has long been unclear. A review of such disorders shows that patterning and tissue <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are female biased, and structural findings are more common in males. This <span class="hlt">suggests</span> different gender dependent susceptibilities to developmental disturbances, with female vulnerabilities focused on early blastogenesis/determination, while males are more likely to involve later organogenesis/morphogenesis. A dual origin for some <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> explains paradoxical reductions of sex biases with greater severity (i.e., multiple rather than single malformations), presumably as more severe events increase the involvement of an otherwise minor process with opposite biases to those of the primary mechanism. The cause for these sex differences is unknown, but early dimorphisms, such as differences in growth or presence of H-Y antigen, may be responsible. This model provides a useful rationale for understanding and classifying sex-biased congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. 42 refs., 7 tabs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24970959','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24970959"><span id="translatedtitle">Familial polythelia associated with dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: a case report.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fonseca, Gabriel M; Cantín, Mario</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Polythelia has been defined as the presence of supernumerary nipples without accessory glandular tissue. Usually, these growths follow imaginary mammary lines running from the armpits to the groin. Although the presence of dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may occasion only a simple cosmetic problem with specific clinical considerations, the association with familial polythelia has been scarcely reported. This paper reports on a case of polythelia that is associated with dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in an Argentine family and discusses <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for a thorough dental history and medical consultation to prevent possible pathological conditions or <span class="hlt">potential</span> malignant transformation of mammary tissues. PMID:24970959</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25326303','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25326303"><span id="translatedtitle">amoA Gene abundances and nitrification <span class="hlt">potential</span> rates <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that benthic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and not Archaea dominate N cycling in the Colne Estuary, United Kingdom.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Li, Jialin; Nedwell, David B; Beddow, Jessica; Dumbrell, Alex J; McKew, Boyd A; Thorpe, Emma L; Whitby, Corinne</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Nitrification, mediated by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), is important in global nitrogen cycling. In estuaries where gradients of salinity and ammonia concentrations occur, there may be differential selections for ammonia-oxidizer populations. The aim of this study was to examine the activity, abundance, and diversity of AOA and AOB in surface oxic sediments of a highly nutrified estuary that exhibits gradients of salinity and ammonium. AOB and AOA communities were investigated by measuring ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) gene abundance and nitrification <span class="hlt">potentials</span> both spatially and temporally. Nitrification <span class="hlt">potentials</span> differed along the estuary and over time, with the greatest nitrification <span class="hlt">potentials</span> occurring mid-estuary (8.2 μmol N grams dry weight [gdw](-1) day(-1) in June, increasing to 37.4 μmol N gdw(-1) day(-1) in January). At the estuary head, the nitrification <span class="hlt">potential</span> was 4.3 μmol N gdw(-1) day(-1) in June, increasing to 11.7 μmol N gdw(-1) day(-1) in January. At the estuary head and mouth, nitrification <span class="hlt">potentials</span> fluctuated throughout the year. AOB amoA gene abundances were significantly greater (by 100-fold) than those of AOA both spatially and temporally. Nitrosomonas spp. were detected along the estuary by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) band sequence analysis. In conclusion, AOB dominated over AOA in the estuarine sediments, with the ratio of AOB/AOA amoA gene abundance increasing from the upper (freshwater) to lower (marine) regions of the Colne estuary. These findings <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that in this nutrified estuary, AOB (possibly Nitrosomonas spp.) were of major significance in nitrification. PMID:25326303</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4262379','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4262379"><span id="translatedtitle">Functional characterization of a competitive peptide antagonist of p65 in human macrophage-like cells <span class="hlt">suggests</span> therapeutic <span class="hlt">potential</span> for chronic inflammation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Srinivasan, Mythily; Blackburn, Corinne; Lahiri, Debomoy K</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) is a glucocorticoid responsive protein that links the nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) and the glucocorticoid signaling pathways. Functional and binding studies <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the proline-rich region at the carboxy terminus of GILZ binds the p65 subunit of NFκB and suppresses the immunoinflammatory response. A widely-used strategy in the discovery of peptide drugs involves exploitation of the complementary surfaces of naturally occurring binding partners. Previously, we observed that a synthetic peptide (GILZ-P) derived from the proline-rich region of GILZ bound activated p65 and ameliorated experimental encephalomyelitis. Here we characterize the secondary structure of GILZ-P by circular dichroic analysis. GILZ-P adopts an extended polyproline type II helical conformation consistent with the structural conformation commonly observed in interfaces of transient intermolecular interactions. To determine the <span class="hlt">potential</span> application of GILZ-P in humans, we evaluated the toxicity and efficacy of the peptide drug in mature human macrophage-like THP-1 cells. Treatment with GILZ-P at a wide range of concentrations commonly used for peptide drugs was nontoxic as determined by cell viability and apoptosis assays. Functionally, GILZ-P suppressed proliferation and glutamate secretion by activated macrophages by inhibiting nuclear translocation of p65. Collectively, our data <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the GILZ-P has therapeutic <span class="hlt">potential</span> in chronic CNS diseases where persistent inflammation leads to neurodegeneration such as multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:25584020</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20100012788','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20100012788"><span id="translatedtitle">An Extreme-Value Approach to <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Vulnerability Identification</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Everett, Chris; Maggio, Gaspare; Groen, Frank</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>The objective of this paper is to present a method for importance analysis in parametric probabilistic modeling where the result of interest is the identification of <span class="hlt">potential</span> engineering vulnerabilities associated with postulated <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in system behavior. In the context of Accident Precursor Analysis (APA), under which this method has been developed, these vulnerabilities, designated as <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> vulnerabilities, are conditions that produce high risk in the presence of anomalous system behavior. The method defines a parameter-specific Parameter Vulnerability Importance measure (PVI), which identifies <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> risk-model parameter values that indicate the <span class="hlt">potential</span> presence of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> vulnerabilities, and allows them to be prioritized for further investigation. This entails analyzing each uncertain risk-model parameter over its credible range of values to determine where it produces the maximum risk. A parameter that produces high system risk for a particular range of values <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the system is vulnerable to the modeled anomalous conditions, if indeed the true parameter value lies in that range. Thus, PVI analysis provides a means of identifying and prioritizing <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-related engineering issues that at the very least warrant improved understanding to reduce uncertainty, such that true vulnerabilities may be identified and proper corrective actions taken.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JHEP...02..003A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JHEP...02..003A"><span id="translatedtitle">On Newton-Cartan trace <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Auzzi, Roberto; Baiguera, Stefano; Nardelli, Giuseppe</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>We classify the trace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> for parity-invariant non-relativistic Schrödinger theories in 2 + 1 dimensions coupled to background Newton-Cartan gravity. The general <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> structure looks very different from the one in the z = 2 Lifshitz theories. The type A content of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is remarkably identical to that of the relativistic 3 + 1 dimensional case, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> the conjecture that an a-theorem should exist also in the Newton-Cartan context.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27097622','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27097622"><span id="translatedtitle">Clinicopathologic Review of 31 Cases of Solid Pseudopapillary Pancreatic Tumors: Can We Use the Scoring System of Microscopic Features for <span class="hlt">Suggesting</span> Clinically Malignant <span class="hlt">Potential</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kim, Jang-Hee; Lee, Jae-Myeong</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>A solid pseudopapillary tumor (SPT) is a pancreatic neoplasm of low malignant <span class="hlt">potential</span>. The <span class="hlt">potentially</span> malignant pathologic features of SPTs were regarded as angioinvasion, perineural invasion, deep invasion of the surrounding acinar tissue, and nuclear pleomorphism. We retrospectively reviewed 31 cases of SPTs (25 female and 6 male patients, with an average age of 35 ± 14 years). The mean follow-up period was 132.0 ± 55.9 months. To evaluate the clinical impact of above pathological parameters, we analyzed their correlation with actually observed clinical malignancy. In three cases, the SPTs were clearly clinically malignant: one patient had recurrences three times, one showed lymph node metastases, and one deep soft tissue invasion around the gastroduodenal artery. Tumor infiltration to the peripancreatic soft tissue was observed in 17 cases (54.8%). The pathologic features considered <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> of malignant <span class="hlt">potential</span> were angioinvasion (25.8%), perineural invasion (6.5%), presence of mitosis in 10 high-power fields (16.1%), and moderate nuclear pleomorphism (19.4%). The presence of at least three of these features was not correlated with clinically confirmed malignant behavior (P = 0.570). Microscopic pathologic features of SPTs cannot be reliably associated with aggressive clinical behavior. Moreover, the absence of these microscopic features cannot exclude clinical malignancy. PMID:27097622</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhLB..752..131S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhLB..752..131S"><span id="translatedtitle">Boundary terms of conformal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Solodukhin, Sergey N.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>We analyze the structure of the boundary terms in the conformal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> integrated over a manifold with boundaries. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of type B, polynomial in the Weyl tensor, are accompanied with the respective boundary terms of the Gibbons-Hawking type. Their form is dictated by the requirement that they produce a variation which compensates the normal derivatives of the metric variation on the boundary in order to have a well-defined variational procedure. This <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> agrees with recent findings in four dimensions for free fields of various spins. We generalize this consideration to six dimensions and derive explicitly the respective boundary terms. We point out that the integrated conformal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in odd dimensions is non-vanishing due to the boundary terms. These terms are specified in three and five dimensions.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li class="active"><span>5</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_5 --> <div id="page_6" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li class="active"><span>6</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="101"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4853521','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4853521"><span id="translatedtitle">Discovery of a <span class="hlt">potentially</span> deleterious variant in TMEM87B in a patient with a hemizygous 2q13 microdeletion <span class="hlt">suggests</span> a recessive condition characterized by congenital heart disease and restrictive cardiomyopathy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Coughlin, Curtis R.; Geiger, Elizabeth A.; Salvador, Blake J.; Elias, Ellen R.; Cavanaugh, Jean L.; Chatfield, Kathryn C.; Miyamoto, Shelley D.; Shaikh, Tamim H.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is a rare cause of heart muscle disease with the highest mortality rate among cardiomyopathy types. The etiology of RCM is poorly understood, although genetic causes have been implicated, and syndromic associations have been described. Here, we describe a patient with an atrial septal defect and restrictive cardiomyopathy along with craniofacial <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and intellectual disabilities. Initial screening using chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) identified a maternally inherited 2q13 microdeletion. The patient had many of the features reported in previous cases with the recurrent 2q13 microdeletion syndrome. However, the inheritance of the microdeletion from an unaffected mother combined with the low incidence (10%) and milder forms of cardiac defects in previously reported cases made the clinical significance of the CMA results unclear. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) with trio-based analysis was performed and identified a paternally inherited TMEM87B mutation (c.1366A>G, p.Asn456Asp) in the patient. TMEM87B, a highly conserved, transmembrane protein of currently unknown function, lies within the critical region of the recurrent 2q13 microdeletion syndrome. Furthermore, a recent study had demonstrated that depletion of TMEM87B in zebrafish embryos affected cardiac development and led to cardiac hypoplasia. Thus, by combining CMA and WES, we <span class="hlt">potentially</span> uncover an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by a severe cardiac phenotype caused by mutations in TMEM87B. This study expands the spectrum of phenotypes associated with the recurrent 2q13 microdeletion syndrome and also further <span class="hlt">suggests</span> the role of TMEM87B in its etiology, especially the cardiac pathology. PMID:27148590</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27148590','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27148590"><span id="translatedtitle">Discovery of a <span class="hlt">potentially</span> deleterious variant in TMEM87B in a patient with a hemizygous 2q13 microdeletion <span class="hlt">suggests</span> a recessive condition characterized by congenital heart disease and restrictive cardiomyopathy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yu, Hung-Chun; Coughlin, Curtis R; Geiger, Elizabeth A; Salvador, Blake J; Elias, Ellen R; Cavanaugh, Jean L; Chatfield, Kathryn C; Miyamoto, Shelley D; Shaikh, Tamim H</p> <p>2016-05-01</p> <p>Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is a rare cause of heart muscle disease with the highest mortality rate among cardiomyopathy types. The etiology of RCM is poorly understood, although genetic causes have been implicated, and syndromic associations have been described. Here, we describe a patient with an atrial septal defect and restrictive cardiomyopathy along with craniofacial <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and intellectual disabilities. Initial screening using chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) identified a maternally inherited 2q13 microdeletion. The patient had many of the features reported in previous cases with the recurrent 2q13 microdeletion syndrome. However, the inheritance of the microdeletion from an unaffected mother combined with the low incidence (10%) and milder forms of cardiac defects in previously reported cases made the clinical significance of the CMA results unclear. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) with trio-based analysis was performed and identified a paternally inherited TMEM87B mutation (c.1366A>G, p.Asn456Asp) in the patient. TMEM87B, a highly conserved, transmembrane protein of currently unknown function, lies within the critical region of the recurrent 2q13 microdeletion syndrome. Furthermore, a recent study had demonstrated that depletion of TMEM87B in zebrafish embryos affected cardiac development and led to cardiac hypoplasia. Thus, by combining CMA and WES, we <span class="hlt">potentially</span> uncover an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by a severe cardiac phenotype caused by mutations in TMEM87B. This study expands the spectrum of phenotypes associated with the recurrent 2q13 microdeletion syndrome and also further <span class="hlt">suggests</span> the role of TMEM87B in its etiology, especially the cardiac pathology. PMID:27148590</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ClinicalTrials.gov/ct2/show/study/NCT02399527','CLINICALTRIALS'); return false;" href="https://ClinicalTrials.gov/ct2/show/study/NCT02399527"><span id="translatedtitle">Lymphatic <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> Registry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct/screen/SimpleSearch">ClinicalTrials.gov</a></p> <p></p> <p>2015-11-04</p> <p>Lymphatic Malformation; Generalized Lymphatic <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> (GLA); Central Conducting Lymphatic <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>; CLOVES Syndrome; Gorham-Stout Disease ("Disappearing Bone Disease"); Blue Rubber Bleb Nevus Syndrome; Kaposiform Lymphangiomatosis; Kaposiform Hemangioendothelioma/Tufted Angioma; Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome; Lymphangiomatosis</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23344701','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23344701"><span id="translatedtitle">Prevalence and function of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in a community sample of adolescents, using <span class="hlt">suggested</span> DSM-5 criteria for a <span class="hlt">potential</span> NSSI disorder.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zetterqvist, Maria; Lundh, Lars-Gunnar; Dahlström, Orjan; Svedin, Carl Göran</p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>Previous prevalence rates of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in adolescents have varied considerably. In the present cross-sectional study, prevalence rates, characteristics and functions of NSSI were assessed in a large randomized community sample consisting of 3,060 (50.5 % female) Swedish adolescents aged 15-17 years. The <span class="hlt">suggested</span> criteria for NSSI disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition, (DSM-5) were used to assess prevalence rates with the aim of arriving at a more precise estimate. Out of the whole sample, 1,088 (35.6 %) adolescents (56.2 % female) reported at least one episode of NSSI during the last year, of which 205 (6.7 %) met <span class="hlt">suggested</span> DSM-5 criteria for a <span class="hlt">potential</span> NSSI disorder diagnosis. The NSSI disorder diagnosis was significantly more common in girls (11.1 % vs. 2.3 %, χ (2) (1, N = 3046) = 94.08, p < 0.001, cOR = 5.43, 95 % CI [3.73, 7.90]). The NSSI disorder group consisted of significantly more smokers and drug users compared to adolescents with NSSI that did not meet DSM-5 criteria for NSSI disorder, and also differed concerning demographic variables. A confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted on reported functions of NSSI, with the aim of validating Nock and Prinstein's (Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology 72:885-890, 2004, Journal of Abnormal Psychology 114:140-146, 2005) four-factor model on a Swedish community sample, resulting in a close to acceptable fit. A two-factor model (social and automatic reinforcement) resulted in a slightly better fit. The most frequently reported factors were positive and negative automatic reinforcement. A majority of functions were significantly more often reported by girls than boys. The implications of the <span class="hlt">suggested</span> DSM-5 criteria and reported functions are discussed. PMID:23344701</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19484068','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19484068"><span id="translatedtitle">Spectral <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Young's double-slit interference experiment.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pu, Jixiong; Cai, Chao; Nemoto, Shojiro</p> <p>2004-10-18</p> <p>We report a phenomenon of spectral <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the interference field of Young's double-slit interference experiment. The <span class="hlt">potential</span> applications of the spectral <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the information encoding and information transmission in free space are also considered. PMID:19484068</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25624136','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25624136"><span id="translatedtitle">Conscious and unconscious detection of semantic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hannon, Brenda</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>When asked What superhero is associated with bats, Robin, the Penguin, Metropolis, Catwoman, the Riddler, the Joker, and Mr. Freeze? people frequently fail to notice the anomalous word Metropolis. The goals of this study were to determine whether detection of semantic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, like Metropolis, is conscious or unconscious and whether this detection is immediate or delayed. To achieve these goals, participants answered anomalous and nonanomalous questions as their reading times for words were recorded. Comparisons between detected versus undetected <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> revealed slower reading times for detected <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>-a finding that <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that people immediately and consciously detected <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Further, comparisons between first and second words following undetected <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> versus nonanomalous controls revealed some slower reading times for first and second words-a finding that <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that people may have unconsciously detected <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> but this detection was delayed. Taken together, these findings support the idea that when we are immediately aware of a semantic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (i.e., immediate conscious detection) our language processes make immediate adjustments in order to reconcile contradictory information of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with surrounding text; however, even when we are not consciously aware of semantic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, our language processes still make these adjustments, although these adjustments are delayed (i.e., delayed unconscious detection). PMID:25624136</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.P43B1929R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.P43B1929R"><span id="translatedtitle">Lunar Orbit <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Riofrio, L.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Independent experiments show a large <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in measurements of lunar orbital evolution, with applications to cosmology and the speed of light. The Moon has long been known to be slowly drifting farther from Earth due to tidal forces. The Lunar Laser Ranging Experiment (LLRE) indicates the Moon's semimajor axis increasing at 3.82 ± .07 cm/yr, anomalously high. If the Moon were today gaining angular momentum at this rate, it would have coincided with Earth less than 2 Gyr ago. Study of tidal rhythmites indicates a rate of 2.9 ± 0.6 cm/yr. Historical eclipse observations independently measure a recession rate of 2.82 ± .08 cm/yr. Detailed numerical simulation of lunar orbital evolution predicts 2.91 cm/yr. LLRE differs from three independent experiments by over12 sigma. A cosmology where speed of light c is related to time t by GM=tc^3 has been <span class="hlt">suggested</span> to predict the redshifts of Type Ia supernovae, and a 4.507034% proportion of baryonic matter. If c were changing in the amount predicted, lunar orbital distance would appear to increase by an additional 0.935 cm/yr. An <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the lunar orbit may be precisely calculated, shedding light on puzzles of 'dark energy'. In Planck units this cosmology may be summarized as M=R=t.Lunar Recession Rate;</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19760015183','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19760015183"><span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of spacecraft <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Bloomquist, C. E.; Graham, W. C.</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from 316 spacecraft covering the entire U.S. space program were analyzed to determine if there were any experimental or technological programs which could be implemented to remove the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from future space activity. Thirty specific categories of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were found to cover nearly 85 percent of all observed <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Thirteen experiments were defined to deal with 17 of these categories; nine additional experiments were identified to deal with other classes of observed and anticipated <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Preliminary analyses indicate that all 22 experimental programs are both technically feasible and economically viable.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014APS..APR.R2002P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014APS..APR.R2002P"><span id="translatedtitle">Experimental <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Neutrino Physics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Palamara, Ornella</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>In recent years, experimental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> ranging in significance (2.8-3.8 σ) have been reported from a variety of experiments studying neutrinos over baselines less than 1 km. Results from the LSND and MiniBooNE short-baseline νe /νe appearance experiments show <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> which cannot be described by oscillations between the three standard model neutrinos (the ``LSND <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>''). In addition, a re-analysis of the anti-neutrino flux produced by nuclear power reactors has led to an apparent deficit in νe event rates in a number of reactor experiments (the ``reactor <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>''). Similarly, calibration runs using 51Cr and 37Ar radioactive sources in the Gallium solar neutrino experiments GALLEX and SAGE have shown an unexplained deficit in the electron neutrino event rate over very short distances (the ``Gallium <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>''). The puzzling results from these experiments, which together may <span class="hlt">suggest</span> the existence of physics beyond the Standard Model and hint at exciting new physics, including the possibility of additional low-mass sterile neutrino states, have raised the interest in the community for new experimental efforts that could eventually solve this puzzle. Definitive evidence for sterile neutrinos would be a revolutionary discovery, with implications for particle physics as well as cosmology. Proposals to address these signals by employing accelerator, reactor and radioactive source experiments are in the planning stages or underway worldwide. In this talk some of these will be reviewed, with emphasis on the accelerator programs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70140581','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70140581"><span id="translatedtitle">Exploratory and spatial data analysis (EDA-SDA) for determining regional background levels and <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of <span class="hlt">potentially</span> toxic elements in soils from Catorce-Matehuala, Mexico</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Chiprés, J.A.; Castro-Larragoitia, J.; Monroy, M.G.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The threshold between geochemical background and <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> can be influenced by the methodology selected for its estimation. Environmental evaluations, particularly those conducted in mineralized areas, must consider this when trying to determinate the natural geochemical status of a study area, quantifying human impacts, or establishing soil restoration values for contaminated sites. Some methods in environmental geochemistry incorporate the premise that <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (natural or anthropogenic) and background data are characterized by their own probabilistic distributions. One of these methods uses exploratory data analysis (EDA) on regional geochemical data sets coupled with a geographic information system (GIS) to spatially understand the processes that influence the geochemical landscape in a technique that can be called a spatial data analysis (SDA). This EDA-SDA methodology was used to establish the regional background range from the area of Catorce-Matehuala in north-central Mexico. Probability plots of the data, particularly for those areas affected by human activities, show that the regional geochemical background population is composed of smaller subpopulations associated with factors such as soil type and parent material. This paper demonstrates that the EDA-SDA method offers more certainty in defining thresholds between geochemical background and <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> than a numeric technique, making it a useful tool for regional geochemical landscape analysis and environmental geochemistry studies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.8110T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.8110T"><span id="translatedtitle">Large interannual Arctic sea-ice <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the coming decades: is there hope to predict them?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tietsche, Steffen; Notz, Dirk; Jungclaus, Johann H.; Marotzke, Jochem</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>In projections of 21st-century climate, Arctic sea ice declines and at the same time exhibits strong interannual <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Here, we investigate the <span class="hlt">potential</span> to predict these strong sea-ice <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> under a perfect-model assumption, using the Max-Planck-Institute Earth System Model in the same setup as in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). We study two cases of strong negative sea-ice <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: a five-year-long <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> for present-day conditions, and a ten-year-long <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> for conditions projected for the middle of the 21st century. We treat these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the CMIP5 projections as the truth, and use exactly the same model configuration for predictions of this synthetic truth. We start ensemble predictions at different times during the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, considering lagged-perfect and sea-ice-assimilated initial conditions. We find that the onset and amplitude of the interannual <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are not predictable. However, the further deepening of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> can be predicted for typically one year lead time if predictions start after the onset but before the maximal amplitude of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The magnitude of an extremely low summer sea-ice minimum is hard to predict: the skill of the prediction ensemble is not better than a damped-persistence forecast for lead times of more than a few months, and is not better than a climatology forecast for lead times of two or more years. Predictions of the present-day <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> are more skillful than predictions of the mid-century <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Predictions using sea-ice-assimilated initial conditions are competitive with those using lagged-perfect initial conditions for lead times of a year or less, but yield degraded skill for longer lead times. The results presented here <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that there is limited prospect of predicting the large interannual sea-ice <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> expected to occur throughout the 21st century.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JHEP...02..078A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JHEP...02..078A"><span id="translatedtitle">Lifshitz scale <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Arav, Igal; Chapman, Shira; Oz, Yaron</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>We analyse scale <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Lifshitz field theories, formulated as the relative cohomology of the scaling operator with respect to foliation preserving diffeomorphisms. We construct a detailed framework that enables us to calculate the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for any number of spatial dimensions, and for any value of the dynamical exponent. We derive selection rules, and establish the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> structure in diverse universal sectors. We present the complete cohomologies for various examples in one, two and three space dimensions for several values of the dynamical exponent. Our calculations indicate that all the Lifshitz scale <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are trivial descents, called B-type in the terminology of conformal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. However, not all the trivial descents are cohomologically non-trivial. We compare the conformal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to Lifshitz scale <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with a dynamical exponent equal to one.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120011729','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120011729"><span id="translatedtitle">Experimental Investigation into the Radar <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> on the Surface of Venus</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Kohler, E.; Gavin, P.; Chevrier, V.; Johnson, Natasha M.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Radar mapping of thc surface of Venus shows areas of high reflectivity (low emissivity) in the Venusian highlands at altitudes between 2.5-4.75 kilometers. The origin of the radar <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> found in the Venusian highlands remains unclear. Most explanations of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> causes for these radar <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> come from theoretical work. Previous studies <span class="hlt">suggest</span> increased surface roughness or materials with higher dielectric constants as well as surface atmospheric interactions. Several possible candidates of high-dielectric materials are tellurium) ferroelectric materials, and lead or bismuth sulfides. While previous studies have been influential in determining possible sources for the Venus <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, only a very few hypotheses have been verified via experimentation. This work intends to experimentally constrain the source of the radar <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on Venus. This study proposes to investigate four possible materials that could <span class="hlt">potentially</span> cause the high reflectivities on the surface of Venus and tests their behavior under simulated Venusian conditions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18665976','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18665976"><span id="translatedtitle">A model incorporating <span class="hlt">potential</span> skewed X-inactivation in MZ girls <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that X-linked QTLs exist for several social behaviours including autism spectrum disorder.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Loat, C S; Haworth, C M A; Plomin, R; Craig, I W</p> <p>2008-11-01</p> <p>Sex differences in the frequency and patterns of behaviours are frequently observed and largely unexplained. We have investigated the possible role of X-linked genes in the aetiology of social behaviour problems, including those involved in autistic spectrum disorders. A novel approach has been implemented. This is based on predictions following from stochastic patterns of X-inactivation of lower concordance of monozygous female (MZF) twins than MZM twins for behaviours underpinned by X-linked QTLs and the converse that DZF twins are expected to correlate more strongly for X-linked traits than DZM twins because unlike males, females always have at least one X chromosome in common. These expectations were tested in an ongoing longitudinal cohort study in which all twins born in England and Wales between 1994 and 1996 were invited to take part. 1000 each of MZF, MZM, DZF and DZM pairs from TEDS were tested at 7 and 8 years of age. The results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> the persistent influence of X-linked genes on cognition and social behaviour problems, including those involved in autistic spectrum disorders, from early to middle childhood. This emphasises the <span class="hlt">potential</span> importance of X-linked genes in the developmental trajectories of behaviour and mental health and the need to stratify genetic analysis of behaviours by gender. PMID:18665976</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22903291','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22903291"><span id="translatedtitle">Dosing of adult pigeons with as little as one #9 lead pellet caused severe δ-ALAD depression, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> adverse effects in wild populations.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Holladay, Jeremy P; Nisanian, Mandy; Williams, Susan; Tuckfield, R Cary; Kerr, Richard; Jarrett, Timothy; Tannenbaum, Lawrence; Holladay, Steven D; Sharma, Ajay; Gogal, Robert M</p> <p>2012-11-01</p> <p>Avian wildlife species commonly ingest lead (Pb) spent shot or bullet fragments as grit or mistakenly as food. In previous studies in our laboratory and others, the toxicity varied based on the diet as well as type and quantity of Pb ingested. In the current study, domestic pigeons were gavaged with 1, 2, or 3 Pb pellets and then followed with weekly radiographs and blood physiologic endpoints for 28 days. Pellet retention decreased by roughly 50 % per week as pellets were either absorbed or excreted, except for week 4 where pellet number no longer was diminished. Size of retained pellets visually decreased over retention time. Birds dosed with a single #9 pellet showed mean blood Pb levels over 80 times higher than those of the controls, verifying Pb pellet absorption from the gut. A single Pb pellet also reduced plasma δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (δ-ALAD) activity by over 80 % compared to controls, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> the <span class="hlt">potential</span> for population injury in Pb pellet-exposed pigeons. PMID:22903291</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16731969','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16731969"><span id="translatedtitle">NMR solution structure and backbone dynamics of domain III of the E protein of tick-borne Langat flavivirus <span class="hlt">suggests</span> a <span class="hlt">potential</span> site for molecular recognition.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mukherjee, Munia; Dutta, Kaushik; White, Mark A; Cowburn, David; Fox, Robert O</p> <p>2006-06-01</p> <p>Flaviviruses cause many human diseases, including dengue fever, yellow fever, West Nile viral encephalitis, and hemorrhagic fevers, and are transmitted to their vertebrate hosts by infected mosquitoes and ticks. Domain III of the envelope protein (E-D3) is considered to be the primary viral determinant involved in the virus-host-cell receptor interaction, and thus represents an excellent target for antiviral drug development. Langat (LGT) virus is a naturally attenuated BSL-2 TBE virus and is a model for the pathogenic BSL-3 and BSL-4 viruses in the serogroup. We have determined the solution structure of LGT-E-D3 using heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. The backbone dynamics of LGT-E-D3 have been investigated using 15N relaxation measurements. A detailed analysis of the solution structure and dynamics of LGT-E-D3 <span class="hlt">suggests</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> residues that could form a surface for molecular recognition, and thereby represent a target site for antiviral therapeutics design. PMID:16731969</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24590274','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24590274"><span id="translatedtitle">Genetics of lymphatic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Brouillard, Pascal; Boon, Laurence; Vikkula, Miikka</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>Lymphatic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> include a variety of developmental and/or functional defects affecting the lymphatic vessels: sporadic and familial forms of primary lymphedema, secondary lymphedema, chylothorax and chylous ascites, lymphatic malformations, and overgrowth syndromes with a lymphatic component. Germline mutations have been identified in at least 20 genes that encode proteins acting around VEGFR-3 signaling but also downstream of other tyrosine kinase receptors. These mutations exert their effects via the RAS/MAPK and the PI3K/AKT pathways and explain more than a quarter of the incidence of primary lymphedema, mostly of inherited forms. More common forms may also result from multigenic effects or post-zygotic mutations. Most of the corresponding murine knockouts are homozygous lethal, while heterozygotes are healthy, which <span class="hlt">suggests</span> differences in human and murine physiology and the influence of other factors. PMID:24590274</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3938256','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3938256"><span id="translatedtitle">Genetics of lymphatic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Brouillard, Pascal; Boon, Laurence; Vikkula, Miikka</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Lymphatic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> include a variety of developmental and/or functional defects affecting the lymphatic vessels: sporadic and familial forms of primary lymphedema, secondary lymphedema, chylothorax and chylous ascites, lymphatic malformations, and overgrowth syndromes with a lymphatic component. Germline mutations have been identified in at least 20 genes that encode proteins acting around VEGFR-3 signaling but also downstream of other tyrosine kinase receptors. These mutations exert their effects via the RAS/MAPK and the PI3K/AKT pathways and explain more than a quarter of the incidence of primary lymphedema, mostly of inherited forms. More common forms may also result from multigenic effects or post-zygotic mutations. Most of the corresponding murine knockouts are homozygous lethal, while heterozygotes are healthy, which <span class="hlt">suggests</span> differences in human and murine physiology and the influence of other factors. PMID:24590274</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2801930','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2801930"><span id="translatedtitle">Taussig-Bing <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Konstantinov, Igor E.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Taussig-Bing <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is a rare congenital heart malformation that was first described in 1949 by Helen B. Taussig (1898–1986) and Richard J. Bing (1909–). Although substantial improvement has since been achieved in surgical results of the repair of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, management of the Taussig-Bing <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> remains challenging. A history of the original description of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, the life stories of the individuals who first described it, and the current outcomes of its surgical management are reviewed herein. PMID:20069085</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19830010868','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19830010868"><span id="translatedtitle">MAGSAT scalar <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Braile, L. W.; Hinze, W. J. (Principal Investigator)</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>To facilitate processing large data arrays, elements of spherical Earth analysis programs NVERTSM, SMFLD, NVERTG and GLFD were implemented and tested on the LARS IBM 4341 computer. Currently, the problem of inverting 2 deg MAGSAT scalar <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for the region (80 W, 60 E) longitude and (40 S, 70 N) latitude is being implemented on the LARS-computer for quantitative comparison with free air gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, geothermal and tectonic data. Gravity and MAGSAT <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from a subset of this region (30 W, 60 E), (40 S, 70 N) were already processed for a paper on satellite magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of Africa and Europe.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li class="active"><span>6</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_6 --> <div id="page_7" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="121"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000JHEP...03..030B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000JHEP...03..030B"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> and tadpoles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bianchi, Massimo; Morales, Jose F.</p> <p>2000-03-01</p> <p>We show that massless RR tadpoles in vacuum configurations with open and unoriented strings are always related to <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. RR tadpoles arising from sectors of the internal SCFT with non-vanishing Witten index are in one-to-one correspondence with conventional irreducible <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The anomalous content of the remaining RR tadpoles can be disclosed by considering anomalous amplitudes with higher numbers of external legs. We then provide an explicit parametrization of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> polynomial in terms of the boundary reflection coefficients, i.e. one-point functions of massless RR fields on the disk. After factorization of the reducible <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, we extract the relevant WZ couplings in the effective lagrangians.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Buddha&pg=3&id=EJ267757','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Buddha&pg=3&id=EJ267757"><span id="translatedtitle">Minor Physical <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>, Footprints, and Behavior: Was the Buddha Right?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Draper, Thomas W.; Munoz, Milagros M.</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>A relationship between an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of the footprint <span class="hlt">suggested</span> by ancient Abhidhamma meditations and Minor Physical <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> Scale was observed in children. The footprint <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> correlated with the activity levels of children in the same way as the scores on the scale and consistently with prior research using the scale. (Author/RD)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvP...5d4015S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvP...5d4015S"><span id="translatedtitle">Effect of Split Gate Size on the Electrostatic <span class="hlt">Potential</span> and 0.7 <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> within Quantum Wires on a Modulation-Doped GaAs /AlGaAs Heterostructure</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Smith, L. W.; Al-Taie, H.; Lesage, A. A. J.; Thomas, K. J.; Sfigakis, F.; See, P.; Griffiths, J. P.; Farrer, I.; Jones, G. A. C.; Ritchie, D. A.; Kelly, M. J.; Smith, C. G.</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>We study 95 split gates of different size on a single chip using a multiplexing technique. Each split gate defines a one-dimensional channel on a modulation-doped GaAs /AlGaAs heterostructure, through which the conductance is quantized. The yield of devices showing good quantization decreases rapidly as the length of the split gates increases. However, for the subset of devices showing good quantization, there is no correlation between the electrostatic length of the one-dimensional channel (estimated using a saddle-point model) and the gate length. The variation in electrostatic length and the one-dimensional subband spacing for devices of the same gate length exceeds the variation in the average values between devices of different lengths. There is a clear correlation between the curvature of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> barrier in the transport direction and the strength of the "0.7 <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>": the conductance value of the 0.7 <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> reduces as the barrier curvature becomes shallower. These results highlight the key role of the electrostatic environment in one-dimensional systems. Even in devices with clean conductance plateaus, random fluctuations in the background <span class="hlt">potential</span> are crucial in determining the <span class="hlt">potential</span> landscape in the active device area such that nominally identical gate structures have different characteristics.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMSA51B4094S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMSA51B4094S"><span id="translatedtitle">Connecting Stratospheric and Ionospheric <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Spraggs, M. E.; Goncharenko, L. P.; Zhang, S.; Coster, A. J.; Benkevitch, L. V.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>This study investigates any relationship between lunar phases and ionospheric <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that appear at low latitudes concurrently with sudden stratospheric warmings (SSWs). The study utilizes World-wide GPS Receiver Network Total Electron Content (TEC) data spanning 13 years (2001-2014) and focuses on the changes in the equatorial ionization <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> the Western hemisphere. TEC is highly variable due to the influences of solar flux, geomagnetic activity, and seasonal variation and these influences are removed by the use of model. This empirical TEC model is a combination of linear dependencies of solar flux (F10.7) and geomagnetic activity (Ap3) with a third degree polynomial dependency for day-of-year (DOY). With such dependencies removed, the remaining TEC variation could be resolved and attributed to an appropriate mechanism. Lunar phase and apside was investigated in particular, especially the new and full moon phases during perigees when tidal forcing would be most powerful. Lunar tidal forcing on planetary waves is also examined as being physically responsible for setting up conditions that may give rise to SSWs and ionospheric <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Preliminary results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that such <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may be enhanced in intensity during the full or new moon and even more so during perigee by different amounts depending on whether the SSW is a major (40-60%) or minor (20-45%) event.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19870029377&hterms=chromium&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dchromium','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19870029377&hterms=chromium&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dchromium"><span id="translatedtitle">Chromium isotopic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the Allende meteorite</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Papanastassiou, D. A.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>Abundances of the chromium isotopes in terrestrial and bulk meteorite samples are identical to 0.01 percent. However, Ca-Al-rich inclusions from the Allende meteorite show endemic isotopic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in chromium which require at least three nucleosynthetic components. Large <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at Cr-54 in a special class of inclusions are correlated with large <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at Ca-48 and Ti-50 and provide strong support for a component reflecting neutron-rich nucleosynthesis at nuclear statistical equilibrium. This correlation <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that materials from very near the core of an exploding massive star may be injected into the interstellar medium.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20010021221&hterms=Gallagher+JR&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DGallagher%2BJR','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20010021221&hterms=Gallagher+JR&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DGallagher%2BJR"><span id="translatedtitle">Magnetosheath Flow <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in 3-D</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Vaisberg, O. L.; Burch, J. L.; Smirnov, V. N.; Avanov, L. A.; Moore, T. E.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Skalsky, A. A.; Borodkova, N. L.; Coffey, V. N.; Gallagher, D. L.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>Measurements of the plasma and magnetic field with high temporal resolution on the Interball Tail probe reveal many flow <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the magnetosheath. They are usually seen as flow direction and number density variations, accompanied by magnetic field discontinuities. Large flow <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with number density variations of factor of 2 or more and velocity variations of 100 km/s or more are seen with periodicity of about I per hour. The cases of flow <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> following in succession are also observed, and <span class="hlt">suggest</span> their decay while propagating through the magnetosheath. Some magnetospheric disturbances observed in the outer magnetosphere after the satellite has crossed the magnetopause on the inbound orbit <span class="hlt">suggest</span> their association with magnetosheath flow <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> observed in the magnetosheath prior to magnetopause crossing.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1350146','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1350146"><span id="translatedtitle">Behavioral economics without <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Rachlin, H</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>Behavioral economics is often conceived as the study of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> superimposed on a rational system. As research has progressed, <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> have multiplied until little is left of rationality. Another conception of behavioral economics is based on the axiom that value is always maximized. It incorporates so-called <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> either as conflicts between temporal patterns of behavior and the individual acts comprising those patterns or as outcomes of nonexponential time discounting. This second conception of behavioral economics is both empirically based and internally consistent. PMID:8551195</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JHEP...03..022G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JHEP...03..022G"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>, conformal manifolds, and spheres</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gomis, Jaume; Hsin, Po-Shen; Komargodski, Zohar; Schwimmer, Adam; Seiberg, Nathan; Theisen, Stefan</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>The two-point function of exactly marginal operators leads to a universal contribution to the trace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in even dimensions. We study aspects of this trace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, emphasizing its interpretation as a sigma model, whose target space {M} is the space of conformal field theories (a.k.a. the conformal manifold). When the underlying quantum field theory is supersymmetric, this sigma model has to be appropriately supersymmetrized. As examples, we consider in some detail {N}=(2,2) and {N}=(0,2) supersymmetric theories in d = 2 and {N}=2 supersymmetric theories in d = 4. This reasoning leads to new information about the conformal manifolds of these theories, for example, we show that the manifold is Kähler-Hodge and we further argue that it has vanishing Kähler class. For {N}=(2,2) theories in d = 2 and {N}=2 theories in d = 4 we also show that the relation between the sphere partition function and the Kähler <span class="hlt">potential</span> of {M} follows immediately from the appropriate sigma models that we construct. Along the way we find several examples of <span class="hlt">potential</span> trace <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that obey the Wess-Zumino consistency conditions, but can be ruled out by a more detailed analysis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11541324','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11541324"><span id="translatedtitle">Isotopic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in extraterrestrial grains.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ireland, T R</p> <p>1996-03-01</p> <p>Isotopic compositions are referred to as anomalous if the isotopic ratios measured cannot be related to the terrestrial (solar) composition of a given element. While small effects close to the resolution of mass spectrometric techniques can have ambiguous origins, the discovery of large isotopic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in inclusions and grains from primitive meteorites <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that material from distinct sites of stellar nucleosynthesis has been preserved. Refractory inclusions, which are predominantly composed of the refractory oxides of Al, Ca, Ti, and Mg, in chondritic meteorites commonly have excesses in the heaviest isotopes of Ca, Ti, and Cr which are inferred to have been produced in a supernova. Refractory inclusions also contain excess 26Mg from short lived 26Al decay. However, despite the isotopic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> indicating the preservation of distinct nucleosynthetic sites, refractory inclusions have been processed in the solar system and are not interstellar grains. Carbon (graphite and diamond) and silicon carbide grains from the same meteorites also have large isotopic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> but these phases are not stable in the oxidized solar nebula which <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that they are presolar and formed in the circumstellar atmospheres of carbon-rich stars. Diamond has a characteristic signature enriched in the lightest and heaviest isotopes of Xe, and graphite shows a wide range in C isotopic compositions. SiC commonly has C and N isotopic signatures which are characteristic of H-burning in the C-N-O cycle in low-mass stars. Heavier elements such as Si, Ti, Xe, Ba, and Nd, carry an isotopic signature of the s-process. A minor population of SiC (known as Grains X, ca. 1%) are distinct in having decay products of short lived isotopes 26Al (now 26Mg), 44Ti (now 44Ca), and 49V (now 49Ti), as well as 28Si excesses which are characteristic of supernova nucleosynthesis. The preservation of these isotopic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> allows the examination of detailed nucleosynthetic pathways in stars. PMID:11541324</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvD..93h4021F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvD..93h4021F"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>, entropy, and boundaries</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fursaev, Dmitry V.; Solodukhin, Sergey N.</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>A relation between the conformal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and the logarithmic term in the entanglement entropy is known to exist for CFTs in even dimensions. In odd dimensions, the local <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and the logarithmic term in the entropy are absent. As was observed recently, there exists a nontrivial integrated <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> if an odd-dimensional spacetime has boundaries. We show that, similarly, there exists a logarithmic term in the entanglement entropy when the entangling surface crosses the boundary of spacetime. The relation of the entanglement entropy to the integrated conformal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is elaborated for three-dimensional theories. Distributional properties of intrinsic and extrinsic geometries of the boundary in the presence of conical singularities in the bulk are established. This allows one to find contributions to the entropy that depend on the relative angle between the boundary and the entangling surface.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22789727','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22789727"><span id="translatedtitle">A novel resistance mechanism to triclosan that <span class="hlt">suggests</span> horizontal gene transfer and demonstrates a <span class="hlt">potential</span> selective pressure for reduced biocide susceptibility in clinical strains of Staphylococcus aureus.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ciusa, Maria Laura; Furi, Leonardo; Knight, Daniel; Decorosi, Francesca; Fondi, Marco; Raggi, Carla; Coelho, Joana Rosado; Aragones, Luis; Moce, Laura; Visa, Pilar; Freitas, Ana Teresa; Baldassarri, Lucilla; Fani, Renato; Viti, Carlo; Orefici, Graziella; Martinez, Jose Luis; Morrissey, Ian; Oggioni, Marco Rinaldo</p> <p>2012-09-01</p> <p>The widely used biocide triclosan selectively targets FabI, the NADH-dependent trans-2-enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase, which is an important target for narrow-spectrum antimicrobial drug development. In relation to the growing concern about biocide resistance, we compared in vitro mutants and clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus with reduced triclosan susceptibility. Clinical isolates of S. aureus as well as laboratory-generated mutants were assayed for minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) phenotypes and genotypes related to reduced triclosan susceptibility. A <span class="hlt">potential</span> epidemiological cut-off (ECOFF) MBC of >4 mg/L was observed for triclosan in clinical isolates of S. aureus. These showed significantly lower MICs and higher MBCs than laboratory mutants. These groups of strains also had few similarities in the triclosan resistance mechanism. Molecular analysis identified novel resistance mechanisms linked to the presence of an additional sh-fabI allele derived from Staphylococcus haemolyticus. The lack of predictive value of in-vitro-selected mutations for clinical isolates indicates that laboratory tests in the present form appear to be of limited value. More importantly, detection of sh-fabI as a novel resistance mechanism with high <span class="hlt">potential</span> for horizontal gene transfer demonstrates for the first time that a biocide could exert a selective pressure able to drive the spread of a resistance determinant in a human pathogen. PMID:22789727</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4643347','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4643347"><span id="translatedtitle">Crystal structure of an antigenic outer-membrane protein from Salmonella Typhi <span class="hlt">suggests</span> a <span class="hlt">potential</span> antigenic loop and an efflux mechanism</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Guan, Hong-Hsiang; Yoshimura, Masato; Chuankhayan, Phimonphan; Lin, Chien-Chih; Chen, Nai-Chi; Yang, Ming-Chi; Ismail, Asma; Fun, Hoong-Kun; Chen, Chun-Jung</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>ST50, an outer-membrane component of the multi-drug efflux system from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, is an obligatory diagnostic antigen for typhoid fever. ST50 is an excellent and unique diagnostic antigen with 95% specificity and 90% sensitivity and is used in the commercial diagnosis test kit (TYPHIDOTTM). The crystal structure of ST50 at a resolution of 2.98 Å reveals a trimer that forms an α-helical tunnel and a β-barrel transmembrane channel traversing the periplasmic space and outer membrane. Structural investigations <span class="hlt">suggest</span> significant conformational variations in the extracellular loop regions, especially extracellular loop 2. This is the location of the most plausible antibody-binding domain that could be used to target the design of new antigenic epitopes for the development of better diagnostics or drugs for the treatment of typhoid fever. A molecule of the detergent n-octyl-β-D-glucoside is observed in the D-cage, which comprises three sets of Asp361 and Asp371 residues at the periplasmic entrance. These structural insights <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a possible substrate transport mechanism in which the substrate first binds at the periplasmic entrance of ST50 and subsequently, via iris-like structural movements to open the periplasmic end, penetrates the periplasmic domain for efflux pumping of molecules, including poisonous metabolites or xenobiotics, for excretion outside the pathogen. PMID:26563565</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26563565','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26563565"><span id="translatedtitle">Crystal structure of an antigenic outer-membrane protein from Salmonella Typhi <span class="hlt">suggests</span> a <span class="hlt">potential</span> antigenic loop and an efflux mechanism.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Guan, Hong-Hsiang; Yoshimura, Masato; Chuankhayan, Phimonphan; Lin, Chien-Chih; Chen, Nai-Chi; Yang, Ming-Chi; Ismail, Asma; Fun, Hoong-Kun; Chen, Chun-Jung</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>ST50, an outer-membrane component of the multi-drug efflux system from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, is an obligatory diagnostic antigen for typhoid fever. ST50 is an excellent and unique diagnostic antigen with 95% specificity and 90% sensitivity and is used in the commercial diagnosis test kit (TYPHIDOT(TM)). The crystal structure of ST50 at a resolution of 2.98 Å reveals a trimer that forms an α-helical tunnel and a β-barrel transmembrane channel traversing the periplasmic space and outer membrane. Structural investigations <span class="hlt">suggest</span> significant conformational variations in the extracellular loop regions, especially extracellular loop 2. This is the location of the most plausible antibody-binding domain that could be used to target the design of new antigenic epitopes for the development of better diagnostics or drugs for the treatment of typhoid fever. A molecule of the detergent n-octyl-β-D-glucoside is observed in the D-cage, which comprises three sets of Asp361 and Asp371 residues at the periplasmic entrance. These structural insights <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a possible substrate transport mechanism in which the substrate first binds at the periplasmic entrance of ST50 and subsequently, via iris-like structural movements to open the periplasmic end, penetrates the periplasmic domain for efflux pumping of molecules, including poisonous metabolites or xenobiotics, for excretion outside the pathogen. PMID:26563565</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JHEP...03..077N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JHEP...03..077N"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> and entanglement entropy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nishioka, Tatsuma; Yarom, Amos</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>We initiate a systematic study of entanglement and Rényi entropies in the presence of gauge and gravitational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in even-dimensional quantum field theories. We argue that the mixed and gravitational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are sensitive to boosts and obtain a closed form expression for their behavior under such transformations. Explicit constructions exhibiting the dependence of entanglement entropy on boosts is provided for theories on spacetimes with non-trivial magnetic fluxes and (or) non-vanishing Pontryagin classes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2048566','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2048566"><span id="translatedtitle">Risk of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in pregnant users of statin drugs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ofori, Benjamin; Rey, Evelyne; Bérard, Anick</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>What is already known about this subject Cholesterol is known to be essential for fetal development. Statins, which inhibit cholesterol production, have therefore been considered as <span class="hlt">potential</span> teratogens and are contraindicated in pregnancy. Data available thus far on the risks of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with statin therapy have come from non-analytic postmarketing surveillance studies. Given the increasing use of statins in women of childbearing age, there is a need for a population-based study on the risks of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with gestational statin use. What this study adds In this pharmacoepidemiological study, we determined the risk of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in women who filled prescriptions for statins during the first trimester of pregnancy, compared with women who had stopped statins before pregnancy or those who used fibrates during pregnancy. We found no evidence of an increased risk of fetal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> among first-trimester statin users, or any discernable pattern of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> among live births. However, in the absence of outcome data on nonlive births, conclusions remain uncertain. Aims Evidence from animal studies <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that statin medications should not be taken during pregnancy. Our aim was to examine the association between the use of statins in early pregnancy and the incidence of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Methods A population-based pregnancy registry was built. Three study groups were assembled: women prescribed statins in the first trimester (group A), fibrate/nicotinic acid in the first trimester (group B) and statins between 1 year and 1 month before conception, but not during pregnancy (group C). Among live-born infants, we selected as cases infants with any congenital <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> diagnosed in the first year of life. Controls were defined as infants with no congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The rate of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the respective groups was calculated. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were also calculated. Results Our study group consisted of 288 pregnant women. Among women with a live birth, the rate of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> was 3/64 (4.69%; 95% CI 1.00, 13.69) in group A, 3/14 in group B (21.43%; 95% CI 4.41, 62.57) and 7/67 in group C (10.45%; 95% CI 4.19, 21.53). The adjusted OR for congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in group A compared with group C was 0.36 (95% CI 0.06, 2.18). Conclusion We did not detect a pattern in fetal congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> or evidence of an increased risk in the live-born infants of women filling prescriptions for statins in the first trimester of pregnancy. Conclusions, however, remain uncertain in the absence of data from nonlive births. PMID:17506782</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26107416','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26107416"><span id="translatedtitle">Differential expression of id genes and their <span class="hlt">potential</span> regulator znf238 in zebrafish adult neural progenitor cells and neurons <span class="hlt">suggests</span> distinct functions in adult neurogenesis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Diotel, Nicolas; Beil, Tanja; Strhle, Uwe; Rastegar, Sepand</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Teleost fish display a remarkable ability to generate new neurons and to repair brain lesions during adulthood. They are, therefore, a very popular model to investigate the molecular mechanisms of constitutive and induced neurogenesis in adult vertebrates. In this study, we investigated the expression patterns of inhibitor of DNA binding (id) genes and of their <span class="hlt">potential</span> transcriptional repressor, znf238, in the whole brain of adult zebrafish. We show that while id1 is exclusively expressed in ventricular cells in the whole brain, id2a, id3 and id4 genes are expressed in broader areas. Interestingly, znf238 was also detected in these regions, its expression overlapping with id2a, id3 and id4 expression. Further detailed characterization of the id-expressing cells demonstrated that (a) id1 is expressed in type 1 and type 2 neural progenitors as previously published, (b) id2a in type 1, 2 and 3 neural progenitors, (c) id3 in type 3 neural progenitors and (d) id4 in postmitotic neurons. Our data provide a detailed map of id and znf238 expression in the brain of adult zebrafish, supplying a framework for studies of id genes function during adult neurogenesis and brain regeneration in the zebrafish. PMID:26107416</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2745651','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2745651"><span id="translatedtitle">Suppressed neuroendocrine stress response in depressed women on job-stress related long-term sick-leave: A stable marker <span class="hlt">potentially</span> <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> of pre-existing vulnerability</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wahlberg, Kristina; Ghatan, Per Hamid; Modell, Sieglinde; Nygren, Åke; Ingvar, Martin; Åsberg, Marie; Heilig, Markus</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Background We recently reported marked hyporeactivity of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in depressed females on job-stress related long-term sick-leave (LTSL). This unexpected finding prompted the question whether HPA-axis hypofunction in this group results from stress exposure, or reflects pre-existing vulnerability. Here, as a first step toward addressing this question, we assessed temporal stability of HPA-axis reactivity in these subjects. Methods We used the combined dexamethasone/corticotropin-releasing hormone (DEX-CRH) test to retest HPA-axis reactivity in 29 patients and 27 controls after 12 months follow-up. Clinical status and cognitive performance was also retested. Results Despite marked clinical improvement, and normalization of initially observed impairments in attention and working memory, marked HPA-axis hyporeactivity persisted in patients. A high test – retest correlation was found both at the level of ACTH (R=0.85, p<0.001) and cortisol (R=0.76, p<0.001) responses. Conclusions Hyporeactivity of the HPA was stable over 12 months in LTSL subjects, independently of clinical improvement and normalized cognitive function. The stability of this response over time <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that decreased DEX-CRH responses in this group may be a trait rather than a state marker. This finding is compatible with a hypothesis that HPA-axis hyporeactivity may reflect a pre-existing vulnerability in these subjects. PMID:19058782</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26655277','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26655277"><span id="translatedtitle">Blocking FGF2 with a new specific monoclonal antibody impairs angiogenesis and experimental metastatic melanoma, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> a <span class="hlt">potential</span> role in adjuvant settings.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>de Aguiar, Rodrigo Barbosa; Parise, Carolina Bellini; Souza, Carolina Rosal Teixeira; Braggion, Camila; Quintilio, Wagner; Moro, Ana Maria; Navarro Marques, Fabio Luiz; Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto; Chammas, Roger; de Moraes, Jane Zveiter</p> <p>2016-02-28</p> <p>Compelling evidence <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), overexpressed in melanomas, plays an important role in tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic use of a new anti-FGF2 monoclonal antibody (mAb), 3F12E7, using for that the B16-F10 melanoma model. The FGF2 neutralizing effect of this antibody was certified by in vitro assays, which allowed the further track of its possible in vivo application. 3F12E7 mAb could be retained in B16-F10 tumors, as shown by antibody low-pH elution and nuclear medicine studies, and also led to reduction in number and size of metastatic foci in lungs, when treatment starts one day after intravenous injection of B16-F10 cells. Such data were accompanied by decreased CD34(+) tumor vascular density and impaired subcutaneous tumor outgrowth. Treatments starting one week after melanoma cell intravenous injection did not reduce tumor burden, remaining the therapeutic effectiveness restricted to early-adopted regimens. Altogether, the presented anti-FGF2 3F12E7 mAb stands as a promising agent to treat metastatic melanoma tumors in adjuvant settings. PMID:26655277</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22462379','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22462379"><span id="translatedtitle">Differences Between Colon Cancer Primaries and Metastases Using a Molecular Assay for Tumor Radiation Sensitivity <span class="hlt">Suggest</span> Implications for <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Oligometastatic SBRT Patient Selection</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Ahmed, Kamran A.; Fulp, William J.; Berglund, Anders E.; Hoffe, Sarah E.; Dilling, Thomas J.; Eschrich, Steven A.; Shridhar, Ravi; Torres-Roca, Javier F.</p> <p>2015-07-15</p> <p>Purpose: We previously developed a multigene expression model of tumor radiation sensitivity index (RSI) with clinical validation in multiple independent cohorts (breast, rectal, esophageal, and head and neck patients). The purpose of this study was to assess differences between RSI scores in primary colon cancer and metastases. Methods and Materials: Patients were identified from our institutional review board–approved prospective observational protocol. A total of 704 metastatic and 1362 primary lesions were obtained from a de-identified metadata pool. RSI was calculated using the previously published rank-based algorithm. An independent cohort of 29 lung or liver colon metastases treated with 60 Gy in 5 fractions stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) was used for validation. Results: The most common sites of metastases included liver (n=374; 53%), lung (n=116; 17%), and lymph nodes (n=40; 6%). Sixty percent of metastatic tumors, compared with 54% of primaries, were in the RSI radiation-resistant peak, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> metastatic tumors may be slightly more radiation resistant than primaries (P=.01). In contrast, when we analyzed metastases based on anatomical site, we uncovered large differences in RSI. The median RSIs for metastases in descending order of radiation resistance were ovary (0.48), abdomen (0.47), liver (0.43), brain (0.42), lung (0.32), and lymph nodes (0.31) (P<.0001). These findings were confirmed when the analysis was restricted to lesions from the same patient (n=139). In our independent cohort of treated lung and liver metastases, lung metastases had an improved local control rate compared to that in patients with liver metastases (2-year local control rate of 100% vs 73.0%, respectively; P=.026). Conclusions: Assessment of radiation sensitivity between primary and metastatic tissues of colon cancer histology revealed significant differences based on anatomical location of metastases. These initial results warrant validation in a larger clinical cohort.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26719367','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26719367"><span id="translatedtitle">Elevated Nuclear and Cytoplasmic FTY720-Phosphate in Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts <span class="hlt">Suggests</span> the <span class="hlt">Potential</span> for Multiple Mechanisms in FTY720-Induced Neural Tube Defects.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gardner, Nicole M; Riley, Ronald T; Showker, Jency L; Voss, Kenneth A; Sachs, Andrew J; Maddox, Joyce R; Gelineau-van Waes, Janee B</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>FTY720 (fingolimod) is a U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved drug to treat relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis. FTY720 treatment in pregnant inbred LM/Bc mice results in approximately 60% of embryos having a neural tube defect (NTD). Sphingosine kinases (Sphk1, Sphk2) phosphorylate FTY720 in vivo to form the bioactive metabolite FTY720-1-phosphate (FTY720-P). Cytoplasmic FTY720-P is an agonist for 4 of the 5 sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptors (S1P1, 3-5) and can also act as a functional antagonist of S1P1, whereas FTY720-P generated in the nucleus inhibits histone deacetylases (HDACs), leading to increased histone acetylation. This study demonstrates that treatment of LM/Bc mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with FTY720 results in a significant accumulation of FTY720-P in both the cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments. Elevated nuclear FTY720-P is associated with decreased HDAC activity and increased histone acetylation at H3K18 and H3K23 in LM/Bc MEFs. Treatment of LM/Bc MEFs with FTY720 and a selective Sphk2 inhibitor, ABC294640, significantly reduces the amount of FTY720-P that accumulates in the nucleus. The data provide insight into the relative amounts of FTY720-P generated in the nuclear versus cytoplasmic subcellular compartments after FTY720 treatment and the specific Sphk isoforms involved. The results of this study <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that FTY720-induced NTDs may involve multiple mechanisms, including: (1) sustained and/or altered S1P receptor activation and signaling by FTY720-P produced in the cytoplasm and (2) HDAC inhibition and histone hyperacetylation by FTY720-P generated in the nucleus that could lead to epigenetic changes in gene regulation. PMID:26719367</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_7 --> <div id="page_8" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="141"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4144667','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4144667"><span id="translatedtitle">Body-on-a-Chip Simulation with Gastrointestinal Tract and Liver Tissues <span class="hlt">Suggests</span> that Ingested Nanoparticles Have the <span class="hlt">Potential</span> to Cause Liver Injury</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Esch, Mandy B.; Mahler, Gretchen J.; Stokol, Tracy; Shuler, Michael L.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The use of nanoparticles in medical applications is highly anticipated, and at the same time little is known about how these nanoparticles affect human tissues. Here we have simulated the oral uptake of 50 nm carboxylated polystyrene nanoparticles with a microscale, body-on-a-chip system (also referred to as multi-tissue microphysiological system or micro Cell Culture Analog). Using this system, we combined in vitro models of the human intestinal epithelium, represented by a co-culture of enterocytes (Caco-2) and mucin-producing (HT29-MTX) cells, and the liver, represented by HepG2/C3A cells, within one microfluidic device. The device also contained chambers that together represented all other organs of the human body. Measuring the transport of 50 nm carboxylated polystyrene nanoparticles across the Caco-2/HT29-MTX co-culture, we have found that this multi-cell layer presents an effective barrier to 90.5 ± 2.9% of the nanoparticles. Further, our simulation <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that a larger fraction of the 9.5 ± 2.9% of nanoparticles that travelled across the Caco-2/HT29-MTX cell layer were not large nanoparticle aggregates, but primarily single nanoparticles and small aggregates. After crossing the GI tract epithelium, nanoparticles that were administered in high doses estimated in terms of possible daily human consumption (240 and 480 × 1011 nanoparticles/mL) induced the release of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), an intracellular enzyme of the liver that indicates liver cell injury. Using the GI ‘tract – liver – other tissue’ system allowed us to observe compounding effects and detect liver tissue injury at lower nanoparticle concentrations than expected from experiments with liver tissue only. Our results indicate that body-on-a-chip devices are highly relevant in vitro models for evaluating nanoparticle interactions with human tissues. PMID:24970651</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009IAU...261.0702A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009IAU...261.0702A"><span id="translatedtitle">Astrometric Solar-System <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Anderson, John D.</p> <p>2009-05-01</p> <p>There are four unexplained <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> connected with astrometric data. Perhaps the most disturbing is the fact that when a spacecraft on a flyby trajectory approaches the Earth within 2000 km or less, it experiences a gain in total orbital energy per unit mass (Anderson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 091102). This amounts to a net velocity increase of 13.5 mm/s for the NEAR spacecraft at a closest approach of 539 km, 3.9 mm/s for the Galileo spacecraft at 960 km, and 1.8 mm/s for the Rosetta spacecraft at 1956 km. Next, I <span class="hlt">suggest</span> the change in the astronomical unit AU is definitely a concern. It is increasing by about 15 cm/yr (Krasinsky and Brumberg, Celes. Mech. & Dynam. Astron. 90, 267). The other two <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are perhaps less disturbing because of known sources of nongravitational acceleration. The first is an apparent slowing of the two Pioneer spacecraft as they exit the solar system in opposite directions (Anderson et al., Phys. Rev. D 65, 082004). Some, including me, are convinced this effect is of concern, but many are convinced it is produced by a nearly identical thermal emission from both spacecraft, in a direction away from the Sun, thereby producing acceleration toward the Sun. The fourth <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is a measured increase in the eccentricity of the Moon's orbit. Here again, an increase is expected from tidal friction in both the Earth and Moon. However, there is a reported increase that is about three times larger than expected (J. G. Williams, DDA/AAS Brouwer Award Lecture, Halifax, Nova Scotia 2006). We suspect that all four <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> have mundane explanations. However, the possibility that they will be explained by a new theory of gravitation is not ruled out, perhaps analogous to Einstein's 1916 explanation of the excess precession of Mercury's perihelion.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25380529','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25380529"><span id="translatedtitle">Limbal Fibroblasts Maintain Normal Phenotype in 3D RAFT Tissue Equivalents <span class="hlt">Suggesting</span> <span class="hlt">Potential</span> for Safe Clinical Use in Treatment of Ocular Surface Failure.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Massie, Isobel; Dale, Sarah B; Daniels, Julie T</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>Limbal epithelial stem cell deficiency can cause blindness, but transplantation of these cells on a carrier such as human amniotic membrane can restore vision. Unfortunately, clinical graft manufacture using amnion can be inconsistent. Therefore, we have developed an alternative substrate, Real Architecture for 3D Tissue (RAFT), which supports human limbal epithelial cells (hLE) expansion. Epithelial organization is improved when human limbal fibroblasts (hLF) are incorporated into RAFT tissue equivalent (TE). However, hLF have the <span class="hlt">potential</span> to transdifferentiate into a pro-scarring cell type, which would be incompatible with therapeutic transplantation. The aim of this work was to assess the scarring phenotype of hLF in RAFT TEs in hLE+ and hLE- RAFT TEs and in nonairlifted and airlifted RAFT TEs. Diseased fibroblasts (dFib) isolated from the fibrotic conjunctivae of ocular mucous membrane pemphigoid (Oc-MMP) patients were used as a pro-scarring positive control against which hLF were compared using surrogate scarring parameters: matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, de novo collagen synthesis, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression, and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) secretion. Normal hLF and dFib maintained different phenotypes in RAFT TE. MMP-2 and -9 activity, de novo collagen synthesis, and α-SMA expression were all increased in dFib cf. normal hLF RAFT TEs, although TGF-β1 secretion did not differ between normal hLF and dFib RAFT TEs. Normal hLF do not progress toward a scarring-like phenotype during culture in RAFT TEs and, therefore, may be safe to include in therapeutic RAFT TE, where they can support hLE, although in vivo work is required to confirm this. dFib RAFT TEs (used in this study as a positive control) may be useful toward the development of an ex vivo disease model of Oc-MMP. PMID:25380529</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20040171195','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20040171195"><span id="translatedtitle">Identification of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections at 1 AU Using Multiple Solar Wind Plasma Composition <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>We investigate the use of multiple simultaneous solar wind plasma compositional <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, relative to the composition of the ambient solar wind, for identifying interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) plasma. We first summarize the characteristics of several solar wind plasma composition signatures (O(+7)/O(+6), Mg/O, Ne/O, Fe charge states, He/p) observed by the ACE and WIND spacecraft within the ICMEs during 1996 - 2002 identsed by Cane and Richardson. We then develop a set of simple criteria that may be used to identify such compositional <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and hence <span class="hlt">potential</span> ICMEs. To distinguish these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from the normal variations seen in ambient solar wind composition, which depend on the wind speed, we compare observed compositional signatures with those 'expected' in ambient solar wind with the same solar wind speed. This method identifies <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> more effectively than the use of fixed thresholds. The occurrence rates of individual composition <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> within ICMEs range from approx. 70% for enhanced iron and oxygen charge states to approx. 30% for enhanced He/p (> 0.06) and Ne/O, and are generally higher in magnetic clouds than other ICMEs. Intervals of multiple <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are usually associated with ICMEs, and provide a basis for the identification of the majority of ICMEs. We estimate that Cane and Richardson, who did not refer to composition data, probably identitied approx. 90% of the ICMEs present. However, around 10% of their ICMEs have weak compositional <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that the presence of such signatures does not provide a necessary requirement for an ICME. We note a remarkably similar correlation between the Mg/O and O(7)/O(6) ratios in hourly-averaged data both within ICMEs and the ambient solar wind. This 'universal' relationship <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that a similar process (such as minor ion heating by waves inside coronal magnetic field loops) produces the first-ionization <span class="hlt">potential</span> bias and ion freezing-in temperatures in the source regions of both ICMEs and the ambient solar wind.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23878335','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23878335"><span id="translatedtitle">Response of African humid tropical forests to recent rainfall <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Asefi-Najafabady, Salvi; Saatchi, Sassan</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>During the last decade, strong negative rainfall <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> resulting from increased sea surface temperature in the tropical Atlantic have caused extensive droughts in rainforests of western Amazonia, exerting persistent effects on the forest canopy. In contrast, there have been no significant impacts on rainforests of West and Central Africa during the same period, despite large-scale droughts and rainfall <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> during the same period. Using a combination of rainfall observations from meteorological stations from the Climate Research Unit (CRU; 1950-2009) and satellite observations of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM; 1998-2010), we show that West and Central Africa experienced strong negative water deficit (WD) <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over the last decade, particularly in 2005, 2006 and 2007. These <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were a continuation of an increasing drying trend in the region that started in the 1970s. We monitored the response of forests to extreme rainfall <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the past decade by analysing the microwave scatterometer data from QuickSCAT (1999-2009) sensitive to variations in canopy water content and structure. Unlike in Amazonia, we found no significant impacts of extreme WD events on forests of Central Africa, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> adaptability of these forests to short-term severe droughts. Only forests near the savanna boundary in West Africa and in fragmented landscapes of the northern Congo Basin responded to extreme droughts with widespread canopy disturbance that lasted only during the period of WD. Time-series analyses of CRU and TRMM data show most regions in Central and West Africa experience seasonal or decadal extreme WDs (less than -600 mm). We hypothesize that the long-term historical extreme WDs with gradual drying trends in the 1970s have increased the adaptability of humid tropical forests in Africa to droughts. PMID:23878335</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/990773','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/990773"><span id="translatedtitle">Astrometric solar system <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Nieto, Michael Martin; Anderson, John D</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>There are at least four unexplained <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> connected with astrometric data. perhaps the most disturbing is the fact that when a spacecraft on a flyby trajectory approaches the Earth within 2000 km or less, it often experiences a change in total orbital energy per unit mass. next, a secular change in the astronomical unit AU is definitely a concern. It is increasing by about 15 cm yr{sup -1}. The other two <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are perhaps less disturbing because of known sources of nongravitational acceleration. The first is an apparent slowing of the two Pioneer spacecraft as they exit the solar system in opposite directions. Some astronomers and physicists are convinced this effect is of concern, but many others are convinced it is produced by a nearly identical thermal emission from both spacecraft, in a direction away from the Sun, thereby producing acceleration toward the Sun. The fourth <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is a measured increase in the eccentricity of the Moon's orbit. Here again, an increase is expected from tidal friction in both the Earth and Moon. However, there is a reported unexplained increase that is significant at the three-sigma level. It is produent to suspect that all four <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> have mundane explanations, or that one or more <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are a result of systematic error. Yet they might eventually be explained by new physics. For example, a slightly modified theory of gravitation is not ruled out, perhaps analogous to Einstein's 1916 explanation for the excess precession of Mercury's perihelion.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/peters-anomaly','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/peters-anomaly"><span id="translatedtitle">Genetics Home Reference: Peters <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... individuals affected with Peters <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> have low vision early in life and about a quarter are legally blind. Due to a lack of visual stimulation, some individuals develop "lazy eye" (amblyopia). Peters <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=tac&pg=7&id=EJ346869','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=tac&pg=7&id=EJ346869"><span id="translatedtitle">Open to <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Journal of Reading, 1987</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>Offers (1) <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for improving college students' study skills; (2) a system for keeping track of parent, teacher, and community contacts; (3) <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for motivating students using tic tac toe; (4) <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for using etymology to improve word retention; (5) a word search grid; and (6) <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for using postcards in remedial reading</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=TIC+AND+education&pg=5&id=EJ346869','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=TIC+AND+education&pg=5&id=EJ346869"><span id="translatedtitle">Open to <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Journal of Reading, 1987</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>Offers (1) <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for improving college students' study skills; (2) a system for keeping track of parent, teacher, and community contacts; (3) <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for motivating students using tic tac toe; (4) <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for using etymology to improve word retention; (5) a word search grid; and (6) <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for using postcards in remedial reading…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvD..93e5028S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvD..93e5028S"><span id="translatedtitle">Understanding diboson <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sajjad, Aqil</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>We conduct a model-independent effective theory analysis of hypercharged fields with various spin structures towards understanding the diboson excess found in LHC run I, as well as possible future <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> involving W Z and W H modes. Within the assumption of no additional physics beyond the standard model up to the scale of the possible diboson resonance, we show that a hypercharged scalar and a spin 2 particle do not have tree-level W Z and W H decay channels up to dimension 5 operators, and cannot therefore account for the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, whereas a hypercharged vector is a viable candidate provided we also introduce a Z' in order to satisfy electroweak precision constraints. We calculate bounds on the Z' mass consistent with the ATLAS/CMS diboson signals as well as electroweak precision data, taking into account both LHC run I and II data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2894498','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2894498"><span id="translatedtitle">Peters' <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> – Anaesthetic Management</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>M, Senthilkumar; V, Darlong; Punj, Jyotsna; Pandey, Ravinder</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Summary Peters' <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> occurs as an isolated ocular abnormality, in association with other systemic abnormality or one component of a number of well-defined syndromes. We review our experience of anaesthetic management and systemic association of peters' <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. To the best of our knowledge there are no reports in the literature of Peters' <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> with relevant to anaesthesia. PMID:20640218</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20030112411','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20030112411"><span id="translatedtitle">Paleo-Pole Positions from Martian Magnetic <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Taylor, Patrick T.; Frawley, James J.</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Magnetic component <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> maps were made from five mapping cycles of the Mars Global Surveyor s magnetometer data. Our goal was to find and isolate positive and negative <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> pairs which would indicate magnetization of a single source body. From these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> we could compute the direction of the magnetizing vector and subsequently the location of the magnetic pole existing at the time of magnetization. We found nine suitable <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> pairs and from these we computed four North and 3 South poles with two at approximately 60 degrees north latitude. These results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that during the existence of the Martian main magnetic field it experienced several reversals.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20040171626','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20040171626"><span id="translatedtitle">Paleo-Pole Positions from Martian Magnetic <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Frawley, James J.; Taylor, Patrick T.</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>Magnetic component <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> maps were made from five mapping cycles of the Mars Global Surveyor's magnetometer data. Our goal was to find and isolate positive and negative <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> pairs which would indicate magnetization of a single source body. From these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> we could compute the direction of the magnetizing vector and subsequently the location of the magnetic pole existing at the time of magnetization. We found nine suitable <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> pairs and from these we computed paleo-poles that were nearly equally divided between north, south and mid-latitudes. These results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that during the existence of the martian main magnetic field it experienced several reversals and excursions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850023285&hterms=oceanic+crust&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Doceanic%2Bcrust','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850023285&hterms=oceanic+crust&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Doceanic%2Bcrust"><span id="translatedtitle">Continental and oceanic magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: Enhancement through GRM</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>In contrast to the POGO and MAGSAT satellites, the Geopotential Research Mission (GRM) satellite system will orbit at a minimum elevation to provide significantly better resolved lithospheric magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for more detailed and improved geologic analysis. In addition, GRM will measure corresponding gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to enhance our understanding of the gravity field for vast regions of the Earth which are largely inaccessible to more conventional surface mapping. Crustal studies will greatly benefit from the dual data sets as modeling has shown that lithospheric sources of long-wavelength magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> frequently involve density variations which may produce detectable gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at satellite elevations. Furthermore, GRM will provide an important replication of lithospheric magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> as an aid to identifying and extracting these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from satellite magnetic measurements. The <span class="hlt">potential</span> benefits to the study of the origin and characterization of the continents and oceans, that may result from the increased GRM resolution are examined.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20060031802&hterms=deutsch&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Ddeutsch','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20060031802&hterms=deutsch&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Ddeutsch"><span id="translatedtitle">Resolving the Cassini/Huygens relay <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Deutsch, L. J.</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>A test using NASA's DSN to mimic the probe's signal was performed in 2000 and uncovered an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> that, unchecked, would result in nearly complete loss of the Huygens mission. This led to a <span class="hlt">suggested</span> modification to the Cassini trajectory that will result in nearly complete data return for Huygens with minimal impact on Cassini.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3031181','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3031181"><span id="translatedtitle">Pathogenesis of Vascular <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Boon, Laurence M.; Ballieux, Fanny; Vikkula, Miikka</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Vascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are localized defects of vascular development. Most of them occur sporadically, i.e. there is no familial history of lesions, yet in a few cases clear inheritance is observed. These inherited forms are often characterized by multifocal lesions that are mainly small in size and increase in number with patient’s age. On the basis of these inherited forms, molecular genetic studies have unraveled a number of inherited mutations giving direct insight into the pathophysiological cause and the molecular pathways that are implicated. Genetic defects have been identified for hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), inherited cutaneomucosal venous malformation (VMCM), glomuvenous malformation (GVM), capillary malformation - arteriovenous malformation (CM-AVM), cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) and some isolated and syndromic forms of primary lymphedema. We focus on these disorders, the implicated mutated genes and the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. We also call attention to the concept of Knudson’s double-hit mechanism to explain incomplete penetrance and the large clinical variation in expressivity of inherited vascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. This variability renders the making of correct diagnosis of the rare inherited forms difficult. Yet, the identification of the pathophysiological causes and pathways involved in them has had an unprecedented impact on our thinking of their etiopathogenesis, and has opened the doors towards a more refined classification of vascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. It has also made it possible to develop animal models that can be tested for specific molecular therapies, aimed at alleviating the dysfunctions caused by the aberrant genes and proteins. PMID:21095468</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4395516','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4395516"><span id="translatedtitle">Whole exome sequence analysis of Peters <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Weh, Eric; Reis, Linda M.; Happ, Hannah C.; Levin, Alex V.; Wheeler, Patricia G.; David, Karen L.; Carney, Erin; Angle, Brad; Hauser, Natalie</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Peters <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is a rare form of anterior segment ocular dysgenesis, which can also be associated with additional systemic defects. At this time, the majority of cases of Peters <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> lack a genetic diagnosis. We performed whole exome sequencing of 27 patients with syndromic or isolated Peters <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> to search for pathogenic mutations in currently known ocular genes. Among the eight previously recognized Peters <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> genes, we identified a de novo missense mutation in PAX6, c.155G>A, p.(Cys52Tyr), in one patient. Analysis of 691 additional genes currently associated with a different ocular phenotype identified a heterozygous splicing mutation c.1025+2T>A in TFAP2A, a de novo heterozygous nonsense mutation c.715C>T, p.(Gln239*) in HCCS, a hemizygous mutation c.385G>A, p.(Glu129Lys) in NDP, a hemizygous mutation c.3446C>T, p.(Pro1149Leu) in FLNA, and compound heterozygous mutations c.1422T>A, p.(Tyr474*) and c.2544G>A, p.(Met848Ile) in SLC4A11; all mutations, except for the FLNA and SLC4A11 c.2544G>A alleles, are novel. This is the frst study to use whole exome sequencing to discern the genetic etiology of a large cohort of patients with syndromic or isolated Peters <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. We report five new genes associated with this condition and <span class="hlt">suggest</span> screening of TFAP2A and FLNA in patients with Peters <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and relevant syndromic features and HCCS, NDP and SLC4A11 in patients with isolated Peters <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. PMID:25182519</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4078216','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4078216"><span id="translatedtitle">A Review of Vascular <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>: Genetics and Common Syndromes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Killion, Elizabeth; Mohan, Kriti; Lee, Edward I.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Vascular tumors and malformations are unique in that affected cells exhibit disrupted angiogenesis. The current treatment options often yield suboptimal results. New insight into the genetics and molecular basis of vascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may pave the way for <span class="hlt">potential</span> development of targeted therapy. The authors review the genetic and molecular basis of vascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and common associated syndromes. PMID:25045331</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009cip..book..101S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009cip..book..101S"><span id="translatedtitle">Modeling And Detecting <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> In Scada Systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Svendsen, Nils; Wolthusen, Stephen</p> <p></p> <p>The detection of attacks and intrusions based on <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is hampered by the limits of specificity underlying the detection techniques. However, in the case of many critical infrastructure systems, domain-specific knowledge and models can impose constraints that <span class="hlt">potentially</span> reduce error rates. At the same time, attackers can use their knowledge of system behavior to mask their manipulations, causing adverse effects to observed only after a significant period of time. This paper describes elementary statistical techniques that can be applied to detect <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in critical infrastructure networks. A SCADA system employed in liquefied natural gas (LNG) production is used as a case study.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19890035505&hterms=hydrogeology&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dhydrogeology','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19890035505&hterms=hydrogeology&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dhydrogeology"><span id="translatedtitle">The source of marine magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Harrison, Christopher G. A.</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>The Vine-Matthews hypothesis (1963) is examined. This hypothesis <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that oceanic rocks become polarized in the direction of the magnetic field at the time of their formation, thus recording the polarity history of the earth's magnetic field. This produces the lineated magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on either side of the midoceanic ridge crests. The strength of these magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is studied to determine the strength of magnetization. Indirect determinations of the magnetization intensity of the oceanic crust and direct observations of the oceanic crust are compared. It is found that the average magnetization of a 6-km thick oceanic crust is 1.18 A/m.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_8 --> <div id="page_9" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="161"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24231863','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24231863"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> detection and localization in crowded scenes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Li, Weixin; Mahadevan, Vijay; Vasconcelos, Nuno</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The detection and localization of anomalous behaviors in crowded scenes is considered, and a joint detector of temporal and spatial <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is proposed. The proposed detector is based on a video representation that accounts for both appearance and dynamics, using a set of mixture of dynamic textures models. These models are used to implement 1) a center-surround discriminant saliency detector that produces spatial saliency scores, and 2) a model of normal behavior that is learned from training data and produces temporal saliency scores. Spatial and temporal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> maps are then defined at multiple spatial scales, by considering the scores of these operators at progressively larger regions of support. The multiscale scores act as <span class="hlt">potentials</span> of a conditional random field that guarantees global consistency of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> judgments. A data set of densely crowded pedestrian walkways is introduced and used to evaluate the proposed <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detector. Experiments on this and other data sets show that the latter achieves state-of-the-art <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection results. PMID:24231863</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26969232','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26969232"><span id="translatedtitle">Gynecologic concerns in patients with cloacal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Breech, Lesley</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Children with anorectal malformations (ARM) constitute a significant group within a pediatric surgery practice. It is important with female cases of anorectal malformations to consider the association of gynecologic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, especially at the time of the definitive repair. However, it is critical to consider the association of such gynecologic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> when caring for patients with a cloacal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. If not recognized, an opportunity to diagnose and treat such <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may be missed with the possibility of negative implications for future reproductive capacity. With the knowledge of the associated <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and long-term sequelae, surgeons can provide better care for girls and important counseling for parents. Knowledge of reproductive related issues in females with cloaca allows the pediatric surgeon an opportunity both, to provide optimal surgical management in infancy, childhood, and into young adulthood and to collaborate medically and surgically with an experienced gynecologist in patients with more complex anatomic variations. Appropriate counseling for patients and families about <span class="hlt">potential</span> reproductive concerns that may develop many years after the definitive surgical repair allows preparation and planning to preserve future fertility. PMID:26969232</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850023286&hterms=pangea&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dpangea','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850023286&hterms=pangea&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dpangea"><span id="translatedtitle">Continental magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> constraints on continental reconstruction</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.; Olivier, R.; Bentley, C. R.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>Crustal magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> mapped by the MAGSAT satellite for North and South America, Europe, Africa, India, Australia and Antarctica and adjacent marine areas were adjusted to a common elevation of 400 km and differentially reduced to the radial pole of intensity 60,000 nT. These radially polarized <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are normalized for differential inclination, declination and intensity effects of the geomagnetic field, so that in principle they directly reflected the geometric and magnetic polarization attributes of sources which include regional petrologic variations of the crust and upper mantle, and crustal thickness and thermal perturbations. Continental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> demonstrate remarkably detailed correlation of regional magnetic sources across rifted margins when plotted on a reconstruction of Pangea. Accordingly, they <span class="hlt">suggest</span> further fundamental constraints on the geologic evolution of the continents and their reconstructions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20090010275','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20090010275"><span id="translatedtitle">Hyperbolic Orbits and the Planetary Flylby <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Wilson, T.L.; Blome, H.J.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Space probes in the Solar System have experienced unexpected changes in velocity known as the flyby <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> [1], as well as shifts in acceleration referred to as the Pioneer <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> [2-4]. In the case of Earth flybys, ESA s Rosetta spacecraft experienced the flyby effect and NASA s Galileo and NEAR satellites did the same, although MESSENGER did not possibly due to a latitudinal property of gravity assists. Measurements indicate that both <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> exist, and explanations have varied from the unconventional to <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> that new physics in the form of dark matter might be the cause of both [5]. Although dark matter has been studied for over 30 years, there is as yet no strong experimental evidence supporting it [6]. The existence of dark matter will certainly have a significant impact upon ideas regarding the origin of the Solar System. Hence, the subject is very relevant to planetary science. We will point out here that one of the fundamental problems in science, including planetary physics, is consistency. Using the well-known virial theorem in astrophysics, it will be shown that present-day concepts of orbital mechanics and cosmology are not consistent for reasons having to do with the flyby <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Therefore, the basic solution regarding the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> should begin with addressing the inconsistencies first before introducing new physics.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3812595','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3812595"><span id="translatedtitle">Advancements of Data <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection Research in Wireless Sensor Networks: A Survey and Open Issues</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Rassam, Murad A.; Zainal, Anazida; Maarof, Mohd Aizaini</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are important and necessary platforms for the future as the concept “Internet of Things” has emerged lately. They are used for monitoring, tracking, or controlling of many applications in industry, health care, habitat, and military. However, the quality of data collected by sensor nodes is affected by <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that occur due to various reasons, such as node failures, reading errors, unusual events, and malicious attacks. Therefore, <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection is a necessary process to ensure the quality of sensor data before it is utilized for making decisions. In this review, we present the challenges of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection in WSNs and state the requirements to design efficient and effective <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection models. We then review the latest advancements of data <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection research in WSNs and classify current detection approaches in five main classes based on the detection methods used to design these approaches. Varieties of the state-of-the-art models for each class are covered and their limitations are highlighted to provide ideas for <span class="hlt">potential</span> future works. Furthermore, the reviewed approaches are compared and evaluated based on how well they meet the stated requirements. Finally, the general limitations of current approaches are mentioned and further research opportunities are <span class="hlt">suggested</span> and discussed. PMID:23966182</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23966182','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23966182"><span id="translatedtitle">Advancements of data <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection research in wireless sensor networks: a survey and open issues.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rassam, Murad A; Zainal, Anazida; Maarof, Mohd Aizaini</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are important and necessary platforms for the future as the concept "Internet of Things" has emerged lately. They are used for monitoring, tracking, or controlling of many applications in industry, health care, habitat, and military. However, the quality of data collected by sensor nodes is affected by <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that occur due to various reasons, such as node failures, reading errors, unusual events, and malicious attacks. Therefore, <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection is a necessary process to ensure the quality of sensor data before it is utilized for making decisions. In this review, we present the challenges of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection in WSNs and state the requirements to design efficient and effective <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection models. We then review the latest advancements of data <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection research in WSNs and classify current detection approaches in five main classes based on the detection methods used to design these approaches. Varieties of the state-of-the-art models for each class are covered and their limitations are highlighted to provide ideas for <span class="hlt">potential</span> future works. Furthermore, the reviewed approaches are compared and evaluated based on how well they meet the stated requirements. Finally, the general limitations of current approaches are mentioned and further research opportunities are <span class="hlt">suggested</span> and discussed. PMID:23966182</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=let+AND+go&pg=2&id=EJ903423','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=let+AND+go&pg=2&id=EJ903423"><span id="translatedtitle">The Life of <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Pearce, Cathie</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Using the notion of a <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>, or rather charting the life of <span class="hlt">suggestions</span>, this article considers the happenings of chance and embodiment as the "problems that got away." The life of <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> helps us to ask how connectivities are made, how desire functions, and how "immanence" rather than "transcendence" can open up the politics and ethics…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19986306','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19986306"><span id="translatedtitle">Theories of <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Brown, W</p> <p>1928-02-01</p> <p>The word "<span class="hlt">suggestion</span>" has been used in educational, scientific and medical literature in slightly different senses. In psychological medicine the use of <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> has developed out of the earlier use of hypnotic influence.Charcot defined hypnosis as an artificial hysteria, Bernheim as an artificially increased <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>. The two definitions need to be combined to give an adequate account of hypnosis. Moreover, due allowance should be made for the factors of dissociation and of rapport in hypnotic phenomena.The relationships between dissociation, <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>, and hypnotizability.Theories of <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> propounded by Pierre Janet, Freud, McDougall, Pawlow and others. Ernest Jones's theory of the nature of auto-<span class="hlt">suggestion</span>. Janet explains <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> in terms of ideo-motor action in which the <span class="hlt">suggested</span> idea, because of the inactivity of competing ideas, produces its maximum effect. Freud explains rapport in terms of the sex instinct "inhibited in its aim" (transference) and brings in his distinction of "ego" and "ego-ideal" (or "super-ego") to supplement the theory. Jones explains auto-<span class="hlt">suggestion</span> in terms of narcissism. McDougall explains hypnotic <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> in terms of the instinct of self-abasement. But different instincts may supply the driving power to produce <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>-effects in different circumstances. Such instincts as those of self-preservation (fear) and gregariousness may play their part. Auto-<span class="hlt">suggestion</span> as a therapeutic factor is badly named. It supplements, but does not supplant the will, and makes complete volition possible. PMID:19986306</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010cosp...38.4223D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010cosp...38.4223D"><span id="translatedtitle">Space Weather and Satellite <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dorman, Lev; Iucci, N.; Levitin, A. E.; Belov, A. V.; Eroshenko, E. A.; Ptitsyna, N. G.; Villoresi, G.; Chizhenkov, G. V.; Gromova, L. I.; Parisi, M.; Tyasto, M. I.; Yanke, V. G.</p> <p></p> <p>Results of the Satellite <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Project, which aims to improve the methods of safeguarding satellites in the Earth's magnetosphere from the negative effects of the space environment, are presented. <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> data from the "Kosmos" series satellites in the period 1971-1999 are com-bined in one database, together with similar information on other spacecrafts. This database contains, beyond the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> information, various characteristics of the space weather: geo-magnetic activity indices (Ap, AE and Dst), fluxes and fluencies of electrons and protons at different energies, high energy cosmic ray variations and other solar, interplanetary and solar wind data. A comparative analysis of the distribution of each of these parameters relative to satellite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> was carried out for the total number of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (about 6000 events), and separately for high ( 5000 events) and low (about 800 events) altitude orbit satellites. No relation was found between low and high altitude satellite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Daily numbers of satel-lite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, averaged by a superposed epoch method around sudden storm commencements and proton event onsets for high (∼1500 km) and low (¡1500 km) altitude orbits revealed a big difference in a behavior. Satellites were divided on several groups according to the orbital char-acteristics (altitude and inclination). The relation of satellite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to the environmental parameters was found to be different for various orbits that should be taken into account under developing of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> frequency models. The preliminary <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> frequency models are presented. Keywords: Space weather; Satellite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>; Energetic particles; Magnetic storms</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992Sci...255..690L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992Sci...255..690L"><span id="translatedtitle">When do <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> begin?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lightman, Alan; Gingerich, Owen</p> <p>1992-02-01</p> <p>The present historical and methodological consideration of scientific <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> notes that some of these are recognized as such, after long neglect, only after the emergence of compelling explanations for their presence in the given theory in view of an alternative conceptual framework. These cases of 'retrorecognition' are indicative not merely of a significant characteristic of the process of conceptual development and scientific discovery, but of the bases for such process in human psychology. Attention is given to the illustrative cases of the 'flatness problem' in big bang theory, the perigee-opposition problem in Ptolemaic astronomy, the continental-fit problem in geology, and the equality of inertial and gravitational mass.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Polymers+AND+Inorganic&pg=2&id=ED245913','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Polymers+AND+Inorganic&pg=2&id=ED245913"><span id="translatedtitle">Chemistry Curricula. Course <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>American Chemical Society, Washington, DC.</p> <p></p> <p>Listings of <span class="hlt">suggested</span> topics aimed at helping university and college faculties plan courses in the main areas of the chemistry curricula are provided. The <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> were originally offered as appendices to the American Chemical Society's (ACS) Committee on Professional Training's 1983 guidelines for ACS-approved schools. The course data included…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=organic+AND+polymers&pg=3&id=ED245913','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=organic+AND+polymers&pg=3&id=ED245913"><span id="translatedtitle">Chemistry Curricula. Course <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>American Chemical Society, Washington, DC.</p> <p></p> <p>Listings of <span class="hlt">suggested</span> topics aimed at helping university and college faculties plan courses in the main areas of the chemistry curricula are provided. The <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> were originally offered as appendices to the American Chemical Society's (ACS) Committee on Professional Training's 1983 guidelines for ACS-approved schools. The course data included</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26929876','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26929876"><span id="translatedtitle">Neonate with VACTERL Association and a Branchial Arch <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> without Hydrocephalus.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Velazquez, Danitza; Pereira, Elaine; Havranek, Thomas</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>VACTERL (vertebral <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, anal atresia, cardiac defect, tracheoesophageal fistula, renal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, limb <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>) is an association of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with a wide spectrum of phenotypic expression. While the majority of cases are sporadic, there is evidence of an inherited component in a small number of patients as well as the <span class="hlt">potential</span> influence of nongenetic risk factors (maternal diabetes mellitus). Presence of hydrocephalus has been reported in VACTERL patients (VACTERL-H) in the past, with some displaying branchial arch <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. We report the unique case of an infant of diabetic mother with VACTERL association and a branchial arch <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-in the absence of hydrocephalus. PMID:26929876</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1935479','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1935479"><span id="translatedtitle">The XXXXY Chromosome <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Zaleski, Witold A.; Houston, C. Stuart; Pozsonyi, J.; Ying, K. L.</p> <p>1966-01-01</p> <p>The majority of abnormal sex chromosome complexes in the male have been considered to be variants of Klinefelter's syndrome but an exception should probably be made in the case of the XXXXY individual who has distinctive phenotypic features. Clinical, radiological and cytological data on three new cases of XXXXY syndrome are presented and 30 cases from the literature are reviewed. In many cases the published clinical and radiological data were supplemented and re-evaluated. Mental retardation, usually severe, was present in all cases. Typical facies was observed in many; clinodactyly of the fifth finger was seen in nearly all. Radiological examination revealed abnormalities in the elbows and wrists in all the 19 personally evaluated cases, and other skeletal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were very frequent. Cryptorchism is very common and absence of Leydig's cells may differentiate the XXXXY chromosome <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> from polysomic variants of Klinefelter's syndrome. The relationship of this syndrome to Klinefelter's syndrome and to Down's syndrome is discussed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 15 PMID:4222822</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=alzheimer%27s+AND+disease+AND+background&pg=2&id=EJ459161','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=alzheimer%27s+AND+disease+AND+background&pg=2&id=EJ459161"><span id="translatedtitle">Open to <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Ruddiman, Joan; And Others</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>Offers six teaching activities <span class="hlt">suggested</span> by teachers: addressing vocabulary development; punctuation awareness; building background knowledge for English literature; a system for notetaking; a month-long unit on African folktales; and an Alzheimer patient's response to children's literature. (SR)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5685614','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5685614"><span id="translatedtitle">Maternal water consumption during pregnancy and congenital cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Shaw, G.M.; Swan, S.H.; Harris, J.A.; Malcoe, L.H. )</p> <p>1990-05-01</p> <p>This case-control study, conducted in a California county that had a local incident of water contamination in 1981, investigated the relation between a mother's reported consumption of tap water during pregnancy and congenital cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in their offspring born during 1981-1983. Data were obtained from telephone interviews with 145 mothers of children born with a severe cardiac <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and 176 mothers of children born without such an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. A positive association between a mother's consumption of home tap water during the first trimester of pregnancy and cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in her infant was unrelated to the incident of water contamination, the mother's race, or her educational level. A negative relation was found between a mother's use of bottled water and cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> among the infants. These findings corresponded primarily to births in 1981. These data could not fully distinguish between a <span class="hlt">potential</span> causal agent in the water and differential reporting of exposure by study subjects.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=japanese+AND+language+AND+basic&pg=4&id=ED109896','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=japanese+AND+language+AND+basic&pg=4&id=ED109896"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> on Japanese Materials.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Miller, Roy Andrew</p> <p></p> <p>After commenting briefly on the current state of instructional materials available to students and teachers of Japanese at a college level, the paper underlines the need for materials that deal specifically with aspects of Japanese culture, and outlines <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for possible materials. Graded intermediate materials that stress particularly the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015IJMPD..2430015I','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015IJMPD..2430015I"><span id="translatedtitle">Gravitational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the solar system?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Iorio, Lorenzo</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>Mindful of the anomalous perihelion precession of Mercury discovered by Le Verrier in the second half of the nineteenth century and its successful explanation by Einstein with his General Theory of Relativity in the early years of the twentieth century, discrepancies among observed effects in our Solar system and their theoretical predictions on the basis of the currently accepted laws of gravitation applied to known matter-energy distributions have the <span class="hlt">potential</span> of paving the way for remarkable advances in fundamental physics. This is particularly important now more than ever, given that most of the universe seems to be made of unknown substances dubbed Dark Matter and Dark Energy. Should this not be directly the case, Solar system's <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> could anyhow lead to advancements in either cumulative science, as shown to us by the discovery of Neptune in the first half of the nineteenth century, and technology itself. Moreover, investigations in one of such directions can serendipitously enrich the other one as well. The current status of some alleged gravitational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the Solar system is critically reviewed. They are: (a) Possible anomalous advances of planetary perihelia. (b) Unexplained orbital residuals of a recently discovered moon of Uranus (Mab). (c) The lingering unexplained secular increase of the eccentricity of the orbit of the Moon. (d) The so-called Faint Young Sun Paradox. (e) The secular decrease of the mass parameter of the Sun. (f) The Flyby <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>. (g) The Pioneer <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>. (h) The anomalous secular increase of the astronomical unit.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JHEP...03..117A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JHEP...03..117A"><span id="translatedtitle">Trace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and counterterms in designer gravity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Anabalón, Andrés; Astefanesei, Dumitru; Choque, David; Martínez, Cristián</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>We construct concrete counterterms of the Balasubramanian-Kraus type for Einstein-scalar theories with designer gravity boundary conditions in AdS4, so that the total action is finite on-shell and satisfy a well defined variational principle. We focus on scalar fields with the conformal mass m 2 = -2 l -2 and show that the holographic mass matches the Hamiltonian mass for any boundary conditions. We compute the trace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of the dual field theory in the generic case, as well as when there exist logarithmic branches of non-linear origin. As expected, the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> vanishes for the boundary conditions that are AdS invariant. When the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> does not vanish, the dual stress tensor describes a thermal gas with an equation of state related to the boundary conditions of the scalar field. In the case of a vanishing <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, we recover the dual theory of a massless thermal gas. As an application of the formalism, we consider a general family of exact hairy black hole solutions that, for some particular values of the parameters in the moduli <span class="hlt">potential</span>, contains solutions of four-dimensional gauged {N}=8 supergravity and its ω-deformation. Using the AdS/CFT duality dictionary, they correspond to triple trace deformations of the dual field theory.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11453627','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11453627"><span id="translatedtitle">A few minor <span class="hlt">suggestions</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Michael, J; Clark, J W</p> <p>2001-05-01</p> <p>We agree with almost all of the analysis in this excellent presentation of the molecular view of avoidance behavior. A few <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> are made as follows: Referring to response-generated stimuli as ''readily observable" seems not quite right for the kinesthetic components of such stimuli, although their scientific legitimacy is not questioned. Interpreting response-generated stimuli as a form of positive reinforcement is contested, and an alternative interpretation is offered. A possibly simpler interpretation of the Sidman (1962) two-lever experiment is <span class="hlt">suggested</span>. We question Dinsmoor's (2001) explanation for warning stimuli not being avoided, except for the reference to the weakness of third-order conditioning effects. A final question is raised regarding the nature of the variables that are responsible for the momentary evocation of the avoidance response. PMID:11453627</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_9 --> <div id="page_10" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="181"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvD..91b5015B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvD..91b5015B"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Structure of Regularized Supergravity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Butter, Daniel; Gaillard, Mary K.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>On-shell Pauli-Villars regularization of the one-loop divergences of supergravity theories is used to study the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> structure of supergravity and the cancellation of field theory <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> under a U (1 ) gauge transformation and under the T -duality group of modular transformations in effective supergravity theories with three Kähler moduli Ti obtained from orbifold compactification of the weakly coupled heterotic string. This procedure requires constraints on the chiral matter representations of the gauge group that are consistent with known results from orbifold compactifications. Pauli-Villars (PV) regulator fields allow for the cancellation of all quadratic and logarithmic divergences, as well as most linear divergences. If all linear divergences were canceled, the theory would be <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> free, with noninvariance of the action arising only from Pauli-Villars masses. However there are linear divergences associated with nonrenormalizable gravitino/gaugino interactions that cannot be canceled by PV fields. The resulting chiral <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> forms a supermultiplet with the corresponding conformal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, provided the ultraviolet cutoff has the appropriate field dependence, in which case total derivative terms, such as Gauss-Bonnet, do not drop out from the effective action. The <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> can be partially canceled by the four-dimensional version of the Green-Schwarz mechanism, but additional counterterms, and/or a more elaborate set of Pauli-Villars fields and couplings, are needed to cancel the full <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, including D -term contributions to the conformal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> that are nonlinear in the parameters of the anomalous transformations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SPIE.9089E..0LH','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SPIE.9089E..0LH"><span id="translatedtitle">Seismic data fusion <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Harrity, Kyle; Blasch, Erik; Alford, Mark; Ezekiel, Soundararajan; Ferris, David</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>Detecting <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in non-stationary signals has valuable applications in many fields including medicine and meteorology. These include uses such as identifying possible heart conditions from an Electrocardiography (ECG) signals or predicting earthquakes via seismographic data. Over the many choices of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection algorithms, it is important to compare possible methods. In this paper, we examine and compare two approaches to <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection and see how data fusion methods may improve performance. The first approach involves using an artificial neural network (ANN) to detect <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in a wavelet de-noised signal. The other method uses a perspective neural network (PNN) to analyze an arbitrary number of "perspectives" or transformations of the observed signal for <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Possible perspectives may include wavelet de-noising, Fourier transform, peak-filtering, etc.. In order to evaluate these techniques via signal fusion metrics, we must apply signal preprocessing techniques such as de-noising methods to the original signal and then use a neural network to find <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the generated signal. From this secondary result it is possible to use data fusion techniques that can be evaluated via existing data fusion metrics for single and multiple perspectives. The result will show which <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection method, according to the metrics, is better suited overall for <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection applications. The method used in this study could be applied to compare other signal processing algorithms.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850007309&hterms=sulfur+topical&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dsulfur%2Btopical','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850007309&hterms=sulfur+topical&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dsulfur%2Btopical"><span id="translatedtitle">Unexplained Fe, Ni and S <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in CV chondrite components</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Wark, D. A.</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>Large negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Fe, Co, Ni, S and Se are present in Allende Type B Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAI's). Based on compilations of all the known published analyses, Allende chondrules, aggregates and other types of CAI's also display <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. These observations show that: (1) since Fe, Co, Ni, S and Se are more depleted than elements bracketing them in volatility (such as Pt and Au, and Su and Cd), the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were not produced during the volatility dependent, high temperature CAI forming processes; (2) since Pt, Au, Ge and other siderophiles are not as depleted as Fe, Co and Ni, the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are not due to a metal/silicate fractionation; (3) the association of Fe, Co, and Ni <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with S and Se <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are due to the removal of FeNi sulfide; and (4) since these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> occur in all types of Allende inclusions, aggregates and chondrules, the Allende parental material must have undergone sulfide loss before the formation of these components.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3075271','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3075271"><span id="translatedtitle">Turtle Carapace <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>: The Roles of Genetic Diversity and Environment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Velo-Antón, Guillermo; Becker, C. Guilherme; Cordero-Rivera, Adolfo</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Background Phenotypic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are common in wild populations and multiple genetic, biotic and abiotic factors might contribute to their formation. Turtles are excellent models for the study of developmental instability because <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are easily detected in the form of malformations, additions, or reductions in the number of scutes or scales. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we integrated field observations, manipulative experiments, and climatic and genetic approaches to investigate the origin of carapace scute <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> across Iberian populations of the European pond turtle, Emys orbicularis. The proportion of anomalous individuals varied from 3% to 69% in local populations, with increasing frequency of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in northern regions. We found no significant effect of climatic and soil moisture, or climatic temperature on the occurrence of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. However, lower genetic diversity and inbreeding were good predictors of the prevalence of scute <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> among populations. Both decreasing genetic diversity and increasing proportion of anomalous individuals in northern parts of the Iberian distribution may be linked to recolonization events from the Southern Pleistocene refugium. Conclusions/Significance Overall, our results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that developmental instability in turtle carapace formation might be caused, at least in part, by genetic factors, although the influence of environmental factors affecting the developmental stability of turtle carapace cannot be ruled out. Further studies of the effects of environmental factors, pollutants and heritability of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> would be useful to better understand the complex origin of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in natural populations. PMID:21533278</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JHEP...02..161C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JHEP...02..161C"><span id="translatedtitle">Hessian geometry and the holomorphic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cardoso, G. L.; Mohaupt, T.</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>We present a geometrical framework which incorporates higher derivative corrections to the action of N = 2 vector multiplets in terms of an enlarged scalar manifold which includes a complex deformation parameter. This enlarged space carries a deformed version of special Kähler geometry which we characterise. The holomorphic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> equation arises in this framework from the integrability condition for the existence of a Hesse <span class="hlt">potential</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27097134','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27097134"><span id="translatedtitle">Congenital <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> of the Nose.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Funamura, Jamie L; Tollefson, Travis T</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the nose range from complete aplasia of the nose to duplications and nasal masses. Nasal development is the result of a complex embryologic patterning and fusion of multiple primordial structures. Loss of signaling proteins or failure of migration or proliferation can result in structural <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with significant cosmetic and functional consequences. Congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the nose can be categorized into four broad categories: (1) aplastic or hypoplastic, (2) hyperplastic or duplications, (3) clefts, and (4) nasal masses. Our knowledge of the embryologic origin of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> helps dictate subsequent work-up for associated conditions, and the appropriate treatment or surgical approach to manage newborns and children with these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. PMID:27097134</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5984454','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5984454"><span id="translatedtitle">Investigations of low-temperature geothermal <span class="hlt">potential</span> in New York State</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Hodge, D.S.; De Rito, R.; Hifiker, K.; Morgan, P.; Swanberg, C.A.</p> <p>1981-09-01</p> <p>Temperature gradient map and published heat flow data indicate a possible <span class="hlt">potential</span> for a geothermal resource in western and central New York State. A new analysis of bottom-hole temperature data for New York State confirms the existence of three positive gradient <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: the East Aurora, Cayuga, and Elmira <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, with gradients as high as 32/sup 0/C/km, 36/sup 0/C/km, and 36/sup 0/C/km, respectively. Ground waters from two of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are enriched in silica relative to surrounding areas. Heat flows based on silica geothermometry are 50 to 70 mWm/sup -2/ for the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and 41.4 mWm/sup -2/ for bordering regional flux. A correlation between Bouguer gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the temperature gradient map <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the geothermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may occur above radioactive granites in the basement.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1163755','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1163755"><span id="translatedtitle">System for closure of a physical <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Bearinger, Jane P; Maitland, Duncan J; Schumann, Daniel L; Wilson, Thomas S</p> <p>2014-11-11</p> <p>Systems for closure of a physical <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Closure is accomplished by a closure body with an exterior surface. The exterior surface contacts the opening of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and closes the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The closure body has a primary shape for closing the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and a secondary shape for being positioned in the physical <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The closure body preferably comprises a shape memory polymer.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4050570','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4050570"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in bulk supercooled water at negative pressure</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Pallares, Gaël; El Mekki Azouzi, Mouna; González, Miguel A.; Aragones, Juan L.; Abascal, José L. F.; Valeriani, Chantal; Caupin, Frédéric</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Water <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> still defy explanation. In the supercooled liquid, many quantities, for example heat capacity and isothermal compressibility κT, show a large increase. The question arises if these quantities diverge, or if they go through a maximum. The answer is key to our understanding of water <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. However, it has remained elusive in experiments because crystallization always occurred before any extremum is reached. Here we report measurements of the sound velocity of water in a scarcely explored region of the phase diagram, where water is both supercooled and at negative pressure. We find several <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: maxima in the adiabatic compressibility and nonmonotonic density dependence of the sound velocity, in contrast with a standard extrapolation of the equation of state. This is reminiscent of the behavior of supercritical fluids. To support this interpretation, we have performed simulations with the 2005 revision of the transferable interaction <span class="hlt">potential</span> with four points. Simulations and experiments are in near-quantitative agreement, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> the existence of a line of maxima in κT (LMκT). This LMκT could either be the thermodynamic consequence of the line of density maxima of water [Sastry S, Debenedetti PG, Sciortino F, Stanley HE (1996) Phys Rev E 53:6144–6154], or emanate from a critical point terminating a liquid–liquid transition [Sciortino F, Poole PH, Essmann U, Stanley HE (1997) Phys Rev E 55:727–737]. At positive pressure, the LMκT has escaped observation because it lies in the “no man’s land” beyond the homogeneous crystallization line. We propose that the LMκT emerges from the no man’s land at negative pressure. PMID:24843177</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19900011231','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19900011231"><span id="translatedtitle">Determination of mean gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the Taiwan Island</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Chang, Ruey-Gang</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>The fitting and proper regression coefficients were made of one hundred seventeen 10 x 10' blocks with observed gravity data and corresponding elevation in the Taiwan Island. To compare five different predicted models, and the proper one for the mean gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were determined. The predicted gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the non-observed gravity blocks were decided when the coefficients obtained through the model with the weighted mean method. It was <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that the mean gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of 10 x 10' blocks should be made when comprehensive the observed and predicted data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JHEP...09..125D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JHEP...09..125D"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> mediation from unbroken supergravity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>D'Eramo, Francesco; Thaler, Jesse; Thomas, Zachary</p> <p>2013-09-01</p> <p>When supergravity (SUGRA) is spontaneously broken, it is well known that <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> mediation generates sparticle soft masses proportional to the gravitino mass. Recently, we showed that one-loop <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-mediated gaugino masses should be associated with unbroken supersymmetry (SUSY). This counterintuitive result arises because the underlying symmetry structure of (broken) SUGRA in flat space is in fact (unbroken) SUSY in anti-de Sitter (AdS) space. When quantum corrections are regulated in a way that preserves SUGRA, the underlying AdS curvature (proportional to the gravitino mass) necessarily appears in the regulated action, yielding soft masses without corresponding goldstino couplings. In this paper, we extend our analysis of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> mediation to sfermion soft masses. Already at tree-level we encounter a number of surprises, including the fact that zero soft masses correspond to broken (AdS) SUSY. At one-loop, we explain how <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> mediation appears when regulating SUGRA in a way that preserves super-Weyl invariance. We find that recent claims in the literature about the non-existence of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> mediation were based on a Wilsonian effective action with residual gauge dependence, and the gauge-invariant 1PI effective action contains the expected <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-mediated spectrum. Finally, we calculate the sfermion spectrum to all orders, and use supertrace relations to derive the familiar two-loop soft masses from minimal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> mediation, as well as unfamiliar tree-level and one-loop goldstino couplings consistent with renormalization group invariance.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1982PhDT.......102H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1982PhDT.......102H"><span id="translatedtitle">Short-Term Climatic Fluctuations Forced by Thermal <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hanna, Adel Fahim</p> <p></p> <p>A two-level, global, spectral model using pressure as a vertical coordinate has been developed. The system of equations describing the model is nonlinear and quasi -geostrophic (linear balance). Static stability is variable in the model. A moisture budget is calculated in the lower layer only. Convective adjustment is used to avoid supercritical temperature lapse rates. The mechanical forcing of topography is introduced as a vertical velocity at the lower boundary. Solar forcing is specified assuming a daily mean zenith angle. The differential diabatic heating between land and sea is parameterized. On land- and sea-ice surfaces, a steady state thermal energy equation is solved to calculate the surface temperature. On the oceans, the sea surface temperature is specified as the climatological average for January, February and March circulations. Experiments are designed to study the response of the atmosphere to thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at the lower boundary or in the midtroposphere. The "memory" in the atmosphere of such <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, after they have decayed, is also studied. Three patterns of sea surface temperature <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are tested. The first pattern represents a cold <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the North Pacific, the second a warm <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the equatorial Pacific and the third pattern contains both of the two <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> patterns acting together. The results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the coupled pattern is the only one that produces the type of geopotential <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with the negative phase of the Southern Oscillation. In contrast to the results of linear models, warm sea surface temperature <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the equatorial Pacific cannot produce such geopotential response on their own. The mid-tropospheric <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is introduced as an easterly propagating wave over the equatorial Pacific and over the Gulf of Bengal. The amplitude and memory of the response is larger than for the sea surface temperature case. The mid-tropospheric thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> show continuous large areas of long memory in the subtropical and middle latitude regions of the Northern Hemisphere.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009LNCS.5823..424M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009LNCS.5823..424M"><span id="translatedtitle">Learning Semantic Query <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Meij, Edgar; Bron, Marc; Hollink, Laura; Huurnink, Bouke; de Rijke, Maarten</p> <p></p> <p>An important application of semantic web technology is recognizing human-defined concepts in text. Query transformation is a strategy often used in search engines to derive queries that are able to return more useful search results than the original query and most popular search engines provide facilities that let users complete, specify, or reformulate their queries. We study the problem of semantic query <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>, a special type of query transformation based on identifying semantic concepts contained in user queries. We use a feature-based approach in conjunction with supervised machine learning, augmenting term-based features with search history-based and concept-specific features. We apply our method to the task of linking queries from real-world query logs (the transaction logs of the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision) to the DBpedia knowledge base. We evaluate the utility of different machine learning algorithms, features, and feature types in identifying semantic concepts using a manually developed test bed and show significant improvements over an already high baseline. The resources developed for this paper, i.e., queries, human assessments, and extracted features, are available for download.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhRvX...4c1035P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhRvX...4c1035P"><span id="translatedtitle">Probing the Chiral <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> with Nonlocal Transport in Three-Dimensional Topological Semimetals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Parameswaran, S. A.; Grover, T.; Abanin, D. A.; Pesin, D. A.; Vishwanath, A.</p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>Weyl semimetals are three-dimensional crystalline systems where pairs of bands touch at points in momentum space, termed Weyl nodes, that are characterized by a definite topological charge: the chirality. Consequently, they exhibit the Adler-Bell-Jackiw <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, which in this condensed-matter realization implies that the application of parallel electric (E) and magnetic (B) fields pumps electrons between nodes of opposite chirality at a rate proportional to E .B. We argue that this pumping is measurable via nonlocal transport experiments, in the limit of weak internode scattering. Specifically, we show that as a consequence of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, applying a local magnetic field parallel to an injected current induces a valley imbalance that diffuses over long distances. A probe magnetic field can then convert this imbalance into a measurable voltage drop far from source and drain. Such nonlocal transport vanishes when the injected current and magnetic field are orthogonal and therefore serves as a test of the chiral <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. We further demonstrate that a similar effect should also characterize Dirac semimetals—recently reported to have been observed in experiments—where the coexistence of a pair of Weyl nodes at a single point in the Brillouin zone is protected by a crystal symmetry. Since the nodes are analogous to valley degrees of freedom in semiconductors, the existence of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that valley currents in three-dimensional topological semimetals can be controlled using electric fields, which has <span class="hlt">potential</span> practical "valleytronic" applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21797593','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21797593"><span id="translatedtitle">Gravitational <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and transport phenomena.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Landsteiner, Karl; Megías, Eugenio; Pena-Benitez, Francisco</p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>Quantum <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> give rise to new transport phenomena. In particular, a magnetic field can induce an anomalous current via the chiral magnetic effect and a vortex in the relativistic fluid can also induce a current via the chiral vortical effect. The related transport coefficients can be calculated via Kubo formulas. We evaluate the Kubo formula for the anomalous vortical conductivity at weak coupling and show that it receives contributions proportional to the gravitational <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> coefficient. The gravitational <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> gives rise to an anomalous vortical effect even for an uncharged fluid. PMID:21797593</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22375825','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22375825"><span id="translatedtitle">Relic vector field and CMB large scale <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Chen, Xingang; Wang, Yi E-mail: yw366@cam.ac.uk</p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>We study the most general effects of relic vector fields on the inflationary background and density perturbations. Such effects are observable if the number of inflationary e-folds is close to the minimum requirement to solve the horizon problem. We show that this can <span class="hlt">potentially</span> explain two CMB large scale <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: the quadrupole-octopole alignment and the quadrupole power suppression. We discuss its effect on the parity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. We also provide analytical template for more detailed data comparison.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1050190','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1050190"><span id="translatedtitle">Holographic models and the QCD trace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Jose L. Goity, Roberto C. Trinchero</p> <p>2012-08-01</p> <p>Five dimensional dilaton models are considered as possible holographic duals of the pure gauge QCD vacuum. In the framework of these models, the QCD trace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> equation is considered. Each quantity appearing in that equation is computed by holographic means. Two exact solutions for different dilaton <span class="hlt">potentials</span> corresponding to perturbative and non-perturbative {beta}-functions are studied. It is shown that in the perturbative case, where the {beta}-function is the QCD one at leading order, the resulting space is not asymptotically AdS. In the non-perturbative case, the model considered presents confinement of static quarks and leads to a non-vanishing gluon condensate, although it does not correspond to an asymptotically free theory. In both cases analyses based on the trace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and on Wilson loops are carried out.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1160097','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1160097"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection in Dynamic Networks</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Turcotte, Melissa</p> <p>2014-10-14</p> <p><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> detection in dynamic communication networks has many important security applications. These networks can be extremely large and so detecting any changes in their structure can be computationally challenging; hence, computationally fast, parallelisable methods for monitoring the network are paramount. For this reason the methods presented here use independent node and edge based models to detect locally anomalous substructures within communication networks. As a first stage, the aim is to detect changes in the data streams arising from node or edge communications. Throughout the thesis simple, conjugate Bayesian models for counting processes are used to model these data streams. A second stage of analysis can then be performed on a much reduced subset of the network comprising nodes and edges which have been identified as <span class="hlt">potentially</span> anomalous in the first stage. The first method assumes communications in a network arise from an inhomogeneous Poisson process with piecewise constant intensity. <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> detection is then treated as a changepoint problem on the intensities. The changepoint model is extended to incorporate seasonal behavior inherent in communication networks. This seasonal behavior is also viewed as a changepoint problem acting on a piecewise constant Poisson process. In a static time frame, inference is made on this extended model via a Gibbs sampling strategy. In a sequential time frame, where the data arrive as a stream, a novel, fast Sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) algorithm is introduced to sample from the sequence of posterior distributions of the change points over time. A second method is considered for monitoring communications in a large scale computer network. The usage patterns in these types of networks are very bursty in nature and don’t fit a Poisson process model. For tractable inference, discrete time models are considered, where the data are aggregated into discrete time periods and probability models are fitted to the communication counts. In a sequential analysis, anomalous behavior is then identified from outlying behavior with respect to the fitted predictive probability models. Seasonality is again incorporated into the model and is treated as a changepoint model on the transition probabilities of a discrete time Markov process. Second stage analytics are then developed which combine anomalous edges to identify anomalous substructures in the network.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70001226','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70001226"><span id="translatedtitle">A major geothermal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the Gulf of California</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Lawver, L.A.; Williams, D.L.; Von Herzen, R. P.</p> <p>1975-01-01</p> <p>We have mapped a 3-km wide, high heat flow <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> with a maximum value of 30 ??calorie cm -2 s-1 within a zone of seafloor extension in the central Gulf of California. From seismic reflection data and thermal modelling we <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is caused by a 1-km wide basaltic intrusion which is roughly 100 m deep and less than 18,000 yr old. ?? 1975 Nature Publishing Group.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/dba/documents/factsheet_cogenitalanomalies.pdf','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/dba/documents/factsheet_cogenitalanomalies.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Congenital <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Congenital <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> In Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA) CS217857 National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities Division of Blood Disorders Congenital <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> In Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA) ...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_10 --> <div id="page_11" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="201"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1994STIN...9433262K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1994STIN...9433262K"><span id="translatedtitle">Spacecraft environmental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> expert system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Koons, Harry C.; Groney, David J.</p> <p>1994-02-01</p> <p>An expert system has been developed by The Aerospace Corporation, Space and Environment Technology Center for use in the diagnosis of satellite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> caused by the space environment. The expert system is designed to determine the probable cause of an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> from the following candidates: surface charging, bulk charging, single-event effects, total radiation dose, and space-plasma effects. Such <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> depend on the orbit of the satellite, the local plasma and radiation environment (which is highly variable), the satellite-exposure time, and the hardness of the circuits and components in the satellite. The expert system is a rule-based system that uses the Texas Instrument's Personal Consultant Plus expert-system shell. The expert system's knowledgebase includes about 200 rules, as well as a number of databases that contain information on spacecraft and their orbits, previous spacecraft <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and the environment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4737631','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4737631"><span id="translatedtitle">Neonate with VACTERL Association and a Branchial Arch <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> without Hydrocephalus</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Velazquez, Danitza; Pereira, Elaine; Havranek, Thomas</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>VACTERL (vertebral <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, anal atresia, cardiac defect, tracheoesophageal fistula, renal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, limb <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>) is an association of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with a wide spectrum of phenotypic expression. While the majority of cases are sporadic, there is evidence of an inherited component in a small number of patients as well as the <span class="hlt">potential</span> influence of nongenetic risk factors (maternal diabetes mellitus). Presence of hydrocephalus has been reported in VACTERL patients (VACTERL-H) in the past, with some displaying branchial arch <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. We report the unique case of an infant of diabetic mother with VACTERL association and a branchial arch anomaly—in the absence of hydrocephalus. PMID:26929876</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3312379','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3312379"><span id="translatedtitle">Binocular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and reading problems.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Simons, H D; Grisham, J D</p> <p>1987-07-01</p> <p>This paper reviews and evaluates the research literature on the relationship of binocular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to reading problems. The weight of the evidence supports a positive relationship between certain binocular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and reading problems. The evidence is positive for exophoria at near, fusional vergence reserves, aniseikonia, anisometropia, convergence insufficiency, and fixation disparity. There is some weak positive evidence for esophoria at near and mixed evidence for stereopsis. The evidence on lateral phorias at distance is negative. PMID:3312379</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014MeScT..25l7002V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014MeScT..25l7002V"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> detection on cup anemometers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Vega, Enrique; Pindado, Santiago; Martínez, Alejandro; Meseguer, Encarnación; García, Luis</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>The performances of two rotor-damaged commercial anemometers (Vector Instruments A100 LK) were studied. The calibration results (i.e. the transfer function) were very linear, the aerodynamic behavior being more efficient than the one shown by both anemometers equipped with undamaged rotors. No detection of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (the rotors’ damage) was possible based on the calibration results. However, the Fourier analysis clearly revealed this <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19830010869','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19830010869"><span id="translatedtitle">Satellite elevation magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> maps</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Braile, L. W.; Hinze, W. J. (Principal Investigator)</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>The problem of inverting 2 deg average MAGSAT scalar <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for the region 80 W, 60 E longitude and 40 S, 70 N latitude was attempted on the LARS computer; however, the effort was aborted due to insufficient allocation of CPU-time. This problem is currently being resubmitted and should be implemented shortly for quantitative comparison with free-air gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, geothermal, and tectonic data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23916956','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23916956"><span id="translatedtitle">Expression and/or activity of the SVCT2 ascorbate transporter may be decreased in many aggressive cancers, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> utility for sodium bicarbonate and dehydroascorbic acid in cancer therapy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>McCarty, Mark F</p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a heterodimer transcription factor whose elevated activity in many cancers helps them to survive under hypoxic conditions and enhances their capacity to grow invasively, establish metastases, and survive chemo- or radiotherapy. Optimal intracellular levels of ascorbate suppress the level and transcriptional activity of HIF-1under normoxic or mildly hypoxic conditions by supporting the activity of proly and asparagyl hydroxylases that target HIF-1alpha. High intracellular ascorbate can also work in various ways to down-regulate activation of NF-kappaB which, like HIF-1 is constitutively active in many cancers and promotes aggressive behavior - in part by promoting transcription of HIF-1alpha. Yet recent evidence <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that, even in the context of adequate ascorbate nutrition, the intracellular ascorbate content of many aggressive cancers may be supoptimal for effective HIF-1 control. This likely reflects low expression or activity of the SVCT2 ascorbate transporter. The expression of SVCT2 in cancers has so far received little study; but the extracellular acidity characteristic of many tumors would be expected to reduce the activity of this transporter, which has a mildly alkaline pH optimum. Unfortunately, since SVCT2 has a high affinity for ascorbate, and its activity is nearly saturated at normal healthy serum levels of this vitamin, increased oral administration of ascorbate would be unlikely to have much impact on the intracellular ascorbate content of tumors. However, cancers in which HIF-1 is active express high levels of glucose transporters such as GLUT-1, and these transporters can promote influx of dehydroascorbic acid (DHA) via facilitated diffusion; once inside the cell, DHA is rapidly reduced to ascorbate, which effectively is "trapped" within the cell. Hence, episodic intravenous infusions of modest doses of DHA may have <span class="hlt">potential</span> for optimizing the intracellular ascorbate content of cancers, <span class="hlt">potentially</span> rendering them less aggressive. Indeed, several published studies have concluded that parenteral DHA--sometimes in quite modest doses--can retard the growth of transplanted tumors in rodents. As an alternative or adjunctive strategy, oral administration of sodium bicarbonate, by normalizing the extracellular pH of tumors, has the <span class="hlt">potential</span> to boost the activity of SCTV2 in tumor cells, thereby promoting increased ascorbate uptake. Indeed, the utility of oral sodium bicarbonate for suppressing metastasis formation in nude mice xenografted with a human breast cancer has been reported. Hence, oral sodium bicarbonate and intravenous DHA may have the <span class="hlt">potential</span> to blunt the aggressiveness of certain cancers in which suboptimal intracellular ascorbate levels contribute to elevated HIF-1 activity. PMID:23916956</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19780042085&hterms=barium&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dbarium','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19780042085&hterms=barium&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dbarium"><span id="translatedtitle">Barium and neodymium isotopic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the Allende meteorite</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Mcculloch, M. T.; Wasserburg, G. J.</p> <p>1978-01-01</p> <p>The discovery of Ba and Nd isotopic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in two inclusions from the Allende meteorite is reported. The inclusions are Ca-Al-rich objects typical of the type considered as high-temperature condensation products in the solar nebula and contain distinctive Mg and O isotopic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the FUN (mass Fractionation, Unknown Nuclear processes) type. Mass-spectrometry results are discussed which show that inclusion C1 has <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Ba at masses 134 and 136, while inclusion EK1-4-1 exhibits large marked negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at 130, 132, 134, and 136, as well as a positive <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> at 137. It is also found that inclusion EK1-4-1 shows marked negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Nd at masses 142, 146, 148, and 150, in addition to a positive <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> at 145. These isotopic shifts are attributed to addition of r-process nuclei rather than mass fractionation. It is <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that an onion-shell supernova explosion followed by injection into the solar nebula is the most likely generic model that may explain the observations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhDT.......207L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhDT.......207L"><span id="translatedtitle">Liquid-liquid phase transitions and water-like <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in liquids</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lascaris, Erik</p> <p></p> <p>In this thesis we employ computer simulations and statistical physics to understand the origin of liquid-liquid phase transitions and their relationship with <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> typical of liquid water. Compared with other liquids, water has many <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. For example the density <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>: when water is cooled below 4 °C the density decreases rather than increases. This and other <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> have also been found to occur in a few other one-component liquids, sometimes in conjunction with the existence of a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) between a low-density liquid (LDL) and a high-density liquid (HDL). Using simple models we explain how these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> arise from the presence of two competing length scales. As a specific example we investigate the cut ramp <span class="hlt">potential</span>, where we show the importance of "competition" in this context, and how one length scale can sometimes be zero. When there is a clear energetic preference for either LDL or HDL for all pressures and temperatures, then there is insufficient competition between the two liquid structures and no <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> occur. From the simple models it also follows that <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> can occur without the presence of a LLPT and vice versa. It remains therefore unclear if water has a LLPT that ends in a liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP), a hypothesis that was first proposed based on simulations of the ST2 water model. We confirm the existence of a LLCP in this model using finite size scaling and the Challa-Landau-Binder parameter, and show that the LLPT is not a liquid-crystal transition, as has recently been <span class="hlt">suggested</span>. Previous research has indicated the possible existence of a LLCP in liquid silica. We perform a detailed analysis of two different silica models (WAC and BKS) at temperatures much lower than was previously simulated. Within the accessible temperature range we find no LLCP in either model, although in the case of WAC <span class="hlt">potential</span> it is closely approached. We compare our results with those obtained for other tetrahedral liquids and conclude that insufficient "stiffness" in the Si-O-Si bond angle might be responsible for the absence of a LLCP.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002AGUFM.S11A1113I','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002AGUFM.S11A1113I"><span id="translatedtitle">Deep Mantle Origin for the DUPAL <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ingle, S.; Weis, D.</p> <p>2002-12-01</p> <p>Twenty years after the discovery of the Dupal <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>, its origin remains a geochemical and geophysical enigma. This <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is associated with the Southern Hemisphere oceanic mantle and is recognized by basalts with geochemical characteristics such as low 206Pb/204Pb and high 87Sr/86Sr. Both mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) and ocean island basalts (OIB) are affected, despite originating from melting at different depths and of different mantle sources. We compile geochemical data for both MORB and OIB from the three major oceans to help constrain the physical distribution and chemical composition of the Dupal <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>. There is a clear decrease in 206Pb/204Pb and an increase in 87Sr/86Sr with more southerly latitude for Indian MORB and OIB; these correlations are less obvious in the Atlantic and non-existent in the Pacific. The average* 143Nd/144Nd for Pacific and Atlantic OIB is 0.5129, but is lower for Indian OIB (0.5128). Interestingly, Pacific, Atlantic and Indian OIB all have 176Hf/177Hf averages of 0.2830. Indian MORB also record this phenomenon of low Nd with normal Hf isotopic compositions (Chauvel and Blichert-Toft, EPSL, 2001). Hf isotopes appear, therefore, to be a valid isotopic proxy for measuring the presence and magnitude of the Dupal <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> at specific locations. Wen (EPSL, 2001) reported a low-velocity layer at the D'' boundary beneath the Indian Ocean from which the Dupal <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> may originate. This hypothesis may be consistent with our compilations demonstrating that the long-lived Dupal <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> does not appear to be either mixing efficiently into the upper mantle or spreading to other ocean basins through time. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the Dupal source could be continually tapped by upwelling Indian Ocean mantle plumes. Plumes would then emplace pockets of Dupal material into the upper mantle and other ascending plumes might further disperse this material into the shallow asthenosphere. This could explain both the presence of the Dupal signature in MORB and OIB and the geochemical similarities between some Indian Ocean mantle plumes, such as Kerguelen, and the Dupal signature. * To avoid sampling biases, data for each ocean island (or group) are averaged and these values are used to calculate the average for each ocean.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21560496','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21560496"><span id="translatedtitle">ANALYZING THE FLUX <span class="hlt">ANOMALIES</span> OF THE LARGE-SEPARATION LENSED QUASAR SDSS J1029+2623</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Kratzer, Rachael M.; Richards, Gordon T.; Goldberg, David M.; Oguri, Masamune; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Hodge, Jacqueline A.; Becker, Robert H.; Inada, Naohisa</p> <p>2011-02-10</p> <p>Using a high-resolution radio image, we successfully resolve the two-fold image components B and C of the quasar lens system SDSS J1029+2623. The flux <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with these two components in the optical regime persist, albeit less strongly, in our radio observations <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that the cluster must be modeled by something more than a single central <span class="hlt">potential</span>. We argue that placing substructure close to one of the components can account for a flux <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> with negligible changes in the component positions. Our best-fit model has a substructure mass of {approx}10{sup 9} M{sub sun} up to the mass-sheet degeneracy, located roughly 0.''1 west and 0.''1 north of component B. We demonstrate that a positional offset between the centers of the source components can explain the differences between the optical and radio flux ratios.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19726113','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19726113"><span id="translatedtitle">Uranium groundwater <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and L'Aquila earthquake, 6th April 2009 (Italy).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Plastino, Wolfango; Povinec, Pavel P; De Luca, Gaetano; Doglioni, Carlo; Nisi, Stefano; Ioannucci, Luca; Balata, Marco; Laubenstein, Matthias; Bella, Francesco; Coccia, Eugenio</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Monitoring of chemical and physical groundwater parameters has been carried out worldwide in seismogenic areas with the aim to test possible correlations between their spatial and temporal variations and strain processes. Uranium (U) groundwater <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were observed during the preparation phases of the recent L'Aquila earthquake of 6th April 2009 in the cataclastic rocks near the overthrust fault crossing the deep underground Gran Sasso National Laboratory. The results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that U may be used as a <span class="hlt">potential</span> strain indicator of geodynamic processes occurring before the seismic swarm and the main earthquake shock. Moreover, this justifies the different radon patterns before and after the main shock: the radon releases during and after the earthquake are much than more during the preparatory period because the process does not include only the microfracturing induced by stress-strain activation, but also radon increases accompanying groundwater U <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. PMID:19726113</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/91090','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/91090"><span id="translatedtitle">Brain <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in velo-cardio-facial syndrome</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Mitnick, R.J.; Bello, J.A.; Shprintzen, R.J.</p> <p>1994-06-15</p> <p>Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in 11 consecutively referred patients with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCF) showed <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in nine cases including small vermis, cysts adjacent to the frontal horns, and small posterior fossa. Focal signal hyperintensities in the white matter on long TR images were also noted. The nine patients showed a variety of behavioral abnormalities including mild development delay, learning disabilities, and characteristic personality traits typical of this common multiple <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> syndrome which has been related to a microdeletion at 22q11. Analysis of the behavorial findings showed no specific pattern related to the brain <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and the patients with VCF who did not have detectable brain lesions also had behavioral abnormalities consistent with VCF. The significance of the lesions is not yet known, but the high prevalence of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in this sample <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that structural brain abnormalities are probably common in VCF. 25 refs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988GeCoA..52..309N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988GeCoA..52..309N"><span id="translatedtitle">Titanium isotopic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in chondrules from carbonaceous chondrites</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Niemeyer, S.</p> <p>1988-02-01</p> <p>Isotopic analyses of Ti from a suite of eight Allende chondrules were conducted to determine whether any relationship exists between the composition and structure of a chondrule and the Ti isotopic patterns. Four of the eight chondrules displayed well-resolved <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with respect to Ti-50/Ti-46 ratio, which ranged from a Ti-50 deficit of two epsilon-units to a T-50 excess of nine epsilon-units. No clear link was found between the structure of the chondrules and the Ti <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (although the chondrule with by far the largest Ti isotopic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> was also Al-rich, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that there might exist a complicated relationship between the degree of refractory enrichment and the magnitude of Ti isotopic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860029300&hterms=Butane&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3DButane','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860029300&hterms=Butane&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3DButane"><span id="translatedtitle">Remote detection of geobotanical <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with hydrocarbon microseepage</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Rock, B. N.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>As part of the continuing study of the Lost River, West Virginia NASA/Geosat Test Case Site, an extensive soil gas survey of the site was conducted during the summer of 1983. This soil gas survey has identified an order of magnitude methane, ethane, propane, and butane <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> that is precisely coincident with the linear maple <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> reported previously. This and other maple <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were previously <span class="hlt">suggested</span> to be indicative of anaerobic soil conditions associated with hydrocarbon microseepage. In vitro studies support the view that anomalous distributions of native tree species tolerant of anaerobic soil conditions may be useful indicators of methane microseepage in heavily vegetated areas of the United States characterized by deciduous forest cover. Remote sensing systems which allow discrimination and mapping of native tree species and/or species associations will provide the exploration community with a means of identifying vegetation distributional <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> indicative of microseepage.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.H41E0863W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.H41E0863W"><span id="translatedtitle">Vegetation Response and Streamflow <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>: Exploring the Modulating Effect of Watershed Storage as Estimated by a Regionalized Stream Recession Index</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Worland, S. C.; Bennartz, R.; Murphy, J.; Merrick, T.; Bradley, M.; Hornberger, G. M.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Water managers often make water allocation decisions based on data that is integrated at regional scales much coarser than those at which water management decisions are typically made. Important sub-regional variations in the data are subsumed in the aggregate, <span class="hlt">potentially</span> leading to an improper handling of water resources. A combination of stream discharge characteristics and remotely sensed data can provide information that is responsive at local scales, such as watershed vulnerability to anomalous moisture conditions. We conducted an exploratory analysis of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data (500 m2 resolution, 16 day) obtained from NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and USGS stream discharge (Q) records from over 100 unregulated streams in Tennessee for the years 2001-2012. The data sets were compiled to evaluate the vegetation response during a historical drought (Aug/Sept of 2007) within different streamflow recession index (SRI) regions. SRI can be applied as a metric for watershed storage and the ability of underlying aquifers to sustain streamflow through prolonged dry periods. The time series were filtered to remove seasonal trends, and bimonthly <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were calculated. Each of the three NDVI and Q time series (raw, filtered, and <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>) were analyzed using cross-correlation analysis, cross-wavelet, and wavelet coherence analyses. Four SRI regions with similar land cover were chosen to spatially analyze NDVI <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> during drought. The results from the cross-correlation analysis reveal strong biannual and annual correlations between raw NDVI and raw discharge values. Correlations between NDVI <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and discharge <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> peak at lag periods of 1 to 1.5 months with NDVI leading. The wavelet coherence analysis <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that drought dampens the monthly signal correlation between the raw values, and <span class="hlt">potentially</span> removes a strong 2 year correlation between the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The spatial analysis shows regions with a higher SRI value tend to have higher NDVI values throughout a drought.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19820016723','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19820016723"><span id="translatedtitle">MAGSAT <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map and continental drift</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Lemouel, J. L. (Principal Investigator); Galdeano, A.; Ducruix, J.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> maps of high quality are needed to display unambiguously the so called long wave length <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were analyzed in terms of continental drift and the nature of their sources is discussed. The map presented confirms the thinness of the oceanic magnetized layer. Continental magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are characterized by elongated structures generally of east-west trend. Paleomagnetic reconstruction shows that the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> found in India, Australia, and Antarctic exhibit a fair consistency with the African <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. It is also shown that <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are locked under the continents and have a fixed geometry.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010IAUS..261..189A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010IAUS..261..189A"><span id="translatedtitle">Astrometric solar-system <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Anderson, John D.; Nieto, Michael Martin</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>There are at least four unexplained <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> connected with astrometric data. Perhaps the most disturbing is the fact that when a spacecraft on a flyby trajectory approaches the Earth within 2000 km or less, it often experiences a change in total orbital energy per unit mass. Next, a secular change in the astronomical unit AU is definitely a concern. It is reportedly increasing by about 15 cm yr-1. The other two <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are perhaps less disturbing because of known sources of nongravitational acceleration. The first is an apparent slowing of the two Pioneer spacecraft as they exit the solar system in opposite directions. Some astronomers and physicists, including us, are convinced this effect is of concern, but many others are convinced it is produced by a nearly identical thermal emission from both spacecraft, in a direction away from the Sun, thereby producing acceleration toward the Sun. The fourth <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is a measured increase in the eccentricity of the Moon's orbit. Here again, an increase is expected from tidal friction in both the Earth and Moon. However, there is a reported unexplained increase that is significant at the three-sigma level. It is prudent to suspect that all four <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> have mundane explanations, or that one or more <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are a result of systematic error. Yet they might eventually be explained by new physics. For example, a slightly modified theory of gravitation is not ruled out, perhaps analogous to Einstein's 1916 explanation for the excess precession of Mercury's perihelion.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19890006236','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19890006236"><span id="translatedtitle">Spacecraft environmental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> expert system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Koons, H. C.; Gorney, D. J.</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>A microcomputer-based expert system is being developed at the Aerospace Corporation Space Sciences Laboratory to assist in the diagnosis of satellite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> caused by the space environment. The expert system is designed to address <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> caused by surface charging, bulk charging, single event effects and total radiation dose. These effects depend on the orbit of the satellite, the local environment (which is highly variable), the satellite exposure time and the hardness of the circuits and components of the satellite. The expert system is a rule-based system that uses the Texas Instruments Personal Consultant Plus expert system shell. The completed expert system knowledge base will include 150 to 200 rules, as well as a spacecraft attributes database, an historical spacecraft <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> database, and a space environment database which is updated in near real-time. Currently, the expert system is undergoing development and testing within the Aerospace Corporation Space Sciences Laboratory.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1046548','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1046548"><span id="translatedtitle">Graph <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in cyber communications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Vander Wiel, Scott A; Storlie, Curtis B; Sandine, Gary; Hagberg, Aric A; Fisk, Michael</p> <p>2011-01-11</p> <p>Enterprises monitor cyber traffic for viruses, intruders and stolen information. Detection methods look for known signatures of malicious traffic or search for <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with respect to a nominal reference model. Traditional <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection focuses on aggregate traffic at central nodes or on user-level monitoring. More recently, however, traffic is being viewed more holistically as a dynamic communication graph. Attention to the graph nature of the traffic has expanded the types of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that are being sought. We give an overview of several cyber data streams collected at Los Alamos National Laboratory and discuss current work in modeling the graph dynamics of traffic over the network. We consider global properties and local properties within the communication graph. A method for monitoring relative entropy on multiple correlated properties is discussed in detail.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002PhRvE..66c1509W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002PhRvE..66c1509W"><span id="translatedtitle">Phase behavior and thermodynamic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of core-softened fluids</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wilding, Nigel B.; Magee, James E.</p> <p>2002-09-01</p> <p>We report extensive simulation studies of phase behavior in single component systems of particles interacting via a core-softened interparticle <span class="hlt">potential</span>. Two recently proposed examples of such <span class="hlt">potentials</span> are considered; one in which the hard core exhibits a shoulder [Sadr-Lahijany et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 4895 (1998)], and the other in which the softening takes the form of a linear ramp [Jagla, Phys. Rev. E 63, 061501 (2001)]. Using a combination of state-of-the-art Monte Carlo methods, we obtain the gas, liquid, and solid phase behavior of the shoulder model in two dimensions. We then focus on the thermodynamic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the liquid phase, namely, maxima in the density and compressibility as a function of temperature. Analysis of the finite-size behavior of these maxima <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that, rather than stemming from a metastable liquid-liquid critical point, as previously supposed, they are actually induced by the quasicontinuous nature of the two dimensional freezing transition. For the ramp model in three dimensions, we confirm the existence of a stable liquid-liquid (``second'') critical point occurring at higher pressure and lower temperature than the liquid-gas critical point. Both these critical points and portions of their associated coexistence curves are located to high precision. In contrast to the shoulder model, the observed thermodynamic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of this model are found to be authentic, i.e., they are not engendered by an incipient new phase. We trace the locus of density and compressibility maxima, the former of which appears to terminate close to the second critical point.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_11 --> <div id="page_12" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="221"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21371550','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21371550"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Mediated Supersymmetry Breaking Demysitified</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Jung, Dong-Won; Lee, Jae Yong</p> <p>2010-02-10</p> <p>We reinterpret <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-mediated supersymmetry breaking from a field-theoretic perspective in which superconformal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> couple to either the chiral compensator or the U(1){sub R} vector su-perfield. As supersymmetry in the hidden sector is spontaneously broken by non-vanishing vacuum expectation values of the chiral compensator F-term and/or the U(1){sub R} vector superfield D-term, the soft breakdown of supersymmetry emerges in the visible sector. This approach is physically more understandable compared with the conventional approach where the chiral compensator is treated on the same footing as a spurion in gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking scenario.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19810015994','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19810015994"><span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of DSN software <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Galorath, D. D.; Hecht, H.; Hecht, M.; Reifer, D. J.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>A categorized data base of software errors which were discovered during the various stages of development and operational use of the Deep Space Network DSN/Mark 3 System was developed. A study team identified several existing error classification schemes (taxonomies), prepared a detailed annotated bibliography of the error taxonomy literature, and produced a new classification scheme which was tuned to the DSN <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> reporting system and encapsulated the work of others. Based upon the DSN/RCI error taxonomy, error data on approximately 1000 reported DSN/Mark 3 <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were analyzed, interpreted and classified. Next, error data are summarized and histograms were produced highlighting key tendencies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/861207','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/861207"><span id="translatedtitle">A New Methodology for Early <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection of BWR Instabilities</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Ivanov, K. N.</p> <p>2005-11-27</p> <p>The objective of the performed research is to develop an early <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection methodology so as to enhance safety, availability, and operational flexibility of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) nuclear power plants. The technical approach relies on suppression of <span class="hlt">potential</span> power oscillations in BWRs by detecting small <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at an early stage and taking appropriate prognostic actions based on an anticipated operation schedule. The research utilizes a model of coupled (two-phase) thermal-hydraulic and neutron flux dynamics, which is used as a generator of time series data for <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection at an early stage. The model captures critical nonlinear features of coupled thermal-hydraulic and nuclear reactor dynamics and (slow time-scale) evolution of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> as non-stationary parameters. The time series data derived from this nonlinear non-stationary model serves as the source of information for generating the symbolic dynamics for characterization of model parameter changes that quantitatively represent small <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The major focus of the presented research activity was on developing and qualifying algorithms of pattern recognition for power instability based on <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection from time series data, which later can be used to formulate real-time decision and control algorithms for suppression of power oscillations for a variety of anticipated operating conditions. The research being performed in the framework of this project is essential to make significant improvement in the capability of thermal instability analyses for enhancing safety, availability, and operational flexibility of currently operating and next generation BWRs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26980401','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26980401"><span id="translatedtitle">Density and structural <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in soft-repulsive dimeric fluids.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Munaó, Gianmarco; Saija, Franz</p> <p>2016-04-14</p> <p>We report Monte Carlo results for the fluid structure of a system of dimeric particles interacting via a core-softened <span class="hlt">potential</span>. More specifically, dimers interact through a repulsive pair <span class="hlt">potential</span> of an inverse-power form, modified in such a way that the repulsion strength is softened for a given range of distances. The aim of such a study is to investigate how both the elongation of the dimers and the softness of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> affect some features of the model. Our results show that the dimeric fluid exhibits both density and structural <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, even if the interaction is not characterized by two length scales. Upon increasing the aspect ratio of the dimers, such <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are progressively hindered, with the structural <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> surviving even after the disappearance of the density <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. These results shed light on the peculiar behaviour of molecular systems of non-spherical shape, showing how geometrical and interaction parameters play a fundamental role in determining the presence of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. PMID:26980401</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993Tecto..12.1267B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993Tecto..12.1267B"><span id="translatedtitle">Interpretation of magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over the Grenada Basin</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bird, Dale E.; Hall, Stuart A.; Casey, John F.; Millegan, Patrick S.</p> <p>1993-10-01</p> <p>The Grenada Basin is a back arc basin located near the eastern border of the Caribbean Plate. The basin is bounded on the west by the north-south trending Aves Ridge (a remnant island arc) and on the east by the active Lesser Antilles island arc. Although this physiography <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that east-west extension formed the basin, magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over the basin exhibit predominantly east-west trends. If the observed magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over the basin are produced by seafloor spreading, then the orientation of extension is complex. Extension in back arc basins is roughly normal to the trench, although some basins exhibit oblique extension. Present models for the formation of the Grenada Basin vary from north-south extension through northeast-southwest extension to east-west extension. An interpretation of magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over the Grenada Basin supports basin development by nearly east-west extension. Low amplitude magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> trends subparallel to the island arc magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> trends over the southern part of the basin and the results of forward three-dimensional (3-D) magnetic modeling are consistent with this conclusion. Late Cenozoic tectonic movements may have been responsible for disrupting the magnetic signature over the northern part of the basin. On the basis of our 3-D analysis, we attribute the prominent east-west trending <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the Grenada Basin to fracture zones formed during seafloor spreading at low latitude. This east-west trend is not interpreted as indicating north-south extension of the basin.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JHEP...01..001B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JHEP...01..001B"><span id="translatedtitle">Conformal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> c-coefficients of superconformal 6d theories</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Beccaria, Matteo; Tseytlin, Arkady A.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>We propose general relations between the conformal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and the chiral (R-symmetry and gravitational) <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> coefficients in 6d (1, 0) superconformal theories. The <span class="hlt">suggested</span> expressions for the three type B conformal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> c i -coefficients complement the expression for the type A <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> a-coefficient found in arXiv:1506.03807. We check them on several examples — the standard (1, 0) hyper and tensor multiplets as well as some higher derivative short multiplets containing vector fields that generalize the super-conformal 6d vector multiplet discussed in arXiv:1506.08727. We also consider a family of higher derivative superconformal (2, 0) 6d multiplets associated to 7d multiplets in the KK spectrum of 11d supergravity compactified on S 4. In particular, we prove that (2,0) 6d conformal supergravity coupled to 26 tensor multiplets is free of all chiral and conformal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. We discuss some interacting (1, 0) superconformal theories, predicting the c i -coefficients for the "E-string" theory on multiple M5-branes at E 8 9-brane and for the theory describing M5-branes at an orbifold singularity {C}^2/Γ . Finally, we elaborate on holographic computation of subleading corrections to conformal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> coefficients coming from R 2 + R 3 terms in 7d effective action, revisiting, in particular, the (2,0) theory case.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014cosp...40E2563P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014cosp...40E2563P"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> of neutron field of the Earth.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Plotnikova, Natalia</p> <p></p> <p>This work is devoted to the researches of time and spatial heterogeneity of thermal neurtron flux (Fn) density in the troposphere of the Earth. We had already received the values of thermal neutron flux density on the surface of the Earth in the European part of Russia. The large-scale monitoring of thermal neutron flux density was carried out on structural cross-section from Drake Strait in the Atlantic Ocean to the high latitudes of Arctic. We observe the increase of Fn from 44о N to 59о N, from 0,4 to 2,9 •10-3 н/(c•cм2). The values of Fn were received in latitude Novorossiysk (0,4•10-3 n/(c•sm2)) , Moskow (0,7-1,5•10-3 n/(c•sm2)), Arhangelsk (1,3•10-3 n/(c•sm2)). High-rise dependance of the thermal neutron flux density on the surface of the Earth and in troposphere during transcontinental flights was researched. With the increasing of height from 0 to 8000 m the thermal neutron flux density rises to 180•10-3 н/(c•cм2) The measurements were carried out in latitude of Spitsbergen. The value of thermal neutron flux density on the North pole was measured. Fn is equal to 0,7•10-3 n/(c•sm2)) 890 20/ in North latitude. Recently it has been shown, that thermal neutrons render appreciable influence on alive organisms [Matveeva and etc., 2004, Masunaga S., 2001]. Abmormal increases of thermal neutron flux density are revealed in flora biogeocenosis. Daily background Fn demonstrate the specific abnormal flares for every biocenosis or biotope long-lasting (for tens of minutes) Fn - meaning during the «flares» in biogeocenosis depends on the contains of flora community and can reach 104 n/(с m2). [Plotnikova N.V., Siroeshkin A.V., 2005]. The researches of the neutron field in the World Ocean were received at the time of transatlantic expedition by the programme of RAS «Meridian» (2006, 2008). Abnormal increasing Fn had being observed in the area of equator and between 310N to 540N and 330S to 530S Moreover, the coordinates of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> coincide with the coordinates of the subequatorial and subtropical climatic zones. This anomalous increase Fn happens above, with an increase in phytoplankton biomass, the value of Fn is growing. Abnormal outbreak of Fn in biocenoses and over fields of phytoplankton can be associated with a well-known effect of «neutron trap» in heterogeneous environments, and the thermalization of the epithermal neutrons. Presence of the biological answer to weak streams thermal neutrons allow to assume, that these corpuscular streams are one of the "intermediaries" allowing alive organisms to feel a lot of astrogeophysical events, in addition to known climatic factors. In addition, the thermal neutron flux density is the integral characteristic,which allows to make a"neutron portrait " of the resort or the countryside. Thus, speaking about the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the natural radioactive background , special attention should be paid to the level Fn and its variations, and the <span class="hlt">potential</span> impact on biological objects and human. The data obtained interaction of neutron flux and biological objects may be important for their adaptation to extreme environmental conditions. Our data <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that even in the lower layers of troposphere value thermal neutron flux (Fn) can be quite high, confirm the need for further studies to human security at the high altitude and transcontinental air flights.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1995sccm.conf...13M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1995sccm.conf...13M"><span id="translatedtitle">Numerical <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> mimicking physical effects</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Menikoff, R.</p> <p></p> <p>Numerical simulations of flows with shock waves typically use finite-difference shock-capturing algorithms. These algorithms give a shock a numerical width in order to generate the entropy increase that must occur across a shock wave. For algorithms in conservation form, steady-state shock waves are insensitive to the numerical dissipation because of the Hugoniot jump conditions. However, localized numerical errors occur when shock waves interact. Examples are the 'excess wall heating' in the Noh problem (shock reflected from rigid wall), errors when a shock impacts a material interface or an abrupt change in mesh spacing, and the start-up error from initializing a shock as a discontinuity. This class of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> can be explained by the entropy generation that occurs in the transient flow when a shock profile is formed or changed. The entropy error is localized spatially but under mesh refinement does not decrease in magnitude. Similar effects have been observed in shock tube experiments with partly dispersed shock waves. In this case, the shock has a physical width due to a relaxation process. An entropy <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> from a transient shock interaction is inherent in the structure of the conservation equations for fluid flow. The <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> can be expected to occur whenever heat conduction can be neglected and a shock wave has a non-zero width, whether the width is physical or numerical. Thus, the numerical <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> from an artificial shock width mimics a real physical effect.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=233766&keyword=calcium+AND+carbonate&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=59515736&CFTOKEN=82707312','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=233766&keyword=calcium+AND+carbonate&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=59515736&CFTOKEN=82707312"><span id="translatedtitle">Coral can have growth <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Coral growth <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (GAs) are changes in the coral cells that deposit the calcium carbonate skeleton. They usually appear as raised areas of the skeleton and tissue that are different from the surrounding normal areas on the same colony. The features include abnormal shape a...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20713765','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20713765"><span id="translatedtitle">Observational manifestations of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> inflow</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Boyarsky, Alexey; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail</p> <p>2005-10-15</p> <p>In theories with chiral couplings, one of the important consistency requirements is that of the cancellation of a gauge <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. In particular, this is one of the conditions imposed on the hypercharges in the standard model. However, <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> cancellation condition of the standard model looks unnatural from the perspective of a theory with extra dimensions. Indeed, if our world were embedded into an odd-dimensional space, then the full theory would be automatically <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-free. In this paper we discuss the physical consequences of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> noncancellation for effective 4-dimensional field theory. We demonstrate that in such a theory parallel electric and magnetic fields get modified. In particular, this happens for any particle possessing both electric charge and magnetic moment. This effect, if observed, can serve as a low energy signature of extra dimensions. On the other hand, if such an effect is absent or is very small, then from the point of view of any theory with extra dimensions it is just another fine-tuning and should acquire theoretical explanation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19383541','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19383541"><span id="translatedtitle">In vitro and in vivo reproduction toxicology of 12 monoaminergic reuptake inhibitors: possible mechanisms of infrequent cardiovascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sloot, Willem N; Bowden, H Clare; Yih, Tjong D</p> <p>2009-09-01</p> <p>The rat Whole Embryo Culture (WEC) has been used to predict the <span class="hlt">potential</span> teratogenicity of 12 selective/mixed monoaminergic reuptake inhibitors (MRUI). WEC results were compared with in vivo animal and human epidemiological teratogenicity data. In vitro, paroxetine and the positive control retinol were the only compounds identified as a clear teratogen, but developmental morphological indicators <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> of a teratogenic <span class="hlt">potential</span> were observed for most other MRUIs, including fluoxetine, citalopram and venlafaxine. No clear evidence of teratogenic <span class="hlt">potential</span> was observed for three compounds, however, all compounds assessed showed a dose-dependent general embryotoxicity. In vivo testing of nine MRUIs for teratogenicity was limited by maternal toxicity (e.g. anorexia) without showing overt embryotoxicity (e.g. implantation loss). Next to complete absence, the cardiovascular (CV) <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> observed (mostly) in rabbits ranged from a low incidence (e.g. above historical background of 0.35%) to a clear incidence (mean 4.1%). It is <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that observed specific malformations in vitro (e.g. branchial bars deformed, displaced or additional otic system), not noted in any (historical) controls, may be early ontogenetic indicators for infrequent CV-<span class="hlt">anomalies</span> observed in vivo. Despite the low incidence of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in vitro or in vivo, they may yet be clinically relevant as in the case of paroxetine. Possible mechanisms are discussed, e.g. perturbed neural crest cell migration. PMID:19383541</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010SSCom.150.2337B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010SSCom.150.2337B"><span id="translatedtitle">Strong phonon <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and Fermi surface nesting of simple cubic Polonium</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Belabbes, A.; Zaoui, A.; Ferhat, M.</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>The unknown lattice dynamics of simple cubic Polonium is calculated using first-principles density-functional perturbation theory with pseudopotentials and a plane-wave basis set. We notice several phonon <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, in particular along major symmetry directions namely M-R, R-Γ, Γ-M, M-X, and X-Γ. The analysis of the Fermi surface strongly <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the observed phonon <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are Kohn <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> arising from strong Fermi surface nesting.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007MNRAS.379.1431D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007MNRAS.379.1431D"><span id="translatedtitle">A model for globular cluster extreme <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>D'Antona, F.; Ventura, P.</p> <p>2007-08-01</p> <p>In spite of the efforts made in recent years, there is still no comprehensive explanation for the chemical <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of globular cluster (GC) stars. Among these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, the most striking is oxygen depletion, which reaches values down to [O/Fe] ~ -0.4 in most clusters, but in M13 it goes down to less than [O/Fe] ~ -1. In this work we <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are due to the superposition of two different events, as follows. (i) Primordial self-enrichment; this is required to explain the oxygen depletion down to a minimum value [O/Fe] ~ -0.4. (ii) Extra mixing in a fraction of the stars already born with anomalous composition; these objects, starting with already low [O/Fe], will reduce the oxygen abundance down to the most extreme values. Contrary to other models that invoke extra mixing to explain the chemical <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, we <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that this mixing is active only if there is a fraction of the stars in which the primordial composition is not only oxygen-depleted, but also extremely helium-rich (Y ~ 0.4), as found in a few GCs from their main-sequence multiplicity. We propose that the rotational evolution (and an associated extra mixing) of extremely helium-rich stars may be affected by the fact that they develop a very small or non-existent molecular weight barrier during the evolution. We show that extra mixing in these stars, having initial chemistry that has already been CNO processed, affects mainly the oxygen abundance, as well as (to a much smaller extent) the sodium abundance. The model also predicts a large fluorine depletion concomitant with the oxygen depletion, and a further enhancement of the surface helium abundance, which reaches values close to Y = 0.5 in the computed models. We stress that, in this tentative explanation, those stars that are primordially oxygen-depleted, but are not extremely helium-rich, do not suffer deep extra mixing.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUSMGP13A..07N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUSMGP13A..07N"><span id="translatedtitle">Band Iron Formations and Satellite Magnetic <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nazarova, K. A.; Wasilewski, P.</p> <p>2005-05-01</p> <p>Band Iron Formations (BIF) are mainly Precambrian (2.5-1.8 Ga) sedimentary deposits and are composed of alternating layers of iron rich material and silica (chert). Precambrian BIF mark growth in the level of free oxygen in the atmosphere and the ocean which happened about 2.2 Ga. Distribution of main BIF includes Hamersley Range, Australia; Transvaal-Griquatown, South Africa; Minas Gerais, Brazil; Labrador Trough, Canada, and Kursk-Krivoi Rog (Russia). Together these five very large BIF deposits constitute about 90 percent of Earth's total estimated BIF (5.76*10 14 ). On each continent these ancient rocks usually metamorphosed and crystallized include what are variously described as hematite-quartzites, banded iron formations, banded jaspers or calico-rocks. West African, Hudson Bay and Western Australian Satellite Magnetic <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> coincide with distribution BIF deposits. The Kursk Satellite Magnetic <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> (KMA) (about 22 nT at the altitude=400km, centered at 51o N, 37o E) also was identified by ground and aeromagnetic observations and is recognized as one of the largest magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> on the Earth. Magnetic modeling shows that immense Precambrian iron ore deposits (iron bands) of Voronezh uplift are the main source of KMA. Magnetic properties of 10000 BIF samples outcropped in the KMA area have been measured and analyzed (Krutikhovskaya et al., 1964) Rockmag BIF dataset is presented at: http://core2.gsfc.nasa.gov/MPDB/datasets.html. Mean NRM value is about 42 A/M, Qn about 1.4. Demagnetization tests <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that hard and stable NRM component is caused by hematite occurring in BIF in different forms and grain sizes. Hematite deposits discovered on Mars in western equatorial area with layered topography of Aram Chaos and Sinus Meridiani could be of hydrothermal origin and may be formed similar to hematite precipitated in BIF on Earth.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011GeoJI.187...85S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011GeoJI.187...85S"><span id="translatedtitle">The North German Conductivity <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> revisited</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Schäfer, A.; Houpt, L.; Brasse, H.; Hoffmann, N.</p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>The North German Conductivity <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> was detected already in the early years of electromagnetic deep sounding. It refers to the reversal of induction arrows (as a graphical representation of the tipper transfer function, the ratio of vertical to horizontal magnetic field variations) at the northern and southern margins of the North German Basin. In spite of the many experiments carried out so far, its origin has remained ambiguous; explanations encompass a deep-crustal or even mantle source as well as the simple response to deepening of sedimentary sequences in the centre of the basin. Here, we report on modelling of new long-period magnetotelluric data collected along two profiles in NE Germany and S Sweden, with one transect crossing the Sorgenfrei-Tornquist Zone as the main boundary between Precambrian Baltica and the Palaeozoic belts of central Europe. With the exception of a few sites probably influenced by 3-D salt domes, the data allow a 2-D analysis. Resolution is reduced for large depths due to a well-conducting, saline aquifer, extending across the entire basin. The main result is that the reversal of induction arrows can largely be explained by the resistivity contrast between crystalline basement and sedimentary basin fill. Beneath Rügen island, a southward dipping conductor is interpreted to reflect an alum shale layer in Middle Cambrian-Lower Ordovician sediments. Beneath the southern basin, a moderately conductive upper mantle is modelled (although not very well resolved) which may reflect the thinning of the lithosphere as implied by seismic tomography. As the main anomalously inductive effect is primarily explained by the basin edges and numerous other <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> exist inside the basin, we <span class="hlt">suggest</span> not using the term 'North German Conductivity <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>' any longer.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014P%26SS...99...36P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014P%26SS...99...36P"><span id="translatedtitle">Detection of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in radio tomography of asteroids: Source count and forward errors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pursiainen, S.; Kaasalainen, M.</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to advance numerical methods for radio tomography in which asteroid's internal electric permittivity distribution is to be recovered from radio frequency data gathered by an orbiter. The focus was on signal generation via multiple sources (transponders) providing one <span class="hlt">potential</span>, or even essential, scenario to be implemented in a challenging in situ measurement environment and within tight payload limits. As a novel feature, the effects of forward errors including noise and a priori uncertainty of the forward (data) simulation were examined through a combination of the iterative alternating sequential (IAS) inverse algorithm and finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation of time evolution data. Single and multiple source scenarios were compared in two-dimensional localization of permittivity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Three different <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> strengths and four levels of total noise were tested. Results <span class="hlt">suggest</span>, among other things, that multiple sources can be necessary to obtain appropriate results, for example, to distinguish three separate <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with permittivity less or equal than half of the background value, relevant in recovery of internal cavities.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUSMNS31A..10A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUSMNS31A..10A"><span id="translatedtitle">Geoelectrical Characterization of the Punta Banda System: A Possible Structural Control for the Geothermal <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Arango-Galvan, C.; Flores-Marquez, E.; Prol-Ledesma, R.; Working Group, I.</p> <p>2007-05-01</p> <p>The lack of sufficient drinking water in Mxico has become a very serious problem, especially in the northern desert regions of the country. In order to give a real solution to this phenomenon the IMPULSA research program has been created to develope novel technologies based on desalination of sea and brackish water using renewable sources of energy to face the problem. The Punta Banda geothermal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is located towards the northern part of Baja California Peninsula (Mexico). High water temperatures in some wells along the coast depicted a geothermal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. An audiomagnetotelluric survey was carried out in the area as a preliminary study, both to understand the process generating these anomalous temperatures and to assess its <span class="hlt">potential</span> exploitation to supply hot water to desalination plants. Among the electromagnetic methods, the audiomagnetotellurics (AMT) method is appropriated for deep groundwater and geothermal studies. The survey consisted of 27 AMT stations covering a 5 km profile along the Agua Blanca Fault. The employed array allowed us to characterize the geoelectrical properties of the main structures up to 500 m depth. Two main geoelectrical zones were identified: 1) a shallow low resistivity media located at the central portion of the profile, coinciding with the Maneadero valley and 2) two high resitivity structures bordering the conductive zone possibly related to NS faulting, already identified by previous geophysical studies. These results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the main geothermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are controlled by the dominant structural regime in the zone.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2784935','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2784935"><span id="translatedtitle">Congenital cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in relation to water contamination, Santa Clara County, California, 1981-1983.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Swan, S H; Shaw, G; Harris, J A; Neutra, R R</p> <p>1989-05-01</p> <p>In November 1981, a leak of solvents from an underground storage tank was detected at an electronics manufacturing plant in Santa Clara County, California. Solvents (predominantly 1,1,1-trichloroethene, or methyl chloroform) were found in a nearby well which supplied drinking water to the surrounding community. Residents were concerned about a possible relation between adverse reproductive outcomes and consumption of contaminated water. To address this concern, the California Department of Health Services conducted two epidemiologic studies: one of these, reported here, is a county-wide study of cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. This study, which looked at major cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> among births throughout Santa Clara County in 1981-1983, found an increased prevalence in the service area of the water company which operated the contaminated well. During the <span class="hlt">potentially</span> exposed time period (January 1981 through August 1982), 12 babies with major cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were born to residents of this area. This represents an excess of six cases over the number expected based on the prevalence in the remainder of the county (relative risk = 2.2, 95 per cent confidence interval 1.2-4.0). No excess was observed in the unexposed time period (September 1982 through December 1983). However, the temporal distribution of major cardiac cases born during the exposed time period <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the solvent leak is an unlikely explanation for this excess. PMID:2784935</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26058490','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26058490"><span id="translatedtitle">Minor Physical <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> as a Window into the Prenatal Origins of Pedophilia.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dyshniku, Fiona; Murray, Michelle E; Fazio, Rachel L; Lykins, Amy D; Cantor, James M</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>Evidence is steadily accumulating to support a neurodevelopmental basis for pedophilia. This includes increased incidence of non-right-handedness, which is a result primarily of prenatal neural development and solidified very early in life. Minor physical <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (MPAs; superficial deviations from typical morphological development, such as un-detached earlobes) also develop only prenatally, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> them as another <span class="hlt">potential</span> marker of atypical physiological development during the prenatal period among pedophiles. This study administered the Waldrop Physical <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Scale to assess the prevalence of MPAs in a clinical sample of men referred for assessment following a sexual assault, or another illegal or clinically significant sexual behavior. Significant associations emerged between MPA indices and indicators of pedophilia, including penile responses to depictions of children, number of child victims, and possession of child pornography. Moreover, greater sexual attraction to children was associated with an elevated craniofacial-to-peripheral <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> ratio. The overall sample demonstrated a greater number of MPAs relative to prior samples of individuals with schizophrenia as well as to healthy controls. PMID:26058490</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SPIE.9875E..25B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SPIE.9875E..25B"><span id="translatedtitle">Model selection for <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Burnaev, E.; Erofeev, P.; Smolyakov, D.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> detection based on one-class classification algorithms is broadly used in many applied domains like image processing (e.g. detection of whether a patient is "cancerous" or "healthy" from mammography image), network intrusion detection, etc. Performance of an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection algorithm crucially depends on a kernel, used to measure similarity in a feature space. The standard approaches (e.g. cross-validation) for kernel selection, used in two-class classification problems, can not be used directly due to the specific nature of a data (absence of a second, abnormal, class data). In this paper we generalize several kernel selection methods from binary-class case to the case of one-class classification and perform extensive comparison of these approaches using both synthetic and real-world data.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_12 --> <div id="page_13" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="241"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.usgs.gov/circ/1968/0595/report.pdf','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.usgs.gov/circ/1968/0595/report.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Geochemical and geophysical <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the western part of the Sheep Creek Range, Lander County, Nevada</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Gott, Garland Bayard; Zablocki, Charles J.</p> <p>1968-01-01</p> <p>Extensive geochemical <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are present along the west side of the Sheep Creek Range in Lander County, Nev. Anomalous concentrations of zinc, arsenic, mercury, silver, copper, lead, and to some extent gold, molybdenum, and antimony occur in iron-rich material along fracture planes and in quartz veins in Paleozoic formations. A magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> occurs over a pediment at the southern part of the range, close to one of the geochemical <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Gravity and electrical resistivity measurements <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is caused by an intrusive igneous mass rather than by a block of downfaulted basalt. A limited amount of shallow drilling would clarify the geochemical and geophysical data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/979362','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/979362"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> and Discrete Chiral Symmetries</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Creutz, M.</p> <p>2009-09-07</p> <p>The quantum <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> that breaks the U(1) axial symmetry of massless multi-flavored QCD leaves behind a discrete flavor-singlet chiral invariance. With massive quarks, this residual symmetry has a close connection with the strong CP-violating parameter theta. One result is that if the lightest quarks are degenerate, then a first order transition will occur when theta passes through pi. The resulting framework helps clarify when the rooting prescription for extrapolating in the number of flavors is valid.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9561584','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9561584"><span id="translatedtitle">Prenatal diagnosis of cloacal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cacciaguerra, S; Lo Presti, L; Di Leo, L; Grasso, S; Gangarossa, S; Di Benedetto, V; Di Benedetto, A</p> <p>1998-02-01</p> <p>The authors present a case of prenatal diagnosis of cloacal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, characterized by the presence of oligohydramnios and cystic pelvic mass with changing features during observation. Postnatal study confirmed the presence of a recto-cloacal fistula, with a high confluence of the urinary, genital and intestinal systems. Both parents had a chromosome 9 inversion (p11q13), but the child was chromosomally normal. PMID:9561584</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19810047271&hterms=flat+earth&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dflat%2Bearth','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19810047271&hterms=flat+earth&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dflat%2Bearth"><span id="translatedtitle">Spherical earth gravity and magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> analysis by equivalent point source inversion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Von Frese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.; Braile, L. W.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>To facilitate geologic interpretation of satellite elevation <span class="hlt">potential</span> field data, analysis techniques are developed and verified in the spherical domain that are commensurate with conventional flat earth methods of <span class="hlt">potential</span> field interpretation. A powerful approach to the spherical earth problem relates <span class="hlt">potential</span> field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to a distribution of equivalent point sources by least squares matrix inversion. Linear transformations of the equivalent source field lead to corresponding geoidal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, pseudo-<span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, vector <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> components, spatial derivatives, continuations, and differential magnetic pole reductions. A number of examples using 1 deg-averaged surface free-air gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of POGO satellite magnetometer data for the United States, Mexico, and Central America illustrate the capabilities of the method.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMIN11C1312V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMIN11C1312V"><span id="translatedtitle">Applications of TOPS <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection Framework to Amazon Drought Analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Votava, P.; Nemani, R. R.; Ganguly, S.; Michaelis, A.; Hashimoto, H.</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>Terrestrial Observation and Prediction System (TOPS) is a flexible modeling software system that integrates ecosystem models with frequent satellite and surface weather observations to produce ecosystem nowcasts (assessments of current conditions) and forecasts useful in natural resources management, public health and disaster management. We have been extending the Terrestrial Observation and Prediction System (TOPS) to include capability for automated <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection and analysis of both on-line (streaming) and off-line data. While there are large numbers of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection algorithms for multivariate datasets, we are extending this capability beyond the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection itself and towards an automated analysis that would discover the possible causes of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. In order to best capture the knowledge about data hierarchies, Earth science models and implied dependencies between <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and occurrences of observable events such as urbanization, deforestation, or fires, we have developed an ontology to serve as a knowledge base. The knowledge is captured using OWL ontology language, where connections are defined in a schema that is later extended by including specific instances of datasets and models. We have integrated this knowledge base with a framework for deploying an ensemble of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection algorithms on large volumes of Earth science datasets and applied it to specific scientific applications that support research conducted by our group. In one early application, we were able to process large number of MODIS, TRMM, CERES data along with ground-based weather and river flow observations to detect the evolution of 2010 drought in the Amazon, identify the affected area, and publish the results in three weeks. A similar analysis of the 2005 drought using the same data sets took nearly 2 years, highlighting the <span class="hlt">potential</span> contribution of our <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> framework in accelerating scientific discoveries.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3600774','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3600774"><span id="translatedtitle">Neural Mechanisms of Rapid Sensitivity to Syntactic <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kim, Albert E.; Gilley, Phillip M.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Recent psycholinguistic models hypothesize that anticipatory processing can speed the response to linguistic input during language comprehension by pre-activating representations necessary for word recognition. We investigated the neurocognitive mechanisms of anticipatory processing by recording event-related <span class="hlt">potentials</span> (ERPs) to syntactically anomalous (The thief was caught by for police) and well-formed (e.g., The thief was caught by the police) sentences. One group of participants saw <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> elicited by the same word in every instance (e.g., for; low-variability stimuli), providing high affordances for predictions about the word-form appearing in the critical position. A second group saw <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> elicited by seven different prepositions (at, of, on, for, from, over, with; high-variability stimuli) across the study, creating a more difficult prediction task. Syntactic category <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> enhanced the occipital-temporal N170 component of the ERP, indicating rapid sensitivity – within 200 ms of word-onset – to syntactic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. For low-variability but not the high-variability stimuli, syntactic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> also enhanced the earlier occipital-temporal P1 component, around 130 ms after word-onset, indicating that affordances for prediction engendered earlier sensitivity to syntactic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Independent components analysis revealed three sources within the ERP signal whose functional dynamics were consistent with predictive processing and early responses to syntactic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Distributed neural source modeling (sLORETA) of these early active sources produced a candidate network for early responses to words during reading in the right posterior occipital, left occipital-temporal, and medial parietal cortex. PMID:23515395</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6361803','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6361803"><span id="translatedtitle">Correlation of groundwater radon <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with earthquakes in the greater Palmdale bulge area</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Teng, T.; Sun, L.; McRaney, J.K.</p> <p>1981-05-01</p> <p>Recent measurements in the Central Transverse Ranges of southern California <span class="hlt">suggest</span> possible correlations of changes in groundwater radon content with occurences of nearby earthquakes. Since measurements began in 1974, three radon <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> have been accompanied by subsequent nearby seismic events. Two of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were associated with moderate-sized earthquakes and one with a swarm. Within a 60-day window prior to the seismicity, groundwater radon increased in each case at sites close to the earthquake epicenters. Before the Big Bear earthquake of June 30, 1979 (M = 4.8), radon <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were found at three nearby monitoring sites. Groundwater radon content at one site near the January 1, 1979 Malibu earthquake (M = 5.0) showed negative as well as positive <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> both prior to and following the earthquake. A radon <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> occurred at a nearby spring prior to the fall 1976 Palmdale swarm. The observed pattern is similar to pre-earthquake <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> reported from Russia, China, and Japan.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvD..93f5059H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvD..93f5059H"><span id="translatedtitle">Entanglement entropy and <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> inflow</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hughes, Taylor L.; Leigh, Robert G.; Parrikar, Onkar; Ramamurthy, Srinidhi T.</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>We study entanglement entropy for parity-violating (time-reversal breaking) quantum field theories on R1 ,2 in the presence of a domain wall between two distinct parity-odd phases. The domain wall hosts a 1 +1 -dimensional conformal field theory (CFT) with nontrivial chiral central charge. Such a CFT possesses gravitational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. It has been shown recently that, as a consequence, its intrinsic entanglement entropy is sensitive to Lorentz boosts around the entangling surface. Here, we show using various methods that the entanglement entropy of the three-dimensional bulk theory is also sensitive to such boosts owing to parity-violating effects, and that the bulk response to a Lorentz boost precisely cancels the contribution coming from the domain wall CFT. We argue that this can naturally be interpreted as entanglement inflow (i.e., inflow of entanglement entropy analogous to the familiar Callan-Harvey effect) between the bulk and the domain-wall, mediated by the low-lying states in the entanglement spectrum. These results can be generally applied to 2 +1 -d topological phases of matter that have edge theories with gravitational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and provide a precise connection between the gravitational <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of the physical edge theory and the low-lying spectrum of the entanglement Hamiltonian.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110011710','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110011710"><span id="translatedtitle">Columbus Payloads Flow Rate <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Quaranta, Albino; Bufano, Gaetana; DePalo, Savino; Holt, James M.; Szigetvari, Zoltan; Palumberi, Sergio; Hinderer, S.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The Columbus Active Thermal Control System (ATCS) is the main thermal bus for the pressurized racks working inside the European laboratory. One of the ATCS goals is to provide proper water flow rate to each payload (P/L) by controlling actively the pressure drop across the common plenum distribution piping. Overall flow measurement performed by the Water Pump Assembly (WPA) is the only flow rate monitor available at system level and is not part of the feedback control system. At rack activation the flow rate provided by the system is derived on ground by computing the WPA flow increase. With this approach, several <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were raised during these 3 years on-orbit, with the indication of low flow rate conditions on the European racks FSL, BioLab, EDR and EPM. This paper reviews the system and P/Ls calibration approach, the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> occurred, the engineering evaluation on the measurement approach and the accuracy improvements proposed, the on-orbit test under evaluation with NASA and finally discusses possible short and long term solutions in case of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> confirmation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2833109','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2833109"><span id="translatedtitle">Reasoning <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> Associated With Delusions in Schizophrenia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Langdon, Robyn; Ward, Philip B.; Coltheart, Max</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Deluded people differ from nondeluded controls on attributional style questionnaires and probabilistic-reasoning and theory-of-mind (ToM) tasks. No study to date has examined the relations between these 3 reasoning <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the same individuals so as to evaluate their functional independence and <span class="hlt">potentially</span> inform theories of delusion formation. We did so in 35 schizophrenic patients with a history of delusions, 30 of whom were currently deluded, and 34 healthy controls. Compared with healthy controls, patients showed (a) a jumping-to-conclusions bias and a bias to overadjust when confronted with a change of evidence on probabilistic-reasoning tasks, (b) an excessive externalizing attributional bias, and (c) performance deficits on 3 ToM tasks. Probabilistic-reasoning and ToM measures correlated, while attributional-bias scores were independent of other task measures. A general proneness to delusional ideation correlated with probabilistic-reasoning and ToM measures, while externalizing bias was unrelated to the study measures of delusional ideation. Personalizing bias associated specifically with paranoia across the clinical and nonclinical participants. Findings are consistent with a common underlying mechanism in schizophrenia which contributes to the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on probabilistic-reasoning and ToM tasks associated with delusions. We speculate that this mechanism is impairment of the normal capacity to inhibit “perceived reality” (the evidence of our senses), a capacity that evolved as part of the “social brain” to facilitate intersubjective communication within a shared reality. PMID:18622010</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18622010','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18622010"><span id="translatedtitle">Reasoning <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with delusions in schizophrenia.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Langdon, Robyn; Ward, Philip B; Coltheart, Max</p> <p>2010-03-01</p> <p>Deluded people differ from nondeluded controls on attributional style questionnaires and probabilistic-reasoning and theory-of-mind (ToM) tasks. No study to date has examined the relations between these 3 reasoning <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the same individuals so as to evaluate their functional independence and <span class="hlt">potentially</span> inform theories of delusion formation. We did so in 35 schizophrenic patients with a history of delusions, 30 of whom were currently deluded, and 34 healthy controls. Compared with healthy controls, patients showed (a) a jumping-to-conclusions bias and a bias to overadjust when confronted with a change of evidence on probabilistic-reasoning tasks, (b) an excessive externalizing attributional bias, and (c) performance deficits on 3 ToM tasks. Probabilistic-reasoning and ToM measures correlated, while attributional-bias scores were independent of other task measures. A general proneness to delusional ideation correlated with probabilistic-reasoning and ToM measures, while externalizing bias was unrelated to the study measures of delusional ideation. Personalizing bias associated specifically with paranoia across the clinical and nonclinical participants. Findings are consistent with a common underlying mechanism in schizophrenia which contributes to the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on probabilistic-reasoning and ToM tasks associated with delusions. We speculate that this mechanism is impairment of the normal capacity to inhibit "perceived reality" (the evidence of our senses), a capacity that evolved as part of the "social brain" to facilitate intersubjective communication within a shared reality. PMID:18622010</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040110227&hterms=iceland&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Diceland','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040110227&hterms=iceland&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Diceland"><span id="translatedtitle">Satellite Geopotential <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Constraints for the Crust of the Greenland-Iceland Region</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>vonFrese, R. R.; Leftwich, T. E.; Kim, H.; Taylor, Patrick T.; Kim, J.</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>Satellite magnetometer observations of the Greenland-Iceland region compare quite well with lower altitude data. The satellite magnetic data <span class="hlt">suggest</span> magnetically enhanced crust was emplaced by the Iceland Plume. Crustal thicknesses, which may be more than 30 km for the Greenland-Scotland Ridge, were obtained from inversion of the compensating terrain gravity effects that were estimated by spectral correlation analysis of the free-air gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and terrain gravity effects. Regional magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> maxima overlie possible thickened crust from eastern Iceland to the Greenland Coast. The Iceland-Faroe Ridge may involve thinner crust than the Greenland-Iceland portion of the Greenland-Scotland Ridge. The gravity derived crustal model exceeds a 0.7 correlation with available seismic estimates. In thermally active areas our gravity Moho estimates are systematically deeper than the seismic estimates <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> local density reductions of the underlying lower crust/upper mantle. In south central Greenland, on the other hand, the gravity Moho estimates are shallower than seismic estimates to <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a local enhancement of the lower crust/upper mantle density. The dichotomous crust of the Greenland-Iceland and Iceland-Faroe Ridges <span class="hlt">suggests</span> unequal crustal development by the Iceland Plume and the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, where more crustal material may have been contributed to the North Atlantic Plate than the Eurasian Plate. A new thermal modeling scheme based on Poisson's relation between point pole gravity and thermal <span class="hlt">potentials</span> allows estimation of magnetic crustal thicknesses. Subsequent magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> inversion for susceptibility contrasts infers crustal development of the Greenland-Scotland Ridge by temporally variable pulses in plume strength.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011EOSTr..92Q.256S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011EOSTr..92Q.256S"><span id="translatedtitle">Seasonal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the Canary Current</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Schultz, Colin</p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>Along the northwestern coast of Africa lies an important fishery, stimulated by an upwelling of cold, nutrient-rich, deep-ocean water. Driven by a complex convergence of ocean currents, the waters between the coast, the Portuguese island of Madeira, and the Canary Islands are known to vary dramatically throughout the year, seeing coastal current reversals near the shore and the location of the large-scale Canary Current drifting seasonally, moving offshore in the winter before returning toward the coast in the summer. To sort out the trigger for this seasonal drift, Mason et al. produced a high-resolution model of the Canary Current that captures details of its interaction with the coastal region where the deep water upwelling occurs. The authors found a pair of circular seasonal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that they <span class="hlt">suggest</span> control the strength and location of the Canary Current. The first, formed in late autumn, is a persistent, clockwise-spinning region of elevated sea surface height and increased flow rates. Its counterpart, a counterclockwise-rotating sea surface depression, is formed in the spring. Both <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> spawn near the African coast and meander westward at around 2.6 kilometers per day, pushing their way out of the region over the course of a year. (Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans, doi:10.1029/2010JC006665, 2011)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25088266','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25088266"><span id="translatedtitle">Congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the urinary tract.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pohl, Hans G; Belman, A Barry</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The upper urinary tract forms as a consequence of the reciprocal inductive signals between the metanephric mesenchyme and ureteric bud. A clue to the timing of events leading to an abnormality of the upper urinary tract can be the presence also of associated <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of internal genitalia since separation of these systems occurs at about the 10th week of gestation. Prenatal sonography has facilitated the detection of urological abnormalities presenting with hydronephrosis. Hydronephrosis <span class="hlt">suggests</span> obstruction, but by itself cannot be equated with it. Instead, further radiographic imaging is required to delineate anatomy and function. Now, moreover, non-surgical management of CAKUT should be considered whenever possible. Despite the widespread use of prenatal screening sonography that usually identifies the majority of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the urinary tract, many children still present with febrile urinary tract infection (UTI). Regardless of the etiology for the presentation, the goal of management is preservation of renal function through mitigation of the risk for recurrent UTI and/or obstruction. In the past many children underwent surgical repair aimed at normalization of the appearance of the urinary tract. Today, management has evolved such that in most cases surgical reconstruction is performed only after a period of observation - with or without urinary prophylaxis. The opinions presented in this section are not espoused by all pediatric urologists but represent instead the practice that has evolved at Children's National Medical Center (Washington DC) based significantly on information obtained by nuclear renography, in addition to sonography and contrast cystography. PMID:25088266</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8693167','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8693167"><span id="translatedtitle">[Ectopic pregnancy: factors related to ovum <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>?].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bouyer, J; Tharaux-Deneux, C; Coste, J; Job-Spira, N</p> <p>1996-04-01</p> <p>Identified risk factors for ectopic pregnancy (prior pelvic inflammatory disease, smoking at the time of conception, intrauterine device, obstetrical and surgical history) explain from 60 to 65% of the cases. Egg <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may also be a risk factor as it is likely that the transport of an abnormal egg along the uterine tube is less efficient than a normal one. We tested this hypothesis with data from two case-control studies with the same design covering a total of 1955 women. The risk of ectopic pregnancy increased specifically with age, which is compatible with our hypothesis. We also studied the associations with spontaneous abortion, considered to be a marker of the risk of pregnancies involving chromosomal malformations. We observed an association between ectopic pregnancy and spontaneous abortions (especially recurrent abortions), not explained by other known risk factors. Although our data do not supply a single definitive demonstration, our results converge to <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that egg chromosomal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may play a part in ectopic pregnancy aetiology. PMID:8693167</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26519554','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26519554"><span id="translatedtitle">Detecting syntactic and semantic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in schizophrenia.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Moro, Andrea; Bambini, Valentina; Bosia, Marta; Anselmetti, Simona; Riccaboni, Roberta; Cappa, Stefano F; Smeraldi, Enrico; Cavallaro, Roberto</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>One of the major challenges in the study of language in schizophrenia is to identify specific levels of the linguistic structure that might be selectively impaired. While historically a main semantic deficit has been widely claimed, results are mixed, with also evidence of syntactic impairment. This might be due to heterogeneity in materials and paradigms across studies, which often do not allow to tap into single linguistic components. Moreover, the interaction between linguistic and neurocognitive deficits is still unclear. In this study, we concentrated on syntactic and semantic knowledge. We employed an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection task including short and long sentences with either syntactic errors violating the principles of Universal Grammar, or a novel form of semantic errors, resulting from a contradiction in the computation of the whole sentence meaning. Fifty-eight patients with diagnosis of schizophrenia were compared to 30 healthy subjects. Results showed that, in patients, only the ability to identify syntactic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, both in short and long sentences, was impaired. This result cannot be explained by working memory abilities or psychopathological features. These findings <span class="hlt">suggest</span> the presence of an impairment of syntactic knowledge in schizophrenia, at least partially independent of the cognitive and psychopathological profile. On the contrary, we cannot conclude that there is a semantic impairment, at least in terms of compositional semantics abilities. PMID:26519554</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GeoRL..42.4801N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GeoRL..42.4801N"><span id="translatedtitle">Interpreting fluid pressure <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in shallow intraplate argillaceous formations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Neuzil, C. E.</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>Investigations have revealed several instances of apparently isolated highs or lows in pore fluid <span class="hlt">potential</span> in shallow (< ~ 1 km depth) argillaceous formations in intraplate settings. Formations with the pressure <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are distinguished by (1) smaller ratios of hydraulic conductivity to formation thickness and (2) smaller hydraulic (or pressure) diffusivities than those without <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. This is consistent with transient Darcian flow caused by strain at rates of ~ 10-17 to 10-16 s-1, by significant perturbing events in the past 104 to 106 annum or by some combination of the two. Plausible causes include erosional downwasting, tectonic strain, and glaciation. In this conceptualization the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> provide constraints on formation-scale flow properties, flow history, and local geological forcing in the last 106 annum and in particular indicate zones of low permeability (10-19-10-22 m2) that could be useful for isolation of nuclear waste.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19950017263','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19950017263"><span id="translatedtitle">Attention focusing and <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection in systems monitoring</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Doyle, Richard J.</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>Any attempt to introduce automation into the monitoring of complex physical systems must start from a robust <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection capability. This task is far from straightforward, for a single definition of what constitutes an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is difficult to come by. In addition, to make the monitoring process efficient, and to avoid the <span class="hlt">potential</span> for information overload on human operators, attention focusing must also be addressed. When an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> occurs, more often than not several sensors are affected, and the partially redundant information they provide can be confusing, particularly in a crisis situation where a response is needed quickly. The focus of this paper is a new technique for attention focusing. The technique involves reasoning about the distance between two frequency distributions, and is used to detect both anomalous system parameters and 'broken' causal dependencies. These two forms of information together isolate the locus of anomalous behavior in the system being monitored.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/445629','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/445629"><span id="translatedtitle">Correlation of cerium <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with indicators of paleoenvironment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>MacLeod, K.G.; Irving, A.J.</p> <p>1996-09-01</p> <p>Among 21 whole-rock samples of the Upper Cretaceous Niobrara Formation from Colorado, the abundance of cerium relative to other rate earth elements (Ce <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>), the weight percent organic carbon (%C{sub org}), and the intensity of bioturbation all covary. This covariation is provocative because %C{sub org} and intensity of bioturbation track changes in the concentration of oxygen in the local water column at the time of deposition (Savrda and Bottjer 1989). Ce <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in apatite-rich fractions of the Maastrichtian Zumaya-Algorta Formation from France and Spain and the Miocene Monterey Formation from California show changes that also may coincide with changes in ancient oxygen levels. Results for the Niobrara samples are the closest correspondence demonstrated between paleo-redox conditions and Ce <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, but the authors cannot yet determine whether the correspondence reflects a cause-and-effect relationship. Variation in Ce <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is influenced by a number of factors, including terrigenous input, depositional environment, and diagenetic conditions. <span class="hlt">Potential</span> interplay of these factors prevents a unique interpretation of the whole-rock data; dissecting whole-rock Ce <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> through analysis of isolated sedimentary components, though, is a promising avenue of research.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1081686','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1081686"><span id="translatedtitle">Automatic Construction of <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detectors from Graphical Models</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Ferragut, Erik M; Darmon, David M; Shue, Craig A; Kelley, Stephen</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Detection of rare or previously unseen attacks in cyber security presents a central challenge: how does one search for a sufficiently wide variety of types of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and yet allow the process to scale to increasingly complex data? In particular, creating each <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detector manually and training each one separately presents untenable strains on both human and computer resources. In this paper we propose a systematic method for constructing a <span class="hlt">potentially</span> very large number of complementary <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detectors from a single probabilistic model of the data. Only one model needs to be trained, but numerous detectors can then be implemented. This approach promises to scale better than manual methods to the complex heterogeneity of real-life data. As an example, we develop a Latent Dirichlet Allocation probability model of TCP connections entering Oak Ridge National Laboratory. We show that several detectors can be automatically constructed from the model and will provide <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection at flow, sub-flow, and host (both server and client) levels. This demonstrates how the fundamental connection between <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection and probabilistic modeling can be exploited to develop more robust operational solutions.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_13 --> <div id="page_14" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="261"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5026785','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5026785"><span id="translatedtitle">Iridium <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> approximately synchronous with terminal eocene extinctions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Alvarez, W.; Asaro, F.; Michel, H.V.; Alvarez, L.W.</p> <p>1982-05-21</p> <p>An iridium <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> has been found in coincidence with the known microtektite level in cores from Deep Sea Drilling Project site 149 in the Caribbean Sea. The iridium was probably not in the microtektites but deposited simultaneously with them; this could occur if the iridium was deposited from a dust cloud resulting from a bolide impact, as <span class="hlt">suggested</span> for the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> associated with the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary. Other workers have deduced that the microtektites are part of the North American strewn tektite field, which is dated at about 34 million years before present, and that the microtektite horizon in deep-sea cores is synchronous with the extinction of five radiolarian species. Mass extinctions also occur in terrestrial mammals within 4 million years of this time. The iridium <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and the tektites and microtektites are supportive of a major bolide impact about 34 million years ago.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19770049816&hterms=facts+solar+power&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dfacts%2Bsolar%2Bpower','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19770049816&hterms=facts+solar+power&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dfacts%2Bsolar%2Bpower"><span id="translatedtitle">Isotopic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and proton irradiation in the early solar system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Clayton, D. D.; Dwek, E.; Woosley, S. E.</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>Nuclear cross sections relevant to the various isotopic-abundance <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> found in solar-system objects are evaluated in an attempt to set constraints on the hypothesized mechanism of irradiation of forming planetesimals by energetic protons from the young sun. A power-law proton spectrum is adopted, attention is restricted to proton energies less than about 20 MeV, and average cross sections are calculated for several reactions that might be expected to lead to the observed <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The following specific <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are examined in detail: Al-26, Na-22, Xe-126, I-129, Kr-80, V-50, Nb-92, La-138, Ta-180, Hg-196, K-40, Ar-36, O-17, O-18, N-15, C-13, Li, Be, and B. It is <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that the picture of presolar-grain carriers accounts for the facts more naturally than do irradiation models.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ESASP.722E.261M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ESASP.722E.261M"><span id="translatedtitle">Method For Object-Based <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection In Hyperspectral Images</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Martinez de Agirre, Alex; Rodriguez-Cuenca, Borja; Alonso, Maria Concepcion; del Val, Alberto</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> detection in aerial and satellite images is important in location, reconnaissance, and surveillance tasks. In remote sensing, the images that best achieve these objectives are hyperspectral imagery. These images provide virtually continuous information about the electromagnetic spectrum, resulting in a high correlation between the bands in that spectrum. For this reason, one of the challenges in hyperspectral image analysis is develop an efficient method for dimensionality reduction. In this work, a segmented principal component transformation for a proper band reduction is proposed. For <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection, we <span class="hlt">suggest</span> such an analysis from an object-based perspective. Several segmentation algorithms have been tested in order to consider some regions of the image in which the pixels exhibit a uniform spectral response. In this paper, we present an automatic method for detecting object-based <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in hyperspectral images using graph theory.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985PhRvB..32.5356P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985PhRvB..32.5356P"><span id="translatedtitle">T3 specific-heat <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in network solids</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Phillips, J. C.</p> <p>1985-10-01</p> <p>A large T3 specific-heat <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> associated with a vibrational mode near 40 cm-1 is found in cristobalite and vitreous silica, but not in quartz or g-B2O3. A material-specific structural model is proposed for this <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The model also explains the 40- and 80-cm-1 modes observed by neutron scattering in cristobalite and g-SiO2 as well as the absence of dispersion in the hypersonic transverse sound velocity. Specific relations with recently observed <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the 775-cm-1 Raman band of mixed alkali silicates are <span class="hlt">suggested</span> and specific experiments designed to test phase separation at the elemental molecular level (true spinodal decomposition) are proposed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900025644&hterms=Cenozoic&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3DCenozoic','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900025644&hterms=Cenozoic&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3DCenozoic"><span id="translatedtitle">Constraints on the deep structure and dynamic processes beneath the Alps and adjacent regions from an analysis of gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Lyon-Caen, Helene; Molnar, Peter</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>Gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over the Alps and the Molasse Basin are examined, focusing on the relationship between the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the tectonic processes beneath the region. Bouguer gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> measured in France, Germany, Italy, and Switzerland are analyzed. No large isostatic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are observed over the Alps and an elastic model is unable to account for gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over the Molasse Basin. These results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the dynamic processes that flexed the European plate down, forming the Molasse Basin and building the Alpine chain, have waned. It is proposed that the late Cenozoic uplift of the region may be due to a diminution or termination of downwelling of mantle material.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20030025663','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20030025663"><span id="translatedtitle">Satellite GN and C <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Trends</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Robertson, Brent; Stoneking, Eric</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>On-orbit <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> records for satellites launched from 1990 through 2001 are reviewed to determine recent trends of un-manned space mission critical failures. <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> categorized by subsystems show that Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) subsystems have a high number of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that result in a mission critical failure when compared to other subsystems. A mission critical failure is defined as a premature loss of a satellite or loss of its ability to perform its primary mission during its design life. The majority of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are shown to occur early in the mission, usually within one year from launch. GN&C <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are categorized by cause and equipment type involved. A statistical analysis of the data is presented for all <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> compared with the GN&C <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for various mission types, orbits and time periods. Conclusions and recommendations are presented for improving mission success and reliability.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4567362','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4567362"><span id="translatedtitle">Coronary <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: what the radiologist should know*</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Neves, Priscilla Ornellas; Andrade, Joalbo; Monção, Henry</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Coronary <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> comprise a diverse group of malformations, some of them asymptomatic with a benign course, and the others related to symptoms as chest pain and sudden death. Such <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may be classified as follows: 1) <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of origination and course; 2) <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of intrinsic coronary arterial anatomy; 3) <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of coronary termination. The origin and the proximal course of anomalous coronary arteries are the main prognostic factors, and interarterial course or a coronary artery is considered to be malignant due its association with increased risk of sudden death. Coronary computed tomography angiography has become the reference method for such an assessment as it detects not only <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in origination of these arteries, but also its course in relation to other mediastinal structures, which plays a relevant role in the definition of the therapeutic management. Finally, it is essential for radiologists to recognize and characterize such <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. PMID:26379322</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26379322','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26379322"><span id="translatedtitle">Coronary <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: what the radiologist should know.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Neves, Priscilla Ornellas; Andrade, Joalbo; Monção, Henry</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Coronary <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> comprise a diverse group of malformations, some of them asymptomatic with a benign course, and the others related to symptoms as chest pain and sudden death. Such <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may be classified as follows: 1) <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of origination and course; 2) <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of intrinsic coronary arterial anatomy; 3) <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of coronary termination. The origin and the proximal course of anomalous coronary arteries are the main prognostic factors, and interarterial course or a coronary artery is considered to be malignant due its association with increased risk of sudden death. Coronary computed tomography angiography has become the reference method for such an assessment as it detects not only <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in origination of these arteries, but also its course in relation to other mediastinal structures, which plays a relevant role in the definition of the therapeutic management. Finally, it is essential for radiologists to recognize and characterize such <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. PMID:26379322</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3937154','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3937154"><span id="translatedtitle">Transcriptomic profiling of TK2 deficient human skeletal muscle <span class="hlt">suggests</span> a role for the p53 signalling pathway and identifies growth and differentiation factor-15 as a <span class="hlt">potential</span> novel biomarker for mitochondrial myopathies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Background Mutations in the gene encoding thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) result in the myopathic form of mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome which is a mitochondrial encephalomyopathy presenting in children. In order to unveil some of the mechanisms involved in this pathology and to identify <span class="hlt">potential</span> biomarkers and therapeutic targets we have investigated the gene expression profile of human skeletal muscle deficient for TK2 using cDNA microarrays. Results We have analysed the whole transcriptome of skeletal muscle from patients with TK2 mutations and compared it to normal muscle and to muscle from patients with other mitochondrial myopathies. We have identified a set of over 700 genes which are differentially expressed in TK2 deficient muscle. Bioinformatics analysis reveals important changes in muscle metabolism, in particular, in glucose and glycogen utilisation, and activation of the starvation response which affects aminoacid and lipid metabolism. We have identified those transcriptional regulators which are likely to be responsible for the observed changes in gene expression. Conclusion Our data point towards the tumor suppressor p53 as the regulator at the centre of a network of genes which are responsible for a coordinated response to TK2 mutations which involves inflammation, activation of muscle cell death by apoptosis and induction of growth and differentiation factor 15 (GDF-15) in muscle and serum. We propose that GDF-15 may represent a <span class="hlt">potential</span> novel biomarker for mitochondrial dysfunction although further studies are required. PMID:24484525</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19820007614','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19820007614"><span id="translatedtitle">The mineralogy of global magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Haggerty, S. E. (Principal Investigator)</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>Progress is reported in developing predictive abilities to evaluate the <span class="hlt">potential</span> stabilities of magnetic minerals in the Earth crust and mantle by: (1) computing oxidation state profiling as a function of temperature and pressure; (2) compiling data on basalts to establish validity of the oxidation state profiles; (3) determining Fe-Ni alloys in association with magnetitie as a function of temperature and oxidation state; and (4) acquiring large chemical data banks on the mineral ilmenite which decomposes to mineral spinel in the presence of high sulfur or carbonate environments in the lower crust upper mantle. In addition to acquiring these data which are related to constraining Curie isotherm depths, an excellent correlation was found between MAGSAT <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data and the geology of West Africa.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24694550','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24694550"><span id="translatedtitle">Understanding water's <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with locally favoured structures.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Russo, John; Tanaka, Hajime</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Water is a complex liquid that displays a surprising array of unusual properties, the most famous being the density maximum at about 4 °C. The origin of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is still a matter of debate, and so far a quantitative description of water's phase behaviour starting from the molecular arrangements is still missing. Here we report a study of the microscopic structural features of water as obtained from computer simulations. We identify locally favoured structures having a high degree of translational order in the second shell, and a two-state model is used to describe the behaviour of liquid water over a wide region of the phase diagram. Furthermore, we show that locally favoured structures not only have translational order in the second shell but also contain five-membered rings of hydrogen-bonded molecules. This <span class="hlt">suggests</span> their mixed character: the former helps crystallization, whereas the latter causes frustration against crystallization. PMID:24694550</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012SPIE.8408E..07B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012SPIE.8408E..07B"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> detection for internet surveillance</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bouma, Henri; Raaijmakers, Stephan; Halma, Arvid; Wedemeijer, Harry</p> <p>2012-06-01</p> <p>Many threats in the real world can be related to activity of persons on the internet. Internet surveillance aims to predict and prevent attacks and to assist in finding suspects based on information from the web. However, the amount of data on the internet rapidly increases and it is time consuming to monitor many websites. In this paper, we present a novel method to automatically monitor trends and find <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on the internet. The system was tested on Twitter data. The results showed that it can successfully recognize abnormal changes in activity or emotion.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140002250','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140002250"><span id="translatedtitle">Hot Flow <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> at Venus</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Collinson, G. A.; Sibeck, David Gary; Boardsen, Scott A.; Moore, Tom; Barabash, S.; Masters, A.; Shane, N.; Slavin, J.A.; Coates, A.J.; Zhang, T. L.; Sarantos, M.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>We present a multi-instrument study of a hot flow <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (HFA) observed by the Venus Express spacecraft in the Venusian foreshock, on 22 March 2008, incorporating both Venus Express Magnetometer and Analyzer of Space Plasmas and Energetic Atoms (ASPERA) plasma observations. Centered on an interplanetary magnetic field discontinuity with inward convective motional electric fields on both sides, with a decreased core field strength, ion observations consistent with a flow deflection, and bounded by compressive heated edges, the properties of this event are consistent with those of HFAs observed at other planets within the solar system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ClDy..tmp..275L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ClDy..tmp..275L"><span id="translatedtitle">How predictable is the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> pattern of the Indian summer rainfall?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Li, Juan; Wang, Bin</p> <p>2015-07-01</p> <p>Century-long efforts have been devoted to seasonal forecast of Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR). Most studies of seasonal forecast so far have focused on predicting the total amount of summer rainfall averaged over the entire India (i.e., all Indian rainfall index-AIRI). However, it is practically more useful to forecast anomalous seasonal rainfall distribution (<span class="hlt">anomaly</span> pattern) across India. The unknown science question is to what extent the anomalous rainfall pattern is predictable. This study attempted to address this question. Assessment of the 46-year (1960-2005) hindcast made by the five state-of-the-art ENSEMBLE coupled dynamic models' multi-model ensemble (MME) prediction reveals that the temporal correlation coefficient (TCC) skill for prediction of AIRI is 0.43, while the area averaged TCC skill for prediction of anomalous rainfall pattern is only 0.16. The present study aims to estimate the predictability of ISMR on regional scales by using Predictable Mode Analysis method and to develop a set of physics-based empirical (P-E) models for prediction of ISMR <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> pattern. We show that the first three observed empirical orthogonal function (EOF) patterns of the ISMR have their distinct dynamical origins rooted in an eastern Pacific-type La Nina, a central Pacific-type La Nina, and a cooling center near dateline, respectively. These equatorial Pacific sea surface temperature <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, while located in different longitudes, can all set up a specific teleconnection pattern that affects Indian monsoon and results in different rainfall EOF patterns. Furthermore, the dynamical models' skill for predicting ISMR distribution primarily comes primarily from these three modes. Therefore, these modes can be regarded as <span class="hlt">potentially</span> predictable modes. If these modes are perfectly predicted, about 51 % of the total observed variability is <span class="hlt">potentially</span> predictable. Based on understanding the lead-lag relationships between the lower boundary <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the predictable modes, a set of P-E models is established to predict the principal component of each predictable mode, so that the ISMR <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> pattern can be predicted by using the sum of the predictable modes. Three validation schemes are used to assess the performance of the P-E models' hindcast and independent forecast. The validated TCC skills of the P-E model here are more than doubled that of dynamical models' MME hindcast, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> a large room for improvement of the current dynamical prediction. The methodology proposed here can be applied to a wide range of climate prediction and predictability studies. The limitation and future improvement are also discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ClDy...46.2847L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ClDy...46.2847L"><span id="translatedtitle">How predictable is the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> pattern of the Indian summer rainfall?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Li, Juan; Wang, Bin</p> <p>2016-05-01</p> <p>Century-long efforts have been devoted to seasonal forecast of Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR). Most studies of seasonal forecast so far have focused on predicting the total amount of summer rainfall averaged over the entire India (i.e., all Indian rainfall index-AIRI). However, it is practically more useful to forecast anomalous seasonal rainfall distribution (<span class="hlt">anomaly</span> pattern) across India. The unknown science question is to what extent the anomalous rainfall pattern is predictable. This study attempted to address this question. Assessment of the 46-year (1960-2005) hindcast made by the five state-of-the-art ENSEMBLE coupled dynamic models' multi-model ensemble (MME) prediction reveals that the temporal correlation coefficient (TCC) skill for prediction of AIRI is 0.43, while the area averaged TCC skill for prediction of anomalous rainfall pattern is only 0.16. The present study aims to estimate the predictability of ISMR on regional scales by using Predictable Mode Analysis method and to develop a set of physics-based empirical (P-E) models for prediction of ISMR <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> pattern. We show that the first three observed empirical orthogonal function (EOF) patterns of the ISMR have their distinct dynamical origins rooted in an eastern Pacific-type La Nina, a central Pacific-type La Nina, and a cooling center near dateline, respectively. These equatorial Pacific sea surface temperature <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, while located in different longitudes, can all set up a specific teleconnection pattern that affects Indian monsoon and results in different rainfall EOF patterns. Furthermore, the dynamical models' skill for predicting ISMR distribution primarily comes primarily from these three modes. Therefore, these modes can be regarded as <span class="hlt">potentially</span> predictable modes. If these modes are perfectly predicted, about 51 % of the total observed variability is <span class="hlt">potentially</span> predictable. Based on understanding the lead-lag relationships between the lower boundary <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the predictable modes, a set of P-E models is established to predict the principal component of each predictable mode, so that the ISMR <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> pattern can be predicted by using the sum of the predictable modes. Three validation schemes are used to assess the performance of the P-E models' hindcast and independent forecast. The validated TCC skills of the P-E model here are more than doubled that of dynamical models' MME hindcast, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> a large room for improvement of the current dynamical prediction. The methodology proposed here can be applied to a wide range of climate prediction and predictability studies. The limitation and future improvement are also discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.T23G2679K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.T23G2679K"><span id="translatedtitle">The early break-up phase of the South Atlantic - magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, volcanism and kinematics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Koopmann, H.; Schreckenberger, B.; Franke, D.; Becker, K.; Schnabel, M.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>The South Atlantic has been generally recognized as a prime example for continental break-up with accompanying volcanic activity reflected today in massive seaward dipping reflector sequences (SDRS) in reflection as well as high velocity lower crust in refraction seismic data. The early history of the South Atlantic passive margin evolution is investigated in the view of interlaced magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> related to seafloor spreading lineations and <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> caused by seaward-dipping reflector sequences (SDRS). As the Atlantic opened from South to North, the magma-poor segments of the southernmost South Atlantic are also the oldest segments of the Ocean. Therefore, the magma-poor segments on the conjugated margins must be considered crucial in the understanding of the initial phase of spreading and rifting concluding in the opening of the South Atlantic. The interpretation of pre-M5n lineations define timing of the termination of excess breakup related volcanic activity and the transition to 'normal' seafloor spreading. Termination of magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> within SDR wedges point towards a scissor-like succession in volcanic activity from south to north, following the opening of the South Atlantic. Reflection, refraction seismic and <span class="hlt">potential</span> field data show that while the two conjugated margins share much of their structural features such as segmentation and abundant volcanism, they are by no means perfectly symmetrical. This is for example shown in shelf width, strength of the magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> or orientation of break-up related sedimentary basins. From our data, we <span class="hlt">suggest</span> changes in spreading and later rifting direction to be the cause of for these asymmetries. This directional change is also <span class="hlt">suggested</span> to be responsible for the change in margin character from magma-poor to volcanic rather than solely a spontaneous change in crustal melt-generation. New models for the magnetic response of SDRS reveal a high variability within the wedges on either side of the Atlantic and between the conjugated margins. Former identifications of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> M11r off Cape Town have already been questioned and can now be shown to be caused by structural or magnetization variations within SDRS.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4459076','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4459076"><span id="translatedtitle">The prevalence of specific dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in a group of Saudi cleft lip and palate patients</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Al-Kharboush, Ghada H.; Al-Balkhi, Khalid M.; Al-Moammar, Khalid</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Objective The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence and distribution of dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in a group of Saudi subjects with cleft lip and palate (CLP), to examine <span class="hlt">potential</span> sex-based associations of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and to compare dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Saudi subjects with CLP with published data from other population groups. Design This retrospective study involved the examination of pre-treatment records obtained from three CLP centers in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, in February and March 2010. The pre-treatment records of 184 subjects with cleft lip and palate were identified and included in this study. Pre-treatment maxillary occlusal radiographs of the cleft region, panoramic radiographs, and orthodontic study models of subjects with CLP were analyzed for dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Results Orthopantomographs and occlusal radiographs may not be reliable for the accurate evaluation of root malformation <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. A total of 265 dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were observed in the 184 study subjects. Hypodontia was observed most commonly (66.8%), followed by microdontia (45.6%), intra-oral ectopic eruption (12.5%), supernumerary teeth (12.5%), intra-nasal ectopic eruption (3.2), and macrodontia (3.2%). No gender difference in the prevalence of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> was observed. Conclusions Dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were common in Saudi subjects with CLP type. This will complicate the health care required for the CL/P subjects. This study was conducted to epidemiologically explore the prevalence of dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> among Saudi Arabian subjects with CLP. PMID:26082573</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120014250','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120014250"><span id="translatedtitle">Characterization of NPP Visible/Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Reflective Solar Bands Dual Gain <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Lee, Shihyan; McIntire, Jeff; Oudari, Hassan</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The Visible/Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) contains six dual gain bands in the reflective solar spectrum. The dual gain bands are designed to switch gain mode at pre-defined thresholds to achieve high resolution at low radiances while maintaining the required dynamic range for science. During pre-launch testing, an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the electronic response before transitioning from high to low gain was discovered and characterized. On-orbit, the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> was confirmed using MODIS data collected during Simultaneous Nadir Overpasses (SNOs). The analysis of the Earth scene data shows that dual gain <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> can be determined at the orbital basis. To characterize the dual gain <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region and electronic offsets were tracked per week during the first 8 month of VIIRS operation. The temporal analysis shows the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region can drift 20 DN and is impacted by detectors DC Restore. The estimated <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> flagging regions cover 2.5 % of the high gain dynamic range and are consistent with prelaunch and on-orbit LUT. The prelaunch results had a smaller <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> range (30-50 DN) and are likely the results of more stable electronics from the shorter data collection time. Finally, this study <span class="hlt">suggests</span> future calibration efforts to focus on the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>'s impact on science products and possible correction method to reduce uncertainties.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014cosp...40E1793L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014cosp...40E1793L"><span id="translatedtitle">Space Weather, Cosmic Rays, and Satellite <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lev, Dorman</p> <p></p> <p>Results are presented of the Satellite <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Project, which aims to improve the methods of safeguarding satellites in the Earth’s magnetosphere from the negative effects of the space environment. <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> data from the USSR and Russian “Kosmos” series satellites in the period 1971-1999 are combined into one database, together with similar information on other spacecraft. This database contains, beyond the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> information, various characteristics of space weather: geomagnetic activity indices (Ap, AE and Dst), fluxes and fluencies of electrons and protons at different energies, high energy cosmic ray variations and other solar, interplanetary and solar wind data. A comparative analysis of the distribution of each of these parameters relative to satellite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> was carried out for the total number of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (about 6000 events), and separately for high altitude orbit satellites ( 5000 events) and low altitude (about 800 events). No relation was found between low and high altitude satellite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Daily numbers of satellite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, averaged by a superposed epoch method around sudden storm commencements and proton event onsets for high (>1500 km) and low (<1500 km) altitude orbits revealed a big difference in behavior. Satellites were divided into several groups according to their orbital characteristics (altitude and inclination). The relation of satellite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to the environmental parameters was found to be different for various orbits, and this should be taken into account when developing <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> frequency models. The preliminary <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> frequency models are presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25947846','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25947846"><span id="translatedtitle">Immatures of Palaearctic species of the weevil genus Sibinia (Coleoptera, <br />Curculionidae): new descriptions and new bionomic data with <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> on their <span class="hlt">potential</span> value in a phylogenetic reconstruction of the genus.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Skuhrovec, Jiří; Gosik, Rafał; Caldara, Roberto; Košťál, Michael</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The larvae and pupae of six species of the Palaearctic genus Sibinia Germar, 1817 are described in detail for the first time. Five of them develop in seeds of Caryophyllaceae and belong to Sibinia (s. str.): S. attalica Gyllenhal, 1835; S. femoralis Germar, 1824; S. tibialis Gyllenhal, 1835; and S. viscariae (Linnaeus, 1760), which are included in the S. femoralis group, and S. sicana Ragusa, 1908, which is included in the S. unicolor Fåhraeus, 1843 group. The sixth species is S. sodalis Germar, 1824, which develops in seeds of Plumbaginaceae and belongs to the subgenus Dichotychius Bedel, 1885. The larvae and pupae of these species are compared with those previously described for some species of the third subgenus, Microtychius Casey, 1910 from the Americas. Some larval characters, but no pupal ones, are useful to support the three subgenera and the two previously mentioned groups of Sibinia s. str., which were previously postulated based on a few adult morphological characters. The immatures of Sibinia are also compared with those of the closely related genus Tychius Germar, 1817, providing some distinctive characters between both genera. New bionomic data on larval and pupal development and adult emergence are reported for all the described species. These data <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that species in this genus are highly homogeneous in life history traits. PMID:25947846</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_14 --> <div id="page_15" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="281"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/133672','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/133672"><span id="translatedtitle">A {open_quotes}balanced{close_quotes} Y:16 translocation with the Y breakpoint just proximal to the Yq heterochromatin boundary associated with Turner-like neonatal lymphedema <span class="hlt">suggests</span> the location of a <span class="hlt">potential</span> anti-Turner gene</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Erickson, R.P.; Hudgins, L.; Stone, J.F.</p> <p>1994-09-01</p> <p>A male patient with Turner-like hydrops in the newborn period (Bonnevie-Ullrich syndrome) was studied. The extensive nucchal cystic hygroma and hydrops resolved over several weeks. The karyotype was 46,X,t(Y;16)(q11.2;q24). The paternal karyotype was normal. Chromosome painting with the heterochromatic long arm repeat DYZ2 disclosed that all the hybridization was on the derivative 16. This was confirmed by chromosome painting with DYZ1, the other major Y long arm heterochromatic repeat, and DYZ3, the Y alphoid, centromeric repeat, which showed chromosomal separation of the 2 stained regions. A {open_quotes}FISHing trip{close_quotes} was performed using the Y YAC contig created in Dr. David Page`s laboratory. This disclosed 2 YACs located just proximal to the Y heterochromatin which {open_quotes}jumped{close_quotes} the translocation. The recent discovery of a candidate gene for the azoospermia factor (AZF) in this region <span class="hlt">suggests</span> the possibility that there are several Y-expressed genes adjacent to the heterochromatin boundary as there are near the pseudoautosomal boundary.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4339076','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4339076"><span id="translatedtitle">THE TRANSCRIPTIONAL SIGNATURES OF CELLS FROM THE HUMAN PEYRONIE'S DISEASE PLAQUE AND THE ABILITY OF THESE CELLS TO GENERATE A PLAQUE IN A RAT MODEL <span class="hlt">SUGGEST</span> <span class="hlt">POTENTIAL</span> THERAPEUTIC TARGETS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Gelfand, R; Vernet, D; Kovanecz, I; Rajfer, J; Gonzalez-Cadavid, NF</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Introduction The success of medical therapies for Peyronie's disease (PD) has not been optimal, possibly because many of them went directly to clinical application without sufficient preclinical scientific research. Previous studies revealed cellular and molecular pathways involved in the formation of the PD plaque, and in particular the role of the myofibroblast. Aims The current work aimed to determine under normal and fibrotic conditions what differentiates PD cells from tunica albuginea (TA) and corpora cavernosa (CC) cells, by defining their global transcriptional signatures and testing in vivo whether PD cells can generate a PD like plaque Main Outcomes Measures Fibroproliferative features of PD cells and identification of related key genes as novel targets to reduce plaque size Methods Human TA, PD, and CC cells were grown with TGFβ1 (TA+, PD+, CC+) or without it (TA−, PD−, CC−) and assayed by: a) immunofluorescence, western blot and RT/PCR for myofibroblast, smooth muscle cell and stem cell markers; b) collagen content; and c) DNA microarray analysis. The ability of PD+ cells to induce a PD like plaque in an immuno-suppressed rat model was assessed by Masson trichrome and Picrosirius Red. Results Upon TGFβ1stimulation, collagen levels were increased by myofibroblasts in the PD+ but not in the CC+ cells. The transcriptional signature of the PD− cells identified fibroproliferative, myogenic (myofibroblasts), inflammatory, and collagen turnover genes, that differentiate them from TA− or CC− cells, and respond to TGFβ1 with a PD+ fibrotic phenotype, by upregulation of IGF1, ACTG2, MYF5, ACTC1, PSTN, COL III, MMP3, and others. The PD+ cells injected into the TA of the rat induce a PD like plaque. Conclusions This <span class="hlt">suggests</span> a novel combination therapy to eliminate a PD plaque, by targeting the identified genes to: a) improve collagenase action by stimulating endogenous MMPs specific to key collagen types, and b) counteract fibromatosis by inhibiting myofibroblast generation, proliferation and/or apoptosis. PMID:25496134</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SGeo...37....5N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SGeo...37....5N"><span id="translatedtitle">Conductivity <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Central Europe</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Neska, Anne</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>This paper is a review of studies which, by applying the magnetotelluric, geomagnetic deep sounding, and magnetovariational sounding methods (the latter refers to usage of the horizontal magnetic tensor), investigate Central Europe for zones of enhanced electrical conductivity. The study areas comprise the region of the Trans-European Suture Zone (i.e. the south Baltic region and Poland), the North German Basin, the German and Czech Variscides, the Pannonian Basin (Hungary), and the Polish, Slovakian, Ukrainian, and Romanian Carpathians. This part of the world is well investigated in terms of data coverage and of the density of published studies, whereas the certainty that the results lead to comprehensive interpretations varies within the reviewed literature. A comparison of spatially coincident or adjacent studies reveals the important role that the data coverage of a distinct conductivity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> plays for the consistency of results. The encountered conductivity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are understood as linked to basin sediments, asthenospheric upwelling, large differences in lithospheric age, and—this concerns most of them, which all concentrate in the middle crust—tectonic boundaries that developed during all mountain building phases that have taken place on the continent.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SGeo..tmp...38N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SGeo..tmp...38N"><span id="translatedtitle">Conductivity <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Central Europe</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Neska, Anne</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>This paper is a review of studies which, by applying the magnetotelluric, geomagnetic deep sounding, and magnetovariational sounding methods (the latter refers to usage of the horizontal magnetic tensor), investigate Central Europe for zones of enhanced electrical conductivity. The study areas comprise the region of the Trans-European Suture Zone (i.e. the south Baltic region and Poland), the North German Basin, the German and Czech Variscides, the Pannonian Basin (Hungary), and the Polish, Slovakian, Ukrainian, and Romanian Carpathians. This part of the world is well investigated in terms of data coverage and of the density of published studies, whereas the certainty that the results lead to comprehensive interpretations varies within the reviewed literature. A comparison of spatially coincident or adjacent studies reveals the important role that the data coverage of a distinct conductivity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> plays for the consistency of results. The encountered conductivity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are understood as linked to basin sediments, asthenospheric upwelling, large differences in lithospheric age, and—this concerns most of them, which all concentrate in the middle crust—tectonic boundaries that developed during all mountain building phases that have taken place on the continent.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4015388','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4015388"><span id="translatedtitle">Deepening Sleep by Hypnotic <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Cordi, Maren J.; Schlarb, Angelika A.; Rasch, Björn</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Study Objectives: Slow wave sleep (SWS) plays a critical role in body restoration and promotes brain plasticity; however, it markedly declines across the lifespan. Despite its importance, effective tools to increase SWS are rare. Here we tested whether a hypnotic <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> to “sleep deeper” extends the amount of SWS. Design: Within-subject, placebo-controlled crossover design. Setting: Sleep laboratory at the University of Zurich, Switzerland. Participants: Seventy healthy females 23.27 ± 3.17 y. Intervention: Participants listened to an auditory text with hypnotic <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> or a control tape before napping for 90 min while high-density electroencephalography was recorded. Measurements and Results: After participants listened to the hypnotic <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> to “sleep deeper” subsequent SWS was increased by 81% and time spent awake was reduced by 67% (with the amount of SWS or wake in the control condition set to 100%). Other sleep stages remained unaffected. Additionally, slow wave activity was significantly enhanced after hypnotic <span class="hlt">suggestions</span>. During the hypnotic tape, parietal theta power increases predicted the hypnosis-induced extension of SWS. Additional experiments confirmed that the beneficial effect of hypnotic <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> on SWS was specific to the hypnotic <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> and did not occur in low <span class="hlt">suggestible</span> participants. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate the effectiveness of hypnotic <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> to specifically increase the amount and duration of slow wave sleep (SWS) in a midday nap using objective measures of sleep in young, healthy, <span class="hlt">suggestible</span> females. Hypnotic <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> might be a successful tool with a lower risk of adverse side effects than pharmacological treatments to extend SWS also in clinical and elderly populations. Citation: Cordi MJ, Schlarb AA, Rasch B. Deepening sleep by hypnotic <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>. SLEEP 2014;37(6):1143-1152. PMID:24882909</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SpWea..13..484L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SpWea..13..484L"><span id="translatedtitle">Space weather conditions during the Galaxy 15 spacecraft <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Loto'aniu, T. M.; Singer, H. J.; Rodriguez, J. V.; Green, J.; Denig, W.; Biesecker, D.; Angelopoulos, V.</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p>On 5 April 2010, the Galaxy 15 spacecraft, orbiting at geosynchronous altitudes, experienced an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> near local midnight when it stopped responding to any ground commands. The <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> has been reported as due to a lockup of the field-programmable gate array within the spacecraft baseband communications unit during an onboard electrostatic discharge (ESD). This study evaluates the space weather conditions at the time of the Galaxy 15 <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The study also compares the plasma and geomagnetic environments around the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> to space weather observations over the operational lifetime of Galaxy 15 up to the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> time. On 5 April, the Galaxy 15 spacecraft encountered severe plasma conditions while it was in eclipse and during the subsequent <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> interval. These conditions included a massive magnetic field dipolarization that injected energetic particles from the magnetotail during a substorm observed by GOES and Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms satellites. Galaxy 15 was located at a near-optimum position and local time to experience the full impact of the injected energetic particles. During the largest previous storm experienced by Galaxy 15 in December 2006, evidence <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that it would not have been exposed to the same level of space weather as on 5 April 2010. Hence, while Galaxy 15 was traversing the nightside on 5 April, it likely experienced, for a short period, the most severe local plasma conditions it had encountered since launch. The most likely contributions to the ESD were interactions of the spacecraft with substorm-injected energetic particles facilitating spacecraft surface charging and deep dielectric charging.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.2508S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.2508S"><span id="translatedtitle">Radio-<span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: tool for earthquakes and tsunami forecasts</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Straser, Valentino; Cataldi, Gabriele; Cataldi, Daniele</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Earthquake is the only among the other geophysical events that doesn't lead directly to death. Tsunami are one of the more dramatic consequences of the seism that happen on global scale. Also in this case, tsunami, we need to improve the tools that can help the forecast of this great geophysical event and the reduction of the dramatic effects on human activities. In order to explain this topic it is necessary that several methods of investigation cooperate and create a scientific network among the complementary branches of science. In this study I <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a new strategy based on the detection of radio-<span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the increasing of the geomagnetic background; we can apply this method two days before the earthquake until the last few hours before it. This research and the data collection started in the 2011 and it show us that more than 400 earthquakes, occurred on global scale, were preceded by the increasing value of the geomagnetic background and the emergence of radio-<span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the frequency range from Elf to Self band. This last range is not globally accepted by the scientific community and it frequency between 0,001 and 3 Hz is included. The detection of radio-<span class="hlt">anomalies</span> data, carried out by the monitoring station Radio Emission Project, in Rome (Italy), it lets us predict a strong seismic event on global scale 6 hour before. The tsunami is a great geophysical event that can embrace several areas of Earth, for this reason the detection of radio-<span class="hlt">anomalies</span> method is useful for the experimentation in operative terms. Another important check about detection of radio-<span class="hlt">anomalies</span> was carried out before and during the strong earthquake and tsunami occurred in Japan in 2011. The radio-<span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that take over in this event and the energy released by the seaquake are linked and proportional between them.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015OptEn..54l3114L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015OptEn..54l3114L"><span id="translatedtitle">Partitioned correlation model for hyperspectral <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lo, Edisanter</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>We develop an algorithm based on a subspace model to detect <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in a hyperspectral image. The <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detector is based on the Mahalanobis distance of a residual from a pixel that is partitioned nonuniformly according to the groups in the spectral components in the pixel. The main background is removed from the pixel by predicting linear combinations of each subset of the partitioned pixel with linear combinations of the main background. The residual is defined to be the difference between the linear combinations of each subset of the partitioned pixel and the linear combinations of the main background. The <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detector is designed for <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that can be best detected in the residual of the pixel. Experimental results using two real hyperspectral images and a simulated dataset show that the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detector outperforms conventional <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detectors.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014GeoRL..41.5139T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014GeoRL..41.5139T"><span id="translatedtitle">Sea level <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> exacerbate beach erosion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Theuerkauf, Ethan J.; Rodriguez, Antonio B.; Fegley, Stephen R.; Luettich, Richard A.</p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>Sea level <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are intra-seasonal increases in water level forced by meteorological and oceanographic processes unrelated to storms. The effects of sea level <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on beach morphology are unknown but important to constrain because these events have been recognized over large stretches of continental margins. Here, we present beach erosion measurements along Onslow Beach, a barrier island on the U.S. East Coast, in response to a year with frequent sea level <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and no major storms. The <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> enabled extensive erosion, which was similar and in most places greater than the erosion that occurred during a year with a hurricane. These results highlight the importance of sea level <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in facilitating coastal erosion and advocate for their inclusion in beach-erosion models and management plans. Sea level <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> amplify the erosive effects of accelerated sea level rise and changes in storminess associated with global climate change.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19820016718','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19820016718"><span id="translatedtitle">Use of MAGSAT <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data for crustal structure and mineral resources in the US Midcontinent</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Carmichael, R. S. (Principal Investigator)</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>Personnel matters related to the processing and interpretation of MAGSAT data are reported. Efforts are being initiated to determine the crustal geology, structure, and <span class="hlt">potential</span> economic consequences to be deduced from the satellite magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in conjuction with correlative data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20060044140&hterms=Mars+Spirit+Rover&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DMars%2BSpirit%2BRover','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20060044140&hterms=Mars+Spirit+Rover&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DMars%2BSpirit%2BRover"><span id="translatedtitle">The Mars Rover Spirit FLASH <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Reeves, Glenn E.; Neilson, Tracy C.</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>The Mars Exploration Rover 'Spirit' suffered a debilitating <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> that prevented communication with Earth for several anxious days. With the eyes of the world upon us, the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> team used each scrap of information, our knowledge of the system, and sheer determination to analyze and fix the problem, then return the vehicle to normal operation. This paper will discuss the Spirit FLASH <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, including the drama of the investigation, the root cause and the lessons learned from the experience.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.1177S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.1177S"><span id="translatedtitle">Crustal Magnetic Field <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> and Global Tectonics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Storetvedt, Karsten</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>A wide variety of evidence <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the ruling isochron (geomagnetic polarity versus age) hypothesis of marine magnetic lineations has no merit - undermining therefore one of the central tenets of plate tectonics. Instead, variable induction by the ambient geomagnetic field is likely to be the principal agent for mega-scale crustal magnetic features - in both oceanic and continental settings. This revitalizes the fault-controlled susceptibility-contrast model of marine magnetic lineations, originally proposed in the late 1960s. Thus, the marine magnetic 'striping' may be ascribed to tectonic shearing and related, but variable, disintegration of the original iron-oxide mineralogy, having developed primarily along one of the two pan-global sets of orthogonal fractures and faults. In this way, fault zones (having the more advanced mineral alteration) would be characterized by relatively low susceptibility, while more moderately affected crustal sections (located between principal fault zones) would be likely to have less altered oxide mineralogy and therefore higher magnetic susceptibility. On this basis, induction by the present geomagnetic field is likely to produce oscillating magnetic field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with axis along the principal shear grain. The modus operandi of the alternative magneto-tectonic interpretation is inertia-driven wrenching of the global Alpine age palaeo-lithosphere - triggered by changes in Earth's rotation. Increasing sub-crustal loss to the upper mantle during the Upper Mesozoic had left the ensuing Alpine Earth in a tectonically unstable state. Thus, sub-crustal eclogitization and associated gravity-driven delamination to the upper mantle led to a certain degree of planetary acceleration which in turn gave rise to latitude-dependent, westward inertial wrenching of the global palaeo-lithosphere. During this process, 1) the thin and mechanically fragile oceanic crust were deformed into a new type of broad fold belts, and 2) the continents were subjected to relative 'in situ' rotations (mostly moderate). Examples of marine magnetic lineations with landward continuation along prominent transcurrent fault zones, and the fact that striped marine magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may display orthogonal networks - concordant with the ubiquitous system of rectilinear fractures, faults and joints - corroborate the wrench tectonic interpretation of crustal field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvD..93f5007J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvD..93f5007J"><span id="translatedtitle">Galilean <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and their effect on hydrodynamics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jain, Akash</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>We study flavor and gravitational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Galilean theories coupled to torsional Newton-Cartan backgrounds. We establish that the relativistic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> inflow mechanism with an appropriately modified <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> polynomial can be used to generate these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Similar to the relativistic case, we find that Galilean <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> also survive only in even dimensions. Further, these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> only effect the flavor and rotational symmetries of a Galilean theory; in particular, the Milne boost symmetry remains nonanomalous. We also extend the transgression machinery used in relativistic fluids to Galilean fluids, and use it to determine how these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> affect the constitutive relations of a Galilean fluid. Unrelated to the Galilean fluids, we propose an analogue of the off-shell second law of thermodynamics for relativistic fluids, to include torsion and a conserved spin current in the vielbein formalism. Interestingly, we find that even in the absence of spin current and torsion the entropy currents in the two formalisms are different: while the usual entropy current gets a contribution from the gravitational <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, the entropy current in the vielbein formalism does not have any <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-induced part.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19790011349','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19790011349"><span id="translatedtitle">The magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of the Ivreazone</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Albert, G.</p> <p>1979-01-01</p> <p>A magnetic field survey was made in the Ivreazone in 1969/70. The results were: significant <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of the vertical intensity is found. It follows the basic main part of the Ivrea-Verbano zone and continues to the south. The width of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is about 10 km, the maximum measures about +800 gamma. The model interpretation shows that possibly the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> belongs to an amphibolitic body, which in connection with the Ivrea-body was found by deep seismic sounding. Therefore, the magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> provides further evidence for the conception that the Ivrea-body has to be regarded as a chip of earthmantle material pushed upward by tectonic processes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19840017065&hterms=Cenozoic&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3DCenozoic','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19840017065&hterms=Cenozoic&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3DCenozoic"><span id="translatedtitle">Satellite Magnetic <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> of Africa and Europe</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hinze, W. J.; Vonfrese, R. R. B. (Principal Investigator); Olivier, R.</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>Preliminary MAGSAT scalar magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data of Africa, Europe, and adjacent marine areas were reduced to the pole assuming a constant inducing Earth's magnetic field of 60,000 nT. This process leads to a consistent <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data set free from marked variations in directional and intensity effects of the Earth's magnetic field over this extensive region. The resulting data are correlated with long wave length-pass filtered free-air gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>; regional heat flow, and tectonic data to investigate magatectonic elements and the region's geologic history. Magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are related to both ancient as well as more recent Cenozoic structural features.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996PhLB..369..108A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996PhLB..369..108A"><span id="translatedtitle">Consistent <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the induced W gravities</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Abud, Mario; Ader, Jean-Pierre; Cappiello, Luigi</p> <p>1996-02-01</p> <p>The BRST <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> which may be present in the induced Wn gravity quantized on the light-cone is evaluated in the geometrical framework of Zucchini. The cocycles linked by the cohomology of the BRST operator to the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> are straightforwardly calculated thanks to the analogy between this formulation and the Yang-Mills theory. We give also a conformally covariant formulation of these quantities including the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, which is valid on arbitrary Riemann surfaces. The example of the W3 theory is discussed and a comparison with other candidates for the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> available in the literature is presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21468506','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21468506"><span id="translatedtitle">[Anorectal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and maternal care].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Melo, Manuela Costa; Kamada, Ivone</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>This purpose of the article was to make a bibliographic review about anorectal malformations and maternal cares. The matter was addressed through an integrative review undertaken in consultation of articles published in the databases indexed in the Virtual Health Library. We identified 25 publications that met the inclusion and exclusion criteria pre-established. In the studies reviewed, there were different study designs, demonstrating that some children born with anorectal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> requiring urgent surgery. Health professionals, along with the parents, need to develop partnerships that would enable a long-term monitoring and careful guidance. It is necessary to do more research on the subject, with methodological proposals that reflect the essence of the best care of an ostomized child. PMID:21468506</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25768048','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25768048"><span id="translatedtitle">Congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of superior vena cava and their implications in central venous catheterization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rossi, Umberto G; Rigamonti, Paolo; Torcia, Pierluca; Mauri, Giovanni; Brunini, Francesca; Rossi, Michele; Gallieni, Maurizio; Cariati, Maurizio</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of superior vena cava (SVC) are generally discovered incidentally during central venous catheter (CVC) insertion, pacemaker electrode placement, and cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. Persistent left SVC (PLSVC) is a rare (0.3%) <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in healthy subjects, usually asymptomatic, but when present and undiagnosed, it may be associated with difficulties and complications of CVC placement. In individuals with congenital heart <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, its prevalence may be up to 10 times higher than in the general population.In this perspective, awareness of the importance of the incidental finding of PLSV during CVC placement is crucial. To improve knowledge of this rare but <span class="hlt">potentially</span> dangerous condition, we describe the embryological origin of SVC, its normal anatomy, and possible congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the venous system and of the heart, including the presence of a right to left cardiac shunt. Diagnosis of PLSVC as well as the clinical complications and technical impact of SVC congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for CVC placement are emphasized. PMID:25768048</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.T51B1882N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.T51B1882N"><span id="translatedtitle">Magnetic <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in the South of Corad Rise, the Southern Indian Ocean</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nogi, Y.; Ikehara, M.; Nakamura, Y.; Kameo, K.; Katsuki, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kita, S.</p> <p>2008-12-01</p> <p>Seafloor age estimated from magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the Southern Indian Ocean are vital to understanding the fragmentation process of the Gondwana, but the seafloor age still remain less well-defined because of the sparse observations in this area. To understand the seafloor spreading history related to the Gondwana breakup, total intensity and vector geomagnetic field measurements as well as swath bathymetry mapping were conducted during the R/V Hakuho-maru cruise KH-07-4 Leg3 in the Southern Indian Ocean between Cape Town, South Africa, and off Lützow-Holm Bay, Antarctica. Magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data have been collected along WNW-ESE trending structures of unknown origin inferred from satellite gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> just to the south of Conrad Rise. We have also collected magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data along NNE-SSW trending lineaments from satellite gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data between the south of the Conrad Rise and off Lützow-Holm Bay. Magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with amplitude of about 500 nT, originating from normal and reversed magnetization of oceanic crust, are detected along the WNW-ESE trending structures just to the south of Conrad Rise. These magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> possibly belong to Mesozoic magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> sequence and this shows the part of the oceanic crust just to the south of the Conrad Rise formed before the long Cretaceous normal polarity superchron although magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> C34 has been identified just to the north of the Conrad Rise. Magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with amplitude of about 300 nT are also observed along the NNE-SSW trending lineaments between the south of the Conrad Rise and off Lützow-Holm Bay, and most likely indicate Mesozoic magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> sequence. These <span class="hlt">suggest</span> the extinct spreading axes in the south of Conrad Rise and complicated seafloor spreading history in this area.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008GeoRL..3518807S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008GeoRL..3518807S"><span id="translatedtitle">False causality between Atlantic hurricane activity fluctuations and seasonal lower atmospheric wind <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Swanson, Kyle L.</p> <p>2008-09-01</p> <p>Statistical studies <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a link between <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in seasonally averaged lower atmospheric dynamical fields and Atlantic hurricane activity. Here we show that lower atmospheric seasonal wind <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> result primarily from the presence of the hurricanes themselves. This is done by assuming a hypothetical vortex structure whose radial structure is constrained by observations derived from aircraft probing of tropical cyclones and whose vorticity magnitude is scaled to time varying, best track intensities. Seasonal vorticity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with Atlantic hurricane activity are accumulated by summing these idealized vorticities along observed tropical cyclone tracks. Winds associated with these seasonal vorticity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> explain the bulk of observed hurricane activity-related fluctuations in the seasonally averaged lower tropospheric wind. Hence, seasonal wind <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> appear to have little causal information relevant to understanding why hurricane activity in the Atlantic has fluctuated in the past, and may be of limited value in projecting future hurricane activity.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_15 --> <div id="page_16" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="301"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.U14B..07S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.U14B..07S"><span id="translatedtitle">Causality and contamination in the attribution of Atlantic hurricane activity fluctuations to seasonal atmospheric <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Swanson, K.</p> <p>2008-12-01</p> <p>Statistical studies <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a link between <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in tropical seasonally averaged atmospheric wind fields and Atlantic hurricane activity. Here we show that a significant fraction of those hurricane-associated atmospheric seasonal wind <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> result from the presence of the hurricanes themselves. This is done by assuming a hypothetical hurricane vortex structure whose radial and vertical structure is constrained by observations derived from aircraft probing of tropical cyclones. Seasonal vorticity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with Atlantic hurricane activity are accumulated by summing these idealized vorticies along observed tropical cyclone tracks. Winds associated with these seasonal vorticity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> explain the bulk of observed hurricane activity-related fluctuations in the seasonally averaged lower tropospheric wind and tropical Atlantic vertical wind shear. Hence, seasonal wind <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> appear to have limited causal information relevant to understanding why hurricane activity in the Atlantic has fluctuated in the past, and may be of limited value in projecting future hurricane activity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.1761C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.1761C"><span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of Solar Irradiation <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Long Term Over India</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cony, M.; Polo, J.; Martin, L.; Navarro, A.; Serra, I.</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>India has a high <span class="hlt">potential</span> for solar energy applications due to its geographic position within the Sun Belt and the large number of cloudless days in many regions of the country. However, certain regions of India, particularly those largely populated, can exhibit large aerosol loading in the atmosphere as a consequence of anthropogenic emissions that could have a negative feedback in the solar resource <span class="hlt">potential</span>. This effect, named as solar dimming, has already been observed in India, and in some other regions in the world, by some authors using ground data from the last two decades. The recent interest in the promotion of solar energy applications in India highlights the need of extending and improving the knowledge of the solar radiation resources in this country, since most of the long term measurements available correspond to global horizontal radiation and most of them are also located big cities or highly populated areas. In addition, accurate knowledge on the aerosol column quantification and on its dynamical behavior with high spatial resolution is particularly important in the case of India, due to their impact on direct normal irradiation. Long term studies of solar irradiation over India can be performed using monthly means of global hemispheric irradiation measurements from the Indian Meteorological Department. Ground data are available from 1964 till today through the World Radiation Data Centre that publish these values in the web. This work shows a long term analysis of solar irradiation in India using <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> techniques and trends in ten places over India. Most of the places have exhibit a decreasing trend and negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> confirming thus the darkening effect already reported by solar dimming studies. The analysis of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> has also found two periods of different behavior. From 1964 till 1988 the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> observed were positive and the last 20 years seems to be a period of negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. This observation is also consequent with solar dimming effect, apparently increased during the last two decades due to the increase of aerosol loading in the atmosphere. These results remark the important of having accurate knowledge of atmospheric aerosol loading and its dynamics over India with high spatial resolution in the framework of solar energy deployment in the country. It is worth to mention that greater <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and a noticeable decreasing trend found in Calcutta could be correlated with the highly population rate, and thus the greater the population density of the area the greater the negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the decreasing trend of solar irradiation monthly means.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1613849C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1613849C"><span id="translatedtitle">Global Horizontal Irradiance <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Long Term Series Over India</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cony, Marco; Liria, Juan; Weisenberg, Ralf; Serrano, Enrique</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>India has a high <span class="hlt">potential</span> for solar energy applications due to its geographic position within the Sun Belt and the large number of cloudless days in many regions of the country. However, certain regions of India, particularly those largely populated, can exhibit large aerosol loading in the atmosphere as a consequence of anthropogenic emissions that could have a negative feedback in the solar resource <span class="hlt">potential</span>. This effect, named as solar dimming, has already been observed in India, and in some other regions in the world, by some authors using ground data from the last two decades. The recent interest in the promotion of solar energy applications in India highlights the need of extending and improving the knowledge of the solar radiation resources in this country, since most of the long term measurements available correspond to global horizontal radiation (GHI) and most of them are also located big cities or highly populated areas. In addition, accurate knowledge on the aerosol column quantification and on its dynamical behavior with high spatial resolution is particularly important in the case of India, due to their impact on direct normal irradiation. Long term studies of solar irradiation over India can be performed using monthly means of GHI measurements from the Indian Meteorological Department. Ground data are available from 1964 till today through the World Radiation Data Centre that publish these values in the web. This work shows a long term analysis of GHI using <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> techniques over ten different sites over India. Besides, techniques of linear trends have been applied for to show the evolution over this period. The analysis of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> has also found two periods of different behavior. From 1964 till 1988 the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> observed were positive and the last 20 years seems to be a period of negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The results exhibit a decreasing trend and negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> confirming thus the darkening effect already reported by solar dimming studies. This observation is also consequent with solar dimming effect, apparently increased during the last two decades due to the increase of aerosol loading in the atmosphere. These results remark the important of having accurate knowledge of atmospheric aerosol loading and its dynamics over India with high spatial resolution in the framework of solar energy deployment in the country. It is worth to mention that greater <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and a noticeable decreasing trend found in Calcutta could be correlated with the highly population rate, and thus the greater the population density of the area the greater the negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the decreasing trend of solar irradiation monthly means.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JChPh.140d4503S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JChPh.140d4503S"><span id="translatedtitle">Diffusivity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in modified Stillinger-Weber liquids</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sengupta, Shiladitya; Vasisht, Vishwas V.; Sastry, Srikanth</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>By modifying the tetrahedrality (the strength of the three body interactions) in the well-known Stillinger-Weber model for silicon, we study the diffusivity of a series of model liquids as a function of tetrahedrality and temperature at fixed pressure. Previous work has shown that at constant temperature, the diffusivity exhibits a maximum as a function of tetrahedrality, which we refer to as the diffusivity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, in analogy with the well-known <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in water upon variation of pressure at constant temperature. We explore to what extent the structural and thermodynamic changes accompanying changes in the interaction <span class="hlt">potential</span> can help rationalize the diffusivity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, by employing the Rosenfeld relation between diffusivity and the excess entropy (over the ideal gas reference value), and the pair correlation entropy, which provides an approximation to the excess entropy in terms of the pair correlation function. We find that in the modified Stillinger-Weber liquids, the Rosenfeld relation works well above the melting temperatures but exhibits deviations below, with the deviations becoming smaller for smaller tetrahedrality. Further we find that both the excess entropy and the pair correlation entropy at constant temperature go through maxima as a function of the tetrahedrality, thus demonstrating the close relationship between structural, thermodynamic, and dynamical <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the modified Stillinger-Weber liquids.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/963957','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/963957"><span id="translatedtitle">A RE-INTRODUCTION TO <span class="hlt">ANOMALIES</span> OF CRITICALITY</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>PUIGH RJ</p> <p>2009-09-09</p> <p>In 1974, a small innocuous document was submitted to the American Nuclear Society's Criticality Safety Division for publication that would have lasting impacts on this nuclear field The author was Duane Clayton, manager of the Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Critical Mass Lab, the world's preeminent reactor critical experimenter with plutonium solutions. The document was entitled, '<span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> of Criticality'. '<span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>...' was a compilation of more than thirty separate and distinct examples of departures from what might be commonly expected in the field of nuclear criticality. Mr. Clayton's publication was the derivative of more than ten thousand experiments and countless analytical studies conducted world-wide on every conceivable reactor system imaginable: from fissile bearing solutions to solids, blocks to arrays of fuel rods, low-enriched uranium oxide systems to pure plutonium and highly enriched uranium systems. After publication, the document was commonly used within the nuclear fuel cycle and reactor community to train <span class="hlt">potential</span> criticality/reactor analysts, experimenters and fuel handlers on important things for consideration when designing systems with critically 'safe' parameters in mind The purpose of this paper is to re-introduce '<span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> of Criticality' to the current Criticality Safety community and to add new '<span class="hlt">anomalies</span>' to the existing compendium. By so doing, it is the authors' hope that a new generation of nuclear workers and criticality engineers will benefit from its content and might continue to build upon this work in support of the nuclear renaissance that is about to occur.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22255239','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22255239"><span id="translatedtitle">Diffusivity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in modified Stillinger-Weber liquids</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Sengupta, Shiladitya; Vasisht, Vishwas V.; Sastry, Srikanth; Theoretical Sciences Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur Campus, Bangalore 560064 </p> <p>2014-01-28</p> <p>By modifying the tetrahedrality (the strength of the three body interactions) in the well-known Stillinger-Weber model for silicon, we study the diffusivity of a series of model liquids as a function of tetrahedrality and temperature at fixed pressure. Previous work has shown that at constant temperature, the diffusivity exhibits a maximum as a function of tetrahedrality, which we refer to as the diffusivity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, in analogy with the well-known <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in water upon variation of pressure at constant temperature. We explore to what extent the structural and thermodynamic changes accompanying changes in the interaction <span class="hlt">potential</span> can help rationalize the diffusivity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, by employing the Rosenfeld relation between diffusivity and the excess entropy (over the ideal gas reference value), and the pair correlation entropy, which provides an approximation to the excess entropy in terms of the pair correlation function. We find that in the modified Stillinger-Weber liquids, the Rosenfeld relation works well above the melting temperatures but exhibits deviations below, with the deviations becoming smaller for smaller tetrahedrality. Further we find that both the excess entropy and the pair correlation entropy at constant temperature go through maxima as a function of the tetrahedrality, thus demonstrating the close relationship between structural, thermodynamic, and dynamical <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the modified Stillinger-Weber liquids.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19830006295','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19830006295"><span id="translatedtitle">MAGSAT <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> field inversion and interpretation for the US</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Mayhew, M. A. (Principal Investigator)</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>Long wavelength <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the total magnetic field measured by MAGSAT over the United States and adjacent areas are inverted to an equivalent layer crustal magnetization distribution. The model is based on an equal area dipole grid at the Earth's surface. Model resolution, defined as the closest dipole spacing giving a solution having physical significance, is about 220 km for MAGSAT data in the elevation range 300-500 km. The magnetization contours correlate well with large scale tectonic provinces. A higher resolution (200 km) model based on relatively noise free synthetic "pseudodata" is also presented. Magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> component data measured by MAGSAT is compared with synthetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> component fields arising from an equivalent source dipole array at the Earth's surface generated from total field <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data alone. An excellent inverse correlation between apparent magnetization and heat flow in the western U.S. is demonstrated. A regional heat flow map which is presented and compared with published maps, predicts high heat flow in Nebraska and the Dakotas, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> the presence of a "blind" geothermal area of regional extent.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20000085910','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20000085910"><span id="translatedtitle">The Effect of Ocean Currents on Sea Surface Temperature <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Stammer, Detlef; Leeuwenburgh, Olwijn</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>We investigate regional and global-scale correlations between observed <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in sea surface temperature and height. A strong agreement between the two fields is found over a broad range of latitudes for different ocean basins. Both time-longitude plots and wavenumber-frequency spectra <span class="hlt">suggest</span> an advective forcing of SST <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> by a first-mode baroclinic wave field on spatial scales down to 400 km and time scales as short as 1 month. Even though the magnitude of the mean background temperature gradient is determining for the effectiveness of the forcing, there is no obvious seasonality that can be detected in the amplitudes of SST <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Instead, individual wave signatures in the SST can in some cases be followed over periods of two years. The phase relationship between SST and SSH <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is dependent upon frequency and wavenumber and displays a clear decrease of the phase lag toward higher latitudes where the two fields come into phase at low frequencies. Estimates of the damping coefficient are larger than generally obtained for a purely atmospheric feedback. From a global frequency spectrum a damping time scale of 2-3 month was found. Regionally results are very variable and range from 1 month near strong currents to 10 month at low latitudes and in the sub-polar North Atlantic. Strong agreement is found between the first global EOF modes of 10 day averaged and spatially smoothed SST and SSH grids. The accompanying time series display low frequency oscillations in both fields.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014TCD.....8.4823B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014TCD.....8.4823B"><span id="translatedtitle">Recent summer Arctic atmospheric circulation <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in a historical perspective</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Belleflamme, A.; Fettweis, X.; Erpicum, M.</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p>A significant increase in the summertime occurrence of a high pressure area over the Beaufort Sea and Greenland has been observed from the beginning of the 2000's, and particularly between 2007 and 2012. These circulation <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are likely partly responsible for the enhanced Greenland ice sheet melt as well as the Arctic sea ice loss observed since 2007. Therefore, it is interesting to analyse whether similar conditions might have happened since the late 19th century over the Arctic region. We have used an atmospheric circulation type classification based on daily mean sea level pressure and 500 hPa geopotential height data from four reanalysis datasets (ERA-Interim, ERA-40, NCEP/NCAR, and 20CRv2) to put the recent circulation <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in perspective with the atmospheric circulation variability since 1871. We found that circulation conditions similar to 2007-2012 have occurred in the past, despite a higher uncertainty of the reconstructed circulation before 1940. But the recent <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> largely exceed the interannual variability of the atmospheric circulation of the Arctic region. These circulation <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are linked with the North Atlantic Oscillation <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that they are not limited to the Arctic. Finally, they favour summertime Arctic sea ice loss.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SolE....7..751K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SolE....7..751K"><span id="translatedtitle">Geopotential field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and regional tectonic features - two case studies: southern Africa and Germany</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Korte, Monika; Mandea, Mioara</p> <p>2016-05-01</p> <p>Maps of magnetic and gravity field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> provide information about physical properties of the Earth's crust and upper mantle, helpful in understanding geological conditions and tectonic structures. Depending on data availability, whether from the ground, airborne, or from satellites, <span class="hlt">potential</span> field <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> maps contain information on different ranges of spatial wavelengths, roughly corresponding to sources at different depths. Focussing on magnetic data, we compare amplitudes and characteristics of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from maps based on various available data and as measured at geomagnetic repeat stations. Two cases are investigated: southern Africa, characterized by geologically old cratons and strong magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and the smaller region of Germany with much younger crust and weaker <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Estimating lithospheric magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> values from the ground stations' time series (repeat station crustal biases) reveals magnetospheric field contributions causing time-varying offsets of several nT in the results. Similar influences might be one source of discrepancy when merging <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> maps from different epochs. Moreover, we take advantage of recently developed satellite <span class="hlt">potential</span> field models and compare magnetic and gravity gradient <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of ˜ 200 km resolution. Density and magnetization represent independent rock properties and thus provide complementary information on compositional and structural changes. Comparing short- and long-wavelength <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the correlation of rather large-scale magnetic and gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and relating them to known lithospheric structures, we generally find a better agreement in the southern African region than the German region. This probably indicates stronger concordance between near-surface (down to at most a few km) and deeper (several kilometres down to Curie depth) structures in the former area, which can be seen to agree with a thicker lithosphere and a lower heat flux reported in the literature for the southern African region.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=functions+AND+psychologist&pg=5&id=EJ868107','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=functions+AND+psychologist&pg=5&id=EJ868107"><span id="translatedtitle">Prevent Cyberbullying: <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for Parents</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Demaray, Michelle K.; Brown, Christina F.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The school, playground, and neighborhood often come to mind when one thinks about bullying that occurs among children and teens. However, given the significant role technology plays in the lives of today's youth, the <span class="hlt">potential</span> of these media to function as a venue for social interaction that includes victimization, or cyberbullying, also needs to…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=lecture+AND+strategies&pg=2&id=EJ891901','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=lecture+AND+strategies&pg=2&id=EJ891901"><span id="translatedtitle">10 <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for Enhancing Lecturing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Heitzmann, Ray</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Criticism of the lecture method remains a staple of discussion and writing in academia--and most of the time it's deserved! Those interested in improving this aspect of their teaching might wish to consider some or all of the following <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for enhancing lectures. These include: (1) Lectures must start with a "grabber"; (2) Lectures must be…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=lolli&id=EJ550544','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=lolli&id=EJ550544"><span id="translatedtitle">Multiage Misconceptions: <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> from Practice.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Lolli, Elizabeth Monce</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>A former principal of a nongraded elementary school discusses the nongraded, multiage philosophy, effects of multiage grouping, prevalent misconceptions, and <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> from practice. Critics often mistakenly characterize multiage classrooms as homogeneous, unstructured, and team-taught; appropriate for kindergarten and primary children only;…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED362633.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED362633.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for Tech Prep Planning.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Partnership for Academic and Career Education, Pendleton, SC.</p> <p></p> <p>This publication provides <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for tech prep planning and program development throughout Anderson, Oconee, and Pickens County, South Carolina, school districts with the help of Partnership for Academic and Career Education (PACE) staff. Background assumptions are outlined first. Then, 16 planning components are listed to help individual…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/972533','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/972533"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> of Nuclear Criticality, Revision 6</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Clayton, E. D.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Durst, Bonita E.; Erickson, David; Puigh, Raymond J.</p> <p>2010-02-19</p> <p>This report is revision 6 of the <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> of Nuclear Criticality. This report is required reading for the training of criticality professionals in many organizations both nationally and internationally. This report describes many different classes of nuclear criticality <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that are different than expected.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19780033682&hterms=photomultiplier&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dphotomultiplier','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19780033682&hterms=photomultiplier&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dphotomultiplier"><span id="translatedtitle">Photodiode and photomultiplier areal sensitivity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Youngbluth, O., Jr.</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>Several silicon photodiodes and photomultipliers were tested to determine signal variations as a light spot was scanned over the photosensitive surface of these detectors. Qualitative and quantitative data is presented to demonstrate the areal sensitivity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. These <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are related back to the fabrication techniques of the manufacturers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19950057678&hterms=non+natural&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dnon%2Bnatural','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19950057678&hterms=non+natural&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dnon%2Bnatural"><span id="translatedtitle">Contributions of cretaceus quiet zone natural remanent magnetization to Magsat <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the Southwest Indian Ocean</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Fullerton, Lawrence G.; Frey, Herbert V.; Roark, James H.; Thomas, Herman H.</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>The Magsat magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over the Southwest Indian Ocean are modeled using a combination of induced plus viscous remanent magnetization (IM/VRM) and natural remanent magnetization (NRM). Two broad, roughly parallel, SW to NE trending triple-peaked positive <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> dominate the region, one lying south of Africa and the other north of Antarctica. Although these <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> peaks generally correspond with the Agulhas Plateau/Maud Rise, Mozambique Plateau/Astrid Ridge, and Madagascar Ridge/Conrad Rise conjugate pairs, the IM/VRM contribution from structural characteristics (i.e., crustal thickness) accounts for only about 20% of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> amplitudes. A spatially variable but observationally constrained NRM contribution in Cretaceous Quiet Zone (KQZ) crust is required to account for the location, shape, and amplitude contrast of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Many crustal features in the Southwest Indian Ocean near Antarctica have little geophysical data to constrain their structure but do hagve tectonic conjugates near Africa for which much more geophysical data are generally available. Using geophysical and geological constraints from one member to model the magnetization structure of its conjugate reproduces the observed Magsat reduced-to-pole <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over both structures very well. This <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that no significant alteration in their magnetization structure has occurred since the features split. Models of these conjugate structures show that IM/VRM reproduces the Magsat <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with non-KQZ crust but that both IM/VRM and a dominant NRM component are required to explain the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with KQZ crust.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26498888','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26498888"><span id="translatedtitle">Vascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the large bowel.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pellino, G; Candilio, G; De Fatico, G S; Marcellinaro, R; Piccione, A; Cautiero, R; Capozzolo, A; Guerniero, R; Volpicelli, A; Reginelli, A; Corvino, A; Sciaudone, G; Canonico, S; Selvaggi, F</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Vascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the large bowel, commonly known as vascular malformations of the colon (VMC), constitute a rare but important condition, <span class="hlt">potentially</span> causing significant morbidity and mortality. Our aim is to provide an up-to-date, practical summary evaluating this disease entity, focussing on pathogenesis, as well as diagnostic and therapeutic modalities. We reviewed available data in the literature, and discussed it in the form of a narrative, readily applicable review. Most VMC (over 70%) are detected in the caecum and ascending colon, and affect people aged over 50 years. VMC are almost always symptomatic, presenting with lower bleeding. Endoscopy is crucial to identify and locate VMC, and to treat the lesions. In patients who fail or do not fit endoscopic treatment, aggressive approaches (interventional angiology or surgery) are mandatory. Up to 40% of patients may have relapse in the long term. VMC are rare but <span class="hlt">potentially</span> life-threatening. Advances in endoscopic imaging and therapy have improved the results of treatment. Long-term follow-up after treatment is recommended. PMID:26498888</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26756138','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26756138"><span id="translatedtitle">Clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular outcomes in a series of 66 patients with Pierre Robin sequence and literature review: 22q11.2 deletion is less common than other chromosomal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gomez-Ospina, Natalia; Bernstein, Jonathan A</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Pierre Robin sequence (PRS) is an important craniofacial <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> that can be seen as an isolated finding or manifestation of multiple syndromes. 22q11.2 deletion and Stickler syndrome are cited as the two most common conditions associated with PRS, but their frequencies are debated. We performed a retrospective study of 66 patients with PRS and reviewed their genetic testing, diagnoses, and clinical findings. The case series is complemented by a comprehensive literature review of the nature and frequency of genetic diagnosis in PRS. In our cohort 65% of patients had associated <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>; of these, a genetic diagnosis was established in 56%. Stickler syndrome was the most common diagnosis, comprising approximately 11% of all cases, followed by Treacher Collins syndrome (9%). The frequency of 22q11.2 deletion was 1.5%. Chromosome arrays, performed for 72% of idiopathic PRS with associated <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, revealed two cases of 18q22→qter deletion, a region not previously reported in association with PRS. A review of the cytogenetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> identified in this population supports an association between the 4q33-qter, 17q24.3, 2q33.1, and 11q23 chromosomal loci and PRS. We found a low frequency of 22q11.2 deletion in PRS, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> it is less commonly implicated in this malformation. Our data also indicate a higher frequency of cytogenetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in PRS patients with associated <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and a <span class="hlt">potential</span> new link with the 18q22→qter locus. The present findings underscore the utility of chromosomal microarrays in cases of PRS with associated <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that delaying testing for apparently isolated cases should be considered. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26756138</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1059337','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1059337"><span id="translatedtitle">A New, Principled Approach to <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Ferragut, Erik M; Laska, Jason A; Bridges, Robert A</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Intrusion detection is often described as having two main approaches: signature-based and <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-based. We argue that only unsupervised methods are suitable for detecting <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. However, there has been a tendency in the literature to conflate the notion of an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> with the notion of a malicious event. As a result, the methods used to discover <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> have typically been ad hoc, making it nearly impossible to systematically compare between models or regulate the number of alerts. We propose a new, principled approach to <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection that addresses the main shortcomings of ad hoc approaches. We provide both theoretical and cyber-specific examples to demonstrate the benefits of our more principled approach.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_16 --> <div id="page_17" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="321"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18278307','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18278307"><span id="translatedtitle">Dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in patients with Down syndrome.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>de Moraes, Mari Eli Leonelli; de Moraes, Luiz Cesar; Dotto, Gustavo Nogara; Dotto, Patrícia Pasquali; dos Santos, Luis Roque de Araújo</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the incidence of dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Brazilian patients with Down syndrome. A sample with 49 panoramic x-rays of syndromic patients aged 3 to 33 years (22 male and 27 female) was used. The characteristics of dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were observed in the panoramic radiographs in both the primary and permanent dentition, according to the ICD (International Classification of Diseases). The corresponding tables and percentile analysis were elaborated. There was a high incidence of syndromic patients with different types of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, such as taurodontism (50%), proven anodontia (20.2%), suspected anodontia (10.7%), conic teeth (8.3%) and impacted teeth (5.9%). In conclusion, patients with Down syndrome presented a high incidence of dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and, in most cases, the same individual presented more than one dental <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. PMID:18278307</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850023287&hterms=Continental+Drift&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3D%2528Continental%2BDrift%2529','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850023287&hterms=Continental+Drift&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3D%2528Continental%2BDrift%2529"><span id="translatedtitle">Regional magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> constraints on continental rifting</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.; Olivier, R.; Bentley, C. R.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>Radially polarized MAGSAT <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of North and South America, Europe, Africa, India, Australia and Antarctica demonstrate remarkably detailed correlation of regional magnetic lithospheric sources across rifted margins when plotted on a reconstruction of Pangea. These major magnetic features apparently preserve their integrity until a superimposed metamorphoric event alters the magnitude and pattern of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The longevity of continental scale magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> contrasts markedly with that of regional gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> which tend to reflect predominantly isostatic adjustments associated with neo-tectonism. First observed as a result of NASA's magnetic satellite programs, these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> provide new and fundamental constraints on the geologic evolution and dynamics of the continents and oceans. Accordingly, satellite magnetic observations provide a further tool for investigating continental drift to compliment other lines of evidence in paleoclimatology, paleontology, paleomagnetism, and studies of the radiometric ages and geometric fit of the continents.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014GeoRL..41.9065R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014GeoRL..41.9065R"><span id="translatedtitle">Trends in hemispheric warm and cold <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Robeson, Scott M.; Willmott, Cort J.; Jones, Phil D.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Using a spatial percentile approach, we explore the magnitude of temperature <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> across the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. Linear trends in spatial percentile series are estimated for 1881-2013, the most recent 30 year period (1984-2013), and 1998-2013. All spatial percentiles in both hemispheres show increases from 1881 to 2013, but warming occurred unevenly via modification of cold <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, producing a reduction in spatial dispersion. In the most recent 30 year period, trends also were consistently positive, with warm <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> having much larger warming rates than those of cold <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in both hemispheres. This recent trend has largely reversed the decrease in spatial dispersion that occurred during the twentieth century. While the period associated with the recent slowdown of global warming, 1998-2013, is too brief to estimate trends reliably, cooling was evident in NH warm and cold <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> during January and February while other months in the NH continued to warm.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26394714','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26394714"><span id="translatedtitle">Genotype-phenotype correlation of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in multiple congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> hypotonia seizures syndrome (MCAHS1)/PIGN-related epilepsy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fleming, Leah; Lemmon, Monica; Beck, Natalie; Johnson, Maria; Mu, Weiyi; Murdock, David; Bodurtha, Joann; Hoover-Fong, Julie; Cohn, Ronald; Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Barañano, Kristin; Hamosh, Ada</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Mutations in PIGN, resulting in multiple congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>-hypotonia-seizures syndrome, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor deficiency, have been published in four families to date. We report four patients from three unrelated families with epilepsy and hypotonia in whom whole exome sequencing yielded compound heterozygous variants in PIGN. As with previous reports Patients 1 and 2 (full siblings) have severe global developmental delay, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and minor dysmorphic features, including high palate, bitemporal narrowing, depressed nasal bridge, and micrognathia; Patient 3 had early global developmental delay with later progressive spastic quadriparesis, intellectual disability, and intractable generalized epilepsy; Patient 4 had bilateral narrowing as well but differed by the presence of hypertelorism, markedly narrow palpebral fissures, and long philtrum, had small distal phalanges of fingers 2, 3, and 4, absent distal phalanx of finger 5 and similar toe <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, underdeveloped nails, unusual brain <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and a more severe early clinical course. These patients expand the known clinical spectrum of the disease. The severity of the presentations in conjunction with the patients' mutations <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a genotype-phenotype correlation in which congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are only seen in patients with biallelic loss-of-function. In addition, PIGN mutations appear to be panethnic and may be an underappreciated cause of epilepsy. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26394714</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=transformational+AND+leadership+AND+performance&pg=4&id=EJ867955','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=transformational+AND+leadership+AND+performance&pg=4&id=EJ867955"><span id="translatedtitle">Leadership Theories--Managing Practices, Challenges, <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hawkins, Cheryl</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>A shortage of community college executives due to the number of retirements occurring among current leaders is predicted. An examination of three leadership theories--servant-leadership, business leadership and transformational leadership--<span class="hlt">suggests</span> techniques for <span class="hlt">potential</span> community college leaders. Servant-leaders focus on the needs of their…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=leadership+AND+theories&id=EJ867955','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=leadership+AND+theories&id=EJ867955"><span id="translatedtitle">Leadership Theories--Managing Practices, Challenges, <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hawkins, Cheryl</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>A shortage of community college executives due to the number of retirements occurring among current leaders is predicted. An examination of three leadership theories--servant-leadership, business leadership and transformational leadership--<span class="hlt">suggests</span> techniques for <span class="hlt">potential</span> community college leaders. Servant-leaders focus on the needs of their</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMPP51A1824H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMPP51A1824H"><span id="translatedtitle">ENSO Variability at Vanuatu during the Medieval Climate <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hereid, K. A.; Quinn, T. M.; Taylor, F. W.; Edwards, R.; Cheng, H.; Shen, C.</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>The Medieval Climate <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> (MCA; ~1050 - 1250 CE) is a period of warm temperatures in the Northern Hemisphere high latitudes caused by enhanced solar forcing. The tropical response to this forcing is variable; sediment records from the tropical Pacific indicate warm conditions in the western tropics and cooler temperatures in the east during this interval, paired with precipitation changes that <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a northward migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone. Speleothem records and western Pacific sediment cores match this migration with a strengthened Asian monsoon, indicating a substantial reorganization in hydrology. However, the effect of these changes in zonal and meridional circulation patterns on the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the dominant mode of global interannual climate variability, is unclear. Conflicting hypotheses arise due to datasets that are too short to be representative of multidecadal ENSO variability trends, cannot identify individual ENSO events due to lower than annual resolution, or are located in remote, teleconnected regions. We present a suite of monthly resolved geochemical records from fossil Porites corals at Vanuatu (Tasmaloum, Espiritu Santo), a location whose climate is strongly influenced by variations in ENSO and the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ). Our proxy coral records of sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface salinity (SSS) variations provide multidecadal- to centennial-scale windows into ENSO variability and mean climate state from ~600 - 1250 CE in the deep tropics. Preliminary results, based on coral Sr/Ca variations during a portion of the MCA, <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that SST was cooler than modern at Vanuatu, with similar levels of total variability. Additional data acquisition and future work will focus on assessing <span class="hlt">potential</span> ENSO event frequency and magnitude changes during the MCA in the deep tropics.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014Tectp.636..228S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014Tectp.636..228S"><span id="translatedtitle">An integrated geophysical study of the Beattie Magnetic <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>, South Africa</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Scheiber-Enslin, Stephanie; Ebbing, Jörg; Webb, Susan J.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>The source of the Beattie Magnetic <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> (BMA) still remains unclear, with several competing hypotheses. Here we add a piece to the puzzle by investigating available <span class="hlt">potential</span> field data over the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Filtered magnetic data show the BMA as part of a group of linear magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. As the linear <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> north of the BMA is associated with exposed supracrustals, migmatites and shear zones within the Natal thrust terranes we assume a similar source for the BMA. This source geometry, constrained by seismic and MT data, fits <span class="hlt">potential</span> field data over the BMA and other magnetic linear <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the south-central and south-western Karoo. In these models the bodies deepen from ~ 5 km towards the south, with horizontal extents of ~ 20-60 km and vertical extents of ~ 10-15 km. Densities range from 2800 to 2940 kg/m3 and magnetic susceptibilities from 10 to 100 × 10- 3 SI. These magnetic susceptibilities are higher than field values from supracrustal rocks (10-60 × 10- 3 SI) but could be due to the fact that no remanent magnetisation was included in the model. The lithologies associated with the different linear <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> vary as is evident from varying <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> amplitudes. The strong signal of the BMA is linked to high magnetic susceptibility granulite facies supracrustals (~ 10-50 × 10- 3 SI) as seen in the Antarctic, where the mobile belt continued during Gondwana times.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26668770','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26668770"><span id="translatedtitle">Disparities in Infant Mortality Due to Congenital <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> on Guam.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Noel, Jonathan K; Namazi, Sara; Haddock, Robert L</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>In the 1970's and 1980's, there were large inter-village disparities in infant mortality due to congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on Guam. A village-level analysis was conducted to determine if these disparities can be explained by behavioral (ie, median age of village females, village fertility ratio), structural (ie, population density, persons per household, single mother households per village, married females per village), and environmental (ie, living in a village where Agent Orange (AO) spraying was conducted) factors. Village-level data for live births and infant mortality due to congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (1970-1989) was collected from Guam's Office of Vital Statistics. Data on median age of village females, village fertility ratio, population density, persons per household, single mother households, and married females were obtained from the 1980 US Census. Estimates of village-level AO use were provided through personal communications, and villages were dichotomized into AO and non-AO spray areas. Village location was classified by usual residence of the mother. Linear regression was used to determine associations between infant mortality due to congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the behavioral, structural, and environmental factors. The association between AO spray area and infant mortality due to congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> was statistically significant under univariable (B [95%CI] = 1.88 [0.64,3.11], P = .005) and multivariable conditions (B [95%CI] = 2.02 [0.08,3.96], P = .042). These results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that infants born to mothers whose usual residence was in an AO spray area on Guam are at an increased risk of mortality due to congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Further studies using individual-level data are needed to validate these results. PMID:26668770</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4675364','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4675364"><span id="translatedtitle">Disparities in Infant Mortality Due to Congenital <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> on Guam</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Namazi, Sara; Haddock, Robert L</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>In the 1970's and 1980's, there were large inter-village disparities in infant mortality due to congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on Guam. A village-level analysis was conducted to determine if these disparities can be explained by behavioral (ie, median age of village females, village fertility ratio), structural (ie, population density, persons per household, single mother households per village, married females per village), and environmental (ie, living in a village where Agent Orange (AO) spraying was conducted) factors. Village-level data for live births and infant mortality due to congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (1970–1989) was collected from Guam's Office of Vital Statistics. Data on median age of village females, village fertility ratio, population density, persons per household, single mother households, and married females were obtained from the 1980 US Census. Estimates of village-level AO use were provided through personal communications, and villages were dichotomized into AO and non-AO spray areas. Village location was classified by usual residence of the mother. Linear regression was used to determine associations between infant mortality due to congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the behavioral, structural, and environmental factors. The association between AO spray area and infant mortality due to congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> was statistically significant under univariable (B [95%CI] = 1.88 [0.64,3.11], P = .005) and multivariable conditions (B [95%CI] = 2.02 [0.08,3.96], P = .042). These results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that infants born to mothers whose usual residence was in an AO spray area on Guam are at an increased risk of mortality due to congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Further studies using individual-level data are needed to validate these results. PMID:26668770</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19990102924','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19990102924"><span id="translatedtitle">Hematite Versus Magnetite as the Signature for Planetary Magnetic <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Kletetshka, Gunther; Taylor, Patrick T.; Wasilewski, Peter J.</p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p>Crustal magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are the result of adjacent geologic units having contrasting magnetization. This magnetization arises from induction and/or remanence. In a planetary context we now know that Mars has significant crustal magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> due to remanent magnetization, while the Earth has some <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> where remanence can be shown to be important. This picture, however, is less clear because of the nature and the magnitude of the geomagnetic field which is responsible for superimposed induced magnetization. Induced magnetization assumes a magnetite source, because of its much greater magnetic susceptibility when compared with other magnetic minerals. We investigated the TRM (thermoremanent magnetization) acquisition of hematite, in weak magnetic fields up to 1 mT, to determine if the remanent and induced magnetization of hematite could compete with magnetite. TRM acquisition curves of magnetite and hematite show that multi-domain hematite reaches TRM saturation (0.3 - 0.4 A sq m/kg) in fields as low as 100 microT. However, multi-domain magnetite reaches only a few percent of its TRM saturation in a field of 100 microT (0.02 - 0.06 A sq m/kg). These results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that a mineral such as hematite and, perhaps, other minerals with significant remanence and minor induced magnetization may play an important role in providing requisite magnetization contrast. Perhaps, and especially for the Mars case, we should reevaluate where hematite and other minerals, with efficient remanence acquisition, exist in significant concentration, allowing a more comprehensive explanation of Martian <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and better insight into the role of remanent magnetization in terrestrial crustal magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17625563','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17625563"><span id="translatedtitle">Spreading rate dependence of gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> along oceanic transform faults.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gregg, Patricia M; Lin, Jian; Behn, Mark D; Montési, Laurent G J</p> <p>2007-07-12</p> <p>Mid-ocean ridge morphology and crustal accretion are known to depend on the spreading rate of the ridge. Slow-spreading mid-ocean-ridge segments exhibit significant crustal thinning towards transform and non-transform offsets, which is thought to arise from a three-dimensional process of buoyant mantle upwelling and melt migration focused beneath the centres of ridge segments. In contrast, fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges are characterized by smaller, segment-scale variations in crustal thickness, which reflect more uniform mantle upwelling beneath the ridge axis. Here we present a systematic study of the residual mantle Bouguer gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of 19 oceanic transform faults that reveals a strong correlation between gravity signature and spreading rate. Previous studies have shown that slow-slipping transform faults are marked by more positive gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> than their adjacent ridge segments, but our analysis reveals that intermediate and fast-slipping transform faults exhibit more negative gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> than their adjacent ridge segments. This finding indicates that there is a mass deficit at intermediate- and fast-slipping transform faults, which could reflect increased rock porosity, serpentinization of mantle peridotite, and/or crustal thickening. The most negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> correspond to topographic highs flanking the transform faults, rather than to transform troughs (where deformation is probably focused and porosity and alteration are expected to be greatest), indicating that crustal thickening could be an important contributor to the negative gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> observed. This finding in turn <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that three-dimensional magma accretion may occur near intermediate- and fast-slipping transform faults. PMID:17625563</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20130011182','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20130011182"><span id="translatedtitle">Data Mining for <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Biswas, Gautam; Mack, Daniel; Mylaraswamy, Dinkar; Bharadwaj, Raj</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The Vehicle Integrated Prognostics Reasoner (VIPR) program describes methods for enhanced diagnostics as well as a prognostic extension to current state of art Aircraft Diagnostic and Maintenance System (ADMS). VIPR introduced a new <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection function for discovering previously undetected and undocumented situations, where there are clear deviations from nominal behavior. Once a baseline (nominal model of operations) is established, the detection and analysis is split between on-aircraft outlier generation and off-aircraft expert analysis to characterize and classify events that may not have been anticipated by individual system providers. Offline expert analysis is supported by data curation and data mining algorithms that can be applied in the contexts of supervised learning methods and unsupervised learning. In this report, we discuss efficient methods to implement the Kolmogorov complexity measure using compression algorithms, and run a systematic empirical analysis to determine the best compression measure. Our experiments established that the combination of the DZIP compression algorithm and CiDM distance measure provides the best results for capturing relevant properties of time series data encountered in aircraft operations. This combination was used as the basis for developing an unsupervised learning algorithm to define "nominal" flight segments using historical flight segments.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20090015031','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20090015031"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for Popularizing Civil Aviation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1926-01-01</p> <p>The public generally is taking very little interest in the progress of Civil Aviation, and the time has come to educate the public in aeronautics and to make them realize the far-reaching importance of air transport. Briefly, the whole problem resolves itself into discovering and applying means for bringing some of the many aspects and effects of civil aviation into the everyday lives of the public. The report <span class="hlt">suggests</span> three principal groups of methods: (1) Bring aviation into daily contact with the public. (2) Bring the public into daily contact with aviation. (3) General publicity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26717174','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26717174"><span id="translatedtitle">Revision of <span class="hlt">Suggested</span> State Regulations.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Winston, John P</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>It is the mission of the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors (CRCPD) to promote radiological health in all aspects and phases of implementation and to create a seamless and coherent regulatory structure across the United States. CRCPD currently has 25 committees charged with the development of <span class="hlt">Suggested</span> State Regulations (SSRs) for everything from transportation and waste disposal to tanning and medical therapy. The SR-F Committee is responsible for the <span class="hlt">suggested</span> regulations of the equipment and processes used in medical diagnostic and interventional x-ray procedures. Several states are required by law to adopt the SSR verbatim, making it vital that they are kept current. The current revision of SR-F brought together representatives from the state radiation control programs, the Food and Drug Administration, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, American College of Radiology, and industry. Through the course of two meetings and multiple conference calls, the Committee finalized an updated draft. The CRCPD process for the development of SSR is well established and includes internal and external peer review, review by the state Director Members, approval by the Board of Directors, and concurrence from relevant federal agencies. Once final, an SSR allows a state radiation control program to proceed through the state's own regulatory process with a vetted set of regulations, making this difficult process more efficient and effective. PMID:26717174</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013GeoJI.193.1277S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013GeoJI.193.1277S"><span id="translatedtitle">On the isostatic gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and disturbance and their applications to Vening Meinesz-Moritz gravimetric inverse problem</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sjberg, Lars E.</p> <p>2013-06-01</p> <p>In this study, we show that the traditionally defined Bouguer gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> needs a correction to become `the no-topography gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>' and that the isostatic gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is better defined by the latter <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> plus a gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> compensation effect than by the Bouguer gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> plus a gravitational compensation effect. This is because only the new isostatic gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> completely removes and compensates for the topographic effect. F. A. Vening Meinesz' inverse problem in isostasy deals with solving for the Moho depth from the known external gravity field and mean Moho depth (known, e.g. from seismic reflection data) by a regional isostatic compensation using a flat Earth approximation. H. Moritz generalized the problem to that of a global compensation with a spherical mean Earth approximation. The problem can be formulated mathematically as that of solving a non-linear Fredholm integral equation. The solutions to these problems are based on the condition of isostatic balance of the isostatic gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, and, theoretically, this assumption cannot be met by the old definition of the isostatic gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. We show how the Moho geometry can be solved for the gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, gravity disturbance and disturbing <span class="hlt">potential</span>, etc., and, from a theoretical point of view, all these solutions are the same.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016GeoRL..43.1241Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016GeoRL..43.1241Z"><span id="translatedtitle">The 2014-2015 warming <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the Southern California Current System observed by underwater gliders</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zaba, Katherine D.; Rudnick, Daniel L.</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>Large-scale patterns of positive temperature <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> persisted throughout the surface waters of the North Pacific Ocean during 2014-2015. In the Southern California Current System, measurements by our sustained network of underwater gliders reveal the coastal effects of the recent warming. Regional upper ocean temperature <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were greatest since the initiation of the glider network in 2006. Additional observed physical <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> included a depressed thermocline, high stratification, and freshening; induced biological consequences included changes in the vertical distribution of chlorophyll fluorescence. Contemporaneous surface heat flux and wind strength perturbations <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that local anomalous atmospheric forcing caused the unusual oceanic conditions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24222728','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24222728"><span id="translatedtitle">Thermal infrared <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of several strong earthquakes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wei, Congxin; Zhang, Yuansheng; Guo, Xiao; Hui, Shaoxing; Qin, Manzhong; Zhang, Ying</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>In the history of earthquake thermal infrared research, it is undeniable that before and after strong earthquakes there are significant thermal infrared <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> which have been interpreted as preseismic precursor in earthquake prediction and forecasting. In this paper, we studied the characteristics of thermal radiation observed before and after the 8 great earthquakes with magnitude up to Ms7.0 by using the satellite infrared remote sensing information. We used new types of data and method to extract the useful <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> information. Based on the analyses of 8 earthquakes, we got the results as follows. (1) There are significant thermal radiation <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> before and after earthquakes for all cases. The overall performance of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> includes two main stages: expanding first and narrowing later. We easily extracted and identified such seismic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> by method of "time-frequency relative power spectrum." (2) There exist evident and different characteristic periods and magnitudes of thermal abnormal radiation for each case. (3) Thermal radiation <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are closely related to the geological structure. (4) Thermal radiation has obvious characteristics in abnormal duration, range, and morphology. In summary, we should be sure that earthquake thermal infrared <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> as useful earthquake precursor can be used in earthquake prediction and forecasting. PMID:24222728</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26246090','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26246090"><span id="translatedtitle">Congenital basis of posterior fossa <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cotes, Claudia; Bonfante, Eliana; Lazor, Jillian; Jadhav, Siddharth; Caldas, Maria; Swischuk, Leonard; Riascos, Roy</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>The classification of posterior fossa congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> has been a controversial topic. Advances in genetics and imaging have allowed a better understanding of the embryologic development of these abnormalities. A new classification schema correlates the embryologic, morphologic, and genetic bases of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in order to better distinguish and describe them. Although they provide a better understanding of the clinical aspects and genetics of these disorders, it is crucial for the radiologist to be able to diagnose the congenital posterior fossa <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> based on their morphology, since neuroimaging is usually the initial step when these disorders are suspected. We divide the most common posterior fossa congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> into two groups: 1) hindbrain malformations, including diseases with cerebellar or vermian agenesis, aplasia or hypoplasia and cystic posterior fossa <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>; and 2) cranial vault malformations. In addition, we will review the embryologic development of the posterior fossa and, from the perspective of embryonic development, will describe the imaging appearance of congenital posterior fossa <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Knowledge of the developmental bases of these malformations facilitates detection of the morphological changes identified on imaging, allowing accurate differentiation and diagnosis of congenital posterior fossa <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. PMID:26246090</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3809928','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3809928"><span id="translatedtitle">Thermal Infrared <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> of Several Strong Earthquakes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wei, Congxin; Guo, Xiao; Qin, Manzhong</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>In the history of earthquake thermal infrared research, it is undeniable that before and after strong earthquakes there are significant thermal infrared <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> which have been interpreted as preseismic precursor in earthquake prediction and forecasting. In this paper, we studied the characteristics of thermal radiation observed before and after the 8 great earthquakes with magnitude up to Ms7.0 by using the satellite infrared remote sensing information. We used new types of data and method to extract the useful <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> information. Based on the analyses of 8 earthquakes, we got the results as follows. (1) There are significant thermal radiation <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> before and after earthquakes for all cases. The overall performance of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> includes two main stages: expanding first and narrowing later. We easily extracted and identified such seismic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> by method of “time-frequency relative power spectrum.” (2) There exist evident and different characteristic periods and magnitudes of thermal abnormal radiation for each case. (3) Thermal radiation <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are closely related to the geological structure. (4) Thermal radiation has obvious characteristics in abnormal duration, range, and morphology. In summary, we should be sure that earthquake thermal infrared <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> as useful earthquake precursor can be used in earthquake prediction and forecasting. PMID:24222728</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_17 --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="341"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ClDy..tmp..479F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ClDy..tmp..479F"><span id="translatedtitle">Structure and dynamics of decadal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the wintertime midlatitude North Pacific ocean-atmosphere system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fang, Jiabei; Yang, Xiu-Qun</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>The structure and dynamics of decadal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the wintertime midlatitude North Pacific ocean-atmosphere system are examined in this study, using the NCEP/NCAR atmospheric reanalysis, HadISST SST and Simple Ocean Data Assimilation data for 1960-2010. The midlatitude decadal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation are identified, being characterized by an equivalent barotropic atmospheric low (high) pressure over a cold (warm) oceanic surface. Such a unique configuration of decadal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> can be maintained by an unstable ocean-atmosphere interaction mechanism in the midlatitudes, which is hypothesized as follows. Associated with a warm PDO phase, an initial midlatitude surface westerly <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> accompanied with intensified Aleutian low tends to force a negative SST <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> by increasing upward surface heat fluxes and driving southward Ekman current <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The SST cooling tends to increase the meridional SST gradient, thus enhancing the subtropical oceanic front. As an adjustment of the atmospheric boundary layer to the enhanced oceanic front, the low-level atmospheric meridional temperature gradient and thus the low-level atmospheric baroclinicity tend to be strengthened, inducing more active transient eddy activities that increase transient eddy vorticity forcing. The vorticity forcing that dominates the total atmospheric forcing tends to produce an equivalent barotropic atmospheric low pressure north of the initial westerly <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, intensifying the initial <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the midlatitude surface westerly and Aleutian low. Therefore, it is <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that the midlatitude ocean-atmosphere interaction can provide a positive feedback mechanism for the development of initial <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, in which the oceanic front and the atmospheric transient eddy are the indispensable ingredients. Such a positive ocean-atmosphere feedback mechanism is fundamentally responsible for the observed decadal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the midlatitude North Pacific ocean-atmosphere system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4211938','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4211938"><span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of Renal <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in VACTERL Association</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Cunningham, Bridget K.; Khromykh, Alina; Martinez, Ariel F.; Carney, Tyler; Hadley, Donald W.; Solomon, Benjamin D.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>VACTERL association refers to a combination of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that can include: Vertebral <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, Anal atresia, Cardiac malformations, Tracheo-Esophageal fistula with esophageal atresia, Renal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (typically structural renal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>), and Limb <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. We conducted a description of a case series to characterize renal findings in a cohort of patients with VACTERL association. Out of the overall cohort, 48 patients (with at least 3 component features of VACTERL and who had abdominal ultrasound performed) met criteria for analysis. Four other patients were additionally analyzed separately, with the hypothesis that subtle renal system <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may occur in patients who would not otherwise meet criteria for VACTERL association. Thirty-three (69%) of the 48 patients had a clinical manifestation affecting the renal system. The most common renal manifestation (RM) was vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in addition to a structural defect (present in 27%), followed by unilateral renal agenesis (24%), and then dysplastic/multicystic kidneys or duplicated collected system (18% for each). Twenty-two (88%) of the 25 patients with a structural RM had an associated anorectal malformation. Individuals with either isolated lower anatomic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, or both upper and lower anatomic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were not statistically more likely to have a structural renal defect than those with isolated upper anatomic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (p=0.22, p=0.284 respectively). Given the high prevalence of isolated VUR in our cohort, we recommend a screening VCUG or other imaging modality be obtained to evaluate for VUR if initial renal US shows evidence of obstruction or renal scarring, as well as ongoing evaluation of renal health. PMID:25196458</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3892239','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3892239"><span id="translatedtitle">Prevalence of dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Indian population</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Doni, Bharati; Kaswan, Sumita; Rahman, Farzan</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Objectives: Developmental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the dentition are not infrequently observed by the dental practitioner. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the Indian population. Study Design: A retrospective study of 4133 panoramic radiographs of patients, who attended the Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Jodhpur Dental College General Hospital between September 2008 to December 2012 was done. The ages of the patients ranged from 13 to 38 years with a mean age of 21.8 years. The orthopantomographs (OPGs) and dental records were examined for any unusual finding such as congenitally missing teeth, impactions, ectopic eruption, supernumerary teeth, odontoma, dilacerations, taurodontism, dens in dente, germination and fusion, among others. Results: 1519 (36.7%) patients had at least one dental <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The congenitally missing teeth 673 (16.3%) had the highest prevalence, followed by impacted teeth 641 (15.5%), supernumerary teeth 51 (1.2%) and microdontia 41 (1.0%). Other <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were found at lower prevalence ranging from transposition 7 (0.1%) to ectopic eruption 30 (0.7%). Conclusion: The most prevalent <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the Indian population was congenitally missing teeth (16.3%), and the second frequent <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> was impacted teeth (15.5%), whereas, macrodontia, odontoma and transposition were the least frequent <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, with a prevalence of 0.2%, 0.2% and 0.1% respectively. While the overall prevalence of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may be low, the early diagnosis is imperative for the patient management and treatment planning. Key words:Dental <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, prevalence, panoramic radiography. PMID:24455078</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19740025741','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19740025741"><span id="translatedtitle">Procedures and results related to the direct determination of gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from satellite and terrestrial gravity data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Rapp, R. H.</p> <p>1974-01-01</p> <p>The equations needed for the incorporation of gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> as unknown parameters in an orbit determination program are described. These equations were implemented in the Geodyn computer program which was used to process optical satellite observations. The arc dependent parameter unknowns, 184 unknown 15 deg and coordinates of 7 tracking stations were considered. Up to 39 arcs (5 to 7 days) involving 10 different satellites, were processed. An <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> solution from the satellite data and a combination solution with 15 deg terrestrial <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were made. The limited data samples indicate that the method works. The 15 deg <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from various solutions and the <span class="hlt">potential</span> coefficients implied by the different solutions are reported.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19820016710','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19820016710"><span id="translatedtitle">Magnetic and gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the Americas</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Braile, L. W.; Hinze, W. J.; Vonfrese, R. R. B. (Principal Investigator)</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>The cleaning and magnetic tape storage of spherical Earth processing programs are reported. These programs include: NVERTSM which inverts total or vector magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data on a distribution of point dipoles in spherical coordinates; SMFLD which utilizes output from NVERTSM to compute total or vector magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> fields for a distribution of point dipoles in spherical coordinates; NVERTG; and GFLD. Abstracts are presented for papers dealing with the mapping and modeling of magnetic and gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and with the verification of crustal components in satellite data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5587891','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5587891"><span id="translatedtitle">Regional magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> constraints on continental breakup</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>von Frese, R.R.B.; Hinze, W.J.; Olivier, R.; Bentley, C.R.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>Continental lithosphere magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> mapped by the Magsat satellite are related to tectonic features associated with regional compositional variations of the crust and upper mantle and crustal thickness and thermal perturbations. These continental-scale <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> patterns when corrected for varying observation elevation and the global change in the direction and intensity of the geomagnetic field show remarkable correlation of regional lithospheric magnetic sources across rifted continental margins when plotted on a reconstruction of Pangea. Accordingly, these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> provide new and fundamental constraints on the geologic evolution and dynamics of the continents and oceans.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21149172','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21149172"><span id="translatedtitle">Non-standard symmetries and quantum <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Visinescu, Anca; Visinescu, Mihai</p> <p>2008-08-31</p> <p>Quantum <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are investigated on curved spacetimes. The intimate relation between Killing-Yano tensors and non-standard symmetries is pointed out. The gravitational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are absent if the hidden symmetry is associated to a Killing-Yano tensor. The axial <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in a background gravitational field is directly related with the index of the Dirac operator. In the Dirac theory on curved spaces, Killing-Yano tensors generate Dirac-type operators involved in interesting algebraic structures. The general results are applied to the 4-dimensional Euclidean Taub-NUT space.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GeoRL..42.9121C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GeoRL..42.9121C"><span id="translatedtitle">A hot flow <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> at Mars</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Collinson, Glyn; Halekas, Jasper; Grebowsky, Joseph; Connerney, Jack; Mitchell, David; Espley, Jared; DiBraccio, Gina; Mazelle, Christian; Sauvaud, Jean-André; Fedorov, Andrei; Jakosky, Bruce</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>One of the most important modes of planet/solar wind interaction are "foreshock transients" such as hot flow <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (HFAs). Here we present early observations by the NASA Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN spacecraft, confirming their presence at Mars and for the first time at an unmagnetized planet revealing the underlying ion perturbations that drive the phenomenon, finding them to be weaker than at magnetized planets. Analysis revealed the HFA to be virtually microscopic: the smallest on record at ˜2200 km across and commensurate with the local proton gyroradius, resulting in a much stronger perturbation in solar wind protons than alpha particles. As at Venus, despite being physically diminutive, the HFA is still large (0.66 RM) when compared to the relative size of the induced magnetosphere. Given the associated order of magnitude decrease in solar wind dynamic pressure (411 pPa ⇒ 70 pPa), we find that HFAs at Mars have the <span class="hlt">potential</span> to directly impact the topside ionosphere. We thus hypothesize that the loss of a planetary magnetic dynamo left Mars far more vulnerable to the pressure pulses resulting from HFAs and related foreshock transients.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3769634','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3769634"><span id="translatedtitle">Disentangling Hippocampal Shape <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Epilepsy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kim, Hosung; Mansi, Tommaso; Bernasconi, Neda</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and epileptic syndromes related to malformations of cortical development (MCD) are associated with complex hippocampal morphology. The contribution of volume and position to the overall hippocampal shape in these conditions has not been studied. We propose a surface-based framework to localize volume changes through measurement of Jacobian determinants, and quantify fine-scale position and curvature through a medial axis model. We applied our methodology to T1-weighted 3D volumetric MRI of 88 patients with TLE and 78 patients with MCD, including focal cortical dysplasia (FCD, n = 29), heterotopia (HET, n = 40), and polymicrogyria (PMG, n = 19). Patients were compared to 46 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Surface-based analysis of volume in TLE revealed severe ipsilateral atrophy mainly along the rostro-caudal extent of the hippocampal CA1 subfield. In MCD, patterns of volume changes included bilateral CA1 atrophy in HET and FCD, and left dentate hypertrophy in all three groups. The analysis of curvature revealed medial bending of the posterior hippocampus in TLE, whereas in MCD there was a supero-medial shift of the hippocampal body. Albeit hippocampal shape <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in TLE and MCD result from a combination of volume and positional changes, their nature and distribution <span class="hlt">suggest</span> different pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:24062718</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26969228','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26969228"><span id="translatedtitle">Pathology of cloaca <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with case correlation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gupta, Anita; Bischoff, Andrea</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>During the fourth week of human embryo development, a transient common channel known as a cloaca is formed from which three cavities with three external orifices arises. Cloaca <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> occur when there is failure of separation of the rectum, vagina, and urethra channel resulting in a single drain into the perineum. In our previous institutional studies, Runck et al.(1) compared human and mouse cloaca development and found early mis-patterning of the embryonic cloaca deranged hedgehog and bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP) signaling. Also, our group reported the embryological correlation of the epithelial and stromal histology found in step sections of the common channel in 14 cloaca malformations in humans.(2) In this review, we present the pathology of a 4-year-old female with a cloaca and VACTERL complex, and summarize our current knowledge of cloaca pathology. Furthermore, we <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that careful pathological examination of cloaca specimens in conjunction with surgical orientation may result in a better understanding of the etiology of this condition. PMID:26969228</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4315290','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4315290"><span id="translatedtitle">BRF1 mutations alter RNA polymerase III–dependent transcription and cause neurodevelopmental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Hög, Friederike; Dentici, Maria Lisa; Tan, Perciliz L.; Sowada, Nadine; Medeira, Ana; Gueneau, Lucie; Thiele, Holger; Kousi, Maria; Lepri, Francesca; Wenzeck, Larissa; Blumenthal, Ian; Radicioni, Antonio; Schwarzenberg, Tito Livio; Mandriani, Barbara; Fischetto, Rita; Morris-Rosendahl, Deborah J.; Altmüller, Janine; Reymond, Alexandre; Nürnberg, Peter; Merla, Giuseppe; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Katsanis, Nicholas; Cramer, Patrick; Kubisch, Christian</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>RNA polymerase III (Pol III) synthesizes tRNAs and other small noncoding RNAs to regulate protein synthesis. Dysregulation of Pol III transcription has been linked to cancer, and germline mutations in genes encoding Pol III subunits or tRNA processing factors cause neurogenetic disorders in humans, such as hypomyelinating leukodystrophies and pontocerebellar hypoplasia. Here we describe an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cerebellar hypoplasia and intellectual disability, as well as facial dysmorphic features, short stature, microcephaly, and dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Whole-exome sequencing revealed biallelic missense alterations of BRF1 in three families. In support of the pathogenic <span class="hlt">potential</span> of the discovered alleles, suppression or CRISPR-mediated deletion of brf1 in zebrafish embryos recapitulated key neurodevelopmental phenotypes; in vivo complementation showed all four candidate mutations to be pathogenic in an apparent isoform-specific context. BRF1 associates with BDP1 and TBP to form the transcription factor IIIB (TFIIIB), which recruits Pol III to target genes. We show that disease-causing mutations reduce Brf1 occupancy at tRNA target genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and impair cell growth. Moreover, BRF1 mutations reduce Pol III–related transcription activity in vitro. Taken together, our data show that BRF1 mutations that reduce protein activity cause neurodevelopmental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that BRF1-mediated Pol III transcription is required for normal cerebellar and cognitive development. PMID:25561519</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25561519','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25561519"><span id="translatedtitle">BRF1 mutations alter RNA polymerase III-dependent transcription and cause neurodevelopmental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Borck, Guntram; Hög, Friederike; Dentici, Maria Lisa; Tan, Perciliz L; Sowada, Nadine; Medeira, Ana; Gueneau, Lucie; Thiele, Holger; Kousi, Maria; Lepri, Francesca; Wenzeck, Larissa; Blumenthal, Ian; Radicioni, Antonio; Schwarzenberg, Tito Livio; Mandriani, Barbara; Fischetto, Rita; Morris-Rosendahl, Deborah J; Altmüller, Janine; Reymond, Alexandre; Nürnberg, Peter; Merla, Giuseppe; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Katsanis, Nicholas; Cramer, Patrick; Kubisch, Christian</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>RNA polymerase III (Pol III) synthesizes tRNAs and other small noncoding RNAs to regulate protein synthesis. Dysregulation of Pol III transcription has been linked to cancer, and germline mutations in genes encoding Pol III subunits or tRNA processing factors cause neurogenetic disorders in humans, such as hypomyelinating leukodystrophies and pontocerebellar hypoplasia. Here we describe an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cerebellar hypoplasia and intellectual disability, as well as facial dysmorphic features, short stature, microcephaly, and dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Whole-exome sequencing revealed biallelic missense alterations of BRF1 in three families. In support of the pathogenic <span class="hlt">potential</span> of the discovered alleles, suppression or CRISPR-mediated deletion of brf1 in zebrafish embryos recapitulated key neurodevelopmental phenotypes; in vivo complementation showed all four candidate mutations to be pathogenic in an apparent isoform-specific context. BRF1 associates with BDP1 and TBP to form the transcription factor IIIB (TFIIIB), which recruits Pol III to target genes. We show that disease-causing mutations reduce Brf1 occupancy at tRNA target genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and impair cell growth. Moreover, BRF1 mutations reduce Pol III-related transcription activity in vitro. Taken together, our data show that BRF1 mutations that reduce protein activity cause neurodevelopmental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that BRF1-mediated Pol III transcription is required for normal cerebellar and cognitive development. PMID:25561519</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3770011','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3770011"><span id="translatedtitle">Interactions between Cytokines, Congenital <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> of Kidney and Urinary Tract and Chronic Kidney Disease</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; Valério, Flávia Cordeiro; Vasconcelos, Mariana Affonso; Miranda, Débora Marques; Oliveira, Eduardo Araújo</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Fetal hydronephrosis is the most common <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detected on antenatal ultrasound, affecting 1–5% of pregnancies. Postnatal investigation has the major aim in detecting infants with severe urinary tract obstruction and clinically significant urinary tract <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> among the heterogeneous universe of patients. Congenital uropathies are frequent causes of pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD). Imaging techniques clearly contribute to this purpose; however, sometimes, these exams are invasive, very expensive, and not sufficient to precisely define the best approach as well as the prognosis. Recently, biomarkers have become a focus of clinical research as <span class="hlt">potentially</span> useful diagnostic tools in pediatric urological diseases. In this regard, recent studies <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a role for cytokines and chemokines in the pathophysiology of CAKUT and for the progression to CKD. Some authors proposed that the evaluation of these inflammatory mediators might help the management of postnatal uropathies and the detection of patients with high risk to developed chronic kidney disease. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to revise general aspects of cytokines and the link between cytokines, CAKUT, and CKD by including experimental and clinical evidence. PMID:24066006</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhLB..746..281N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhLB..746..281N"><span id="translatedtitle">One-loop effective actions and 2D hydrodynamics with <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ng, Gim Seng; Surówka, Piotr</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>We revisit the study of a 2D quantum field theory in the hydrodynamic regime and develop a formalism based on Euclidean one-loop partition functions that is suitable to analyze transport properties due to gauge and gravitational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. To do so, we generalize the method of a modified Dirac operator developed for zero-temperature <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to finite temperature, chemical <span class="hlt">potentials</span> and rotations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24966759','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24966759"><span id="translatedtitle">Esthetic dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> as motive for bullying in schoolchildren.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Scheffel, Débora Lopes Salles; Jeremias, Fabiano; Fragelli, Camila Maria Bullio; Dos Santos-Pinto, Lourdes Aparecida Martins; Hebling, Josimeri; de Oliveira, Osmir Batista</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Facial esthetics, including oral esthetics, can severely affect children's quality-of-life, causing physical, social and psychological impairment. Children and adolescents with esthetic-related dental malformations are <span class="hlt">potential</span> targets for bullies. This study was aimed to present and discuss patients who suffered from bullying at school and family environment due to esthetic-related teeth <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Providing an adequate esthetic dental treatment is an important step in their rehabilitation when the lack of esthetic is the main source of bullying. After dental treatment, we noted significant improvement in self-esteem, self-confidence, socialization and academic performance of all patients and improvement in parental satisfaction regarding the appearance of their children. It is imperative that both family and school care providers be constantly alert about bullying in order to prevent or interrupt aggressive and discriminatory practices against children and adolescents. Clearly, dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may be a motive for bullying. PMID:24966759</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20040200918','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20040200918"><span id="translatedtitle">Topographic Change of the Dichotomy Boundary <span class="hlt">Suggested</span> by Crustal Inversion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Neumann, G. A.</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>Linear negative gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Acidalia Planitia along the eastern edge of Tempe Terra and along the northern edge of Arabia Terra have been noted in Mars Global Surveyor gravity fields. Once proposed to represent buried fluvial channels, it is now believed that these gravity troughs mainly arise from partial compensation of the hemispheric dichotomy topographic scarp. A recent inversion for crustal structure finds that mantle compensation of the scarp is offset from the present-day topographic expression of the dichotomy boundary. The offset <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that erosion or other forms of mass wasting occurred after lithosphere thickened and no longer accomodated topographic change through viscous relaxation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ApGeo..13...59F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ApGeo..13...59F"><span id="translatedtitle">Regional magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> fields: 3D Taylor polynomial and surface spline models</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Feng, Yan; Jiang, Yong; Jiang, Yi; Li, Zheng; Jiang, Jin; Liu, Zhong-Wei; Ye, Mei-Chen; Wang, Hong-Sheng; Li, Xiu-Ming</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>We used data from 1960.0, 1970.0, 1980.0, 1990.0, and 2000.0 to study the geomagnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> field over the Chinese mainland by using the three-dimensional Taylor polynomial (3DTP) and the surface spline (SS) models. To obtain the pure <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> field, the main field and the induced field of the ionospheric and magnetospheric fields were removed from measured data. We also compared the SS model <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the data obtained with Kriging interpolation (KI). The geomagnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> distribution over the mainland was analyzed based on the SS and 3DTP models by transferring all points from 1960.0-1990.0 to 2000.0. The results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the total intensity F <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> estimated based on the SS and KI for each year are basically consistent in distribution and intensity. The anomalous distributions in the X-, Y-, and Z-direction and F are mainly negative. The 3DTP model <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the intensity in the X-direction increases from -100 nT to 0 nT with longitude, whereas the intensity in the Y-direction decreases from 400 nT to 20 nT with longitude and over the eastern mainland is almost negative. The intensity in the Z-direction and F are very similar and in most areas it is about -50nT and higher in western Tibet. The SS model <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> overall reflect the actual distribution of the magnetic field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>; however, because of the uneven distribution of measurements, it yields several big <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Owing to the added altitude term, the 3DTP model offers higher precision and is consistent with KI.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19770029046&hterms=Seamounts&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3DSeamounts','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19770029046&hterms=Seamounts&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3DSeamounts"><span id="translatedtitle">On global gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and two-scale mantle convection</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Marsh, B. D.; Marsh, J. G.</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>The two-scale model of mantle convection developed by Richter and Parsons (1975) predicts that if the depth of the convective layer is about 600 km, then for a plate moving at 10 cm/yr, longitudinal convective rolls will be produced in about 50 million years, and the strike of these rolls indicates the direction of motion of the plate relative to the upper mantle. The paper tests these predictions by examining a new global free air gravity model complete to the 30th degree and order. The free air gravity map developed shows a series of linear positive and negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (with transverse wavelengths of about 2000 km) spanning the Pacific Ocean, crossing the Pacific rise and striking parallel to the Hawaiian seamounts. It is <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that the pattern of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may indicate the presence of longitudinal convective rolls beneath the Pacific plates, a result which tends to support the predictions of Richter and Parsons.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25115222','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25115222"><span id="translatedtitle">Pelger-Huët <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in a cat.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Deshuillers, Pierre; Raskin, Rose; Messick, Joanne</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p>A 14-year-old, spayed female Domestic Shorthair cat was referred to the Purdue University Veterinary Teaching Hospital (PUVTH) for iodine 131 treatment of hyperthyroidism. Upon arrival, a biochemistry profile and a CBC were performed. Approximately 50% of the neutrophils and all the eosinophils observed were hyposegmented with a mature, condensed chromatin pattern. Nuclei had a band to "dumbbell" shape, and rarely a round shape, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> a Pelger-Huët <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> or a pseudo Pelger-Huët. Based on both a negative FeLV and FIV tests, the absence of any clinical signs to support an inflammatory process, and the persistence of this granulocytic morphology 6 months after its previous admission to the PUVTH, a diagnosis of Pelger-Huët <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> was established in this cat. PMID:25115222</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26545588','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26545588"><span id="translatedtitle">Stillbirth and congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in migrants in Europe.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nybo Andersen, Anne-Marie; Gundlund, Anna; Villadsen, Sarah Fredsted</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>The risk of giving birth to a stillborn child or a child with severe congenital <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is higher for women who have immigrated to Europe as compared to the majority population in the receiving country. The literature, however, reveals great differences between migrant groups, even within migrants from low-income countries, although there is no clear pattern regarding refugee or non-refugee status. This heterogeneity argues against a particular migration-related explanation. There are social disparities in stillbirth risk worldwide, and it has been <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that the demonstrated ethnic disparity is a result of the socioeconomic disadvantage most migrants face. Consanguinity has been considered as another cause for the increased stillbirth risk and the high risk of congenital <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> observed in many migrant groups. Utilization and quality of care during pregnancy and childbirth is the third major aspect. All three factors seem to contribute to stillbirth risk, and they should be considered in clinical practice and public health. PMID:26545588</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_18 --> <div id="page_19" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="361"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22774684','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22774684"><span id="translatedtitle">Building false memories without <span class="hlt">suggestions</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Foster, Jeffrey L; Garry, Maryanne</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>People can come to remember doing things they have never done. The question we asked in this study is whether people can systematically come to remember performing actions they never really did, in the absence of any <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> from the experimenter. People built LEGO vehicles, performing some steps but not others. For half the people, all the pieces needed to assemble each vehicle were laid out in order in front of them while they did the building; for the other half, the pieces were hidden from view. The next day, everyone returned for a surprise recognition test. People falsely and confidently remembered having carried out steps they did not; those who saw all the pieces while they built each vehicle were more likely to correctly remember performing steps they did perform but equally likely to falsely remember performing steps they did not. We explain our results using the source monitoring framework: People used the relationships between actions to internally generate the missing, related actions, later mistaking that information for genuine experience. PMID:22774684</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/443768','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/443768"><span id="translatedtitle">Hydrocephalus, skeletal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and mental disturbances in a mother and three daughters: A new syndrome</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Ferlini, A.; Zanetti, A.; Milan, M.; Calzolari, E.</p> <p>1995-12-04</p> <p>We report on a family in which a mother and her 3 daughters have delayed psychomotor development and/or psychosis, hydrocephalus with white matter alterations, arachnoid cysts, skeletal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> consisting of brachydactyly, and Sprengel <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Biochemical and cytogenetic analyses were normal on all 4 patients. The pattern of inheritance, clinical manifestations, and variability of expression <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that this is a new hydrocephalus syndrome possibly transmitted as an X-linked dominant trait. 24 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMOS21B1120I','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMOS21B1120I"><span id="translatedtitle">The Growth and Decay of Hydrate <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Marine Sediments</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Irizarry, J. T.; Rempel, A. W.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Natural gas hydrates, stored in huge quantities beneath permafrost, and in submarine sediments on the continental shelf, have the <span class="hlt">potential</span> to become a vital clean-burning energy source. However, clear evidence is recorded in coastal sediments worldwide that past changes in environmental conditions have caused hydrates to become unstable and trigger both massive submarine landslides and the development of crater-like pockmarks, thereby releasing methane into the overlying seawater and atmosphere, where it acts as a powerful greenhouse gas. Arctic permafrost is thawing, and environmental changes can alter ocean circulation to warm the seafloor, causing hydrates to dissociate or dissolve in the sediments beneath. Decades of focused research provide a firm understanding of laboratory conditions under which hydrates become unstable and dissociate, and how hydrate reserves form when microbes convert organic material into methane, which can also dissolve and be carried by pore waters into the hydrate stability zone. Despite these advances, many key questions that concern both the resource <span class="hlt">potential</span> of hydrates and their role in causing environmental geohazards, are intimately tied to the more poorly understood behavior of hydrate <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, which tend to be concentrated in the large pores of sand layers and form segregated lenses and nodules in muds. We present simple models designed to unravel the importance of the diverse physical interactions (i.e. flow focusing, free-gas infiltration, and pore-scale solubility effects) that help control how hydrate <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> form. Predicted hydrate distributions are qualitatively different when accumulation in <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is supplied primarily by: 1. aqueous flow through sediments with enhanced permeability, 2. free-gas transport high above the three-phase stability boundary, or 3. diffusive transport along solubility gradients associated with pore-scale effects. We discuss examples that illustrate each of these distinct generation modes, in hopes of providing a framework for interpreting field observations of hydrate <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and their geomechanical properties in terms of the history of environmental forcing that led to their development.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120010487','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120010487"><span id="translatedtitle">The Impact of Devegetated Dune Fields on North American Climate During the Late Medieval Climate <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Cook, B. I.; Seager, R.; Miller, R. L.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>During the Medieval Climate <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>, North America experienced severe droughts and widespread mobilization of dune fields that persisted for decades. We use an atmosphere general circulation model, forced by a tropical Pacific sea surface temperature reconstruction and changes in the land surface consistent with estimates of dune mobilization (conceptualized as partial devegetation), to investigate whether the devegetation could have exacerbated the medieval droughts. Presence of devegetated dunes in the model significantly increases surface temperatures, but has little impact on precipitation or drought severity, as defined by either the Palmer Drought Severity Index or the ratio of precipitation to <span class="hlt">potential</span> evapotranspiration. Results are similar to recent studies of the 1930s Dust Bowl drought, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> bare soil associated with the dunes, in and of itself, is not sufficient to amplify droughts over North America.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011GeoRL..3814704C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011GeoRL..3814704C"><span id="translatedtitle">The impact of devegetated dune fields on North American climate during the late Medieval Climate <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cook, B. I.; Seager, R.; Miller, R. L.</p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>During the Medieval Climate <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>, North America experienced severe droughts and widespread mobilization of dune fields that persisted for decades. We use an atmosphere general circulation model, forced by a tropical Pacific sea surface temperature reconstruction and changes in the land surface consistent with estimates of dune mobilization (conceptualized as partial devegetation), to investigate whether the devegetation could have exacerbated the medieval droughts. Presence of devegetated dunes in the model significantly increases surface temperatures, but has little impact on precipitation or drought severity, as defined by either the Palmer Drought Severity Index or the ratio of precipitation to <span class="hlt">potential</span> evapotranspiration. Results are similar to recent studies of the 1930s Dust Bowl drought, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> bare soil associated with the dunes, in and of itself, is not sufficient to amplify droughts over North America.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20010028800','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20010028800"><span id="translatedtitle">Implementation of a General Real-Time Visual <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection System Via Soft Computing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Dominguez, Jesus A.; Klinko, Steve; Ferrell, Bob; Steinrock, Todd (Technical Monitor)</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>The intelligent visual system detects <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> or defects in real time under normal lighting operating conditions. The application is basically a learning machine that integrates fuzzy logic (FL), artificial neural network (ANN), and generic algorithm (GA) schemes to process the image, run the learning process, and finally detect the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> or defects. The system acquires the image, performs segmentation to separate the object being tested from the background, preprocesses the image using fuzzy reasoning, performs the final segmentation using fuzzy reasoning techniques to retrieve regions with <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> or defects, and finally retrieves them using a learning model built via ANN and GA techniques. FL provides a powerful framework for knowledge representation and overcomes uncertainty and vagueness typically found in image analysis. ANN provides learning capabilities, and GA leads to robust learning results. An application prototype currently runs on a regular PC under Windows NT, and preliminary work has been performed to build an embedded version with multiple image processors. The application prototype is being tested at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, to visually detect <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> along slide basket cables utilized by the astronauts to evacuate the NASA Shuttle launch pad in an emergency. The <span class="hlt">potential</span> applications of this <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection system in an open environment are quite wide. Another current, <span class="hlt">potentially</span> viable application at NASA is in detecting <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the NASA Space Shuttle Orbiter's radiator panels.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010SPIE.7652E..24R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010SPIE.7652E..24R"><span id="translatedtitle">Gouy phase <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in astigmatic beams</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rolland, Jannick P.; Schmid, Tobias; Tamkin, John, Jr.; Lee, Kye-Sung; Thompson, Kevin P.; Wolf, Emil</p> <p>2010-08-01</p> <p>We simulate the predicted Gouy phase <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> near astigmatic foci of Gaussian beams using a beam propagation algorithm integrated with lens design software and compare computational results with experimental data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1016383','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1016383"><span id="translatedtitle">Poland <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> with contralateral ulnar ray defect.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Powell, C V; Coombs, R C; David, T J</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>We report an atypical case of the Poland <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Unreported features are that the hand abnormality is on the contralateral side to the chest wall defect, there is an ulnar ray predominance, and lack of syndactyly. Images PMID:8320708</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10214503','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10214503"><span id="translatedtitle">Congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with congenital hypothyroidism.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Stoll, C; Dott, B; Alembik, Y; Koehl, C</p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p>The French national neonatal screening program for congenital hypothyroidism (CH) was initiated in 1978. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the incidence of congenital extrathyroid <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (ETAs) among the infants with congenital hypothyroidism (CH) and to compare it with the Northeastern France Birth Defect Monitoring System data from 1979 to 1996. Among 129 CH infants on whom adequate data were available, 20 infants (15.5%) had associated congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Eight out of 76 infants with persistent CH had ETAs (10.5%) whereas 12 out of 53 children with transient hypothyroidism had ETAs (22.6%, p < 0.05). Some additional <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were considerably more common than in the general population. Nine infants had congenital cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (6.9%). This rises the question if teratogenic effects active during organogenesis may affect simultaneously many organs, including the developing thyroid, causing a relatively high percentage of CH infants with congenital ETAs. PMID:10214503</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140012998','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140012998"><span id="translatedtitle">Flyby <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Test Integrating Multiple Approaches (FATIMA)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Levit, Creon; Jaroux, Belgacem Amar</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>FATIMA is a mission concept for a small satellite to investigate the flyby <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> - a possible velocity increase that has been observed in some earlier satellites when they have performed gravitational swingy maneuvers of the earth.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/301532','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/301532"><span id="translatedtitle">Are visual <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> related to reading ability?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Grosvenor, T</p> <p>1977-04-01</p> <p>Although reading ability is known to be related to a large number of factors, when a child having a reading problem is brought to an optometrist he (or she) has the responsibility of determining whether or not a visual <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> may be a major or contributing cause of the reading problem. A review of the literature indicates that myopia is consistently associated with good reading performance; and that hypermetropia, astigmatism, lateral phorias, poor fusional vergences, strabismus and color vision <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> tend to be associated with poorer than average reading performance. Well-designed and well-controlled studies are needed, particularly concerning the effect on reading ability of the correction of visual <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Until such studies have been done, any child who has a reading problem deserves a thorough optometric or ophthalmologic examination and the correction of any visual <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> found. PMID:301532</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21254487','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21254487"><span id="translatedtitle">Relaxing Lorentz invariance in general perturbative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Salvio, A.</p> <p>2008-10-15</p> <p>We analyze the role of Lorentz symmetry in the perturbative nongravitational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for a single family of fermions. The theory is assumed to be translational-invariant, power-counting renormalizable and based on a local action, but is allowed to have general Lorentz violating operators. We study the conservation of global and gauge currents associated with general internal symmetry groups and find, by using a perturbative approach, that Lorentz symmetry does not participate in the clash of symmetries that leads to the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. We first analyze the triangle graphs and prove that there are regulators for which the anomalous part of the Ward identities exactly reproduces the Lorentz-invariant case. Then we show, by means of a regulator independent argument, that the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> cancellation conditions derived in Lorentz-invariant theories remain necessary ingredients for <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> freedom.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Earth+AND+plate&pg=5&id=EJ386135','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Earth+AND+plate&pg=5&id=EJ386135"><span id="translatedtitle">Understanding Magnetic <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> and Their Significance.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Shea, James H.</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>Describes a laboratory exercise testing the Vine-Matthews-Morley hypothesis of plate tectonics. Includes 14 questions with explanations using graphs and charts. Provides a historical account of the current plate tectonic and magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> theory. (MVL)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3119441','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3119441"><span id="translatedtitle">Renal <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> Associated with Ectopic Neurohypophysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Özen, Samim; Şişmek, Damla Gökşen; Önder, Asan; Darcan, Şükran</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Objective: Although the etiology of ectopic neurohypophysis that leads to pituitary hormone deficiencies is not yet clearly understood, birth trauma or genetic factors have been considered responsible. Concurrent cranial and extracranial congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> have been reported in such cases. The aim of the present study was to investigate the frequency of renal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in nonsyndromic cases with ectopic neurohypophysis. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated the medical records of 20 patients with ectopic neurohypophysis who were followed up between January 1990 and December 2007 in a tertiary University Hospital. Results: Renal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were identified in three (15%) cases including unilateral renal agenesis in one case, renal hypoplasia in one case, and double collecting system and unilateral renal agenesis in one case. Conclusions: In the present study, the increased frequency of renal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in cases of ectopic neurohypophysis was highlighted, and it was emphasized that there might be common genetic factors that lead to such associations. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:21750632</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AcPPB..36..935S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AcPPB..36..935S"><span id="translatedtitle">Tunguska Genetic <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> and Electrophonic Meteors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Silagadze, Z. K.</p> <p>2005-03-01</p> <p>One of great mysteries of the Tunguska event is its genetic impact. Some genetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were reported in the plants, insects and people of the Tunguska region. Remarkably, the increased rate of biological mutations was found not only within the epicenter area, but also along the trajectory of the Tunguska Space Body (TSB). At that no traces of radioactivity were found, which could be reliably associated with the Tunguska event. The main hypotheses about the nature of the TSB, a stony asteroid, a comet nucleus or a carbonaceous chondrite, readily explain the absence of radioactivity but give no clues how to deal with the genetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. A choice between these hypotheses, as far as the genetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is concerned, is like to the choice between ``blue devil, green devil and speckled devil'', to quote late Academician N.V. Vasilyev. However, if another mysterious phenomenon, electrophonic meteors, is evoked, the origin of the Tunguska genetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> becomes less obscure.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhLB..751..188C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhLB..751..188C"><span id="translatedtitle">Interpretations of the ATLAS diboson <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cheung, Kingman; Keung, Wai-Yee; Tseng, Po-Yan; Yuan, Tzu-Chiang</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Recently, the ATLAS Collaboration recorded an interesting <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in diboson production with excesses at the diboson invariant mass around 2 TeV in boosted jets of all the WZ, W+W-, and ZZ channels. We offer a theoretical interpretation of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> using a phenomenological right-handed model with extra W‧ and Z‧ bosons. Constraints from narrow total decay widths, dijet cross sections, and W / Z + H production are taken into account. We also comment on a few other possibilities.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21452249','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21452249"><span id="translatedtitle">An exceptional combination of congenital coronary <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kharrat, Ilyes; El-Fassy, Eric; Amabile, Nicolas</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>We present a case of congenital coronary artery <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> combining the absence of the circumflex artery, ectopic origins of left anterior descending and diagonal arteries and abnormal courses of these vessels. These rare <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were detected during an elective coronary angiography in a patient with stable angina that was related to significant stenosis of the posterolateral and middle right coronary artery. A computed tomography scanner with three-dimensional reconstructions confirmed the anatomy. PMID:21452249</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ClDy..tmp..451G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ClDy..tmp..451G"><span id="translatedtitle">On the feedback of the winter NAO-driven sea ice <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>García-Serrano, J.; Frankignoul, C.</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>Satellite-derived sea-ice concentration (SIC) and re-analysed atmospheric data are used to analyse the <span class="hlt">potential</span> feedback of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO)-driven sea-ice <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in winter onto the atmosphere during 1979-2013. A maximum covariance analysis shows that this feedback can be detected with monthly data. When SIC leads, the covariability between Atlantic SIC and the Euro-Atlantic atmospheric circulation in February is statistically significant, but shows intra-seasonal differences: the December SIC influence is dominated by <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> east of Greenland, with maximum amplitude in the Greenland Sea (GS); while the January SIC influence is dominated by <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> west of Greenland, in the Davis Strait-Labrador Sea (DL) region. The lagged atmospheric <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are likewise different. A reduction of SIC over GS in December is followed in February by a negative NAO-like pattern near the surface and a hemispheric signature in the upper-troposphere, thus acting as a negative feedback. On the other hand, a reduction of SIC over DL in January is followed by an atmospheric <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> over the North Atlantic that projects on the positive phase of the East Atlantic pattern. The dynamics associated with these atmospheric <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is described, indicating that transient-eddy activity is likely at work in settling the large-scale patterns. The role of concomitant North Atlantic sea surface temperature <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3806762','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3806762"><span id="translatedtitle">Altered Orientation and Flight Paths of Pigeons Reared on Gravity <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>: A GPS Tracking Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Blaser, Nicole; Guskov, Sergei I.; Meskenaite, Virginia; Kanevskyi, Valerii A.; Lipp, Hans-Peter</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The mechanisms of pigeon homing are still not understood, in particular how they determine their position at unfamiliar locations. The “gravity vector” theory holds that pigeons memorize the gravity vector at their home loft and deduct home direction and distance from the angular difference between memorized and actual gravity vector. However, the gravity vector is tilted by different densities in the earth crust leading to gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. We predicted that pigeons reared on different gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> would show different initial orientation and also show changes in their flight path when crossing a gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. We reared one group of pigeons in a strong gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> with a north-to-south gravity gradient, and the other group of pigeons in a normal area but on a spot with a strong local <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> with a west-to-east gravity gradient. After training over shorter distances, pigeons were released from a gravitationally and geomagnetically normal site 50 km north in the same direction for both home lofts. As expected by the theory, the two groups of pigeons showed divergent initial orientation. In addition, some of the GPS-tracked pigeons also showed changes in their flight paths when crossing gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. We conclude that even small local gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at the birth place of pigeons may have the <span class="hlt">potential</span> to bias the map sense of pigeons, while reactivity to gravity gradients during flight was variable and appeared to depend on individual navigational strategies and frequency of position updates. PMID:24194860</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016HEAD...1510004M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016HEAD...1510004M"><span id="translatedtitle">Chandra solves the mystery: Understanding the UV <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> discovered by HST</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mathur, Smita; Gupta, Anjali</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>A strange <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> was discovered during our 180 day HST campaign to observe NGC5548 for reverberation mapping. The UV emission lines responded to changes in the UV continuum, as they should, during most ofthe observing season. However, there was a period of about 60--70 days during which the UV emission lines decorrelated from continuum variations. Understanding this <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is vital to the success of reverberation mapping technique. We also observed the source 4 times with Chandra during the 180 day HST observations. Chandra observations revealed the presence of soft excess during the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, but there was no soft excess before or after the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. This <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the accretion disk temperature increased from the ``normal'' state, peaking in FUV, to that peaking in soft X-rays during the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Thus, there was no ionizing continuum to which to reverberate. There are more curious things about the response of emission lines, such as the time at which the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> sets in and the amount flux decrease during the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. I will discuss the details of this first-of-its-kind behavior and present detailed explanation.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_19 --> <div id="page_20" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="381"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMOS31B1707P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMOS31B1707P"><span id="translatedtitle">High salinity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> south of Oahu, Hawaii</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pearson, K.; Carter, G. S.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Patches of higher salinity water were observed, using Seaglider data, in the upper 50m of the water-column between Oahu and Penguin Bank. These <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> occur approximately once a month, and are visible in the glider data for an average of 3 days. <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> have abrupt transitions occurring over mere hours. Salinity within the patches can reach values in excess of 35.2 psu, 0.3 higher than the average profile for the region. The salinity signature associated with the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> corresponds to Subtropical surface water, found north of the Hawaiian island chain. The high salinity water is trapped by the thermocline in the mixed layer. Seasonal variations of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> depth are directly related to the seasonal variations of mixed layer depth. These patches of high salinity coincide with the presence of eddies. Using sea surface height as an indicator, we found that eddy-eddy interaction and eddy-island interaction dictate the advection of upwelled waters into the region. Infrequently, we observe corresponding temperature <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The larger the distance between the center of the eddy and the glider, the less visible the temperature <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Positive (negative) values indicate salinity above (below) the mean profile.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhRvD..88d5013W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhRvD..88d5013W"><span id="translatedtitle">Classifying gauge <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> through symmetry-protected trivial orders and classifying gravitational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> through topological orders</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wen, Xiao-Gang</p> <p>2013-08-01</p> <p>In this paper, we systematically study gauge <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in bosonic and fermionic weak-coupling gauge theories with gauge group G (which can be continuous or discrete) in d space-time dimensions. We show a very close relation between gauge <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for gauge group G and symmetry-protected trivial (SPT) orders (also known as symmetry-protected topological (SPT) orders) with symmetry group G in one-higher dimension. The SPT phases are classified by group cohomology class Hd+1(G,R/Z). Through a more careful consideration, we argue that the gauge <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are described by the elements in Free[Hd+1(G,R/Z)]⊕Hπ˙d+1(BG,R/Z). The well known Adler-Bell-Jackiw <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are classified by the free part of Hd+1(G,R/Z) (denoted as Free[Hd+1(G,R/Z)]). We refer to other kinds of gauge <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> beyond Adler-Bell-Jackiw <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> as non-ABJ gauge <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, which include Witten SU(2) global gauge <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. We introduce a notion of π-cohomology group, Hπ˙d+1(BG,R/Z), for the classifying space BG, which is an Abelian group and include Tor[Hd+1(G,R/Z)] and topological cohomology group Hd+1(BG,R/Z) as subgroups. We argue that Hπ˙d+1(BG,R/Z) classifies the bosonic non-ABJ gauge <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and partially classifies fermionic non-ABJ <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Using the same approach that shows gauge <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to be connected to SPT phases, we can also show that gravitational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are connected to topological orders (i.e., patterns of long-range entanglement) in one-higher dimension.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70016136','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70016136"><span id="translatedtitle">Enzyme leaching of surficial geochemical samples for detecting hydromorphic trace-element <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with precious-metal mineralized bedrock buried beneath glacial overburden in northern Minnesota</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Clark, Robert J.; Meier, A.L.; Riddle, G.</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>One objective of the International Falls and Roseau, Minnesota, CUSMAP projects was to develop a means of conducting regional-scale geochemical surveys in areas where bedrock is buried beneath complex glacially derived overburden. Partial analysis of B-horizon soils offered hope for detecting subtle hydromorphic trace-element dispersion patterns. An enzyme-based partial leach selectively removes metals from oxide coatings on the surfaces of soil materials without attacking their matrix. Most trace-element concentrations in the resulting solutions are in the part-per-trillion to low part-per-billion range, necessitating determinations by inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry. The resulting data show greater contrasts for many trace elements than with other techniques tested. Spatially, many trace metal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are locally discontinuous, but anomalous trends within larger areas are apparent. In many instances, the source for an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> seems to be either basal till or bedrock. Ground water flow is probably the most important mechanism for transporting metals toward the surface, although ionic diffusion, electrochemical gradients, and capillary action may play a role in <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> dispersal. Sample sites near the Rainy Lake-Seine River fault zone, a regional shear zone, often have anomalous concentrations of a variety of metals, commonly including Zn and/or one or more metals which substitute for Zn in sphalerite (Cd, Ge, Ga, and Sn). Shifts in background concentrations of Bi, Sb, and As show a trend across the area indicating a possible regional zoning of lode-Au mineralization. Soil <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of Ag, Co, and Tl parallel basement structures, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> areas that may have <span class="hlt">potential</span> for Cobalt/Thunder Baytype silver viens. An area around Baudette, Minnesota, which is underlain by quartz-chlorite-carbonate-altered shear zones, is anomalous in Ag, As, Bi, Co, Mo, Te, Tl, and W. <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> of Ag, As, Bi, Te, and W tend to follow the fault zones, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> for lode-Au deposits. Soil <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of Co, Mo, and Tl appear to follow northwest-striking structures that cross the shear zones, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that Thunder Bay-type mineralization may have overprinted earlier mineralization along the shear zones.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.V53A2238T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.V53A2238T"><span id="translatedtitle">New experimental constraints for Hadean zircon source melts from Ce and Eu <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in zircon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Trail, D.; Watson, E. B.; Tailby, N.</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>A common feature of zircon rare earth element profiles is that they often have enriched chondrite normalized Ce abundances relative to bracketing rare earth elements (REEs) La and Pr. The magnitude of a zircon Ce <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is generally attributed to an increase in Ce4+/Ce3+ of the crystallizing medium (Ce4+ is more compatible than Ce3+ in zircon), which is associated with more oxidizing environments. Zircons may also have depleted chondrite normalized Eu abundances relative to Sm and Gd. A negative Eu <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> may be indicative of more reducing conditions (Eu2+ is incompatible in zircon) or depletion of Eu in the melt from plagioclase prior to or during zircon crystallization. We report experimental data from zircons crystallized in hydrous peralkaline, metaluminous, and peraluminous melts (800-1300oC; 10 kbar) with the oxygen fugacity buffered from ~IW to HM+1 in order to constrain magnitude of zircon Ce and Eu <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Zircon Ce <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> increase in magnitude with higher oxygen fugacities and lower crystallization temperatures; Eu <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are more negative at ~IW vs. NNO for the same temperature and melt composition. Our experiments also show that with the oxygen fugacity buffered at NNO, zircons may have both positive Ce <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and negative Eu <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Thus, Eu2+ and Ce4+ may co-exist in terrestrial melts; furthermore, melt depletion of Eu by plagioclase fractionation prior to (or during) zircon crystallization may not be a requisite for the presence of zircon Eu <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in (Hadean) zircons. The magnitude of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is also a function of the melt composition; peraluminous melts yield the largest positive Ce (or negative Eu) <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at a given oxygen fugacity and temperature. Extrapolation of our preliminary empirical calibration to the crystallization temperatures of the Jack Hills Hadean zircons (~700oC) <span class="hlt">suggests</span> the magnitude of Ce <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in approximately half of the Hadean zircons cannot be produced in metaluminous or peralkaline melts, even at oxygen fugacities as high as HM+1. However, the magnitude of Ce <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Hadean zircons is within the range of predicted <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of our experiments for peraluminous melts, implying that a significant portion of the Hadean zircon population may be derived from peraluminous melts. This result is consistent with muscovite inclusion mineralogy in Hadean zircons (e.g., Hopkins et al., 2008), but does not preclude the possibility of other, less evolved peraluminous source rocks, or some process which leads to significant Ce enrichment (relative to La and/or Pr) in the melt at the time of zircon crystallization.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20060053332','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20060053332"><span id="translatedtitle">Clustering and Recurring <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Identification: Recurring <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection System (ReADS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>McIntosh, Dawn</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>This viewgraph presentation reviews the Recurring <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection System (ReADS). The Recurring <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection System is a tool to analyze text reports, such as aviation reports and maintenance records: (1) Text clustering algorithms group large quantities of reports and documents; Reduces human error and fatigue (2) Identifies interconnected reports; Automates the discovery of possible recurring <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>; (3) Provides a visualization of the clusters and recurring <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> We have illustrated our techniques on data from Shuttle and ISS discrepancy reports, as well as ASRS data. ReADS has been integrated with a secure online search</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..12.2967J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..12.2967J"><span id="translatedtitle">Joint Interpretation of Bathymetric and Gravity <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Maps Using Cross and Dot-Products.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jilinski, Pavel; Fontes, Sergio Luiz</p> <p>2010-05-01</p> <p>0.1 Summary We present the results of joint map interpretation technique based on cross and dot-products applied to bathymetric and gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> gradients maps. According to the theory (Gallardo, Meju, 2004) joint interpretation of different gradient characteristics help to localize and empathize patterns unseen on one image interpretation and gives information about the correlation of different spatial data. Values of angles between gradients and their cross and dot-product were used. This technique helps to map unseen relations between bathymetric and gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> maps if they are analyzed separately. According to the method applied for the southern segment of Eastern-Brazilian coast bathymetrical and gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> gradients indicates a strong source-effect relation between them. The details of the method and the obtained results are discussed. 0.2 Introduction We applied this method to investigate the correlation between bathymetric and gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at the southern segment of the Eastern-Brazilian coast. Gridded satellite global marine gravity data and bathymetrical data were used. The studied area is located at the Eastern- Brazilian coast between the 20° W and 30° W meridians and 15° S and 25° S parallels. The volcanic events responsible for the uncommon width of the continental shelf at the Abrolhos bank also were responsible for the formation of the Abrolhos islands and seamounts including the major Vitoria-Trindade chain. According to the literature this volcanic structures are expected to have a corresponding gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (McKenzie, 1976, Zembruscki, S.G. 1979). The main objective of this study is to develop and test joint image interpretation method to compare spatial data and analyze its relations. 0.3 Theory and Method 0.3.1 Data sources The bathymetrical satellite data were derived bathymetry 2-minute grid of the ETOPO2v2 obtained from NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov). The satellite marine gravity 1-minute gridded data were obtained from the Satellite Geodesy at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Smith & Sandwell (1997; http://topex.ucsd.edu. Gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data were re-gridded using the ETOPO2v2 grid. All calculations and maps were made using MatLab 2007 software. 0.3.2 Cross-Product Cross-product is the result of multiplication of bathymetric and gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> gradient magnitudes by the sine of the angle between them. According to the definition of gradient cross-product minimal values are expected to be found in points where the angle between gradients is close to zero or where one or both of the gradient magnitudes have values close to zero. It creates an ambiguity and a problem for data interpretation since there is no exact correspondence between bathymetric structures and gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. 0.3.3 Dot-Product Dot-product is the result of multiplication of bathymetric and gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> magnitudes by the cosine on the angle between them. According to the definition of dot-product, values close to zero can be generated by near perpendicular orientation of the gradients or small magnitudes of one or both gradients. So, the results are mutually increased in areas with larger magnitudes or smaller angles between gradients. Due to this mutual amplification dot-products are less affected by the ambiguity of cross-product explained above. The same statistical separation of cross-product was used to support the conclusions. 0.3.4 Statistics and Significance Criteria Statistical analysis was made in order to sort the data into two groups to reduce ambiguity effect: first group - data with magnitudes that could be considered anomalous (where the main minimizing source is the angle between the gradients and the second group - data with magnitudes variations that could be considered as (non significant or background (where cross-product value is determined by the small magnitude). It was chosen to use the mean value and standard deviation (std) to sort the data in such two groups. These values were determined for bathymetric and gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> gradient magnitudes creating two data sets - one where one or both gradient magnitudes are one standard deviation larger than the mean value with a total of 7831 (anomalous) and a second one where both magnitudes differ smaller than one standard deviation from the mean value with 85584 (background ). Statistical analysis of distribution patterns for both groups was made. 0.4 Examples of Method Application 0.4.1 Map of Angles Between Gradients Figure 1 shows the map of angle values. The angle values were divided into 4 equal intervals. The statistical distribution of angles between gradient in the given intervals is the following (percents of the total): 0 to 60° - 51.39% of the values; 60° to 90° -12.08%; 90° to 120° -14.92%; 120° to 180° -21.18%. It can be seen that 51% of the gradients have a small angle between them, 72% of gradients can be considered as parallel (72%) with angles smaller than 60° or bigger than 120° between them. After statistical separation in the anomalous group almost 91% of the gradients have an angle smaller than 60° while in the background group just 48.6%. From these results we can make a conclusion that the majority of the bathymetric and gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> gradients are related. Regions with higher gradient magnitudes are characterized by cosine values close to 1 (indicating a small angle between them). The size of the areas characterized by small angles between gradients exceed the size of bathymetric and gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> isolines characterizing the area of influence of the structures and their effects. Regions with no significant <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> show uncorrelated value spots. 0.4.2 Map of Cross-Product The resulting map shows small spots of higher cross-product magnitudes following magnitude isolines. About 90% of the values are close to minimum. As was mentioned before, we can presume that areas where bathymetry and gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> gradient cross-products have smallest magnitudes there is a good correspondence between them indicating a good correspondence between shapes. According to these results for the studied area the shapes and positions of bathymetric structures and gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are well correlated <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> strong correlation between source and its effect. 0.4.3 Map of Dot-Product The resulting map resembles bathymetric and gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> isolines. All the sea mounts, banks, continental slope and other notable geomorphologic structures and gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are well delimitated in the dot-product map eliminating uncorrelated areas where gradient orientations can be considered as near perpendicular. The dot-product map of the studied area <span class="hlt">suggests</span> a strong source-effect between bathymetry and gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. 0.5 Conclusions The joint image interpretation technique uses three different criteria that are sensitive to different gradient properties. Angles between gradients are a good indicator of areas where data are related and it is not sensitive to the magnitudes of the gradients. Angles maps can be used to find areas with direct and inverse relation between mapped properties and contour areas of influence of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> unseen on gradient magnitude maps alone. Statistical measures of distribution of angles can be an indicator of relation between data sets as show using significance criteria. Cross-product map has a spotted character of contours. To reduce the effects of the ambiguity the separation into two groups proved to be useful. It helps to separate the cross-product values that are minimized due to gradient magnitudes from those that minimize due to sine values which is a measure of correlation between them. Dot-product values contour areas where gradients are correlated. According to joint image interpretation technique applied bathymetric structures especially the volcanic seamounts and banks in the southern part of East-Brazilian Coast are closely related to the observed gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and can be interpreted as sources and effect. This technique also helps to evaluate the shape and dispersion of the gravitational effect from a bathymetrical source. 0.6 References Dehlinger P., Marine Gravity, Elsevier, 1978. Gallardo, L. A., and M. A. Meju., Joint 2D cross-gradient imaging of magnetotelluric and seismic travel-time data for structural and lithological classification, Geophys. J. Int., 169, 1261-1272. (2007) Gallardo, L.A., M. A. Meju (2004), Joint two-dimensional dc resistivity and seismic traveltime inversion with cross-gradients constraints, J. Geophys. Res., 109, B03311, doi:10.1029/2003JB002716 Jacoby, W., and Smilde P. L., Gravity Interpretation, Springer, 2009. McKenzie D. & Bowin C. 1976. The relationship between bathymetry and gravity in Atlantic Ocean. Journal of Geophysical Research, 81: 1903-1915. Roy. K. K., <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Theory in Applied Geophysics, Springer, 2008. Smith, W. H. F., and D. T. Sandwell, Global seafloor topography from satellite altimetry and ship depth soundings, Science, v. 277, p. 1957-1962, 26 Sept., 1997. Sandwell, D. T., and W. H. F. Smith, Global marine gravity from retracked Geosat and ERS-1 altimetry: Ridge Segmentation versus spreading rate, J. Geophys. Res., 114, B01411, doi:10.1029/2008JB006008, 2009. Zembruscki, S.G. 1979. Geomorfologia da Margem Continental Sul Brasileira e das Bacias Oceânicas Adjacentes. In: Geomorfologia da margem continental brasileira e das áreas oceânicas adjacentes. Série Projeto REMAC, N° 7.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFMPP11A1409G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFMPP11A1409G"><span id="translatedtitle">Barbados Corals as Recorders of Amazon River Salinity <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Greer, L.; Telfeyan, K.; Arienzo, M. M.; Rosenberg, A. D.; Waite, A. J.; Swart, P. K.</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>Low salinity plumes of Amazon and Orinoco sourced water have previously been detected around the island of Barbados. Barbados corals may therefore have the <span class="hlt">potential</span> to record salinity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> governed by natural, climate-related, and anthropogenic changes in the Amazon and Orinoco Basin watersheds beyond the recent historic record. In order to determine whether Barbados corals record salinity variations associated with local or Amazon/Orinoco sourced signals, multiple specimens of Montastraea sp. and Siderastrea sp. coral skeletons were analyzed for stable C and O isotope and Sr/Ca variations. Corals were collected from the northwest, central-west, and southwest regions of the island to determine degree of salinity signal heterogeneity over a 5-6 year period at approximately monthly resolution. Four separate published paleotemperature equations were used to assess the importance of temperature on stable oxygen isotope composition. In situ temperature measurements obtained from NOAA show an annual sea surface temperature (SST) cycle of approximately 4 degrees Celsius off Barbados. If governed solely by SST, stable isotope data from all 8 corals in this study indicate a significantly greater annual temperature range of approximately 6 degrees Celsius. This <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that salinity related fluctuations in oxygen isotopic composition of water are an important influence on the geochemistry of Barbados corals. Some regional differences in geochemical composition of corals were apparent. Corals from the southwest of Barbados showed the clearest sub-annual isotope signal, better correlations with mean annual SST measurements, and lowest mean salinity of the regions. Corals from the central-west and northwest showed distinctly higher mean, but more variable, salinity than corals from the south. Stable carbon isotope data from southwest corals also best <span class="hlt">potentially</span> reflect the Suess Effect. Montastraea sp. corals generally show a higher paleotemperature offset from in situ values, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that the ability to extract salinity data from Barbados corals may be species-specific. These results may have implications for understanding local eddy patterns as Amazon-sourced water encounters Barbados. It is possible that the central and northern lee coasts may be less impacted by Amazon water and more subject to local restriction from open marine conditions and/or increased evaporative effects.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.P51C0670H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.P51C0670H"><span id="translatedtitle">Modelling and interpreting magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> features over lunar mare using a GIS method</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hemant, K.; Purucker, M.; Sabaka, T.</p> <p>2007-12-01</p> <p>The global magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> maps derived from the Lunar Prospector vector magnetometer data has revealed weak <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over the regions flooded by lunar mare basalts and strong <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over the regions diametrically opposite to some of the largest basin-forming impact craters. Conversely, the spectrometer data over the Lunar mare show a high concentration of FeO by weight, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that iron could mostly be present in the form of ilmenites and other high Titanium oxide. Among the mare basins, Crisium and Marginis show <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> strength > 4 nT at 30 km altitude while Serenitatis, Fecundiatis, Nectaris, Australe and Moscoviense show strength < 4 nT. Large mare basins Imbrium and Orientale show the weakest features < 1.5 nT. The <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are modelled in terms of vertically integrated magnetization model of the lunar crust. The lunar crustal thickness model, paleomagnetic measurements of the samples collected from Apollo Lunar mission and the known geological regions covering the lunar mare are combined together following a Geographic Information System based technique to compute a lunar crustal magnetization model (LCMM). Vector magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> maps are predicted at an altitude of 30 km using LCMM and are compared with the corresponding observed magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map. The sources causing the magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, in particular the thickness of the underlying basalts are modified to match the observations. Some of the regions, for instance north of Mare Marginis, not occupied by the present known surface expression of the mare regions also show strong <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> features whose causative sources need to be understood and modelled.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..11.6460N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..11.6460N"><span id="translatedtitle">Mesozoic Sequence Magnetic <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in the South of Corad Rise, the Southern Indian Ocean</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nogi, Y.; Ikehara, M.; Nakamura, Y.; Kameo, K.; Katsuki, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kita, S.</p> <p>2009-04-01</p> <p>The Southern Indian Ocean is key area for understanding the fragmentation process of the Gondwana. However, tectonic history in the Southern Indian Ocean still remains less well-defined because of the sparse observations in this area. The R/V Hakuho-maru cruise KH-07-4 Leg3 were conducted to understand the tectonic history related to the Gondwana breakup in the Southern Indian Ocean between Cape Town, South Africa, and off Lutzow-Holm Bay, Antarctica. Total intensity and vector geomagnetic field measurements as well as swath bathymetry mapping were collected during the cruise. Magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data have been collected along WNW-ESE trending inferred from satellite gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> just to the south of Conrad Rise. We have also collected magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data along NNE-SSW trending lineaments from satellite gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data between the south of the Conrad Rise and off Lutzow-Holm Bay. Magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with amplitude of about 500 nT, originating from normal and reversed magnetization of oceanic crust are detected along the WNW-ESE trending structures just to the south of Conrad Rise. Those magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> most likely indicate Mesozoic magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> sequence, Mesozoic sequence magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with amplitude of about 300 nT are also observed along the NNE-SSW trending lineaments between the south of the Conrad Rise and off Lutzow-Holm Bay. Oceanic crusts formed during Cretaceous normal polarity superchron are found in both profiles, although magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> C34 has been identified just to the north of the Conrad Rise. These <span class="hlt">suggest</span> the extinct spreading axes in the south of Conrad Rise and the two different seafloor spreading systems were active around Cretaceous normal polarity superchron between the south of the Conrad Rise and off Lutzow-Holm Bay. These provide new constraints for the fragmentation process of the Gondwana.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.G33B1247H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.G33B1247H"><span id="translatedtitle">Detection of Characteristic Precipitation <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Patterns of El Nino / La Nina in Time- variable Gravity Fields by GRACE</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Heki, K.; Morishita, Y.</p> <p>2007-12-01</p> <p>GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) satellites, launched in March 2002, have been mapping monthly gravity fields of the Earth, allowing us to infer changes in surface mass, e.g. water and ice. Past findings include the ice mass loss in southern Greenland (Luthcke et al., 2006) and its acceleration in 2004 (Velicogna and Wahr, 2006), crustal dilatation by the 2004 Sumatra Earthquake (Han et al., 2006) and the postseismic movement of water in mantle (Ogawa and Heki, 2007). ENSO (El Nino and Southern Oscillation) brings about global climate impacts, together with its opposite phenomenon, La Nina. Ropelewski and Halpert (1987) showed typical precipitation patterns in ENSO years; characteristic regional-scale precipitation <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> occur in India, tropical and southern Africa and South America. Nearly opposite precipitation <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are shown to occur in La Nina years (Ropelewski and Halpert, 1988). Here we report the detection of such precipitation <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> patterns in the GRACE monthly gravity data 2002 - 2007, which includes both La Nina (2005 fall - 2006 spring) and El Nino (2006 fall - 2007 spring) periods. We modeled the worldwide gravity time series with constant trends and seasonal changes, and extracted deviations of gravity values at two time epochs, i.e. February 2006 and 2007, and converted them into the changes in equivalent surface water mass. East Africa showed negative gravity deviation (-20.5 cm in water) in 2006 February (La Nina), which reversed to positive (18.7 cm) in 2007 February (El Nino). Northern and southern parts of South America also showed similar see-saw patterns. Such patterns closely resemble to those found meteorologically (Ropelewski and Halpert, 1987; 1988), <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> the <span class="hlt">potential</span> of GRACE as a sensor of inter-annual precipitation <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> through changes in continental water storage. We performed numerical simulations of soil moisture changes at grid points in land area incorporating the CMAP precipitation data, NCEP/NCAR temperature data, and <span class="hlt">potential</span> evapotranspiration calculated after Thornswaite (1942). We took out the soil moisture <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in 2006 February and 2007 February by modeling its time series in the same way as gravity, and confirmed that they are quantitatively consistent with GRACE gravity deviations. Out study demonstrates that satellite gravity data can detect not only of global warming signals in high latitude regions but also inter-annual climate changes in low and middle latitude continental regions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015amos.confE..84M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015amos.confE..84M"><span id="translatedtitle">Using Big Data Technologies and Analytics to Predict Sensor <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mital, R.; Coughlin, J.; Canaday, M.</p> <p></p> <p>A goal of big data analytics is to help leaders make informed and rapid decisions by analyzing large volumes of complex data, as well as other forms of data that may be untapped by conventional analyses, and presenting it in a form that facilitates decision making. Big data analytics is the process of examining large data sets containing a variety of data types to uncover hidden patterns, unknown correlations, and other useful information. Sensors typically record significant amounts of data but it is often not exploited except in special cases and after historically large amounts of analysis time. Big data analytics provides a mechanism to routinely monitor these data sets while also providing insight into anomalous events, such as are encountered in large sensor systems such as those in the space surveillance network. In this study, we simulate recorded data from a notional radar or optical sensor and use big data technologies and the analytics to process the data to analyze and predict sensor performance. This study focuses on data products that would commonly be analyzed at a site and how big data technologies can be used to detect <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. This study shows how the ability to rapidly drill down into the data enables an analyst or decision maker to assess <span class="hlt">potential</span> system <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. This study shows how current technologies and predictive analytical techniques can be used to view the data, detect and explain <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and predict preventative maintenance actions in a timely manner.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19870007985','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19870007985"><span id="translatedtitle">Improving the geological interpretation of magnetic and gravity satellite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hinze, William J.; Braile, Lawrence W.; Vonfrese, Ralph R. B.</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>Quantitative analysis of the geologic component of observed satellite magnetic and gravity fields requires accurate isolation of the geologic component of the observations, theoretically sound and viable inversion techniques, and integration of collateral, constraining geologic and geophysical data. A number of significant contributions were made which make quantitative analysis more accurate. These include procedures for: screening and processing orbital data for lithospheric signals based on signal repeatability and wavelength analysis; producing accurate gridded <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> values at constant elevations from the orbital data by three-dimensional least squares collocation; increasing the stability of equivalent point source inversion and criteria for the selection of the optimum damping parameter; enhancing inversion techniques through an iterative procedure based on the superposition theorem of <span class="hlt">potential</span> fields; and modeling efficiently regional-scale lithospheric sources of satellite magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. In addition, these techniques were utilized to investigate regional <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> sources of North and South America and India and to provide constraints to continental reconstruction. Since the inception of this research study, eleven papers were presented with associated published abstracts, three theses were completed, four papers were published or accepted for publication, and an additional manuscript was submitted for publication.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006PhDT........75G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006PhDT........75G"><span id="translatedtitle">Claycap <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection using hyperspectral remote sensing and lidargrammetric techniques</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Garcia Quijano, Maria Jose</p> <p></p> <p>Clay capped waste sites are a common method to dispose of the more than 40 million tons of hazardous waste produced in the United States every year (EPA, 2003). Due to the <span class="hlt">potential</span> threat that hazardous waste poses, it is essential to monitor closely the performance of these facilities. Development of a monitoring system that exploits spectral and topographic changes over hazardous waste sites is presented. Spectral <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection is based upon the observed changes in absolute reflectance and spectral derivatives in centipede grass (Eremochloa ophiuroides) under different irrigation levels. The spectral features that provide the best separability among irrigation levels were identified using Stepwise Discriminant Analyses. The Red Edge Position was selected as a suitable discriminant variable to compare the performance of a global and a local <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection algorithm using a DAIS 3715 hyperspectral image. Topographical <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection is assessed by evaluating the vertical accuracy of two LIDAR datasets acquired from two different altitudes (700 m and 1,200 m AGL) over a clay-capped hazardous site at the Savannah River National Laboratory, SC using the same Optech ALTM 2050 and Cessna 337 platform. Additionally, a quantitative comparison is performed to determine the effect that decreasing platform altitude and increasing posting density have on the vertical accuracy of the LIDAR data collected.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016GeoRL..43..377M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016GeoRL..43..377M"><span id="translatedtitle">Improved seasonal drought forecasts using reference evapotranspiration <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>McEvoy, Daniel J.; Huntington, Justin L.; Mejia, John F.; Hobbins, Michael T.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>A novel contiguous United States (CONUS) wide evaluation of reference evapotranspiration (ET0; a formulation of evaporative demand) <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is performed using the Climate Forecast System version 2 (CFSv2) reforecast data for 1982-2009. This evaluation was motivated by recent research showing ET0 <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> can accurately represent drought through exploitation of the complementary relationship between actual evapotranspiration and ET0. Moderate forecast skill of ET0 was found up to leads of 5 months and was consistently better than precipitation skill over most of CONUS. Forecasts of ET0 during drought events revealed high categorical skill for notable warm-season droughts of 1988 and 1999 in the central and northeast CONUS, with precipitation skill being much lower or absent. Increased ET0 skill was found in several climate regions when CFSv2 forecasts were initialized during moderate-to-strong El Niño-Southern Oscillation events. Our findings <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that ET0 <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> forecasts can improve and complement existing seasonal drought forecasts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.V11B2028P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.V11B2028P"><span id="translatedtitle">MODIS thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> during strombolian activity at Stromboli</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Piscopo, D.; Cigolini, C.; Coppola, D.; Delle Donne, D.</p> <p>2008-12-01</p> <p>We investigated the spectral radiance of Stromboli volcano through a time-series of more than 1200 nighttimes and daytimes MODIS granules. MODIS images allowed us to analyse the infrared radiation of Stromboli volcano during the period spanning between 1 January 2008 and 4 September 2008. MODIS data has been resampled within a spatial mask (15 km X 15 km) including the volcano. Then we applied a cloud mask algorithm and the NTI to the all pixels in order to detect the pixel containing the thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. According to this principle, the MODVOLC algorithm detects an alert whenever a pixel has an NTI higher than a fixed threshold (-0.8); such thresholds were settled in order to avoid false alarms on a global scale. At Stromboli volcano a clear seasonal pattern is evident for the measured specific NTI trend and many thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may be detected when this parameter is lower than -0.8, as well. Therefore we processed all data by means of an automatic routine without setting any fixed threshold. Since during typical strombolian activity, thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are located within the crater area, we monitored the pixel with highest NTI within the spatial mask. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the thermal energy measured for these peaks can be better related to the amount of lava erupted, thus providing a tools to refine the estimate of the effusion rates during the typical strombolian activity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003JGRE..108.5015K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003JGRE..108.5015K"><span id="translatedtitle">Photometric <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the lunar surface: Results from Clementine data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kreslavsky, M. A.; Shkuratov, Y. G.</p> <p>2003-03-01</p> <p>We mapped the photometric characteristics of the lunar surface for several small areas using Clementine UVVIS camera images. The maps of the phase function steepness showed several anomalous sites. Several small fresh impact craters have anomalous halos in these maps. The phase function within the halos is less steep than for the surrounding mare surface. We interpret these halos to be due to geologically recent impact-caused alteration of the equilibrium millimeter-scale regolith structure. This equilibrium structure is established through micrometeoritic bombardment at a geologically short timescale. An <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of the same signature was found at the Apollo 15 landing site. We interpret it as being a result of the regolith structure alteration with the lander jets. A unique photometric <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> not correlated with albedo was found within the Reiner Gamma Formation. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that this <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is genetically related to the formation, which indicates its young age. This favors the impact hypothesis for the nature of the Reiner Gamma Formation. Our study showed that mapping of photometric characteristics is a new powerful tool in studies of the surfaces of atmosphereless bodies. Future photometric studies of the Moon with existing and new data sets are promising for a search for traces of recent seismic events, studies of the recent population of meteoroids in the inner solar system, an advance in the understanding of swirls, etc.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9682497','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9682497"><span id="translatedtitle">Congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the central nervous system at autopsy in Croatia in the period before and after the Chernobyl accident.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kruslin, B; Jukić, S; Kos, M; Simić, G; Cviko, A</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>In this study, we analyzed the frequency, type and sex distribution of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the central nervous system (CNS) at autopsy in the period prior to and after the Chernobyl accident in northwest Croatia, one of the areas with the highest exposure to nuclear contamination from Chernobyl. All autopsies in both periods were performed by the same technique, i.e. dissection of the trunk and head, and inspection of the extremities. There were 53 infants with congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the CNS in the period prior to, and 99 in the period after the Chernobyl accident. Our results showed a statistically significant increase in the incidence of CNS <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in general (chi 2 = 4,719, p < 0.05, D. F. = 1) and of neural tube defects (chi 2 = 5.380, p < 0.05, D. F. = 1) in the period after the Chernobyl accident. Differences in the incidence of various CNS <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, in all types of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and in sex distribution were not statistically significant. Studies of the association between the Chernobyl accident and congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> showed no clear changes in the prevalence of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at birth which might have been associated with the accident. This study provided some additional data on the frequency of CNS <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the period after the Chernobyl accident in one of the areas with the highest exposure to the nuclear contamination from Chernobyl. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the frequency of all <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, including CNS, in the period after the Chernobyl accident should be carefully monitored. PMID:9682497</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1983GeoRL..10..155W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1983GeoRL..10..155W"><span id="translatedtitle">Nighttime VHF and GHz scintillations in the East-Asian sector of the equatorial <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wernik, A. W.; Franke, S.; Liu, C. H.; Fang, D. J.</p> <p>1983-02-01</p> <p>Measurements made during solar maximum years in the East Asian sector of the equatorial <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> show different seasonal patterns of night-time scintillation occurrence at 137 MHz at Lunping and 4 GHz at Hong Kong. These seasonal variations are very similar to that observed at the equatorial station in Guam, indicating strong coupling between equatorial and <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> irregularities. Model computations indicate that the GHz scintillation observed at Hong Kong is much stronger than one would expect based on VHF scintillation measured at Lunping. It is <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that this might be an indication of strong latitudinal dependence of scintillation in the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region. Attention is also given to the possible difference in local ionospheric conditions that were responsible for generating GHz scintillation causing irregularities in the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region and at the equator.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1918307','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1918307"><span id="translatedtitle">Incidence of numerical chromosome <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in human pregnancy estimation from induced and spontaneous abortion data.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Burgoyne, P S; Holland, K; Stephens, R</p> <p>1991-04-01</p> <p>Induced abortion data provided an estimate of 4.7% numerical chromosome <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for women with a clinically recognized pregnancy at the end of the 7th week after the last menstrual period (LMP). This frequency requires that 51.9% of spontaneous abortions occurring after the 7th week should be chromosomally abnormal if the frequency of numerical chromosome <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at term (live and stillbirths combined) is 0.53%. Cytogenetic data from surveys of spontaneous abortion <span class="hlt">suggested</span> a lower incidence of 39.7%. However, this figure is likely to be an underestimate because chromosome <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are almost certainly over-represented among the many early abortuses which lack embryonic tissue and hence are not karyotyped. The frequency of numerical chromosome <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at conception, arising from meiotic errors, was estimated from sperm karyotype data combined with information on the relative frequencies of maternal and paternal errors in the aetiology of trisomies. This provided a minimum estimate of 20%. PMID:1918307</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4738123','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4738123"><span id="translatedtitle">Outcomes of Surgical Treatment of Vascular <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> on the Vermilion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Park, Sang Min; Lee, Jae Woo; Kim, Hoon Soo; Lee, In Sook</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Background The vermilion plays an important role in both the aesthetic and functional aspects of facial anatomy. Due to its structural features, the complete excision of vascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on the vermilion is challenging, making it difficult to determine the appropriate treatment strategy. Thus, the authors analyzed the results of surgical treatment of vascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on the vermilion. Methods The medical records of 38 patients with vascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on the vermilion who underwent surgery from 1995 to 2013 were analyzed. Nine of the cases had an involuted hemangioma, and 29 cases had a vascular malformation; of the vascular malformations, 13, 11, one, and four cases involved were capillary malformations (CMs), venous malformations (VMs), lymphatic malformations (LMs), and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), respectively. We investigated the surgical methods used to treat these patients, the quantity of surgical procedures, complications and instances of recurrence, and self-assessed satisfaction scores. Results A total of 50 operations were carried out: 28 horizontal partial excisions, eight vertical partial excisions, and 14 operations using other surgical methods. All cases of AVM underwent complete excision. Six cases experienced minor complications and one case of recurrence was observed. The overall average satisfaction score was 4.1 out of 5, while the satisfaction scores associated with each lesion type were 4.2 for hemangiomas, 3.9 for CMs, 4.2 for VMs, 5.0 for LMs, and 4.0 for AVMs. Conclusions It is difficult to completely excise vascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that involve the vermilion. This study <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that partial excision focused on correcting the overall contour of the lips is effective and leads to satisfactory results. PMID:26848441</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_20 --> <div id="page_21" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="401"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ChJOL..31.1129F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ChJOL..31.1129F"><span id="translatedtitle">Surface thermal centroid <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of the eastern equatorial Pacific as a unified Niño index</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fang, Mingqiang; Chen, Yan; Li, Hongping; Wu, Lixin</p> <p>2013-09-01</p> <p>By analyzing the variability of global SST (sea surface temperature) <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, we propose a unified Niño index using the surface thermal centroid <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of the region along the Pacific equator embraced by the 0.7°C contour line of the standard deviation of the SST <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and try to unify the traditional Niño regions into a single entity. The unified Niño region covers almost all of the traditional Niño regions. The <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> time series of the averaged SST over this region are closely correlated to historical Niño indices. The <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> time series of the zonal and meridional thermal centroid have close correlation with historical TNI (Trans-Niño index) indices, showing differences among El Niño (La Niña) events. The meridional centroid <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that areas of maximum temperature <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> are moving meridionally (although slightly) with synchronous zonal movement. The zonal centroid <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the unified Niño region are found helpful in the classification of the Eastern Pacific (EP)/Central Pacific (CP) types of El Niño events. More importantly, the zonal centroid <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> shows that warm areas might move during a single warming/cooling phase. All the current Niño indices can be well represented by a simple linear combination of unified Niño indices, which <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the thermal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (SSTA) and thermal centroid location <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of the unified Niño region would yield a more complete image of each El Niño/La Niña event.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19850011242','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19850011242"><span id="translatedtitle">Geological reasons for change in intensity of linear magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the Kursk magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Zhavoronkin, I. A.; Kopayev, V. V.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>The geological reasons for fluctuations in the anomalous field intensity along the polar axes were examined. The Kursk magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is used as the basis for the study. A geological-geophysical section was constructed which used the results of the interpretation of gravimagnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19709904','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19709904"><span id="translatedtitle">Hypnotic <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>, cognitive inhibition, and dissociation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dienes, Zoltán; Brown, Elizabeth; Hutton, Sam; Kirsch, Irving; Mazzoni, Giuliana; Wright, Daniel B</p> <p>2009-12-01</p> <p>We examined two <span class="hlt">potential</span> correlates of hypnotic <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>: dissociation and cognitive inhibition. Dissociation is the foundation of two of the major theories of hypnosis and other theories commonly postulate that hypnotic responding is a result of attentional abilities (including inhibition). Participants were administered the Waterloo-Stanford Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form C. Under the guise of an unrelated study, 180 of these participants also completed: a version of the Dissociative Experiences Scale that is normally distributed in non-clinical populations; a latent inhibition task, a spatial negative priming task, and a memory task designed to measure negative priming. The data ruled out even moderate correlations between hypnotic <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> and all the measures of dissociation and cognitive inhibition overall, though they also indicated gender differences. The results are a challenge for existing theories of hypnosis. PMID:19709904</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19800022475','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19800022475"><span id="translatedtitle">Spherical Earth analysis and modeling of lithospheric gravity and magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Ph.D. Thesis - Purdue Univ.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.; Braile, L. W.</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>A comprehensive approach to the lithospheric analysis of <span class="hlt">potential</span> field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the spherical domain is provided. It has widespread application in the analysis and design of satellite gravity and magnetic surveys for geological investigation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S31A2484B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S31A2484B"><span id="translatedtitle">Gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, forearc morphology and seismicity in subduction zones</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bassett, D.; Watts, A. B.; Das, S.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>We apply spectral averaging techniques to isolate and remove the long-wavelength large-amplitude trench-normal topographic and free-air gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> "high" and "low" associated with subduction zones. The residual grids generated illuminate the short-wavelength structure of the forearc. Systematic analysis of all subduction boundaries on Earth has enabled a classification of these grids with particular emphasis placed on topography and gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> observed in the region above the shallow seismogenic portion of the plate interface. The isostatic compensation of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is investigated using 3D calculations of the gravitational admittance and coherence. In the shallow region of the megathrust, typically within 100 km from the trench, isolated residual <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with amplitudes of up to 2.5 km and 125 mGal are generally interpreted as accreted/subducting relief in the form of seamounts and other bathymetric features. While most of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, which have radii < 50km, are correlated with areas of reduced seismicity, several in regions such as Japan and Java appear to have influenced the nucleation and/or propagation of large magnitude earthquakes. Long-wavelength (500 - >1000 km) trench-parallel forearc ridges with residual <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of up to 1.5 km and 150 mGal are identified in approximately one-third of the subduction zones analyzed. Despite great length along strike, these ridges are less than 100 km wide and several appear uncompensated. A high proportion of arc-normal structure and the truncation/morphological transition of trench-parallel forearc ridges is explained through the identification and tracking of pre-existing structure on the over-riding and subducting plates into the seismogenic portion of the plate boundary. Spatial correlations between regions with well-defined trench-parallel forearc ridges and the occurrence of large magnitude interplate earthquakes, in addition to the uncompensated state of these ridges, <span class="hlt">suggest</span> links between the morphology of the forearc and the peak earthquake stress drop on the subduction megathrust. We present our classification of residual bathymetric and gravitational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> using examples from Sumatra, Kuril-Kamchatka, Mariana, Peru-Chile and the Tonga-Kermadec margin. We reassess proposed links between trench-parallel residual topography and gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and subduction zone seismicity using global earthquake catalogs and a new compilation of published aftershock locations and distributed slip models from over 200 of the largest subduction zone earthquakes. Our results highlight the role of pre-existing structure in both the over-riding and subducting plates in modulating the along- and across-strike segmentation of subduction zones. Understanding the genesis of long-wavelength trench-parallel forearc ridges may provide further insights into links between forearc morphology, the rheology of the overriding and subducting plates and seismicity in subduction zones.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1164252','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1164252"><span id="translatedtitle">Muon g-2 <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> and Dark Leptonic Gauge Boson</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Lee, Hye-Sung</p> <p>2014-11-01</p> <p>One of the major motivations to search for a dark gauge boson of MeV-GeV scale is the long-standing muon g-2 <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Because of active searches such as fixed target experiments and rare meson decays, the muon g-2 favored parameter region has been rapidly reduced. With the most recent data, it is practically excluded now in the popular dark photon model. We overview the issue and investigate a <span class="hlt">potentially</span> alternative model based on the gauged lepton number or U(1)_L, which is under different experimental constraints.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.usgs.gov/circ/1964/0489/report.pdf','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.usgs.gov/circ/1964/0489/report.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">A magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of possible economic significance in southeastern Minnesota</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Zietz, Isidore</p> <p>1964-01-01</p> <p>An aeromagnetic survey in southeastern Minnesota by the U. S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the State of Minnesota has revealed a high-amplitude, linear, and narrow magnetic feature that <span class="hlt">suggests</span> a possible source of Precambrian iron-formation of economic value. For the past few years the U. S. Geological Survey has been conducting detailed geophysical studies of the midcontinent gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>--a broad, high-amplitude feature that extends from Lake Superior through the States of Minnesota, Iowa, Nebraska, and part of Kansas. As part of this study an aeromagnetic survey of the southern part of the State was made in cooperation with the State of Minnesota during the summer of 1963, in which a linear high-amplitude <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of the order of 4,000 gammas was discovered. Because of the high amplitude, the linearity, and the narrowness of the magnetic feature, it is believed the source may be Precambrian iron-formation of possible economic value. The anomalous area is in Fillmore County, approximately between the towns of Lanesboro and Peterson in the extreme southeastern part of the State. (See figures 1 and 2.) At the site of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, Cambrian sedimentary rocks occur in the valley of the Root River, and Ordovician rocks (nearly flat lying) mantle the upland areas. The uplands are largely covered by glacial deposits, which are relatively thin (Paul K. Sims, written communication, 1964). Depths to the Precambrian are estimated to range from 500 feet to 1,000 feet below the surface. The aeromagnetic map shown in figure 2 was compiled from continuous magnetic profiles made along east-west flight lines 1,000 feet above ground, and spaced approximately 1 mile apart. Contour intervals of 20, 100, and 500 gammas were used depending on the intensity. The instrument for the survey was a flux-gate type magnetometer (AN/ASQ-3A) which measures total-field variations. The contour map displays variations in magnetic pattern which are typical of shallow Precambrian rocks. <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> of the order of 1,000 gammas are shown along the east and west edges of the map. The outstanding feature is the previously mentioned linear positive <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> that trends northeast and reaches a peak of 3,960 gammas. The positive <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is contoured from data on four consecutive profiles, but only two show high amplitudes. The high-amplitude <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> along traverses 1 and 2 are shown in figure 3. Depth calculations <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the source of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> lies about 1,000 feet below the surface. Assuming a dikelike source and magnetization resulting entirely from induction in the earth's field, several calculations were made in an attempt to fit the magnetic profile taken along the line AA' (see figs. 2 and 4), considered to be a typical cross-section of the magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Comparisons are shown between observed and computed profiles. The fixed parameters used were (a) distance from detector to source of 2,000 ft; width of dike of 5,000 ft; dip of dike of 75?, 90?, 105? , and 120? , as shown. The best fit occurs when the dike is vertical or dips 75? to the southwest. For these cases, the susceptibility, k, is computed to be 0.016 c.g.s, units, and is comparable to k = 0.02+ calculated by Bath (1962) for the relatively unmetamorphosed iron-formation of the Main Megabi district in Minnesota where the induced magnetization was most likely the dominant magnetization. If the dominant magnetization for the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in Fillmore County were remanent rather than induced, the economic importance of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> would be greatly reduced. This <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> seems sufficiently promising to warrant further geologic and geophysical investigation. Detailed ground magnetic and electrical studies would be useful to delineate the feature. In the final analysis, however, the presence of iron-formation can be determined only by the drill.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GeoRL..4210913M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GeoRL..4210913M"><span id="translatedtitle">Subseasonal prediction of Australian summer monsoon <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Marshall, Andrew G.; Hendon, Harry H.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Subseasonal prediction of Australian summer monsoon <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is assessed using 30 years of retrospective forecasts from version 2 of the Predictive Ocean Atmosphere Model for Australia. Active and break monsoon rainfall episodes are associated with large-scale cyclonic westerly and anticyclonic easterly winds, respectively, for which the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) makes a dominant contribution and thus is a source of predictability. Although the forecast model can predict the local large-scale zonal wind <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for lead times beyond 4 weeks, predictive skill of the monsoon rainfall <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is limited to about 2 weeks. We show that improving the prediction of the MJO and its local expression in the summer monsoon leads to improved monsoon rainfall predictions at multiweek timescales.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19850007963','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19850007963"><span id="translatedtitle">The mineralogy of global magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Haggerty, S. E. (Principal Investigator)</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>Experimental and analytical data on magnetic mineralogy was provided as an aid to the interpretation of magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> maps. An integrated program, ranging from the chemistry of materials from 100 or more km depth within the Earth, to an examination of the MAGSAT <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> maps at about 400 km above the Earth's surface, was undertaken. Within this framework, a detailed picture of the pertinent mineralogical and magnetic relationships for the region of West Africa was provided. Efforts were directed toward: (1) examining the geochemistry, mineralogy, magnetic properties, and phases relations of magnetic oxides and metal alloys in rocks demonstrated to have originated in the lower crust of upper mantle, (2) examining the assumption that these rocks portray the nature of their source regions; and (3) examining the regional geology, tectonics, gravity field and the MAGSAT <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> maps for West Africa.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20782903','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20782903"><span id="translatedtitle">Trace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> on a quantum spacetime manifold</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Spallucci, Euro; Smailagic, Anais; Nicolini, Piero</p> <p>2006-04-15</p> <p>In this paper we investigate the trace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in a space-time where single events are delocalized as a consequence of short distance quantum coordinate fluctuations. We obtain a modified form of heat kernel asymptotic expansion which does not suffer from short distance divergences. Calculation of the trace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is performed using an IR regulator in order to circumvent the absence of UV infinities. The explicit form of the trace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is presented and the corresponding 2D Polyakov effective action and energy-momentum tensor are obtained. The vacuum expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor in the Boulware, Hartle-Hawking and Unruh vacua is explicitly calculated in a rt section of a recently found, noncommutative inspired, Schwarzschild-like solution of the Einstein equations. The standard short distance divergences in the vacuum expectation values are regularized in agreement with the absence of UV infinities removed by quantum coordinate fluctuations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1047647','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1047647"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection for Discrete Sequences: A Survey</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Chandola, Varun; Banerjee, Arindam; Kumar, Vipin</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>This survey attempts to provide a comprehensive and structured overview of the existing research for the problem of detecting <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in discrete/symbolic sequences. The objective is to provide a global understanding of the sequence <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection problem and how existing techniques relate to each other. The key contribution of this survey is the classification of the existing research into three distinct categories, based on the problem formulation that they are trying to solve. These problem formulations are: 1) identifying anomalous sequences with respect to a database of normal sequences; 2) identifying an anomalous subsequence within a long sequence; and 3) identifying a pattern in a sequence whose frequency of occurrence is anomalous. We show how each of these problem formulations is characteristically distinct from each other and discuss their relevance in various application domains. We review techniques from many disparate and disconnected application domains that address each of these formulations. Within each problem formulation, we group techniques into categories based on the nature of the underlying algorithm. For each category, we provide a basic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection technique, and show how the existing techniques are variants of the basic technique. This approach shows how different techniques within a category are related or different from each other. Our categorization reveals new variants and combinations that have not been investigated before for <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection. We also provide a discussion of relative strengths and weaknesses of different techniques. We show how techniques developed for one problem formulation can be adapted to solve a different formulation, thereby providing several novel adaptations to solve the different problem formulations. We also highlight the applicability of the techniques that handle discrete sequences to other related areas such as online <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection and time series <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.H44B..07S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.H44B..07S"><span id="translatedtitle">Inversion of Pressure <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Data for CO2 Leakage Detection at Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sun, A. Y.; Nicot, J.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Leakage from abandoned wells and geologic faults represents one of the greatest risks to the integrity of geologic CO2 sequestration sites. Ensuring timely detection and mitigation of CO2 leakage is thus of great interest to regulators, operators, and the public. So far model-based CO2 leakage detection has not been widely tested or used. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of source identification algorithms for recovering both leakage locations and rates in the above-zone monitoring intervals by using observed pressure <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data. For leakage rate inversion, we used ordinary least squares (OLS), truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD), and minimum relative entropy algorithm (MRE). When the leakage location(s) is unknown, inversion becomes more challenging. We coupled OLS with simulated annealing (SA) for simultaneous leakage rate and location recovery. The performance of inversion algorithms was compared while considering effects such as data noise and spatial heterogeneity. Our tests show that both OLS and TSVD can be used to recover leakage rates. TSVD is more robust than OLS and can handle large observation errors well. When the actual leaky location is unknown but is known to belong to a pool of <span class="hlt">potentially</span> leaky wells, MRE can be used to identify the actual leakage rates and leaky locations. Finally if prior information is insufficient to isolate a group of <span class="hlt">potentially</span> leaky wells, the combination of SA and OLS can be used to identify source locations among all existing wells. Our results are promising and <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the pressure-<span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-based leakage detection can be readily incorporated into existing CO2 sequestration risk management frameworks.roblem setup bservations and identified leakage rates</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26578241','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26578241"><span id="translatedtitle">Associated congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> among cases with Down syndrome.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Stoll, Claude; Dott, Beatrice; Alembik, Yves; Roth, Marie-Paule</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Down syndrome (DS) is the most common congenital <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> widely studied for at least 150 years. However, the type and the frequency of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with DS are still controversial. Despite prenatal diagnosis and elective termination of pregnancy for fetal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, in Europe, from 2008 to 2012 the live birth prevalence of DS per 10,000 was 10. 2. The objectives of this study were to examine the major congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> occurring in infants and fetuses with Down syndrome. The material for this study came from 402,532 consecutive pregnancies of known outcome registered by our registry of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> between 1979 and 2008. Four hundred sixty seven (64%) out of the 728 cases with DS registered had at least one major associated congenital <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The most common associated <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, 323 cases (44%), followed by digestive system <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, 42 cases (6%), musculoskeletal system <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, 35 cases (5%), urinary system <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, 28 cases (4%), respiratory system <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, 13 cases (2%), and other system <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, 26 cases (3.6%). Among the cases with DS with congenital heart defects, the most common cardiac <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> was atrioventricular septal defect (30%) followed by atrial septum defect (25%), ventricular septal defect (22%), patent ductus arteriosus (5%), coarctation of aorta (5%), and tetralogy of Fallot (3%). Among the cases with DS with a digestive system <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> recorded, duodenal atresia (67%), Hirschsprung disease (14%), and tracheo-esophageal atresia (10%) were the most common. Fourteen (2%) of the cases with DS had an obstructive <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of the renal pelvis, including hydronephrosis. The other most common <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with cases with DS were syndactyly, club foot, polydactyly, limb reduction, cataract, hydrocephaly, cleft palate, hypospadias and diaphragmatic hernia. Many studies to assess the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with DS have reported various results. There is no agreement in the literature as to which associated <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are most common in cases with DS with associated <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. In this study we observed a higher percentage of associated <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> than in the other reported series as well as an increase in the incidence of duodenal atresia, urinary system <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, musculoskeletal system <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and respiratory system <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and a decrease in the incidence of anal atresia, annular pancreas, and limb reduction defects. In conclusion, we observed a high prevalence of total congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and specific patterns of malformations associated with Down syndrome which emphasizes the need to evaluate carefully all cases with Down syndrome for possible associated major congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. PMID:26578241</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985JGeo....4....3C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985JGeo....4....3C"><span id="translatedtitle">Heat flow <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and their interpretation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chapman, David S.; Rybach, Ladislaus</p> <p>1985-12-01</p> <p>More than 10,000 heat flow determinations exist for the earth and the data set is growing steadily at about 450 observations per year. If heat flow is considered as a surface expression of geothermal processes at depth, the analysis of the data set should reveal properties of those thermal processes. They do, but on a variety of scales. For this review heat flow maps are classified by 4 different horizontal scales of 10 n km (n = 1, 2, 3 and 4) and attention is focussed on the interpretation of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> which appear with characteristic dimensions of 10 (n - 1) km in the respective representations. The largest scale of 10 4 km encompasses heat flow on a global scale. Global heat loss is 4 10 13 W and the process of sea floor spreading is the principal agent in delivering much of this heat to the surface. Correspondingly, active ocean ridge systems produce the most prominent heat flow <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at this scale with characteristic widths of 10 3 km. Shields, with similar dimensions, exhibit negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The scale of 10 3 km includes continent wide displays. Heat flow patterns at this scale mimic tectonic units which have dimensions of a few times 10 2 km, although the thermal boundaries between these units are sometimes sharp. Heat flow <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at this scale also result from plate tectonic processes, and are associated with arc volcanism, back arc basins, hot spot traces, and continental rifting. There are major controversies about the extent to which these surface thermal provinces reflect upper mantle thermal conditions, and also about the origin and evolution of the thermal state of continental lithosphere. Beginning with map dimensions of 10 2 km thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of scale 10 1 km, which have a definite crustal origin, become apparent. The origin may be tectonic, geologic, or hydrologic. Ten kilometers is a common wavelength of topographic relief which drives many groundwater flow systems producing thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The largest recognized continental geothermal systems have thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> 10 1 km wide and are capable of producing hundreds of megawatts of thermal energy. The smallest scale addressed in this paper is 10 1 km. Worldwide interest in exploiting geothermal systems has been responsible for a recent accumulation of heat flow data on the smallest of scales considered here. The exploration nature of the surveys involve 10's of drillholes and reveal thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> having widths of 10 0 km. These are almost certainly connected to surface and subsurface fluid discharge systems which, in spite of their restricted size, are typically delivering 10 MW of heat to the near surface environment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1093253','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1093253"><span id="translatedtitle">Radioactive <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> discrimination from spectral ratios</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Maniscalco, James; Sjoden, Glenn; Chapman, Mac Clements</p> <p>2013-08-20</p> <p>A method for discriminating a radioactive <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> from naturally occurring radioactive materials includes detecting a first number of gamma photons having energies in a first range of energy values within a predetermined period of time and detecting a second number of gamma photons having energies in a second range of energy values within the predetermined period of time. The method further includes determining, in a controller, a ratio of the first number of gamma photons having energies in the first range and the second number of gamma photons having energies in the second range, and determining that a radioactive <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is present when the ratio exceeds a threshold value.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20150016532','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20150016532"><span id="translatedtitle">Meteoroid-Induced <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> on Spacecraft</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Cooke, Bill</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Sporadic meteoroid background is directional (not isotropic) and accounts for 90 percent of the meteoroid risk to a typical spacecraft. Meteor showers get all the press, but account for only approximately10 percent of spacecraft risk. Bias towards assigning meteoroid cause to <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> during meteor showers. Vast majority of meteoroids come from comets and have a bulk density of approximately 1 gram per cubic centimeter (ice). High speed meteoroids (approximately 50 kilometers per second) can induce electrical <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in spacecraft through discharging of charged surfaces (also EMP (electromagnetic pulse?).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26472205','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26472205"><span id="translatedtitle">Perioperative and Anesthetic Considerations in Ebstein's <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ross, Faith J; Latham, Gregory J; Richards, Michael; Geiduschek, Jeremy; Thompson, Douglas; Joffe, Denise</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>Ebstein's <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is a complex and heterogeneous form of congenital heart disease characterized by malformation and apical displacement of the tricuspid valve leaflets. Patients may present at any time from the neonatal period to adulthood with symptoms ranging from cardiac failure and cyanosis to paroxysmal arrhythmias. Depending on the timing of presentation, various surgical options are available for the management of symptomatic patients. This review will discuss the perioperative and anesthetic management of patients with Ebstein's <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> with reference to the more common surgical approaches. PMID:26472205</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19990111728&hterms=effect+latitude+climate&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Deffect%2Blatitude%2Bclimate','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19990111728&hterms=effect+latitude+climate&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Deffect%2Blatitude%2Bclimate"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of Longwave Cloud Radiative Forcing <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> on the Atmospheric Response to Equatorial Pacific Sea Surface Temperature <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Chen, M.; Cess, Robert D.; Zhang, Ming-Hua</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>The latest version of the National Center for Atmospheric Research community climate model (CCM2) has been used to investigate cloud radiative forcing (CRF) <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with equatorial Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the effects of the longwave CRF (LWCRF) <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on the atmospheric response to the SST <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The SST <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> cause large CRF <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, both longwave and shortwave, as well as latent heat <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at low latitudes on a global scale. The relative magnitude of the simulated longwave and shortwave CRF <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is consistent with the result of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE), implying that cloud height and cloud radiative properties such as emissivity and reflectivity are well simulated by the model. The LWCRF <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> strongly enhances the precipitation <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the whole tropical belt. The positive (negative) LWCRF <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> warms (cools) the troposphere and destabilizes (stabilizes) the upper troposphere. The LWCRF <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> enhances the Southern Oscillation and the related Walker circulation <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The effects of the LWCRF <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> are essential to the northern hemispheric extratropical circulation <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, the Pacific/North American pattern.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015Icar..257...88R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015Icar..257...88R"><span id="translatedtitle">A large-scale <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in Enceladus' microwave emission</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ries, Paul A.; Janssen, Michael</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>The Cassini spacecraft flew by Enceladus on 6 November 2011, configured to acquire synthetic aperture RADAR imaging of most of the surface with the RADAR instrument. The pass also recorded microwave thermal emission from most of the surface. We report on global patterns of thermal emission at 2.17 cm based on this data set in the context of additional unresolved data both from the ground and from Cassini. The observed thermal emission is consistent with dielectric constants of pure water or methane ice, but cannot discriminate between the two. The emissivity is similar to those of other icy satellites (≈ 0.7), consistent with volume scattering. The most intriguing result, however, is an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the thermal emission of Enceladus' leading hemisphere. Evidence presented here <span class="hlt">suggests</span> the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is buried at depths on the order of a few meters. This <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is located in similar geographic location to <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> previously detected with the CIRS and ISS instruments on Mimas, Tethys, and Dione (Howett, C.J.A. et al. [2011]. Icarus 216, 221-226; Howett, C.J.A. et al. [2012]. Icarus 221, 1084-1088; Howett, C.J.A. et al. [2014]. Icarus 241, 239-247; Schenk, P. et al. [2011]. Icarus 211, 740-757), but also corresponds with a geological feature on Enceladus' leading terrain (Crow-Willard, E., Pappalardo, R.T. [2011]. Global geological mapping of Enceladus. In: EPSC-DPS Joint Meeting 2011. p. 635). Simple models show that the Crow-Willard and Pappalardo (Crow-Willard, E., Pappalardo, R.T. [2011]. Global geological mapping of Enceladus. In: EPSC-DPS Joint Meeting 2011. p. 635) model is a better fit to the data. Our best-supported hypothesis is that the leading hemisphere smooth terrain is young enough (<75-200 Myr old) that the micrometeorite impact gardening depth is shallower than the electromagnetic skin depth of the observations (≈ 3-5 m), a picture consistent with ground and space radar measurements, which show no variation at 2 cm, but an increase in albedo in the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region at 13 cm.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009SpWea...7.9003O','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009SpWea...7.9003O"><span id="translatedtitle">SEAES-GEO: A spacecraft environmental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> expert system for geosynchronous orbit</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>O'Brien, T. P.</p> <p>2009-09-01</p> <p>Indications of the space environment hazard at any point in space and time along geosynchronous orbit (GEO) can be obtained using the set of rules described in this paper. These rules are implemented using real-time Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite particle sensor data and the magnetic index Kp. These rules should be useful for both real-time and posthoc analysis of GEO spacecraft <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The hazards covered are surface charging, internal charging, single-event effects due to solar particle events, and total dose (solar arrays). The system provides a "hazard quotient," the ratio of the instantaneous to mission-averaged likelihood of an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> due to each hazard, based on environmental measurements. With the exception of total dose, the hazard quotients are derived from lists of on-orbit <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> or their proxies, and it is assumed that the probability of future <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> will share the same functional dependence on the environment exhibited by the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the lists. Hazard quotients are <span class="hlt">potentially</span> more valuable to satellite operators than are raw measurements, as hazard quotients directly convey the statistical relationship between the radiation environment and the likelihood of an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_21 --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="421"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JAESc..62..616S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JAESc..62..616S"><span id="translatedtitle">High-resolution residual geoid and gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data of the northern Indian Ocean - An input to geological understanding</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sreejith, K. M.; Rajesh, S.; Majumdar, T. J.; Srinivasa Rao, G.; Radhakrishna, M.; Krishna, K. S.; Rajawat, A. S.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Geoid data are more sensitive to density distributions deep within the Earth, thus the data are useful for studying the internal processes of the Earth leading to formation of geological structures. In this paper, we present much improved version of high resolution (1' × 1') geoid <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map of the northern Indian Ocean generated from the altimeter data obtained from Geodetic Missions of GEOSAT and ERS-1 along with ERS-2, TOPEX/POSIDEON and JASON satellites. The geoid map of the Indian Ocean is dominated by a significant low of -106 m south of Sri Lanka, named as the Indian Ocean Geoid Low (IOGL), whose origin is not clearly known yet. The residual geoid data are retrieved from the geoid data by removing the long-wavelength core-mantle density effects using recent spherical harmonic coefficients of Earth Gravity Model 2008 (EGM2008) up to degree and order 50 from the observed geoid data. The coefficients are smoothly rolled off between degrees 30-70 in order to avoid artifacts related to the sharp truncation at degree 50. With this process we observed significant improvement in the residual geoid data when compared to the previous low-spatial resolution maps. The previous version was superposed by systematic broad regional highs and lows (like checker board) with amplitude up to ±12 m, though the trends of geoid in general match in both versions. These methodical artifacts in the previous version may have arisen due to the use of old Rapp's geo-<span class="hlt">potential</span> model coefficients, as well as sharp truncation of reference model at degree and order 50. Geoid <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are converted to free-air gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and validated with cross-over corrected ship-borne gravity data of the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal. The present satellite derived gravity data matches well with the ship-borne data with Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) of 5.1-7.8 mGal, and this is found to be within the error limits when compared with other globally available satellite data. Spectral analysis of ship-borne and satellite data <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that the satellite gravity data have a resolution down to 16-18 km. Further, the geoid, residual geoid and gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are integrated with seismic data along two profiles in the Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea, and inferences have been made in terms of density distributions at different depths. The new residual geoid <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map shows excellent correlation with regional tectonic features such as Sunda subduction zone, volcanic traces (Chagos-Laccadive, Ninetyeast and 85°E ridges) and mid-ocean ridge systems (Central Indian and Carlsberg ridges).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20947638','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20947638"><span id="translatedtitle">N-(4-((2-(trifluoromethyl)-3-hydroxy-4-(isobutyryl)phenoxy)methyl)benzyl)-1-methyl-1H-imidazole-4-carboxamide (THIIC), a novel metabotropic glutamate 2 <span class="hlt">potentiator</span> with <span class="hlt">potential</span> anxiolytic/antidepressant properties: in vivo profiling <span class="hlt">suggests</span> a link between behavioral and central nervous system neurochemical changes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fell, Matthew J; Witkin, Jeffrey M; Falcone, Julie F; Katner, Jason S; Perry, Kenneth W; Hart, John; Rorick-Kehn, Linda; Overshiner, Carl D; Rasmussen, Kurt; Chaney, Stephen F; Benvenga, Mark J; Li, Xia; Marlow, Deanna L; Thompson, Linda K; Luecke, Susan K; Wafford, Keith A; Seidel, Wesley F; Edgar, Dale M; Quets, Anne T; Felder, Christian C; Wang, XuShan; Heinz, Beverly A; Nikolayev, Alexander; Kuo, Ming-Shang; Mayhugh, Daniel; Khilevich, Albert; Zhang, Deyi; Ebert, Philip J; Eckstein, James A; Ackermann, Bradley L; Swanson, Steven P; Catlow, John T; Dean, Robert A; Jackson, Kimberley; Tauscher-Wisniewski, Sitra; Marek, Gerard J; Schkeryantz, Jeffrey M; Svensson, Kjell A</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The normalization of excessive glutamatergic neurotransmission through the activation of metabotropic glutamate 2 (mGlu2) receptors may have therapeutic <span class="hlt">potential</span> in a variety of psychiatric disorders, including anxiety/depression and schizophrenia. Here, we characterize the pharmacological properties of N-(4-((2-(trifluoromethyl)-3-hydroxy-4-(isobutyryl)phenoxy)methyl)benzyl)-1-methyl-1H-imidazole-4-carboxamide (THIIC), a structurally novel, potent, and selective allosteric <span class="hlt">potentiator</span> of human and rat mGlu2 receptors (EC(50) = 23 and 13 nM, respectively). THIIC produced anxiolytic-like efficacy in the rat stress-induced hyperthermia assay and the mouse stress-induced elevation of cerebellar cGMP and marble-burying assays. THIIC also produced robust activity in three assays that detect antidepressant-like activity, including the mouse forced-swim test, the rat differential reinforcement of low rate 72-s assay, and the rat dominant-submissive test, with a maximal response similar to that of imipramine. Effects of THIIC in the forced-swim test and marble burying were deleted in mGlu2 receptor null mice. Analysis of sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) showed that THIIC had a sleep-promoting profile with increased non-rapid eye movement (REM) and decreased REM sleep. THIIC also decreased the dark phase increase in extracellular histamine in the medial prefrontal cortex and decreased levels of the histamine metabolite tele-methylhistamine (t-MeHA) in rat cerebrospinal fluid. Collectively, these results indicate that the novel mGlu2-positive allosteric modulator THIIC has robust activity in models used to predict anxiolytic/antidepressant efficacy, substantiating, at least with this molecule, differentiation in the biological impact of mGlu2 <span class="hlt">potentiation</span> versus mGlu2/3 orthosteric agonism. In addition, we provide evidence that sleep EEG and CSF t-MeHA might function as viable biomarker approaches to facilitate the translational development of THIIC and other mGlu2 <span class="hlt">potentiators</span>. PMID:20947638</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70011277','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70011277"><span id="translatedtitle">Statistical averaging of marine magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the aging of oceanic crust.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Blakely, R.J.</p> <p>1983-01-01</p> <p>Visual comparison of Mesozoic and Cenozoic magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the North Pacific <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that older <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> contain less short-wavelength information than younger <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in this area. To test this observation, magnetic profiles from the North Pacific are examined from crust of three ages: 0-2.1, 29.3-33.1, and 64.9-70.3Ma. For each time period, at least nine profiles were analyzed by 1) calculating the power density spectrum of each profile, 2) averaging the spectra together, and 3) computing a 'recording filter' for each time period by assuming a hypothetical seafloor model. The model assumes that the top of the source is acoustic basement, the source thickness is 0.5km, and the time scale of geomagnetic reversals is according to Ness et al. (1980). The calculated power density spectra of the three recording filters are complex in shape but show an increase of attenuation of short-wavelength information as the crust ages. These results are interpreted using a multilayer model for marine magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in which the upper layer, corresponding to pillow basalt of seismic layer 2A, acts as a source of noise to the magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. As the ocean crust ages, this noisy contribution by the pillow basalts becomes less significant to the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Consequently, magnetic sources below layer 2A must be faithful recorders of geomagnetic reversals.-AuthorPacific power density spectrum</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040171248&hterms=RAE&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3DRAE','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040171248&hterms=RAE&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3DRAE"><span id="translatedtitle">Estimating Antarctic Near-Surface Magnetic <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> from Oersted and CHAMP Satellite Magnetometer Observations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>vonFrese, Ralph R. B.; Kim, Hyung Rae; Gaya-Pique, Luis R.; Taylor, Patrick T.; Golynsky, Alexander V.; Kim, Jeong Woo</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>Significant improvement in predicting near-surface magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> can result from the highly accurate magnetic observations of the CHAMP satellite that is orbiting at about 400 km altitude. In general, regional magnetic signals of the crust are strongly masked by the core field and its secular variations due to wavelength coupling in the spherical harmonic representation and thus are difficult to isolate in the satellite measurements. However, efforts to isolate the regional lithospheric from core field components can exploit the correlations between the CHAMP magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the pseudo magnetic effects inferred from gravity-derived crustal thickness variations. In addition, we can use spectral correlation theory to filter the static lithospheric field components from the dynamic external field effects. Employing these procedures, we processed the CHAMP magnetic conservations for an improved magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map of the Antarctic crust. Relative to the much higher altitude Oersted and noisier Magsat observations, CHAMP magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at 400 km altitude reveal new details on the effects of intra-crustal magnetic features and crustal thickness variations of the Antarctic. Moreover, these results greatly facilitate predicting magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the regional coverage gaps of the ADMAP compilation of Antarctic magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from shipborne, airborne and ground surveys. Our analysis <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that considerable new insights on the magnetic properties of the lithosphere may be revealed by a further order-of-magnitude improvement in the accuracy of the magnetometer.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006GeoRL..3319702C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006GeoRL..3319702C"><span id="translatedtitle">Air-sea humidity effects on the generation of tropical Atlantic SST <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> during the ENSO events</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chikamoto, Yoshimitsu; Tanimoto, Youichi</p> <p>2006-10-01</p> <p>After the mature stage of the ENSO events in the boreal winter, SST and latent heat flux <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over the tropical Atlantic during the following spring show large amplitude north of the equator but small one south of the equator. The linear decomposition analyses of the latent heat flux <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> indicate that the contribution from wind speed <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> shows an equatorial antisymmetric structure with same magnitude but opposite polarity between north and south of the equator, while the contribution from anomalous air-sea humidity difference counters to that from wind speed <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> south of the equator. These results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> an important role of anomalous air-sea humidity difference on forming latent heat flux <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and significantly modifies the conventional view of wind speed as the dominant effect in ENSO-induced tropical Atlantic SST changes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2570346','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2570346"><span id="translatedtitle">A Genome Wide Linkage Scan for Cleft Lip and Palate and Dental <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Vieira, Alexandre R.; McHenry, Toby G.; Daack-Hirsch, Sandra; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Marazita, Mary L.</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>We revisited 46 families with two or more siblings affected with an orofacial cleft that participated in previous genome wide studies and collected complete dental information. Genotypes from 392 microsatellite markers at 10 cM intervals were reanalyzed. We carried out four sets of genome wide analyses. First, we ran the analysis solely on the cleft status. Second, we assigned to any dental <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (tooth agenesis, supernumerary teeth, and microdontia) an affection status, and repeated the analysis. Third, we ran only the 19 families where the proband had a cleft with no dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Finally, we ran only the 27 families that had a proband with cleft and additional dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> outside the cleft area. Chromosomes (1, 2, 6, 8, 16, and 19) presented regions with LOD scores >2.0. Chromosome 19 has the most compelling results in our study. The LOD scores increased from 3.11 (in the scan of all 46 families with clefts as the only assigned affection status) to 3.91 when the 19 families whose probands present with no additional dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were studied, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> the interval 19p13.12-19q12 may contain a gene that contributes to clefts but not to dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. On the other hand, we found a LOD score of 3.00 in the 2q22.3 region when dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> data were added to the analysis to define affection status. Our preliminary results support the hypothesis that some loci may contribute to both clefts and congenital dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Also, adding dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> information will provide new opportunities to map susceptibility loci for clefts. PMID:18442096</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27041525','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27041525"><span id="translatedtitle">Anatomic <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> Encountered in 467 Open Carpal Tunnel Surgeries.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Afshar, Ahmadreza; Nasiri, Behnam; Mousavi, Seyed Ahmad; Hesarikia, Hamid; Navaeifar, Nasrin; Taleb, Hassan</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common compression neuropathy and carpal tunnel surgery is the most frequently performed hand surgery. Anatomic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may predispose the median nerve to compression. The aim of the current study was to search for anatomic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in open carpal tunnel surgeries through a cross-sectional study. uring a cross-sectional study in a one-year period, 436 consecutive patients (307 females and 129 males) with the average age of 50.3 ± 2.4 years underwent 467 classic open carpal tunnel surgeries. Thirty-one patients had bilateral surgeries. A thorough inspection of the incisions was conducted to search for vascular, neural, tendon and muscular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Forty-two (8.9%) hands (14 males and 28 females) had <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The average age of the patients with discovered <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> was 48.6 ± 7.6 years. Ten <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were seen on the left hands and 32 <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were seen on the right hands. Among the 42 <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, there were 16 persistent median arteries, 14 <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the median nerve, 7 intratunnel intrusion of the flexor and lumbrical muscle bellies and 5 <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the origin of the thenar muscles. There was no correlation between the discovered <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the age, gender or hand sides. Anatomical <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are not uncommon in carpal tunnel surgeries. However, the frequencies of the reported <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> vary among different studies. Familiarity with these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> increases the safety of the operation. PMID:27041525</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001JAfES..32..851Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001JAfES..32..851Z"><span id="translatedtitle">La prospection geothermique de surface au Maroc: hydrodynamisme, <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> thermiques et indices de surfaceGeothermal prospecting in Morocco: hydrodynamics, thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and surface indices</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zarhloule, Y.; Lahrache, A.; Ben Abidate, L.; Khattach, D.; Bouri, S.; Boukdir, A.; Ben Dhia, H.</p> <p>2001-05-01</p> <p>Shallow geothermal prospecting ( < 700 m) has been performed in four zones in Morocco for which few deep data are available: northwestern basin, northeastern basin, Tadla Basin and Agadir Basin. These areas are different geologically and hydrogeologically. The temperature data from 250 wells at depths between 15 and 500 m have been analysed in order to estimate the natural geothermal gradient in these areas, to determine the principal thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, to identify the main thermal indices and to characterise the recharge, discharge and <span class="hlt">potential</span> mixing limits of the aquifers. The hydrostratigraphical study of each basin revealed several <span class="hlt">potential</span> reservoir layers in which the Turonian carbonate aquifer (Tadal and Agadir Basins) and Liassic acquifer (Moroccan northwestern and northeastern basins) are the most important hot water reservoirs in Morocco. The recharge zones of each aquifer are characterised by high topography, high water <span class="hlt">potential</span>, shallow cold water, low geothermal gradient and negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The discharge zones are characterized by low topography, low piezometric level, high geothermal gradient, high temperature with hot springs and positive <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The main thermal indices and the principal thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that coincide with the artesian zones of the Turonian and Liassic aquifers have been identified.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6037136','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6037136"><span id="translatedtitle">Latitudinal extent of the equatorial <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Klobuchar, J.A.; Anderson, D.N.; Doherty, P.H.</p> <p>1990-05-03</p> <p>The latitudinal extent of the equatorial <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> has been studied using a theoretical model of the ionosphere which incorporates measured values of vertical E x B drift at the earth's magnetic equator. Realistic values of neutral winds are also included. The equatorial <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region, typically between plus and minus 20 degrees magnetic latitude, is that part of the world where the highest values of electron density and Total Electron Content, (TEC), normally occur, and hence is very important to high frequency propagation and to trans-ionospheric propagation effects. During the daytime, upward E x B drift at the magnetic equator drives the ionization across field lines to higher latitudes, causing crests in ionization to occur at approximately plus and minus 15 deg dip latitude. The latitude range over which the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> makes a significant difference in values of foF2 and TEC is calculated as a percent departure from the case with no equatorial electric field. Results from the model studies with different values of realistic electric fields show that the effects of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> can be highly variable and widespread in latitude and local time.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5399283','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5399283"><span id="translatedtitle">N =2 conformal supergravity and superconformal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Kachkachi, M.; Lhallabi, T. )</p> <p>1992-02-01</p> <p>The differential geometry formalism for {ital N}=2 conformal supergravity in harmonic superspace is developed. The {ital N}=2 superdiffeomorphisms and local super-Weyl transformations and their BRST-like symmetries are derived. These lead to the formulation of the cohomology problem and the {ital N}=2 superconformal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19830005257','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19830005257"><span id="translatedtitle">The mineralogy of global magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Haggerty, S. E. (Principal Investigator)</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>The Curie Balance was brought to operational stage and is producing data of a preliminary nature. Substantial problems experienced in the assembly and initial operation of the instrument were, for the most part, rectified, but certain problems still exist. Relationships between the geology and the gravity and MAGSAT <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of West Africa are reexamined in the context of a partial reconstruction of Gondwanaland.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992JMP....33..725K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992JMP....33..725K"><span id="translatedtitle">N = 2 conformal supergravity and superconformal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kachkachi, M.; Lhallabi, T.</p> <p>1992-02-01</p> <p>The differential geometry formalism for N = 2 conformal supergravity in harmonic superspace is developed. The N = 2 superdiffeomorphisms and local super-Weyl transformations and their BRST-like symmetries are derived. These lead to the formulation of the cohomology problem and the N = 2 superconformal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19770015851','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19770015851"><span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data base of screwworm information</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Giddings, L. E.</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>Standard statistical processing of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data in the screwworm eradication data system is possible from data compiled on magnetic tapes with the Univac 1108 computer. The format and organization of the data in the data base, which is also available on dedicated disc storage, are described.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3196023','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3196023"><span id="translatedtitle">Congenital cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in an English bulldog</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>McConkey, Marina J.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>A 4-year-old male castrated English bulldog was referred to the Atlantic Veterinary College for evaluation of exercise intolerance, multiple syncopal episodes, and a grade IV/VI heart murmur. The dog was shown to have 3 congenital cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: atrial septal defect, mitral valve dysplasia, and subaortic stenosis. Medical management consisted of exercise restriction, atenolol, pimobendan, and taurine. PMID:22547849</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=networks+AND+Wireless+AND+sensors&pg=2&id=ED513684','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=networks+AND+Wireless+AND+sensors&pg=2&id=ED513684"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection Techniques for Ad Hoc Networks</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Cai, Chaoli</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> detection is an important and indispensable aspect of any computer security mechanism. Ad hoc and mobile networks consist of a number of peer mobile nodes that are capable of communicating with each other absent a fixed infrastructure. Arbitrary node movements and lack of centralized control make them vulnerable to a wide variety of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JGP....62.1038H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JGP....62.1038H"><span id="translatedtitle">Modular forms and generalized <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> cancellation formulas</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Han, Fei; Liu, Kefeng; Zhang, Weiping</p> <p>2012-05-01</p> <p>In this paper, we generalize the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> cancellation formulas given by Alvarez-Gaumé and Witten (1983), Liu (1995) and Han and Zhang (2004) [1,2,7] to the cases where an auxiliary bundle W and a complex line bundle ξ are involved with no conditions on the first Pontryagin forms being assumed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=nervous+AND+system&pg=6&id=EJ802118','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=nervous+AND+system&pg=6&id=EJ802118"><span id="translatedtitle">Psychoeducational Implications of Sex Chromosome <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Wodrich, David L.; Tarbox, Jennifer</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Numerous <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> involving the sex chromosomes (X or Y) have been documented and their impact on development, learning, and behavior studied. This article reviews three of these disorders, Turner syndrome, Klinefelter syndrome, and Lesch-Nyhan disease. Each of these three is associated with one or more selective impairments or behavioral</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19780048604&hterms=latin&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dlatin','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19780048604&hterms=latin&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dlatin"><span id="translatedtitle">The intermediate <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. [satellite orbit integration</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Nacozy, P.</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>Time transformations of the equation dt = cr to the n ds, where s is a variable called the intermediate <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, are known to reduce global error in the solution of gravitational systems obtained by numerical integration. Attention is given to the Sundman time transformation, and its relation to equations of Keplerian elliptical motion.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19940039005&hterms=Atlantic+Ocean+Circulation&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3DAtlantic%2BOcean%2BCirculation','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19940039005&hterms=Atlantic+Ocean+Circulation&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3DAtlantic%2BOcean%2BCirculation"><span id="translatedtitle">Ocean response to surface heat <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Jiang, Xingjian; Fung, Inez</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>An ocean general circulation model (OGCM) is used to study the response of ocean heat and mass transport to positive and negative heat flux <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at the ocean surface. As expected, tropical and low-latitude mixed layers respond rapidly (e-folding time about 50-70 years) to external forcing, while the response of the high-latitude mixed layer, especially the Southern Ocean and northern North Atlantic, is very slow (e-folding time greater than 300 yr). The overall response is faster for negative than positive heat flux <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> at the surface. The meridional heat transport changes by 15% in the first 50 yr in the southern high latitudes. Surprisingly, for the next 400-500 yr the change is very small. The analysis shows that the meridional mass transport intensifies in response to a negative surface heat flux <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> but weakens in response to a positive heat flux <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. For example, at model year 100 the North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) is reduced from about 18 Sv to about 10 Sv for the positive heat flux experiment but increased to about 26 Sv for the negative heat flux experiment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JHEP...02..012K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JHEP...02..012K"><span id="translatedtitle">D-brane <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> inflow revisited</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kim, Heeyeon; Yi, Piljin</p> <p>2012-02-01</p> <p>Axial and gravitational <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of field theories, when embedded in string the- ory, must be accompanied by canceling inflow. We give a self-contained overview for various world-volume theories, and clarify the role of smeared magnetic sources in I-brane/D-brane cases. The proper <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> descent of the source, as demanded by regularity of RR field strengths H's, turns out to be an essential ingredient. We show how this allows correct inflow to be generated for all such theories, including self-dual cases, and also that the mechanism is now insensitive to the choice between the two related but inequivalent forms of D-brane Chern-Simons couplings. In particular, SO(6) R axial <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of d = 4 max- imal SYM is canceled by the inflow onto D3-branes via the standard minimal coupling to C 4. We also propose how, for the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> cancelation, the four types of Orientifold planes should be coupled to the spacetime curvatures, of which conflicting claims existed previously.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Fuzzy+AND+logic&pg=3&id=ED513684','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Fuzzy+AND+logic&pg=3&id=ED513684"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection Techniques for Ad Hoc Networks</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Cai, Chaoli</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> detection is an important and indispensable aspect of any computer security mechanism. Ad hoc and mobile networks consist of a number of peer mobile nodes that are capable of communicating with each other absent a fixed infrastructure. Arbitrary node movements and lack of centralized control make them vulnerable to a wide variety of</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=nervous+AND+system&pg=7&id=EJ802118','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=nervous+AND+system&pg=7&id=EJ802118"><span id="translatedtitle">Psychoeducational Implications of Sex Chromosome <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Wodrich, David L.; Tarbox, Jennifer</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Numerous <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> involving the sex chromosomes (X or Y) have been documented and their impact on development, learning, and behavior studied. This article reviews three of these disorders, Turner syndrome, Klinefelter syndrome, and Lesch-Nyhan disease. Each of these three is associated with one or more selective impairments or behavioral…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008APS..APR.K1014H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008APS..APR.K1014H"><span id="translatedtitle">Scalar <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Model of light</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hodge, John</p> <p>2008-04-01</p> <p>Some observations of light are inconsistent with a wave--like model. Other observations of light are inconsistent with a particle--like model. A model of light is proposed wherein Newton's and Democritus's speculations are combined with the cosmological scalar <span class="hlt">potential</span> model (SPM). The SPM was tested by confrontation with observations of galaxy HI rotation curves (RCs), asymmetric RCs, redshift, discrete redshift, galaxy central mass, and central velocity dispersion; and with observations of the Pioneer <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>. The resulting model of light will be tested by numerical simulation of a photon behaving in a wave-like manner such as diffusion, interference, reflection, spectrography, and the Afshar experiment. Although the SPM light model requires more work, early results are beginning to emerge that <span class="hlt">suggest</span> possible tests because a few predictions are inconsistent with both the current particle and wave models of light and that <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a re-interpretation of the equations of quantum mechanics.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ClDy..tmp..131R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ClDy..tmp..131R"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> transform methods based on total energy and ocean heat content norms for generating ocean dynamic disturbances for ensemble climate forecasts</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Romanova, Vanya; Hense, Andreas</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>In our study we use the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> transform, a special case of ensemble transform method, in which a selected set of initial oceanic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in space, time and variables are defined and orthogonalized. The resulting orthogonal perturbation patterns are designed such that they pick up typical balanced <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> structures in space and time and between variables. The metric used to set up the eigen problem is taken either as the weighted total energy with its zonal, meridional kinetic and available <span class="hlt">potential</span> energy terms having equal contributions, or the weighted ocean heat content in which a disturbance is applied only to the initial temperature fields. The choices of a reference state for defining the initial <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are such that either perturbations on seasonal timescales and or on interannual timescales are constructed. These project a-priori only the slow modes of the ocean physical processes, such that the disturbances grow mainly in the Western Boundary Currents, in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and the El Nino Southern Oscillation regions. An additional set of initial conditions is designed to fit in a least square sense data from global ocean reanalysis. Applying the AT produced sets of disturbances to oceanic initial conditions initialized by observations of the MPIOM-ESM coupled model on T63L47/GR15 resolution, four ensemble and one hind-cast experiments were performed. The weighted total energy norm is used to monitor the amplitudes and rates of the fastest growing error modes. The results showed minor dependence of the instabilities or error growth on the selected metric but considerable change due to the magnitude of the scaling amplitudes of the perturbation patterns. In contrast to similar atmospheric applications, we find an energy conversion from kinetic to available <span class="hlt">potential</span> energy, which <span class="hlt">suggests</span> a different source of uncertainty generation in the ocean than in the atmosphere mainly associated with changes in the density field.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006PhDT.......161W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006PhDT.......161W"><span id="translatedtitle">Imaging geometry, velocity, and anisotropy of the "African <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>"</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wang, Yi</p> <p></p> <p>The "African <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>" is a prominent low velocity province in the lower mantle beneath Africa. I have determined the geometry and geographic distribution of a very low velocity province (VLVP) at the base of the "African <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>" near the core mantle boundary (CMB). The VLVP exhibits an "L-shaped" form stretching from the South Atlantic Ocean to the Indian Ocean, occupying an area of about 1.8 x 107 km2 at the CMB. Waveform modeling analyses with the SH hybrid method <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the VLVP has rapidly varying geometries and sharp borders as well as a linear gradient of shear velocity reduction from -2% (top) to -9% - -12% (bottom) relative to the Preliminary Reference Earth Model. These seismic characteristics unambiguously indicate that the VLVP is compositionally distinct, and can best be explained by partial melt driven by a compositional change, possibly produced early in the Earth's history. I have imaged the geometry and P- and S-velocity structures for the "African <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>" along the great arc from the East Pacific Rise to the Japan Sea. The "African <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>" exhibits a "cusplike" shape with both flanks tilting toward the apex beneath southern Africa, and it continuously extends about 1300 km upward into the mid-lower mantle. The average Vs reductions are about -5% in the base above the CMB and about -2% - -3% in the mid-lower portion above the base. A uniform Vs to Vp perturbation ratio of 3:1 can best explain the P wave data. The geometry and seismic features indicate that the mid-lower mantle portion of the "African <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>" is an integrated component of the VLVP at the base, and might also be compositionally distinct and geologically stable. After the geometry and seismic structure were imaged for the "African <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>", I have studied the anisotropy associated with the VLVP at the base of the "African <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>". I measure the apparent splitting parameters (the fast polarization direction and the delay time) for high-quality SKS and SKKS waveforms of deep earthquakes. The medium in the interior of the VLVP may be isotropic or vertically transverse isotropic due to the good station correlation of apparent splitting parameters and the consistency of apparent splitting parameters for SKS and SKKS waves of the same earthquake when seismic data sample in the interior of the VLVP. However, the medium near the borders of the VLVP has to be anisotropic in order to account for the lack of station correlation of apparent splitting parameters and the inconsistency of apparent splitting parameters for SKS and SKKS waves of the same earthquake when seismic data sample near the borders of the VLVP. The anisotropy near the borders of the VLVP can be generated by the lattice-preferred orientation of anisotropic aggregates, revealing a complex mantle flow in the surrounding areas.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvB..92e4410Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvB..92e4410Y"><span id="translatedtitle">Topological orders with global gauge <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>You, Yi-Zhuang; Xu, Cenke</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p>By definition, the physics of the d -dimensional (dim) boundary of a (d +1 ) -dim symmetry protected topological (SPT) state cannot be realized as itself on a d -dim lattice. If the symmetry of the system is unitary, then a formal way to determine whether a d -dim theory must be a boundary or not, is to couple this theory to a gauge field (or to "gauge" its symmetry), and check if there is a gauge <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. In this paper we discuss the following question: Can the boundary of a SPT state be driven into a fully gapped topological order which preserves all the symmetries? We argue (conjecture) that if the gauge <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of the boundary is "perturbative," then the boundary must remain gapless; while if the boundary only has global gauge <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> but no perturbative <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, then it is possible to gap out the boundary by driving it into a topological state, when d ≥2 . We will demonstrate this conjecture with two examples: (1) the 3 d spin-1/2 chiral fermion with the well-known Witten's global <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> [Phys. Lett. 117, 324 (1982), 10.1016/0370-2693(82)90728-6], which can be realized on the boundary of a 4 d topological superconductor with SU(2) or U (1 ) ⋊Z2 symmetry; and (2) the 4 d boundary of a 5 d topological superconductor with the same symmetry. We show that these boundary systems can be driven into a fully gapped Z2 N topological order with topological degeneracy, but this Z2 N topological order cannot be future driven into a trivial confined phase that preserves all the symmetries due to some special properties of its topological defects. Our study also leads to exotic states of matter in pure 3 d space.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11623670','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11623670"><span id="translatedtitle">Environmental imperatives reconsidered: demographic crises in western North America during the medieval climatic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jones, T L; Brown, G M; Raab, L M; McVickar, J L; Spaulding, W G; Kennett, D J; York, A; Wlaker, P L</p> <p>1999-04-01</p> <p>Review of late Holocene paleoenvironmental and cultural sequences from four regions of western North America show striking correlations between drought and changes in subsistence, population, exchange, health, and interpersonal violence during the Medieval Climatic <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> (A.D. 800-1350). While ultimate causality is difficult to identify in the archaeological record, synchrony of the environmental and cultural changes and the negative character of many human responses--increased interpersonal violence, deterioration of long-distance exchange relationships, and regional abandonments--<span class="hlt">suggest</span> widespread demographic crises caused by decreased environmental productivity. The medieval droughts occurred at a unique juncture in the demographic history of western North America when unusually large populations of both hunter-gathers and agriculturalists had evolved highly intensified economies that put them in unprecedented ecological jeopardy. Long-term patterns in the archaeological record are inconsistent with the predicted outcomes of simple adaptation or continuous economic intensification, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that in this instance environmental dynamics played a major role in cultural transformations across a wide expanse of western North America among groups with diverse subsistence strategies. These events <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that environment should not be overlooked as a <span class="hlt">potential</span> cause of prehistoric culture change. PMID:11623670</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4222065','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4222065"><span id="translatedtitle">A prospective observational study of associated <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Hirschsprung’s disease</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Background Associated <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> have been reported in around 20% of Hirschsprung patients but many Authors <span class="hlt">suggested</span> a measure of underestimation. We therefore implemented a prospective observational study on 106 consecutive HSCR patients aimed at defining the percentage of associated <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and implementing a personalized and up-to-date diagnostic algorithm. Methods After Institutional Ethical Committee approval, 106 consecutive Hirschsprung patients admitted to our Institution between January 2010 and December 2012 were included. All families were asked to sign a specific Informed Consent form and in case of acceptance each patient underwent an advanced diagnostic algorithm, including renal ultrasound scan (US), cardiologic assessment with cardiac US, cerebral US, audiometry, ENT and ophthalmologic assessments plus further specialist evaluations based on specific clinical features. Results Male to female ratio of our series of patients was 3,4:1. Aganglionosis was confined to the rectosigmoid colon (classic forms) in 74,5% of cases. We detected 112 associated <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in 61 (57,5%) patients. The percentage did not significantly differ according to gender or length of aganglionosis. Overall, 43,4% of patients complained ophthalmologic issues (mostly refraction <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>), 9,4% visual impairment, 20,7% congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the kidney and urinary tract, 4,7% congenital heart disease, 4,7% hearing impairment or deafness, 2,3% central nervous system <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, 8,5% chromosomal abnormalities or syndromes and 12,3% other associated <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Conclusions Our study confirmed the underestimation of certain associated <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Hirschsprung patients, such as hearing impairment and congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the kidney and urinary tract. Subsequently, based on our results we strongly <span class="hlt">suggest</span> performing renal US and audiometry in all patients. Conversely, ophthalmologic assessment and cerebral and heart US can be performed according to guidelines applied to the general population or in case of patients with suspected clinical features or chromosomal abnormalities. This updated diagnostic algorithm aims at improving overall outcome thanks to better prognostic expectations, prevention strategies and early rehabilitation modalities. The investigation of genetic background of patients with associated <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> might be the next step to explore this intriguing multifactorial congenital disease. PMID:24267509</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7060969','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7060969"><span id="translatedtitle">Is plagioclase removal responsible for the negative Eu <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the source regions of mare basalts</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Shearer, C.K.; Papike, J.J. )</p> <p>1989-12-01</p> <p>The nearly ubiquitous presence of a negative Eu <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the mare basalts has been <span class="hlt">suggested</span> to indicate prior separation and flotation of plagioclase from the basalt source region during its crystallization from a lunar magma ocean (LMO). Are there any mare basalts derived from a mantle source which did not experience prior plagioclase separation Crystal chemical rationale for REE substitution in pyroxene <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the combination of REE size and charge, M2 site characteristics of pyroxene, fO{sub 2}, magma chemistry, and temperature may account for the negative Eu <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the source region of some types of primitive, low TiO{sub 2} mare basalts. This origin for the negative Eu <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> does not preclude the possibility of the LMO as many mare basalts still require prior plagioclase crystallization and separation and/or hybridization involving a KREEP component.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GeoRL..42.2378H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GeoRL..42.2378H"><span id="translatedtitle">The role of tropical Atlantic SST <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in modulating western North Pacific tropical cyclone genesis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Huo, Liwei; Guo, Pinwen; Hameed, Saji N.; Jin, Dachao</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>The connection between north tropical Atlantic (NTA) sea surface temperature (SST) <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and tropical cyclone (TC) genesis over the western North Pacific (WNP) and associated physical mechanisms are investigated in this study. We demonstrate a remarkable negative correlation of WNP TC genesis frequency with the (preceding) boreal spring NTA SST <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Our analysis <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that major factors for TC genesis including distributions of large-scale vorticity and midtropospheric humidity are rendered unfavorable by remote teleconnections while barotropic energy conversion from the large-scale flow is suppressed. As shown in recent studies, the remote teleconnection from the Atlantic is sustained and enhanced throughout the typhoon season through local air-sea interactions. These results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that boreal spring NTA SST <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> could be a new predictor for the seasonal WNP TC activity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900033168&hterms=Europium&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3DEuropium','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900033168&hterms=Europium&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3DEuropium"><span id="translatedtitle">Is plagioclase removal responsible for the negative Eu <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the source regions of mare basalts?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Shearer, C. K.; Papike, J. J.</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>The nearly ubiquitous presence of a negative Eu <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the mare basalts has been <span class="hlt">suggested</span> to indicate prior separation and flotation of plagioclase from the basalt source region during its crystallization from a lunar magma ocean (LMO). Are there any mare basalts derived from a mantle source which did not experience prior plagioclase separation? Crystal chemical rationale for REE substitution in pyroxene <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the combination of REE size and charge, M2 site characteristics of pyroxene, fO2, magma chemistry, and temperature may account for the negative Eu <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the source region of some types of primitive, low TiO2 mare basalts. This origin for the negative Eu <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> does not preclude the possibility of the LMO as many mare basalts still require prior plagioclase crystallization and separation and/or hybridization involving a KREEP component.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JGRE..120.1160T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JGRE..120.1160T"><span id="translatedtitle">Surface vector mapping of magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over the Moon using Kaguya and Lunar Prospector observations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tsunakawa, Hideo; Takahashi, Futoshi; Shimizu, Hisayoshi; Shibuya, Hidetoshi; Matsushima, Masaki</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>We have provided preliminary global maps of three components of the lunar magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> on the surface applying the surface vector mapping (SVM) method. The data used in the present study consist of about 5 million observations of the lunar magnetic field at 10-45 km altitudes by Kaguya and Lunar Prospector. The lunar magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were mapped at 0.2° equi-distance points on the surface by the SVM method, showing the highest intensity of 718 nT in the Crisium antipodal region. Overall features on the SVM maps indicate that elongating magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are likely to be dominant on the Moon except for the young large basins with the impact demagnetization. Remarkable demagnetization features <span class="hlt">suggested</span> by previous studies are also recognized at Hertzsprung and Kolorev craters on the farside. These features indicate that demagnetized areas extend to about 1-2 radii of the basins/craters. There are well-isolated central magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at four craters: Leibnitz, Aitken, Jules Verne, and Grimaldi craters. Their magnetic poles through the dipole source approximation <span class="hlt">suggest</span> occurrence of the polar wander prior to 3.3-3.5 Ga. When compared with high-albedo markings at several magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> such as the Reiner Gamma <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, three-dimensional structures of the magnetic field on/near the surface are well correlated with high-albedo areas. These results indicate that the global SVM maps are useful for the study of the lunar magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in comparison with various geological and geophysical data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005ASAJ..118Q1856L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005ASAJ..118Q1856L"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggested</span> noise criteria for plumbing systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lilly, Jerry</p> <p>2005-09-01</p> <p>The issue of noise that is generated by plumbing systems has been addressed in several articles and texts in the acoustic literature, but most of this information deals with a description of the various noise generation mechanisms and recommended methods of controlling noise from plumbing fixtures and piping. As with any noise source that has the <span class="hlt">potential</span> for generating annoyance, the question of how much noise is too much noise eventually arises. Chapter 47 of the 2003 ASHRAE Applications Handbook contains newly published guidelines for plumbing noise criteria as it impacts building occupants. This paper discusses the ASHRAE guidelines, and it also <span class="hlt">suggests</span> additional noise criteria for other plumbing-related sources of noise in multitenant buildings.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23074681','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23074681"><span id="translatedtitle">Pure duplication of the distal long arm of chromosome 15 with ebstein <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and clavicular <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>O'Connor, Rachel; Al-Murrani, Amel; Aftimos, Salim; Asquith, Philip; Mazzaschi, Roberto; Eyrolle-Guignot, Dominique; George, Alice M; Love, Donald R</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>This report is of a patient with pure trisomy of 15q24-qter who presents with the rare Ebstein <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and a previously unreported skeletal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Chromosome microarray analysis allowed high-resolution identification of the extent of the trisomy and provided a means of achieving higher-resolution breakpoint data. The phenotypic expression of unbalanced chromosomal regions is a complex phenomenon, and fine mapping of the involved region, as described here, is only a first step on the path to its full understanding. Overexpression of the LINGO-1 and CSPG4 genes has been implicated in developmental delay seen in other patients with trisomy of 15q24-qter, but our patient is currently too young to ascertain developmental progress. The genetic underpinning of Ebstein <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and the skeletal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> reported here is unclear based on our high-resolution dosage mapping. PMID:23074681</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910046682&hterms=Research+experimental&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3DResearch%2Bexperimental','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910046682&hterms=Research+experimental&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3DResearch%2Bexperimental"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggested</span> future directions in high-speed transition experimental research</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Bushnell, Dennis</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>Historical developments in the area of high-speed experimental transition research are outlined, and future directions in this area as determined by the panel membership are listed. The directions include measurement and modeling of initial disturbance fields, both in ground facilities and flight, for all modes; development of advanced high-speed instrumentation for disturbance field measurements, measurements of the details of receptivity in multitudinous flows; further development and use of high-speed quiet tunnels; stability and transition studies for multitudinous flows; detailed studies of the transitional region for boundary layers, free flows, vortices separated flows, corner flows, etc.; and studies of flow-chemistry effects on transition phenomena. Applied research such areas as the physics of perforated-surface suction stabilization and the resolution of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the existing high-speed database is also <span class="hlt">suggested</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19750010748','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19750010748"><span id="translatedtitle">Direct recovery of mean gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from satellite to satellite tracking</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hajela, D. P.</p> <p>1974-01-01</p> <p>The direct recovery was investigated of mean gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from summed range rate observations, the signal path being ground station to a geosynchronous relay satellite to a close satellite significantly perturbed by the short wave features of the earth's gravitational field. To ensure realistic observations, these were simulated with the nominal orbital elements for the relay satellite corresponding to ATS-6, and for two different close satellites (one at about 250 km height, and the other at about 900 km height) corresponding to the nominal values for GEOS-C. The earth's gravitational field was represented by a reference set of <span class="hlt">potential</span> coefficients up to degree and order 12, considered as known values, and by residual gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> obtained by subtracting the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, implied by the <span class="hlt">potential</span> coefficients, from their terrestrial estimates. It was found that gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> could be recovered from strong signal without using any a-priori terrestrial information, i.e. considering their initial values as zero and also assigning them a zero weight matrix. While recovering them from weak signal, it was necessary to use the a-priori estimate of the standard deviation of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to form their a-priori diagonal weight matrix.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007SPIE.6579E..0ER','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007SPIE.6579E..0ER"><span id="translatedtitle">Steganography <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection using simple one-class classification</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rodriguez, Benjamin M.; Peterson, Gilbert L.; Agaian, Sos S.</p> <p>2007-04-01</p> <p>There are several security issues tied to multimedia when implementing the various applications in the cellular phone and wireless industry. One primary concern is the <span class="hlt">potential</span> ease of implementing a steganography system. Traditionally, the only mechanism to embed information into a media file has been with a desktop computer. However, as the cellular phone and wireless industry matures, it becomes much simpler for the same techniques to be performed using a cell phone. In this paper, two methods are compared that classify cell phone images as either an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> or clean, where a clean image is one in which no alterations have been made and an anomalous image is one in which information has been hidden within the image. An image in which information has been hidden is known as a stego image. The main concern in detecting steganographic content with machine learning using cell phone images is in training specific embedding procedures to determine if the method has been used to generate a stego image. This leads to a possible flaw in the system when the learned model of stego is faced with a new stego method which doesn't match the existing model. The proposed solution to this problem is to develop systems that detect steganography as <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, making the embedding method irrelevant in detection. Two applicable classification methods for solving the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection of steganographic content problem are single class support vector machines (SVM) and Parzen-window. Empirical comparison of the two approaches shows that Parzen-window outperforms the single class SVM most likely due to the fact that Parzen-window generalizes less.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4823473','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4823473"><span id="translatedtitle">A sign on CT that predicts a hazardous ureteral <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Allam, E.S.; Johnson, D.Y.; Grewal, S.G.; Johnson, F.E.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Introduction An aberrant course of the distal ureter can pose a risk of ureteral injury during surgery for inguinal hernia repair and other groin operations. In a recent case series of inguinoscrotal hernation of the ureter, we found that each affected ureter was markedly anterior to the psoas muscle at its mid-point on abdominal CT. We hypothesized that this abnormality in the abdominal course of the ureter would predict the <span class="hlt">potentially</span> hazardous aberrant course of the distal ureter. Presentation of cases We reviewed all evaluable CT urograms performed at St. Louis University Hospital from June 2012 to July 2013 and measured the ureteral course at several anatomically fixed points. Discussion 93% (50/54) of ureters deviated by less than 1 cm from the psoas muscle in their mid-course (at the level of the L4 vertebra). Reasons for anterior deviation of the ureter in this study included morbid obesity with prominent retroperitoneal fat, congenital renal abnormality, and post-traumatic renal/retroperitoneal hematoma. We determined that the optimal level on abdominal CT to detect the displaced ureter was the mid-body of the L4 vertebra. Conclusion Anterior deviation of the ureter in its mid-course appears to predict inguinoscrotal herniation of the ureter. This finding is a sensitive predictor and should raise concern for this <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the appropriate clinical setting. It is not entirely specific as morbid obesity and congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may result in a similar imaging appearance. We believe that this association has not been reported previously. Awareness of this <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> can have significant operative implications. PMID:27046105</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SPIE.9064E..1ED','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SPIE.9064E..1ED"><span id="translatedtitle">Reliable prediction of micro-<span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from macro-observables</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Das, Sonjoy; Chakravarty, Sourish</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>A stochastic multi-scale based approach is presented in this work to detect signatures of micro-<span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from macrolevel response variables. By micro-<span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, we primarily refer to micro-cracks of size 10-100 μm (depending on the material), while macro-level response variables imply, e.g., strains, strain energy density of macro-level structures (typical size often varying in the order of 10-100 m). The micro-<span class="hlt">anomalies</span> referred above are not discernible to the naked eyes. Nevertheless, they can cause catastrophic failures of structural systems due to fatigue cyclic loading that results in initiation of fatigue cracks. Analysis of such precursory state of internal damage evolution, before amacro-crack visibly appears (say, size of a few cms), is beyond the scope of the conventional crack propagation analysis, e.g., classical fracture mechanics. The present work addresses this issue in a certain sense by incorporating the effects of micro-cracks into the macro-scale constitutive material properties (e.g., constitutive elasticity tensors) within a probabilistic formalism based on random matrix theory, maximum entropy principle, and principles of minimum complementary energy and minimum <span class="hlt">potential</span> energy. Distinct differences are observed in the macro-level response characteristics depending on the presence or absence of micro-cracks. This particular feature can now be used to reliably detect micro-cracks from experimental measurements of macro-observables. The present work, therefore, further proposes an efficient and robust optimization scheme: (1) to identify locations of micro-cracks in macroscopic structural systems, say, in an aircraft wing which is of the size of 10- 100 m, and (2) to determine the weakened (due to the presence of micro-cracks) macroscopic material properties which will be useful in predicting the remaining useful life of structural systems. The proposed optimization scheme achieves better convergence rate and accuracy by exploiting positive-definite structure of the macroscopic constitutive matrices.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMNG41B..07D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMNG41B..07D"><span id="translatedtitle">Analyzing Global Climate System Using Graph Based <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Das, K.; Agrawal, S.; Atluri, G.; Liess, S.; Steinbach, M.; Kumar, V.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Climate networks have been studied for understanding complex relationships between different spatial locations such as community structures and teleconnections. Analysis of time-evolving climate networks reveals changes that occur in those relationships over time and can provide insights for discovering new and complex climate phenomena. We have recently developed a novel data mining technique to discover anomalous relationships from dynamic climate networks. The algorithms efficiently identifies anomalous changes in relationships that cause significant structural changes in the climate network from one time instance to the next. Using this technique we investigated the presence of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in precipitation networks that were constructed based on monthly averages of precipitation recorded at .5 degree resolution during the time period 1982 to 2002. The precipitation network consisted of 10-nearest neighbor graphs for every month's data. Preliminary results on this data set indicate that we were able to discover several <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that have been verified to be related to or as the outcome of well known climate phenomena. For instance, one such set of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> corresponds to transition from January 1994 (normal conditions) to January 1995 (El-Nino conditions) and include events like worst droughts of the 20th century in Australian Plains, very high rainfall in southeast Asian islands, and drought-like conditions in Peru, Chile, and eastern equatorial Africa during that time period. We plan to further apply our technique to networks constructed out of different climate variables such as sea-level pressure, surface air temperature, wind velocity, 500 geo-<span class="hlt">potential</span> height etc. at different resolutions. Using this method we hope to develop deeper insights regarding the interactions of multiple climate variables globally over time, which might lead to discovery of previously unknown climate phenomena involving heterogeneous data sources.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24591991','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24591991"><span id="translatedtitle">Unicornuate uteri associated with contralateral renal agenesis and ovarian <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cerekja, Albana; Dillon, Kathleen Comalli; Racanska, Eva; Piazze, Juan</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Our findings regarding two cases of unicornuate uterus validate that conventional transvaginal ultrasound is helpful in diagnosing uterine <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Moreover, <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the urinary system and the contralateral ovary should always be considered. PMID:24591991</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3939280','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3939280"><span id="translatedtitle">Unicornuate uteri associated with contralateral renal agenesis and ovarian <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Cerekja, Albana; Dillon, Kathleen Comalli; Racanska, Eva; Piazze, Juan</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Our findings regarding two cases of unicornuate uterus validate that conventional transvaginal ultrasound is helpful in diagnosing uterine <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Moreover, <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the urinary system and the contralateral ovary should always be considered. PMID:24591991</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21460040','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21460040"><span id="translatedtitle">NEUTRON-RICH CHROMIUM ISOTOPE <span class="hlt">ANOMALIES</span> IN SUPERNOVA NANOPARTICLES</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Dauphas, N.; Remusat, L.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Guan, Y.; Ma, C.; Eiler, J. M.; Chen, J. H.; Roskosz, M.; Stodolna, J.</p> <p>2010-09-10</p> <p>Neutron-rich isotopes with masses near that of iron are produced in Type Ia and II supernovae (SNeIa and SNeII). Traces of such nucleosynthesis are found in primitive meteorites in the form of variations in the isotopic abundance of {sup 54}Cr, the most neutron-rich stable isotope of chromium. The hosts of these isotopic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> must be presolar grains that condensed in the outflows of SNe, offering the opportunity to study the nucleosynthesis of iron-peak nuclei in ways that complement spectroscopic observations and can inform models of stellar evolution. However, despite almost two decades of extensive search, the carrier of {sup 54}Cr <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is still unknown, presumably because it is fine grained and is chemically labile. Here, we identify in the primitive meteorite Orgueil the carrier of {sup 54}Cr <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> as nanoparticles (<100 nm), most likely spinels that show large enrichments in {sup 54}Cr relative to solar composition ({sup 54}Cr/{sup 52}Cr ratio >3.6 x solar). Such large enrichments in {sup 54}Cr can only be produced in SNe. The mineralogy of the grains supports condensation in the O/Ne-O/C zones of an SNII, although a Type Ia origin cannot be excluded. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that planetary materials incorporated different amounts of these nanoparticles, possibly due to late injection by a nearby SN that also delivered {sup 26}Al and {sup 60}Fe to the solar system. This idea explains why the relative abundance of {sup 54}Cr and other neutron-rich isotopes vary between planets and meteorites. We anticipate that future isotopic studies of the grains identified here will shed new light on the birth of the solar system and the conditions in SNe.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24473551','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24473551"><span id="translatedtitle">MedMon: securing medical devices through wireless monitoring and <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhang, Meng; Raghunathan, Anand; Jha, Niraj K</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Rapid advances in personal healthcare systems based on implantable and wearable medical devices promise to greatly improve the quality of diagnosis and treatment for a range of medical conditions. However, the increasing programmability and wireless connectivity of medical devices also open up opportunities for malicious attackers. Unfortunately, implantable/wearable medical devices come with extreme size and power constraints, and unique usage models, making it infeasible to simply borrow conventional security solutions such as cryptography. We propose a general framework for securing medical devices based on wireless channel monitoring and <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection. Our proposal is based on a medical security monitor (MedMon) that snoops on all the radio-frequency wireless communications to/from medical devices and uses multi-layered <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection to identify <span class="hlt">potentially</span> malicious transactions. Upon detection of a malicious transaction, MedMon takes appropriate response actions, which could range from passive (notifying the user) to active (jamming the packets so that they do not reach the medical device). A key benefit of MedMon is that it is applicable to existing medical devices that are in use by patients, with no hardware or software modifications to them. Consequently, it also leads to zero power overheads on these devices. We demonstrate the feasibility of our proposal by developing a prototype implementation for an insulin delivery system using off-the-shelf components (USRP software-defined radio). We evaluate its effectiveness under several attack scenarios. Our results show that MedMon can detect virtually all naive attacks and a large fraction of more sophisticated attacks, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that it is an effective approach to enhancing the security of medical devices. PMID:24473551</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26283594','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26283594"><span id="translatedtitle">Pictorial review of coronary <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Tetralogy of Fallot.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kapur, Sangita; Aeron, Gunjan; Vojta, Christopher N</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) classically consists of four characteristic features-right ventricular outflow obstruction, right ventricular hypertrophy, ventricular septal defect and an overriding aorta. In addition there are multiple other associated cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, including coronary artery <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. In this review, the role of CT angiography and the spectrum of coronary <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> will be discussed along with importance of such <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the context of surgery. PMID:26283594</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9231606','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9231606"><span id="translatedtitle">Multirooted <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the primary dentition of Native Americans.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Winkler, M P; Ahmad, R</p> <p>1997-07-01</p> <p>The dental literature contains a small number of reports of primary multirooted <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and even fewer reports on the clinical significance of these findings. When conducting routine clinical examinations, the authors found multirooted <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in three Native American children. The <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> included a primary bifurcated maxillary left canine, a primary three-rooted mandibular right first molar and bilateral primary three-rooted mandibular first and second molars. The clinical significance of these types of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is discussed. PMID:9231606</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26679527','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26679527"><span id="translatedtitle">Neuroanatomical <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of dyslexia: Disambiguating the effects of disorder, performance, and maturation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Xia, Zhichao; Hoeft, Fumiko; Zhang, Linjun; Shu, Hua</p> <p>2016-01-29</p> <p>An increasing body of studies has revealed neuroanatomical impairments in developmental dyslexia. However, whether these structural <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are driven by dyslexia (disorder-specific effects), absolute reading performance (performance-dependent effects), and/or further influenced by age (maturation-sensitive effects) remains elusive. To help disentangle these sources, the current study used a novel disorder (dyslexia vs. control) by maturation (younger vs. older) factorial design in 48 Chinese children who were carefully matched. This design not only allows for direct comparison between dyslexics versus controls matched for chronological age and reading ability, but also enables examination of the influence of maturation and its interaction with dyslexia. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) showed that dyslexic children had reduced regional gray matter volume in the left temporo-parietal cortex (spanning over Heschl's gyrus, planum temporale and supramarginal gyrus), middle frontal gyrus, superior occipital gyrus, and reduced regional white matter in bilateral parieto-occipital regions (left cuneus and right precuneus) compared with both age-matched and reading-level matched controls. Therefore, maturational stage-invariant neurobiological signatures of dyslexia were found in brain regions that have been associated with impairments in the auditory/phonological and attentional systems. On the other hand, maturational stage-dependent effects on dyslexia were observed in three regions (left ventral occipito-temporal cortex, left dorsal pars opercularis and genu of the corpus callosum), all of which were previously reported to be involved in fluent reading and its development. These striking dissociations collectively <span class="hlt">suggest</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> atypical developmental trajectories of dyslexia, where underlying mechanisms are currently unknown but may be driven by interactions between genetic and/or environmental factors. In summary, this is the first study to disambiguate maturational stage on neuroanatomical <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of dyslexia in addition to the effects of disorder, reading performance and maturational stage on neuroanatomical <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of dyslexia, despite the limitation of a relatively small sample-size. These results will hopefully encourage future research to place greater emphasis on taking a developmental perspective to dyslexia, which may, in turn, further our understanding of the etiological basis of this neurodevelopmental disorder, and ultimately optimize early identification and remediation. PMID:26679527</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20114160','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20114160"><span id="translatedtitle">Head and neck vascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in children.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tucci, Filippo Maria; De Vincentiis, Giovanni Carlo; Sitzia, Emanuela; Giuzio, Loanna; Trozzi, Marilena; Bottero, Sergio</p> <p>2009-12-01</p> <p>Vascular lesions are the most common congenital and neonatal abnormalities. The aim of this work is to point out differences between various vascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, in order to define accurate diagnosis, and to present different therapeutic options now used for the treatment of the vascular lesions in children. According to biological classification described by the work of Mulliken and Glowacki there are two major types of vascular abnormality: haemangioma and vascular malformation. Haemangioma is a distinct biologic tumour entity characterised by rapid endothelial proliferation shortly after birth. The lesion is absent at birth and growth in early infancy, followed by a spontaneous resolution in childhood. Vascular malformations are structural <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that have a normal growth rate and endothelial turnover. According to the morphology of the vessels and the flow rate we distinguish: slow-flow and fast-flow vascular malformation. The authors document their personal experience in diagnosis, clinical evaluation, treatment and follow-up of the vascular lesions. PMID:20114160</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/626655','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/626655"><span id="translatedtitle">[Cloverleaf cranial <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Report of 2 cases].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Carnevale, A; Gómez, H; Mendoza, E; del Castillo, V; Valencia, G; Rueda, F</p> <p>1978-01-01</p> <p>Two cases of cloverleaf <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> are presented. The first one was associated to complete spina bifida and flexion of elbows and knees, and the second to syndactyly of 3rd and 4th fingers of both hands; short, broad and swerved thumbs; rudimentary bilateral preaxial polydactyly, pes varus with broad first metatarsus. Authors agree with the opinion that this <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is a sign which may occur in disorders with early craniosynostosis and emphasise the importance of the identification of the underlying disorder because, knowing its pattern of inheritance, a proper genetic advice may be rendered. The neurosurgical procedure can be useful for cosmetic purposes and for encephalitic decompression, but the results are somewhat unsatisfactory because of the severity of the defect. PMID:626655</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=retrieve&db=pubmed&list_uids=626655&dopt=AbstractPlus','TOXNETTOXLINE'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=retrieve&db=pubmed&list_uids=626655&dopt=AbstractPlus"><span id="translatedtitle">[Cloverleaf cranial <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Report of 2 cases].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/sis/htmlgen?TOXLINE">TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information</a></p> <p>Carnevale A; Gómez H; Mendoza E; del Castillo V; Valencia G; Rueda F</p> <p>1978-03-01</p> <p>Two cases of cloverleaf <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> are presented. The first one was associated to complete spina bifida and flexion of elbows and knees, and the second to syndactyly of 3rd and 4th fingers of both hands; short, broad and swerved thumbs; rudimentary bilateral preaxial polydactyly, pes varus with broad first metatarsus. Authors agree with the opinion that this <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is a sign which may occur in disorders with early craniosynostosis and emphasise the importance of the identification of the underlying disorder because, knowing its pattern of inheritance, a proper genetic advice may be rendered. The neurosurgical procedure can be useful for cosmetic purposes and for encephalitic decompression, but the results are somewhat unsatisfactory because of the severity of the defect.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20159474','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20159474"><span id="translatedtitle">Prenatal diagnosis and treatment of craniomaxillofacial <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Costello, Bernard J; Edwards, Sean P</p> <p>2010-02-01</p> <p>Many advances in health care are built on the evolution of technology. An entirely new patient has emerged in fetal medicine, with these advances in prenatal imaging allowing one to see and diagnose disease not previously appreciated. Clinicians can better plan for the delivery of the neonate, with identified <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> being optimally managed and the impact on the neonate's health minimized. The oral and maxillofacial surgeon offers expertise in the management of craniomaxillofacial <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, including congenital tumors, facial clefts, craniosynostosis, micrognathia, and other congenital abnormalities. The techniques for perinatal care of the patient with craniofacial abnormalities continue to evolve as the technology improves. The authors describe their experience and some of the more common abnormalities with their management considerations that may be encountered by the oral and maxillofacial surgeon on the fetal diagnosis and treatment team. PMID:20159474</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4314572','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4314572"><span id="translatedtitle">Congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the optic nerve</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Amador-Patarroyo, Manuel J.; Pérez-Rueda, Mario A.; Tellez, Carlos H.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Congenital optic nerve head <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are a group of structural malformations of the optic nerve head and surrounding tissues, which may cause congenital visual impairment and blindness. Each entity in this group of optic nerve <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> has individually become more prevalent as our ability to differentiate between them has improved due to better characterization of cases. Access to better medical technology (e.g., neuroimaging and genetic analysis advances in recent years) has helped to expand our knowledge of these abnormalities. However, visual impairment may not be the only problem in these patients, some of these entities will be related to ophthalmologic, neurologic and systemic features that will help the physician to identify and predict possible outcomes in these patients, which sometimes may be life-threatening. Herein we present helpful hints, associations and management (when plausible) for them. PMID:25859137</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20160001621','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20160001621"><span id="translatedtitle">International Space Station (ISS) <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> Trending Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Beil, Robert J.; Brady, Timothy K.; Foster, Delmar C.; Graber, Robert R.; Malin, Jane T.; Thornesbery, Carroll G.; Throop, David R.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) set out to utilize data mining and trending techniques to review the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> history of the International Space Station (ISS) and provide tools for discipline experts not involved with the ISS Program to search <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data to aid in identification of areas that may warrant further investigation. Additionally, the assessment team aimed to develop an approach and skillset for integrating data sets, with the intent of providing an enriched data set for discipline experts to investigate that is easier to navigate, particularly in light of ISS aging and the plan to extend its life into the late 2020s. This report contains the outcome of the NESC Assessment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/1176372','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/1176372"><span id="translatedtitle">System and method for <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Scherrer, Chad</p> <p>2010-06-15</p> <p>A system and method for detecting one or more <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in a plurality of observations is provided. In one illustrative embodiment, the observations are real-time network observations collected from a stream of network traffic. The method includes performing a discrete decomposition of the observations, and introducing derived variables to increase storage and query efficiencies. A mathematical model, such as a conditional independence model, is then generated from the formatted data. The formatted data is also used to construct frequency tables which maintain an accurate count of specific variable occurrence as indicated by the model generation process. The formatted data is then applied to the mathematical model to generate scored data. The scored data is then analyzed to detect <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JHEP...11..216R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JHEP...11..216R"><span id="translatedtitle">Holographic trace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and local renormalization group</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rajagopal, Srivatsan; Stergiou, Andreas; Zhu, Yechao</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>The Hamilton-Jacobi method in holography has produced important results both at a renormalization group (RG) fixed point and away from it. In this paper we use the Hamilton-Jacobi method to compute the holographic trace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> for four- and six-dimensional boundary conformal field theories (CFTs), assuming higher-derivative gravity and interactions of scalar fields in the bulk. The scalar field contributions to the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> appear in CFTs with exactly marginal operators. Moving away from the fixed point, we show that the Hamilton-Jacobi formalism provides a deep connection between the holographic and the local RG. We derive the local RG equation holographically, and verify explicitly that it satisfies Weyl consistency conditions stemming from the commutativity of Weyl scalings. We also consider massive scalar fields in the bulk corresponding to boundary relevant operators, and comment on their effects to the local RG equation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SPIE.9659E..14L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SPIE.9659E..14L"><span id="translatedtitle">Hyperspectral <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection based on maximum likelihood method</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lo, Edisanter</p> <p>2015-07-01</p> <p>Detection of a subspace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is an important application of hyperspectral imaging in remote sensing. Sub-space <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection depends on the unknown dimension of the main background subspace. When the dimension is high, detection algorithms tend to have unsatisfactory performance. This paper proposes an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection algorithm that will continue to perform satisfactorily when the dimension is high.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1198324-large-angle-anomalies-cmb','SCIGOV-DOEP'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1198324-large-angle-anomalies-cmb"><span id="translatedtitle">Large-Angle <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in the CMB</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/pages">DOE PAGESBeta</a></p> <p>Copi, Craig J.; Huterer, Dragan; Schwarz, Dominik J.; Starkman, Glenn D.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>We review the recently found large-scale <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the maps of temperature anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background. These include alignments of the largest modes of CMB anisotropy with each other and with geometry and direction of motion of the solar ssystem, and the unusually low power at these largest scales. We discuss these findings in relation to expectation from standard inflationary cosmology, their statistical significance, the tools to study them, and the various attempts to explain them.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008SPIE.6945E..0WR','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008SPIE.6945E..0WR"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> detection in the maritime domain</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Roy, Jean</p> <p>2008-04-01</p> <p>Defence R&D Canada is developing a Collaborative Knowledge Exploitation Framework (CKEF) to support the analysts in efficiently managing and exploiting relevant knowledge assets to achieve maritime domain awareness in joint operations centres of the Canadian Forces. While developing the CKEF, <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection has been clearly recognized as an important aspect requiring R&D. An activity has thus been undertaken to implement, within the CKEF, a proof-of-concept prototype of a rule-based expert system to support the analysts regarding this aspect. This expert system has to perform automated reasoning and output recommendations (or alerts) about maritime <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, thereby supporting the identification of vessels of interest and threat analysis. The system must contribute to a lower false alarm rate and a better probability of detection in drawing operator's attention to vessels worthy of their attention. It must provide explanations as to why the vessels may be of interest, with links to resources that help the operators dig deeper. Mechanisms are necessary for the analysts to fine tune the system, and for the knowledge engineer to maintain the knowledge base as the expertise of the operators evolves. This paper portrays the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection prototype, and describes the knowledge acquisition and elicitation session conducted to capture the know-how of the experts, the formal knowledge representation enablers and the ontology required for aspects of the maritime domain that are relevant to <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection, vessels of interest, and threat analysis, the prototype high-level design and implementation on the service-oriented architecture of the CKEF, and other findings and results of this ongoing activity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21502822','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21502822"><span id="translatedtitle">Statistical significance of the gallium <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Giunti, Carlo; Laveder, Marco</p> <p>2011-06-15</p> <p>We calculate the statistical significance of the anomalous deficit of electron neutrinos measured in the radioactive source experiments of the GALLEX and SAGE solar neutrino detectors, taking into account the uncertainty of the detection cross section. We found that the statistical significance of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is {approx}3.0{sigma}. A fit of the data in terms of neutrino oscillations favors at {approx}2.7{sigma} short-baseline electron neutrino disappearance with respect to the null hypothesis of no oscillations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7726465','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7726465"><span id="translatedtitle">Associated dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in an Etruscan adolescent.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Baccetti, T; Franchi, L; Cecchi, J M; Pacciani, E</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>Three fragments of the upper jaw of an Etruscan adolescent of the 6th century B.C. discovered at the necropolis of Cancellone 1 (Magliano in Tuscany, Grosseto, Italy) were examined. A triad of associated dental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> was found: congenitally missing second premolars, "peg-shaped" permanent lateral incisors, and ectopic (palatal) eruption of a permanent canine. These findings provided the opportunity to discuss etiopathogenetic aspects of the associations among different types of tooth abnormalities. PMID:7726465</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992PhLB..293..327G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992PhLB..293..327G"><span id="translatedtitle">A quantum <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> for rigid particles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Govaerts, Jan</p> <p>1992-10-01</p> <p>Canonical quantisation of rigid particles is considered paying special attention to the restriction on phase space due to causal propagation. A mixed Lorentz-gravitational <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is found in the commutator of Lorentz boosts with world-line reparametrisations. The subspace of gauge invariant physical states is therefore not invariant under Lorentz transformations. The analysis applies for an arbitrary extrinsic curvature dependence with exception of only one case to be studied separately. Consequences for rigid strings are also discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5547201','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5547201"><span id="translatedtitle">Chiral <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, bosonization, and fractional charge</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Mignaco, J.A.; Monteiro, M.A.R.</p> <p>1985-06-15</p> <p>We present a method to evaluate the Jacobian of chiral rotations, regulating determinants through the proper-time method and using Seeley's asymptotic expansion. With this method we compute easily the chiral <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> for ..nu.. = 4,6 dimensions, discuss bosonization of some massless two-dimensional models, and handle the problem of charge fractionization. In addition, we comment on the general validity of Fujikawa's approach to regulate the Jacobian of chiral rotations with non-Hermitian operators.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22212655','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22212655"><span id="translatedtitle">Hamiltonian <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of bound states in QED</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Shilin, V. I.; Pervushin, V. N.</p> <p>2013-10-15</p> <p>The Bound State in QED is described in systematic way by means of nonlocal irreducible representations of the nonhomogeneous Poincare group and Dirac's method of quantization. As an example of application of this method we calculate triangle diagram Para-Positronium {yields} {gamma}{gamma}. We show that the Hamiltonian approach to Bound State in QED leads to <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-type contribution to creation of pair of parapositronium by two photon.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/677096','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/677096"><span id="translatedtitle">`t Hooft <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> matching for discrete symmetries</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Csaki, C.; Murayama, Hitoshi |</p> <p>1998-05-01</p> <p>The authors show how to extend the `t Hooft <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> matching conditions to discrete symmetries. They check these discrete anomally matching conditions on several proposed low-energy spectra of certain strongly interacting gauge theories. The excluded examples include the proposed chirally symmetric vacuum of pure N = 1 supersymmetric yang-Mills theories, certain non-supersymmetric confining theories and some self-dual N = 1 supersymmetric theories based on exceptional groups.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70012919','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70012919"><span id="translatedtitle">Remotely sensed limonite <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> on Lordsburg Mesa, New Mexico: possible implications for uranium deposits ( USA).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Raines, G.L.; Erdman, J.A.; McCarthy, J.H.; Reimer, G.M.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>We have identified a large, anomalously limonitic area in Cenozoic gravels on Lordsburg Mesa near Lordsburg, New Mexico, using Landsat images. Our interpretation of the geophysical and geochemical data <span class="hlt">suggests</span> the exploration hypothesis that the Lordsburg Mesa limonite <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is the surface expression of a chemical trap that may contain concentrations of uranium similar to calcrete-uranium deposits. -from Authors</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25391631','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25391631"><span id="translatedtitle">Thermal expansion <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> regulated by entropy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Liu, Zi-Kui; Wang, Yi; Shang, ShunLi</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Thermal expansion, defined as the temperature dependence of volume under constant pressure, is a common phenomenon in nature and originates from anharmonic lattice dynamics. However, it has been poorly understood how thermal expansion can show <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> such as colossal positive, zero, or negative thermal expansion (CPTE, ZTE, or NTE), especially in quantitative terms. Here we show that changes in configurational entropy due to metastable micro(scopic)states can lead to quantitative prediction of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. We integrate the Maxwell relation, statistic mechanics, and first-principles calculations to demonstrate that when the entropy is increased by pressure, NTE occurs such as in Invar alloy (Fe3Pt, for example), silicon, ice, and water, and when the entropy is decreased dramatically by pressure, CPTE is expected such as in anti-Invar cerium, ice and water. Our findings provide a theoretic framework to understand and predict a broad range of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in nature in addition to thermal expansion, which may include gigantic electrocaloric and electromechanical responses, anomalously reduced thermal conductivity, and spin distributions. PMID:25391631</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014NatSR...4E7043L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014NatSR...4E7043L"><span id="translatedtitle">Thermal Expansion <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Regulated by Entropy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Liu, Zi-Kui; Wang, Yi; Shang, Shunli</p> <p>2014-11-01</p> <p>Thermal expansion, defined as the temperature dependence of volume under constant pressure, is a common phenomenon in nature and originates from anharmonic lattice dynamics. However, it has been poorly understood how thermal expansion can show <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> such as colossal positive, zero, or negative thermal expansion (CPTE, ZTE, or NTE), especially in quantitative terms. Here we show that changes in configurational entropy due to metastable micro(scopic)states can lead to quantitative prediction of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. We integrate the Maxwell relation, statistic mechanics, and first-principles calculations to demonstrate that when the entropy is increased by pressure, NTE occurs such as in Invar alloy (Fe3Pt, for example), silicon, ice, and water, and when the entropy is decreased dramatically by pressure, CPTE is expected such as in anti-Invar cerium, ice and water. Our findings provide a theoretic framework to understand and predict a broad range of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in nature in addition to thermal expansion, which may include gigantic electrocaloric and electromechanical responses, anomalously reduced thermal conductivity, and spin distributions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21541643','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21541643"><span id="translatedtitle">Flavorful hybrid <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-gravity mediation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Gross, Christian; Hiller, Gudrun</p> <p>2011-05-01</p> <p>We consider supersymmetric models where <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and gravity mediation give comparable contributions to the soft terms and discuss how this can be realized in a five-dimensional brane world. The gaugino mass pattern of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> mediation is preserved in such a hybrid setup. The flavorful gravity-mediated contribution cures the tachyonic slepton problem of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> mediation. The supersymmetric flavor puzzle is solved by alignment. We explicitly show how a working flavor-tachyon link can be realized with Abelian flavor symmetries and give the characteristic signatures of the framework, including O(1) slepton mass splittings between different generations and between doublets and singlets. This provides opportunities for same flavor dilepton edge measurements with missing energy at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Rare lepton decay rates could be close to their current experimental limit. Compared to pure gravity mediation, the hybrid model is advantageous because it features a heavy gravitino which can avoid the cosmological gravitino problem of gravity-mediated models combined with leptogenesis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21010939','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21010939"><span id="translatedtitle">Deflected <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> mediation and neutralino dark matter</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Cesarini, Alessandro; Fucito, Francesco; Lionetto, Andrea</p> <p>2007-01-15</p> <p>This is a study of the phenomenology of the neutralino dark matter in the so called deflected <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> mediation scenario. This scheme is obtained from the minimal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-mediated scenario by introducing a gauge-mediated sector with N{sub f} messenger fields. Unlike the former scheme the latter has no tachyons. We find that the neutralino is still the LSP in a wide region of the parameter space: it is essentially a pure bino in the scenario with N{sub f}=1 while it can also be a pure Higgsino for N{sub f}>1. This is very different from the naive <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-mediated scenario which predicts a wino like neutralino. Moreover we do not find any tachyonic scalars in this scheme. After computing the relic density (considering all the possible coannihilations) we find that there are regions in the parameter space with values compatible with the latest WMAP results with no need to consider moduli fields that decay in the early universe.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20040034237','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20040034237"><span id="translatedtitle">CHAMP Magnetic <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> of the Antarctic Crust</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Kim, Hyung Rae; Gaya-Pique, Luis R.; vonFrese, Ralph R. B.; Taylor, Patrick T.; Kim, Jeong Woo</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Regional magnetic signals of the crust are strongly masked by the core field and its secular variations components and hence difficult to isolate in the satellite measurements. In particular, the un-modeled effects of the strong auroral external fields and the complicated- behavior of the core field near the geomagnetic poles conspire to greatly reduce the crustal magnetic signal-to-noise ratio in the polar regions relative to the rest of the Earth. We can, however, use spectral correlation theory to filter the static lithospheric and core field components from the dynamic external field effects. To help isolate regional lithospheric from core field components, the correlations between CHAMP magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the pseudo magnetic effects inferred from gravity-derived crustal thickness variations can also be exploited.. Employing these procedures, we processed the CHAMP magnetic observations for an improved magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map of the Antarctic crust. Relative to the much higher altitude Orsted and noisier Magsat observations, the CHAMP magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at 400 km altitude reveal new details on the effects of intracrustal magnetic features and crustal thickness variations of the Antarctic.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012NuPhB.862..430B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012NuPhB.862..430B"><span id="translatedtitle">Conformal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of super Wilson loop</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Belitsky, A. V.</p> <p>2012-09-01</p> <p>Classically supersymmetric Wilson loop on a null polygonal contour possesses all symmetries required to match it onto non-MHV amplitudes in maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. However, to define it quantum mechanically, one is forced to regularize it since perturbative loop diagrams are not well defined due to presence of ultraviolet divergences stemming from integration in the vicinity of the cusps. A regularization that is adopted by practitioners by allowing one to use spinor helicity formalism, on the one hand, and systematically go to higher orders of perturbation theory is based on a version of dimensional regularization, known as Four-Dimensional Helicity scheme. Recently it was demonstrated that its use for the super Wilson loop at one loop breaks both conformal symmetry and Poincaré supersymmetry. Presently, we exhibit the origin for these effects and demonstrate how one can undo this breaking. The phenomenon is alike the one emerging in renormalization group mixing of conformal operators in conformal theories when one uses dimensional regularization. The rotation matrix to the diagonal basis is found by means of computing the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the Ward identity for the conformal boost. Presently, we apply this ideology to the super Wilson loop. We compute the one-loop conformal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> for the super Wilson loop and find that the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> depends on its Grassmann coordinates. By subtracting this anomalous contribution from the super Wilson loop we restore its interpretation as a dual description for reduced non-MHV amplitudes which are expressed in terms of superconformal invariants.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25712419','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25712419"><span id="translatedtitle">Chiral <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and transport in Weyl metals.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Burkov, A A</p> <p>2015-03-25</p> <p>We present an overview of our recent work on transport phenomena in Weyl metals, which may be connected to their nontrivial topological properties, particularly to chiral <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. We argue that there are two basic phenomena, which are related to chiral <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in Weyl metals: anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and chiral magnetic effect (CME). While AHE is in principle present in any ferromagnetic metal, we demonstrate that a magnetic Weyl metal is distinguished from an ordinary ferromagnetic metal by the absence of the extrinsic and the Fermi surface part of the intrinsic contributions to the AHE, as long as the Fermi energy is sufficiently close to the Weyl nodes. The AHE in a Weyl metal is thus shown to be a purely intrinsic, universal property, fully determined by the location of the Weyl nodes in the first Brillouin zone. In other words, a ferromagnetic Weyl metal may be thought of as the only example of a ferromagnetic metal with a purely intrinsic AHE. We further develop a fully microscopic theory of diffusive magnetotransport in Weyl metals. We derive coupled diffusion equations for the total and axial (i.e. node-antisymmetric) charge densities and show that chiral <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> manifests as a magnetic-field-induced coupling between them. We demonstrate that an experimentally-observable consequence of CME in magnetotransport in Weyl metals is a quadratic negative magnetoresistance, which will dominate all other contributions to magnetoresistance under certain conditions and may be regarded as a smoking-gun transport characteristic, unique to Weyl metals. PMID:25712419</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JPCM...27k3201B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JPCM...27k3201B"><span id="translatedtitle">Chiral <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and transport in Weyl metals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Burkov, A. A.</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>We present an overview of our recent work on transport phenomena in Weyl metals, which may be connected to their nontrivial topological properties, particularly to chiral <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. We argue that there are two basic phenomena, which are related to chiral <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in Weyl metals: anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and chiral magnetic effect (CME). While AHE is in principle present in any ferromagnetic metal, we demonstrate that a magnetic Weyl metal is distinguished from an ordinary ferromagnetic metal by the absence of the extrinsic and the Fermi surface part of the intrinsic contributions to the AHE, as long as the Fermi energy is sufficiently close to the Weyl nodes. The AHE in a Weyl metal is thus shown to be a purely intrinsic, universal property, fully determined by the location of the Weyl nodes in the first Brillouin zone. In other words, a ferromagnetic Weyl metal may be thought of as the only example of a ferromagnetic metal with a purely intrinsic AHE. We further develop a fully microscopic theory of diffusive magnetotransport in Weyl metals. We derive coupled diffusion equations for the total and axial (i.e. node-antisymmetric) charge densities and show that chiral <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> manifests as a magnetic-field-induced coupling between them. We demonstrate that an experimentally-observable consequence of CME in magnetotransport in Weyl metals is a quadratic negative magnetoresistance, which will dominate all other contributions to magnetoresistance under certain conditions and may be regarded as a smoking-gun transport characteristic, unique to Weyl metals.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4229665','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4229665"><span id="translatedtitle">Thermal Expansion <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Regulated by Entropy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Liu, Zi-Kui; Wang, Yi; Shang, ShunLi</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Thermal expansion, defined as the temperature dependence of volume under constant pressure, is a common phenomenon in nature and originates from anharmonic lattice dynamics. However, it has been poorly understood how thermal expansion can show <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> such as colossal positive, zero, or negative thermal expansion (CPTE, ZTE, or NTE), especially in quantitative terms. Here we show that changes in configurational entropy due to metastable micro(scopic)states can lead to quantitative prediction of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. We integrate the Maxwell relation, statistic mechanics, and first-principles calculations to demonstrate that when the entropy is increased by pressure, NTE occurs such as in Invar alloy (Fe3Pt, for example), silicon, ice, and water, and when the entropy is decreased dramatically by pressure, CPTE is expected such as in anti-Invar cerium, ice and water. Our findings provide a theoretic framework to understand and predict a broad range of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in nature in addition to thermal expansion, which may include gigantic electrocaloric and electromechanical responses, anomalously reduced thermal conductivity, and spin distributions. PMID:25391631</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850023273&hterms=Map+drawing&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DMap%2Bdrawing','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850023273&hterms=Map+drawing&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DMap%2Bdrawing"><span id="translatedtitle">MAGSAT scalar <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map of South America</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Ridgway, J. R.; Hinze, W. J.; Braile, L. W.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>A scalar magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map was prepared for South America and adjacent marine areas directly from original MAGSAT orbits. The preparation of the map poses special problems, notably in the separation of external field and crustal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and in the reduction of data to a common altitude. External fields are manifested in a long-wavelength ring current effect, a medium-wavelength equatorial electrojet, and short-wavelength noise. The noise is reduced by selecting profiles from quiet periods, and since the electrojet is confined primarily to dusk profiles, its effect is minimized by drawing the data set from dawn profiles only. The ring current is corrected through the use of the standard ring current equation, augmented by further filtering with a Butterworth bandpass filter. Under the assumption that the time-variant ring current is best removed when a replication of redundant profiles is achieved, a test set of 25 groups of 3 nearly coincident orbits per group is set up for filtering with a range of long-wavelength cutoffs to determine which cutoff best replicates the residual profiles. Altitude differences are then normalized by an inversion of the profile data onto a grid of equivalent point dipoles, and recalculated at an altitude of 350 km. The resulting map, when compared to the 2 deg averaged map, shows more coherent <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, with notable differences in the region affected by the electrojet.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvD..93h4006A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvD..93h4006A"><span id="translatedtitle">Weyl <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and initial singularity crossing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Awad, Adel</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>We consider the role of quantum effects, mainly, Weyl <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in modifying Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) model singular behavior at early times. Weyl <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> corrections to FLRW models have been considered in the past, here we reconsider this model and show the following: The singularity of this model is weak according to Tipler and Krolak, therefore, the spacetime might admit a geodesic extension. Weyl <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> corrections change the nature of the initial singularity from a big bang singularity to a sudden singularity. The two branches of solutions consistent with the semiclassical treatment form a disconnected manifold. Joining these two parts at the singularity provides us with a C1 extension to nonspacelike geodesics and leaves the spacetime geodesically complete. Using Gauss-Codazzi equations one can derive generalized junction conditions for this higher-derivative gravity. The extended spacetime obeys Friedmann and Raychaudhuri equations and the junction conditions. The junction does not generate Dirac delta functions in matter sources which keeps the equation of state unchanged.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.P32C..04J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.P32C..04J"><span id="translatedtitle">Looking for Thermal <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> on Titan's Surface</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Janssen, M. A.; Le Gall, A.; Lopes, R. M.</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>A radiometric brightness map of Titan at 2-cm wavelength has been constructed from seven years worth of observations by the Cassini RADAR. To the extent that Titan's surface temperature distribution is known from a combination of Huygens probe, far infrared, and radio occultation measurements, this map can be used to construct a map of emissivity. This can in turn be compared with the radar reflectivity map, which now covers half of Titan at SAR resolution. Emissivity and reflectivity are related through Kirchhoff's law of thermal radiation. One can use this comparison to test the assumption that we indeed know Titan's surface physical temperature everywhere, noting that a possible thermal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> due to active cryovolcanism may be present that, if strong enough, would appear as an emissivity that is too high for the measured reflectivity. Thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> as small as a few degrees averaged over a radiometer footprint could be observed. The possible existence of such <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and their relation to surface features will be discussed. This work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUSM.H52A..07V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUSM.H52A..07V"><span id="translatedtitle">Oscillations, trends and <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in rainfall and air temperature in the principal cities in Bolivia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Villazon, M. F.</p> <p>2013-05-01</p> <p>Rainfall and temperature can be extremely variable in space and time especially in mountainous environment. The determination of climate variability and climate change needs a special assessment for water management. Increase our knowledge of the main climate trends in the region toward higher quality future climate determination is required. This research examines the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of observed monthly rainfall and temperature data from 4 stations located in the principal cities in Bolivia (see Table below). Trends and <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in quantiles were determined for each station for monthly and 6-month seasonal block periods (wet period and dry period). The results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> the presence of cycles rather than unidirectional trends. The Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) gives an indication of the development and intensity of El Niño or La Niña events in the Pacific Ocean. After determination of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for each of the stations, in both monthly rainfall and average temperature, together with the confidence intervals, comparison is made with the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> calculated in a similar way with data corresponding to the SOI. Comparison in cycles, shape and correlation has been performed between the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from the observation data and the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from the SOI with different time delay. The aim of this comparison is to identify the external influences of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in rainfall and temperature (Tele-connections). Influences have been identified during cycles of El Niño in the Andean zones La Paz, El Alto and Cochabamba dry cycles occur and in the most Amazonian side, Santa Cruz city, wet cycle is observed. This relation is opposite in La Niña periods.Meteorological stations under study;</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012MNRAS.420.1367L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012MNRAS.420.1367L"><span id="translatedtitle">Observations of HCN hyperfine line <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> towards low- and high-mass star-forming cores</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Loughnane, R. M.; Redman, M. P.; Thompson, M. A.; Lo, N.; O'Dwyer, B.; Cunningham, M. R.</p> <p>2012-02-01</p> <p>HCN is becoming a popular choice of molecule for studying star formation in both low- and high-mass regions and for other astrophysical sources from comets to high-redshift galaxies. However, a major and often overlooked difficulty with HCN is that it can exhibit dramatic non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) behaviour in its hyperfine line structure. Individual hyperfine lines can be strongly boosted or suppressed. In low-mass star-forming cloud observations, this could possibly lead to large errors in the calculation of opacity and excitation temperature, while in massive star-forming clouds, where the hyperfine lines are partially blended due to turbulent broadening, errors will arise in infall measurements that are based on the separation of the peaks in a self-absorbed profile. This is because the underlying line shape cannot be known for certain if hyperfine <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are present. We present a first observational investigation of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> across a wide range of conditions and transitions by carrying out a survey of low-mass starless cores (in Taurus and Ophiuchus) and high-mass protostellar objects (in the G333 giant molecular cloud) using hydrogen cyanide (HCN) ? and ? emission lines. We quantify the degree of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in these two rotational levels by considering ratios of individual hyperfine lines compared to LTE values. We find that all the cores observed demonstrate some degree of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> while many of the lines are severely anomalous. We conclude that HCN hyperfine <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are common in both lines in both low-mass and high-mass protostellar objects, and we discuss the differing hypotheses for the generation of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. In light of the results, we favour a line overlap effect for the origins of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. We discuss the implications for the use of HCN as a dynamical tracer and <span class="hlt">suggest</span> in particular that the ? hyperfine line should be avoided in quantitative calculations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..1711384A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..1711384A"><span id="translatedtitle">Interaction of Solar Wind and Magnetic <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> - Modelling from Moon to Mars</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Alho, Markku; Kallio, Esa; Wedlund, Cyril Simon; Wurz, Peter</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>The crustal magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on both the Moon and Mars strongly affect the local plasma environment. On the Moon, the impinging solar wind is decelerated or deflected when interacting with the magnetic field <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, visible in the lunar surface as energetic neutral atom (ENA) emissions or as reflected protons, and may play a part in the space weathering of the lunar soil. At Mars, the crustal magnetic fields have been shown to be associated with, e.g., enhanced electron scale heights and modified convection of ionospheric plasma, resulting in the plasma environment being dominated by crustal magnetic fields up to altitudes of 400km. Our previous modelling work <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that Hall currents are a dominant feature in a Moon-like magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> interaction at scales at or below the proton inertial length. In this work we study the solar wind interaction with magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and compare the plasma environments of a Moon-like <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> with a Mars-like <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> by introducing an ionosphere and an exosphere to probe the transition from an atmosphere-less <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> interaction to an ionospheric one. We utilize a 3D hybrid plasma model, in which ions are modelled as particles while electrons form a charge-neutralizing massless fluid. The hybrid model gives a full description of ion kinetics and associated plasma phenomena at the simulation region ranging from instabilities to possible reconnection. The model can thus be used to interpret both in-situ particle and field observations and remotely-sensed ENA emissions. A self-consistent ionosphere package for the model is additionally in development.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_25 --> <center> <div class="footer-extlink text-muted"><small>Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. 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