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Sample records for anomalous hollow electron

  1. Observations And Measurements of Anomalous Hollow Electron Beams in a Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.K.; Li, J.; Wu, J.; /SLAC

    2006-02-06

    Anomalous hollow electron beams have been recently observed in the Duke storage ring. With a single bunch beam in a lattice with a negative chromaticity, a hollow beam can be created. This beam consists of a solid core beam inside and a large ring beam outside. In this paper, we report the measurements of the hollow beam phenomenon, including its distinct image pattern and spectrum signature, and its evolution with time. By capturing the post-instability bursting beam, the hollow beam is a unique model system for studying transverse instabilities, in particular, the interplay of the wakefield and lattice nonlinearity. The hollow beam can also be used as a tool to study linear and nonlinear particle dynamics in the storage ring.

  2. Collimation with hollow electron beams.

    PubMed

    Stancari, G; Valishev, A; Annala, G; Kuznetsov, G; Shiltsev, V; Still, D A; Vorobiev, L G

    2011-08-19

    A novel concept of controlled halo removal for intense high-energy beams in storage rings and colliders is presented. It is based on the interaction of the circulating beam with a 5-keV, magnetically confined, pulsed hollow electron beam in a 2-m-long section of the ring. The electrons enclose the circulating beam, kicking halo particles transversely and leaving the beam core unperturbed. By acting as a tunable diffusion enhancer and not as a hard aperture limitation, the hollow electron beam collimator extends conventional collimation systems beyond the intensity limits imposed by tolerable losses. The concept was tested experimentally at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. The first results on the collimation of 980-GeV antiprotons are presented. PMID:21929171

  3. Hollow cathode lamp based Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Duo; Xue, Xiaobo; Shang, Haosen; Luo, Bin; Chen, Jingbiao; Guo, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF), which has acquired wide applications, is mainly limited to some gaseous elements and low melting-point metals before, for the restriction of the attainable atomic density. In conventional FADOF systems a high atomic density is usually achieved by thermal equilibrium at the saturated vapor pressure, hence for elements with high melting-points a high temperature is required. To avoid this restriction, we propose a scheme of FADOF based on the hollow cathode lamp (HCL), instead of atomic vapor cells. Experimental results in strontium atoms verified this scheme, where a transmission peak corresponding to the 88Sr (5s2)1S0 − (5s5p)1P1 transition (461 nm) is obtained, with a maximum transmittance of 62.5% and a bandwith of 1.19 GHz. The dependence of transmission on magnetic field and HCL discharge current is also studied. Since the state-of-art commercial HCLs cover about 70 elements, this scheme can greatly expand the applications of FADOFs, and the abundant atomic transitions they provide bring the HCL based FADOFs potential applications for frequency stabilization. PMID:27418112

  4. Hollow cathode lamp based Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Duo; Xue, Xiaobo; Shang, Haosen; Luo, Bin; Chen, Jingbiao; Guo, Hong

    2016-07-01

    The Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF), which has acquired wide applications, is mainly limited to some gaseous elements and low melting-point metals before, for the restriction of the attainable atomic density. In conventional FADOF systems a high atomic density is usually achieved by thermal equilibrium at the saturated vapor pressure, hence for elements with high melting-points a high temperature is required. To avoid this restriction, we propose a scheme of FADOF based on the hollow cathode lamp (HCL), instead of atomic vapor cells. Experimental results in strontium atoms verified this scheme, where a transmission peak corresponding to the 88Sr (5s2)1S0 ‑ (5s5p)1P1 transition (461 nm) is obtained, with a maximum transmittance of 62.5% and a bandwith of 1.19 GHz. The dependence of transmission on magnetic field and HCL discharge current is also studied. Since the state-of-art commercial HCLs cover about 70 elements, this scheme can greatly expand the applications of FADOFs, and the abundant atomic transitions they provide bring the HCL based FADOFs potential applications for frequency stabilization.

  5. Hollow cathode lamp based Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter.

    PubMed

    Pan, Duo; Xue, Xiaobo; Shang, Haosen; Luo, Bin; Chen, Jingbiao; Guo, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF), which has acquired wide applications, is mainly limited to some gaseous elements and low melting-point metals before, for the restriction of the attainable atomic density. In conventional FADOF systems a high atomic density is usually achieved by thermal equilibrium at the saturated vapor pressure, hence for elements with high melting-points a high temperature is required. To avoid this restriction, we propose a scheme of FADOF based on the hollow cathode lamp (HCL), instead of atomic vapor cells. Experimental results in strontium atoms verified this scheme, where a transmission peak corresponding to the (88)Sr (5s(2))(1)S0 - (5s5p)(1)P1 transition (461 nm) is obtained, with a maximum transmittance of 62.5% and a bandwith of 1.19 GHz. The dependence of transmission on magnetic field and HCL discharge current is also studied. Since the state-of-art commercial HCLs cover about 70 elements, this scheme can greatly expand the applications of FADOFs, and the abundant atomic transitions they provide bring the HCL based FADOFs potential applications for frequency stabilization. PMID:27418112

  6. Anomalous optogalvanic line shapes of argon metastable transitions in a hollow cathode lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruyten, W. M.

    1993-01-01

    Anomalous optogalvanic line shapes were observed in a commercial hollow cathode lamp containing argon buffer gas. Deviations from Gaussian line shapes were particularly strong for transitions originating from the 3P2 metastable level of argon. The anomalous line shapes can be described reasonably well by the assumption that two regions in the discharge are excited simultaneously, each giving rise to a purely Gaussian line shape, but with different polarities, amplitudes, and linewidths.

  7. Three dimensional simulation of the operation of a hollow cathode electron emitter on the Shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, V. A.; Katz, I.; Mandell, M. J.; Parks, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    Several researchers have suggested using hollow cathodes as plasma contactors for electrodynamic tethers, particularly to prevent the shuttle orbiter from charging to large negative potentials. Previous studies have shown that fluid models with anomalous scattering can describe the electron transport in hollow cathode generated plasmas. An improved theory of the hollow cathode plasmas is developed and computational results using the theory are compared with laboratory experiment. Numerical predictions for a hollow cathode plasma source of the type considered for use on the shuttle are presented as are three-dimensional NASCAP/LEO calculations of the emitted ion trajectories and the resulting potentials in the vicinity of the orbiter. The computer calculations show that the hollow cathode plasma source makes vastly superior contact with the ionospheric plasma compared with either an electron gun or passive ion collection by the orbiter.

  8. Hollow cathodes as electron emitting plasma contactors Theory and computer modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, V. A.; Katz, I.; Mandell, M. J.; Parks, D. E.

    1987-01-01

    Several researchers have suggested using hollow cathodes as plasma contactors for electrodynamic tethers, particularly to prevent the Shuttle Orbiter from charging to large negative potentials. Previous studies have shown that fluid models with anomalous scattering can describe the electron transport in hollow cathode generated plasmas. An improved theory of the hollow cathode plasmas is developed and computational results using the theory are compared with laboratory experiments. Numerical predictions for a hollow cathode plasma source of the type considered for use on the Shuttle are presented, as are three-dimensional NASCAP/LEO calculations of the emitted ion trajectories and the resulting potentials in the vicinity of the Orbiter. The computer calculations show that the hollow cathode plasma source makes vastly superior contact with the ionospheric plasma compared with either an electron gun or passive ion collection by the Orbiter.

  9. Electronic properties of Si hollow nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Di Mario, Lorenzo; Martelli, Faustino; Turchini, Stefano; Zema, Nicola; Cimino, Roberto

    2014-11-07

    The electronic and structural properties of amorphous and crystalline silicon hollow nanowires (HNWs) have been investigated by X-ray photoemission (XPS), Raman, and photoluminescence spectroscopies. The HNWs have an internal diameter of about 80 nm and sidewalls with a thickness of 8–15 nm. Crystalline HNWs are obtained by thermal annealing of the amorphous ones. XPS shows that although oxidation is a very important process in these suspended nanostructures, a clear Si 2p signal is detected in the crystalline HNWS, thus indicating that the sidewall surface maintains mainly a pure silicon nature. Raman shows that the thermal annealing gives rise to a very good crystal quality and a weak visible luminescence signal is detected in the crystalline HNWs.

  10. Development of hollow electron beams for proton and ion collimation

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, G.; Drozhdin, A.I.; Kuznetsov, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Still, D.A.; Valishev, A.; Vorobiev, L.G.; Assmann, R.; Kabantsev, A.; /UC, San Diego

    2010-06-01

    Magnetically confined hollow electron beams for controlled halo removal in high-energy colliders such as the Tevatron or the LHC may extend traditional collimation systems beyond the intensity limits imposed by tolerable material damage. They may also improve collimation performance by suppressing loss spikes due to beam jitter and by increasing capture efficiency. A hollow electron gun was designed and built. Its performance and stability were measured at the Fermilab test stand. The gun will be installed in one of the existing Tevatron electron lenses for preliminary tests of the hollow-beam collimator concept, addressing critical issues such as alignment and instabilities of the overlapping proton and electron beams.

  11. Anomalous electronic transport in boron carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emin, D.; Samara, G. A.; Wood, C.

    The boron carbides are composed of icosahedral units, B12 and B11C1, linked together by strong intericosahedral bonds. With such distributions of icosahedral and intericosahedral compositions, boron carbides, B/sub 1-x/C/sub x/, are single phase over 0.1 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 0.2. The electronic transport properties of the boron carbides were examined within this single-phase region. Results are inconsistent with conventional analyses of both itinerant and hopping transport. Most striking are Seebeck coefficients which are both large and rapidly increasing functions of temperature despite thermally activated dc conductivities. These results manifest the hopping of small bipolaronic holes between carbon-containing icosahedral that are inequivalent in energy and electron-lattice coupling strength. Under hydrostatic pressures up to approx. 25 kbar, the dc conductivities increase with pressure. This anomalous behavior for hopping conduction reflects the distinctive structure and bonding of these materials.

  12. Monodisperse Hollow Tricolor Pigment Particles for Electronic Paper

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A general approach has been designed to blue, green, and red pigments by metal ions doping hollow TiO 2. The reaction involves initial formation of PS at TiO2 core–shell nanoparticles via a mixed-solvent method, and then mixing with metal ions solution containing PEG, followed calcining in the atmosphere. The as-prepared hollow pigments exhibit uniform size, bright color, and tunable density, which are fit for electronic paper display. PMID:20651918

  13. Anomalous cross field electron transport in a Hall effect thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Boniface, C.; Garrigues, L.; Hagelaar, G. J. M.; Boeuf, J. P.; Gawron, D.; Mazouffre, S.

    2006-10-16

    The origin of anomalous electron transport across the magnetic field in the channel of a Hall effect thruster has been the subject of controversy, and the relative importance of electron-wall collisions and plasma turbulence on anomalous transport is not clear. From comparisons between Fabry-Perot measurements and hybrid model calculations of the ion velocity profile in a 5 kW Hall effect thruster, we deduce that one and the same mechanism is responsible for anomalous electron transport inside and outside the Hall effect thruster channel. This suggests that the previous assumption that Bohm anomalous conductivity is dominant outside the thruster channel whereas electron-wall conductivity prevails inside the channel is not valid.

  14. Anomalous confined electron states in graphene superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Anh Le, H.; Chien Nguyen, D.; Nam Do, V.

    2014-07-07

    We show that periodic scalar potentials can induce the localization of some electronic states in graphene. Particularly, localized states are found at energies outside the potential variation range and embedded in the continuum spectrum of delocalized ones. The picture of the connection of wave functions with typical symmetries defined in relevant-edge nanoribbons is employed to explain the formation of the electronic structure and to characterize/classify eigen-states in graphene superlattices.

  15. Modeling of anomalous electron mobility in Hall thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Koo, Justin W.; Boyd, Iain D.

    2006-03-15

    Accurate modeling of the anomalous electron mobility is absolutely critical for successful simulation of Hall thrusters. In this work, existing computational models for the anomalous electron mobility are used to simulate the UM/AFRL P5 Hall thruster (a 5 kW laboratory model) in a two-dimensional axisymmetric hybrid particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision code. Comparison to experimental results indicates that, while these computational models can be tuned to reproduce the correct thrust or discharge current, it is very difficult to match all integrated performance parameters (thrust, power, discharge current, etc.) simultaneously. Furthermore, multiple configurations of these computational models can produce reasonable integrated performance parameters. A semiempirical electron mobility profile is constructed from a combination of internal experimental data and modeling assumptions. This semiempirical electron mobility profile is used in the code and results in more accurate simulation of both the integrated performance parameters and the mean potential profile of the thruster. Results indicate that the anomalous electron mobility, while absolutely necessary in the near-field region, provides a substantially smaller contribution to the total electron mobility in the high Hall current region near the thruster exit plane.

  16. In situ conversion of nanostructures from solid to hollow in transmission electron microscopes using electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Mel, Abdel-Aziz; Bittencourt, Carla

    2016-05-01

    With the current development of electron beam sources, the use of transmission electron microscopes is no more limited to imaging or chemical analysis but has rather been extended to nanoengineering. This includes the e-beam induced growth, etching and structural transformation of nanomaterials. In this review we summarize recent progress on the e-beam induced morphological transformation of nanostructures from solid to hollow. We provide a detailed account of the processes reported so far in the literature with a special emphasis on the mechanistic understanding of the e-beam induced hollowing of nanomaterials. Through an important number of examples, we discuss how one can achieve a precise control of such hollowing processes by understanding the fundamental mechanisms occurring at the atomic scale during the irradiation of solid nanostructures. Finally, we conclude with remarks and our own view on the prospective future directions of this research field.

  17. In situ conversion of nanostructures from solid to hollow in transmission electron microscopes using electron beam.

    PubMed

    El Mel, Abdel-Aziz; Bittencourt, Carla

    2016-06-01

    With the current development of electron beam sources, the use of transmission electron microscopes is no more limited to imaging or chemical analysis but has rather been extended to nanoengineering. This includes the e-beam induced growth, etching and structural transformation of nanomaterials. In this review we summarize recent progress on the e-beam induced morphological transformation of nanostructures from solid to hollow. We provide a detailed account of the processes reported so far in the literature with a special emphasis on the mechanistic understanding of the e-beam induced hollowing of nanomaterials. Through an important number of examples, we discuss how one can achieve a precise control of such hollowing processes by understanding the fundamental mechanisms occurring at the atomic scale during the irradiation of solid nanostructures. Finally, we conclude with remarks and our own view on the prospective future directions of this research field. PMID:27172892

  18. Anomalous broadening of energy distributions in photoemitted electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidi, Vincenzo

    1996-06-01

    Photoemission is widely used to generate electron beams with an energy spread lower than by thermoemission. However, when a photocathode is illuminated by a multimode laser this feature is lost and an electron beam with several eV of energy spread is produced. We have developed an explanation for this anomalous behavior pointing out its origin in the combined effect of charge relaxation, taking place within the beam, together with the modulation of the laser power imposed by laser modes. The model permits a correct interpretation overall experimental evidences.

  19. Combinatorial approach to identify electronically cloaked hollow nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Wenqing; Tian, Tao; Liao, Bolin; Zebarjadi, Mona

    2014-08-01

    The possibility of designing core-shell nanoparticles that are "invisible" to the conduction electrons has been demonstrated recently. A total scattering cross section smaller than 0.01% of the physical cross section was demonstrated by artificially adjusting the parameters of the barrier and the well in a core-shell geometry. In this paper, we aim to extend the developed concept and find realistic material combinations that satisfy the cloaking criteria. We report designs of hollow nanoparticles that could be used to realize the cloaking concept in III-V semiconductor host matrices. Such particles could be used in advanced materials design to enhance and tune the electrical and the thermoelectric properties of a given host matrix. This paper may also contribute to defect engineering by coating defect sites with a proper cloaking layer.

  20. Effects of anomalous transport on lower hybrid electron heating

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, M.G.; Harvey, R.W.

    1981-02-01

    The transport of electron energy out of tokamaks is known to be far greater than that calculated using classical and neoclassical theory. However, low levels of non-axisymmetric magnetic field turbulence can couple the fast transport of electrons parallel to the magnetic field lines to radial transport, thus providing a plausible explanation for observed energy confinement. These models further predict that the electron loss rate is proportional to v/sub parallel bars/. This has subsequently been found to be consistent with data for runaway electrons in PLT, at energies up to 1 MeV. Recently it has been pointed out by Chan, Chiu and Ohkawa that anomalous transport processes should be taken into account in attempting to determine steady state electron distribution functions for cases involving RF electron tail heating, particularly in view of the v/sub parallel bars/ dependence of the loss rate. In this work these physical processes are modeled through a 2-D nonlinear program which describes the evolution of the electron distribution function in velocity magnitude; (v) and plasma radius (r), and which studies the efficiency of tail electron heating.

  1. Anomalous conductivity and secondary electron emission in Hall effect thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Garrigues, L.; Hagelaar, G. J. M.; Boniface, C.; Boeuf, J. P.

    2006-12-15

    This paper is devoted to the study of the effects of electron-wall interactions on cross magnetic field electron momentum and energy losses in Hall effect thrusters. By coupling a semianalytical model of the wall sheath similar to models used by several authors in this context, with a two-dimensional hybrid simulation of a Hall effect thruster, we find that the cross magnetic field conductivity enhanced by electron-wall collisions and secondary electron emission is not sufficient to explain the conductivity deduced from experiments. Calculated current-voltage curves including electron-wall collisions from a standard sheath model as the sole 'anomalous' conductivity mechanism do not reproduce the measurements, especially at high discharge voltages, and for various wall ceramics. Results also show that a one-dimensional description of electron-wall collisions with a constant radial plasma density profile as used by many authors leads to an overestimation of the contribution of electron-wall interactions to cross magnetic field conductivity.

  2. Anomalous Skin Effect for Anisotropic Electron Velocity Distribution Function

    SciTech Connect

    Igor Kaganovich; Edward Startsev; Gennady Shvets

    2004-02-19

    The anomalous skin effect in a plasma with a highly anisotropic electron velocity distribution function (EVDF) is very different from skin effect in a plasma with the isotropic EVDF. An analytical solution was derived for the electric field penetrated into plasma with the EVDF described as a Maxwellian with two temperatures Tx >> Tz, where x is the direction along the plasma boundary and z is the direction perpendicular to the plasma boundary. The skin layer was found to consist of two distinctive regions of width of order nTx/w and nTz/w, where nTx,z/w = (Tx,z/m)1/2 is the thermal electron velocity and w is the incident wave frequency.

  3. Anomalous electron mobility in a coaxial Hall discharge plasma.

    PubMed

    Meezan, N B; Hargus, W A; Cappelli, M A

    2001-02-01

    A comprehensive analysis of measurements supporting the presence of anomalous cross-field electron mobility in Hall plasma accelerators is presented. Nonintrusive laser-induced fluorescence measurements of neutral xenon and ionized xenon velocities, and various electrostatic probe diagnostic measurements are used to locally determine the effective electron Hall parameter inside the accelerator channel. These values are then compared to the classical (collision-driven) Hall parameters expected for a quiescent magnetized plasma. The results indicate that in the vicinity of the anode, where there are fewer plasma instabilities, the electron-transport mechanism is likely elastic collisions with the background neutral xenon. However, we find that in the vicinity of the discharge channel exit, where the magnetic field is the strongest and where there are intense fluctuations in the plasma properties, the inferred Hall parameter departs from the classical value, and is close to the Bohm value of (omega(ce)tau)(eff) approximately 16. These results are used to support a simple model for the Hall parameter that is based on the scalar addition of the electron collision frequencies (elastic collision induced plus fluctuation induced), as proposed by Boeuf and Garrigues [J. Appl. Phys. 84, 3541 (1998)]. The results also draw attention to the possible role of fluctuations in enhancing electron transport in regions where the electrons are highly magnetized. PMID:11308588

  4. The Electronic Properties of Superatom States of Hollow Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Min; Zhao, Jin; Huang, Tian; Zhu, Xiaoyang; Petek, Hrvoje

    2011-05-17

    Electronic and optical properties of molecules and molecular solids are traditionally considered from the perspective of the frontier orbitals and their intermolecular interactions. How molecules condense into crystalline solids, however, is mainly attributed to the long-range polarization interaction. In this Account, we show that long-range polarization also introduces a distinctive set of diffuse molecular electronic states, which in quantum structures or solids can combine into nearly-free-electron (NFE) bands. These NFE properties, which are usually associated with good metals, are vividly evident in sp2 hybridized carbon materials, specifically graphene and its derivatives. The polarization interaction is primarily manifested in the screening of an external charge at a solid/vacuum interface. It is responsible for the universal image potential and the associated unoccupied image potential (IP) states, which are observed even at the He liquid/vacuum interface. The molecular electronic properties that we describe are derived from the IP states of graphene, which float above and below the molecular plane and undergo free motion parallel to it. Rolling or wrapping a graphene sheet into a nanotube or a fullerene transforms the IP states into diffuse atom-like orbitals that are bound primarily to hollow molecular cores, rather than the component atoms. Therefore, we named them the superatom molecular orbitals (SAMOs). Like the excitonic states of semiconductor nanostructures or the plasmonic resonances of metallic nanoparticles, SAMOs of fullerene molecules, separated by their van der Waals distance, can combine to form diatomic molecule-like orbitals of C60 dimers. For larger aggregates, they form NFE bands of superatomic quantum structures and solids. The overlap of the diffuse SAMO wavefunctions in van der Waals solids provides a different paradigm for band formation than the valence or conduction bands formed by interaction of the more tightly bound

  5. Anomalous skin effects in a weakly magnetized degenerate electron plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, G.; Sarfraz, M.; Shah, H. A.

    2014-09-01

    Fully relativistic analysis of anomalous skin effects for parallel propagating waves in a weakly magnetized degenerate electron plasma is presented and a graphical comparison is made with the results obtained using relativistic Maxwellian distribution function [G. Abbas, M. F. Bashir, and G. Murtaza, Phys. Plasmas 18, 102115 (2011)]. It is found that the penetration depth for R- and L-waves for degenerate case is qualitatively small in comparison with the Maxwellian plasma case. The quantitative reduction due to weak magnetic field in the skin depth in R-wave for degenerate plasma is large as compared to the non-degenerate one. By ignoring the ambient magnetic field, previous results for degenerate field free case are salvaged [A. F. Alexandrov, A. S. Bogdankevich, and A. A. Rukhadze, Principles of Plasma Electrodynamics (Springer-Verlag, Berlin/Heidelberg, 1984), p. 90].

  6. Anomalous k⊥(-8/3) spectrum in electron magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Meyrand, Romain; Galtier, Sébastien

    2013-12-27

    Electron magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is investigated under the presence of a relatively strong external magnetic field b0e∥ and through three-dimensional direct numerical simulations. Our study reveals the emergence of a k⊥(-8/3) scaling for the magnetic energy spectrum at scales k∥(D)≤k⊥≤k⊥(D), where k∥(D) and k⊥(D) are, respectively, the typical largest dissipative scales along and transverse to the b0 direction. Unlike standard magnetohydrodynamic, this turbulence regime is characterized by filaments of electric currents parallel to b0. The anomalous scaling is in agreement with a heuristic model in which the transfer in the parallel direction is negligible. Implications for solar wind turbulence are discussed. PMID:24483798

  7. Anomalous skin effects in a weakly magnetized degenerate electron plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Abbas, G. Sarfraz, M.; Shah, H. A.

    2014-09-15

    Fully relativistic analysis of anomalous skin effects for parallel propagating waves in a weakly magnetized degenerate electron plasma is presented and a graphical comparison is made with the results obtained using relativistic Maxwellian distribution function [G. Abbas, M. F. Bashir, and G. Murtaza, Phys. Plasmas 18, 102115 (2011)]. It is found that the penetration depth for R- and L-waves for degenerate case is qualitatively small in comparison with the Maxwellian plasma case. The quantitative reduction due to weak magnetic field in the skin depth in R-wave for degenerate plasma is large as compared to the non-degenerate one. By ignoring the ambient magnetic field, previous results for degenerate field free case are salvaged [A. F. Alexandrov, A. S. Bogdankevich, and A. A. Rukhadze, Principles of Plasma Electrodynamics (Springer-Verlag, Berlin/Heidelberg, 1984), p. 90].

  8. Generation of anomalously energetic suprathermal electrons by an electron beam interacting with a nonuniform plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sydorenko, D.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Chen, L.; Ventzek, P. L. G.

    2015-12-15

    Generation of anomalously energetic suprathermal electrons was observed in simulation of a high-voltage dc discharge with electron emission from the cathode. An electron beam produced by the emission interacts with the nonuniform plasma in the discharge via a two-stream instability. The energy transfer from the beam to the plasma electrons is ensured by the plasma nonuniformity. The electron beam excites plasma waves whose wavelength and phase speed gradually decrease towards anode. The waves with short wavelength near the anode accelerate plasma bulk electrons to suprathermal energies. The sheath near the anode reflects some of the accelerated electrons back into the plasma. These electrons travel through the plasma, reflect near the cathode, and enter the accelerating area again but with a higher energy than before. Such particles are accelerated to energies much higher than after the first acceleration. This mechanism plays a role in explaining earlier experimental observations of energetic suprathermal electrons in similar discharges.

  9. Simulation of Hollow Electron Beam Collimation in the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, I.A.; Stancari, G.; Valishev, A.; Shatilov, D.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2012-05-01

    The concept of augmenting the conventional collimation system of high-energy storage rings with a hollow electron beam was successfully demonstrated in experiments at the Tevatron. A reliable numerical model is required for understanding particle dynamics in the presence of a hollow beam collimator. Several models were developed to describe imperfections of the electron beam profile and alignment. The features of the imperfections are estimated from electron beam profile measurements. Numerical simulations of halo removal rates are compared with experimental data taken at the Tevatron.

  10. Conceptual design of hollow electron lenses for beam halo control in the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, Giulio; Previtali, Valentina; Valishev, Alexander; Bruce, Roderik; Redaelli, Stefano; Rossi, Adriana; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen

    2014-06-26

    Collimation with hollow electron beams is a technique for halo control in high-power hadron beams. It is based on an electron beam (possibly pulsed or modulated in intensity) guided by strong axial magnetic fields which overlaps with the circulating beam in a short section of the ring. The concept was tested experimentally at the Fermilab Tevatron collider using a hollow electron gun installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses. We are proposing a conceptual design for applying this technique to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A prototype hollow electron gun for the LHC was built and tested. The expected performance of the hollow electron beam collimator was based on Tevatron experiments and on numerical tracking simulations. Halo removal rates and enhancements of halo diffusivity were estimated as a function of beam and lattice parameters. Proton beam core lifetimes and emittance growth rates were checked to ensure that undesired effects were suppressed. Hardware specifications were based on the Tevatron devices and on preliminary engineering integration studies in the LHC machine. Required resources and a possible timeline were also outlined, together with a brief discussion of alternative halo-removal schemes and of other possible uses of electron lenses to improve the performance of the LHC.

  11. Positron Acceleration by Plasma Wakefields Driven by a Hollow Electron Beam.

    PubMed

    Jain, Neeraj; Antonsen, T M; Palastro, J P

    2015-11-01

    A scheme for positron plasma wakefield acceleration using hollow or donut-shaped electron driver beams is studied. An annular-shaped, electron-free region forms around the hollow driver beam, creating a favorable region (longitudinal field is accelerating and transverse field is focusing) for positron acceleration. For Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET)-like parameters, the hollow beam driver produces accelerating gradients on the order of 10  GV/m. The accelerating gradient increases linearly with the total charge in the driver beam. Simulations show acceleration of a 23-GeV positron beam to 35.4 GeV with a maximum energy spread of 0.4% and very small emittance over a plasma length of 140 cm is possible. PMID:26588391

  12. Non-nuclear electron transport channels in hollow molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jin; Petek, Hrvoje

    2014-08-01

    Electron transport in inorganic semiconductors and metals occurs through delocalized bands formed by overlapping electron orbitals. Strong correlation of electronic wave functions with the ionic cores couples the electron and lattice motions, leading to efficient interaction and scattering that degrades coherent charge transport. By contrast, unoccupied electronic states at energies near the vacuum level with diffuse molecular orbitals may form nearly-free-electron bands with density maxima in non-nuclear interstitial voids, which are subject to weaker electron-phonon interaction. The position of such bands typically above the frontier orbitals, however, renders them unstable with respect to electronic interband relaxation and therefore unsuitable for charge transport. Through electronic-structure calculations, we engineer stable, non-nuclear, nearly-free-electron conduction channels in low-dimensional molecular materials by tailoring their electrostatic and polarization potentials. We propose quantum structures of graphane-derived Janus molecular sheets with spatially isolated conducting and insulating regions that potentially exhibit emergent electronic properties, as a paradigm for molecular-scale non-nuclear charge conductors; we also describe tuning of their electronic properties by application of external fields and calculate their electron-acoustic-phonon interaction.

  13. Turbulent anomalous transport and anisotropic electron heating in a return current system

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kuang Wu; Buechner, Joerg

    2011-02-15

    Anisotropic electron heating due to self-generated electromagnetic turbulences is observed in collisionless return current plasmas. The corresponding energy conversion, electron heating, and associated anomalous momentum transport are investigated by means of a two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation code. The return current model consists of two counterstreaming electron beams with different temperatures and a stationary ion background. First, a general multifluid dispersion analyzer is presented in a clear matrix form that allows to study electron streaming instabilities. The numerical simulation confirms the predicted electrostatic electron-electron acoustic instability. Generating electromagnetic waves, the system evolves into a nonlinear stage. As a result, the electron drifts are slowed down due to turbulence-induced anomalous momentum exchange. Localized electric and magnetic field fluctuations play major roles in the energy conversion. Perpendicular electron heating follows the growth of magnetic field perturbations and the slowing of the electron drifts. Parallel and perpendicular electron heating occurs at different time scales. It is shown that the longer lasting perpendicular electron heating is caused by preheated parallel electron flows. The deflection of the preheated parallel electron flows in the localized turbulences, which is essentially a two-dimensional effect, leads to perpendicular electron heating even after the saturation of parallel electron heating. We conclude that the self-generated magnetic turbulence dominates the anomalous transport process in the late stage of return current system evolution.

  14. Non-nuclear Electron Transport Channels in Hollow Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jin; Petek, Hrvoje

    2014-08-15

    Electron transport in inorganic semiconductors and metals occurs through delocalized bands formed by overlapping electron orbitals. Strong correlation of electronic wave functions with the ionic cores couples the electron and lattice motions, leading to efficient interaction and scattering that degrades coherent charge transport. By contrast, unoccupied electronic states at energies near the vacuum level with diffuse molecular orbitals may form nearly-free-electron bands with density maxima in non-nuclear interstitial voids, which are subject to weaker electron-phonon interaction. The position of such bands typically above the frontier orbitals, however, renders them unstable with respect to electronic interband relaxation and therefore unsuitable for charge transport. Through electronic-structure calculations, we engineer stable, non-nuclear, nearly-free-electron conduction channels in low-dimensional molecular materials by tailoring their electrostatic and polarization potentials. We propose quantum structures of graphane-derived Janus molecular sheets with spatially isolated conducting and insulating regions that potentially exhibit emergent electronic properties, as a paradigm for molecular-scale non-nuclear charge conductors; we also describe tuning of their electronic properties by application of external fields and calculate their electron–acoustic-phonon interaction.

  15. Plans for Deployment of Hollow Electron Lenses at the LHC for Enhanced Beam Collimation

    SciTech Connect

    Redaelli, S.; Bertarelli, A.; Bruce, R.; Perini, D.; Rossi, A.; Salvachua, B.; Stancari, G.; Valishev, A.

    2015-06-01

    Hollow electron lenses are considered as a possible means to improve the LHC beam collimation system, providing active control of halo diffusion rates and suppressing the population of transverse halos. After a very successful experience at the Tevatron, a conceptual design of a hollow e-lens optimized for the LHC was produced. Recent further studies have led to a mature preliminary technical design. In this paper, possible scenarios for the deployment of this technology at the LHC are elaborated in the context of the scheduled LHC long shutdowns until the full implementation of the HL-LHC upgrade in 2023. Possible setups of electron beam test stands at CERN and synergies with other relevant electron beam programmes are also discussed.

  16. Experimental study of magnetically confined hollow electron beams in the Tevatron as collimators for intense high-energy hadron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, G.; Annala, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Still, D.; Valishev, A.; Vorobiev, L.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Magnetically confined hollow electron beams for controlled halo removal in high-energy colliders such as the Tevatron or the LHC may extend traditional collimation systems beyond the intensity limits imposed by tolerable losses. They may also improve collimation performance by suppressing loss spikes due to beam jitter and by increasing capture efficiency. A hollow electron gun was designed and tested at Fermilab for this purpose. It was installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses in the summer of 2010. We present the results of the first experimental tests of the hollow-beam collimation concept on 980-GeV antiproton bunches in the Tevatron.

  17. Side-effects of the space charge field introduced by a hollow electron beam in the electron cooler of CSRm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Mei-Tang; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Mao, Li-Jun; Li, Jie; Ma, Xiao-Ming; Yan, Tai-Lai; Zheng, Wen-Heng; Zhao, He; Wu, Bo; Wang, Geng; Ruan, Shuang; Sha, Xiao-Ping

    2015-12-01

    An electron cooler is used to improve the quality of the ion beam in a synchrotron; however it also introduces a nonlinear electromagnetic field to the accelerator, which causes tune shift, tune spread and may drive resonances leading to ion beam loss. In this paper the tune shift and the tune spread caused by the nonlinear electromagnetic field of a hollow electron beam is investigated, and the resonance driving terms of the nonlinear electromagnetic field are analysed. The differences are presented compared with a solid electron beam. Calculations are performed for 238U32+ ions of energy 1.272 MeV stored in the main Cooler Storage Ring (CSRm) at the Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou. It is found that in this situation the nonlinear field caused by the hollow electron beam does not lead to serious resonances. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375245)

  18. Development of a New Generation of Coolers with a Hollow Electron Beam and Electrostatic Bending

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhomchuk, V. V.

    2006-03-20

    The basic features and design of a new generation coolers made for CSRm,CSRe (Lanzhow, IMP) and for LEIR (Geneva, CERN) will discussed. The hollow profile electron beam help suppress recombination at the accumulation zone. The low electron beam density at the core of the intensive ion beam decrease the amplitude coherent electron-ion beam oscillations (so called electron heating effect). The electrostatic bending made the recuperation loss electron beam current less then 1 mkA for 1-2 Amp the main electron beam current. Decreasing out gassing by the electrons desorption the vacuum chamber cooler open perspective for obtain the high vacuum at cooler on level 1E-12 Torr (for LEIR cooler)

  19. Anomalous electron-ion energy coupling in electron drift wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lei

    Turbulence is a ubiquitous phenomenon in nature, and it is well known that turbulence couples energy input to dissipation by cascade processes. Plasma turbulence play a critical role in tokamak confinement. Magnetized plasma turbulence is quasi 2D, anisotropic, wave like and two fluid (i.e. electrons and ions) in structure. Thus, weakly collisional plasma turbulence can mediate electron and ion energy transfer. The issue of anomalous electron and ion energy coupling is particularly important for low collisionality, electron heated plasmas, such as ITER. In this work, we reconsider the classic problem of turbulent heating and energy transfer pathways in drift wave turbulence. The total turbulent heating, composed of quasilinear electron cooling, quasilinear ion heating, nonlinear ion heating and zonal flow frictional heating, is analyzed. In Chapter 2, the electron and ion energy exchange via linear wave and particle resonance will be computed. To address net heating, we show the turbulent heating in an annulus arises due to a wave energy flux differential across this region. We show this net heating is proportional to the Reynolds work on the zonal flow. Zonal flow friction heats ions, thus the turbulence and zonal flow interaction enters as an important energy transfer channel. Since zonal flows are nonlinearly generated, it follows that we should apply weak turbulence theory to calculate the nonlinear ion turbulent heating via the virtual mode resonance in the electron drift wave turbulence, which will be discussed in Chapter 3. We defines a new collisionless turbulent energy transfer channel through nonlinear Landau damping in the electron and ion energy coupling process. The result shows that nonlinear ion heating can exceed quasilinear ion heating, so that nonlinear heating becomes the principal collisionless wave energy dissipation channel in electron drift wave turbulence. This follows since the beat mode resonates with the bulk of the ion distribution, in

  20. Intrashell Electron Interaction Mediated Photoformation of Hollow Atoms near Threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Houtari, S.; Kao, C.; Hamalainen, K.; Diamant, R.; Sharon, R.; Deutsch, M.

    2008-07-25

    Double photoionization (DPI) of an atom by a single photon is a direct consequence of electron-electron interactions within the atom. We have measured the evolution of the K-shell DPI from threshold up in transition metals by high-resolution x-ray emission spectroscopy of the K{sup h}a hypersatellites, photoexcited by monochromatized synchrotron radiation. The measured evolution of the single-to-double photoionization cross-section ratio with excitation energy was found to be universal. Theoretical fits suggest that near threshold DPI is predominantly a semiclassical knockout effect, rather than the purely quantum-mechanical shake-off observed at the infinite photon energy limit.

  1. Extraction of a steady state electron beam from HCD (hollow cathode discharge) plasmas for EBIS (electron beam ion source) applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, A.; Kovarik, V.; Prelec, K.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments to extract high brightness electron beams from hollow cathode discharge plasmas are now in progress. A unique feature of these plasmas, which in principle can facilitate the extraction of large current low emittance electron beams, is the existence of a relatively high energy electron population with a very narrow energy spread. This electron population was identified in a self-extraction experiment, which yielded a 35 eV, 600 mA electron beam with parallel energy spread of less than 0.5 eV. Preliminary, crude application of 2.5 kV extraction voltage yielded a steady state electron beam current of 1.2 A. The end result of this endeavor would be an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) with an electron beam current of 6 A. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Observation of New Hollow States of Li^+ in High-Resolution Electron-Spectroscopy Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, S.; Cubaynes, D.; Bizau, J.-M.; Wuilleumier, F. J.; Mosnier, J.-P.; Kennedy, E. T.

    1998-05-01

    Using the synchrotron radiation emitted by the Super-ACO storage ring in Orsay and an electron spectrometer with decelerating optics, we have observed new highly-excited (2l,3l') and (2l, 4l'') hollow states of the singly-charged lithium ion. They were observed in the second step of the autoionization decay of atomic hollow states created by photoexcitation of lithium atoms at excitation energies below the triple-ionization potential (203 eV), and after direct ionization into the continuum at photon energies above 203 eV . We have measured the energies and widths of the new states, and found that they are in excellent agreement with theoretical calculations by K. T. Chung using the saddle point approximation.

  3. FEL indulators with the hollow-ring electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Epp, V.; Bordovitsyn, V.; Kozhevnikov, A.

    1995-12-31

    A conceptual design of undulators with a modulated longitudinal magnetic field is proposed. The magnetic field is created by use of a solenoid with axis coincident with the electron beam axis. In order to modulate the magnetic field we propose an insertion of a row of alternating ferromagnetic and superconducting diaphragms in line with electron beam. The simulation of two-dimensional distribution of the magnetic field in the plane containing undulator axis was made using the computer code {open_quotes}Mermaid{close_quotes}. The magnetic field was analysed as a function of the system geometry. The dependence on the spacing l between superconducting diaphragms, inner a and outer b radii of the last ones is investigated. Two versions of the device are considered: with ferromagnetic rings made of magnetically soft material placed between the superconducting diaphragms and without them. It is shown that the field modulation depth increases with ratio of b/l and can exceed 50% in case of the ferromagnetic insertions. An approximate analytical calculation of the magnetic field distribution is performed as follows. The axial-symmetrical magnetic field can be defined by the vector potential with only one nonzero component A(r,{phi}) where r and {phi} are the cylindrical coordinates. The solution of the Laplace`s equation is found under the assumption that the magnetic field is infinitely extended and periodic along the z-axis. The boundary conditions are defined by the undulator design. The result is used for the calculation of the particle dynamics and for the investigations of the trajectory stability. The spectral and angular distribution of the radiation emitted from the described systems is found. The estimations show that the proposed design allows to create relatively high magnitude of the magnetic field (up to 1 T) with a short period about 1 cm or less.

  4. Numerical simulation of the creation of a hollow neutral-hydrogen channel by an electron beam.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, V V; Antsiferov, P S; Koshelev, K N; Akdim, M R; Bijkerk, F

    2006-11-17

    An experimental method is proposed for the creation of plasma optical waveguides at low electron densities. The method consists of creating a hollow neutral-hydrogen channel by means of fast local heating of a hydrogen volume by a needlelike electron beam, followed by laser ionization of the hydrogen to provide the plasma waveguide. Results of numerical simulations are presented which show that guiding with an axial electron density in the range of 10(17) cm-3 can be achieved with a matched spot size of 30 microm. Its application for laser wakefield acceleration of electrons is discussed. The method would enable guiding lengths up to 30 cm at maximal energies of accelerated electrons in the range 10-100 GeV. PMID:17155692

  5. Anomalous electronic structure and magnetoresistance in TaAs2.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yongkang; McDonald, R D; Rosa, P F S; Scott, B; Wakeham, N; Ghimire, N J; Bauer, E D; Thompson, J D; Ronning, F

    2016-01-01

    The change in resistance of a material in a magnetic field reflects its electronic state. In metals with weakly- or non-interacting electrons, the resistance typically increases upon the application of a magnetic field. In contrast, negative magnetoresistance may appear under some circumstances, e.g., in metals with anisotropic Fermi surfaces or with spin-disorder scattering and semimetals with Dirac or Weyl electronic structures. Here we show that the non-magnetic semimetal TaAs2 possesses a very large negative magnetoresistance, with an unknown scattering mechanism. Density functional calculations find that TaAs2 is a new topological semimetal [ℤ2 invariant (0;111)] without Dirac dispersion, demonstrating that a negative magnetoresistance in non-magnetic semimetals cannot be attributed uniquely to the Adler-Bell-Jackiw chiral anomaly of bulk Dirac/Weyl fermions. PMID:27271852

  6. Anomalous electronic structure and magnetoresistance in TaAs2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yongkang; McDonald, R. D.; Rosa, P. F. S.; Scott, B.; Wakeham, N.; Ghimire, N. J.; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Ronning, F.

    2016-06-01

    The change in resistance of a material in a magnetic field reflects its electronic state. In metals with weakly- or non-interacting electrons, the resistance typically increases upon the application of a magnetic field. In contrast, negative magnetoresistance may appear under some circumstances, e.g., in metals with anisotropic Fermi surfaces or with spin-disorder scattering and semimetals with Dirac or Weyl electronic structures. Here we show that the non-magnetic semimetal TaAs2 possesses a very large negative magnetoresistance, with an unknown scattering mechanism. Density functional calculations find that TaAs2 is a new topological semimetal [ℤ2 invariant (0;111)] without Dirac dispersion, demonstrating that a negative magnetoresistance in non-magnetic semimetals cannot be attributed uniquely to the Adler-Bell-Jackiw chiral anomaly of bulk Dirac/Weyl fermions.

  7. Anomalous electronic structure and magnetoresistance in TaAs2

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yongkang; McDonald, R. D.; Rosa, P. F. S.; Scott, B.; Wakeham, N.; Ghimire, N. J.; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Ronning, F.

    2016-01-01

    The change in resistance of a material in a magnetic field reflects its electronic state. In metals with weakly- or non-interacting electrons, the resistance typically increases upon the application of a magnetic field. In contrast, negative magnetoresistance may appear under some circumstances, e.g., in metals with anisotropic Fermi surfaces or with spin-disorder scattering and semimetals with Dirac or Weyl electronic structures. Here we show that the non-magnetic semimetal TaAs2 possesses a very large negative magnetoresistance, with an unknown scattering mechanism. Density functional calculations find that TaAs2 is a new topological semimetal [ℤ2 invariant (0;111)] without Dirac dispersion, demonstrating that a negative magnetoresistance in non-magnetic semimetals cannot be attributed uniquely to the Adler-Bell-Jackiw chiral anomaly of bulk Dirac/Weyl fermions. PMID:27271852

  8. Anomalous electronic structure and magnetoresistance in TaAs2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Luo, Yongkang; McDonald, R. D.; Rosa, P. F. S.; Scott, B.; Wakeham, N.; Ghimire, N. J.; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Ronning, F.

    2016-01-01

    We report that the change in resistance of a material in a magnetic field reflects its electronic state. In metals with weakly- or non-interacting electrons, the resistance typically increases upon the application of a magnetic field. In contrast, negative magnetoresistance may appear under some circumstances, e.g., in metals with anisotropic Fermi surfaces or with spin-disorder scattering and semimetals with Dirac or Weyl electronic structures. Here we show that the non-magnetic semimetal TaAs2 possesses a very large negative magnetoresistance, with an unknown scattering mechanism. In conclusion, density functional calculations find that TaAs2 is a new topological semimetal [Z2 invariant (0;111)] withoutmore » Dirac dispersion, demonstrating that a negative magnetoresistance in non-magnetic semimetals cannot be attributed uniquely to the Adler-Bell-Jackiw chiral anomaly of bulk Dirac/Weyl fermions.« less

  9. Anomalous Electronic Anisotropy Triggered by Ferroelastic Coupling in Multiferroic Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Ju, Changcheng; Yang, Jan-Chi; Luo, Cheng; Shafer, Padraic; Liu, Heng-Jui; Huang, Yen-Lin; Kuo, Ho-Hung; Xue, Fei; Luo, Chih-Wei; He, Qing; Yu, Pu; Arenholz, Elke; Chen, Long-Qing; Zhu, Jinsong; Lu, Xiaomei; Chu, Ying-Hao

    2016-02-01

    The ferroelastic strain coupling in multiferroic heterostructures is explored aiming at novel physical effects and fascinating functionality. Ferroelastic domain walls in manganites induced by a stripe BiFeO3 template can modulate the electronic transfer and sufficiently block the magnetic ordering, creating a vast anisotropy. The findings suggest the great importance of ferroelastic strain engineering in material modifications. PMID:26640119

  10. Acceleration and evolution of a hollow electron beam in wakefields driven by a Laguerre-Gaussian laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guo-Bo; Chen, Min; Schroeder, C. B.; Luo, Ji; Zeng, Ming; Li, Fei-Yu; Yu, Lu-Le; Weng, Su-Ming; Ma, Yan-Yun; Yu, Tong-Pu; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Esarey, E.

    2016-03-01

    We show that a ring-shaped hollow electron beam can be injected and accelerated by using a Laguerre-Gaussian laser pulse and ionization-induced injection in a laser wakefield accelerator. The acceleration and evolution of such a hollow, relativistic electron beam are investigated through three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. We find that both the ring size and the beam thickness oscillate during the acceleration. The beam azimuthal shape is angularly dependent and evolves during the acceleration. The beam ellipticity changes resulting from the electron angular momenta obtained from the drive laser pulse and the focusing forces from the wakefield. The dependence of beam ring radius on the laser-plasma parameters (e.g., laser intensity, focal size, and plasma density) is studied. Such a hollow electron beam may have potential applications for accelerating and collimating positively charged particles.

  11. Hollow Cone Electron Imaging for Single Particle 3D Reconstruction of Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Chun-Ying; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Lobato, Ivan; van Dyck, Dirk; Chen, Fu-Rong

    2016-06-01

    The main bottlenecks for high-resolution biological imaging in electron microscopy are radiation sensitivity and low contrast. The phase contrast at low spatial frequencies can be enhanced by using a large defocus but this strongly reduces the resolution. Recently, phase plates have been developed to enhance the contrast at small defocus but electrical charging remains a problem. Single particle cryo-electron microscopy is mostly used to minimize the radiation damage and to enhance the resolution of the 3D reconstructions but it requires averaging images of a massive number of individual particles. Here we present a new route to achieve the same goals by hollow cone dark field imaging using thermal diffuse scattered electrons giving about a 4 times contrast increase as compared to bright field imaging. We demonstrate the 3D reconstruction of a stained GroEL particle can yield about 13.5 Å resolution but using a strongly reduced number of images.

  12. Hollow Cone Electron Imaging for Single Particle 3D Reconstruction of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chun-Ying; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Lobato, Ivan; Van Dyck, Dirk; Chen, Fu-Rong

    2016-01-01

    The main bottlenecks for high-resolution biological imaging in electron microscopy are radiation sensitivity and low contrast. The phase contrast at low spatial frequencies can be enhanced by using a large defocus but this strongly reduces the resolution. Recently, phase plates have been developed to enhance the contrast at small defocus but electrical charging remains a problem. Single particle cryo-electron microscopy is mostly used to minimize the radiation damage and to enhance the resolution of the 3D reconstructions but it requires averaging images of a massive number of individual particles. Here we present a new route to achieve the same goals by hollow cone dark field imaging using thermal diffuse scattered electrons giving about a 4 times contrast increase as compared to bright field imaging. We demonstrate the 3D reconstruction of a stained GroEL particle can yield about 13.5 Å resolution but using a strongly reduced number of images. PMID:27292544

  13. Hollow Cone Electron Imaging for Single Particle 3D Reconstruction of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chun-Ying; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Lobato, Ivan; Van Dyck, Dirk; Chen, Fu-Rong

    2016-01-01

    The main bottlenecks for high-resolution biological imaging in electron microscopy are radiation sensitivity and low contrast. The phase contrast at low spatial frequencies can be enhanced by using a large defocus but this strongly reduces the resolution. Recently, phase plates have been developed to enhance the contrast at small defocus but electrical charging remains a problem. Single particle cryo-electron microscopy is mostly used to minimize the radiation damage and to enhance the resolution of the 3D reconstructions but it requires averaging images of a massive number of individual particles. Here we present a new route to achieve the same goals by hollow cone dark field imaging using thermal diffuse scattered electrons giving about a 4 times contrast increase as compared to bright field imaging. We demonstrate the 3D reconstruction of a stained GroEL particle can yield about 13.5 Å resolution but using a strongly reduced number of images. PMID:27292544

  14. Controlling hollow relativistic electron beam orbits with an inductive current divider

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Richardson, A. S.; Angus, J. R.; Cooperstein, G.; Hinshelwood, D. D.; Ottinger, P. F.; Rittersdorf, I. M.; Schumer, J. W.; Weber, B. V.; Zier, J. C.

    2015-02-06

    A passive method for controlling the trajectory of an intense, hollow electron beam is proposed using a vacuum structure that inductively splits the beam's return current. A central post carries a portion of the return current (I1), while the outer conductor carries the remainder (I2). An envelope equation appropriate for a hollow electron beam is derived and applied to the current divider. The force on the beam trajectory is shown to be proportional to (I2-I1), while the average force on the envelope (the beam width) is proportional to the beam current Ib = (I2 + I1). The values of I1 and I2 depend on the inductances in the return-current path geometries. Proper choice of the return-current geometries determines these inductances and offers control over the beam trajectory. As a result, solutions using realistic beam parameters show that, for appropriate choices of the return-current-path geometry, the inductive current divider can produce a beam that is both pinched and straightened so that it approaches a target at near-normal incidence with a beam diameter that is on the order of a few mm.

  15. Controlling hollow relativistic electron beam orbits with an inductive current divider

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Richardson, A. S.; Angus, J. R.; Cooperstein, G.; Hinshelwood, D. D.; Ottinger, P. F.; Rittersdorf, I. M.; Schumer, J. W.; Weber, B. V.; Zier, J. C.

    2015-02-06

    A passive method for controlling the trajectory of an intense, hollow electron beam is proposed using a vacuum structure that inductively splits the beam's return current. A central post carries a portion of the return current (I1), while the outer conductor carries the remainder (I2). An envelope equation appropriate for a hollow electron beam is derived and applied to the current divider. The force on the beam trajectory is shown to be proportional to (I2-I1), while the average force on the envelope (the beam width) is proportional to the beam current Ib = (I2 + I1). The values of I1more » and I2 depend on the inductances in the return-current path geometries. Proper choice of the return-current geometries determines these inductances and offers control over the beam trajectory. As a result, solutions using realistic beam parameters show that, for appropriate choices of the return-current-path geometry, the inductive current divider can produce a beam that is both pinched and straightened so that it approaches a target at near-normal incidence with a beam diameter that is on the order of a few mm.« less

  16. Controlling hollow relativistic electron beam orbits with an inductive current divider

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Richardson, A. S.; Angus, J. R.; Cooperstein, G.; Hinshelwood, D. D.; Ottinger, P. F.; Rittersdorf, I. M.; Schumer, J. W.; Weber, B. V.; Zier, J. C.

    2015-02-15

    A passive method for controlling the trajectory of an intense, hollow electron beam is proposed using a vacuum structure that inductively splits the beam's return current. A central post carries a portion of the return current (I{sub 1}), while the outer conductor carries the remainder (I{sub 2}). An envelope equation appropriate for a hollow electron beam is derived and applied to the current divider. The force on the beam trajectory is shown to be proportional to (I{sub 2}-I{sub 1}), while the average force on the envelope (the beam width) is proportional to the beam current I{sub b} = (I{sub 2} + I{sub 1}). The values of I{sub 1} and I{sub 2} depend on the inductances in the return-current path geometries. Proper choice of the return-current geometries determines these inductances and offers control over the beam trajectory. Solutions using realistic beam parameters show that, for appropriate choices of the return-current-path geometry, the inductive current divider can produce a beam that is both pinched and straightened so that it approaches a target at near-normal incidence with a beam diameter that is on the order of a few mm.

  17. Visible light photocatalysis and electron emission from porous hollow spherical BiVO4 nanostructures synthesized by a novel route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Subrata; Chattopadhyay, K. K.

    2014-04-01

    Hollow spheres of BiVO4, made of pyramid like nanocrystals have been synthesized in an aqueous medium through a precursor solution mediated growth method with appropriate amount of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). It was found that concentration of PVA in the precursor solution played a crucial role in determining the morphology of the product. Hollow spherical BiVO4 was formed with PVA concentration of 64 mg/mL in the precursor solution while with 32 mg/mL PVA concentration mixed morphology of hollow spherical and cubical structure was formed. Without adding PVA, only cubical (bulk like) BiVO4 powder was obtained. The structures have been characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Fourier-transformed infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, thermogravimetry analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). As-prepared hollow spherical BiVO4 samples were having monoclinic structure with energy band gap 2.42 eV. The hollow spherical BiVO4 exhibited excellent visible-light-driven photocatalytic efficiency for degrading N,N,N‧,N‧-tetraethylated rhodamine (RhB) organic dye, which was nearly 13 times efficient than that of the samples prepared by the same method but without PVA in the precursor solution. After five recycles, the hollow spherical BiVO4 catalyst did not exhibit any significant loss of photocatalytic activity, confirming the photocatalyst is essentially stable. The BiVO4 hollow spheres also exhibited electron field emission indicating that BiVO4 with tailored morphology can be used as a multi-functional material.

  18. Anomalous Coulomb Drag in Electron-Hole Bilayers due to the Formation of Excitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimkin, Dmitry K.; Galitski, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Several recent experiments have reported an anomalous temperature dependence of the Coulomb drag effect in electron-hole bilayers. Motivated by these puzzling data, we study theoretically a low-density electron-hole bilayer, where electrons and holes avoid quantum degeneracy by forming excitons. We describe the ionization-recombination crossover between the electron-hole plasma and exciton gas and calculate both the intralayer and drag resistivity as a function of temperature. The latter exhibits a minimum followed by a sharp upturn at low temperatures, in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations [see, e.g., J. A. Seamons et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 026804 (2009)]. Importantly, the drag resistivity in the proposed scenario is found to be rather insensitive to a mismatch in electron and hole concentrations, in sharp contrast to the scenario of electron-hole Cooper pairing.

  19. Electrons on a spherical surface: Physical properties and hollow spherical clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cricchio, Dario; Fiordilino, Emilio; Persico, Franco

    2012-07-01

    We discuss the physical properties of a noninteracting electron gas constrained to a spherical surface. In particular we consider its chemical potentials, its ionization potential, and its electric static polarizability. All these properties are discussed analytically as functions of the number N of electrons. The trends obtained with increasing N are compared with those of the corresponding properties experimentally measured or theoretically evaluated for quasispherical hollow atomic and molecular clusters. Most of the properties investigated display similar trends, characterized by a prominence of shell effects. This leads to the definition of a scale-invariant distribution of magic numbers which follows a power law with critical exponent -0.5. We conclude that our completely mechanistic and analytically tractable model can be useful for the analysis of self-assembling complex systems.

  20. High contrast hollow-cone dark field transmission electron microscopy for nanocrystalline grain size quantification.

    PubMed

    Yao, Bo; Sun, Tik; Warren, Andrew; Heinrich, Helge; Barmak, Katayun; Coffey, Kevin R

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we describe hollow-cone dark field (HCDF) transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging, with a slightly convergent beam, as an improved technique that is suitable to form high contrast micrographs for nanocrystalline grain size quantification. We also examine the various factors that influence the HCDF TEM image quality, including the conditions of microscopy (alignment, focus and objective aperture size), the properties of the materials imaged (e.g., atomic number, strain, defects), and the characteristics of the TEM sample itself (e.g., thickness, ion milling artifacts). Sample preparation was found to be critical and an initial thinning by wet etching of the substrate (for thin film samples) or tripod polishing (for bulk samples), followed by low-angle ion milling was found to be the preferred approach for preparing high-quality electron transparent samples for HCDF imaging. PMID:20018512

  1. Nonperturbative renormalization and the electron{close_quote}s anomalous moment in large-{alpha} QED

    SciTech Connect

    Hiller, J.R.; Brodsky, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    We study the physical electron in quantum electrodynamics expanded on the light-cone Fock space in order to address two problems: (1) the physics of the electron{close_quote}s anomalous magnetic moment a{sub e} in nonperturbative QED and (2) the practical problems of ultraviolet regularization and renormalization in truncated nonperturbative light-cone Hamiltonian theory. We present results for a{sub e} computed in a light-cone gauge Fock space truncated to include one bare electron and at most two photons, i.e., up to two photons in flight. The calculational scheme uses an invariant mass cutoff, discretized light-cone quantization (DLCQ), a Tamm-Dancoff truncation of the Fock space, and a photon mass regulator. We introduce new weighting methods which greatly improve convergence to the continuum within DLCQ. Nonperturbative renormalization of the coupling and electron mass are carried out, and a limit on the magnitude of the effective physical coupling strength is computed. A large renormalized coupling strength {alpha}{sub R}=0.1 is then used to make the nonperturbative effects in the electron anomalous moment from the one-electron, two-photon Fock state sector numerically detectable. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Electron Anomalous Magnetic Moment in Basis Light-Front Quantization Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xingbo; Honkanen, Heli; Maris, Pieter; Vary, James P.; Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2012-02-17

    We apply the Basis Light-Front Quantization (BLFQ) approach to the Hamiltonian field theory of Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) in free space. We solve for the mass eigenstates corresponding to an electron interacting with a single photon in light-front gauge. Based on the resulting non-perturbative ground state light-front amplitude we evaluate the electron anomalous magnetic moment. The numerical results from extrapolating to the infinite basis limit reproduce the perturbative Schwinger result with relative deviation less than 1.2%. We report significant improvements over previous works including the development of analytic methods for evaluating the vertex matrix elements of QED.

  3. Anomalous giant piezoresistance in AlAs 2D electron systems with antidot lattices.

    PubMed

    Gunawan, O; Gokmen, T; Shkolnikov, Y P; De Poortere, E P; Shayegan, M

    2008-01-25

    An AlAs two-dimensional electron system patterned with an antidot lattice exhibits a giant piezoresistance effect at low temperatures, with a sign opposite to the piezoresistance observed in the unpatterned region. We suggest that the origin of this anomalous giant piezoresistance is the nonuniform strain in the antidot lattice and the exclusion of electrons occupying the two conduction-band valleys from different regions of the sample. This is analogous to the well-known giant magnetoresistance effect, with valley playing the role of spin and strain the role of magnetic field. PMID:18233015

  4. Calculation of the transverse kicks generated by the bends of a hollow electron lens

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, Giulio

    2014-03-25

    Electron lenses are pulsed, magnetically confined electron beams whose current-density profile is shaped to obtain the desired effect on the circulating beam in high-energy accelerators. They were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for abort-gap clearing, beam-beam compensation, and halo scraping. A beam-beam compensation scheme based upon electron lenses is currently being implemented in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This work is in support of a conceptual design of hollow electron beam scraper for the Large Hadron Collider. It also applies to the implementation of nonlinear integrable optics with electron lenses in the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator at Fermilab. We consider the axial asymmetries of the electron beam caused by the bends that are used to inject electrons into the interaction region and to extract them. A distribution of electron macroparticles is deposited on a discrete grid enclosed in a conducting pipe. The electrostatic potential and electric fields are calculated using numerical Poisson solvers. The kicks experienced by the circulating beam are estimated by integrating the electric fields over straight trajectories. These kicks are also provided in the form of interpolated analytical symplectic maps for numerical tracking simulations, which are needed to estimate the effects of the electron lens imperfections on proton lifetimes, emittance growth, and dynamic aperture. We outline a general procedure to calculate the magnitude of the transverse proton kicks, which can then be generalized, if needed, to include further refinements such as the space-charge evolution of the electron beam, magnetic fields generated by the electron current, and longitudinal proton dynamics.

  5. Anomalous charge transport in a quasi-one-dimensional electron system over liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladchenko, S. P.; Kovdrya, Yu. Z.; Nikolaenko, V. A.

    2003-11-01

    The conductivity σ in a quasi-one-dimensional electron system over liquid helium is measured in the temperature interval 0.5-1.7 K over a wide range of electron densities n. It is shown that the quantity σ/ne (e is the charge of the electron) initially increases with decreasing temperature and then, after passing through a maximum, begins to decline for T≈1 K. In this temperature region the value of σ/ne, above a certain value of the drift potential Vd, decreases with increasing Vd. It is conjectured that the anomalous charge transport observed in this study is due either to spatial ordering of the electrons in the quasi-one-dimensional channels or to the formation of many-electron polarons in the nonuniform potential along the channels.

  6. Electron contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment at four loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, Alexander; Liu, Tao; Marquard, Peter; Smirnov, Alexander V.; Smirnov, Vladimir A.; Steinhauser, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    We present results for the QED contributions to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon containing closed electron loops. The main focus is on perturbative corrections at four-loop order where the external photon couples to the external muon. Furthermore, all four-loop contributions involving simultaneously a closed electron and tau loop are computed. In combination with our recent results on the light-by-light-type corrections (see Ref. [1]), the complete four-loop electron-loop contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon has been obtained with an independent calculation. Our calculation is based on an asymptotic expansion in the ratio of the electron and the muon mass and shows the importance of higher-order terms in this ratio. We perform a detailed comparison with results available in the literature and find good numerical agreement. As a byproduct, we present analytic results for the on-shell muon mass and wave function renormalization constants at three-loop order including massive closed electron and tau loops, which we also calculated using the method of asymptotic expansion.

  7. Theory for the anomalous electron transport in Hall effect thrusters. II. Kinetic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafleur, T.; Baalrud, S. D.; Chabert, P.

    2016-05-01

    In Paper I [T. Lafleur et al., Phys. Plasmas 23, 053502 (2016)], we demonstrated (using particle-in-cell simulations) the definite correlation between an anomalously high cross-field electron transport in Hall effect thrusters (HETs), and the presence of azimuthal electrostatic instabilities leading to enhanced electron scattering. Here, we present a kinetic theory that predicts the enhanced scattering rate and provides an electron cross-field mobility that is in good agreement with experiment. The large azimuthal electron drift velocity in HETs drives a strong instability that quickly saturates due to a combination of ion-wave trapping and wave-convection, leading to an enhanced mobility many orders of magnitude larger than that expected from classical diffusion theory. In addition to the magnetic field strength, B0, this enhanced mobility is a strong function of the plasma properties (such as the plasma density) and therefore does not, in general, follow simple 1 /B02 or 1 /B0 scaling laws.

  8. Velocity space evolution of a minority energetic electron population undergoing the anomalous Doppler instability

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, W. N.; Chapman, S. C.; Dendy, R. O.

    2015-11-15

    The kinetic evolution in velocity space of a minority suprathermal electron population that is undergoing the anomalous Doppler instability (ADI) is investigated using the results from fully nonlinear numerical simulations that self-consistently evolve particles and fields in a plasma. Electron trajectories in phase space during different stages of the ADI are captured, and are analysed in relation to the characteristics of the excited electric fields and of the overall distribution of particles. For some electrons, trapping and mirroring effects are observed during the saturation phase. A relationship between the second order moments of the perpendicular electron distribution function and time is established, and is used to investigate the range of applicability of analytical approximations drawn from classical theory, that involve a quasilinear wave-driven diffusion operator.

  9. Hollow cone illumination for fast TEM, and outrunning damage with electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, J. C. H.; Subramanian, G.; Musumeci, P.

    2015-11-01

    We consider the possibility of imaging individual bioparticles using snapshot diffraction from femotsecond pulses, using a 3 MeV electron beam, based on the recent experimental performance of these coherent beams. Assuming that radiation damage can be outrun using 100 fs pulses (or less), we find that a sufficient number of electrons are scattered per particle only if the beam diameter can be matched to that of the particle (e.g. a virus), about three orders of magnitude smaller than has currently been demonstrated (and limited by space-charge effects). We then propose the use of the hollow-cone illumination mode for fast transmission electron microscope imaging, because it can provide full-field atomic resolution imaging despite the use of the large incoherent annular source required for an efficient photocathode, so that coherent illumination is not needed for high-resolution imaging. Reciprocity arguments are used to compare this full-field mode with data aquisition times and source brightness in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

  10. Anomalous electron heating and energy balance in an ion beam generated plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Guethlein, G.

    1987-04-01

    The plasma described in this report is generated by a 15 to 34 kV ion beam, consisting primarily of protons, passing through an H/sub 2/ gas cell neutralizer. Plasma ions (or ion-electron pairs) are produced by electron capture from (or ionization of) gas molecules by beam ions and atoms. An explanation is provided for the observed anomalous behavior of the electron temperature (T/sub e/): a step-lite, nearly two-fold jump in T/sub e/ as the beam current approaches that which minimizes beam angular divergence; insensitivity of T/sub e/ to gas pressure; and the linear relation of T/sub e/ to beam energy.

  11. Anomalous electron heating effects on the E region ionosphere in TIEGCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Wang, Wenbin; Oppenheim, Meers; Dimant, Yakov; Wiltberger, Michael; Merkin, Slava

    2016-03-01

    We have recently implemented a new module that includes both the anomalous electron heating and the electron-neutral cooling rate correction associated with the Farley-Buneman Instability (FBI) in the thermosphere-ionosphere electrodynamics global circulation model (TIEGCM). This implementation provides, for the first time, a modeling capability to describe macroscopic effects of the FBI on the ionosphere and thermosphere in the context of a first-principle, self-consistent model. The added heating sources primarily operate between 100 and 130 km altitude, and their magnitudes often exceed auroral precipitation heating in the TIEGCM. The induced changes in E region electron temperature in the auroral oval and polar cap by the FBI are remarkable with a maximum Te approaching 2200 K. This is about 4 times larger than the TIEGCM run without FBI heating. This investigation demonstrates how researchers can add the important effects of the FBI to magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere models and simulators.

  12. Nonlinear simulations of peeling-ballooning modes with anomalous electron viscosity and their role in edge localized mode crashes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xu, X. Q.; Dudson, B.; Snyder, P. B.; Umansky, M. V.; Wilson, H.

    2010-10-22

    A minimum set of equations based on the peeling-ballooning (P-B) model with nonideal physics effects (diamagnetic drift, E×B drift, resistivity, and anomalous electron viscosity) is found to simulate pedestal collapse when using the new BOUT++ simulation code, developed in part from the original fluid edge code BOUT. Nonlinear simulations of P-B modes demonstrate that the P-B modes trigger magnetic reconnection, which leads to the pedestal collapse. With the addition of a model of the anomalous electron viscosity under the assumption that the electron viscosity is comparable to the anomalous electron thermal diffusivity, it is found from simulations using a realisticmore » high-Lundquist number that the pedestal collapse is limited to the edge region and the edge localized mode (ELM) size is about 5–10% of the pedestal stored energy. Furthermore, this is consistent with many observations of large ELMs.« less

  13. Nonlinear simulations of peeling-ballooning modes with anomalous electron viscosity and their role in edge localized mode crashes

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X. Q.; Dudson, B.; Snyder, P. B.; Umansky, M. V.; Wilson, H.

    2010-10-22

    A minimum set of equations based on the peeling-ballooning (P-B) model with nonideal physics effects (diamagnetic drift, E×B drift, resistivity, and anomalous electron viscosity) is found to simulate pedestal collapse when using the new BOUT++ simulation code, developed in part from the original fluid edge code BOUT. Nonlinear simulations of P-B modes demonstrate that the P-B modes trigger magnetic reconnection, which leads to the pedestal collapse. With the addition of a model of the anomalous electron viscosity under the assumption that the electron viscosity is comparable to the anomalous electron thermal diffusivity, it is found from simulations using a realistic high-Lundquist number that the pedestal collapse is limited to the edge region and the edge localized mode (ELM) size is about 5–10% of the pedestal stored energy. Furthermore, this is consistent with many observations of large ELMs.

  14. Nonlinear simulations of peeling-ballooning modes with anomalous electron viscosity and their role in edge localized mode crashes.

    PubMed

    Xu, X Q; Dudson, B; Snyder, P B; Umansky, M V; Wilson, H

    2010-10-22

    A minimum set of equations based on the peeling-ballooning (P-B) model with nonideal physics effects (diamagnetic drift, E×B drift, resistivity, and anomalous electron viscosity) is found to simulate pedestal collapse when using the new BOUT++ simulation code, developed in part from the original fluid edge code BOUT. Nonlinear simulations of P-B modes demonstrate that the P-B modes trigger magnetic reconnection, which leads to the pedestal collapse. With the addition of a model of the anomalous electron viscosity under the assumption that the electron viscosity is comparable to the anomalous electron thermal diffusivity, it is found from simulations using a realistic high-Lundquist number that the pedestal collapse is limited to the edge region and the edge localized mode (ELM) size is about 5%-10% of the pedestal stored energy. This is consistent with many observations of large ELMs. PMID:21231055

  15. Nonlinear Simulations of Peeling-Ballooning Modes with Anomalous Electron Viscosity and their Role in Edge Localized Mode Crashes

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X. Q.; Umansky, M. V.; Dudson, B.; Wilson, H.; Snyder, P. B.

    2010-10-22

    A minimum set of equations based on the peeling-ballooning (P-B) model with nonideal physics effects (diamagnetic drift, ExB drift, resistivity, and anomalous electron viscosity) is found to simulate pedestal collapse when using the new BOUT++ simulation code, developed in part from the original fluid edge code BOUT. Nonlinear simulations of P-B modes demonstrate that the P-B modes trigger magnetic reconnection, which leads to the pedestal collapse. With the addition of a model of the anomalous electron viscosity under the assumption that the electron viscosity is comparable to the anomalous electron thermal diffusivity, it is found from simulations using a realistic high-Lundquist number that the pedestal collapse is limited to the edge region and the edge localized mode (ELM) size is about 5%-10% of the pedestal stored energy. This is consistent with many observations of large ELMs.

  16. Neutral cloud theory of the Jovian nebula: Anomalous ionization effect of superthermal electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbosa, D. D.

    1994-01-01

    The standard model of the Jovian nebula postulates that its particle source is the extended cloud of neutral sulfur and oxygen atoms that escape from the satellite Io and become ionized through electron impact from the corotating plasma. Its energy source is the gyroenergy acquired by newly formed pickup ions as they are swept up to corotation velocity by the planetary magnetic field. Elastic collisions between plasma ions and electrons cool the ions and heat the electrons, while inelastic collisions cool the electrons and excite the ions to radiate intense line emission, which is the primary energy-loss mechanism for the plasma. This neutral cloud theory of the Io plasma torus, as it has come to be known, has been the subject of recent critcism which asserts that the theory cannot account for the observed charge state of the plasma which features O(+) and S(2+) as the dominant ions. It is shown in this work that the inclusion of a small population of super-thermal electrons is required to achieve the correct ion partitioning among various charge states. It is also argued that the anomalous ionization effect of the superthermal electrons is responsible for the overall spatial bifurcation of the nebula into a hot multiply charged plasma region outside of 5.7 Jovian radii and a cool singly ionized plasma inside this distance.

  17. Guide for 3D WARP simulations of hollow electron beam lenses. Practical explanation on basis of Tevatron electron lens test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Moens, Vince

    2014-06-08

    The purpose of this guide is to help successive students handle WARP. It outlines the installation of WARP on personal computers as well as super-computers and clusters. It furthermore teaches the reader how to handle the WARP environment and run basic scripts. Lastly it outlines how to execute the current Hollow Electron Beam Lens scripts.

  18. Anomalous skin effects in relativistic parallel propagating weakly magnetized electron plasma waves

    SciTech Connect

    Abbas, Gohar; Bashir, M. F.; Murtaza, G.

    2011-10-15

    Fully relativistic analysis of anomalous skin effects for parallel propagating waves in a weakly magnetized electron plasma is presented and general expressions for longitudinal and transverse permittivites are derived. It is found that the penetration depth for R- and L-waves increases as we move from non-relativistic to highly relativistic regime. The ambient magnetic field reduces/enhances the skin effects for R-wave/L-wave as the strength of the field is increased. In general, the weak magnetic field effects are pronounced for the weakly relativistic regime as compared with other relativistic cases. The results are also graphically illustrated. On switching off the magnetic field, previous results for field free case are retrieved [A. F. Alexandrov, A. S. Bogdankevich, and A. A. Rukhadze, Priniples of Plasma Electrodynamics (Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, 1984), Vol. 9, p. 106].

  19. Collisionless reversed magnetic shear trapped electron instability and contribution of sidebands to anomalous transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogister, André L.; Singh, Raghvendra

    2005-11-01

    By keeping account of the trapped electron ∇B and curvature drifts, it is found that the spatial decay of the collisionless electron drift wave is governed either by the trapped electron response or by the resonant interaction of ions with the sidebands of the primary oscillation. In the former case, pairs of spatially bounded unstable and damped solutions are obtained for negative magnetic shear (ŝ<0) if, as usual, LTe=1/∂rlnTe<0; there are no bounded solutions if ŝLTe<0. In the latter case, there is either a set of bounded damped solutions if ηi>0 or a set of bounded unstable solutions if ηi<0. The unstable modes have a radiating character and the growth rates are γ ˜(2n+1)√1+2q2 ∣ŝ∣∣LNωe*/qR∣ (n is the Hermite polynomial solution index, q the safety factor, ŝ the magnetic shear parameter, R the major radius, ωe* the electron diamagnetic frequency, LN=1/∂rlnNe, and ηi=LN/LTi).The sidebands are responsible for unusually large ratios Qe/TeΓe, where Qe and Γe are the anomalous electron energy flux and the particle flux. These results may explain the box-type Te profile observed in lower hybrid current drive reversed magnetic shear plasmas on the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute Tokamak 60 Upgrade (JT-60U) [H. Ninomiya and the JT-60U Team, Phys. Fluids B 4, 2070 (1992)]. It is finally demonstrated that the ballooning hypothesis generally leads to conflicting requirements: it is thus hardly relevant for the electron drift branch! The "radiating" boundary condition that has formerly been imposed on the slab solution is finally discussed.

  20. Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar observations of anomalous electron heating in the E region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarevich, R. A.; Koustov, A. V.; Nicolls, M. J.

    2013-07-01

    A comprehensive 2-year dataset collected with the Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR) located near Fairbanks, Alaska (MLAT = 65.4° N) is employed to identify and analyse 22 events of anomalous electron heating (AEH) in the auroral E region. The overall AEH occurrence probability is conservatively estimated to be 0.3% from nearly-continuous observations of the E region by PFISR, although it increases to 0.7-0.9% in the dawn and dusk sectors where all AEH events were observed. The AEH occurrence variation with MLT is broadly consistent with those of events with high convection velocity (>1000 m s-1) or electron temperature (> 800 K), except for much smaller AEH probability and absence of AEH events near magnetic midnight. This suggests that high convection electric field by itself is necessary but not sufficient for measurable electron heating by two-stream plasma waves. The multi-point observations are utilised to investigate the fundamental dependence of the electron temperature on the convection electric field, focusing on the previously-proposed saturation effects at extreme electric fields. The AEH dataset was found to exhibit considerable scatter and, on average, similar rate of the electron temperature increase with the electric field up to 100 mV m-1 as compared with previous studies. At higher (highest) electric fields, the electron temperatures are below the linear trend on average (within uncertainty). By employing a simple fluid model of AEH, it is demonstrated that some of this deviation from the linear trend may be due to a stronger vibrational cooling at very large temperatures and electric fields.

  1. Layer-dependent quantum cooperation of electron and hole states in the anomalous semimetal WTe2

    PubMed Central

    Das, Pranab Kumar; Di Sante, D.; Vobornik, I.; Fujii, J.; Okuda, T.; Bruyer, E.; Gyenis, A.; Feldman, B. E.; Tao, J.; Ciancio, R.; Rossi, G.; Ali, M. N.; Picozzi, S.; Yadzani, A.; Panaccione, G.; Cava, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    The behaviour of electrons and holes in a crystal lattice is a fundamental quantum phenomenon, accounting for a rich variety of material properties. Boosted by the remarkable electronic and physical properties of two-dimensional materials such as graphene and topological insulators, transition metal dichalcogenides have recently received renewed attention. In this context, the anomalous bulk properties of semimetallic WTe2 have attracted considerable interest. Here we report angle- and spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of WTe2 single crystals, through which we disentangle the role of W and Te atoms in the formation of the band structure and identify the interplay of charge, spin and orbital degrees of freedom. Supported by first-principles calculations and high-resolution surface topography, we reveal the existence of a layer-dependent behaviour. The balance of electron and hole states is found only when considering at least three Te–W–Te layers, showing that the behaviour of WTe2 is not strictly two dimensional. PMID:26924386

  2. Layer-dependent quantum cooperation of electron and hole states in the anomalous semimetal WTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Pranab Kumar; di Sante, D.; Vobornik, I.; Fujii, J.; Okuda, T.; Bruyer, E.; Gyenis, A.; Feldman, B. E.; Tao, J.; Ciancio, R.; Rossi, G.; Ali, M. N.; Picozzi, S.; Yadzani, A.; Panaccione, G.; Cava, R. J.

    2016-02-01

    The behaviour of electrons and holes in a crystal lattice is a fundamental quantum phenomenon, accounting for a rich variety of material properties. Boosted by the remarkable electronic and physical properties of two-dimensional materials such as graphene and topological insulators, transition metal dichalcogenides have recently received renewed attention. In this context, the anomalous bulk properties of semimetallic WTe2 have attracted considerable interest. Here we report angle- and spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of WTe2 single crystals, through which we disentangle the role of W and Te atoms in the formation of the band structure and identify the interplay of charge, spin and orbital degrees of freedom. Supported by first-principles calculations and high-resolution surface topography, we reveal the existence of a layer-dependent behaviour. The balance of electron and hole states is found only when considering at least three Te-W-Te layers, showing that the behaviour of WTe2 is not strictly two dimensional.

  3. Layer-dependent quantum cooperation of electron and hole states in the anomalous semimetal WTe2.

    PubMed

    Das, Pranab Kumar; Di Sante, D; Vobornik, I; Fujii, J; Okuda, T; Bruyer, E; Gyenis, A; Feldman, B E; Tao, J; Ciancio, R; Rossi, G; Ali, M N; Picozzi, S; Yadzani, A; Panaccione, G; Cava, R J

    2016-01-01

    The behaviour of electrons and holes in a crystal lattice is a fundamental quantum phenomenon, accounting for a rich variety of material properties. Boosted by the remarkable electronic and physical properties of two-dimensional materials such as graphene and topological insulators, transition metal dichalcogenides have recently received renewed attention. In this context, the anomalous bulk properties of semimetallic WTe2 have attracted considerable interest. Here we report angle- and spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of WTe2 single crystals, through which we disentangle the role of W and Te atoms in the formation of the band structure and identify the interplay of charge, spin and orbital degrees of freedom. Supported by first-principles calculations and high-resolution surface topography, we reveal the existence of a layer-dependent behaviour. The balance of electron and hole states is found only when considering at least three Te-W-Te layers, showing that the behaviour of WTe2 is not strictly two dimensional. PMID:26924386

  4. Layer-dependent quantum cooperation of electron and hole states in the anomalous semimetal WTe2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Das, Pranab Kumar; Di Sante, D.; Vobornik, I.; Fujii, J.; Okuda, T.; Bruyer, E.; Gyenis, A.; Feldman, B. E.; Tao, J.; Ciancio, R.; et al

    2016-02-29

    The behaviour of electrons and holes in a crystal lattice is a fundamental quantum phenomenon, accounting for a rich variety of material properties. Boosted by the remarkable electronic and physical properties of two-dimensional materials such as graphene and topological insulators, transition metal dichalcogenides have recently received renewed attention. In this context, the anomalous bulk properties of semimetallic WTe2 have attracted considerable interest. We report angle- and spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of WTe2 single crystals, through which we disentangle the role of W and Te atoms in the formation of the band structure and identify the interplay of charge, spin and orbitalmore » degrees of freedom. Supported by first-principles calculations and high-resolution surface topography, we also reveal the existence of a layer-dependent behaviour. The balance of electron and hole states is found only when considering at least three Te–W–Te layers, showing that the behaviour of WTe2 is not strictly two dimensional.« less

  5. Broadband 7-fs diffractive-optic-based 2D electronic spectroscopy using hollow-core fiber compression.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaonan; Dostál, Jakub; Brixner, Tobias

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate noncollinear coherent two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy for which broadband pulses are generated in an argon-filled hollow-core fiber pumped by a 1-kHz Ti:Sapphire laser. Compression is achieved to 7 fs duration (TG-FROG) using dispersive mirrors. The hollow fiber provides a clean spatial profile and smooth spectral shape in the 500-700 nm region. The diffractive-optic-based design of the 2D spectrometer avoids directional filtering distortions and temporal broadening from time smearing. For demonstration we record data of cresyl-violet perchlorate in ethanol and use phasing to obtain broadband absorptive 2D spectra. The resulting quantum beating as a function of population time is consistent with literature data. PMID:27607681

  6. Gas pressure and electron density at the level of the active zone of hollow cathode arc discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minoo, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    A model for the longitudinal variations of the partial pressures of electrons, ions, and neutral particles is proposed as a result of an experimental study of pressure variations at the level of the active zone as a function of the various discharge parameters of a hollow cathode arc. The cathode region where the temperature passes through its maximum is called active zone. The proposed model embodies the very important variations which the partial electron and neutral particles pressures undergo at the level of the active zone.

  7. Effects of Anomalous Electron Cross-Field Transport in a Low Temperature Magnetized Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitses, Yevgeny

    2014-10-01

    The application of the magnetic field in a low pressure plasma can cause a spatial separation of low and high energy electrons. This so-called magnetic filter effect is used for many plasma applications, including ion and neutral beam sources, plasma processing of semiconductors and nanomaterials, and plasma thrusters. In spite of successful practical applications, the magnetic filter effect is not well understood. In this work, we explore this effect by characterizing the electron and ion energy distribution functions in a plasma column with crossed electric and magnetic fields. Experimental results revealed a strong dependence of spatial variations of plasma properties on the gas pressure. For xenon and argon gases, below ~ 1 mtorr, the increase of the magnetic field leads to a more uniform profile of the electron temperature. This surprising result is due to anomalously high electron cross-field transport that causes mixing of hot and cold electrons. High-speed imaging and probe measurements revealed a coherent structure rotating in E cross B direction with frequency of a few kHz. Theory and simulations describing this rotating structure has been developed and points to ionization and electrostatic instabilities as their possible cause. Similar to spoke oscillations reported for Hall thrusters, this rotating structure conducts the large fraction of the cross-field current. The use of segmented electrodes with an electrical feedback control is shown to mitigate these oscillations. Finally, a new feature of the spoke phenomenon that has been discovered, namely a sensitive dependence of the rotating oscillations on the gas pressure, can be important for many applications. This work was supported by DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  8. Protein structure determination by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction phasing of X-ray free-electron laser data

    PubMed Central

    Nass, Karol; Meinhart, Anton; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Foucar, Lutz; Gorel, Alexander; Aquila, Andrew; Botha, Sabine; Doak, R. Bruce; Koglin, Jason; Liang, Mengning; Shoeman, Robert L.; Williams, Garth; Boutet, Sebastien; Schlichting, Ilme

    2016-01-01

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) at X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) offers unprecedented possibilities for macromolecular structure determination of systems that are prone to radiation damage. However, phasing XFEL data de novo is complicated by the inherent inaccuracy of SFX data, and only a few successful examples, mostly based on exceedingly strong anomalous or isomorphous difference signals, have been reported. Here, it is shown that SFX data from thaumatin microcrystals can be successfully phased using only the weak anomalous scattering from the endogenous S atoms. Moreover, a step-by-step investigation is presented of the particular problems of SAD phasing of SFX data, analysing data from a derivative with a strong anomalous signal as well as the weak signal from endogenous S atoms. PMID:27158504

  9. Protein structure determination by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction phasing of X-ray free-electron laser data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nass, Karol; Meinhart, Anton; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Foucar, Lutz; Gorel, Alexander; Aquila, Andrew; Botha, Sabine; Doak, R. Bruce; Koglin, Jason; Liang, Mengning; et al

    2016-03-09

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) at X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) offers unprecedented possibilities for macromolecular structure determination of systems that are prone to radiation damage. However, phasing XFEL data de novo is complicated by the inherent inaccuracy of SFX data, and only a few successful examples, mostly based on exceedingly strong anomalous or isomorphous difference signals, have been reported. Here, it is shown that SFX data from thaumatin microcrystals can be successfully phased using only the weak anomalous scattering from the endogenous S atoms. Furthermore, a step-by-step investigation is presented of the particular problems of SAD phasing of SFX data, analysingmore » data from a derivative with a strong anomalous signal as well as the weak signal from endogenous S atoms.« less

  10. Anomalous conductivity in Hall thrusters: Effects of the non-linear coupling of the electron-cyclotron drift instability with secondary electron emission of the walls

    SciTech Connect

    Héron, A.; Adam, J. C.

    2013-08-15

    With the help of an implicit particle-in-cell code, we have shown in a previous paper that the electron-cyclotron drift instability was able to induce anomalous conductivity as well as anomalous heating. As such it can be a major actor among the mechanisms involved in the operation of Hall thrusters. However, experimental results show that the nature of wall material has a significant effect on the behavior of the thruster. The purpose of this paper is to study the plasma-wall interaction in the case where the plasma is heated self-consistently by electrostatic fluctuations induced by the electron-cyclotron drift instability.

  11. A kinetic cyclotron maser instability associated with a hollow beam of electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. S.; Freund, H. P.

    1984-01-01

    A kinetic cyclotron maser instability associated with a hollow-beam distribution function is studied. The instability differs from that discussed for the gyrotron device in two respects: in the present case the momentum dispersion is substantial, and furthermore there exists a low-energy background plasma. On the basis of physical arguments it can be demonstrated that the hollow-beam distribution is far more unstable than the loss cone distribution which has been extensively investigated in recent years. A criterion for maximum growth rate is established on the basis of consideration of the resonance ellipse. The validity of this criterion is supported by the results of numerical calculation.

  12. Anomalous electronic transport features in a lateral quantum dot array sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Wei; Dunn, R. G.; Reno, J. L.; Simmons, J. A.; Li, D.; Brueck, S. R. J.

    2006-03-01

    We will present in this talk experimental results obtained in a lateral quantum dot array sample, with a pitch size of ˜ 350 nm and a designed dot size of ˜ 150nm. The starting material is a high quality quantum well with the two-dimensional electron gas buried 200 nm below the surface. The quantum dot array is defined by a Ti/Au metal grid, which was fabricated using the interferometric lithograph and lift-off techniques. Around zero magnetic field, a pronounced positive magnetoresistance is observed, which can be explained by the semi-classical model of magnetic breakdown. The so-called commensurability oscillations together with the usual Shubnikov- de Hass oscillations are also observed. Surprisingly, in a pure DC measurement of longitudinal resistance, an anomalous resistance spike is clearly seen. The magnetic field position of this resistance spike depends on the amplitude of applied DC bias (Vds) between source and drain, and shows roughly a 1/Vds dependence.Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. Study of nonlinear evolution of tearing modes induced by anomalous electron viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhixiong; Dong, J. Q.; He, Hongda; Wang, Z. T.; Long, Y. X.; Mou, Z. Z.

    2015-12-01

    The nonlinear development of double tearing modes (DTMs) induced by anomalous electron viscosity, which may be present in magnetically confined plasmas due to electromagnetic turbulence and structures such as braiding of magnetic field lines, in a periodic cylinder is simulated. Comparing the evolution of the helical magnetic flux contours, the nonlinear development of magnetic reconnection of the DTMs is studied for different distances between the two resonant rational flux surfaces. There are three clear phases in the nonlinear evolution of DTMs when the distance between the two resonant flux surfaces is large: linear growing, nonlinearly driven growing, and saturation. There are four phases when the distance is medium: linear growing, nonlinearly driven growing, fast growing, and decaying. Finally, there are three phases of evolution when the distance is quite small, which are different from the phases when the distance is large: linear growing, nonlinearly driven growing, and decaying,. The coupling between the fastest-growing modes at the two resonant surfaces drives the nonlinear evolution of the system.

  14. Hydrothermal synthesis and magnetic properties of CuO hollow microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J.G.; Yin, J.Z.; Yang, M.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • CuO hollow microspheres were synthesized through hydrothermal route. • The possible growth mechanism was proposed according to the experimental results. • CuO hollow microspheres show an anomalous ferromagnetic behavior at 5 K and 300 K. - Abstract: In the present work, CuO hollow microspheres with the diameter about 2 μm were successfully synthesized through a facile hydrothermal method. The phase purity, morphologies and structure features of the as obtained products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. It was found that reaction temperature, reaction time and different volume ratios of ethanol and distilled water played important roles on the morphologies of the obtained CuO hollow microspheres. The possible formation mechanism was also proposed according to the corresponding experimental results. The magnetic properties were investigated by superconducting quantum interference device, revealing that the CuO hollow microspheres exhibited an anomalous ferromagnetic behavior at 5 K and 300 K. At the same time, the origin of the ferromagnetism in CuO hollow microspheres was also discussed.

  15. Tenth-order electron anomalous magnetic moment: Contribution of diagrams without closed lepton loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Tatsumi; Hayakawa, Masashi; Kinoshita, Toichiro; Nio, Makiko

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents a detailed account of the evaluation of the electron anomalous magnetic moment ae which arises from a gauge-invariant set, called Set V, consisting of 6354 tenth-order Feynman diagrams without closed lepton loops. The latest value of the sum of Set V diagrams evaluated by the Monte Carlo integration routine VEGAS is 8.726 (336 )(α /π )5 , which replaces the very preliminary value reported in 2012. Combining it with 6318 previously published tenth-order diagrams, we obtain 7.795 (336 )(α /π )5 as the complete mass-independent tenth-order term. Together with the improved value of the eighth-order term this leads to ae(theory)=1 159 652 181.643 (25 )(23 )(16 )(763 )×1 0-12 , where the first three uncertainties are from the eighth-order, tenth-order, and hadronic and elecroweak terms. The fourth and largest uncertainty is from α-1=137.035 999 049 (90 ) , the fine-structure constant derived from the rubidium recoil measurement. Thus, ae(experiment)-ae(theory)=-0.91 (0.82 )×1 0-12 . Assuming the validity of the standard model, we obtain the fine-structure constant α-1(ae)=137.035 999 1570 (29 )(27 )(18 )(331 ) , where uncertainties are from the eighth-order, tenth-order, and hadronic and electroweak terms, and the measurement of ae. This is the most precise value of α available at present and provides a stringent constraint on possible theories beyond the standard model.

  16. Role of electrostatic and magnetic electron confinement in a hollow-cathode glow discharge in a nonuniform magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Metel, A. S. Grigoriev, S. N.; Volosova, M. A.; Bolbukov, V. P.; Melnik, Yu. A.

    2015-02-15

    Glow discharge with electron confinement in an electrostatic trap has been studied. The trap is formed by a cylindrical hollow cathode, as well as by a flat target on its bottom and a grid covering its output aperture, both being negatively biased relative to the cathode. At a gas pressure of 0.2–0.4 Pa, the fraction of ions sputtering the target (δ = 0.13) in the entire number of ions emitted by the uniform discharge plasma corresponds to the ratio of the target surface area to the total surface area of the cathode, grid, and target. When a nonuniform magnetic field with force lines passing through the target center (where the magnetic induction reaches 35 mT), as well as through the grid, hollow cathode, and target periphery (where the field lines are arc-shaped), is applied to the trap, its influence on the discharge depends on the magnetic induction B{sub 0} at the target edge. At B{sub 0} = 1 mT, the electrons emitted from the target periphery and drifting azimuthally in the arc-shaped field insignificantly contribute to gas ionization. Nevertheless, since fast electrons that are emitted from the cathode and oscillate inside it are forced by the magnetic field to come more frequently to the target, thereby intensifying gas ionization near the latter, the fraction δ doubles and the plasma density near the target becomes more than twice as high as that near the grid. At B{sub 0} = 6 mT, the contribution of electrons emitted from the target surface to gas ionization near the target grows up and δ increases two more times. At cathode-target voltages in the range of 0–3 kV, the current in the target circuit vanishes as the voltage between the anode and the cathode decreases to zero.

  17. Role of electrostatic and magnetic electron confinement in a hollow-cathode glow discharge in a nonuniform magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metel, A. S.; Grigoriev, S. N.; Volosova, M. A.; Bolbukov, V. P.; Melnik, Yu. A.

    2015-02-01

    Glow discharge with electron confinement in an electrostatic trap has been studied. The trap is formed by a cylindrical hollow cathode, as well as by a flat target on its bottom and a grid covering its output aperture, both being negatively biased relative to the cathode. At a gas pressure of 0.2-0.4 Pa, the fraction of ions sputtering the target (δ = 0.13) in the entire number of ions emitted by the uniform discharge plasma corresponds to the ratio of the target surface area to the total surface area of the cathode, grid, and target. When a nonuniform magnetic field with force lines passing through the target center (where the magnetic induction reaches 35 mT), as well as through the grid, hollow cathode, and target periphery (where the field lines are arc-shaped), is applied to the trap, its influence on the discharge depends on the magnetic induction B 0 at the target edge. At B 0 = 1 mT, the electrons emitted from the target periphery and drifting azimuthally in the arc-shaped field insignificantly contribute to gas ionization. Nevertheless, since fast electrons that are emitted from the cathode and oscillate inside it are forced by the magnetic field to come more frequently to the target, thereby intensifying gas ionization near the latter, the fraction δ doubles and the plasma density near the target becomes more than twice as high as that near the grid. At B 0 = 6 mT, the contribution of electrons emitted from the target surface to gas ionization near the target grows up and δ increases two more times. At cathode-target voltages in the range of 0-3 kV, the current in the target circuit vanishes as the voltage between the anode and the cathode decreases to zero.

  18. Tunable Microwave Absorption Frequency by Aspect Ratio of Hollow Polydopamine@α-MnO2 Microspindles Studied by Electron Holography.

    PubMed

    She, Wen; Bi, Han; Wen, Zhiwei; Liu, Qinghe; Zhao, Xuebing; Zhang, Jie; Che, Renchao

    2016-04-20

    A tunable response frequency is highly desirable for practical applications of microwave absorption materials but remains a great challenge. Here, hollow lightweight polydopamine@α-MnO2 microspindles were facilely synthesized with the tunable absorption frequency governed by the aspect ratio. The size of the hard template is a key factor to achieve the unique shape; the polymer layer with uniform thickness plays an important role in obtaining spindles with homogeneous size. With the aspect ratio increasing, the maximum reflection loss, as well as the absorption bandwidth (<-10 dB), increases and then decreases; meanwhile, the microwave absorption band shifts to the low frequency. The optimized aspect ratio of the cavity about the hollow polydopamine@α-MnO2 microspindles is ∼2.8. With 3 mm thickness at 9.7 GHz, the strongest reflection reaches -21.8 dB, and the width of the absorbing band (<-10 dB) is as wide as 3.3 GHz. Via electron holography, it is confirmed that strong charge accumulates around the interface between the polydopamine and α-MnO2 layers, which mainly contributes to the dielectric polarization absorption. This study proposes a reliable strategy to tune the absorption frequency via different aspect ratio polymer@α-MnO2 microspindles. PMID:27027922

  19. Wear Mechanisms in Electron Sources for Ion Propulsion, 2: Discharge Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.; Jameson, Kristina K.; Polk, James E.

    2008-01-01

    The wear of the keeper electrode in discharge hollow cathodes is a major impediment to the implementation of ion propulsion onboard long-duration space science missions. The development of a predictive theoretical model for hollow cathode keeper life has long been sought, but its realization has been hindered by the complexities associated with the physics of the partially ionized gas and the associated erosion mechanisms in these devices. Thus, although several wear mechanisms have been hypothesized, a quantitative explanation of life test erosion profiles has remained incomplete. A two-dimensional model of the partially ionized gas in a discharge cathode has been developed and applied to understand the mechanisms that drove the erosion of the keeper in two long-duration life tests of a 30-cm ion thruster. An extensive set of comparisons between predictions by the numerical simulations and measurements of the plasma properties and of the erosion patterns is presented. It is found that the near-plume plasma oscillations, predicted by theory and observed by experiment, effectively enhance the resistivity of the plasma as well as the energy of ions striking the keeper.

  20. Wear Mechanisms in Electron Sources for Ion Propulsion, 1: Neutralizer Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2008-01-01

    Upon the completion of two long-duration life tests of a 30-cm ion engine, the orifice channel of the neutralizer hollow cathode was eroded away to as much as twice its original diameter. Whereas the neutralizer cathode orifice opened significantly, no noticeable erosion of the discharge cathode orifice was observed. Noquantitative explanation of these erosion trends has been established since the completion of the two life tests. A two-dimensional model of the partially ionized gas inside these devices has been developed and applied to the neutralizer hollow cathode. The numerical simulations show that the main mechanism responsible for the channel erosion is sputtering by Xe+. These ions are accelerated by the sheath along the channel and bombard the surface with kinetic energy/charge of about 17 V at the beginning of cathode life. The density of the ions inside the neutralizer orifice is computed to be as high as 2.1 x 10(sup 22) m(sup -3). Because of the 3.5-times larger diameter of the discharge cathode orifice, the ion density inside the orifice is more than 40 times lower and the sheath drop 7 V lower compared with the values in the neutralizer. At these conditions, Xe+ can cause no significant sputtering of the surface.

  1. Hollow cathode apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A hollow cathode apparatus is described, which can be rapidly and reliably started. An ignitor positioned upstream from the hollow cathode, generates a puff of plasma that flows with the primary gas to be ionized through the cathode. The plasma puff creates a high voltage breakdown between the downstream end of the cathode and a keeper electrode, to heat the cathode to an electron-emitting temperature.

  2. The measurement of electron number density in helium micro hollow gas discharge using asymmetric He I lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovović, J.; Šišović, N. M.

    2015-09-01

    The electron number density N e in helium micro hollow gas discharge (MHGD) is measured by means of optical emission spectroscopy (OES) techniques. The structure of MHGD is a gold-alumina-gold sandwich with 250 μm alumina thickness and 100 μm diameter hole. The electron temperature T e and gas temperature T g in the discharge is determined using the relative intensity of He I lines and {{\\text{N}}2}+≤ft({{\\text{B}}2}Σ\\text{u}+- {{X}2}Σ\\text{g}+\\right) R branch lines in the frame of BP technique, respectively. The simple procedure based on spectral line broadening theory was developed in MATLAB to generate synthetic neutral line asymmetric profiles. The synthetic profiles were compared with an experimental He I 447.1 nm and He I 492.2 nm line to obtain N e from the centre of a micro hollow gas discharge (MHGD) source in helium. The N e results were compared with N e values obtained from the forbidden-to-allowed (F/A) intensity ratio technique. The comparison confirmed higher N e determined using a F/A ratio due to large uncertainty of the method. Applying the fitting formula for a He I 492.2 nm line derived from computer simulation (CS) gives the same N e values as the one determined using the MATLAB procedure in this study. The dependence of N e on gas pressure and electric current is investigated as well.

  3. Performance of 75-millimeter-bore bearings using electron-beam-welded hollow balls with a diameter ratio of 1.26

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, H. H.; Parker, R. J.; Scibbe, H. W.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to determine the rolling element fatigue life of electron beam-welded hollow balls with a diameter ratio (o.d./i.d.) of 1.26 and to determine the operating characteristics of bearings using these hollow balls. Similar bearings with solid balls were also tested and the data compared. The bearings were operated at shaft speeds up to 28,000 rpm with a thrust load of 2200 N (500 lb). Ball failures during the bearing tests were due to flexure fatigue. The solid and hollow ball bearings tested showed little difference in outer race temperatures and indicated the same bearing torque. The 17.5-mm (0.6875-in.) diameter balls were also tested in the five-ball fatigue tester and showed no significant difference in life when compared with the life of a solid ball.

  4. Anomalously enhanced electronic specific heat in Fe doped BISCO 2212 superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, M. K.; Franck, J. P.

    1994-12-01

    The specific heat of Fe substituted Bi 1.8Pb 0.2Sr 2Ca(Cu 1-xFe x) 2O 8 was measured for x = 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8%. A large anomalous contribution to the specific heat is observed below 15 K for the substituted samples. The anomaly suggests that Fe enters in the 3d 5 state, and that the samples are spin glasses in the superconducting state.

  5. Effect of entropy on anomalous transport in electron-temperature-gradient-modes

    SciTech Connect

    Yaqub Khan, M.; Iqbal, J.; Ul Haq, A.

    2014-05-15

    Due to the interconnection of entropy with temperature and density of plasma, it would be interesting to investigate plasma related phenomena with respect to entropy. By employing Braginskii transport equations, it is proved that entropy is proportional to a function of potential and distribution function of entropy is re-defined, ∇S–drift in obtained. New dispersion relation is derived; it is found that the anomalous transport depends on the gradient of the entropy.

  6. Formation and stability of a hollow electron beam in the presence of a plasma wake field driven by an ultra-short electron bunch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanjia, F.; Fedele, R.; De Nicola, S.; Akhter, T.; Jovanović, D.

    2016-09-01

    A numerical investigation on the spatiotemporal evolution of an electron beam, externally injected in a plasma in the presence of a plasma wake field, is carried out. The latter is driven by an ultra-short relativistic axially-symmetric femtosecond electron bunch. We first derive a novel Poisson-like equation for the wake potential where the driving term is the ultra-short bunch density, taking suitably into account the interplay between the sharpness and high energy of the bunch. Then, we show that a channel is formed longitudinally, through the externally injected beam while experiencing the effects of the bunch-driven plasma wake field, within the context of thermal wave model. The formation of the channel seems to be a final stage of the 3D evolution of the beam. This involves the appearance of small filaments and bubbles around the longitudinal axis. The bubbles coalesce forming a relatively stable axially-symmetric hollow beam structure.

  7. Spectroscopic studies of neutral erbium in a hollow cathode lamp: Electronic temperature and two-step optogalvanic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, Patricia; Victor, Alessandro R.; Santos, Jhonatha R. dos; Barreta, Luiz F. N.; Destro, Marcelo G.; Sbampato, Maria Esther; Neri, Jose W.; Silveira, Carlos A. B.

    2016-04-01

    This work reports the results obtained through spectroscopic studies developed on an erbium-neon hollow cathode lamp. First, emission spectra were obtained in order to estimate the electronic temperature of neutral erbium, which is an important plasma parameter for the calculation of atomic population in different energy levels. It was identified seven pairs of lines that can be used to estimate the electronic temperature of this metal by the two-line Boltzmann method. After these experiments, using the laser multistep excitation technique, three transitions for the first step excitation from the erbium ground state and eight transitions corresponding to the second step were observed. Four of these eight second steps correspond to erbium lines that were not reported in the literature before: 599.44 nm (17,157.31 → 33,844 cm- 1), 603.65 nm (17,073.80 → 33,635 cm- 1), 597.48 nm (17,029.06 → 33,761 cm- 1) and 597.56 nm (17,029.06 → 33,759 cm- 1).

  8. Theory for the anomalous electron transport in Hall effect thrusters. I. Insights from particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafleur, T.; Baalrud, S. D.; Chabert, P.

    2016-05-01

    Using a 1D particle-in-cell simulation with perpendicular electric, E0, and magnetic, B0, fields, and modelling the azimuthal direction (i.e., the E0 × B0 direction), we study the cross-field electron transport in Hall effect thrusters (HETs). For low plasma densities, the electron transport is found to be well described by classical electron-neutral collision theory, but at sufficiently high densities (representative of typical HETs), a strong instability is observed to significantly enhance the electron mobility, even in the absence of electron-neutral collisions. This instability is associated with correlated high-frequency (of the order of MHz) and short-wavelength (of the order of mm) fluctuations in both the electric field and the plasma density, which are shown to be the cause of the anomalous transport. Saturation of the instability is observed to occur due to a combination of ion-wave trapping in the E0 × B0 direction, and convection in the E0 direction.

  9. Electron, Ion and Atom Collisions Leading to Anomalous Doppler Broadening in Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Zoran Lj.; Stojanović, Vladimir D.; Nikitović, Željka D.

    2007-09-01

    DC high E/N swarm experiment (self sustained discharge operating in the Townsend regime) may be modeled directly and exactly as it does not require self consistent calculation of the electric field and is thus open to a simple Monte Carlo simulation that may include complexity at the level of representation of collisional events. Thus such an experiment operating under swarm conditions is the best way to test the mechanism of generation of anomalously large Doppler broadening that was often observed in low pressure discharges. In this paper we show revised results of modeling of Doppler profiles by using a well tested Monte Carlo procedure and revised models of heavy particle collisions. In particular we study the importance of fast H2 and fast H particles, the effect of different models of angular distribution of particles scattered of the surface and of the molecules and we study the role of the energy losses due to vibrational excitation.

  10. Electron's anomalous magnetic-moment effects on electron-hydrogen elastic collisions in the presence of a circularly polarized laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Elhandi, S.; Taj, S.; Attaourti, Y.; Manaut, B.; Oufni, L.

    2010-04-15

    The effect of the electron's anomalous magnetic moment on the relativistic electronic dressing for the process of electron-hydrogen atom elastic collisions is investigated. We consider a laser field with circular polarization and various electric field strengths. The Dirac-Volkov states taking into account this anomaly are used to describe the process in the first order of perturbation theory. The correlation between the terms coming from this anomaly and the electric field strength gives rise to the strong dependence of the spinor part of the differential cross section (DCS) with respect to these terms. A detailed study has been devoted to the nonrelativistic regime as well as the moderate relativistic regime. Some aspects of this dependence as well as the dynamical behavior of the DCS in the relativistic regime have been addressed.

  11. Thermal magnetic fluctuations and anomalous electron diffusion in a mirror-confined plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Murtaza, G.; Rahman, H.U.

    1983-09-01

    The electron test particle cross-field diffusion due to thermally excited magnetostatic modes with ergodic field lines is investigated. Estimate shows that in mirror-confined plasmas, the electron transport (and hence the electron thermal conduction) caused by the magnetostatic mode exceeds the convective as well as the classical transport.

  12. Electronic and optical device applications of hollow cathode plasma assisted atomic layer deposition based GaN thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Bolat, Sami Tekcan, Burak; Ozgit-Akgun, Cagla; Biyikli, Necmi; Okyay, Ali Kemal

    2015-01-15

    Electronic and optoelectronic devices, namely, thin film transistors (TFTs) and metal–semiconductor–metal (MSM) photodetectors, based on GaN films grown by hollow cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (PA-ALD) are demonstrated. Resistivity of GaN thin films and metal-GaN contact resistance are investigated as a function of annealing temperature. Effect of the plasma gas and postmetallization annealing on the performances of the TFTs as well as the effect of the annealing on the performance of MSM photodetectors are studied. Dark current to voltage and responsivity behavior of MSM devices are investigated as well. TFTs with the N{sub 2}/H{sub 2} PA-ALD based GaN channels are observed to have improved stability and transfer characteristics with respect to NH{sub 3} PA-ALD based transistors. Dark current of the MSM photodetectors is suppressed strongly after high-temperature annealing in N{sub 2}:H{sub 2} ambient.

  13. A hollow cathode ion source for production of primary ions for the BNL electron beam ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessi, James; Beebe, Edward; Carlson, Charles; McCafferty, Daniel; Pikin, Alexander; Ritter, John

    2014-02-01

    A hollow cathode ion source, based on one developed at Saclay, has been modified significantly and used for several years to produce all primary 1+ ions injected into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) at Brookhaven. Currents of tens to hundreds of microamperes have been produced for 1+ ions of He, C, O, Ne, Si, Ar, Ti, Fe, Cu, Kr, Xe, Ta, Au, and U. The source is very simple, relying on a glow discharge using a noble gas, between anode and a solid cathode containing the desired species. Ions of both the working gas and ionized sputtered cathode material are extracted, and then the desired species is selected using an ExB filter before being transported into the EBIS trap for charge breeding. The source operates pulsed with long life and excellent stability for most species. Reliable ignition of the discharge at low gas pressure is facilitated by the use of capacitive coupling from a simple toy plasma globe. The source design, and operating experience for the various species, is presented.

  14. A hollow cathode ion source for production of primary ions for the BNL electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Alessi, James Beebe, Edward; Carlson, Charles; McCafferty, Daniel; Pikin, Alexander; Ritter, John

    2014-02-15

    A hollow cathode ion source, based on one developed at Saclay, has been modified significantly and used for several years to produce all primary 1+ ions injected into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) at Brookhaven. Currents of tens to hundreds of microamperes have been produced for 1+ ions of He, C, O, Ne, Si, Ar, Ti, Fe, Cu, Kr, Xe, Ta, Au, and U. The source is very simple, relying on a glow discharge using a noble gas, between anode and a solid cathode containing the desired species. Ions of both the working gas and ionized sputtered cathode material are extracted, and then the desired species is selected using an ExB filter before being transported into the EBIS trap for charge breeding. The source operates pulsed with long life and excellent stability for most species. Reliable ignition of the discharge at low gas pressure is facilitated by the use of capacitive coupling from a simple toy plasma globe. The source design, and operating experience for the various species, is presented.

  15. A hollow cathode ion source for production of primary ions for the BNL electron beam ion source.

    PubMed

    Alessi, James; Beebe, Edward; Carlson, Charles; McCafferty, Daniel; Pikin, Alexander; Ritter, John

    2014-02-01

    A hollow cathode ion source, based on one developed at Saclay, has been modified significantly and used for several years to produce all primary 1+ ions injected into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) at Brookhaven. Currents of tens to hundreds of microamperes have been produced for 1+ ions of He, C, O, Ne, Si, Ar, Ti, Fe, Cu, Kr, Xe, Ta, Au, and U. The source is very simple, relying on a glow discharge using a noble gas, between anode and a solid cathode containing the desired species. Ions of both the working gas and ionized sputtered cathode material are extracted, and then the desired species is selected using an ExB filter before being transported into the EBIS trap for charge breeding. The source operates pulsed with long life and excellent stability for most species. Reliable ignition of the discharge at low gas pressure is facilitated by the use of capacitive coupling from a simple toy plasma globe. The source design, and operating experience for the various species, is presented. PMID:24593637

  16. Direct electron transfer of glucose oxidase and biosensing of glucose on hollow sphere-nanostructured conducting polymer/metal oxide composite.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chun Xian; Li, Chang Ming

    2010-10-14

    A hollow sphere-nanostructured conductive polymer/metal oxide composite was synthesized and used to investigate the electrochemical behavior of glucose oxidase, demonstrating a significantly enhanced direct electron transfer ability of glucose oxidase. In particular, the long-standing puzzle of whether enzymatic glucose sensing involves an enzyme direct electron transfer process was studied. The results indicate the mechanism is indeed a glucose oxidase direct electron transfer process with competitive glucose oxidation and oxygen reduction to detect glucose. A glucose biosensor with the glucose oxidase-immobilized nanomaterial was further constructed, demonstrating superior sensitivity and reliability, and providing great potential in clinical applications. PMID:20714592

  17. Hollow Retroreflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A hollow retroreflector is a mirror-like instrument that reflects light and other radiations back to the source. After developing a hollow retroreflector for NASA's Apollo-Soyuz mission, PLX, Inc. continued to expand the technology and develop a variety of retroreflector systems. The Lateral Transfer Hollow Retroreflector maintains precise separation, at any wavelength, of incoming and existing beams regardless of their orientation. It can be used as an instrument or as a component of an optical system. In the laboratory, it offers a new efficient means of beam positioning. In other applications, it connects laser resonators, aligns telescope mirrors and is useful in general boresighting and alignment.

  18. Momentum and energy dependence of the anomalous high-energy dispersion in the electronic structure of high temperature superconductors.

    PubMed

    Inosov, D S; Fink, J; Kordyuk, A A; Borisenko, S V; Zabolotnyy, V B; Schuster, R; Knupfer, M; Büchner, B; Follath, R; Dürr, H A; Eberhardt, W; Hinkov, V; Keimer, B; Berger, H

    2007-12-01

    Using high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy we have studied the momentum and photon energy dependence of the anomalous high-energy dispersion, termed waterfalls, between the Fermi level and 1 eV binding energy in several high-T_{c} superconductors. We observe strong changes of the dispersion between different Brillouin zones and a strong dependence on the photon energy around 75 eV, which we associate with the resonant photoemission at the Cu3p-->3d_{x;{2}-y;{2}} edge. We conclude that the high-energy "waterfall" dispersion results from a strong suppression of the photoemission intensity at the center of the Brillouin zone due to matrix element effects and is, therefore, not an intrinsic feature of the spectral function. This indicates that the new high-energy scale in the electronic structure of cuprates derived from the waterfall-like dispersion may be incorrect. PMID:18233401

  19. Giant anomalous Hall effect in Fe-based microwires grown by focused-electron-beam-induced deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdoba, R.; Lavrijsen, R.; Fernández-Pacheco, A.; Ibarra, M. R.; Schoenaker, F.; Ellis, T.; Barcones-Campo, B.; Kohlhepp, J. T.; Swagten, H. J. M.; Koopmans, B.; Mulders, J. J. L.; De Teresa, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    We report the temperature dependence of the resistivity, the anisotropic magnetoresistance and the Hall effect of iron microwires grown by focused-electron-beam-induced deposition. By modifying the growth conditions in a controllable way, we study wires with iron compositions varying from 45% to 70%, which present different electrical conduction mechanisms, with resistivity values differing over three orders of magnitude. The magnetoresistance depends highly on the composition, and it can be understood by a subtle interplay between the anisotropic magnetoresistance and intergrain magnetoresistance due to their complex microstructure, consisting of an iron-carbon-oxygen amorphous matrix. A giant value for the anomalous Hall effect is found, which we explain by a large contribution of the skew scattering mechanism. The present results emphasize the correlation between the exotic microstructure of the microwires, and their magnetotransport properties.

  20. About a peculiar extra U(1): Z{sup '} discovery limit, muon anomalous magnetic moment, and electron electric dipole moment

    SciTech Connect

    Heo, Jae Ho

    2009-08-01

    The model (Lagrangian) with a peculiar extra U(1)[S. M. Barr and I. Dorsner, Phys. Rev. D 72, 015011 (2005); S. M. Barr and A. Khan, Phys. Rev. D 74, 085023 (2006)] is clearly presented. The assigned extra U(1) gauge charges give a strong constraint to build Lagrangians. The Z{sup '} discovery limits are estimated and predicted at the Tevatron and the LHC. The new contributions of the muon anomalous magnetic moment are investigated at one and two loops, and we predict that the deviation from the standard model may be explained. The electron electric dipole moment could also be generated because of the explicit CP-violation effect in the Higgs sector, and a sizable contribution is expected for a moderately sized CP phase [argument of the CP-odd Higgs], 0.1{<=}sin{delta}{<=}1[6 deg. {<=}arg(A){<=}90 deg.].

  1. Momentum and Energy Dependence of the Anomalous High-Energy Dispersion in the Electronic Structure of High Temperature Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inosov, D. S.; Fink, J.; Kordyuk, A. A.; Borisenko, S. V.; Zabolotnyy, V. B.; Schuster, R.; Knupfer, M.; Büchner, B.; Follath, R.; Dürr, H. A.; Eberhardt, W.; Hinkov, V.; Keimer, B.; Berger, H.

    2007-12-01

    Using high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy we have studied the momentum and photon energy dependence of the anomalous high-energy dispersion, termed waterfalls, between the Fermi level and 1 eV binding energy in several high-Tc superconductors. We observe strong changes of the dispersion between different Brillouin zones and a strong dependence on the photon energy around 75 eV, which we associate with the resonant photoemission at the Cu3p→3dx2-y2 edge. We conclude that the high-energy “waterfall” dispersion results from a strong suppression of the photoemission intensity at the center of the Brillouin zone due to matrix element effects and is, therefore, not an intrinsic feature of the spectral function. This indicates that the new high-energy scale in the electronic structure of cuprates derived from the waterfall-like dispersion may be incorrect.

  2. Anomalous Electron Transport Due to Multiple High Frequency Beam Ion Driven Alfven Eigenmode

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelenkov, N. N.; Stutman, D.; Tritz, K.; Boozer, A.; Delgardo-Aparicio, L.; Fredrickson, E.; Kaye, S.; White, R.

    2010-07-13

    We report on the simulations of recently observed correlations of the core electron transport with the sub-thermal ion cyclotron frequency instabilities in low aspect ratio plasmas of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). In order to model the electron transport of the guiding center code ORBIT is employed. A spectrum of test functions of multiple core localized Global shear Alfven Eigenmode (GAE) instabilities based on a previously developed theory and experimental observations is used to examine the electron transport properties. The simulations exhibit thermal electron transport induced by electron drift orbit stochasticity in the presence of multiple core localized GAE.

  3. Breaking all the invariants: Anomalous electron radiation belt diffusion by pitch angle scattering in the presence of split magnetic drift shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, T. P.

    2014-01-01

    Relativistic electron observations near geostationary orbit routinely show pitch angle distributions peaked away from 90 degrees. These "butterfly" distributions are consistent with magnetic drift shell splitting combined with a radial flux gradient. During magnetic storms, nature adds pitch angle scattering to split drift shells, breaking all three adiabatic invariants of the particle's motion. Therefore, some degree of anomalous radial diffusion is likely, and cross terms between the gyration and drift invariants and between the bounce and drift invariants arise. Using typical assumptions about the pitch angle scattering and the magnetic field topology, we calculate these anomalous diffusion coefficients near geostationary orbit. We show that the anomalous radial diffusion can exceed that due to more traditional drift-resonant wave-particle interactions. We also show that the neglected cross terms, particularly the bounce-drift cross term, can be significant. These results suggest necessary additions to some global electron radiation belt simulations.

  4. Anomalous Hall effect in ZnxFe3-xO4: Universal scaling law and electron localization below the Verwey transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedrecy, N.; Hamieh, M.; Hebert, C.; Escudier, M.; Becerra, L.; Perriere, J.

    2016-08-01

    We show that the well-established universal scaling σxyAHE ˜ σxx1.6 between anomalous Hall and longitudinal conductivities in the low conductivity regime (σxx < 104 Ω-1 cm-1) transforms into the scaling σxyAHE ˜ σxx2 at the onset of strong electron localization. The crossover between the two relations is observed in magnetite-derived ZnxFe3-xO4 thin films where an insulating/hopping regime follows a bad metal/hopping regime below the Verwey transition temperature Tv. Our results demonstrate that electron localization effects come into play in the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) modifying significantly the scaling exponent. In addition, the thermal evolution of the anomalous Hall resistivity suggests the existence of spin polarons whose size would decrease below Tv.

  5. Anomalous correlation effects and unique phase diagram of electron-doped FeSe revealed by photoemission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wen, C H P; Xu, H C; Chen, C; Huang, Z C; Lou, X; Pu, Y J; Song, Q; Xie, B P; Abdel-Hafiez, Mahmoud; Chareev, D A; Vasiliev, A N; Peng, R; Feng, D L

    2016-01-01

    FeSe layer-based superconductors exhibit exotic and distinctive properties. The undoped FeSe shows nematicity and superconductivity, while the heavily electron-doped KxFe2-ySe2 and single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 possess high superconducting transition temperatures that pose theoretical challenges. However, a comprehensive study on the doping dependence of an FeSe layer-based superconductor is still lacking due to the lack of a clean means of doping control. Through angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy studies on K-dosed thick FeSe films and FeSe0.93S0.07 bulk crystals, here we reveal the internal connections between these two types of FeSe-based superconductors, and obtain superconductivity below ∼46 K in an FeSe layer under electron doping without interfacial effects. Moreover, we discover an exotic phase diagram of FeSe with electron doping, including a nematic phase, a superconducting dome, a correlation-driven insulating phase and a metallic phase. Such an anomalous phase diagram unveils the remarkable complexity, and highlights the importance of correlations in FeSe layer-based superconductors. PMID:26952215

  6. Magnetic and anomalous electronic transport properties of the quaternary Heusler alloys Co2Ti1-xFexGe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkateswarlu, B.; Midhunlal, P. V.; Babu, P. D.; Kumar, N. Harish

    2016-06-01

    The half-metallic Heusler alloy Co2TiGe has a ferromagnetic ground state with a low magnetic moment (2 μB). It is free of atomic antisite disorder but has low Curie temperature (~390 K). In contrast the other cobalt based Heusler alloy Co2FeGe has high Curie temperature (~980 K) and high magnetic moment (5.6 μB) while exhibiting antisite disorder and lack of half-metallicity. Hence it is of interest to investigate the magnetic and transport properties of solid solutions of these two materials with contrasting characteristics. We report the structural, magnetic and electronic transport properties of quaternary Co2Ti1-x FexGe (x=0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8) Heusler alloys. The alloys crystallize in L21 structure but with antisite disorder. The magnetization measurements revealed that the alloys were of soft ferromagnetic type with high Curie temperatures. Deviation from Slater-Pauling behavior and drastic change in electronic transport properties with some anomalous features were observed.The complex electronic transport properties have been explained using different scattering mechanisms.

  7. Anomalously strong two-electron one-photon X-ray decay transitions in CO caused by avoided crossing

    PubMed Central

    Couto, Rafael C.; Guarise, Marco; Nicolaou, Alessandro; Jaouen, Nicolas; Chiuzbăian, Gheorghe S.; Lüning, Jan; Ekholm, Victor; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Såthe, Conny; Hennies, Franz; Kimberg, Victor; Guimarães, Freddy F.; Agren, Hans; Gel’mukhanov, Faris; Journel, Loïc; Simon, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The unique opportunity to study and control electron-nuclear quantum dynamics in coupled potentials offered by the resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) technique is utilized to unravel an anomalously strong two-electron one-photon transition from core-excited to Rydberg final states in the CO molecule. High-resolution RIXS measurements of CO in the energy region of 12–14 eV are presented and analyzed by means of quantum simulations using the wave packet propagation formalism and ab initio calculations of potential energy curves and transition dipole moments. The very good overall agreement between the experimental results and the theoretical predictions allows an in-depth interpretation of the salient spectral features in terms of Coulomb mixing of “dark” with “bright” final states leading to an effective two-electron one-photon transition. The present work illustrates that the improved spectral resolution of RIXS spectra achievable today may call for more advanced theories than what has been used in the past. PMID:26860458

  8. Anomalous correlation effects and unique phase diagram of electron-doped FeSe revealed by photoemission spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wen, C. H. P.; Xu, H. C.; Chen, C.; Huang, Z. C.; Lou, X.; Pu, Y. J.; Song, Q.; Xie, B. P.; Abdel-Hafiez, Mahmoud; Chareev, D. A.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Peng, R.; Feng, D. L.

    2016-01-01

    FeSe layer-based superconductors exhibit exotic and distinctive properties. The undoped FeSe shows nematicity and superconductivity, while the heavily electron-doped KxFe2−ySe2 and single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 possess high superconducting transition temperatures that pose theoretical challenges. However, a comprehensive study on the doping dependence of an FeSe layer-based superconductor is still lacking due to the lack of a clean means of doping control. Through angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy studies on K-dosed thick FeSe films and FeSe0.93S0.07 bulk crystals, here we reveal the internal connections between these two types of FeSe-based superconductors, and obtain superconductivity below ∼46 K in an FeSe layer under electron doping without interfacial effects. Moreover, we discover an exotic phase diagram of FeSe with electron doping, including a nematic phase, a superconducting dome, a correlation-driven insulating phase and a metallic phase. Such an anomalous phase diagram unveils the remarkable complexity, and highlights the importance of correlations in FeSe layer-based superconductors. PMID:26952215

  9. Anomalous correlation effects and unique phase diagram of electron-doped FeSe revealed by photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, C. H. P.; Xu, H. C.; Chen, C.; Huang, Z. C.; Lou, X.; Pu, Y. J.; Song, Q.; Xie, B. P.; Abdel-Hafiez, Mahmoud; Chareev, D. A.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Peng, R.; Feng, D. L.

    2016-03-01

    FeSe layer-based superconductors exhibit exotic and distinctive properties. The undoped FeSe shows nematicity and superconductivity, while the heavily electron-doped KxFe2-ySe2 and single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 possess high superconducting transition temperatures that pose theoretical challenges. However, a comprehensive study on the doping dependence of an FeSe layer-based superconductor is still lacking due to the lack of a clean means of doping control. Through angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy studies on K-dosed thick FeSe films and FeSe0.93S0.07 bulk crystals, here we reveal the internal connections between these two types of FeSe-based superconductors, and obtain superconductivity below ~46 K in an FeSe layer under electron doping without interfacial effects. Moreover, we discover an exotic phase diagram of FeSe with electron doping, including a nematic phase, a superconducting dome, a correlation-driven insulating phase and a metallic phase. Such an anomalous phase diagram unveils the remarkable complexity, and highlights the importance of correlations in FeSe layer-based superconductors.

  10. Anomalously strong two-electron one-photon X-ray decay transitions in CO caused by avoided crossing.

    PubMed

    Couto, Rafael C; Guarise, Marco; Nicolaou, Alessandro; Jaouen, Nicolas; Chiuzbăian, Gheorghe S; Lüning, Jan; Ekholm, Victor; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Såthe, Conny; Hennies, Franz; Kimberg, Victor; Guimarães, Freddy F; Agren, Hans; Gel'mukhanov, Faris; Journel, Loïc; Simon, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The unique opportunity to study and control electron-nuclear quantum dynamics in coupled potentials offered by the resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) technique is utilized to unravel an anomalously strong two-electron one-photon transition from core-excited to Rydberg final states in the CO molecule. High-resolution RIXS measurements of CO in the energy region of 12-14 eV are presented and analyzed by means of quantum simulations using the wave packet propagation formalism and ab initio calculations of potential energy curves and transition dipole moments. The very good overall agreement between the experimental results and the theoretical predictions allows an in-depth interpretation of the salient spectral features in terms of Coulomb mixing of "dark" with "bright" final states leading to an effective two-electron one-photon transition. The present work illustrates that the improved spectral resolution of RIXS spectra achievable today may call for more advanced theories than what has been used in the past. PMID:26860458

  11. Combined infrared multiphoton dissociation and electron capture dissociation with a hollow electron beam in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tsybin, Youri O; Witt, Matthias; Baykut, Gökhan; Kjeldsen, Frank; Håkansson, Per

    2003-01-01

    An electron injection system based on an indirectly heated ring-shaped dispenser cathode has been developed and installed in a 7 Tesla Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer. This new hardware design allows high-rate electron capture dissociation (ECD) to be carried out by a hollow electron beam coaxial with the ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) trap. Infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) can also be performed with an on-axis IR-laser beam passing through a hole at the centre of the dispenser cathode. Electron and photon irradiation times of the order of 100 ms are required for efficient ECD and IRMPD, respectively. As ECD and IRMPD generate fragments of different types (mostly c, z and b, y, respectively), complementary structural information that improves the characterization of peptides and proteins by FTICR mass spectrometry can be obtained. The developed technique enables the consecutive or simultaneous use of the ECD and IRMPD methods within a single FTICR experimental sequence and on the same ensemble of trapped ions in multistage tandem (MS/MS/MS or MS(n)) mass spectrometry. Flexible changing between ECD and IRMPD should present advantages for the analysis of protein digests separated by liquid chromatography prior to FTICRMS. Furthermore, ion activation by either electron or laser irradiation prior to, as well as after, dissociation by IRMPD or ECD increases the efficiency of ion fragmentation, including the w-type fragment ion formation, and improves sequencing of peptides with multiple disulfide bridges. The developed instrumental configuration is essential for combined ECD and IRMPD on FTICR mass spectrometers with limited access into the ICR trap. PMID:12872281

  12. Use of multiwavelength emission from hollow cathode lamp for measurement of state resolved atom density of metal vapor produced by electron beam evaporation.

    PubMed

    Majumder, A; Dikshit, B; Bhatia, M S; Mago, V K

    2008-09-01

    State resolved atom population of metal vapor having low-lying metastable states departs from equilibrium value. It needs to be experimentally investigated. This paper reports the use of hollow cathode lamp based atomic absorption spectroscopy technique to measure online the state resolved atom density (ground and metastable) of metal vapor in an atomic beam produced by a high power electron gun. In particular, the advantage of availability of multiwavelength emission in hollow cathode lamp is used to determine the atom density in different states. Here, several transitions pertaining to a given state have also been invoked to obtain the mean value of atom density thereby providing an opportunity for in situ averaging. It is observed that at higher source temperatures the atoms from metastable state relax to the ground state. This is ascribed to competing processes of atom-atom and electron-atom collisions. The formation of collision induced virtual source is inferred from measurement of atom density distribution profile along the width of the atomic beam. The total line-of-sight average atom density measured by absorption technique using hollow cathode lamp is compared to that measured by atomic vapor deposition method. The presence of collisions is further supported by determination of beaming exponent by numerically fitting the data. PMID:19044405

  13. Use of multiwavelength emission from hollow cathode lamp for measurement of state resolved atom density of metal vapor produced by electron beam evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Majumder, A.; Dikshit, B.; Bhatia, M. S.; Mago, V. K.

    2008-09-15

    State resolved atom population of metal vapor having low-lying metastable states departs from equilibrium value. It needs to be experimentally investigated. This paper reports the use of hollow cathode lamp based atomic absorption spectroscopy technique to measure online the state resolved atom density (ground and metastable) of metal vapor in an atomic beam produced by a high power electron gun. In particular, the advantage of availability of multiwavelength emission in hollow cathode lamp is used to determine the atom density in different states. Here, several transitions pertaining to a given state have also been invoked to obtain the mean value of atom density thereby providing an opportunity for in situ averaging. It is observed that at higher source temperatures the atoms from metastable state relax to the ground state. This is ascribed to competing processes of atom-atom and electron-atom collisions. The formation of collision induced virtual source is inferred from measurement of atom density distribution profile along the width of the atomic beam. The total line-of-sight average atom density measured by absorption technique using hollow cathode lamp is compared to that measured by atomic vapor deposition method. The presence of collisions is further supported by determination of beaming exponent by numerically fitting the data.

  14. Anomalously Large Chiral Sensitivity in the Dissociative Electron Attachment of 10-Iodocamphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreiling, J. M.; Lewis, F. W.; Mills, J. D.; Gay, T. J.

    2016-03-01

    We have studied dissociative electron attachment (DEA) between low energy (≤0.6 eV ) longitudinally polarized electrons and gas-phase chiral targets of 3-bromocamphor (C10 H15 BrO ), 3-iodocamphor (C10 H15 IO ), and 10-iodocamphor. The DEA rate depends on the sign of the incident electron helicity for a given target handedness, and it varies with both the atomic number (Z ) and location of the heaviest atom in the molecule. While simple dynamic mechanisms can account for the asymmetry dependence on Z , they fail to explain the large asymmetry variation with the heavy atom location.

  15. Anomalously Large Chiral Sensitivity in the Dissociative Electron Attachment of 10-Iodocamphor.

    PubMed

    Dreiling, J M; Lewis, F W; Mills, J D; Gay, T J

    2016-03-01

    We have studied dissociative electron attachment (DEA) between low energy (≤0.6  eV) longitudinally polarized electrons and gas-phase chiral targets of 3-bromocamphor (C_{10}H_{15}BrO), 3-iodocamphor (C_{10}H_{15}IO), and 10-iodocamphor. The DEA rate depends on the sign of the incident electron helicity for a given target handedness, and it varies with both the atomic number (Z) and location of the heaviest atom in the molecule. While simple dynamic mechanisms can account for the asymmetry dependence on Z, they fail to explain the large asymmetry variation with the heavy atom location. PMID:26991173

  16. Understanding the dramatic role of anomalous dispersion on the measurement of electron densities in plasmas using interferometers

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, J; Johnson, W R; Iglesias, C A; Scofield, J H

    2005-07-20

    For decades the electron density of plasmas has been measured using optical interferometers. With the availability of good X-ray laser sources in the last decade interferometers have been extended into the wavelength range 14-47 nm, which has enabled researchers to probe even higher density plasmas. The data analysis assumes the index of refraction is due only to the free electrons, which makes the index less than one. Recent interferometer experiments in Al plasmas observed plasmas with index of refraction greater than one at 14 nm and brought into question the validity of the usual formula for calculating the index. In this paper we show how the anomalous dispersion from bound electrons can dominate the free electron contribution to the index of refraction in many plasmas and make the index greater than one or enhance the contribution to the index such that one would greatly overestimate the density of the plasma using interferometers. Using a new average-atom code we calculate the index of refraction in many plasmas at different temperatures for photon energies from 0 to 100 eV and compare against calculations done with OPAL. We also present examples of other plasmas that may have index of refraction greater than one at X-ray laser energies. During the next decade X-ray free electron lasers and other X-ray sources will be available to probe a wider variety of plasmas at higher densities and shorter wavelengths so understanding the index of refraction in plasmas will be even more essential.

  17. Many-electron effects in anomalous elastic scattering of linearly polarized x-ray photons by Xe near the K-edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopersky, A. N.; Yavna, V. A.; Popov, V. A.

    1997-11-01

    Within the non-relativistic approximation the effect of radial monopole rearrangement of electron shells within the field of a vacancy and of the processes of one-photon double excitation - ionization on the differential cross section of anomalous non-zero-angle elastic scattering of linearly polarized x-ray photons by the Xe atom in the region of its 1s-shell ionization threshold is studied. Theoretical results for the anomalous dispersion region of scattering demonstrate a strong dependence of the cross section value on the approximation used.

  18. Effect of anomalous electron cross-field transport on electron energy distribution function in a DC-RF magnetized plasma discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Donnelly, Vincent; Kaganovich, Igor; Godyak, Valery

    2013-09-01

    The application of the magnetic field in a low pressure plasma can cause a spatial separation of cold and hot electron groups. This so-called magnetic filter effect is not well understood and is the subject of our studies. In this work, we investigate electron energy distribution function in a DC-RF plasma discharge with crossed electric and magnetic field operating at sub-mtorr pressure range of xenon gas. Experimental studies showed that the increase of the magnetic field leads to a more uniform profile of the electron temperature across the magnetic field. This surprising result indicates the importance of anomalous electron transport that causes mixing of hot and cold electrons. High-speed imaging and probe measurements revealed a coherent structure rotating in E cross B direction with frequency of a few kHz. Similar to spoke oscillations reported for Hall thrusters, this rotating structure conducts the largest fraction of the cross-field current. This work was supported by the US DOE under Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  19. Effect of anomalous electron cross-field transport on electron energy distribution function in a DC-RF magnetized plasma discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Donnelly, Vincent M.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Godyak, Valery

    2013-10-01

    The application of the magnetic field in a low pressure plasma can cause a spatial separation of cold and hot electron groups. This so-called magnetic filter effect is not well understood and is the subject of our studies. In this work, we investigate electron energy distribution function in a DC-RF plasma discharge with crossed electric and magnetic field operating at sub-mtorr pressure range of xenon gas. Experimental studies showed that the increase of the magnetic field leads to a more uniform profile of the electron temperature across the magnetic field. This surprising result indicates the importance of anomalous electron transport that causes mixing of hot and cold electrons. High-speed imaging and probe measurements revealed a coherent structure rotating in E cross B direction with frequency of a few kHz. Similar to spoke oscillations reported for Hall thrusters, this rotating structure conducts the largest fraction of the cross-field current. This work was supported by DOE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  20. Anomalous electronic structure and magnetoresistance in TaAs2

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Yongkang; McDonald, R. D.; Rosa, P. F. S.; Scott, B.; Wakeham, N.; Ghimire, N. J.; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Ronning, F.

    2016-01-01

    We report that the change in resistance of a material in a magnetic field reflects its electronic state. In metals with weakly- or non-interacting electrons, the resistance typically increases upon the application of a magnetic field. In contrast, negative magnetoresistance may appear under some circumstances, e.g., in metals with anisotropic Fermi surfaces or with spin-disorder scattering and semimetals with Dirac or Weyl electronic structures. Here we show that the non-magnetic semimetal TaAs2 possesses a very large negative magnetoresistance, with an unknown scattering mechanism. In conclusion, density functional calculations find that TaAs2 is a new topological semimetal [Z2 invariant (0;111)] without Dirac dispersion, demonstrating that a negative magnetoresistance in non-magnetic semimetals cannot be attributed uniquely to the Adler-Bell-Jackiw chiral anomaly of bulk Dirac/Weyl fermions.

  1. Hydrogen adsorption and anomalous electronic properties of nitrogen-doped graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Yoshitaka; Saito, Susumu

    2014-04-21

    We investigate hydrogen adsorption effects on stabilities and electronic properties of nitrogen defects in graphene using first-principles electronic-structure calculations within the density-functional theory. We find that the adsorption of hydrogen atoms on the pyridine-type nitrogen defects in graphene becomes energetically favorable, whereas in the case of the substitutional nitrogen defect the hydrogen adsorption becomes unfavorable. We also find that a transition from p-type to n-type doping properties occurs by hydrogen adsorption on the pyridine-type defects, suggesting that even the carrier type is controllable in nitrogen-doped graphene.

  2. Efficiency enhancement of anomalous-Doppler electron cyclotron masers with tapered magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Chao-Ran; Hou, Zhi-Ling; Kong, Ling-Bao E-mail: pkliu@pku.edu.cn; Beijing Key Laboratory of Harmful Chemicals Analysis and School of Science, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 ; Liu, Pu-Kun E-mail: pkliu@pku.edu.cn; Du, Chao-Hai; Jin, Hai-Bo

    2014-02-15

    The efficiency of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers (ECM) is usually low, thus limiting the practical applications. Here, a method of tapered magnetic field is introduced for the efficiency enhancement of the slow-wave ECM. The numerical calculations show that the tapered magnetic-field method can enhance the efficiency of slow-wave ECM significantly. The effect of beam electron velocity spread on the efficiency has also been studied. Although the velocity spread reduces the efficiency, a great enhancement of efficiency can still be obtained by the tapered magnetic field method.

  3. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy of anomalous plutonium behavior in nuclear waste materials.

    PubMed

    Buck, Edgar C; Finn, Patricia A; Bates, John K

    2004-01-01

    Plutonium-enriched layer has been observed in corroded spent uranium oxide fuel (CSNF). These Pu-enriched regions were examined with analytical transmission electron microscopy combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). The enriched region also contained U, Am, Ru, Zr, but only minor enrichment of rare earth elements. The Pu, possibly as Pu(V) according to EELS measurements, was dispersed within re-precipitated uranium oxide (identified as U3O8) nano-crystals between U(VI) secondary phases and the CSNF surface. The U, Pu, and Am enrichment was observed in the corrosion products with tests on different nuclear fuels. This may have implications for the long-term behavior of CSNF under storage in a geologic waste repository. Furthermore, there may be an increased potential for the generation of Pu-bearing colloids from this type of weathered CSNF. PMID:15003610

  4. Electron Energy-loss Spectroscopy of Anomalous Plutonium Behavior in Nuclear Waste Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, Edgar C.; Finn, patricia A.; Bates, John K.

    2004-06-01

    Plutonium-enriched layer has been observed in corroded spent uranium oxide fuel (CSNF). These Pu-enriched regions were examined with analytical transmission electron microscopy combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The enriched region also contained U, Am, Ru, Zr, but only minor enrichment of rare earth elements. The Pu, possibly as Pu(V) according to EELS measurements, was dispersed within re-precipitated uranium oxide (identified as U3O8) nano-crystals between U(VI) secondary phases and the CSNF surface. The U, Pu, and Am enrichment was observed in the corrosion products with tests on different nuclear fuels. This may have implications for the long-term behavior of CSNF under storage in a geologic waste repository. Furthermore, there may be an increased potential for the generation of Pu-bearing colloids from this type of weathered CSNF.

  5. Anomalous organic magnetoresistance from competing carrier-spin-dependent interactions with localized electronic and nuclear spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flatté, Michael E.

    Transport of carriers through disordered electronic energy landscapes occurs via hopping or tunneling through various sites, and can enhance the effects of carrier spin dynamics on the transport. When incoherent hopping preserves the spin orientation of carriers, the magnetic-field-dependent correlations between pairs of spins influence the charge conductivity of the material. Examples of these phenomena have been identified in hopping transport in organic semiconductors and colloidal quantum dots, as well as tunneling through oxide barriers in complex oxide devices, among other materials. The resulting room-temperature magnetic field effects on the conductivity or electroluminescence require external fields of only a few milliTesla. These magnetic field effects can be dramatically modified by changes in the local spin environment. Recent theoretical and experimental work has identified a regime for low-field magnetoresistance in organic semiconductors in which the spin-relaxing effects of localized nuclear spins and electronic spins interfere1. The regime is studied experimentally by the controlled addition of localized electronic spins, through the addition of a stable free radical (galvinoxyl) to a material (MEH-PPV) that exhibits substantial room-temperature magnetoresistance (20 initially suppressed by the doping, as the localized electronic spin mixes one of the two spins whose correlation controls the transport. At intermediate doping, when one spin is fully decohered but the other is not, there is a regime where the magnetoresistance is insensitive to the doping level. For much greater doping concentrations the magnetoresistance is fully suppressed as both spins that control the charge conductivity of the material are mixed. The behavior is described within a theoretical model describing the effect of carrier spin dynamics on the current. Generalizations to amorphous and other disordered crystalline semiconductors will also be described. This work was

  6. Anomalous electron loading in SLAC 5045 klystron and relativistic klystron input cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, R.F.; Fowkes, R.W.; Lavine, T.L.; Miller, R.H.; Vlieks, A.E.

    1989-03-01

    Recent studies of RF breakup and instability in the SLAC 5045 klystrons have revealed that many production klystrons show loading of the input cavity by low energy electrons even under cold cathode no beam conditions. Sometime after the onset of the RF drive pulse, the input cavity absorbs a portion of the incident RF drive that would otherwise be reflected from the not-beam-loaded cavity. This power absorption is a function of drive level, and of axial magnetic field surrounding the cavity. No power absorption is present when the axial magnetic field is zero. This same phenomenon has been observed in the input cavity of relativistic klystron experiments being conducted as part of the SLAC-LBL-LLNL development program. The phenomenon may be associated with RF breakup and RF instability in SLAC 5045 klystrons, and with unstable pulse shortening in the relativistic klystron experiments. This paper outlines some old and new observations of microwave beam device malfunctions that probably are associated with low energy electron fluxes in the vacuum environments of microwave power devices. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Anomalous behavior of LiF:Mg,Cu,P (TLD100H) irradiated with electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triolo, A.; Brai, M.; Bartolotta, A.; Marrale, M.

    2006-12-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimeters of LiF:Mg,Cu,P (TLD100H) were exposed to 60Co γ-ray, protons, high energy electrons and the glow curves were analyzed. We observed an unusual behavior of the TL response of dosimeters to 7 and 14 MeV electron beam. In fact the relative amplitude between two of the five peaks (2° and 3° peaks) assumes values smaller than the unity for doses up to 5 Gy and values greater than the unity for doses equal to or greater than 10 Gy. A possible explanation of this behavior is given adopting a model of the formation of the peaks 2° and 3° and examining the different ways of energy release in matter for each beam. To perform this analysis we deconvoluted the glow curve adopting general order kinetic (GOK) equation for the description of the peak shape, determining the number of peaks and their trapping parameter (E,s,n0).

  8. Anomalous electron cooling observed by the eiscat within the dusty nightside auroral dynamo layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, Evgeny; Kangas, Jorma; Vallinkoski, Matti; Shalimov, Sergey

    In the present study we analyze parameters of the lower ionosphere, measured by the EISCAT radar facility at the zenith of Tromsø auroral observatory during the ERRRIS campaign. Data used consists of 20 different nights of observations and includes approximately 2000 measurements. At that 75% and 25% of the data corresponds to measured ionospheric electric field that is below and above the threshold of the Farley-Buneman instability (which is 15-20 mV/m), respectively. In the first part of our analysis the height profiles of the electron and ion temperature difference (Te-Ti) (including standard deviation, STD) for both, small and large electric fields were calculated using the superimposed epoch method. It was shown that: 1) for the large electric fields the profile (Te-Ti) with Te>Ti takes the maximum (60-70 K) at 115 km in agreement with the standard conception; 2) for the small electric fields the thermal anomaly was revealed when Te

  9. Anomalous one-electron processes in the chemistry of uranium nitrogen multiple bonds.

    PubMed

    Mullane, Kimberly C; Lewis, Andrew J; Yin, Haolin; Carroll, Patrick J; Schelter, Eric J

    2014-09-01

    Novel reaction pathways are illustrated in the synthesis of uranium(IV), uranium(V), and uranium(VI) monoimido complexes. In contrast to the straightforward preparation of U(V)(═NSiMe3)[N(SiMe3)2]3 (1), the synthesis of a uranium(V) tritylimido complex, U(V)(═NCPh3)[N(SiMe3)2]3 (4), from U(III)[N(SiMe3)2]3 and Ph3CN3 was found to proceed through multiple one-electron steps. Whereas the oxidation of 1 with copper(II) salts produced the uranium(VI) monoimido complexes U(VI)(═NSiMe3)X[N(SiMe3)2]3 (X = Cl, Br), the reaction of 4 with CuBr2 undergoes sterically induced reduction to form the uranium(VI) monoimido complex U(VI)(═NCPh3)Br2[N(SiMe3)2]2, demonstrating a striking difference in reactivity based on imido substituent. The facile reduction of compounds 1 and 4 with KC8 allowed for the synthesis of the uranium(IV) monoimido derivatives, K[U(IV)(═NSiMe3)[N(SiMe3)2]3] (1-K) and K[U(IV)(═NCPh3)[N(SiMe3)2]3] (4-K), respectively. In contrast, an analogous uranium(IV) monoimido complex, K[U(IV)(═NPh(F))[N(SiMe3)Ph(F)

  10. Applications of anomalous diffraction systems, generation of attosecond electron and photon pulses and Raman amplification by stimulated emission of radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartak, Sameer Dinkar

    1998-10-01

    Anomalous diffraction is scattering process due to phase distortion introduced on incident phase front by scattering object. Phase mask or hologram, Christiansen filter, PDLC are examples of an anomalously diffracting systems. Phase hologram modulates an input wavefront to produce a wavefront which when Fourier transformed using a converging lens gives desired image on to a screen. We made a nonlinear optical element using phase mask made up of nonlinear material. It forms a lens because of nonlinear index of refraction when a high intensity beam is incident. This lens Fourier transforms the phase mask and images the phase mask. This nonlinear optical element can be used for various applications like image gating and 3-D memory writing and read out. Christiansen filter (CF) is a two component scattering system whose dispersion curves intersect at certain wavelength. Thus light corresponding to this wavelength traverses the filter without any scattering and light at other wavelengths gets scattered. This results in narrow wavelength dependent transmission curve centered at the index matching wavelength. When materials with an intensity dependent refractive index are used to make a CF, the index matching condition of CF becomes function of the input intensity resulting in intensity dependent beam size and transmittance through the filter. This property of nonlinear CF can be used to switch beam optically in both self and cross-modulation modes. Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystal (PDLC) is dispersion of liquid crystal droplets in polymer whose index of refraction is same as ordinary refractive index of liquid crystal. PDLC shows voltage dependent scattering and are used in flat panel displays. We used this element as voltage controlled intracavity loss element in a laser cavity to make a lasing pixel projection display. Output of this pixel shows all desired properties for a projection display like narrow linewidth, high brightness, TTL switching compatibility and

  11. Fast Ignition relevant study of the flux of high intensity laser generated electrons via a hollow cone into a laser-imploded plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M; Adam, J; Akli, K; Borgheshi, M; Chen, M; Evans, R; Freeman, R; Hatchett, S; Hill, J; Heron, A; King, J; Lancaster, K; Mackinnon, A; Norreys, P; Phillips, T; Romagnani, L; Snavely, R; Stephens, R; Stoeckl, C

    2005-10-11

    An integrated experiment relevant to fast ignition is described. A Cu doped CD spherical shell target is imploded around an inserted hollow Au cone by a six beam 600J, 1ns laser to a peak density of 4gcm{sup -3} and a diameter of 100 {micro}m. A 10 ps, 20TW laser pulse is focused into the cone at the time of peak compression. The flux of high-energy electrons through the imploded material is determined from the yield of Cu K{alpha} fluorescence by comparison with a Monte Carlo model and is estimated to carry 15% of the laser energy. Collisional and Ohmic heating are modeled. An electron spectrometer shows significantly greater reduction of the transmitted electron flux than is due to binary collisions and Ohmic potential. Enhanced scattering by instability-induced magnetic fields is suggested.

  12. Anomalous High-Energy Waterfall-Like Electronic Structure in 5 d Transition Metal Oxide Sr2IrO4 with a Strong Spin-Orbit Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Yu, Li; Jia, Xiaowen; Zhao, Jianzhou; Weng, Hongming; Peng, Yingying; Chen, Chaoyu; Xie, Zhuojin; Mou, Daixiang; He, Junfeng; Liu, Xu; Feng, Ya; Yi, Hemian; Zhao, Lin; Liu, Guodong; He, Shaolong; Dong, Xiaoli; Zhang, Jun; Xu, Zuyan; Chen, Chuangtian; Cao, Gang; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; Zhou, X. J.

    2015-01-01

    The low energy electronic structure of Sr2IrO4 has been well studied and understood in terms of an effective Jeff = 1/2 Mott insulator model. However, little work has been done in studying its high energy electronic behaviors. Here we report a new observation of the anomalous high energy electronic structure in Sr2IrO4. By taking high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission measurements on Sr2IrO4 over a wide energy range, we have revealed for the first time that the high energy electronic structures show unusual nearly-vertical bands that extend over a large energy range. Such anomalous high energy behaviors resemble the high energy waterfall features observed in the cuprate superconductors. While strong electron correlation plays an important role in producing high energy waterfall features in the cuprate superconductors, the revelation of the high energy anomalies in Sr2IrO4, which exhibits strong spin-orbit coupling and a moderate electron correlation, points to an unknown and novel route in generating exotic electronic excitations. PMID:26267653

  13. Anomalous High-Energy Waterfall-Like Electronic Structure in 5 d Transition Metal Oxide Sr2IrO4 with a Strong Spin-Orbit Coupling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Yu, Li; Jia, Xiaowen; Zhao, Jianzhou; Weng, Hongming; Peng, Yingying; Chen, Chaoyu; Xie, Zhuojin; Mou, Daixiang; He, Junfeng; Liu, Xu; Feng, Ya; Yi, Hemian; Zhao, Lin; Liu, Guodong; He, Shaolong; Dong, Xiaoli; Zhang, Jun; Xu, Zuyan; Chen, Chuangtian; Cao, Gang; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; Zhou, X J

    2015-01-01

    The low energy electronic structure of Sr2IrO4 has been well studied and understood in terms of an effective Jeff = 1/2 Mott insulator model. However, little work has been done in studying its high energy electronic behaviors. Here we report a new observation of the anomalous high energy electronic structure in Sr2IrO4. By taking high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission measurements on Sr2IrO4 over a wide energy range, we have revealed for the first time that the high energy electronic structures show unusual nearly-vertical bands that extend over a large energy range. Such anomalous high energy behaviors resemble the high energy waterfall features observed in the cuprate superconductors. While strong electron correlation plays an important role in producing high energy waterfall features in the cuprate superconductors, the revelation of the high energy anomalies in Sr2IrO4, which exhibits strong spin-orbit coupling and a moderate electron correlation, points to an unknown and novel route in generating exotic electronic excitations. PMID:26267653

  14. Anomalous High-Energy Waterfall-Like Electronic Structure in 5 d Transition Metal Oxide Sr2IrO4 with a Strong Spin-Orbit Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Yu, Li; Jia, Xiaowen; Zhao, Jianzhou; Weng, Hongming; Peng, Yingying; Chen, Chaoyu; Xie, Zhuojin; Mou, Daixiang; He, Junfeng; Liu, Xu; Feng, Ya; Yi, Hemian; Zhao, Lin; Liu, Guodong; He, Shaolong; Dong, Xiaoli; Zhang, Jun; Xu, Zuyan; Chen, Chuangtian; Cao, Gang; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; Zhou, X. J.

    2015-08-01

    The low energy electronic structure of Sr2IrO4 has been well studied and understood in terms of an effective Jeff = 1/2 Mott insulator model. However, little work has been done in studying its high energy electronic behaviors. Here we report a new observation of the anomalous high energy electronic structure in Sr2IrO4. By taking high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission measurements on Sr2IrO4 over a wide energy range, we have revealed for the first time that the high energy electronic structures show unusual nearly-vertical bands that extend over a large energy range. Such anomalous high energy behaviors resemble the high energy waterfall features observed in the cuprate superconductors. While strong electron correlation plays an important role in producing high energy waterfall features in the cuprate superconductors, the revelation of the high energy anomalies in Sr2IrO4, which exhibits strong spin-orbit coupling and a moderate electron correlation, points to an unknown and novel route in generating exotic electronic excitations.

  15. Anomalous electrodynamic explosions in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Aspden, H.

    1986-06-01

    The recently reported Graneau experiments on electrodynamic explosions in liquids, which reveal anomalous longitudinal electrodynamic forces of the order of 10/sup 4/ times greater than expected, verify the need for a term in the law of electrodynamics that corresponds to the ion/electron mass ratio. This confirms an earlier theoretical interpretation of the anomalous cathode reaction forces found in the vacuum arc.

  16. Anomalous Local Fermi Liquid in f2-Singlet Configuration: Impurity Model for Heavy-Electron System UPt3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yotsuhashi, Satoshi; Miyake, Kazumasa; Kusunose, Hiroaki

    2016-03-01

    It is shown by the Wilson numerical renormalization group method that a strongly correlated impurity with a crystalline-electric-field singlet ground state in the f2-configuration exhibits an anomalous local Fermi liquid state in which the static magnetic susceptibility remains an uncorrelated value while the NMR relaxation rate is enhanced in proportion to the square of the mass enhancement factor. Namely, the Korringa-Shiba relation is apparently broken. This feature closely matches the anomalous behaviors observed in UPt3, i.e., the coexistence of an unenhanced value of the Knight shift due to quasiparticles contribution (the decrease across the superconducting transition) and the enhanced relaxation rate of NMR. Such an anomalous Fermi liquid behavior suggests that the Fermi liquid corrections for the susceptibility are highly anisotropic.

  17. Model of a Hollow Cathode Insert Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.; Polk, James E.

    2004-01-01

    A 2-D axisymmetric fluid model of the plasma in the insert region of a hollow cathode is presented. The level of sophistication included in the model is motivated in part by the need to determine quantitatively plasma fluxes to the emitter surface. The ultimate goal is to assess whether plasma effects can degrade the life of impregnated inserts beyond those documented throughout the 30-50 year history of vacuum cathode technologies. Results from simulations of a 1.2-cm diameter cathode operating at a discharge current of 25 A, and a gas flow rate of 5 sccm, suggest that approximately 10 A of electron current, and 3.5 A of ion current return to the emitter surface. The total emitted electron current computed by the model is about 35 A. Comparisons with plasma measurements suggest that anomalous heating of the plasma due to two-stream instabilities is possible near the orifice region. Solution to the heavy species energy equation, with classical transport and no viscous effects, predicts heavy species temperatures as high as 2640 K.

  18. The plasma properties and electron emission characteristics of near-zero differential resistance of hollow cathode-based plasma contactors with a discharge chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Kan; Farnell, Casey C.; Williams, John D.

    2014-08-15

    The formation of electron emission-bias voltage (I-V) characteristics of near-zero differential resistance in the cathodic plasma contactor for bare electrodynamic tether applications, based on a hollow cathode embedded in a ring-cusp ionization stage, is studied. The existence of such an I-V regime is important to achieve low impedance performance without being affected by the space plasma properties for a cathodic plasma contactor. Experimental data on the plasma structure and properties downstream from the ionization stage are presented as functions of the xenon flow rate and the electron emission current. The electrons were emitted from the cathode to the cylindrical vacuum chamber wall (r = 0.9 m) under ≈10{sup −5 }Torr of vacuum pressure. The ring-cusp configuration selected for the plasma contactor created a 125-Gauss axial field near the cathode orifice, along with a large-volume 50-Gauss magnitude pocket in the stage. A baseline ion energy cost of ≈300 eV/ion was measured in the ionization stage when no electrons were emitted to the vacuum chamber wall. In addition, the anode fall growth limited the maximum propellant unitization to below ≈75% in the discharge loss curves for this ion stage. Detailed measurements on the plasma properties were carried out for the no-electron emission and 3 A emission conditions. The experimental data are compared with 1-D models, and the effectiveness of the model is discussed. The four key issues that played important roles in the process of building the near-zero different resistance I-V regime are: a significant amount of ionization by the emission electrons, a decrease in the number of reflected electrons in the plume, the electron-temperature increment, and low initial ion energy at the source outlet.

  19. The plasma properties and electron emission characteristics of near-zero differential resistance of hollow cathode-based plasma contactors with a discharge chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Kan; Farnell, Casey C.; Williams, John D.

    2014-08-01

    The formation of electron emission-bias voltage (I-V) characteristics of near-zero differential resistance in the cathodic plasma contactor for bare electrodynamic tether applications, based on a hollow cathode embedded in a ring-cusp ionization stage, is studied. The existence of such an I-V regime is important to achieve low impedance performance without being affected by the space plasma properties for a cathodic plasma contactor. Experimental data on the plasma structure and properties downstream from the ionization stage are presented as functions of the xenon flow rate and the electron emission current. The electrons were emitted from the cathode to the cylindrical vacuum chamber wall (r = 0.9 m) under ≈10-5 Torr of vacuum pressure. The ring-cusp configuration selected for the plasma contactor created a 125-Gauss axial field near the cathode orifice, along with a large-volume 50-Gauss magnitude pocket in the stage. A baseline ion energy cost of ≈300 eV/ion was measured in the ionization stage when no electrons were emitted to the vacuum chamber wall. In addition, the anode fall growth limited the maximum propellant unitization to below ≈75% in the discharge loss curves for this ion stage. Detailed measurements on the plasma properties were carried out for the no-electron emission and 3 A emission conditions. The experimental data are compared with 1-D models, and the effectiveness of the model is discussed. The four key issues that played important roles in the process of building the near-zero different resistance I-V regime are: a significant amount of ionization by the emission electrons, a decrease in the number of reflected electrons in the plume, the electron-temperature increment, and low initial ion energy at the source outlet.

  20. Fast ignition relevant study of the flux of high intensity laser-generated electrons via a hollow cone into a laser-imploded plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M. H.; Chen, M. H.; Hatchett, S. P.; Hill, J. M.; King, J. A.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Patel, P.; Phillips, T.; Snavely, R. A.; Town, R.; Adam, J. C.; Heron, A.; Akli, K. U.; Stephens, R.; Borghesi, M.; Romagnani, L.; Zepf, M.; Evans, R. G.; Freeman, R. R.; Habara, H.

    2008-02-15

    An integrated experiment relevant to fast ignition . A Cu-doped deuterated polymer spherical shell target with an inserted hollow Au cone is imploded by a six-beam 900-J, 1-ns laser. A 10-ps, 70-J laser pulse is focused into the cone at the time of peak compression. The flux of high-energy electrons through the imploded material is determined from the yield of Cu K{alpha} fluorescence by comparison with a Monte Carlo model. The electrons are estimated to carry about 15% of the laser energy. Collisional and Ohmic heating are modeled, and Ohmic effects are shown to be relatively unimportant. An electron spectrometer shows significantly greater reduction of the transmitted electron flux than is calculated in the model. Enhanced scattering by instability-induced magnetic fields is suggested. An extension of this fluor-based technique to measurement of coupling efficiency to the ignition hot spot in future larger-scale fast ignition experiments is outlined.

  1. Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of the Origins of Anomalous Particle Size Distributions in Supported Metal Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Benavidez, Angelica D.; Kovarik, Libor; Genc, Arda; Agrawal, Nitin; Larsson, Elin M.; Hansen, Thomas W.; Karim, Ayman M.; Datye, Abhaya K.

    2012-10-31

    In this Environmental TEM (ETEM) study of supported Pt and Pd model catalysts, individual nanoparticles were tracked during heat treatments at temperatures up to 600°C in H2, O2, and vacuum. We found anomalous growth of nanoparticles occurred during the early stages of catalyst sintering wherein some particles started to grow significantly larger than the mean, resulting in a broadening of the particle size distribution. We can rule out sample non-uniformity as a cause for the growth of these large particles, since images were recorded prior to heat treatments. The anomalous growth of these particles may help explain particle size distributions in heterogeneous catalysts which often show particles that are significantly larger than the mean, resulting in a long tail to the right. It has been suggested that particle migration and coalescence could be the likely cause for the broad size distributions. This study shows that anomalous growth of nanoparticles can occur under conditions where Ostwald ripening is the primary sintering mechanism.

  2. A New Geometric Method Based on Two-Dimensional Transmission Electron Microscopy for Analysis of Interior versus Exterior Pd Loading on Hollow Carbon Nanofibers

    SciTech Connect

    Shuai, Danmeng; Wang, Chong M.; Genc, Arda; Werth, Charles J.

    2011-04-18

    Hallow carbon nanofibers (CNFs) are being explored as catalyst supports because of their unique properties; catalytic activities with both interior and exterior metal loadings are being evaluated. Electron tomography (3D transmission electron microscopy, 3D TEM) has been used to estimate internal versus external loading of metal nanoclusters. However, this method is time consuming and requires a specialized TEM. We prepared three hollow CNF supported Pd samples with various Pd localizations, and developed a geometric analysis method based on 2D TEM images to estimate Pd internal versus external loading percentages. Results show the similar localization for the same sample in terms of the number, surface area, and mass of Pd nanoclusters but distinct values for different samples. To test our method, we compare results for one segment of a CNF using both 3D scanning transmission electron microscopy (3D TEM) and our new 2D geometic analysis method. Agreement is within 15.1%. Our results also agree with 3D TEM results from the literature for similarly prepared Pd on CNFs (within 5.6%). Our geometric analysis method is proposed as a more straightforward and fast way to evaluate metal nanocluster localizations on tubular supports.

  3. Anomalous Arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    In this composite image of spiral galaxy M106 (NGC 4258), optical data from the Digitized Sky Survey is shown as yellow, radio data from the Very Large Array appears as purple, X-ray data from Chandra is coded blue, and infrared data from the Spitzer Space Telescope appears red. Two anomalous arms, which aren't visible at optical wavelengths, appear as purple and blue emission.

  4. Operating characteristics of a hollow-cathode neutralizer for 5 and 8 centimeter-diameter electron bombardment mercury ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weigand, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    Thin-tip 0.3-cm-outside-diameter hollow-cathode neutralizers were used to investigate causes of neutralizer tip erosion experienced in thruster endurance tests. Bell-jar tests indicated that neutralizers with new rolled tantalum foil inserts coated with an emissive mixture eroded very little over the neutral flow rates investigated (3 to 10 mA) for simulated 5- and 8-cm-diameter thruster neutralizer conditions. Tip erosion rates of neutralizers operated with no insert or emissive mixture increased by two orders of magnitude for both configurations as the neutral flow rate decreased. Spectroscopic analysis of the discharge plasma from neutralizers operated with inserts coated with the emissive mixture detected tungsten at all neutral flow rates for both thruster neutralizer conditions. The only source of tungsten was the tip. Therefore, detection of tungsten indicated neutralizer tip erosion. Barium, an element of the emissive mixture, was detected at low neutral flow rates for the 5-cm-diameter thruster neutralizer operating condition only.

  5. Channeling of high-power radio waves under conditions of strong anomalous absorption in the presence of an averaged electron heating source

    SciTech Connect

    Vas'kov, V. V.; Ryabova, N. A.

    2010-02-15

    Strong anomalous absorption of a high-power radio wave by small-scale plasma inhomogeneities in the Earth's ionosphere can lead to the formation of self-consistent channels (solitons) in which the wave propagates along the magnetic field, but has a soliton-like intensity distribution across the field. The structure of a cylindrical soliton as a function of the wave intensity at the soliton axis is analyzed. Averaged density perturbations leading to wave focusing were calculated using the model proposed earlier by Vas'kov and Gurevich (Geomagn. Aeron. 16, 1112 (1976)), in which an averaged electron heating source was used. It is shown that, under conditions of strong electron recombination, the radii of individual solitons do not exceed 650 m.

  6. Hollow cathodes for arcjet thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebben, Craig R.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    1987-01-01

    In an attempt to prevent exterior spot emission, hollow cathode bodies and orifice plates were constructed from boron nitride which is an electrical insulator, but the orifice plates melted and/or eroded at high interelectrode pressures. The most suitable hollow cathodes tested included a refractory metal orifice plate in a boron nitride body, with the insert insulated electrically from the orifice plate. In addition, the hollow cathode interior was evacuated to assure a low pressure at the insert surface, thus promoting diffuse electron emission. At high interelectrode pressures, the electrons tended to flow through the orifice plate rather than through the orifice, which could result in overheating of the orifice plate. Using a carefully aligned centerline anode, electron flow through the orifice could be sustained at interelectrode pressures up to 500 torr - but the current flow path still occasionally jumped from the orifice to the orifice plate. Based on these tests, it appears that a hollow cathode would operate most effectively at pressures in the arcjet regime with a refractory, chemically stable, and electrically insulating cathode body and orifice plate.

  7. Hydrogen hollow cathode ion source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J., Jr.; Sovey, J. S.; Roman, R. F. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A source of hydrogen ions is disclosed and includes a chamber having at one end a cathode which provides electrons and through which hydrogen gas flows into the chamber. Screen and accelerator grids are provided at the other end of the chamber. A baffle plate is disposed between the cathode and the grids and a cylindrical baffle is disposed coaxially with the cathode at the one end of the chamber. The cylindrical baffle is of greater diameter than the baffle plate to provide discharge impedance and also to protect the cathode from ion flux. An anode electrode draws the electrons away from the cathode. The hollow cathode includes a tubular insert of tungsten impregnated with a low work function material to provide ample electrons. A heater is provided around the hollow cathode to initiate electron emission from the low work function material.

  8. Anomalous electronic transport in ξ'-Al-Pd-Mn complex metallic alloy studied by spectral conductivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Maciá, Enrique; Dolinšek, Janez

    2007-04-30

    The ξ' giant-unit-cell phase of the Al-Pd-Mn alloy system exhibits an almost temperature-independent electrical conductivity with a value typical of metallic alloys, but an anomalously low thermal conductivity comparable to that of thermal insulators. The origin of the T-independent conductivity is analysed by determining the spectral conductivity function σ(E) from a combined analysis of the electrical conductivity σ(T) and the thermoelectric power S(T) using a phenomenological approach. It is found that the T-independence of the conductivity results from the specific form of the spectral conductivity, which shows very weak variation over an energy scale of several k(B)T around the Fermi level, but exhibits fine structure that yields observable effects in σ(T) and S(T). PMID:21690958

  9. Cascade decays of hollow ions

    SciTech Connect

    Omar, G. ); Hahn, Y. )

    1991-05-01

    A multiple-electron-emission process for atoms with one or more inner-shell vacancies is treated using the radiative- and Auger-electron-emission cascade model, in which inner-shell holes are assumed to decay by sequentially emitting radiations and/or Auger electrons. Such hollow ions are produced by synchrotron irradiation of atomic targets and in ion-surface interactions with multiple-electron transfers. The final charge-state distribution is determined by the Auger and radiative branching ratios at each stage of the decay sequence. At intermediate stages of cascade, hollow ions with more than one hole in different ionization stages are created. The Ne, Mg, and Fe{sup 14+} ions with the initial 1{ital s}, 2{ital s}, and 2{ital p} vacancies are considered in detail, and the core charge dependence of the maximum charge state is studied. The hollow Mg ion with double initial 1{ital s} holes is analyzed, and the result compared with that for the case of one 1{ital s} hole. The peak is shifted more than two units to a higher degree of ionization. The correlated shake-off and shake-up multiple-electron processes are not considered, but they are expected to cause further shifts.

  10. Evidence of nonclassical plasma transport in hollow cathodes for electric propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.; Jameson, Kristina K.

    2007-03-15

    Measurements, simplified analyses, and two-dimensional numerical simulations with a fluid plasma model show that classical resistivity cannot account for the elevated electron temperatures and steep plasma potential gradients measured in a 25-27.5 A electric propulsion hollow cathode. The cathode consisted of a 1.5 cm hollow tube with an {approx}0.28 cm diameter orifice and was operated with 5.5 SCCM (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP) of xenon flow using two different anode geometries: a segmented cone and a circular flat plate. The numerical simulations show that classical resistivity yields as much as four times colder electron temperatures compared to the measured values in the orifice and near-plume regions of the cathode. Classical transport and Ohm's law also predict exceedingly high electron-ion relative drift speeds compared to the electron thermal speed (>4). It is found that the addition of anomalous resistivity based on existing growth rate formulas for electron-ion streaming instabilities improves qualitatively the comparison between the numerical results and the time-averaged measurements. Simplified analyses that have been based largely on the axial measurements support the conclusion that additional resistivity is required in Ohm's law to explain the measurements. The combined results from the two-dimensional simulations and the analyses bound the range of enhanced resistivity to be 3-100 times the classical value.

  11. Direct observation of melting behaviors at the nanoscale under electron beam and heat to form hollow nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chun-Wei; Hsin, Cheng-Lun; Wang, Chun-Wen; Chu, Fu-Hsuan; Kao, Chen-Yen; Chen, Jui-Yuan; Huang, Yu-Ting; Lu, Kuo-Chang; Wu, Wen-Wei; Chen, Lih-Juann

    2012-07-01

    We report the melting behaviours of ZnO nanowire by heating ZnO-Al2O3 core-shell heterostructures to form Al2O3 nanotubes in an in situ ultrahigh vacuum transmission electron microscope (UHV-TEM). When the ZnO-Al2O3 core-shell nanowire heterostructures were annealed at 600 °C under electron irradiation, the amorphous Al2O3 shell became single crystalline and then the ZnO core melted. The average vanishing rate of the ZnO core was measured to be 4.2 nm s-1. The thickness of the Al2O3 nanotubes can be precisely controlled by the deposition process. Additionally, the inner geometry of nanotubes can be defined by the initial ZnO core. The result shows a promising method to obtain the biocompatible Al2O3 nanotubes, which may be applied in drug delivery, biochemistry and resistive switching random access memory (ReRAM).We report the melting behaviours of ZnO nanowire by heating ZnO-Al2O3 core-shell heterostructures to form Al2O3 nanotubes in an in situ ultrahigh vacuum transmission electron microscope (UHV-TEM). When the ZnO-Al2O3 core-shell nanowire heterostructures were annealed at 600 °C under electron irradiation, the amorphous Al2O3 shell became single crystalline and then the ZnO core melted. The average vanishing rate of the ZnO core was measured to be 4.2 nm s-1. The thickness of the Al2O3 nanotubes can be precisely controlled by the deposition process. Additionally, the inner geometry of nanotubes can be defined by the initial ZnO core. The result shows a promising method to obtain the biocompatible Al2O3 nanotubes, which may be applied in drug delivery, biochemistry and resistive switching random access memory (ReRAM). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Proof of the electron irradiation effect and three in situ TEM videos as dynamic observation of the ZnO-Al2O3 core-shell nanowire heterostructures forming the Al2O3 nanotube at 600 °C under electron irradiation and the disappearance of the ZnO core. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30724c

  12. Interface Electron Traps as a Source of Anomalous Capacitance in AlGaN/GaN Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osvald, J.

    2013-06-01

    We studied by modeling and simulation how deep traps at the AlGaN/GaN heterostructure interface influence the shape of capacitance-voltage ( C- V) curves of the heterostructure. Assuming donor and acceptor type of traps, we found differences in the C- V curves for sharp energy interface states or continuously distributed states with the same total concentration for the acceptor-type interface states. The background doping concentration of GaN had only a marginal influence on the shape of the C- V curves. We observed that an anomalous capacitance peak occurred for the continuous distribution of traps in the bandgap; a similar peak had been observed in experiment. We also saw that the capacitance curves shifted slightly to the right or to the left depending on the GaN doping concentration. A remarkable difference was found between the capacitance curves for the structures with the sharp acceptor trap level and continuous distribution of traps. For donor-type interface states, we found practically no influence on C- V curves since they remain populated and charge neutral during the measurement.

  13. Origin of anomalous electronic circular dichroism spectrum of RuPt2(tppz)2Cl2(PF6)4 in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hua-Gen

    2014-07-24

    We report a theoretical study of the structures, energetics, and electronic spectra of the Pt(II)/Ru(II) mixed-metal complex RuPt2(tppz)2Cl2(PF6)4 (tppz = 2,3,5,6-tetra(2-pyridyl)pyrazine) in acetonitrile. The hybrid B3LYP density functional theory and its TDDFT methods were used with a complete basis set (CBS) extrapolation scheme and a conductor polarizable continuum model (C-PCM) for solvation effects. Results showed that the trinuclear complex has four types of stable conformers and/or enantiomers. They are separated by high barriers owing to the repulsive H/H geometrical constraints in tppz. A strong entropy effect was found for the dissociation of RuPt2(tppz)2Cl2(PF6)n in acetonitrile. The UV-visible and emission spectra of the complex were also simulated. They are in good agreement with experiments. In this work we have largely focused on exploring the origin of anomalous electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectra of the RuPt2(tppz)2Cl2(PF6)4 complex in acetonitrile. As a result, a new mechanism has been proposed together with a clear illustration by using a physical model. PMID:25026322

  14. Anomalous tunneling in carbon/alkane/TiO(2)/gold molecular electronic junctions: energy level alignment at the metal/semiconductor interface.

    PubMed

    Yan, Haijun; McCreery, Richard L

    2009-02-01

    Carbon/TiO(2)/gold electronic junctions show slightly asymmetric electronic behavior, with higher current observed in current density (J)/voltage (V) curves when carbon is biased negative with respect to the gold top contact. When a approximately 1-nm-thick alkane film is deposited between the carbon and TiO(2), resulting in a carbon/alkane/TiO(2)/gold junction, the current increases significantly for negative bias and decreases for positive bias, thus creating a much less symmetric J/V response. Similar results were obtained when SiO(2) was substituted for the alkane layer, but Al(2)O(3) did not produce the effect. The observation that, by the addition of an insulating material between carbon and TiO(2), the junction becomes more conductive is unexpected and counterintuitive. Kelvin probe measurements revealed that while the apparent work function of the pyrolyzed photoresist film electrode is modulated by surface dipoles of different surface-bound molecular layers, the anomalous effect is independent of the direction of the surface dipole. We propose that by using a nanometer-thick film with a low dielectric constant as an insertion layer, most of the applied potential is dropped across this thin film, thus permitting alignment between the carbon Fermi level and the TiO(2) conduction band. Provided that the alkane layer is sufficiently thin, electrons can directly tunnel from carbon to the TiO(2) conduction band. Therefore, the electron injection barrier at the carbon/TiO(2) interface is effectively reduced by this energy-level alignment, resulting in an increased current when carbon is biased negative. The modulation of injection barriers by a low-kappa molecular layer should be generally applicable to a variety of materials used in micro- and nanoelectronic fabrication. PMID:20353235

  15. Electron temperature profile invariance on OH, L- and H-mode plasmas and consequences for the anomalous transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, G.

    1992-01-01

    The shapes of the electron temperature and electron density profiles in the OH, L- and H-mode confinement regimes of ASDEX are explored by statistical analysis. It is shown that the shape of Te(r) is conserved in the outer half of the plasma in these regimes and that it is invariant with respect to heating power, heating profile, density, density scale length, q value and ion mass. These results suggest that microturbulence constrains the shape of the temperature profile by adjusting the electron heat diffusivity χe(r). No such invariance is found for the temperature profile in the inner half of the plasma and for the density profile over the whole cross-section. Properties of the empirical electron heat diffusivity and the diffusion coefficient in different regimes can be described by Te profile invariance. The improved confinement with peaked density profiles, the reduction of χe in the bulk of H-mode plasmas and the power dependence of χe in the L-regime are discussed

  16. Hollow spherical supramolecular dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Percec, Virgil; Peterca, Mihai; Dulcey, Andrés E; Imam, Mohammad R; Hudson, Steven D; Nummelin, Sami; Adelman, Peter; Heiney, Paul A

    2008-10-01

    The synthesis of a library containing 12 conical dendrons that self-assemble into hollow spherical supramolecular dendrimers is reported. The design principles for this library were accessed by development of a method that allows the identification of hollow spheres, followed by structural and retrostructural analysis of their Pm3n cubic lattice. The first hollow spherical supramolecular dendrimer was made by replacing the tapered dendron, from the previously reported tapered dendritic dipeptide that self-assembled into helical pores, with its constitutional isomeric conical dendron. This strategy generated a conical dendritic dipeptide that self-assembled into a hollow spherical supramolecular dendrimer that self-organizes in a Pm3n cubic lattice. Other examples of hollow spheres were assembled from conical dendrons without a dipeptide at their apex. These are conical dendrons originated from tapered dendrons containing additional benzyl ether groups at their apex. The inner part of the hollow sphere assembled from the dipeptide resembles the path of a spherical helix or loxodrome and, therefore, is chiral. The spheres assembled from other conical dendrons are nonhelical, even when they contain stereocenters on the alkyl groups from their periphery. Functionalization of the apex of the conical dendrons with diethylene glycol allowed the encapsulation of LiOTf and RbOTf in the center of the hollow sphere. These experiments showed that hollow spheres function as supramolecular dendritic capsules and therefore are expected to display functions complementary to those of other related molecular and supramolecular structures. PMID:18771261

  17. Facile synthesis of hollow carbon nanospheres from hollow chitosan nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ya; Xia, Xing-Hua

    2006-04-01

    Hollow carbon nanospheres (HCNS) with large surface area were synthesized from hollow chitosan nanospheres by one-step pyrolysis with a relatively low temperature (550 degrees C). The resulted HCNS is fully carbonized and partially graphitized under the experiment conditions. It is an important and facile method to prepare the uniform, shape- and size-controlled carbon nanomaterials by carbonization of the natural polysaccharide compounds and their derivatives. The as-prepared HCNS has a narrow size distribution in hollow carbon nanospheres (about 53 nm). The structure and size of HCNS are reproducible and could be tunable by changing the preparation conditions. The characterizations to estimate the composition, decompose properties, crystalline form, structure and surface property of the HCNS were investigated using FT-IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction measurement (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, and the N2 adsorption-desorption isothermal process. The present preparation method makes it feasible to synthesize carbon nanospheres in abundance in the lab, and the synthesized HCNS could be a promising support for metal catalysts, an ideal matrix connecting with DNA or other bioactive substances. PMID:16736772

  18. Self-contained hot-hollow cathode gun source assembly

    DOEpatents

    Zeren, J.D.

    1984-08-01

    A self-contained hot-hollow cathode gun source assembly for use in a vacuum chamber includes a crucible block having a hot-hollow cathode gun mounted underneath and providing a hole for the magnetic deflection of the ion/electron beam into a crucible on top the block.

  19. Self-contained hot-hollow cathode gun source assembly

    DOEpatents

    Zeren, Joseph D.

    1986-01-01

    A self-contained hot-hollow cathode gun source assembly for use in a vacuum chamber includes a crucible block having a hot-hollow cathode gun mounted underneath and providing a hole for the magnetic deflection of the ion/electron beam into a crucible on top the block.

  20. Pressure effect and electron diffraction on the anomalous transition in ternary superconductor Bi2Rh3Se2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. Y.; Chan, C. L.; Mukherjee, S.; Chou, C. C.; Tseng, C. M.; Hsu, S. L.; Chu, M.-W.; Lin, J.-Y.; Yang, H. D.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of external hydrostatic pressure up to 22.23 kbar on the temperature-dependent transport properties of the ternary compound Bi2Rh3Se2 is investigated. Interestingly, the resistive anomaly at Ts~250 K, previously proposed as a charge-density-wave (CDW) transition, is shifted to higher temperature with increasing pressure, in distinct contrast to an established knowledge for CDW. Using temperature-dependent electron-diffraction characterizations, we have unraveled that this transition is, in effect, of a structural phase-transformation nature, experiencing the symmetry reduction from a high-symmetry C-centered monoclinic lattice to a low-symmetry primitive one below Ts. A more elaborately determined room-temperature C-centered lattice was also proposed.

  1. Facile Fabrication of Ultrafine Hollow Silica and Magnetic Hollow Silica Nanoparticles by a Dual-Templating Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; Xiao, Xiangheng; Zhang, Shaofeng; Fan, Lixia; Peng, Tangchao; Ren, Feng; Jiang, Changzhong

    2010-01-01

    The development of synthetic process for hollow silica materials is an issue of considerable topical interest. While a number of chemical routes are available and are extensively used, the diameter of hollow silica often large than 50 nm. Here, we report on a facial route to synthesis ultrafine hollow silica nanoparticles (the diameter of ca. 24 nm) with high surface area by using cetyltrimethylammmonium bromide (CTAB) and sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) as co-templates and subsequent annealing treatment. When the hollow magnetite nanoparticles were introduced into the reaction, the ultrafine magnetic hollow silica nanoparticles with the diameter of ca. 32 nm were obtained correspondingly. Transmission electron microscopy studies confirm that the nanoparticles are composed of amorphous silica and that the majority of them are hollow.

  2. Direct phase selection of initial phases from single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) for the improvement of electron density and ab initio structure determination

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chung-De; Huang, Yen-Chieh; Chiang, Hsin-Lin; Hsieh, Yin-Cheng; Guan, Hong-Hsiang; Chuankhayan, Phimonphan; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2014-09-01

    A novel direct phase-selection method to select optimized phases from the ambiguous phases of a subset of reflections to replace the corresponding initial SAD phases has been developed. With the improved phases, the completeness of built residues of protein molecules is enhanced for efficient structure determination. Optimization of the initial phasing has been a decisive factor in the success of the subsequent electron-density modification, model building and structure determination of biological macromolecules using the single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) method. Two possible phase solutions (ϕ{sub 1} and ϕ{sub 2}) generated from two symmetric phase triangles in the Harker construction for the SAD method cause the well known phase ambiguity. A novel direct phase-selection method utilizing the θ{sub DS} list as a criterion to select optimized phases ϕ{sub am} from ϕ{sub 1} or ϕ{sub 2} of a subset of reflections with a high percentage of correct phases to replace the corresponding initial SAD phases ϕ{sub SAD} has been developed. Based on this work, reflections with an angle θ{sub DS} in the range 35–145° are selected for an optimized improvement, where θ{sub DS} is the angle between the initial phase ϕ{sub SAD} and a preliminary density-modification (DM) phase ϕ{sub DM}{sup NHL}. The results show that utilizing the additional direct phase-selection step prior to simple solvent flattening without phase combination using existing DM programs, such as RESOLVE or DM from CCP4, significantly improves the final phases in terms of increased correlation coefficients of electron-density maps and diminished mean phase errors. With the improved phases and density maps from the direct phase-selection method, the completeness of residues of protein molecules built with main chains and side chains is enhanced for efficient structure determination.

  3. Production of hollow aerogel microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhye, R.S.; Henning, S.A.

    1990-12-31

    A method is described for making hollow aerogel microspheres of 800--1200{mu} diameter and 100--300{mu} wall thickness by forming hollow alcogel microspheres during the sol/gel process in a catalytic atmosphere and capturing them on a foam surface containing catalyst. Supercritical drying of the formed hollow alcogel microspheres yields hollow aerogel microspheres which are suitable for ICF targets.

  4. Production of hollow aerogel microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Henning, Sten A.

    1993-01-01

    A method is described for making hollow aerogel microspheres of 800-1200 .mu. diameter and 100-300 .mu. wall thickness by forming hollow alcogel microspheres during the sol/gel process in a catalytic atmosphere and capturing them on a foam surface containing catalyst. Supercritical drying of the formed hollow alcogel microspheres yields hollow aerogel microspheres which are suitable for ICF targets.

  5. Effects of crystal orientation on electronic band structure and anomalous shift of higher critical point in VO2 thin films during the phase transition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Huang, Ting; You, Qinghu; Zhang, Jinzhong; Li, Wenwu; Wu, Jiada; Hu, Zhigao; Chu, Junhao

    2015-12-01

    The phase transition behaviour of vanadium dioxide (VO2) with different thicknesses has been investigated by temperature-dependent optical transmittance and Raman spectra. It is found that the crystal orientation has a great effect on the metal-insulator transition (MIT) of VO2 films. The x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows that the films are polycrystalline and exhibit the characteristics of the monoclinic phase. The preferential growth crystal orientation (0 2 0) is converted to the (\\bar{1} 1 1) plane with the film thickness increasing. It is believed that the (\\bar{1} 1 1) plane is the reflection of a twinned structure with (0 1 1) crystal orientation, which will lead to the arrangements of oxygen atoms and vanadium atoms deviating from the pure monoclinic structure. It is found that the highest order transition (E 3) is highly susceptible to the crystal orientation, whereas the lowest order transition (E 1) is nearly unaffected by it. The E 3 exhibits an anomalous temperature dependence with an abrupt blue-shift (˜0.5 eV) in the vicinity of the metal-insulator transition (MIT) for VO2 film with a thickness of 84 nm. The findings show that the empty {σ*} band can be driven close to the Fermi level when the (0 2 0) orientation is converted to the (\\bar{1} 1 1) orientation. Compared to the VO2 films with thicknesses of 39 and 57 nm, the E 3 decreases by 0.8 eV and the E 2 increases by about 0.1 eV at the insulator state for the VO2 film with a thickness of 84 nm. The abnormal electronic transition and the variation of energy band is likely caused by the lattice distortion and V-V dimerisation deviation from the monoclinic {{a}\\text{m}} axis.

  6. Hollow-Fiber Clinostat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Percy H.; Miller, Teresa Y.; Snyder, Robert S.

    1990-01-01

    Hollow-fiber clinostat, is bioreactor used to study growth and other behavior of cells in simulated microgravity. Cells under study contained in porous hollow fiber immersed in culture medium inside vessel. Bores in hollow fiber allow exchange of gases, nutrients, and metabolic waste products between living cells and external culture media. Hollow fiber lies on axis of vessel, rotated by motor equipped with torque and speed controls. Desired temperature maintained by operating clinostat in standard tissue-culture incubator. Axis of rotation made horizontal or vertical. Designed for use with conventional methods of sterilization and sanitation to prevent contamination of specimen. Also designed for asepsis in assembly, injection of specimen, and exchange of medium.

  7. Wanted: A Positive Control for Anomalous Subdiffusion

    PubMed Central

    Saxton, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Anomalous subdiffusion in cells and model systems is an active area of research. The main questions are whether diffusion is anomalous or normal, and if it is anomalous, its mechanism. The subject is controversial, especially the hypothesis that crowding causes anomalous subdiffusion. Anomalous subdiffusion measurements would be strengthened by an experimental standard, particularly one able to cross-calibrate the different types of measurements. Criteria for a calibration standard are proposed. First, diffusion must be anomalous over the length and timescales of the different measurements. The length-scale is fundamental; the time scale can be adjusted through the viscosity of the medium. Second, the standard must be theoretically well understood, with a known anomalous subdiffusion exponent, ideally readily tunable. Third, the standard must be simple, reproducible, and independently characterizable (by, for example, electron microscopy for nanostructures). Candidate experimental standards are evaluated, including obstructed lipid bilayers; aqueous systems obstructed by nanopillars; a continuum percolation system in which a prescribed fraction of randomly chosen obstacles in a regular array is ablated; single-file diffusion in pores; transient anomalous subdiffusion due to binding of particles in arrays such as transcription factors in randomized DNA arrays; and computer-generated physical trajectories. PMID:23260043

  8. A hollow cathode hydrogen ion source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, J. S.; Mirtich, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    High current density ion sources have been used to heat plasmas in controlled thermonuclear reaction experiments. High beam currents imply relatively high emission currents from cathodes which have generally taken the form of tungsten filaments. A hydrogen ion source is described which was primarily developed to assess the emission current capability and design requirements for hollow cathodes for application in neutral injection devices. The hydrogen source produced ions by electron bombardment via a single hollow cathode. Source design followed mercury ion thruster technology, using a weak magnetic field to enhance ionization efficiency.

  9. Stabilized Hollow Ions Extracted in Vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Ninomiya, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Azuma, T.; Komaki, K.; Koike, F.; Masuda, H.; Kuroki, K.; Sekiguchi, M.

    1997-06-01

    K x rays emitted from 2.1 keV/uN{sup 6+} ions passed through a thin Ni microcapillary foil were measured in coincidence with the exit charge states. Ions with a K hole but with several electrons in outershells, i.e., hollow ions formed above a surface (in the first generation), were successfully extracted in vacuum. It was found that a considerable fraction of extracted hollow ions had extremely long lifetimes of the order of ns. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. 20. Detail, crack in southeast end wall showing hollow brick ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Detail, crack in southeast end wall showing hollow brick lining of exterior wall; view to south, 135mm lens plus electronic flash illumination. - Benicia Arsenal, Powder Magazine No. 5, Junction of Interstate Highways 680 & 780, Benicia, Solano County, CA

  11. Submicrometer-sized hollow nickel spheres synthesized by autocatalytic reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Yida . E-mail: denyda@sjtu.edu.cn; Zhao Ling; Liu Lei; Shen Bin; Hu Wenbin

    2005-10-06

    A facile method to fabricate submicrometer-sized hollow nickel spheres by autocatalyzing the redox reaction around a sacrificial colloidal particle surface is presented in this paper. The size distribution of these spheres can be controlled by regulating the concentration of the alkali solution. The hollow nickel particles were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. The hollow spheres produced by this process may have potential applications in many fields, including chemistry, biotechnology and materials science.

  12. The Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect: Theory and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao-Xing; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Qi, Xiao-Liang

    2016-03-01

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect is defined as a quantized Hall effect realized in a system without an external magnetic field. The quantum anomalous Hall effect is a novel manifestation of topological structure in many-electron systems and may have potential applications in future electronic devices. In recent years, the quantum anomalous Hall effect was proposed theoretically and realized experimentally. In this review article, we provide a systematic overview of the theoretical and experimental developments in this field.

  13. Anomalous Diffraction in Crystallographic Phase Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, Wayne A.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray diffraction patterns from crystals of biological macromolecules contain sufficient information to define atomic structures, but atomic positions are inextricable without having electron-density images. Diffraction measurements provide amplitudes, but the computation of electron density also requires phases for the diffracted waves. The resonance phenomenon known as anomalous scattering offers a powerful solution to this phase problem. Exploiting scattering resonances from diverse elements, the methods of multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD) now predominate for de novo determinations of atomic-level biological structures. This review describes the physical underpinnings of anomalous diffraction methods, the evolution of these methods to their current maturity, the elements, procedures and instrumentation used for effective implementation, and the realm of applications. PMID:24726017

  14. The Smokey Hollow Community The Smokey Hollow Community, Informal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    The Smokey Hollow Community - The Smokey Hollow Community, Informal boundaries by street name: North to South: East Jefferson Street to East Van Buren Street. West to East: South Gadsden Street to Marvin Street., Tallahassee, Leon County, FL

  15. Smokey Hollow Ethnographic Landscape Circa 1955 The Smokey Hollow ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Smokey Hollow Ethnographic Landscape Circa 1955 - The Smokey Hollow Community, Informal boundaries by street name: North to South: East Jefferson Street to East Van Buren Street. West to East: South Gadsden Street to Marvin Street., Tallahassee, Leon County, FL

  16. Electrochemical performance and electronic properties of shell LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 hollow spheres for lithium ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yongli; Wang, Jiali; Wang, Mingzhen; Zhuang, Quanchao

    2016-03-01

    Shell spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 hollow microspheres were successfully synthesized by MnCO3 template, and characterized by XRD, SEM, and TEM. The results show that the hollow LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode has good cycle stability to reach 124.5, 119.8, and 96.6mAh/g at 0.5, 1, and 5 C, the corresponding retention rate of 98.1%, 98.2%, and 98.0% after 50 cycles at 20∘C, and the reversible capacity of 94.6mAh/g can be obtained at 1 C rate at 55∘C, 83.3% retention after 100 cycles. As the temperature decreases from 10∘C to ‑20∘C, the resistance of RSEI increases from 5.5 Ω to 135 Ω, Re from 27 Ω to 353.2 Ω, and Rct from 12.7 Ω to 73.0 Ω. Moreover, the B constant and Ea activation energy are 4480K and 37.22KJ/mol for the NTC spinel material, respectively.

  17. Hot hollow cathode gun assembly

    DOEpatents

    Zeren, J.D.

    1983-11-22

    A hot hollow cathode deposition gun assembly includes a hollow body having a cylindrical outer surface and an end plate for holding an adjustable heat sink, the hot hollow cathode gun, two magnets for steering the plasma from the gun into a crucible on the heat sink, and a shutter for selectively covering and uncovering the crucible.

  18. Hollow-Core Fiber Lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Lin (Inventor); Tjoelker, Robert L. (Inventor); Burt, Eric A. (Inventor); Huang, Shouhua (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Hollow-core capillary discharge lamps on the millimeter or sub-millimeter scale are provided. The hollow-core capillary discharge lamps achieve an increased light intensity ratio between 194 millimeters (useful) and 254 millimeters (useless) light than conventional lamps. The capillary discharge lamps may include a cone to increase light output. Hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) may also be used.

  19. Boron nitride hollow nanospheres: Synthesis, formation mechanism and dielectric property

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, B.; Tang, X.H.; Huang, X.X.; Xia, L.; Zhang, X.D.; Wang, C.J.; Wen, G.W.

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • BN hollow nanospheres are fabricated in large scale via a new CVD method. • Morphology and structure are elucidated by complementary analytical techniques. • Formation mechanism is proposed based on experimental observations. • Dielectric properties are investigated in the X-band microwave frequencies. • BN hollow nanospheres show lower dielectric loss than regular BN powders. - Abstract: Boron nitride (BN) hollow nanospheres have been successfully fabricated by pyrolyzing vapors decomposed from ammonia borane (NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}) at 1300 °C. The final products have been extensively characterized by X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The BN hollow nanospheres were ranging from 100 to 300 nm in diameter and around 30–100 nm in thickness. The internal structure of the products was found dependent on the reaction temperatures. A possible formation mechanism of the BN hollow nanospheres was proposed on the basis of the experimental observations. Dielectric measurements in the X-band microwave frequencies (8–12 GHz) showed that the dielectric loss of the paraffin filled by the BN hollow nanospheres was lower than that filled by regular BN powders, which indicated that the BN hollow nanospheres could be potentially used as low-density fillers for microwave radomes.

  20. Anomalous Enhancement of the Superconducting Transition Temperature of Electron-doped La2-xCexCuO4 and Pr2-xCexCuO4 Cuprate Heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    K Jin; P Vach; X Zhang; U Grupel; E Zohar; I Diamant; Y Dagan; S Smadici; P Abbamonte; R Greene

    2011-12-31

    The superconducting transition temperature T{sub c} of multilayers of electron-doped cuprates, composed of underdoped (or undoped) and overdoped La{sub 2-x}Ce{sub x}CuO{sub 4} (LCCO) and Pr{sub 2-x}Ce{sub x}CuO{sub 4} (PCCO) thin films, is found to increase significantly with respect to the T{sub c} of the corresponding single-phase films. By investigating the critical current density of superlattices with different doping levels and layer thicknesses, we find that the T{sub c} enhancement is caused by a redistribution of charge over an anomalously large distance.

  1. ACS SBC Recovery from Anomalous Shutdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    This proposal is designed to permit recovery of the SBC {FUV MAMA} detector after an anomalous shutdown. Anomalous shutdowns can occur as a result of bright object violations which trigger the Bright Scene Detection or Software Global Monitor. Anomalous shutdowns can also occur as a result of SBC hardware problems. The recovery from anomalous shutdown procedure consists of four tests: 1} a signal processing electronics check, 2} a slow high voltage ramp-up to an intermediate voltage, 3} a slow high-voltage ramp-up to the full operating voltage, and 4} a Fold Test. During the two high-voltage ramp-ups, dark ACCUM exposures are taken. At high voltage, dark ACCUM exposures and diagnostics are taken. This proposal is based on Proposal 12738 from Cycle 19.

  2. ACS SBC Recovery from Anomalous Shutdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    This proposal is designed to permit recovery of the SBC {FUV MAMA} detector after an anomalous shutdown. Anomalous shutdowns can occur as a result of bright object violations which trigger the Bright Scene Detection or Software Global Monitor. Anomalous shutdowns can also occur as a result of SBC hardware problems. The recovery from anomalous shutdown procedure consists of four tests: a signal processing electronics check, a slow high voltage ramp-up to an intermediate voltage, a slow high-voltage ramp-up to the full operating voltage, and lastly, a Fold Test. During the two high-voltage ramp-ups, dark ACCUM exposures are taken. At high voltage, dark ACCUM exposures and diagnostics are taken. This proposal is based on proposal 11884, visits 1 to 4.

  3. Nonlocal anomalous Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shulei; Vignale, Giovanni

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) is a distinctive transport property of ferromagnetic metals arising from spin orbit coupling (SOC) in concert with spontaneous spin polarization. Nonetheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also appears in a nonmagnetic metal in contact with a magnetic insulator. The main puzzle lies in the apparent absence of spin polarized electrons in the non-magnetic metal. Here, we theoretically demonstrate that the scattering of electrons from a rough metal-insulator interface is generally spin-dependent, which results in mutual conversion between spin and charge currents flowing in the plane of the layer. It is the current-carrying spin polarized electrons and the spin Hall effect in the bulk of the metal layer that conspire to generate the AH current. This novel AHE differs from the conventional one only in the spatial separation of the SOC and the magnetization, so we name it as nonlocal AHE. In contrast to other previously proposed mechanisms (e.g., spin Hall AHE and magnetic proximity effect (MPE)), the nonlocal AHE appears on the first order of spin Hall angle and does not rely on the induced moments in the metal layer, which make it experimentally detectable by contrasting the AH current directions of two layered structures such as Pt/Cu/YIG and β -Ta/Cu/YIG (with a thin inserted Cu layer to eliminate the MPE). We predict that the directions of the AH currents in these two trilayers would be opposite since the spin Hall angles of Pt and β -Ta are of opposite signs. Work supported by NSF Grants DMR-1406568.

  4. Synthesis of ZrC hollow nanospheres at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Guozhen; Chen, Di; Liu, Yuanfang; Tang, Kaibin; Qian, Yitai

    2004-02-01

    A novel chemical synthetic route has been developed to prepare ZrC hollow nanospheres at 600°C, using ZrCl 4 and C 6Cl 6 as source materials, and metallic Na as the reductant. The samples were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. And an in situ template reduction-carbonization mechanism for ZrC hollow nanospheres was proposed.

  5. Harnessing thermal expansion mismatch to form hollow nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jen-La Plante, Ilan; Mokari, Taleb

    2013-01-14

    Nano popcorn: a new formation mechanism for the synthesis of hollow metal oxide nanoparticles through a melt fracture mechanism. The hollow nanoparticles are formed via brittle fracture following the generation of tensile stresses arising due to liquid-phase thermal expansion of a low melting point core metal. The progress of this physical process can be monitored using in situ transmission electron microscopy for a model system of indium/indium oxide. PMID:23125049

  6. Laser-plasma-based linear collider using hollow plasma channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, C. B.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2016-09-01

    A linear electron-positron collider based on laser-plasma accelerators using hollow plasma channels is considered. Laser propagation and energy depletion in the hollow channel is discussed, as well as the overall efficiency of the laser-plasma accelerator. Example parameters are presented for a 1-TeV and 3-TeV center-of-mass collider based on laser-plasma accelerators.

  7. Fabrication and photocatalytic properties of SnO2 double-shelled and triple-shelled hollow spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Shanshan; Wang, Yong; Lu, Shan; Wang, Dongxia; Wang, Ping

    2016-06-01

    SnO2 double-shelled and triple-shelled hollow spheres were tailored by adjusting concentration of tin (IV) chloride solution during the process of the tin (IV) ions infused carbonaceous spheres. The structures of these SnO2 multi-shelled hollow spheres were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and their possible formation mechanism were also discussed. In virtue of triple-shelled hollow porous structure and higher specific surface area, SnO2 triple-shelled hollow spheres exhibited enhanced photocatalytic properties compared to SnO2 double-shelled hollow spheres.

  8. Anomalous Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaosa, Naoto; Sinova, Jairo; Onoda, Shigeki; MacDonald, A. H.; Ong, N. P.

    2010-04-01

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE) occurs in solids with broken time-reversal symmetry, typically in a ferromagnetic phase, as a consequence of spin-orbit coupling. Experimental and theoretical studies of the AHE are reviewed, focusing on recent developments that have provided a more complete framework for understanding this subtle phenomenon and have, in many instances, replaced controversy by clarity. Synergy between experimental and theoretical works, both playing a crucial role, has been at the heart of these advances. On the theoretical front, the adoption of the Berry-phase concepts has established a link between the AHE and the topological nature of the Hall currents. On the experimental front, new experimental studies of the AHE in transition metals, transition-metal oxides, spinels, pyrochlores, and metallic dilute magnetic semiconductors have established systematic trends. These two developments, in concert with first-principles electronic structure calculations, strongly favor the dominance of an intrinsic Berry-phase-related AHE mechanism in metallic ferromagnets with moderate conductivity. The intrinsic AHE can be expressed in terms of the Berry-phase curvatures and it is therefore an intrinsic quantum-mechanical property of a perfect crystal. An extrinsic mechanism, skew scattering from disorder, tends to dominate the AHE in highly conductive ferromagnets. The full modern semiclassical treatment of the AHE is reviewed which incorporates an anomalous contribution to wave-packet group velocity due to momentum-space Berry curvatures and correctly combines the roles of intrinsic and extrinsic (skew-scattering and side-jump) scattering-related mechanisms. In addition, more rigorous quantum-mechanical treatments based on the Kubo and Keldysh formalisms are reviewed, taking into account multiband effects, and demonstrate the equivalence of all three linear response theories in the metallic regime. Building on results from recent experiment and theory, a

  9. Hollow fission fragment tracks in fluorapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weixing

    Spontaneous fission of uranium in minerals creates a damaged "track" along the trajectory of the fission fragments. Fission tracks in fluorapatite, enlarged by chemical etching, are widely used in geologic age-dating and the reconstruction of the thermal history of Earth's crust. However, despite this wide spread application, there have been no systematic studies of the internal structure of unetched fission tracks or the atomic-scale process of track annealing. In this research, fission tracks in fluorapatite are demonstrated to be nano-channels instead of amorphous cores as had been assumed. The formation of hollow tracks is ascribed to the highly ionizing energy deposition of fission fragments inducing radiolytic decomposition of fluorapatite accompanied by the loss of volatile elements. The mechanism for thermal annealing of hollow tracks in fluorapatite is shown to be entirely different from that of amorphous tracks in zircon. The discontinuity of fission tracks, in addition to the shrinkage, prevents chemicals from entering into the hollow tracks for further etching, and then significantly reduces the etched length. The shrinkage of hollow fission tracks results from thermo-emission of vacancies or gaseous species from the cavities to surrounding solids instead of atomic-scale recovery of the amorphous core. The high diffusivity of atoms on the surface of hollow tracks causes the discontinuity of tracks either by Rayleigh instability, by Brownian motion, or by preferential motion of track segments. The preferential motion of atoms along c-axis causes more rapid annealing of fission tracks perpendicular to the c-axis. Under the electron beam, the hollow tracks segment into droplets and the track segments randomly move at room temperature or preferentially move along c-axis at high temperatures. The radiolytic annealing results from beam-enhanced diffusion, which is similar to thermally enhanced diffusion. The similarity in the morphology of fission tracks and

  10. Anomalous Diffraction in Cold Magnetized Plasma.

    PubMed

    Abelson, Z; Gad, R; Bar-Ad, S; Fisher, A

    2015-10-01

    Cold magnetized plasma possesses an anisotropic permittivity tensor with a unique dispersion relation that for adequate electron density and magnetic field results in anomalous diffraction of a right-hand circularly polarized beam. In this work, we demonstrate experimentally anomalous diffraction of a microwave beam in plasma. Additionally, decreasing the electron density enables observation of the transition of the material from a hyperbolic to a standard material. Manipulation of the control parameters will enable plasma to serve as a reconfigurable metamaterial-like medium. PMID:26551813

  11. Anomalous Diffraction in Cold Magnetized Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelson, Z.; Gad, R.; Bar-Ad, S.; Fisher, A.

    2015-10-01

    Cold magnetized plasma possesses an anisotropic permittivity tensor with a unique dispersion relation that for adequate electron density and magnetic field results in anomalous diffraction of a right-hand circularly polarized beam. In this work, we demonstrate experimentally anomalous diffraction of a microwave beam in plasma. Additionally, decreasing the electron density enables observation of the transition of the material from a hyperbolic to a standard material. Manipulation of the control parameters will enable plasma to serve as a reconfigurable metamaterial-like medium.

  12. Hollow fiber liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction followed by solid-phase microextraction and in situ derivatization for the determination of chlorophenols by gas chromatography-electron capture detection.

    PubMed

    Saraji, Mohammad; Ghani, Milad

    2015-10-30

    A method based on the combination of hollow fiber liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction and solid-phase microextraction (SPME) followed by gas chromatography-electron capture detection was developed for the determination of chlorophenols in water and wastewater samples. Silica microstructures fabricated on the surface of a stainless steel wire were coated by an organic solvent and used as a SPME fiber. The analytes were extracted through a hollow fiber membrane containing n-decane from sample solution to an alkaline aqueous acceptor phase. They were then extracted and in situ derivatized on the SPME fiber using acetic anhydride. Experimental parameters such as the type of extraction solvent, acceptor phase NaOH concentration, donor phase HCl concentration, the amount of derivatizing reagent, salt concentration, stirring rate and extraction time were investigated and optimized. The precision of the method for the analytes at 0.02-30μgL(-1) concentration level ranged from 7.1 to 10.2% (as intra-day relative standard deviation) and 6.4 to 9.8% (as inter-day relative standard deviation). The linear dynamic ranges were in the interval of 5-500μgL(-1), 0.05-5μgL(-1), 0.02-1μgL(-1) and 0.001-0.5μgL(-1) for 2-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol and pentachlorophenol, respectively. The enrichment factors were between 432 and 785. The limits of detection were in the range of 0.0004-1.2μgL(-1). Tap water, well water and wastewater samples were also analyzed to evaluate the method capability for real sample analysis. PMID:26411480

  13. Hollow Cathode With Multiple Radial Orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Improved hollow cathode serving as source of electrons has multiple radial orifices instead of single axial orifice. Distributes ion current more smoothly, over larger area. Prototype of high-current cathodes for ion engines in spacecraft. On Earth, cathodes used in large-diameter ion sources for industrial processing of materials. Radial orientation of orifices in new design causes current to be dispersed radially in vicinity of cathode. Advantageous where desireable to produce plasma more nearly uniform over wider region around cathode.

  14. Preparation and surface encapsulation of hollow TiO nanoparticles for electrophoretic displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qian; Tan, Tingfeng; Qi, Peng; Wang, Shirong; Bian, Shuguang; Li, Xianggao; An, Yong; Liu, Zhaojun

    2011-02-01

    Hollow black TiO nanosparticles were obtained via deposition of inorganic coating on the surface of hollow core-shell polymer latex with Ti(OBu)4 as precursor and subsequent calcination in ammonia gas. Hollow TiO particles were characterized by scanning electron microscope, transmission electronic microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and thermogravimetric analysis. Encapsulation of TiO via dispersion polymerization was promoved by pretreating the pigments with 3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl methacrylate, making it possible to prepare hollow TiO-polymer particles. When St and DVB were used as polymerization monomer, hollow TiO-polymer core-shell particles came into being via dispersion polymerization, and the lipophilic degree is 28.57%. Glutin-arabic gum microcapsules containing TiO-polymer particles electrophoretic liquid were prepared using via complex coacervation. It was founded that hollow TiO-polymer particles had enough electrophoretic mobility after coating with polymer.

  15. On Anomalous Quark Triangles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainshtein, Arkady

    2011-04-01

    Anomalous quark triangles with one axial and two vector currents are studied in special kinematics when one of the vector currents carries a soft momentum. According to the Adler-Bardeen theorem the anomalous longitudinal part of the triangle is not renormalized in the chiral limit. We show that perturbative corrections the transversal part of the triangle is also absent. This nonrenormalization, in difference with the longitudinal part, holds on only perturbatively.

  16. Anomalous fluorescence line intensity in megavoltage bremsstrahlung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Nino; Litz, Marc; Merkel, George; Schumer, Joseph; Seely, John; Carroll, Jeff

    2009-11-01

    A Cauchois transmission crystal spectrometer intended for laser plasma diagnostics has measured an anomalous ratio between the fluorescence lines in megavoltage bremsstrahlung. When observed in reflection, Kα1 fluorescence is twice as strong as the Kβ line, as is usual. However, in forward-directed bremsstrahlung from a 2 MV end point linear accelerator with a tungsten converter, the Kα1 and Kβ fluorescence are approximately equal. The anomalous fluorescence line ratio, unity, reflects the large amount of fluorescence generated on the side of the converter where the electrons enter, and the differential attenuation of the fluorescence photons as they pass through the converter to opposite side. Understanding of fluorescence in megavoltage bremsstrahlung is relevant to the explanation of anomalous line ratios in spectra produced by high-energy electrons generated by intense femtosecond laser irradiation.

  17. HOLLOW CARBON ARC DISCHARGE

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J.S.

    1960-10-11

    A device is described for producing an energetic, direct current, hollow, carbon-arc discharge in an evacuated container and within a strong magnetic field. Such discharges are particularly useful not only in dissociation and ionization of high energy molecular ion beams, but also in acting as a shield or barrier against the instreaming of lowenergy neutral particles into a plasma formed within the hollow discharge when it is used as a dissociating mechanism for forming the plasma. There is maintained a predetermined ratio of gas particles to carbon particles released from the arc electrodes during operation of the discharge. The carbon particles absorb some of the gas particles and are pumped along and by the discharge out of the device, with the result that smaller diffusion pumps are required than would otherwise be necessary to dispose of the excess gas.

  18. Hollow spherical shell manufacture

    DOEpatents

    O'Holleran, T.P.

    1991-11-26

    A process is disclosed for making a hollow spherical shell of silicate glass composition in which an aqueous suspension of silicate glass particles and an immiscible liquid blowing agent is placed within the hollow spherical cavity of a porous mold. The mold is spun to reduce effective gravity to zero and to center the blowing agent, while being heated so as to vaporize the immiscible liquid and urge the water carrier of the aqueous suspension to migrate into the body of the mold, leaving a green shell compact deposited around the mold cavity. The green shell compact is then removed from the cavity, and is sintered for a time and a temperature sufficient to form a silicate glass shell of substantially homogeneous composition and uniform geometry. 3 figures.

  19. Hollow Microporous Organic Capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Buyi; Yang, Xinjia; Xia, Lingling; Majeed, Muhammad Irfan; Tan, Bien

    2013-07-01

    Fabrication of hollow microporous organic capsules (HMOCs) could be very useful because of their hollow and porous morphology, which combines the advantages of both microporous organic polymers and non-porous nanocapsules. They can be used as storage materials or reaction chambers while supplying the necessary path for the design of controlled uptake/release systems. Herein, the synthesis of HMOCs with high surface area through facile emulsion polymerization and hypercrosslinking reactions, is described. Due to their tailored porous structure, these capsules possessed high drug loading efficiency, zero-order drug release kinetics and are also demonstrated to be used as nanoscale reactors for the prepareation of nanoparticles (NPs) without any external stabilizer. Moreover, owing to their intrinsic biocompatibility and fluorescence, these capsules exhibit promising prospect for biomedical applications.

  20. Hollow spherical shell manufacture

    DOEpatents

    O'Holleran, Thomas P.

    1991-01-01

    A process for making a hollow spherical shell of silicate glass composition in which an aqueous suspension of silicate glass particles and an immiscible liquid blowing agent is placed within the hollow spherical cavity of a porous mold. The mold is spun to reduce effective gravity to zero and to center the blowing agent, while being heated so as to vaporize the immiscible liquid and urge the water carrier of the aqueous suspension to migrate into the body of the mold, leaving a green shell compact deposited around the mold cavity. The green shell compact is then removed from the cavity, and is sintered for a time and a temperature sufficient to form a silicate glass shell of substantially homogeneous composition and uniform geometry.

  1. Hollow Microporous Organic Capsules

    PubMed Central

    Li, Buyi; Yang, Xinjia; Xia, Lingling; Majeed, Muhammad Irfan; Tan, Bien

    2013-01-01

    Fabrication of hollow microporous organic capsules (HMOCs) could be very useful because of their hollow and porous morphology, which combines the advantages of both microporous organic polymers and non-porous nanocapsules. They can be used as storage materials or reaction chambers while supplying the necessary path for the design of controlled uptake/release systems. Herein, the synthesis of HMOCs with high surface area through facile emulsion polymerization and hypercrosslinking reactions, is described. Due to their tailored porous structure, these capsules possessed high drug loading efficiency, zero-order drug release kinetics and are also demonstrated to be used as nanoscale reactors for the prepareation of nanoparticles (NPs) without any external stabilizer. Moreover, owing to their intrinsic biocompatibility and fluorescence, these capsules exhibit promising prospect for biomedical applications. PMID:23820511

  2. Hollow cathode plasma coupling study, 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    The electron collection and emission characteristics of a simple hollow cathode contactor, an extended anode hollow cathode contactor supplied by JSC, and a ring cusp magnetic field contactor are presented and the effects of discharge power and argon or xenon expellant flowrate on these characteristics are examined. All of the contactors are shown to exhibit good electron emission performance over a wide range of discharge power and expellant type and flowrate. Good electron performance is shown to be more difficult to achieve. Results suggest that the extended anode and ring cusp contactors should perform satisfactorily to electron emission currents beyond 1000 mA and electron collection currents beyond 500 mA. All contactors performed better on xenon than argon. A general theory of plasma contactor operation in both the electron collection and electron emission modes, which describes the current-limiting effects of space-charge phenomena is given. This current-limiting and collecting phenomenon is shown to be a function of driving potential differences and emitting and collecting surface radius ratio for the case of a spherical geometry. Discharge power did not appear to influence the electron collection current substantially in the experiments so it is suggested in light of the model that the contactors are generally not limited by their ion production capabilities under conditions at which they were tested.

  3. Anomalous is ubiquitous

    SciTech Connect

    Eliazar, Iddo; Klafter, Joseph

    2011-09-15

    Brownian motion is widely considered the quintessential model of diffusion processes-the most elemental random transport processes in Science and Engineering. Yet so, examples of diffusion processes displaying highly non-Brownian statistics-commonly termed 'Anomalous Diffusion' processes-are omnipresent both in the natural sciences and in engineered systems. The scientific interest in Anomalous Diffusion and its applications is growing exponentially in the recent years. In this Paper we review the key statistics of Anomalous Diffusion processes: sub-diffusion and super-diffusion, long-range dependence and the Joseph effect, Levy statistics and the Noah effect, and 1/f noise. We further present a theoretical model-generalizing the Einstein-Smoluchowski diffusion model-which provides a unified explanation for the prevalence of Anomalous Diffusion statistics. Our model shows that what is commonly perceived as 'anomalous' is in effect ubiquitous. - Highlights: > The article provides an overview of Anomalous Diffusion (AD) statistics. > The Einstein-Smoluchowski diffusion model is extended and generalized. > The generalized model universally generates AD statistics. > A unified 'universal macroscopic explanation' for AD statistics is established. > AD statistics are shown to be fundamentally connected to robustness.

  4. Preparation and Application of Hollow Silica/magnetic Nanocomposite Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng-Chien; Lin, Jing-Mo; Lin, Chun-Rong; Wang, Sheng-Chang

    The hollow silica/cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) magnetic microsphere with amino-groups were successfully prepared via several steps, including preparing the chelating copolymer microparticles as template by soap-free emulsion polymerization, manufacturing the hollow cobalt ferrite magnetic microsphere by in-situ chemical co-precipitation following calcinations, and surface modifying of the hollow magnetic microsphere by 3-aminopropyltrime- thoxysilane via the sol-gel method. The average diameter of polymer microspheres was ca. 200 nm from transmission electron microscope (TEM) measurement. The structure of the hollow magnetic microsphere was characterized by using TEM and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The spinel-type lattice of CoFe2O4 shell layer was identified by using XRD measurement. The diameter of CoFe2O4 crystalline grains ranged from 54.1 nm to 8.5 nm which was estimated by Scherrer's equation. Additionally, the hollow silica/cobalt ferrite microsphere possesses superparamagnetic property after VSM measurement. The result of BET measurement reveals the hollow magnetic microsphere which has large surface areas (123.4m2/g). After glutaraldehyde modified, the maximum value of BSA immobilization capacity of the hollow magnetic microsphere was 33.8 mg/g at pH 5.0 buffer solution. For microwave absorption, when the hollow magnetic microsphere was compounded within epoxy resin, the maximum reflection loss of epoxy resins could reach -35dB at 5.4 GHz with 1.9 mm thickness.

  5. Novel hollow all-carbon structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundholm, Dage; Wirz, Lukas N.; Schwerdtfeger, Peter

    2015-09-01

    A new family of cavernous all-carbon structures is proposed. These molecular cage structures are constructed by edge subdivisions and leapfrog transformations from cubic polyhedra or their duals. The obtained structures were then optimized at the density functional level. These hollow carbon structures represent a new class of carbon allotropes which could lead to many interesting applications.A new family of cavernous all-carbon structures is proposed. These molecular cage structures are constructed by edge subdivisions and leapfrog transformations from cubic polyhedra or their duals. The obtained structures were then optimized at the density functional level. These hollow carbon structures represent a new class of carbon allotropes which could lead to many interesting applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Cartesian coordinates of the studied molecules. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr04370k

  6. Mercury - the hollow planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothery, D. A.

    2012-04-01

    Mercury is turning out to be a planet characterized by various kinds of endogenous hole (discounting impact craters), which are compared here. These include volcanic vents and collapse features on horizontal scales of tens of km, and smaller scale depressions ('hollows') associated with bright crater-floor deposits (BCFD). The BCFD hollows are tens of metres deep and kilometres or less across and are characteristically flat-floored, with steep, scalloped walls. Their form suggests that they most likely result from removal of surface material by some kind of mass-wasting process, probably associated with volume-loss caused by removal (via sublimation?) of a volatile component. These do not appear to be primarily a result of undermining. Determining the composition of the high-albedo bluish surface coating in BCFDs will be a key goal for BepiColombo instruments such as MIXS (Mercury Imaging Xray Spectrometer). In contrast, collapse features are non-circular rimless pits, typically on crater floors (pit-floor craters), whose morphology suggests collapse into void spaces left by magma withdrawal. This could be by drainage of either erupted lava (or impact melt) or of shallowly-intruded magma. Unlike the much smaller-scale BCFD hollows, these 'collapse pit' features tend to lack extensive flat floors and instead tend to be close to triangular in cross-section with inward slopes near to the critical angle of repose. The different scale and morphology of BCFD hollows and collapse pits argues for quite different modes of origin. However, BCFD hollows adjacent to and within the collapse pit inside Scarlatti crater suggest that the volatile material whose loss was responsible for the growth of the hollows may have been emplaced in association with the magma whose drainage caused the main collapse. Another kind of volcanic collapse can be seen within a 25 km-wide volcanic vent outside the southern rim of the Caloris basin (22.5° N, 146.1° E), on a 28 m/pixel MDIS NAC image

  7. Hollow Polyimide Microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Echigo, Yoshiaki (Inventor); Kaneshiro, Hisayasu (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A shaped article composed of an aromatic polyimide has a hollow, essentially spherical structure and a particle size of about 100 to about 1500 micrometers, a density of about 1 to about 6 pounds/cubic foot and a volume change of 1 to about 20% by a pressure treatment of 30 psi for 10 minutes at room temperature. A syntactic foam, made of a multiplicity of the shaped articles which are bonded together by a matrix resin to form an integral composite structure, has a density of about 3 to about 30 pounds/cubic feet and a compression strength of about 100 to about 1400 pounds/sq inch.

  8. Hollow Polyimide Microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Echigo, Yoshiaki (Inventor); Kaneshiro, Hisayasu (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A shaped article composed of an aromatic polyimide has a hollow, essentially spherical structure and a particle size of about 100 to about 1500 microns, a density of about I to about 6 pounds/ft3 and a volume change of 1 to about 20% by a pressure treatment of 30 psi for 10 minutes at room temperature. A syntactic foam, made of a multiplicity of the shaped articles which are bounded together by a matrix resin to form an integral composite structure, has a density of about 3 to about 30 pounds/cu ft and a compression strength of about 100 to about 1400 pounds/sq in.

  9. Hollow Polyimide Microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Echigo, Yoshiaki (Inventor); Kaneshiro, Hisayasu (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A shaped article composed of an aromatic polyimide has a hollow, essentially spherical structure and a particle size of about 100 to about 1500 microns a density of about 1 to about 6 pounds/cubic ft and a volume change of 1 to about 20 percent by a pressure treatment of 30 psi for 10 minutes at room temperature. A syntactic foam, made of a multiplicity of the shaped articles which are bonded together by a matrix resin to form an integral composite structure, has a density of about 3 to about 30 pounds/cubic ft and a compression strength 2 of about 100 to about 1400 pounds/sq in.

  10. 28,000 Hour Xenon Hollow Cathode LifeTest Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.

    1997-01-01

    The International Space Station Plasma Contactor System requires a hollow cathode assembly (HCA) with a lifetime of at least 18,000 hours. Critical components of the HCA include the hollow cathode and electron emitter. A series of hollow cathode wear tests was performed which included a life test operated at the maximum current of the HCA. This test sought to verify the hollow cathode design and contamination control protocols. The life test accumulated 27,800 hours of operation before failing to ignite. The hollow cathode exhibited relatively small changes in operating parameters over the course of the test. This life test is the longest duration test of a high current xenon hollow cathode reported to date.

  11. Anomalous law of cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Rubí, J. Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2015-03-14

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton’s law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  12. Anomalous law of cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Rubí, J. Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2015-03-01

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  13. Anomalous law of cooling.

    PubMed

    Lapas, Luciano C; Ferreira, Rogelma M S; Rubí, J Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A

    2015-03-14

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics. PMID:25770525

  14. Anomalous gauge boson interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Aihara, H.; Barklow, T.; Baur, U. |

    1995-03-01

    We discuss the direct measurement of the trilinear vector boson couplings in present and future collider experiments. The major goals of such experiments will be the confirmation of the Standard Model (SM) predictions and the search for signals of new physics. We review our current theoretical understanding of anomalous trilinear gauge-boson self interactions. If the energy scale of the new physics is {approximately} 1 TeV, these low energy anomalous couplings are expected to be no larger than {Omicron}(10{sup {minus}2}). Constraints from high precision measurements at LEP and low energy charged and neutral current processes are critically reviewed.

  15. Experimental realization of quantized anomalous Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Qi-Kun

    2014-03-01

    Anomalous Hall effect was discovered by Edwin Hall in 1880. In this talk, we report the experimental observation of the quantized version of AHE, the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in thin films of Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3 magnetic topological insulator. At zero magnetic field, the gate-tuned anomalous Hall resistance exhibits a quantized value of h /e2 accompanied by a significant drop of the longitudinal resistance. The longitudinal resistance vanishes under a strong magnetic field whereas the Hall resistance remains at the quantized value. The realization of QAHE paves a way for developing low-power-consumption electronics. Implications on observing Majorana fermions and other exotic phenomena in magnetic topological insulators will also be discussed. The work was collaborated with Ke He, Yayu Wang, Xucun Ma, Xi Chen, Li Lv, Dai Xi, Zhong Fang and Shoucheng Zhang.

  16. Graphene-based hollow spheres as efficient electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Longfei; Feng, Hongbin; Liu, Mengjia; Zhang, Kaixiang; Li, Jinghong

    2013-11-21

    A facile and straightforward approach is developed for the construction of graphene-based hollow spheres. An electron rich sodium-ammonia solution is used to effectively restore the π-conjugation of graphene. The hollow spheres exhibit excellent electrocatalytic activity towards oxygen reduction without catalyst deactivation. PMID:24089043

  17. Preparation and characterization of optical-functional diblock copolymer brushes on hollow sphere surface via atom transfer radical polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Li-Ping; Li, Wen-Zhi; Zhao, Li-Min; Zhang, Chun-Juan; Wang, Yan-Dong; Kong, Li-Li; Li, Ling-Ling

    2010-09-15

    The optical-functional poly(methyl methacrylate)-block-Tb complex diblock copolymer brushes grafted from hollow sphere surface via atom transfer radical polymerization were investigated in this work. A sufficient amount of azo initiator was introduced onto hollow sphere surface firstly. Then the monomer methyl methacrylate was polymerized via surface-initiated reverse atom transfer radical polymerization using azo group modified hollow sphere as initiator. Following, the poly(methyl methacrylate) modified hollow sphere was used as maroinitiator for surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization of Tb complex. The samples were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance, gel permeation chromatographer and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. The results indicated that the poly(methyl methacrylate) had grafted from hollow sphere surface and the average diameter of hollow core was about 1 {mu}m. The optical properties of the poly(methyl methacrylate)-block-Tb copolymer modified hollow sphere were also reported.

  18. Effect of growth temperature on the electronic transport and anomalous Hall effect response in co-sputtered Co2FeSi thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Anjali; Chaudhary, Sujeet

    2015-11-01

    Co-sputtered Co2FeSi thin films are studied by varying the growth temperature (Ts) as a control parameter in terms of the appreciable change in the disorder. The effect of Ts on structural, magnetic, electrical, and magneto-transport properties was investigated. As Ts is increased from room temperature to 400 °C, an improvement in the crystallinity and atomic ordering are observed. These are found to be correlated with the associated reduction in residual resistivity ( ρ x x 0 ) from 410 to 88 μΩ cm, an increment in residual resistivity ratio (r) from 0.8 to 1.23, and an increase in saturation magnetization from 1074 to 1196 emu/cc. The spin wave stiffness constant in these films is found to increase with Ts, with a reasonably high value of 358 meVÅ2 at the optimum value of Ts of 400 °C. Further, the obtained high carrier concentration and mobility values (at 10 K) of ˜30 e-s/f.u. and ˜0.11 cm2 V-1 s-1 for the films deposited at Ts = 400 °C shows the presence of compensated Fermi surface. The transport properties are investigated qualitatively from the scaling of anomalous Hall resistivity ρx y s (T) with the longitudinal resistivity ρ x x ( T ) data, employing the extrinsic (skew- and side-jump scatterings) and intrinsic scattering contributions. The variation in the intrinsic scattering contributions observed via the variation in linear dependence of ρx y s on ρx x 2 with the change in Ts is found to be associated with the improvement in the crystallinity of these films.

  19. Multi-shelled CeO₂ hollow microspheres as superior photocatalysts for water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jian; Zhao, Kun; Li, Guodong; Gao, Yan; Zhao, Huijun; Yu, Ranbo; Tang, Zhiyong

    2014-04-21

    A general self-templating method is introduced to construct triple-shelled CeO₂ hollow microspheres, which are composed of tiny CeO₂ nanoparticles. When the triple-shelled CeO₂ hollow microspheres are used as photocatalysts for direct water oxidation with AgNO₃ as the electron scavenger, excellent activity and enhanced stability for O₂ evolution are achieved, in contrast with commercial CeO₂ nanoparticles, single-shelled CeO₂ hollow microspheres and double-shelled CeO₂ hollow microspheres. Such an outstanding performance is attributed to the unique properties of the triple-shelled CeO₂ hollow microspheres including more efficient multiple reflections of the incident light by the inner shells, the larger surface area and more active sites for improving separation of electron-hole pairs, and the more curved surfaces unfavorable for deposition of in situ generated Ag nanoparticles. PMID:24608859

  20. Hollow-cathode evaporators

    SciTech Connect

    Saenko, V.A.; Kravatskii, V.A.; Veremeichenko, G.N.; Vladimirov, A.I.

    1985-08-01

    This paper describes devices for producing plasma from the vapor of a solid substance under vacuum and depositing films from the plasma. The plasma is produced by a discharge between a hollow cathode crucible and an anode, which are placed in a magnetic field longitudinal in relation to the vapor flow. The basic parameters are: film deposition rate 1-70 nm/sec, consumption of working substance 1-30 mg/sec, ionization factor for the working substance in the flow 1-10%, ion-current density at the substrate 0.1-10 mA/cm/sup 2/. Films of Cu, Au, Ag, Cr, and A1 have been made with parameters better than those of films deposited without ionization.

  1. Catalytic hollow spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The improved, heterogeneous catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitably formed of a shell (12) of metal such as aluminum having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be, itself, catalytic or the catalyst can be coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  2. Catalytic, hollow, refractory spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Improved, heterogeneous, refractory catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitable formed of a shell (12) of refractory such as alumina having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be itself catalytic or a catalytically active material coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  3. Catalytic hollow spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The improved, heterogeneous catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitably formed of a shell (12) of metal such as aluminum having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be, itself, catalytic or the catalyst can be coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  4. Colored models for anomalous nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, P.J.S.; Saly, R.; Romo, W.J.; Sundaresan, M.K.; Campbell, B.; Elias, V.

    1983-04-01

    There seems to be good experimental evidence that anomalous nuclei are produced in heavy-ion collisions; they are anomalous in that they have an abnormally short mean free path, for example, in nuclear emulsions. Here we consider the possibility that anomalous nuclei are combinations of a colored anomalous particle fragment (based on theories with spontaneous breakdown of color symmetry) with ordinary nucleons. Phenomenological implications of various possible models in which the anomalous particle fragment is considered to be a colored particle with the color symmetry SU(3)/sub c/ explicitly broken are given.

  5. Demystifying fluorine chemical shifts: electronic structure calculations address origins of seemingly anomalous (19)F-NMR spectra of fluorohistidine isomers and analogues.

    PubMed

    Kasireddy, Chandana; Bann, James G; Mitchell-Koch, Katie R

    2015-11-11

    Fluorine NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying biomolecular structure, dynamics, and ligand binding, yet the origins of (19)F chemical shifts are not well understood. Herein, we use electronic structure calculations to describe the changes in (19)F chemical shifts of 2F- and 4F-histidine/(5-methyl)-imidazole upon acid titration. While the protonation of the 2F species results in a deshielded chemical shift, protonation of the 4F isomer results in an opposite, shielded chemical shift. The deshielding of 2F-histidine/(5-methyl)-imidazole upon protonation can be rationalized by concomitant decreases in charge density on fluorine and a reduced dipole moment. These correlations do not hold for 4F-histidine/(5-methyl)-imidazole, however. Molecular orbital calculations reveal that for the 4F species, there are no lone pair electrons on the fluorine until protonation. Analysis of a series of 4F-imidazole analogues, all with delocalized fluorine electron density, indicates that the deshielding of (19)F chemical shifts through substituent effects correlates with increased C-F bond polarity. In summary, the delocalization of fluorine electrons in the neutral 4F species, with gain of a lone pair upon protonation may help explain the difficulty in developing a predictive framework for fluorine chemical shifts. Ideas debated by chemists over 40 years ago, regarding fluorine's complex electronic effects, are shown to have relevance for understanding and predicting fluorine NMR spectra. PMID:26524669

  6. Method for sizing hollow microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Farnum, E.H.; Fries, R.J.

    1975-10-29

    Hollow Microspheres may be effectively sized by placing them beneath a screen stack completely immersed in an ultrasonic bath containing a liquid having a density at which the microspheres float and ultrasonically agitating the bath.

  7. Anomalous In-Plane Electronic Scattering in Charge Ordered Na0.41CoO2·0.6H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Guixin; Korshunov, Maxim M.; Gao, Yuze; Le Tacon, Mathieu; Singh, David J.; Lin, Chengtian

    2012-06-01

    We report electronic transport measurements on high quality floating zone grown NaxCoO2 and Na0.41CoO2·0.6H2O single crystals. We find an in-plane electronic scattering minimum near 11 K and a clear charge ordering at approximately 50 K. The electronic and magnetic properties in hydrated and nonhydrated Na0.41CoO2 samples are similar at higher temperature, but evolve in markedly different ways below ˜50K, where a strong ferromagnetic tendency is observed in the hydrated sample. Model calculations show the relationship of this tendency to the structure of the Fermi surface. The results, particularly the clear differences between the hydrated and nonhydrated material show a substantially enhanced ferromagnetic tendency upon hydration. Implications for superconductivity are discussed.

  8. Nonlocal Anomalous Hall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Steven S.-L.; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall (AH) effect is deemed to be a unique transport property of ferromagnetic metals, caused by the concerted action of spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also occurs in a nonmagnetic metal (Pt) in contact with a magnetic insulator [yttrium iron garnet (YIG)], even when precautions are taken to ensure that there is no induced magnetization in the metal. We propose a theory of this effect based on the combined action of spin-dependent scattering from the magnetic interface and the spin-Hall effect in the bulk of the metal. At variance with previous theories, we predict the effect to be of first order in the spin-orbit coupling, just as the conventional anomalous Hall effect—the only difference being the spatial separation of the spin-orbit interaction and the magnetization. For this reason we name this effect the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect and predict that its sign will be determined by the sign of the spin-Hall angle in the metal. The AH conductivity that we calculate from our theory is in order of magnitude agreement with the measured values in Pt /YIG structures.

  9. High efficiency ionizer using a hollow cathode discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Alessi, J.G.; Prelec, K.

    1984-01-01

    A proposal for an ionizer using a hollow cathode discharge plasma is described. Ionization is via the very high current density electron beam component in the plasma, as well as from charge exchange with plasma ions. Extraction of a He/sup +/ current corresponding to approximately 50% of the incoming atomic beam flux should be possible.

  10. Hollow Retroreflectors Offer Solid Benefits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    A technician who lead a successful team of scientists, engineers, and other technicians in the design, fabrication, and characterization of cryogenic retroreflectors for the NASA Cassini/Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) mission to Saturn, developed a hollow retroreflector technology while working at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. With 16 years of NASA experience, the technician teamed up with another NASA colleague and formed PROSystems, Inc., of Sharpsburg, Maryland, to provide the optics community with an alternative source for precision hollow retroreflectors. The company's hollow retroreflectors are front surface glass substrates assembled to provide many advantages over existing hollow retroreflectors and solid glass retroreflectors. Previous to this new technology, some companies chose not to use hollow retroreflectors due to large seam widths and loss of signal. The "tongue and groove" facet design of PROSystems's retroreflector allows for an extremely small seam width of .001 inches. Feedback from users is very positive regarding this characteristic. Most of PROSystems's primary customers mount the hollow retroreflectors in chrome steel balls for laser tracker targets in applications such as automobile manufacturing and spacecraft assembly.