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Sample records for anomalous rf field

  1. Revisiting the Anomalous rf Field Penetration into a Warm Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Oleg V. Polomarov; Constantine E. Theodosiou

    2005-06-24

    Radio-frequency [rf] waves do not penetrate into a plasma and are damped within it. The electric field of the wave and plasma current are concentrated near the plasma boundary in a skin layer. Electrons can transport the plasma current away from the skin layer due to their thermal motion. As a result, the width of the skin layer increases when electron temperature effects are taken into account. This phenomenon is called anomalous skin effect. The anomalous penetration of the rf electric field occurs not only for transversely propagating to the plasma boundary wave (inductively coupled plasmas) but also for the wave propagating along the plasma boundary (capacitively coupled plasmas). Such anomalous penetration of the rf field modifies the structure of the capacitive sheath. Recent advances in the nonlinear, non-local theory of the capacitive sheath are reported. It is shown that separating the electric field profile into exponential and non-exponential parts yields an efficient qualitative and quantitative description of the anomalous skin effect in both inductively and capacitively coupled plasma.

  2. Effect of anomalous electron cross-field transport on electron energy distribution function in a DC-RF magnetized plasma discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Donnelly, Vincent; Kaganovich, Igor; Godyak, Valery

    2013-09-01

    The application of the magnetic field in a low pressure plasma can cause a spatial separation of cold and hot electron groups. This so-called magnetic filter effect is not well understood and is the subject of our studies. In this work, we investigate electron energy distribution function in a DC-RF plasma discharge with crossed electric and magnetic field operating at sub-mtorr pressure range of xenon gas. Experimental studies showed that the increase of the magnetic field leads to a more uniform profile of the electron temperature across the magnetic field. This surprising result indicates the importance of anomalous electron transport that causes mixing of hot and cold electrons. High-speed imaging and probe measurements revealed a coherent structure rotating in E cross B direction with frequency of a few kHz. Similar to spoke oscillations reported for Hall thrusters, this rotating structure conducts the largest fraction of the cross-field current. This work was supported by the US DOE under Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  3. Effect of anomalous electron cross-field transport on electron energy distribution function in a DC-RF magnetized plasma discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Donnelly, Vincent M.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Godyak, Valery

    2013-10-01

    The application of the magnetic field in a low pressure plasma can cause a spatial separation of cold and hot electron groups. This so-called magnetic filter effect is not well understood and is the subject of our studies. In this work, we investigate electron energy distribution function in a DC-RF plasma discharge with crossed electric and magnetic field operating at sub-mtorr pressure range of xenon gas. Experimental studies showed that the increase of the magnetic field leads to a more uniform profile of the electron temperature across the magnetic field. This surprising result indicates the importance of anomalous electron transport that causes mixing of hot and cold electrons. High-speed imaging and probe measurements revealed a coherent structure rotating in E cross B direction with frequency of a few kHz. Similar to spoke oscillations reported for Hall thrusters, this rotating structure conducts the largest fraction of the cross-field current. This work was supported by DOE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  4. Unbalanced field RF electron gun

    DOEpatents

    Hofler, Alicia

    2013-11-12

    A design for an RF electron gun having a gun cavity utilizing an unbalanced electric field arrangement. Essentially, the electric field in the first (partial) cell has higher field strength than the electric field in the second (full) cell of the electron gun. The accompanying method discloses the use of the unbalanced field arrangement in the operation of an RF electron gun in order to accelerate an electron beam.

  5. Anomalous rf magnetoresistance in copper at 4/degree/K

    SciTech Connect

    Halama, H.J.; Prodell, A.G.; Rogers, J.T.; De Panfilis, S.; Melissinos, A.C.; Moskowitz, B.E.; Semertzidis, Y.K.; Wuensch, W.U.; Fowler, W.B.; Nezrick, F.A.

    1988-03-01

    We have measured the effect of a magnetic field on the surface resistance of polycrystalline Cu at f = 1.2 GHz and at 4.4/degree/K; under these conditions the surface resistance is well into the anomalous skin effect regime but has not reached its limiting value. We find that the transverse and longitudinal magnetoresistance are an order of magnitude smaller than the DC magnetoresistance and depend quadratically on the field. At low fields we observe a decrease in surface resistance with increasing field which can be interpreted as a size effect of the TF surface current. 17 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. RF Field Visualization of RF Ablation at the Larmor Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Stang, Pascal; Kerr, Adam; Pauly, John; Scott, Greig

    2012-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation is an effective minimally invasive treatment for tumors. One primary source of difficulty is monitoring and controlling the ablation region. Currently, RF ablation is performed at 460 kHz, for which MRI could play a role given its capability for temperature monitoring and tumor visualization. If instead the ablation were to be performed at the MRI Larmor frequency, then the MR capability for B1 field mapping could be used to directly visualize the RF fields created by the ablation currents. Visualizing the RF fields may enable better control of the ablation currents, enabling better control of lesion shape and size and improving repeatability. We demonstrate the feasibility of performing RF ablations at 64 MHz and show preliminary results from imaging the RF fields from the ablation. The post-ablation RF fields show an increase in current density in the ablated region, consistent with an increase in conductivity of the ablated tissue. PMID:21775256

  7. Exploration of Anomalous Gravity Effects by rf-Pumped Magnetized High-T(c) Superconducting Oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Tony; Litchford, Ron; Peters, Randall; Thompson, Byran; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A number of anomalous gravitational effects have been reported in the scientific literature during recent years, but there has been no independent confirmation with regard to any of these claims. Therefore, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, in response to the propulsion challenges specified by NASA's Breakthrough Propulsion Physics (BPP) program, proposed to explore the possibility of observing anomalous gravitation behavior through the manipulation of Josephson junction effects in magnetized high-Tc superconducting oxides. The technical goal was to critically test this revolutionary physical claim and provide a rigorous, independent, empirical confirmation (or refutation) of anomalous effects related to the manipulation of gravity by radio frequency (rf)-pumped magnetized type-2 superconductors. Because the current empirical evidence for gravity modification is anecdotal, our objective was to design, construct, and meticulously implement a discriminating experiment, which would put these observations on a more firm footing within the scientific community. Our approach is unique in that we advocate the construction of an extremely sensitive torsion balance with which to measure gravity modification effects by rf-pumped type-2 superconductor test masses. This paper reviews the anecdotal evidence for anomalous gravity effects, describes the design and development of a simplified torsion balance experiment for empirically investigating these claims, and presents the results of preliminary experiments.

  8. Calculation of rf fields in axisymmetric cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Iwashita, Y.

    1985-01-01

    A new code, PISCES, has been developed for calculating a complete set of rf electromagnetic modes in an axisymmetric cavity. The finite-element method is used with up to third-order shape functions. Although two components are enough to express these modes, three components are used as unknown variables to take advantage of the symmetry of the element matrix. The unknowns are taken to be either the electric field components or the magnetic field components. The zero-divergence condition will be satisfied by the shape function within each element.

  9. RF Head Coil Design with Improved RF Magnetic Near-Fields Uniformity for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Systems

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Sung-Min; DelaBarre, Lance; Gopinath, Anand; Vaughan, John Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Higher magnetic field strength in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems offers higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast, and spatial resolution in MR images. However, the wavelength in ultra-high fields (7 tesla and beyond) becomes shorter than the human body at the Larmor frequency with increasing static magnetic field (B0) of MRI system. At short wavelengths, interference effect appears resulting in non- uniformity of the RF magnetic near-field (B1) over the subject and MR images may have spatially anomalous contrast. The B1 near-field generated by the transverse electromagnetic (TEM) RF coil’s microstrip line element has a maximum near the center of its length and falls off towards both ends. In this study, a double trapezoidal shaped microstrip transmission line element is proposed to obtain uniform B1 field distribution by gradual impedance variation. Two multi-channel RF head coils with uniform and trapezoidal shape elements were built and tested with a phantom at 7T MRI scanner for comparison. The simulation and experimental results show stronger and more uniform B1+ near-field with the trapezoidal shape. PMID:25892746

  10. Evidence for Water Ie on the Moon: Results for Anomalous Polar Craters from the LRO Mini-RF Imaging Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spudis, P.D.; Bussey, D. B. J.; Baloga, S. M.; Cahill, J. T. S.; Glaze, L. S.; Patterson, G. W.; Raney, R. K.; Thompson, T. W.; Thomson, B. J.; Ustinov, E. A.

    2013-01-01

    The Mini-RF radar instrument on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft mapped both lunar poles in two different RF wavelengths (complete mapping at 12.6 cm S-band and partial mapping at 4.2 cm X-band) in two look directions, removing much of the ambiguity of previous Earth- and spacecraft-based radar mapping of the Moon's polar regions. The poles are typical highland terrain, showing expected values of radar cross section (albedo) and circular polarization ratio (CPR). Most fresh craters display high values of CPR in and outside the crater rim; the pattern of these CPR distributions is consistent with high levels of wavelength-scale surface roughness associated with the presence of block fields, impact melt flows, and fallback breccia. A different class of polar crater exhibits high CPR only in their interiors, interiors that are both permanently dark and very cold (less than 100 K). Application of scattering models developed previously suggests that these anomalously high-CPR deposits exhibit behavior consistent with the presence of water ice. If this interpretation is correct, then both poles may contain several hundred million tons of water in the form of relatively "clean" ice, all within the upper couple of meters of the lunar surface. The existence of significant water ice deposits enables both long-term human habitation of the Moon and the creation of a permanent cislunar space transportation system based upon the harvest and use of lunar propellant.

  11. Evidence for water ice on the moon: Results for anomalous polar craters from the LRO Mini-RF imaging radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spudis, P. D.; Bussey, D. B. J.; Baloga, S. M.; Cahill, J. T. S.; Glaze, L. S.; Patterson, G. W.; Raney, R. K.; Thompson, T. W.; Thomson, B. J.; Ustinov, E. A.

    2013-10-01

    The Mini-RF radar instrument on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft mapped both lunar poles in two different RF wavelengths (complete mapping at 12.6 cm S-band and partial mapping at 4.2 cm X-band) in two look directions, removing much of the ambiguity of previous Earth- and spacecraft-based radar mapping of the Moon's polar regions. The poles are typical highland terrain, showing expected values of radar cross section (albedo) and circular polarization ratio (CPR). Most fresh craters display high values of CPR in and outside the crater rim; the pattern of these CPR distributions is consistent with high levels of wavelength-scale surface roughness associated with the presence of block fields, impact melt flows, and fallback breccia. A different class of polar crater exhibits high CPR only in their interiors, interiors that are both permanently dark and very cold (less than 100 K). Application of scattering models developed previously suggests that these anomalously high-CPR deposits exhibit behavior consistent with the presence of water ice. If this interpretation is correct, then both poles may contain several hundred million tons of water in the form of relatively "clean" ice, all within the upper couple of meters of the lunar surface. The existence of significant water ice deposits enables both long-term human habitation of the Moon and the creation of a permanent cislunar space transportation system based upon the harvest and use of lunar propellant.

  12. Evidence for Water Ice on the Moon: Results for Anomalous Polar Craters from the LRO Mini-RF Imaging Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spudis, P. D.; Bussey, D. B. J.; Baloga, S. M.; Cahill, J. T. S.; Glaze, L. S.; Patterson, G. W.; Raney, R. K.; Thompson, T. W.; Thomson, B. J.; Ustinov, E. A.

    2013-01-01

    The Mini-RF radar instrument on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft mapped both lunar poles in two different RF wavelengths (complete mapping at 12.6 cm S-band and partial mapping at 4.2 cm X-band) in two look directions, removing much of the ambiguity of previous Earth- and spacecraft-based radar mapping of the Moon's polar regions. The poles are typical highland terrain, showing expected values of radar cross section (albedo) and circular polarization ratio (CPR). Most fresh craters display high values of CPR in and outside the crater rim; the pattern of these CPR distributions is consistent with high levels of wavelength-scale surface roughness associated with the presence of block fields, impact melt flows, and fallback breccia. A different class of polar crater exhibits high CPR only in their interiors, interiors that are both permanently dark and very cold (less than 100 K). Application of scattering models developed previously suggests that these anomalously high-CPR deposits exhibit behavior consistent with the presence of water ice. If this interpretation is correct, then both poles may contain several hundred million tons of water in the form of relatively "clean" ice, all within the upper couple of meters of the lunar surface. The existence of significant water ice deposits enables both long-term human habitation of the Moon and the creation of a permanent cislunar space transportation system based upon the harvest and use of lunar propellant.

  13. Observation of anomalous field penetration in collisional, cylindrical ICP discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, John D.; Chen, Francis F.; Arnush, Donald

    2000-10-01

    Measurements of the radial penetration of RF-generated B-fields are performed in a large diameter cylindrical ICP. A loop antenna surrounds a dome-shaped Pyrex top that sits on top of a magnetic bucket. Rtop=15cm height of top, Rbucket 18cm, bucket height 30cm, N 1011cm-3, Te 3eV, Prf < 1.4kW, Frf = 2-27.12MHz, Po 1-100mT. Field penetration (``skin") depths Lsd are measured in the outer plasma region (r > R/2) that are consistent with collisional skin depth theory. However, in the interior region (r < R/2), non-monotonic radial profiles and interference phenomena that resemble standing wave behavior (e.g. nodes) are observed, where no propagating waves are predicted to occur. Similar phenomena have been observed by other groups [1], but for chambers sizes such that R Lsd. Such observations were explained as manifestations of the anomalous skin effect (ASE), the electromagnetic analog of Debye shielding. However, these phenomena are more apparent as Po (and collisionality) is increased, in apparent contradiction to the predictions of ASE theory. Results of a detailed experimental investigation of interference phenomena under conditions that fall outside of the ASE regime will be presented, as well as a simple physical picture that resolves this apparent paradox. [1]. B. Joye and H. Schneider, Helv. Phys. Acta 51, 804 (1978).

  14. Wave associated anomalous drag during magnetic field reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Mozer, F. S.; Wilber, M.; Drake, J. F.

    2011-10-15

    The anomalous drag, D, due to large amplitude plasma waves is used for the first time, in place of {eta}*j, to estimate dissipation at the sub-solar magnetopause and to determine the extent to which this drag accounts for the reconnection electric field. This anomalous drag is determined by measuring correlations of the fluctuations in the electric field and plasma density. Large amplitude electric fields occurred more than 60% of the time in the more than 100 sub-solar, low latitude magnetopause crossings of the THEMIS satellite. They occurred mainly near the magnetospheric separatrix in the form of electrostatic lower hybrid and whistler waves. The anomalous drag at the separatrix was generally <10% of the average reconnection electric field, and it was <1% of the field in the current sheet. Thus, anomalous drag due to waves is not a significant driver of reconnection or of the required dissipation at the sub-solar magnetopause.

  15. Anomalous Thrust Production from an RF Test Device Measured on a Low-Thrust Torsion Pendulum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, David A.; White, Harold G.; March, Paul; Lawrence, James T.; Davies, Frank J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the test campaigns designed to investigate and demonstrate viability of using classical magnetoplasmadynamics to obtain a propulsive momentum transfer via the quantum vacuum virtual plasma. This paper will not address the physics of the quantum vacuum plasma thruster (QVPT), but instead will describe the recent test campaign. In addition, it contains a brief description of the supporting radio frequency (RF) field analysis, lessons learned, and potential applications of the technology to space exploration missions. During the first (Cannae) portion of the campaign, approximately 40 micronewtons of thrust were observed in an RF resonant cavity test article excited at approximately 935 megahertz and 28 watts. During the subsequent (tapered cavity) portion of the campaign, approximately 91 micronewtons of thrust were observed in an RF resonant cavity test article excited at approximately 1933 megahertz and 17 watts. Testing was performed on a low-thrust torsion pendulum that is capable of detecting force at a single-digit micronewton level. Test campaign results indicate that the RF resonant cavity thruster design, which is unique as an electric propulsion device, is producing a force that is not attributable to any classical electromagnetic phenomenon and therefore is potentially demonstrating an interaction with the quantum vacuum virtual plasma.

  16. Anomalous scaling of a scalar field advected by turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Kraichnan, R.H.

    1995-12-31

    Recent work leading to deduction of anomalous scaling exponents for the inertial range of an advected passive field from the equations of motion is reviewed. Implications for other turbulence problems are discussed.

  17. Reduction of RF penetration effects in high field imaging.

    PubMed

    Foo, T K; Hayes, C E; Kang, Y W

    1992-02-01

    A method of correcting for the RF inhomogeneity in the body by dielectric loading of the coil-to-shield space in an RF resonator (coil and shield assembly) is described. The presence of the RF coil and RF shield have significant effects on RF homogeneity. Based on theoretical calculations, a method for adjusting the RF homogeneity by manipulating the axial propagation constant, kappa z, is proposed. This is accomplished by loading the coil-to-shield space with dielectric material of suitable relative permittivity so as to increase kappa z and decrease the radial propagation constant, kappa rho. In this manner, the radial wavelength (lambda rho = 2 pi/kappa rho) can be increased relative to the body dimensions, and the field amplitude variations in the axial plane minimized. Theoretical calculations indicate that a value of between 30 and 40 for the relative permittivity of the dielectric material in the coil-to-shield space would reduce the RF field inhomogeneity from +/- 15% to about +/- 3% over a central 30-cm-diameter region of a homogeneous 40-cm-diameter body at both 64 and 170 MHz. The theoretical model was verified in laboratory measurements of the [formula; see text] field generated in a test coil at 170 MHz which was scaled to correspond to a body at 64 MHz. However, the improved RF field homogeneity would be accompanied by increased RF power requirements and reduced coil sensitivity. PMID:1549043

  18. High field rf superconductivity: to pulse or not to pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, I.E.

    1984-10-01

    Experimental data on the behavior of superconductors under the application of rf fields of amplitude comparable to their critical fields are sporadic and not always consistent. In many cases the field level at which breakdown in superconducting rf cavities should be expected has not been clearly established. Tests conducted with very short (approx. 1 ..mu..s) rf pulses indicate that in this mode of operation fields close to the critical values can be consistently reached in superconducting cavities without breakdown. The advantages and disadvantages of the pulsed method are discussed compared to those of the more standard continuous wave (cw) systems. 60 references.

  19. Technique for Predicting the RF Field Strength Inside an Enclosure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallett, M.; Reddell, J.

    1998-01-01

    This Memorandum presents a simple analytical technique for predicting the RF electric field strength inside an enclosed volume in which radio frequency radiation occurs. The technique was developed to predict the radio frequency (RF) field strength within a launch vehicle's fairing from payloads launched with their telemetry transmitters radiating and to the impact of the radiation on the vehicle and payload. The RF field strength is shown to be a function of the surface materials and surface areas. The method accounts for RF energy losses within exposed surfaces, through RF windows, and within multiple layers of dielectric materials which may cover the surfaces. This Memorandum includes the rigorous derivation of all equations and presents examples and data to support the validity of the technique.

  20. Anomalous cross field electron transport in a Hall effect thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Boniface, C.; Garrigues, L.; Hagelaar, G. J. M.; Boeuf, J. P.; Gawron, D.; Mazouffre, S.

    2006-10-16

    The origin of anomalous electron transport across the magnetic field in the channel of a Hall effect thruster has been the subject of controversy, and the relative importance of electron-wall collisions and plasma turbulence on anomalous transport is not clear. From comparisons between Fabry-Perot measurements and hybrid model calculations of the ion velocity profile in a 5 kW Hall effect thruster, we deduce that one and the same mechanism is responsible for anomalous electron transport inside and outside the Hall effect thruster channel. This suggests that the previous assumption that Bohm anomalous conductivity is dominant outside the thruster channel whereas electron-wall conductivity prevails inside the channel is not valid.

  1. TRAK_RF - Electromagnetic Field and Charged Particle Simulations in RF Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphries, Stanley; Rees, Daniel

    1997-05-01

    An integrated software system has been developed to model electromagnetic fields and charged particle orbits in high-power RF devices. The primary application is simulation of electron multipactoring in linac vacuum windows for Accelerator Production of Tritium(G. Lawrence, et.al., Conventional and Superconducting RF Linac Design for the APT Project, in Proc. 1996 Int'l. Linear Acc. Conf. (Geneva, 1996), to be published.). The finite-element frequency-domain field solver can determine resonant fields such as cutoff and propagating modes of waveguides and TE(mnp) and TM(mnp) modes of cylindrical structures. In contrast to codes like Superfish, TRAK_RF makes direct determinations of power dissipation and phase shifts resulting ffrom lossy materials and walls. Furthermore, the program can handle scattering solutions, simulating free-space conditions with resistive termination boundary layers. TRAK_RF has advanced particle tracking capabilities to investigate a variety of innovative window designs. The program can simutaneously apply three numerical solutions for electrostatic, magnetostatic and electromagnetic fields on independent conformal triangular meshes. The finite-element method allows an unambiguous determination of particle collisions with material surfaces. It is possible to define up to 32 material types with energy-dependent secondary emission coefficients. TRAK_RF has a versatile automatic mesh generator with an interactive drafting utility for boundary input. Other applications include cavity design, radar and communications, microwave systems, and beam optics in RF accelerators.

  2. Anomalous variations of lithosphere magnetic field before several earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Z.; Chen, B.

    2015-12-01

    Based on the geomagnetic vector data measured each year since 2011 at more than 500 sites with a mean spatial interval of ~70km.we observed anomalous variations of lithospheric magnetic field before and after over 15 earthquakes having magnitude > 5. We find that the field in near proximity (about 50km) to the epicenter of large earthquakes shows high spatial and temporal gradients before the earthquake. Due to the low frequency of repeat measurements it is unclear when these variations occurred and how do them evolve. We point out anomalous magnetic filed using some circles with radius of 50km usually in June of each year, and then we would check whether quake will locat in our circles during one year after that time (June to next June). Now we caught 10 earthquakes of 15 main shocks having magnitude > 5, most of them located at less than10km away from our circles and some of them were in our circles. Most results show that the variations of lithosphere magnetic filed at the epicenter are different with surrending backgroud usually. When we figure out horizontal variations (vector) of lithosphere magnetic field and epicenter during one year after each June, we found half of them show that the earthquakes will locat at "the inlands in a flowing river", that means earthquakes may occur at "quiet"regions while the backgroud show character as"flow" as liquid. When we compared with GPS results, it appears that these variations of lithospere magnetic field may also correlate with displacement of earth's surface. However we do not compared with GPS results for each earthquake, we are not clear whether these anomalous variations of lithospere magnetic field may also correlate with anomalous displacement of earth's surface. Future work will include developing an automated method for identifying this type of anomalous field behavior and trying to short repeat measurement period to 6 month to try to find when these variations occur.

  3. Effective field theory: A modern approach to anomalous couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Degrande, Céline; Centre for Particle Physics and Phenomenology , Université Catholique de Louvain, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve ; Greiner, Nicolas; Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München ; Kilian, Wolfgang; University of Siegen, Fachbereich Physik, D-57068 Siegen ; Mattelaer, Olivier; Mebane, Harrison; Stelzer, Tim; Willenbrock, Scott; Zhang, Cen; Centre for Particle Physics and Phenomenology , Université Catholique de Louvain, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve

    2013-08-15

    We advocate an effective field theory approach to anomalous couplings. The effective field theory approach is the natural way to extend the standard model such that the gauge symmetries are respected. It is general enough to capture any physics beyond the standard model, yet also provides guidance as to the most likely place to see the effects of new physics. The effective field theory approach also clarifies that one need not be concerned with the violation of unitarity in scattering processes at high energy. We apply these ideas to pair production of electroweak vector bosons. -- Highlights: •We discuss the advantages of effective field theories compared to anomalous couplings. •We show that one need not be concerned with unitarity violation at high energy. •We discuss the application of effective field theory to weak boson physics.

  4. Vacuum field energy and spontaneous emission in anomalously dispersive cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, Douglas H.; Di Rosa, Michael D.

    2011-05-15

    Anomalously dispersive cavities, particularly white-light cavities, may have larger bandwidth to finesse ratios than their normally dispersive counterparts. Partly for this reason, they have been proposed for use in laser interferometer gravitational-wave observatory (LIGO)-like gravity-wave detectors and in ring-laser gyroscopes. In this paper we analyze the quantum noise associated with anomalously dispersive cavity modes. The vacuum field energy associated with a particular cavity mode is proportional to the cavity-averaged group velocity of that mode. For anomalously dispersive cavities with group index values between 1 and 0, this means that the total vacuum field energy associated with a particular cavity mode must exceed ({h_bar}/2{pi}){omega}/2. For white-light cavities in particular, the group index approaches zero and the vacuum field energy of a particular spatial mode may be significantly enhanced. We predict enhanced spontaneous emission rates into anomalously dispersive cavity modes and broadened laser linewidths when the linewidth of intracavity emitters is broader than the cavity linewidth.

  5. Anomalous Fano Profiles in External Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Alejandro; Majety, Vinay Pramod; Nagele, Stefan; Pazourek, Renate; Burgdörfer, Joachim; Scrinzi, Armin

    2015-12-01

    We show that the external control of Fano resonances in general leads to complex Fano q parameters. Fano line shapes of photoelectron and transient absorption spectra in the presence of an infrared control field are investigated. Computed transient absorption spectra are compared with a model proposed for a recent experiment [C. Ott et al., Science 340, 716 (2013)]. Control mechanisms for photoelectron spectra are exposed: control pulses applied during excitation modify the line shapes by momentum boosts of the continuum electrons. Pulses arriving after excitation generate interference fringes due to infrared two-photon transitions.

  6. Anomalous Fano Profiles in External Fields.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, Alejandro; Majety, Vinay Pramod; Nagele, Stefan; Pazourek, Renate; Burgdörfer, Joachim; Scrinzi, Armin

    2015-12-11

    We show that the external control of Fano resonances in general leads to complex Fano q parameters. Fano line shapes of photoelectron and transient absorption spectra in the presence of an infrared control field are investigated. Computed transient absorption spectra are compared with a model proposed for a recent experiment [C. Ott et al., Science 340, 716 (2013)]. Control mechanisms for photoelectron spectra are exposed: control pulses applied during excitation modify the line shapes by momentum boosts of the continuum electrons. Pulses arriving after excitation generate interference fringes due to infrared two-photon transitions. PMID:26705629

  7. A double-frequency rf gun for field emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiangkun; Li, Ming; Dan, Lijun; He, Tianhui; Liu, Yu; Xu, Zhou; Tang, Chuanxiang

    2015-05-01

    Cold cathodes have attracted a lot of attention in the field of accelerators in recent years. While the development of suitable cold cathodes is in progress, attempts have been made to combine the cold cathode with a rf structure. Due to the strong dependence on the electric field, field emissions peak at the wave crest, which is not the best injection phase, during a rf cycle. To make the injection phase adjustable, a flexible double-frequency rf gun is designed. The addition of a 3rd-harmonic field to the fundamental one in the half cell will move the wave crest toward a better injection phase and make the initial bunch length shorter. The full cell is resonant at the fundamental frequency. Since only the half cell is resonant at two frequencies, the gun can be easily tuned. Simulations show that the time-dependent rf effects on the transverse and longitudinal phase spaces of the electron bunch can be reduced by choosing proper rf parameters and the space charge effects can be compensated for by using an external solenoid field. Therefore, the gun is able to provide low emittance, low energy spread and short electron bunches with high average current.

  8. Anomalous resistivity and the evolution of magnetic field topology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. N.

    1993-01-01

    This paper explores the topological restructuring of a force-free magnetic field caused by the hypothetical sudden onset of a localized region of strong anomalous resistivity. It is shown that the topological complexity increases, with the primitive planar force-free field with straight field lines developing field lines that wrap half a turn around each other, evidently providing a surface of tangential discontinuity in the wraparound region. It is suggested that the topological restructuring contributes to the complexity of the geomagnetic substorm, the aurora, and perhaps some of the flare activity on the sun, or other star, and the Galactic halo.

  9. RF breakdown of 805 MHz cavities in strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bowring, D.; Stratakis, D.; Kochemirovskiy, A.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Palmer, M.; Peterson, D.; Yonehara, K.; Freemire, B.; Lane, P.; Torun, Y.; Haase, A.

    2015-05-03

    Ionization cooling of intense muon beams requires the operation of high-gradient, normal-conducting RF structures in the presence of strong magnetic fields. We have measured the breakdown rate in several RF cavities operating at several frequencies. Cavities operating within solenoidal magnetic fields B > 0.25 T show an increased RF breakdown rate at lower gradients compared with similar operation when B = 0 T. Ultimately, this breakdown behavior limits the maximum safe operating gradient of the cavity. Beyond ionization cooling, this issue affects the design of photoinjectors and klystrons, among other applications. We have built an 805 MHz pillbox-type RF cavity to serve as an experimental testbed for this phenomenon. This cavity is designed to study the problem of RF breakdown in strong magnetic fields using various cavity materials and surface treatments, and with precise control over sources of systematic error. We present results from tests in which the cavity was run with all copper surfaces in a variety of magnetic fields.

  10. Transient anomalous charge production in strong-field QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanji, Naoto; Mueller, Niklas; Berges, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    We investigate axial charge production in two-color QCD out of equilibrium. We compute the real-time evolution starting with spatially homogeneous strong gauge fields, while the fermions are in vacuum. The idealized class of initial conditions is motivated by glasma flux tubes in the context of heavy-ion collisions. We focus on axial charge production at early times, where important aspects of the anomalous dynamics can be derived analytically. This is compared to real-time lattice simulations. Quark production at early times leading to anomalous charge generation is investigated using Wilson fermions. Our results indicate that coherent gauge fields can transiently produce significant amounts of axial charge density, while part of the induced charges persist to be present even well beyond characteristic decoherence times. The comparisons to analytic results provide stringent tests of real-time representations of the axial anomaly on the lattice.

  11. Flute stabilization due to ponderomotive force created by an rf field with a variable gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Yasaka, Y.; Itatani, R.

    1986-06-30

    An rf-stabilization experiment was performed in the axisymmetric single-mirror device HIEI by controlling the radial-gradient scale length of the rf field with the aid of an azimuthally phased antenna array. The flute stability depends sensitively on the scale length of the perpendicular rf electric field, which shows that rf stabilization is caused by the ponderomotive force for ions.

  12. Identification of anomalous motion of thunderstorms using daily rainfall fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Moral, Anna; Llasat, Maria Carmen; Rigo, Tomeu

    2016-04-01

    Adverse weather phenomena in Catalonia (NE of the Iberian Peninsula) is commonly associated to heavy rains, large hail, strong winds, and/or tornados, all of them caused by thunderstorms. In most of the cases with adverse weather, thunderstorms vary sharply their trajectories in a concrete moment, changing completely the motion directions that have previously followed. Furthermore, it is possible that a breaking into several cells may be produced, or, in the opposite, it can be observed a joining of different thunderstorms into a bigger system. In order to identify the main features of the developing process of thunderstorms and the anomalous motions that these may follow in some cases, this contribution presents a classification of the events using daily rainfall fields, with the purpose of distinguishing quickly anomalous motion of thunderstorms. The methodology implemented allows classifying the daily rainfall fields in three categories by applying some thresholds related with the daily precipitation accumulated values and their extension: days with "no rain", days with "potentially convective" rain and days with "non-potentially convective" rain. Finally, for those "potentially convective" daily rainfall charts, it also allows a geometrical identification and classification of all the convective structures into "ellipse" and "non-ellipse", obtaining then the structures with "normal" or "anomalous" motion pattern, respectively. The work is focused on the period 2008-2015, and presents some characteristics of the rainfall behaviour in terms of the seasonal distribution of convective rainfall or the geographic variability. It shows that convective structures are mainly found during late spring and summer, even though they can be recorded in any time of the year. Consequently, the maximum number of convective structures with anomalous motion is recorded between July and November. Furthermore, the contribution shows the role of the orography of Catalonia in the

  13. Inhomogeneous electric field effects in a linear RF quadruple trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melborne, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    The exact potential corresponding to confining fields inside a linear rf quadrupole particle trap of finite length is presented. The analytic expressions for the trapping potential is derived by introducing a linear trap employing a relatively simple cylindrical geometry and solving Laplace's equation for the trap electrodes. The finite length of linear traps results in field distortion near the trap ends. An exact analytic determination of the fields is useful because the profile of the trapped ion cloud is highly dependent on the fields confining it. It is shown that near the ends of the trap, the effective potential arising from the rf fields acts to propel particles out of the trap, and further, that the addition of a dc bias generates an inhomogeneous in the trap that influences the particles both perpendicularly to and along the trap's long axis.

  14. Resonance properties of the biological objects in the RF field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocherova, E.; Kupec, P.; Stofanik, V.

    2011-12-01

    Irradiation of people with electromagnetic fields emitted from miscellaneous devices working in the radio-frequency (RF) range may have influence, for example may affect brain processes. The question of health impact of RF electromagnetic fields on population is still not closed. This article is devoted to an investigation of resonance phenomena of RF field absorption in the models of whole human body and body parts (a head) of different size and shape. The values of specific absorption rate (SAR) are evaluated for models of the different shapes: spherical, cylindrical, realistic shape and for different size of the model, that represents the case of new-born, child and adult person. In the RF frequency region, absorption depends nonlinearly on frequency. Under certain conditions (E-polarization), absorption reaches maximum at frequency, that is called "resonance frequency". The whole body absorption and the resonance frequency depends on many further parameters, that are not comprehensively clarified. The simulation results showed the dependence of the whole-body average SAR and resonance frequency on the body dimensions, as well as the influence of the body shape.

  15. Dynamo and anomalous transport in the reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Prager, S.C.

    1998-08-01

    The reversed field pinch is an effective tool to study the macroscopic consequences of magnetic fluctuations, such as the dynamo effect and anomalous transport. Several explanations exist for the dynamo (the self-generation of plasma current)--the MHD dynamo, the kinetic dynamo, and the diamagnetic dynamo. There is some experimental evidence for each, particularly from measurements of ion velocity and electron pressure fluctuations. Magnetic fluctuations are known to produce energy and particle flux in the RFP core. Current profile control is able to decrease fluctuation-induced transport by a factor of five. Improved confinement regimes are also obtained at deep reversal and, possibly, with flow shear.

  16. Rf Gun with High-Current Density Field Emission Cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2005-12-19

    High current-density field emission from an array of carbon nanotubes, with field-emission-transistor control, and with secondary electron channel multiplication in a ceramic facing structure, have been combined in a cold cathode for rf guns and diode guns. Electrodynamic and space-charge flow simulations were conducted to specify the cathode configuration and range of emission current density from the field emission cold cathode. Design of this cathode has been made for installation and testing in an existing S-band 2-1/2 cell rf gun. With emission control and modulation, and with current density in the range of 0.1-1 kA/cm2, this cathode could provide performance and long-life not enjoyed by other currently-available cathodes

  17. Anomalous Capacitive Sheath with Deep Radio Frequency Electric Field Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Igor D. Kaganovich

    2002-01-18

    A novel nonlinear effect of anomalously deep penetration of an external radio-frequency electric field into a plasma is described. A self-consistent kinetic treatment reveals a transition region between the sheath and the plasma. Because of the electron velocity modulation in the sheath, bunches in the energetic electron density are formed in the transition region adjusted to the sheath. The width of the region is of order V(subscript T)/omega, where V(subscript T) is the electron thermal velocity, and w is frequency of the electric field. The presence of the electric field in the transition region results in a cooling of the energetic electrons and an additional heating of the cold electrons in comparison with the case when the transition region is neglected.

  18. Anomalous Thrust Production from an RF Test Device Measured on a Low-Thrust Torsion Pendulum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, David; White, Harold G.; March, Paul; Lawrence, James T.; Davies, Frank J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the eight-day August 2013 test campaign designed to investigate and demonstrate viability of using classical magnetoplasmadynamics to obtain a propulsive momentum transfer via the quantum vacuum virtual plasma. This paper will not address the physics of the quantum vacuum plasma thruster, but instead will describe the test integration, test operations, and the results obtained from the test campaign. Approximately 30-50 micro-Newtons of thrust were recorded from an electric propulsion test article consisting primarily of a radio frequency (RF) resonant cavity excited at approximately 935 megahertz. Testing was performed on a low-thrust torsion pendulum that is capable of detecting force at a single-digit micronewton level, within a stainless steel vacuum chamber with the door closed but at ambient atmospheric pressure. Several different test configurations were used, including two different test articles as well as a reversal of the test article orientation. In addition, the test article was replaced by an RF load to verify that the force was not being generated by effects not associated with the test article. The two test articles were designed by Cannae LLC of Doylestown, Pennsylvania. The torsion pendulum was designed, built, and operated by Eagleworks Laboratories at the NASA Johnson Space Center of Houston, Texas. Approximately six days of test integration were required, followed by two days of test operations, during which, technical issues were discovered and resolved. Integration of the two test articles and their supporting equipment was performed in an iterative fashion between the test bench and the vacuum chamber. In other words, the test article was tested on the bench, then moved to the chamber, then moved back as needed to resolve issues. Manual frequency control was required throughout the test. Thrust was observed on both test articles, even though one of the test articles was designed with the expectation that it would not

  19. Iterative Methods to Solve Linear RF Fields in Hot Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Joseph; Svidzinski, Vladimir; Evstatiev, Evstati; Galkin, Sergei; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2014-10-01

    Most magnetic plasma confinement devices use radio frequency (RF) waves for current drive and/or heating. Numerical modeling of RF fields is an important part of performance analysis of such devices and a predictive tool aiding design and development of future devices. Prior attempts at this modeling have mostly used direct solvers to solve the formulated linear equations. Full wave modeling of RF fields in hot plasma with 3D nonuniformities is mostly prohibited, with memory demands of a direct solver placing a significant limitation on spatial resolution. Iterative methods can significantly increase spatial resolution. We explore the feasibility of using iterative methods in 3D full wave modeling. The linear wave equation is formulated using two approaches: for cold plasmas the local cold plasma dielectric tensor is used (resolving resonances by particle collisions), while for hot plasmas the conductivity kernel (which includes a nonlocal dielectric response) is calculated by integrating along test particle orbits. The wave equation is discretized using a finite difference approach. The initial guess is important in iterative methods, and we examine different initial guesses including the solution to the cold plasma wave equation. Work is supported by the U.S. DOE SBIR program.

  20. Precise quantization of anomalous Hall effect near zero magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Bestwick, A. J.; Fox, E. J.; Kou, Xufeng; Pan, Lei; Wang, Kang L.; Goldhaber-Gordon, D.

    2015-05-04

    In this study, we report a nearly ideal quantum anomalous Hall effect in a three-dimensional topological insulator thin film with ferromagnetic doping. Near zero applied magnetic field we measure exact quantization in the Hall resistance to within a part per 10,000 and a longitudinal resistivity under 1 Ω per square, with chiral edge transport explicitly confirmed by nonlocal measurements. Deviations from this behavior are found to be caused by thermally activated carriers, as indicated by an Arrhenius law temperature dependence. Using the deviations as a thermometer, we demonstrate an unexpected magnetocaloric effect and use it to reach near-perfect quantization by cooling the sample below the dilution refrigerator base temperature in a process approximating adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration.

  1. Anomalous transport in fracture networks: field scale experiments and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, P. K.; Le Borgne, T.; Bour, O.; Dentz, M.; Juanes, R.

    2012-12-01

    Anomalous transport is widely observed in different settings and scales of transport through porous and fractured geologic media. A common signature of anomalous transport is the late-time power law tailing in breakthrough curves (BTCs) during tracer tests. Various conceptual models of anomalous transport have been proposed, including multirate mass transfer, continuous time random walk, and stream tube models. Since different conceptual models can produce equally good fits to a single BTC, tracer test interpretation has been plagued with ambiguity. Here, we propose to resolve such ambiguity by analyzing BTCs obtained from both convergent and push-pull flow configurations at two different fracture planes. We conducted field tracer tests in a fractured granite formation close to Ploemeur, France. We observe that BTC tailing depends on the flow configuration and the injection fracture. Specifically the tailing disappears under push-pull geometry, and when we injected at a fracture with high flux (Figure 1). This indicates that for this fractured granite, BTC tailing is controlled by heterogeneous advection and not by matrix diffusion. To explain the change in tailing behavior for different flow configurations, we employ a simple lattice network model with heterogeneous conductivity distribution. The model assigns random conductivities to the fractures and solves the Darcy equation for an incompressible fluid, enforcing mass conservation at fracture intersections. The mass conservation constraint yields a correlated random flow through the fracture system. We investigate whether BTC tailing can be explained by the spatial distribution of preferential flow paths and stagnation zones, which is controlled by the conductivity variance and correlation length. By combining the results from the field tests and numerical modeling, we show that the reversibility of spreading is a key mechanism that needs to be captured. We also demonstrate the dominant role of the injection

  2. Pushing the Limits: RF Field Control at High Loaded Q

    SciTech Connect

    M. Liepe; S.A. Belomestnykh; J. Dobbins; R.P.K. Kaplan; C.R. Strohman; B.K. Stuhl; C. Hovater; T. Plawski

    2005-05-16

    The superconducting cavities in an Energy-Recovery-Linac will be operated with a high loaded Q of several 10{sup 7}, possible up to 10{sup 8}. Not only has no prior control system ever stabilized the RF field in a linac cavity with such high loaded Q, but also highest field stability in amplitude and phase is required at this high loaded Q. Because of a resulting bandwidth of the cavity of only a few Hz, this presents a significant challenge: the field in the cavity extremely sensitive to any perturbation of the cavity resonance frequency due to microphonics and Lorentz force detuning. To prove that the RF field in a high loaded Q cavity can be stabilized, and that Cornell's newly developed digital control system is able to achieve this, the system was connected to a high loaded Q cavity at the JLab IR-FEL. Excellent cw field stability--about 10{sup -4} rms in relative amplitude and 0.02 deg rms in phase--was achieved at a loaded Q of 2.1 x 10{sup 7} and 1.2 x 10{sup 8}, setting a new record in high loaded Q operation of a linac cavity. Piezo tuner based cavity frequency control proved to be very effective in keeping the cavity on resonance and allowed reliable to ramp up to high gradients in less than 1 second.

  3. Gauge invariant approach to low-spin anomalous conformal currents and shadow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Metsaev, R. R.

    2011-05-15

    Conformal low-spin anomalous currents and shadow fields in flat space-time of dimensions greater than or equal to four are studied. The gauge invariant formulation for such currents and shadow fields is developed. Gauge symmetries are realized by involving Stueckelberg and auxiliary fields. The gauge invariant differential constraints for anomalous currents and shadow fields and the realization of global conformal symmetries are obtained. Gauge invariant two-point vertices for anomalous shadow fields are also obtained. In the Stueckelberg gauge frame, these gauge invariant vertices become the standard two-point vertices of conformal field theory. Light-cone gauge two-point vertices of the anomalous shadow fields are derived. The AdS/CFT correspondence for anomalous currents and shadow fields and the respective normalizable and non-normalizable solutions of massive low-spin anti-de Sitter fields is studied. The bulk fields are considered in a modified de Donder gauge that leads to decoupled equations of motion. We demonstrate that leftover on-shell gauge symmetries of bulk massive fields correspond to gauge symmetries of boundary anomalous currents and shadow fields, while the modified (Lorentz) de Donder gauge conditions for bulk massive fields correspond to differential constraints for boundary anomalous currents and shadow fields.

  4. Transverse low-field RF coils in MRI.

    PubMed

    Claasen-Vujcić, T; Borsboom, H M; Gaykema, H J; Mehlkopf, T

    1996-07-01

    Imaging at low fields imposes a number of nonstandard requirements on the RF coil. At low fields, coil losses are dominant over patient losses. This means that even more stress is put on the quality factor Q. Furthermore, the low frequency also implies a high inductance L and/or a high capacitance C product. Just increasing the capacitance C results in a difficult optimal matching to the preamplifier as well as increased costs and higher complexity of the resonator construction. Coils with a high quality factor Q and a high inductance are thus required at low fields. Birdcage coils possess a number of advantages over saddle and solenoidal coils. However, the currently used birdcages have inherently low inductances limited by the size of the coil. The problem can be solved by a novel design in which the strip configuration for inductors is abandoned and the inductors are realized as a certain number of turns. The Q factor can be further improved by using Litz wire. Three novel transverse RF coils with high inductances are presented and compared with each other as well as to the standard coils. Both linear and quadrature modes are discussed. PMID:8795029

  5. Concurrent recording of RF pulses and gradient fields - comprehensive field monitoring for MRI.

    PubMed

    Brunner, David O; Dietrich, Benjamin E; Çavuşoğlu, Mustafa; Wilm, Bertram J; Schmid, Thomas; Gross, Simon; Barmet, Christoph; Pruessmann, Klaas P

    2016-09-01

    Reconstruction of MRI data is based on exact knowledge of all magnetic field dynamics, since the interplay of RF and gradient pulses generates the signal, defines the contrast and forms the basis of resolution in spatial and spectral dimensions. Deviations caused by various sources, such as system imperfections, delays, eddy currents, drifts or externally induced fields, can therefore critically limit the accuracy of MRI examinations. This is true especially at ultra-high fields, because many error terms scale with the main field strength, and higher available SNR renders even smaller errors relevant. Higher baseline field also often requires higher acquisition bandwidths and faster signal encoding, increasing hardware demands and the severity of many types of hardware imperfection. To address field imperfections comprehensively, in this work we propose to expand the concept of magnetic field monitoring to also encompass the recording of RF fields. In this way, all dynamic magnetic fields relevant for spin evolution are covered, including low- to audio-frequency magnetic fields as produced by main magnets, gradients and shim systems, as well as RF pulses generated with single- and multiple-channel transmission systems. The proposed approach permits field measurements concurrently with actual MRI procedures on a strict common time base. The combined measurement is achieved with an array of miniaturized field probes that measure low- to audio-frequency fields via (19) F NMR and simultaneously pick up RF pulses in the MRI system's (1) H transmit band. Field recordings can form the basis of system calibration, retrospective correction of imaging data or closed-loop feedback correction, all of which hold potential to render MRI more robust and relax hardware requirements. The proposed approach is demonstrated for a range of imaging methods performed on a 7 T human MRI system, including accelerated multiple-channel RF pulses. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

  6. Dependence of the microwave surface resistance of superconducting niobium on the magnitude of the rf field

    SciTech Connect

    Romanenko, A.; Grassellino, A.

    2013-06-24

    Utilizing difference in temperature dependencies we decoupled Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) and residual components of the microwave surface resistance of superconducting niobium at all rf fields up to B{sub rf}{approx}115 mT. We reveal that the residual resistance decreases with field at B{sub rf} Less-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 40 mT and strongly increases in chemically treated niobium at B{sub rf}>80 mT. We find that BCS surface resistance is weakly dependent on field in the clean limit, whereas a strong and peculiar field dependence emerges after 120 Degree-Sign C vacuum baking.

  7. Spin resonance strength of a localized rf magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. Y.

    2006-07-01

    Spin-resonance strength produced by a localized rf field has been a focus of recent publications [V. S. Morozov , Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 7, 024002 (2004).PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.7.024002; M. A. Leonova (to be published).; T. Roser, in Handbook of Accelerator Physics and Engineering, edited by A. W. Chao and M. Tigner (World Scientific, Singapore, 1999), p. 151.; M. Bai, W. W. MacKay, and T. Roser, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 8, 099001 (2005).PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.8.099001; V. S. Morozov , Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 8, 099002 (2005).PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.8.099002]. This paper discusses the debated factor of 2, and provides a formula to calculate the component enhanced by the induced betatron motion.

  8. A method to localize RF B₁ field in high-field magnetic resonance imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hyoungsuk; Gopinath, Anand; Vaughan, J Thomas

    2012-12-01

    In high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems, B₀ fields of 7 and 9.4 T, the RF field shows greater inhomogeneity compared to clinical MRI systems with B₀ fields of 1.5 and 3.0 T. In multichannel RF coils, the magnitude and phase of the input to each coil element can be controlled independently to reduce the nonuniformity of the RF field. The convex optimization technique has been used to obtain the optimum excitation parameters with iterative solutions for homogeneity in a selected region of interest. The pseudoinverse method has also been used to find a solution. The simulation results for 9.4- and 7-T MRI systems are discussed in detail for the head model. Variation of the simulation results in a 9.4-T system with the number of RF coil elements for different positions of the regions of interest in a spherical phantom are also discussed. Experimental results were obtained in a phantom in the 9.4-T system and are compared to the simulation results and the specific absorption rate has been evaluated. PMID:22929360

  9. Advanced electric field computation for RF sheaths prediction with TOPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanesio, Daniele; Maggiora, Riccardo

    2012-10-01

    The design of an Ion Cyclotron (IC) launcher is not only driven by its coupling properties, but also by its capability of maintaining low parallel electric fields in front of it, in order to provide good power transfer to plasma and to reduce the impurities production. However, due to the impossibility to verify the antenna performances before the starting of the operations, advanced numerical simulation tools are the only alternative to carry out a proper antenna design. With this in mind, it should be clear that the adoption of a code, such as TOPICA [1], able to precisely take into account a realistic antenna geometry and an accurate plasma description, is extremely important to achieve these goals. Because of the recently introduced features that allow to compute the electric field distribution everywhere inside the antenna enclosure and in the plasma column, the TOPICA code appears to be the only alternative to understand which elements may have a not negligible impact on the antenna design and then to suggest further optimizations in order to mitigate RF potentials. The present work documents the evaluation of the electric field map from actual antennas, like the Tore Supra Q5 and the JET A2 launchers, and the foreseen ITER IC antenna. [4pt] [1] D. Milanesio et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 115019 (2009).

  10. Electromagnetic fields and anomalous transports in heavy-ion collisions-a pedagogical review.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xu-Guang

    2016-07-01

    The hot and dense matter generated in heavy-ion collisions may contain domains which are not invariant under P and CP transformations. Moreover, heavy-ion collisions can generate extremely strong magnetic fields as well as electric fields. The interplay between the electromagnetic field and triangle anomaly leads to a number of macroscopic quantum phenomena in these P- and CP-odd domains known as anomalous transports. The purpose of this article is to give a pedagogical review of various properties of the electromagnetic fields, the anomalous transport phenomena, and their experimental signatures in heavy-ion collisions. PMID:27275776

  11. Electromagnetic fields and anomalous transports in heavy-ion collisions—a pedagogical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xu-Guang

    2016-07-01

    The hot and dense matter generated in heavy-ion collisions may contain domains which are not invariant under P and CP transformations. Moreover, heavy-ion collisions can generate extremely strong magnetic fields as well as electric fields. The interplay between the electromagnetic field and triangle anomaly leads to a number of macroscopic quantum phenomena in these P- and CP-odd domains known as anomalous transports. The purpose of this article is to give a pedagogical review of various properties of the electromagnetic fields, the anomalous transport phenomena, and their experimental signatures in heavy-ion collisions.

  12. Pressurized H_{2} rf Cavities in Ionizing Beams and Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, M.; et al.

    2013-10-01

    A major technological challenge in building a muon cooling channel is operating RF cavities in multi-tesla external magnetic fields. We report the first experimental characterization of a high pressure gas-filled 805 MHz RF cavity for use with intense ionizing beams and strong external magnetic fields. RF power consumption by beam-induced plasma was investigated with hydrogen and deuterium gases with pressures between 20 and 100 atm and peak RF gradients between 5 and 50 MV/m. The energy absorption per ion pair-RF cycle ranges from 10−18 to 10−16 J. The low pressure case agrees well with an analytical model based on electron and ion mobilities. Varying concentrations of oxygen gas were investigated to remove free electrons from the cavity and reduce the RF power consumption. Measurements of the electron attachment time to oxygen and rate of ion-ion recombination were also made. Additionally, we demonstrate the operation of the gas-filled RF cavity in a solenoidal field of up to 3 T, finding no major magnetic field dependence. These results indicate that a high pressure gas-filled cavity is potentially a viable technology for muon ionization cooling.

  13. Anomalous scaling of the magnetic field in the helical Kazantsev-Kraichnan model.

    PubMed

    Jurčišinová, E; Jurčišin, M

    2015-06-01

    The field-theoretic renormalization group and the operator product expansion are used to investigate the influence of spatial parity violation of the conductive turbulent environment on the anomalous scaling behavior of correlation functions of a weak magnetic field in the framework of the Kazantsev-Kraichnan rapid change model. Two-loop expressions for the critical dimensions of the leading composite operators, which drive the anomalous scaling of the two-point single-time correlation functions of the magnetic field in the presence of large-scale anisotropy, are found to be functions of the helicity parameter. It is shown that the presence of helicity in the system leads to a significantly stronger manifestation of anomalous scaling than in the nonhelical case. At the same time, it is also shown that helicity does not destroy the standard hierarchy of the anisotropic anomalous exponents in the framework of which the leading contribution to anomalous scaling is given by the isotropic shell. PMID:26172794

  14. A New First-Principles Calculation of Field-Dependent RF Surface Impedance of BCS Superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Binping; Reece, Charles E.

    2014-02-01

    There is a need to understand the intrinsic limit of radiofrequency (RF) surface impedance that determines the performance of superconducting RF cavities in particle accelerators. Here we present a field-dependent derivation of Mattis-Bardeen theory of the RF surface impedance of BCS superconductors based on the shifted density of states resulting from coherently moving Cooper pairs. Our theoretical prediction of the effective BCS RF surface resistance (Rs) of niobium as a function of peak surface magnetic field amplitude agrees well with recently reported record low loss resonant cavity measurements from JLab and FNAL with carefully, yet differently, prepared niobium material. The surprising reduction in resistance with increasing field is explained to be an intrinsic effect.

  15. Anomalous cross-B field transport and spokes in HiPIMS plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecimovic, A.

    2016-05-01

    Localized light emission patterns observed during on time of a high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge on a planar magnetron, known as spokes or ionization zones, have been identified as a potential source of anomalous cross-B field diffusion. In this paper experimental evidence is presented that anomalous diffusion is triggered by the appearance of spokes. The Hall parameter {ω\\text{ce}}{τ\\text{c}} , product of the electron cyclotron frequency and the classical collision time, reduces from Bohm diffusion values (∼ 16 and higher) down to the value of 3 as spokes appear, indicating anomalous cross-B field transport. A combination of intensified charge coupled device imaging and electric probe measurements reveals that the ions from the spokes are instantaneously diffusing away from the target. The ion diffusion coefficients calculated from a sideways image of the spoke are six times higher than Bohm diffusion coefficients, which is consistent with the reduction of the Hall parameter.

  16. Ambipolar radial electric field generated by anomalous transport induced by magnetic perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dunqiang; Zhu, Siqiang; Zhang, Debing; Wang, Shaojie

    2016-05-01

    The anomalous particle transport induced by magnetic perturbations in a tokamak is investigated. The correlation between the radial position and the kinetic energy of electrons, Dr K=-e ErDr r , is predicted theoretically and is verified by simulations in the presence of a mean radial electric field. This correlation leads to a radial particle flux produced by the radial electric field. The ambipolar radial electric field can thus be predicted by using the ambipolarity condition Γri=Γre .

  17. Field-effect modulation of anomalous Hall effect in diluted ferromagnetic topological insulator epitaxial films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, CuiZu; Liu, MinHao; Zhang, ZuoCheng; Wang, YaYu; He, Ke; Xue, QiKun

    2016-03-01

    High quality chromium (Cr) doped three-dimensional topological insulator (TI) Sb2Te3 films are grown via molecular beam epitaxy on heat-treated insulating SrTiO3 (111) substrates. We report that the Dirac surface states are insensitive to Cr doping, and a perfect robust long-range ferromagnetic order is unveiled in epitaxial Sb2- x Cr x Te3 films. The anomalous Hall effect is modulated by applying a bottom gate, contrary to the ferromagnetism in conventional diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMSs), here the coercivity field is not significantly changed with decreasing carrier density. Carrier-independent ferromagnetism heralds Sb2- x Cr x Te3 films as the base candidate TI material to realize the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect. These results also indicate the potential of controlling anomalous Hall voltage in future TI-based magneto-electronics and spintronics.

  18. Characterization of rf-SSET in both in-plane and perpendicular magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chunyang; Yang, Zhen; Yuan, Mingyun; Rimberg, A. J.; Savage, D. E.; Eriksson, M. A.; Rimberg Team; Eriksson Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    Previous success in coupling an aluminum radio-frequency superconducting single electron transistor (rf-SSET) to quantum dots (QDs) has demonstrated use of the rf-SSET as an ultra-sensitive and fast charge sensor. Since a magnetic field is usually necessary for quantum dot qubit manipulation, it is important to understand the effect of magnetic fields, either in-plane or perpendicular, on the performance of any charge sensor near the QDs. Here we report characterization of rf-SSETs in both in-plane and perpendicular magnetic fields. The rf-SSET works well in an in-plane fields up to 1 Tesla at a temperature of 30 mK. At 0.3K, in a perpendicular field generated by a stripline located 700 nm away, the rf-SSET charge sensitivity even shows improvement for up to 2.1 mA current through the stripline (corresponding roughly to a field of 6 Gauss). This work was supported by NSA, LPS and ARO

  19. Experimental investigation of heating phenomena in linac mechanical interfaces due to RF field penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Fazio, M.V.; Reid, D.W.; Potter, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    In a high duty-factor, high-current, drift-tube linear accelerator, a critical interface exists between the drift-tube stem and the tank wall. This interface must provide vacuum integrity and RF continuity, while simultaneously allowing alignment flexibility. Because of past difficulties with RF heating of vacuum bellows and RF joints encountered by others, a paucity of available information, and the high reliability requirement for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) accelerator, a program was initiated to study the problem. Because RF heating is the common failure mode, an attempt was made to find a correlation between the drift-tube-stem/linac-tank interface geometry and RF field penetration from the tank into the interface region. Experiments were performed at 80 MHz on an RF structure designed to simulate the conditions to which a drift-tube stem and vacuum bellows are exposed in a drift-tube linac. Additional testing was performed on a 367-MHz model of the FMIT prototype drift-tube linac. Experimental results, and a method to predict excessive RF heating, is presented. An experimentally tested solution to the problem is discussed.

  20. A dynamo explanation for Mercury's anomalous magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hao; Aurnou, Jonathan M.; Wicht, Johannes; Dietrich, Wieland; Soderlund, Krista M.; Russell, Christopher T.

    2014-06-01

    Recent MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) measurements have shown that Mercury's magnetic field is axial-dominant, yet strongly asymmetric with respect to the equator: the field strength in the Northern Hemisphere is approximately 3 times stronger than that in the Southern Hemisphere. Here we show that convective dynamo models driven by volumetric buoyancy with north-south symmetric thermal boundaries are capable of generating quasi-steady north-south asymmetric magnetic fields similar to Mercury's. This symmetry breaking is promoted and stabilized when the core-mantle boundary heat flux is higher at the equator than at high latitudes. The equatorially asymmetric magnetic field generation in our dynamo models corresponds to equatorially asymmetric kinetic helicity, which results from mutual excitation of two different modes of columnar convection. Our dynamo model can be tested by future assessment of Mercury's magnetic field from MESSENGER and BepiColombo as well as through investigations on Mercury's lower mantle temperature heterogeneity and buoyancy forcing in Mercury's core.

  1. Simulation of RF Cavity Dark Current in Presence of Helical Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, Gennady; Kashikhin, Vladimir; /Unlisted

    2010-09-01

    In order to produce muon beam of high enough quality to be used for a Muon Collider, its large phase space must be cooled several orders of magnitude. This task can be accomplished by ionization cooling. Ionization cooling consists of passing a high-emittance muon beam alternately through regions of low Z material, such as liquid hydrogen, and very high accelerating RF cavities within a multi-Tesla solenoidal focusing channel. But first high power tests of RF cavity with beryllium windows in solenoidal magnetic field showed a dramatic drop in accelerating gradient due to RF breakdowns. It has been concluded that external magnetic fields parallel to RF electric field significantly modifies the performance of RF cavities. However, magnetic field in Helical Cooling Channel has a strong dipole component in addition to solenoidal one. The dipole component essentially changes electron motion in a cavity compare to pure solenoidal case, making dark current less focused at field emission sites. The simulation of dark current dynamic in HCC performed with CST Studio Suit is presented in this paper.

  2. Simulation of RF Cavity Dark Current In Presence of Helical Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, Gennady; Kashikhin, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    In order to produce muon beam of high enough quality to be used for a Muon Collider, its large phase space must be cooled several orders of magnitude. This task can be accomplished by ionization cooling. Ionization cooling consists of passing a high-emittance muon beam alternately through regions of low Z material, such as liquid hydrogen, and very high accelerating RF cavities within a multi-Tesla solenoidal focusing channel. But first high power tests of RF cavity with beryllium windows in solenoidal magnetic field showed a dramatic drop in accelerating gradient due to RF breakdowns. It has been concluded that external magnetic fields parallel to RF electric field significantly modifies the performance of RF cavities. However, magnetic field in Helical Cooling Channel has a strong dipole component in addition to solenoidal one. The dipole component essentially changes electron motion in a cavity compare to pure solenoidal case, making dark current less focused at field emission sites. The simulation of dark current dynamic in HCC performed with CST Studio Suit is presented in this paper.

  3. Computational Investigation of Helical Traveling Wave Tube Transverse RF Field Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.; Dayton, James A.

    1998-01-01

    In a previous study using a fully three-dimensional (3D) helical slow-wave circuit cold- test model it was found, contrary to classical helical circuit analyses, that transverse FF electric fields have significant amplitudes compared with the longitudinal component. The RF fields obtained using this helical cold-test model have been scaled to correspond to those of an actual TWT. At the output of the tube, RF field forces reach 61%, 26% and 132% for radial, azimuthal and longitudinal components, respectively, compared to radial space charge forces indicating the importance of considering them in the design of electron beam focusing.

  4. Field-aligned currents, plasma waves, and anomalous resistivity in the disturbed polar cusp.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredricks, R. W.; Scarf, F. L.; Russell, C. T.

    1973-01-01

    During the magnetic storm of November 1, 1968, the Ogo 5 spacecraft encountered the polar cusp region at low magnetic latitudes. We show that the region just outside the last closed field lines contained a warm magnetosheath plasma, magnetic field perturbations interpretable as field-aligned current layers, and electrostatic waves possibly due to plasma instabilities driven by these currents. Estimates of anomalous resistivity extrapolated along the field lines due to these electrostatic waves lead to estimates of field-aligned potential drops between Ogo 5 and the ionosphere on the order of 2 kV.

  5. DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS FOR LOW FIELD SHORT PHOTO-INJECTED RF ELECTRON GUN WITH HIGH CHARGE ELECTRON BUNCH.

    SciTech Connect

    CHANG,X.; BEN-ZVI,I.; KEWISCH,J.

    2004-06-21

    The RF field and space charge effect in a low field RF gun is given. The cell lengths are modified to have maximum accelerating efficiency. The modification introduces an extra RF field slice emittance. The phase space evolution of the following emittance compensation system is presented taking into account the chromatic effect. The emittance compensation mechanics for RF field and chromatic effect induced emittance is similar to that of compensating the space charge induced emittance. But the requirements are different to have best compensation for them. The beam waist is far in front of linac entrance to have best compensation for the RF field and chromatic effect induced emittance. For low field RF gun with high charge electron bunch this compensation is more important.

  6. Anomalously Strong Vertical Magnetic Fields from Distant Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silber, I.; Price, C. G.; Galanti, E.; Shuval, A.

    2014-12-01

    At distances of thousands of kilometers from lightning the vertical component of the magnetic field in the Very Low Frequencies (VLF - 3-30 kHz) and Extremely Low Frequencies (ELF - 3-3000 Hz) is expected to be very weak and several orders of magnitude lower than the horizontal magnetic components. However, measurements in Israel show a relatively strong vertical magnetic component in both the ELF and VLF bands, at the same order of magnitude as the horizontal components. Our measurements suggest that the real Earth-ionosphere waveguide might often be very different from the theoretical waveguide used in model calculations.

  7. Anomalous transport theory for the reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, P.W.; Hegna, C.C; Sovinec, C.R.

    1996-09-01

    Physically motivated transport models with predictive capabilities and significance beyond the reversed field pinch (RFP) are presented. It is shown that the ambipolar constrained electron heat loss observed in MST can be quantitatively modeled by taking account of the clumping in parallel streaming electrons and the resultant self-consistent interaction with collective modes; that the discrete dynamo process is a relaxation oscillation whose dependence on the tearing instability and profile relaxation physics leads to amplitude and period scaling predictions consistent with experiment; that the Lundquist number scaling in relaxed plasmas driven by magnetic turbulence has a weak S{sup {minus}1/4} scaling; and that radial E{times}B shear flow can lead to large reductions in the edge particle flux with little change in the heat flux, as observed in the RFP and tokamak. 24 refs.

  8. Multipole and field uniformity tailoring of a 750 MHz rf dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, Jean R.; Castillo, Alejandro

    2014-12-01

    In recent years great interest has been shown in developing rf structures for beam separation, correction of geometrical degradation on luminosity, and diagnostic applications in both lepton and hadron machines. The rf dipole being a very promising one among all of them. The rf dipole has been tested and proven to have attractive properties that include high shunt impedance, low and balance surface fields, absence of lower order modes and far-spaced higher order modes that simplify their damping scheme. As well as to be a compact and versatile design in a considerable range of frequencies, its fairly simple geometry dependency is suitable both for fabrication and surface treatment. The rf dipole geometry can also be optimized for lowering multipacting risk and multipole tailoring to meet machine specific field uniformity tolerances. In the present work a survey of field uniformities, and multipole contents for a set of 750 MHz rf dipole designs is presented as both a qualitative and quantitative analysis of the inherent flexibility of the structure and its limitations.

  9. RF-SABRE: A Way to Continuous Spin Hyperpolarization at High Magnetic Fields.

    PubMed

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V; Vieth, Hans-Martin; Ivanov, Konstantin L

    2015-10-29

    A new technique is developed that allows one to carry out the signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) experiments at high magnetic field. SABRE is a hyperpolarization method, which utilizes transfer of spin order from para-hydrogen to the spins of a substrate in transient iridium complexes. Previously, it has been thought that such a transfer of spin order is only efficient at low magnetic fields, notably, at level anti-crossing (LAC) regions. Here it is demonstrated that LAC conditions can also be fulfilled at high fields under the action of a RF field. The high-field RF-SABRE experiment can be implemented using commercially available nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machines and does not require technically demanding field-cycling. The achievable NMR enhancements are around 100 for several substrates as compared to their NMR signals at thermal equilibrium conditions at 4.7 T. The frequency dependence of RF-SABRE is comprised of well pronounced peaks and dips, whose position and amplitude are conditioned solely by the magnetic resonance parameters such as chemical shifts and scalar coupling of the spin system involved in the polarization transfer and by the amplitude of the RF field. Thus, the proposed method can serve as a new sensitive tool for probing transient complexes. Simulations of the dependence of magnetization transfer (i.e., NMR signal amplifications) on the frequency and amplitude of the RF field are in good agreement with the developed theoretical approach. Furthermore, the method enables continuous re-hyperpolarization of the SABRE substrate over a long period of time, giving a straightforward way to repetitive NMR experiments. PMID:25970807

  10. RF Power and Magnetic Field Modulation Experiments with Simple Mirror Geometry in the Central Cell of Hanbit Device

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.G.; Bak, J.G.; Jhang, H.G.; Kim, S.S.

    2005-01-15

    The radio frequency (RF) stabilization effects to investigate the characteristics of the interchange instability by RF power and magnetic field modulation experiments were performed near {omega}/{omega}{sub i} {approx} = 1 and with low beta ({approx} 0.1%) plasmas in the central cell of the Hanbit mirror device. Temporal behaviors of the interchange mode were measured and analyzed when the interchange mode was triggered by sudden changes of the RF power and magnetic field intensity.

  11. RF Field Distributions in a Slotted-Type Lisitano Coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suetsugu, Yusuke; Kawai, Yoshinobu

    1984-08-01

    The field distributions in a slotted-type Lisitano coil are analyzed using a simple antenna model, and the microwave power is theoretically found to be supplied near the center of the coil. Field intensities in the Lisitano coil measured with a calibrated loop antenna are compared with the theoretical values, and results supporting the analysis are obtained. The field distributions in a vacuum chamber were also measured.

  12. ALTERATIONS IN CALCIUM ION ACTIVITY BY ELF AND RF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS

    EPA Science Inventory



    Alterations in calcium ion activity by ELF and RF electromagnetic fields

    Introduction

    Calcium ions play many important roles in biological systems. For example, calcium ion activity can be used as an indicator of second-messenger signal-transduction processe...

  13. Exposure of workers to intense RF electric fields that leak from plastic sealers.

    PubMed

    Bini, M; Checcucci, A; Ignesti, A; Millanta, L; Olmi, R; Rubino, N; Vanni, R

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an environmental investigation in a plastic-ware industry using RF sealers. Environmental measurements have demonstrated the presence of strong electric fields the intensity of which: reaches significant levels from the health-protection point of view only in proximity to the applicators; often exceeds the maximal levels allowed by all standards (including the most permissive) for short duration exposures, especially in the region of the hands. Results of a cross-sectional study on the health of 63 female workers are related to the observed RF exposure. A statistically significant correlation was found to exist between RF exposure and some minor health effects--eye irritation, upper limb paresthesias, and vitreous body disorganization. PMID:3635629

  14. Final Technical Report- Back-gate Field Emission-based Cathode RF Electron Gun

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, Gary; Martin, Allen; Noonan, John

    2010-10-30

    The objective was to complete the design of an electron gun which utilizes a radio frequency (RF) power source to apply a voltage to a field emission (FE) cathode, a so called cold cathode, in order to produce an electron beam. The concept of the RF electron gun was originally conceived at Argonne National Laboratory but never reduced to practice. The research allowed the completion of the design based upon the integration of the FE electron source. Compared to other electron guns, the RF gun is very compact, less than one third the size of other comparable guns, and produces a high energy (to several MeV), high quality, high power electron beam with a long focal length with high repetition rates. The resultant electron gun may be used in welding, materials processing, analytical equipment and waste treatment.

  15. Confinement improvement with rf poloidal current drive in the reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Hokin, S.; Sarff, J.; Sovinec, C.; Uchimoto, E.

    1994-03-08

    External control of the current profile in a reversed-field pinch (RFP), by means such as rf poloidal current drive, may have beneficial effects well beyond the direct reduction of Ohmic input power due to auxiliary heating. Reduction of magnetic turbulence associated with the dynamo, which drives poloidal current in a conventional RFP, may allow operation at lower density and higher electron temperature, for which rf current drive becomes efficient and the RFP operates in a more favorable regime on the n{tau} vs T diagram. Projected parameters for RFX at 2 MA axe studied as a concrete example. If rf current drive allows RFX to operate with {beta} = 10% (plasma energy/magnetic energy) at low density (3 {times} 10{sup 19} m{sup {minus}3}) with classical resistivity (i.e. without dynamo-enhanced power input), 40 ms energy confinement times and 3 keV temperatures will result, matching the performance of tokamaks of similar size.

  16. Anomalous attenuation of ultrasound in ferrofluids under the influence of a magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isler, W. E.; Chung, D. Y.

    1978-01-01

    Ultrasonic wave propagation has been studied in a water-base ferrofluid by pulse-echo methods. A commercial box-car integrator was used to measure the change in attenuation due to an external magnetic field applied at various angles relative to the ultrasonic propagation vector. Anomalous results were obtained when the attenuation was plotted as a function of the magnetic field strength. As the field increased, the attenuation reached a maximum and then decreased to a flat minimum before it approached saturation at a field of 2 KG. This variation of attenuation with magnetic field cannot be explained from the simple picture derivable from the work of McTague on the viscosity of ferrofluids. In no case was the viscosity seen to decrease with field, nor was the oscillatory behavior observed. The results of this study were compared with the theory developed by Parsons.

  17. Measurement and control of field in RF GUN at FLASH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, A.; Hoffmann, M.; Koprek, W.; Pucyk, P.; Simrock, S.; Pozniak, K. T.; Romaniuk, R. S.

    2008-01-01

    The paper describes the hardware and software architecture of a control and measurement system for electromagnetic field stabilization inside the radio frequency electron gun, in FLASH experiment. A complete measurement path has been presented, including I and Q detectors and FPGA based, low latency digital controller. Algorithms used to stabilize the electromagnetic field have been presented as well as the software environment used to provide remote access to the control device. An input signal calibration procedure has been described as a crucial element of measurement process.

  18. Open Cavity Solutions to the rf in Magnetic Field Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Robert B.; Berg, J. Scott; Fernow, Richard C.; Gallardo, Juan C.; Kirk, Harold G.

    2008-02-01

    It has been observed [1] that breakdown in an 805 MHz pill-box cavity occurs at much lower gradients as an external axial magnetic field is increased. This effect was not observed with on open iris cavity. It is proposed that this effect depends on the relative angles of the magnetic and maximum electric fields: parallel in the pill-box case; at an angle in the open iris case. If so, using an open iris structure with solenoid coils in the irises should perform even better. A lattice, using this principle, is presented, for use in 6D cooling for a Muon Collider. Experimental layouts to test this principle are proposed.

  19. OPEN CAVITY SOLUTIONS TO THE RF IN MAGNETIC FIELD PROBLEM.

    SciTech Connect

    PALMER,R.B.; BERG, J.S.; FERNOW, R.C.; GALLARDO, J.C.; KIRK, H.G.

    2007-08-06

    It has been observed [1] that breakdown in an 805 MHz pill-box cavity occurs at much lower gradients as an external axial magnetic field is increased. This effect was not observed with on open iris cavity. It is proposed that this effect depends on the relative angles of the magnetic and maximum electric fields: parallel in the pill-box case; at an angle in the open iris case. If so, using an open iris structure with solenoid coils in the irises should perform even better. A lattice, using this principle, is presented, for use in 6D cooling for a Muon Collider. Experimental layouts to test this principle are proposed.

  20. Generalization of susceptibility of RF systems through far-field pattern superposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdin, B.; Debroux, P.

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to perform an analysis of RF (Radio Frequency) communication systems in a large electromagnetic environment to identify its susceptibility to jamming systems. We propose a new method that incorporates the use of reciprocity and superposition of the far-field radiation pattern of the RF system and the far-field radiation pattern of the jammer system. By using this method we can find the susceptibility pattern of RF systems with respect to the elevation and azimuth angles. A scenario was modeled with HFSS (High Frequency Structural Simulator) where the radiation pattern of the jammer was simulated as a cylindrical horn antenna. The RF jamming entry point used was a half-wave dipole inside a cavity with apertures that approximates a land-mobile vehicle, the dipole approximates a leaky coax cable. Because of the limitation of the simulation method, electrically large electromagnetic environments cannot be quickly simulated using HFSS's finite element method (FEM). Therefore, the combination of the transmit antenna radiation pattern (horn) superimposed onto the receive antenna pattern (dipole) was performed in MATLAB. A 2D or 3D susceptibility pattern is obtained with respect to the azimuth and elevation angles. In addition, by incorporating the jamming equation into this algorithm, the received jamming power as a function of distance at the RF receiver Pr(Φr, θr) can be calculated. The received power depends on antenna properties, propagation factor and system losses. Test cases include: a cavity with four apertures, a cavity above an infinite ground plane, and a land-mobile vehicle approximation. By using the proposed algorithm a susceptibility analysis of RF systems in electromagnetic environments can be performed.

  1. Effects of rf magnetic field and wave reflection on multipactor discharge on a dielectric

    SciTech Connect

    Sazontov, A. G.; Nevchaev, V. E.

    2010-03-15

    This paper analyzes the effects of the rf magnetic field and partial reflection of the circularly polarized electromagnetic wave on multipactor discharge on a dielectric. A statistical theory (taking into account the velocity spread of injected electrons) is constructed to evaluate the multipactor induced breakdown and saturation level. It is concluded that the spread of initial velocities considerably changes the condition for multipactor initiation in comparison with the dynamic approach. This effect is especially strong for the case of relatively low rf electric field amplitude (when the transit time essentially exceeds the rf period) and leads to the oscillation suppression of effective electron yield and to an increase in the threshold of multipactor growth. It is established that the rf magnetic field eliminates the upper boundary of the susceptibility diagram, while the low boundary almost remains unchanged. It is also found that the presence of partial reflection causes degradation of the saturation level (in comparison with the nonreflecting case) and results in decreasing of the characteristic time required to achieve the steady state.

  2. Evaluation of the dielectric constant for RF shimming at high field MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayatilake, Mohan; Storrs, Judd; Chu, Wen-Jang; Lee, Jing-Huei

    2010-10-01

    Optimal image quality for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) at high fields requires a homogeneous RF (B1) field; however, the dielectric properties of the human brain result in B1 field inhomogeneities and signal loss at the periphery of the head. These result from constructive and destructive RF interactions of complex wave behaviour, which become worse with increasing magnetic field strength. Placement of a shim object with high-dielectric constant adjacent to the body has been proposed as a method for reducing B1 inhomogeneity by altering wave propagation within the volume of interest. Selecting the appropriate permittivity and quantity of material for the shim is essential. Whereas previous work has determined the dielectric properties of the shim empirically, this work introduces an improved theoretical framework for determining the requisite dielectric constant of the passive shim material directly by increasing the axial or minimizing the radial propagation constant.

  3. Theoretical analysis of the electromagnetic field inside an anomalous-dispersion microresonator under synthetical pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Xu; Xiaohong, Hu; Ye, Feng; Yuanshan, Liu; Wei, Zhang; Zhi, Yang; Wei, Zhao; Yishan, Wang

    2016-03-01

    We study the spatiotemporal evolution of the electromagnetic field inside a microresonator showing an anomalous dispersion at the pump wavelength by using the normalized Lugiato-Lefever equation. Unlike the traditional single continuous wave (CW) pumping, an additional pump source consisting of periodical pulse train with variable repetition rate is adopted. The influences of the microresonator properties and the pump parameters on the field evolution and the electromagnetic field profile are analyzed. The simulation results indicate that, in the anomalous dispersion regime, both increases of the input pulse amplitude and the repetition frequency can result in the field profiles consisting of multiple peaks. A series of equidistant pulses can also be obtained by increasing the CW pump power. In addition, we find that a large physical detuning between the pump laser carrier and the cavity resonance frequency also causes the splitting of the inside field. Project supported by the National Major Scientific Instrumentation Development Program of China (Grant No. 2011YQ120022), CAS/SAFEA International Partnership Program for Creative Research Teams, China, and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61275164).

  4. Simulation of RF-fields in a fusion device

    SciTech Connect

    De Witte, Dieter; Bogaert, Ignace; De Zutter, Daniel; Van Oost, Guido; Van Eester, Dirk

    2009-11-26

    In this paper the problem of scattering off a fusion plasma is approached from the point of view of integral equations. Using the volume equivalence principle an integral equation is derived which describes the electromagnetic fields in a plasma. The equation is discretized with MoM using conforming basis functions. This reduces the problem to solving a dense matrix equation. This can be done iteratively. Each iteration can be sped up using FFTs.

  5. Model for B1 Imaging in MRI Using the Rotating RF Field

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Ewald; Crozier, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Conventionally, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is performed by pulsing gradient coils, which invariably leads to strong acoustic noise, patient safety concerns due to induced currents, and costly power/space requirements. This modeling study investigates a new silent, gradient coil-free MR imaging method, in which a radiofrequency (RF) coil and its nonuniform field (B 1 +) are mechanically rotated about the patient. The advantage of the rotating B 1 + field is that, for the first time, it provides a large number of degrees of freedom to aid a successful B 1 + image encoding process. The mathematical modeling was performed using flip angle modulation as part of a finite-difference-based Bloch equation solver. Preliminary results suggest that representative MR images with intensity deviations of <5% from the original image can be obtained using rotating RF field approach. This method may open up new avenues towards anatomical and functional imaging in medicine. PMID:24963336

  6. Simulations of Field-Emission Electron Beams from CNT Cathodes in RF Photoinjectors

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalcea, Daniel; Faillace, Luigi; Panuganti, Harsha; Thangaraj, Jayakar C.T.; Piot, Philippe

    2015-06-01

    Average field emission currents of up to 700 mA were produced by Carbon Nano Tube (CNT) cathodes in a 1.3 GHz RF gun at Fermilab High Brightness Electron Source Lab. (HBESL). The CNT cathodes were manufactured at Xintek and tested under DC conditions at RadiaBeam. The electron beam intensity as well as the other beam properties are directly related to the time-dependent electric field at the cathode and the geometry of the RF gun. This report focuses on simulations of the electron beam generated through field-emission and the results are compared with experimental measurements. These simulations were performed with the time-dependent Particle In Cell (PIC) code WARP.

  7. On the Importance of Symmetrizing RF Coupler Fields for Low Emittance Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zenghai; Zhou, Feng; Vlieks, Arnold; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2011-06-23

    The input power of accelerator structure is normally fed through a coupling slot(s) on the outer wall of the accelerator structure via magnetic coupling. While providing perfect matching, the coupling slots may produce non-axial-symmetric fields in the coupler cell that can induce emittance growth as the beam is accelerated in such a field. This effect is especially important for low emittance beams at low energies such as in the injector accelerators for light sources. In this paper, we present studies of multipole fields of different rf coupler designs and their effect on beam emittance for an X-band photocathode gun being jointly designed with LLNL, and X-band accelerator structures. We will present symmetrized rf coupler designs for these components to preserve the beam emittance.

  8. Study of microparticles' anomalous diffusion in active bath using speckle light fields (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pince, Ercag; Sabareesh, Sabareesh K. P.; Volpe, Giorgio; Gigan, Sylvain; Volpe, Giovanni S.

    2015-08-01

    Particles undergoing a stochastic motion within a disordered medium is a ubiquitous physical and biological phenomenon. Examples can be given from organelles as molecular machines of cells performing physical tasks in a populated cytoplasm to human mobility in patchy environment at larger scales. Our recent results showed that it is possible to use the disordered landscape generated by speckle light fields to perform advanced manipulation tasks at the microscale. Here, we use speckle light fields to study the anomalous diffusion of micron size silica particles (5 μm) in the presence of active microswimmers. The microswimmers we used in the experiments are motile bacteria, Escherichia coli (E.coli). They constitute an active background constantly agitating passive silica particles within complex optical potentials. The speckle fields are generated by mode mixing inside a multimode optical fiber where a small amount of incident laser power (maximum power = 12 μW/μm2) is needed to obtain an effective random landscape pattern for the purpose of optical manipulation. We experimentally show how complex potentials contribute to the anomalous diffusion of silica particles undergoing collisions with swimming bacteria. We observed an enhanced diffusion of particles interacting with the active bath of E.coli inside speckle light fields: this effect can be tuned and controlled by varying the intensity and the statistical properties of the speckle pattern. Potentially, these results could be of interest for many technological applications, such as the manipulation of microparticles inside optically disordered media of biological interests.

  9. Magnetic field effects in RF magnetron sputtering of CdS/CdTe solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Compaan, A.D.; Shao, M.; Tabory, C.N.; Feng, Z.; Fischer, A.; Shen, F.; Narayanswami, C.; Bohn, R.G.

    1996-01-01

    We have studied effects of magnetic field strength and configuration on rf planar magnetron sputtering of CdS and CdTe. This study was carried out with one sputter gun having an unbalanced magnetic field and a second gun having an approximately balanced magnetic field. The unbalanced field gun produces significantly higher ion and electron bombardment of the film during growth and slightly higher electron kinetic energies. Films produced with the unbalanced gun show much stronger photoluminescence and cell performance is much better when the CdTe is deposited with the unbalanced gun. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Fringe field NMR diffusometry of anomalous self-diffusion in molecular sieves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ylihautala, Mika; Jokisaari, Jukka; Fischer, Elmar; Kimmich, Rainer

    1998-06-01

    Superconducting magnet fringe field NMR diffusometry is applied to an adsorbate-molecular sieve system in order to obtain intracrystalline self-diffusion of adsorbed molecules. Effects of self-diffusion, exchange, relaxation, and dipolar correlation are discussed. The proper equations for one- and two-dimensional anomalous self-diffusion with and without macroscopic order are derived. The method is applied to investigate methane self-diffusion in the molecular sieve silicoaluminophosphate, type 11 (SAPO-11). It is concluded that the nature of the methane displacements in the sieve channels is single-file self-diffusion.

  11. Global Constraints on Anomalous Triple Gauge Couplings in the Effective Field Theory Approach.

    PubMed

    Falkowski, Adam; González-Alonso, Martín; Greljo, Admir; Marzocca, David

    2016-01-01

    We present a combined analysis of LHC Higgs data (signal strengths) together with LEP-2 WW production measurements. To characterize possible deviations from the standard model (SM) predictions, we employ the framework of an effective field theory (EFT) where the SM is extended by higher-dimensional operators suppressed by the mass scale of new physics Λ. The analysis is performed consistently at the order Λ(-2) in the EFT expansion keeping all the relevant operators. While the two data sets suffer from flat directions, together they impose stringent model-independent constraints on the anomalous triple gauge couplings. PMID:26799011

  12. Period Clustering of the Anomalous X-Ray Pulsars and Magnetic Field Decay in Magnetars.

    PubMed

    Colpi; Geppert; Page

    2000-01-20

    We confront theoretical models for the rotational, magnetic, and thermal evolution of an ultramagnetized neutron star, or magnetar, with available data on the anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs). We argue that, if the AXPs are interpreted as magnetars, their clustering of spin periods between 6 and 12 s (observed at present in this class of objects), their period derivatives, their thermal X-ray luminosities, and the association of two of them with young supernova remnants can only be understood globally if the magnetic field in magnetars decays significantly on a timescale of the order of 104 yr. PMID:10615029

  13. Global Constraints on Anomalous Triple Gauge Couplings in the Effective Field Theory Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falkowski, Adam; González-Alonso, Martín; Greljo, Admir; Marzocca, David

    2016-01-01

    We present a combined analysis of LHC Higgs data (signal strengths) together with LEP-2 W W production measurements. To characterize possible deviations from the standard model (SM) predictions, we employ the framework of an effective field theory (EFT) where the SM is extended by higher-dimensional operators suppressed by the mass scale of new physics Λ . The analysis is performed consistently at the order Λ-2 in the EFT expansion keeping all the relevant operators. While the two data sets suffer from flat directions, together they impose stringent model-independent constraints on the anomalous triple gauge couplings.

  14. Strut Shaping of 34m Beam Waveguide Antenna for Reductions in Near-Field RF and Noise Temeperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khayatian, Behrouz; Hoppe, Daniel J.; Britcliffe, Michael J.; Gama, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Struts shaping of the NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) 34m Beam Waveguide (BWG) antenna has been implemented to reduce near-field RF exposure while improving the antenna noise temperature. Strut shaping was achieved by introducing an RF shield that does not compromise the structural integrity of the existing structure. Reduction in the RF near-field exposure will compensate for the planned transmit power increase of the antenna from 20 kW to 80 kW while satisfying safety requirements for RF exposure. Antenna noise temperature was also improved by as much as 1.5 K for the low elevation angles and 0.5 K in other areas. Both reductions of RF near-field exposure and antenna noise temperature were verified through measurements and agree very well with calculated results.

  15. Reducing Near-Field RF Levels and Noise Temperature on a 34-m Beam-Waveguide Antenna by Strut Shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khayatian, B.; Hoppe, D. J.; Britcliffe, M. J.; Gama, E.

    2013-02-01

    Strut shaping of NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) 34-m beam-waveguide (BWG) antenna has been implemented to reduce near-field RF exposure while improving the antenna noise temperature. Strut shaping was achieved by introducing an RF shield that does not compromise the structural integrity of the existing structure. Reduction in the RF near-field exposure will compensate for the planned transmit power increase of the antenna from 20 kW to 80 kW while satisfying safety requirements for RF exposure. Antenna noise temperature was also improved by as much as 1.5 K for the low elevation angles and 0.5 K in other areas. Both reductions of RF near-field exposure and antenna noise temperature were verified through measurements and agree very well with calculated results.

  16. Use of Exotic Coordinate Systems in the Design of RF Resonators for High-Field MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterworth, Edward

    2008-10-01

    High field human MRI (11.7 Tesla is FDC approved for human research) renders standard RF coil design inadequate because the resonant wavelength in human soft tissue (about 8 cm at 500 MHz) is significantly smaller than the physical size of the human body. I propose optimizing the design of such RF coils using coordinate systems appropriate to human body parts, as has been done with ellipticalootnotetextCrozier et al, Concepts Magn Reson 1997; 9:195-210. and Cassinian ovalootnotetextDe Zanche et al, Magn Reson Med 2005; 53:201-211. cross sections. I have computed analytically the magnetic fields produced by a device of toroidal cross section using a cascade of conformal transformations.ootnotetextButterworth & Gore, J Magn Reson 2005; 175:114-123. Building upon these efforts, I will use the eleven coordinate systems of Moon & Spencer,ootnotetextMoon & Spencer, Field Theory Handbook, Berlin: Springer-Verlag; 1971. along with other possible coordinate systems and conformal transformations, to identify a small number of configurations that have the highest probability of being useful as RF coil designs for ultrahigh-field MRI.

  17. RF interference suppression in a cardiac synchronization system operating in a high magnetic field NMR imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Damji, A.A.; Snyder, R.E.; Ellinger, D.C.; Witkowski, F.X.; Allen, P.S.

    1988-11-01

    An electrocardiographic (ECG) unit suitable for cardiac-synchronized nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in high magnetic fields is presented. The unit includes lossy transmission lines as ECG leads in order to suppress radio frequency (RF) interference in the electrocardiogram. The unit's immunity to RF interference is demonstrated.

  18. Tumor Selective Hyperthermia Induced by Short-Wave Capacitively-Coupled RF Electric-Fields

    PubMed Central

    Raoof, Mustafa; Cisneros, Brandon T.; Corr, Stuart J.; Palalon, Flavio; Curley, Steven A.; Koshkina, Nadezhda V.

    2013-01-01

    There is a renewed interest in developing high-intensity short wave capacitively-coupled radiofrequency (RF) electric-fields for nanoparticle-mediated tumor-targeted hyperthermia. However, the direct thermal effects of such high-intensity electric-fields (13.56 MHZ, 600 W) on normal and tumor tissues are not completely understood. In this study, we investigate the heating behavior and dielectric properties of normal mouse tissues and orthotopically-implanted human hepatocellular and pancreatic carcinoma xenografts. We note tumor-selective hyperthermia (relative to normal mouse tissues) in implanted xenografts that can be explained on the basis of differential dielectric properties. Furthermore, we demonstrate that repeated RF exposure of tumor-bearing mice can result in significant anti-tumor effects compared to control groups without detectable harm to normal mouse tissues. PMID:23861912

  19. CeRu2Al10: Anomalous Magnetic Ordering and Its Field Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strydom, A. M.

    2010-04-01

    The intermetallic compound CeRu2Al10 orders in a new crystal structure type that is cage-like on account of its peculiar atomic arrangement and large interatomic distances—especially concerning the environment of the rare-earth element Ce. In previous work we showed that anomalous thermal, electronic, and magnetic properties of this compound coalesce into a phase transition at T *=27 K, which is exceptionally high for a cerium intermetallic compound. T * has been characterized through various temperature-dependent properties which suggest a multi-parameter nature of the ordering at T *. Here we report on continued investigations into this compound and focus in particular on the response to applied magnetic fields. Whereas transport properties in the ordered region are receptive to magnetic fields, the transition itself turns out to be more robust and is insensitive to static fields up to 14 T.

  20. A PARAMETRIC STUDY OF BCS RF SURFACE IMPEDANCE WITH MAGNETIC FIELD USING THE XIAO CODE

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, Charles E.; Xiao, Binping

    2013-09-01

    A recent new analysis of field-dependent BCS rf surface impedance based on moving Cooper pairs has been presented.[1] Using this analysis coded in Mathematica TM, survey calculations have been completed which examine the sensitivities of this surface impedance to variation of the BCS material parameters and temperature. The results present a refined description of the "best theoretical" performance available to potential applications with corresponding materials.

  1. International policy and advisory response regarding children's exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF).

    PubMed

    Redmayne, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) exposure regulations/guidelines generally only consider acute effects, and not chronic, low exposures. Concerns for children's exposure are warranted due to the amazingly rapid uptake of many wireless devices by increasingly younger children. This review of policy and advice regarding children's RF-EMF exposure draws material from a wide variety of sources focusing on the current situation. This is not a systematic review, but aims to provide a representative cross-section of policy and advisory responses within set boundaries. There are a wide variety of approaches which I have categorized and tabulated ranging from ICNIRP/IEEE guidelines and "no extra precautions needed" to precautionary or scientific much lower maxima and extensive advice to minimize RF-EMF exposure, ban advertising/sale to children, and add exposure information to packaging. Precautionary standards use what I term an exclusion principle. The wide range of policy approaches can be confusing for parents/carers of children. Some consensus among advisory organizations would be helpful acknowledging that, despite extensive research, the highly complex nature of both RF-EMF and the human body, and frequent technological updates, means simple assurance of long-term safety cannot be guaranteed. Therefore, minimum exposure of children to RF-EMF is recommended. This does not indicate need for alarm, but mirrors routine health-and-safety precautions. Simple steps are suggested. ICNIRP guidelines need to urgently publish how the head, torso, and limbs' exposure limits were calculated and what safety margin was applied since this exposure, especially to the abdomen, is now dominant in many children. PMID:26091083

  2. Anomalous degradation of low-field mobility in short-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natori, Kenji; Iwai, Hiroshi; Kakushima, Kuniyuki

    2015-12-01

    The anomalous degradation of the low-field mobility observed in short-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors is analyzed by collating various reported data in experiments and simulations. It is inferred that the degradation is not caused by the channel scattering of the carriers. The origin is proposed to be the backscattering of channel carriers on injection into the drain. The expression of the low-field mobility, including the backscattering effect, is derived. The inverse of the low-field mobility is a linear function of the inverse of channel length, the expression of which reproduces that empirically derived by Bidal's group. By fitting the expression to simulated as well as experimental data, we can estimate the value of parameters related to the channel scattering and also to the backscattering from the drain. We find that these values are in reasonable magnitude.

  3. Anomalous resistivity at the field null of the FRC: a quasi-linear expression based upon flute-type modes

    SciTech Connect

    Gerwin, R.

    1983-10-01

    In the Field-Reversed Theta Pinch (FRC) experiment, the poloidal flux is observed to be lost at a rate several times greater than classical resistivity would allow. Thus, there must be anomalous resistivity at the field null. Assuming that an electromagnetic microinstability of the flute mode type is responsible for this, we derived a general expression for the anomalous resistivity at the field null based upon a quasi-linear model of the microturbulence. This general expression does not depend upon the details of the ion-species model, for example, whether the ions are fluid or kinetic.

  4. Brownian motion in a speckle light field: tunable anomalous diffusion and selective optical manipulation.

    PubMed

    Volpe, Giorgio; Volpe, Giovanni; Gigan, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    The motion of particles in random potentials occurs in several natural phenomena ranging from the mobility of organelles within a biological cell to the diffusion of stars within a galaxy. A Brownian particle moving in the random optical potential associated to a speckle pattern, i.e., a complex interference pattern generated by the scattering of coherent light by a random medium, provides an ideal model system to study such phenomena. Here, we derive a theory for the motion of a Brownian particle in a speckle field and, in particular, we identify its universal characteristic timescale. Based on this theoretical insight, we show how speckle light fields can be used to control the anomalous diffusion of a Brownian particle and to perform some basic optical manipulation tasks such as guiding and sorting. Our results might broaden the perspectives of optical manipulation for real-life applications. PMID:24496461

  5. On the anomalous mass defect of strange stars in the Field Correlator Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, F. I. M.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate general aspects of the mass defects of strange stars in the context of the Field Correlator Method, without magnetic field. The main parameters of the model that enter the corresponding nonperturbative equation of state of the quark gluon plasma are the gluon condensate G2 and the large distance static Q Q bar potential V1. We calculate mass defects of stellar configurations in the central density range 11 < log ⁡ρc < 18. In general, the mass defects are strongly dependent on the model parameters. For a large range of values of G2 and V1, we obtain anomalous mass defects with magnitudes around 1053 erg, of the same order of the observed energies of gamma-ray bursts and neutrino emissions in SN1987A, and of the theoretically predicted energies of the quark-novae explosions.

  6. Zero-field Dissipationless Chiral Edge Current in Quantum Anomalous Hall State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Cui-Zu; Zhao, Weiwei; Kim, Duk Y.; Wei, Peng; Jain, J. K.; Liu, Chaoxing; Chan, Moses H. W.; Moodera, Jagadeesh S.

    The quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) state is predicted to possess, at zero magnetic field, chiral edge channels that conduct spin polarized current without dissipation, and thus holds great promise for future high-performance information processing. In this talk, we will discuss our transport experiments that probe the QAH state with gate bias and temperature dependences, by local and nonlocal magnetoresistance measurements. This allows us to unambiguously distinguish the dissipationless edge transport from transport via other dissipative channels in the QAH system. Our experiments confirm a fundamental feature of the QAH state, namely the dissipationless transport by edge channels in zero applied fields, which will be crucial for future chiral interconnected electric and spintronic applications. This research is supported by the NSF Grants (DMR-1420620, Penn State MRSEC; in MIT by DMR-1207469 and the STC Center for Integrated Quantum Materials under NSF Grant DMR-1231319) and by ONR Grant N00014-13-1-0301.

  7. Anomalous diffusion across the magnetic field-plasma boundary - The Porcupine artificial plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, E. V.; Kapitanov, V. Ia.; Treumann, R. A.

    1986-09-01

    Very fast magnetic field diffusion into the beam is required for observation of the nearly undisturbed penetration of the Porcupine's dense, fast and heavy ion beam into the magnetized ionospheric plasma after termination of the short adiabatic phase. The diffusion is presently attributed to a transverse electron drift current-driven electrostatic instability that is excited by the diamagnetic current flowing in the boundary layer between the injected beam and the ambient field. The anomalous collision frequencies turn out to be of the order of the local lower hybrid frequency in the dense Xe plasma. Since only a very small fraction of beam energy is dissipated in the diffusion process, no significant deceleration of the ion beam is observable.

  8. Brownian Motion in a Speckle Light Field: Tunable Anomalous Diffusion and Selective Optical Manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, Giorgio; Volpe, Giovanni; Gigan, Sylvain

    2014-02-01

    The motion of particles in random potentials occurs in several natural phenomena ranging from the mobility of organelles within a biological cell to the diffusion of stars within a galaxy. A Brownian particle moving in the random optical potential associated to a speckle pattern, i.e., a complex interference pattern generated by the scattering of coherent light by a random medium, provides an ideal model system to study such phenomena. Here, we derive a theory for the motion of a Brownian particle in a speckle field and, in particular, we identify its universal characteristic timescale. Based on this theoretical insight, we show how speckle light fields can be used to control the anomalous diffusion of a Brownian particle and to perform some basic optical manipulation tasks such as guiding and sorting. Our results might broaden the perspectives of optical manipulation for real-life applications.

  9. Micro-instabilities and anomalous transport effects in collisionless guide field reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz Sepulveda, Patricio Alejandro; Büchner, Jörg; Kilian, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    It is often the case that magnetic reconnection takes place in collisionless plasmas with a current aligned guide magnetic field, such as in the Solar corona. The general characteristics of this process have been exhaustively analyzed with theory and numerical simulations, under different approximations, since some time ago. However, some consequences and properties of the secondary instabilities arising spontaneously -other than tearing instability-, and their dependence on the guide field strength, have not been completely understood yet. For this sake, we use the results of fully kinetic 2D PIC numerical simulations of guide field reconnection. By using a mean field approach for the Generalized Ohm's law that explains the balance of the reconnected electric field, we find that some of the cross-streaming and gradient driven instabilities -in the guide field case- produce an additional anomalous transport term. The latter can be interpreted as a result of the enhanced correlated electromagnetic fluctuations, leading to a slow down of the current carriers and kinetic scale turbulence. We characterize these processes on dependence on the guide field strength, and explore the causal relation with the source of free energy driving the mentioned instabilities. Finally, we show the main consequences that a fully 3D approach have on all those phenomena in contrast to the reduced 2D description.

  10. Investigation of Fully Three-Dimensional Helical RF Field Effects on TWT Beam/Circuit Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.

    2000-01-01

    A fully three-dimensional (3D), time-dependent, helical traveling wave-tube (TWT) interaction model has been developed using the electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) code MAFIA. The model includes a short section of helical slow-wave circuit with excitation fed by RF input/output couplers, and electron beam contained by periodic permanent magnet (PPM) focusing. All components of the model are simulated in three dimensions allowing the effects of the fully 3D helical fields on RF circuit/beam interaction to be investigated for the first time. The development of the interaction model is presented, and predicted TWT performance using 2.5D and 3D models is compared to investigate the effect of conventional approximations used in TWT analyses.

  11. A high-charge and short-pulse RF photocathode gun for wake-field acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, W.; Li, X.; Conde, M.; Power, J.; Schoessow, P.

    1998-02-01

    In this paper we present a design report on 1-1/2 cell, L-Band RF photocathode gun which is capable of generating and accelerating electron beams with peak currents >10 kA. We address several critical issues of high-current RF photoinjectors such as longitudinal space charge effect, and transverse emittance growth. Unlike conventional short electron pulse generation, this design does not require magnetic pulse compression. Based on numerical simulations using SUPERFISH and PARMELA, this design will produce 100 nC beam at 18 MeV with r.m.s. bunch length 1.25 mm and normalized transverse emittance 108 mm mrad. Applications of this source beam for wake-field acceleration are also discussed.

  12. RF skin-depth measurement of UIrGe in high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Nasreen, Farzana; Altarawneh, Moaz M; Harrison, Neil; Kothapalli, Karunakar; Nakotte, Heinz; Bruck, Ekkehard

    2010-01-01

    UIrGe crystallizes in the orthorhombic TiNiSi structure and it orders anti ferromagnetically at low temperatures. Previous magnetoresistance and magnetization studies had revealed multiple metamagnetic transitions between {approx}12 T and {approx}19T. Our present studies show that RF skin depth measurement offers an alternative magnetotransport probe. A proximity detector oscillator (PDO) is used to perform the contact less RF skin-depth measurements of UIrGe in pulsed magnetic fields up to 47 T in temperature range 0.57-12 K. The frequency and amplitude shifts reflect the changes in both the real and imaginary components of the conductivity. Our results confirm that the measured frequency shifts can be related to the magnetoresistance effects.

  13. Electric field induced quantum anomalous Hall effect in two-dimensional antiferromagnetic triphenyl-lead lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Jung; Li, Chaokai; Feng, Ji; Zhang, Zhenyu; Cho, Jun-Hyung

    The tuning of topological states is of significant fundamental and practical importance in contemporary condensed matter physics, for which the extension to two-dimensional (2D) organometallic systems is particularly attractive. Using first-principles calculations, we find that a 2D hexagonal triphenyl-lead lattice composed of only main group elements is susceptible to a magnetic instability, characterized by a antiferromagnetic (AFM) insulating state with a renormalized valley gaps with gap difference of 24 meV due to the spin and valley coupling. This AFM state will be subject to a anomalous valley Hall effect under the action of Berry curvature-induced spin and valley currents via, for example, injection of circularly polarized light. Furthermore, such a AFM band insulator can be tuned into a topologically nontrivial quantum anomalous Hall state with a Chern number of one by the application of an out-of-plane electric field. These findings further enrich our understanding of 2D hexagonal organometallic lattices for potential applications in spintronics and valleytronics.

  14. A Theory for the RF Surface Field for Various Metals at the Destructive Breakdown Limit

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Perry B.

    2006-11-27

    By destructive breakdown we mean a breakdown event that results in surface melting over a macroscopic area in a high E-field region of an accelerator structure. A plasma forms over the molten area, bombarding the surface with an intense ion current ({approx}108 A/cm2), equivalent to a pressure of about a thousand Atmospheres. This pressure in turn causes molten copper to migrate away from the iris tip, resulting in measurable changes in the iris shape. The breakdown process can be roughly divided into four stages: (1) the formation of ''plasma spots'' at field emission sites, each spot leaving a crater-like footprint; (2) crater clustering, and the formation of areas with hundreds of overlapping craters; (3) surface melting in the region of a crater cluster; (4) the process after surface melting that leads to destructive breakdown. The physics underlying each of these stages is developed, and a comparison is made between the theory and experimental evidence whenever possible. The key to preventing breakdown lies in stage (3). A single plasma spot emits a current of several amperes, a portion of which returns to impact the surrounding area with a power density on the order 107 Watt/cm2. This power density is not quite adequate to melt the surrounding surface on a time scale short compared to the rf pulse length. In a crater field, however, the impact areas from multiple plasma spots overlap to provide sufficient power density for surface melting over an area on the order of 0.1 mm2 or more. The key to preventing breakdown is to choose an iris tip material that requires the highest power density (proportional to the square of the rf surface field) for surface melting, taking into account the penetration depth of the impacting electrons. The rf surface field required for surface melting (relative to copper) has been calculated for a large number elementary metals, plus stainless-steel and carbon.

  15. RF heating due to conductive wires during MRI depends on the phase distribution of the transmit field.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Christopher J; Susil, Robert C; Atalar, Ergin

    2002-12-01

    In many studies concerning wire heating during MR imaging, a "resonant wire length" that maximizes RF heating is determined. This may lead to the nonintuitive conclusion that adding more wire, so as to avoid this resonant length, will actually improve heating safety. Through a theoretical analysis using the method of moments, we show that this behavior depends on the phase distribution of the RF transmit field. If the RF transmit field has linear phase, with slope equal to the real part of the wavenumber in the tissue, long wires always heat more than short wires. In order to characterize the intrinsic safety of a device without reference to a specific body coil design, this maximum-tip heating phase distribution must be considered. Finally, adjusting the phase distribution of the electric field generated by an RF transmit coil may lead to an "implant-friendly" coil design. PMID:12465125

  16. Hypersensitivity to RF fields emitted from CDMA cellular phones: a provocation study.

    PubMed

    Nam, Ki Chang; Lee, Ju Hyung; Noh, Hyung Wook; Cha, Eun Jong; Kim, Nam Hyun; Kim, Deok Won

    2009-12-01

    With the number of cellular phone users rapidly increasing, there is a considerable amount of public concern regarding the effects that electromagnetic fields (EMFs) from cellular phones have on health. People with self-attributed electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS) complain of subjective symptoms such as headaches, insomnia, and memory loss, and attribute these symptoms to radio frequency (RF) radiation from cellular phones and/or base stations. However, EHS is difficult to diagnose because it relies on a person's subjective judgment. Various provocation studies have been conducted on EHS caused by Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) phones in which heart rate and blood pressure or subjective symptoms were investigated. However, there have been few sham-controlled provocation studies on EHS with Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) phones where physiological parameters, subjective symptoms, and perception of RF radiation for EHS and non-EHS groups were simultaneously investigated. In this study, two volunteer groups of 18 self-reported EHS and 19 non-EHS persons were tested for both sham and real RF exposure from CDMA cellular phones with a 300 mW maximum exposure that lasted half an hour. We investigated not only the physiological parameters such as heart rate, respiration rate, and heart rate variability (HRV), but also various subjective symptoms and the perception of EMF. In conclusion, RF exposure did not have any effects on physiological parameters or subjective symptoms in either group. As for EMF perception, there was no evidence that the EHS group better perceived EMF than the non-EHS group. PMID:19551766

  17. Precise Quantization of the Anomalous Hall Effect near Zero Magnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Bestwick, A J; Fox, E J; Kou, Xufeng; Pan, Lei; Wang, Kang L; Goldhaber-Gordon, D

    2015-05-01

    We report a nearly ideal quantum anomalous Hall effect in a three-dimensional topological insulator thin film with ferromagnetic doping. Near zero applied magnetic field we measure exact quantization in the Hall resistance to within a part per 10 000 and a longitudinal resistivity under 1  Ω per square, with chiral edge transport explicitly confirmed by nonlocal measurements. Deviations from this behavior are found to be caused by thermally activated carriers, as indicated by an Arrhenius law temperature dependence. Using the deviations as a thermometer, we demonstrate an unexpected magnetocaloric effect and use it to reach near-perfect quantization by cooling the sample below the dilution refrigerator base temperature in a process approximating adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration. PMID:26001016

  18. Measurement of RF electric field in high- β plasma using a Pockels detector in magnetosphere plasma confinement device RT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushiake, Toshiki; Nishiura, M.; Yoshida, Z.; Yano, Y.; Kawazura, Y.; Saitoh, H.; Yamasaki, M.; Kashyap, A.; Takahashi, N.; Nakatsuka, M.; Fukuyama, Atsushi

    2015-11-01

    The magnetosphere plasma confinement device RT-1 generates a dipole magnetic field that can confine high- β plasma by using a levitated superconducting coil. So far it is reported that high temperature electrons (up to 50keV) exist and that the local electron βe value exceeds more than 100%. However, the ion β value βi remains low in the present high- β state. To realize a high-βi state, we have started Ion Cyclotron Heating (ICH) experiments. For efficient ICH in a dipole topology, it is important to measure RF electric fields and characterize the propagation of RF waves in plasmas. On this viewpoint, we started direct measurement of local RF electric fields in RT-1 with a Pockels sensor system. A non-linear optical crystal in the Pockels sensor produces birefringence in an ambient electric field. The refractive index change of the birefringence is proportional to the applied electric field strength, which can be used to measure local electric fields. RF electric field distribution radiated from an ICH antenna was measured inside RT-1 in air, and was compared with numerical results calculated by TASK code. Results on the measurement of electric field distribution in high- β plasma and evaluation of the absorbed RF power into ions will be reported. Supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers 23224014.

  19. Simulation of ITER full-field ICWC scenario in JET: RF physics aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyssoivan, A.; Douai, D.; Koch, R.; Ongena, J.; Philipps, V.; Schüller, F. C.; Van Eester, D.; Wauters, T.; Blackman, T.; Bobkov, V.; Brezinsek, S.; de la Cal, E.; Durodié, F.; Gauthier, E.; Gerbaud, T.; Graham, M.; Jachmich, S.; Joffrin, E.; Kreter, A.; Kyrytsya, V.; Lerche, E.; Lomas, P.; Louche, F.; Maslov, M.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Moiseenko, V.; Monakhov, I.; Pankratov, I.; Paul, M. K.; Pitts, R. A.; Plyusnin, V.; Sergienko, G.; Shimada, M.; Vdovin, V. L.; contributors, JET-EFDA

    2012-07-01

    ITER as a superconducting fusion machine needs efficient wall conditioning techniques for application in the presence of the permanent high toroidal magnetic field for (i) reducing the in-vessel impurity content, (ii) controlling the surface hydrogen isotopic ratio and (iii) mitigating the in-vessel long-term tritium inventory build-up. Encouraging results recently obtained with ion-cyclotron wall conditioning (ICWC) in the present-day tokamaks and stellarators have raised ICWC to the status of one of the most promising techniques available to ITER for routine inter-pulse and overnight conditioning with the ITER main ICRF heating system in the presence of the permanent high toroidal magnetic field. This paper is dedicated to a milestone experiment in ICWC research: the first simulation of ICWC operation in an equivalent ITER full-field scenario and the assessment of the wall conditioning effect on the carbon wall in the largest present-day tokamak JET. In addition, we address in this paper the following topics: (i) an analysis of the radio frequency (RF) physics of ICWC discharges, (ii) the optimization of the operation of ICRF antennas for plasma startup and (iii) an outlook for the performance of ICWC in ITER using the ICRF heating system. Important operational aspects of the conventional ICRF heating system in JET (the so-called A2 antenna system) for use in the ICWC mode are highlighted: (i) the ability of the antenna to ignite the cleaning discharge safely and reliably in different gases, (ii) the capacity of the antennas to couple a large fraction of the RF generator power (>50%) to low-density (≈1016-1018 m-3) plasmas and (iii) the ICRF absorption schemes aimed at improved RF plasma homogeneity and enhanced conditioning effect. Successful optimization of the JET-ICWC discharge parameters (BT = 3.3 T, f = 25 MHz) resulted in a reliable operation of the JET A2 antennas and a high conditioning efficiency in a scenario imitating closely ITER full-field

  20. A simplified HTc rf SQUID to analyze the human cardiac magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Chen E-mail: tfk616@sina.com E-mail: zizhaogan@pku.edu.cn; Tang, Fakuan E-mail: tfk616@sina.com E-mail: zizhaogan@pku.edu.cn; Ma, Ping E-mail: tfk616@sina.com E-mail: zizhaogan@pku.edu.cn; Gan, Zizhao E-mail: tfk616@sina.com E-mail: zizhaogan@pku.edu.cn

    2014-12-15

    We have developed a four-channel high temperature radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference device (HT{sub c} rf SQUID) in a simple magnetically shielded room (MSR) that can be used to analyze the cardiac magnetic field. It is more robust and compact than existing systems. To achieve the high-quality magnetocardiographic signal, we explored new adaptive software gradiometry technology constructed by the first-order axial gradiometer with a baseline of 80mm, which can adjust its performance timely with the surrounding conditions. The magnetic field sensitivity of each channel was less than 100fT/√Hz in the white noise region. Especially, in the analysis of MCG signal data, we proposed the total transient mapping (TTM) technique to visualize current density map (CDM), then we focused to observe the time-varying behavior of excitation propagation and estimated the underlying currents at T wave. According to the clear 3D imaging, isomagnetic field and CDM, the position and distribution of a current source in the heart can be visualized. It is believed that our four-channel HT{sub c} rf SQUID magnetometer based on biomagnetic system is available to detect MCG signals with sufficient signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio. In addition, the CDM showed the macroscopic current activation pattern, in a way, it has established strong underpinnings for researching the cardiac microscopic movement mechanism and opening the way for its use in clinical diagnosis.

  1. A simplified HTc rf SQUID to analyze the human cardiac magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chen; Tang, Fakuan; Ma, Ping; Gan, Zizhao

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a four-channel high temperature radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference device (HTc rf SQUID) in a simple magnetically shielded room (MSR) that can be used to analyze the cardiac magnetic field. It is more robust and compact than existing systems. To achieve the high-quality magnetocardiographic signal, we explored new adaptive software gradiometry technology constructed by the first-order axial gradiometer with a baseline of 80mm, which can adjust its performance timely with the surrounding conditions. The magnetic field sensitivity of each channel was less than 100fT/√Hz in the white noise region. Especially, in the analysis of MCG signal data, we proposed the total transient mapping (TTM) technique to visualize current density map (CDM), then we focused to observe the time-varying behavior of excitation propagation and estimated the underlying currents at T wave. According to the clear 3D imaging, isomagnetic field and CDM, the position and distribution of a current source in the heart can be visualized. It is believed that our four-channel HTc rf SQUID magnetometer based on biomagnetic system is available to detect MCG signals with sufficient signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio. In addition, the CDM showed the macroscopic current activation pattern, in a way, it has established strong underpinnings for researching the cardiac microscopic movement mechanism and opening the way for its use in clinical diagnosis.

  2. Strut Shaping of 34m Beam Waveguide Antenna for Reductions in Near-Field RF and Noise Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khayatian, Behrouz; Hoppe, Daniel J.; Britcliffe, Michael J.; Gama, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Strut shaping of NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) 34m Beam Waveguide (BWG) antenna has been implemented to reduce near-field RF exposure while improving the antenna noise temperature. Strut shaping was achieved by introducing an RF shield that does not compromise the structural integrity of the existing antenna. Reduction in the RF near-field level will compensate for the planned transmit power increase of the antenna from 20 kW to 80 kW while satisfying safety requirements for RF exposure. Measured antenna noise temperature was also improved by as much as 1.5 K for the low elevation angles and 0.5 K in other areas.

  3. Experimental Demonstration of Anomalous Field Enhancement in All-Dielectric Transition Magnetic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jingbo; Liu, Xiaoming; Zhou, Ji; Kudyshev, Zhaxylyk; Litchinitser, Natalia M.

    2015-11-01

    Anomalous field enhancement accompanied by resonant absorption phenomenon was originally discussed in the context of plasma physics and in applications related to radio-communications between the ground and spacecraft returning to Earth. Indeed, there is a critical period of time when all communications are lost due to the reflection/absorption of electromagnetic waves by the sheath of plasma created by a high speed vehicle re-entering the atmosphere. While detailed experimental studies of these phenomena in space are challenging, the emergence of electromagnetic metamaterials enables researchers exceptional flexibility to study them in the laboratory environment. Here, we experimentally demonstrated the strong localized field enhancement of magnetic field for an electromagnetic wave propagating in Mie-resonance-based inhomogeneous metamaterials with magnetic permeability gradually changing from positive to negative values. Although these experiments were performed in the microwave frequency range, the proposed all-dielectric approach to transition metamaterials can be extended to terahertz, infrared, and visible frequencies. We anticipate that these results, besides most basic science aspects, hold the potential for numerous applications, including low-intensity nonlinear transformation optics, topological photonics, and the broader area of surface and interface science.

  4. Experimental Demonstration of Anomalous Field Enhancement in All-Dielectric Transition Magnetic Metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jingbo; Liu, Xiaoming; Zhou, Ji; Kudyshev, Zhaxylyk; Litchinitser, Natalia M.

    2015-01-01

    Anomalous field enhancement accompanied by resonant absorption phenomenon was originally discussed in the context of plasma physics and in applications related to radio-communications between the ground and spacecraft returning to Earth. Indeed, there is a critical period of time when all communications are lost due to the reflection/absorption of electromagnetic waves by the sheath of plasma created by a high speed vehicle re-entering the atmosphere. While detailed experimental studies of these phenomena in space are challenging, the emergence of electromagnetic metamaterials enables researchers exceptional flexibility to study them in the laboratory environment. Here, we experimentally demonstrated the strong localized field enhancement of magnetic field for an electromagnetic wave propagating in Mie-resonance-based inhomogeneous metamaterials with magnetic permeability gradually changing from positive to negative values. Although these experiments were performed in the microwave frequency range, the proposed all-dielectric approach to transition metamaterials can be extended to terahertz, infrared, and visible frequencies. We anticipate that these results, besides most basic science aspects, hold the potential for numerous applications, including low-intensity nonlinear transformation optics, topological photonics, and the broader area of surface and interface science. PMID:26531855

  5. Spin-Down Mechanisms in Neutron Stars with ``Anomalous'' Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Adam; Safi-Harb, Samar

    2015-08-01

    Energy losses from isolated neutron stars are attributed to a number of factors, the most common assumption being the emission of electromagnetic radiation from a rotating point-like magnetic dipole in vacuum. This energy loss mechanism predicts a braking index n = 3, which is not observed in highly magnetized neutron stars. Despite this fact, the assumptions of a dipole field and rapid early rotation are often assumed a priori. This typically causes a discrepancy in the characteristic age of these objects and the age of their associated Supernova Remnants (SNRs). In this work we consider neutron stars with ``anomalous'' magnetic fields - namely magnetars, high-B radio pulsars, and the Central Compact Objects (proposed to be `anti-magnetars’) that are securely associated with SNRs. Without making any assumptions about the initial spin periods of these objects and by constraining the SNR ages to match their associated pulsar ages, we compare the predictions of distinct energy loss mechanisms, such as field decay and the emission of relativistic winds using all observed data on the braking indices. This study has important implications on the proposed emission models for these exotic objects and helps in resolving the PSR-SNR age discrepancy.

  6. Experimental Demonstration of Anomalous Field Enhancement in All-Dielectric Transition Magnetic Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingbo; Liu, Xiaoming; Zhou, Ji; Kudyshev, Zhaxylyk; Litchinitser, Natalia M

    2015-01-01

    Anomalous field enhancement accompanied by resonant absorption phenomenon was originally discussed in the context of plasma physics and in applications related to radio-communications between the ground and spacecraft returning to Earth. Indeed, there is a critical period of time when all communications are lost due to the reflection/absorption of electromagnetic waves by the sheath of plasma created by a high speed vehicle re-entering the atmosphere. While detailed experimental studies of these phenomena in space are challenging, the emergence of electromagnetic metamaterials enables researchers exceptional flexibility to study them in the laboratory environment. Here, we experimentally demonstrated the strong localized field enhancement of magnetic field for an electromagnetic wave propagating in Mie-resonance-based inhomogeneous metamaterials with magnetic permeability gradually changing from positive to negative values. Although these experiments were performed in the microwave frequency range, the proposed all-dielectric approach to transition metamaterials can be extended to terahertz, infrared, and visible frequencies. We anticipate that these results, besides most basic science aspects, hold the potential for numerous applications, including low-intensity nonlinear transformation optics, topological photonics, and the broader area of surface and interface science. PMID:26531855

  7. Development of the Shielding Materials Having the Highly Orientation Characteristics in the RF Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikubo, Tokoh; Itoh, Mineo

    The conventional electromagnetic shielding technique is all but impossible to fundamental solution of the problems in the information and communication fields, such as virtual image for radar. Namely, it is necessary to receive a required electromagnetic wave as the information signal, and to shield a needless electromagnetic wave as the noise. the present research has developed the carbon, copper, ferrite, and BPSCCO plates, as the typical shielding material, having the orientation characteristics in the RF (radio frequency) magnetic field. To exhibit the orientation characteristics in the plane wave, it has formed the slit on the surface of typical shielding materials; termed the slit plate. For example, the value of RF magnetic shielding degree SDHP of slit carbon plate for holding the slit perpendicularly to the ground increased with frequency in the region from 1 MHz (7 dB) to 3 GHz (70 dB). And, the value of SDHH when holding the slit horizontally is indicated an average value of approximately 10 dB in this frequency region. That is, the difference values, SDHP-SDHH, indicated the orientation characteristics. Experimental results revealed several characteristics of the slit plates that include the influences of orientation characteristics on the slit length, slit width, and slit number. In the present paper, it was succeeded to improved the difference average value of approximately 35 dB for SDHP-SDHH, by the sandwich of slit ferrite plate over a slit carbon plate, in the civilian communication frequency region from 1 MHz to 3 GHz. In addition, important criteria are discussed for the design of an effective RF magnetic shielding plate having orientation characteristics.

  8. Vacuum effects in magnetic field with with account for fermion anomalous magnetic moment and axial-vector interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubnov, Andrey; Gubina, Nadezda; Zhukovsky, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    We study vacuum polarization effects in the model of Dirac fermions with additional interaction of an anomalous magnetic moment with an external magnetic field and fermion interaction with an axial-vector condensate. The proper time method is used to calculate the one-loop vacuum corrections with consideration for different configurations of the characteristic parameters of these interactions.

  9. Effect of low-frequency ambient magnetic fields on the control unit and RF head of a commercial SQUID magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcus, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    The control unit and RF head of the SHE model 330XRFSQUID system are shown to be sensitive to ambient ac magnetic fields below 1 HZ, which cause the appearance of false signals corresponding to a magnetometer signal of 0.000001 phi(0) per gauss of field applied. The control unit shows a sensitivity that is linear with frequency, suggesting that the signal is generated by Faraday induction. In contrast, the RF head response is independent of frequency and shows a strong second-harmonic coversion. This response may be due to the magnetic field sensitivity of the ferrite core inductor in the tuned amplifier of the RF head. These signals induced by ambient fields are a potential source of error in Stanford's Relativity Gyroscope experiment, which uses SQUID's on board a rolling satellite as part of the gyroscope readout system. The extent of the magnetic field sensitivity in these components necessitates the use of additional magnetic shielding aboard the satellite.

  10. Magnetization reversal of a single cobalt cluster using a RF field pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamion, A.; Raufast, C.; Bonet, E.; Dupuis, V.; Fournier, T.; Crozes, T.; Bernstein, E.; Wernsdorfer, W.

    2010-05-01

    Technological improvements require the understanding of dynamical magnetization reversal processes at the nanosecond time scales. In this paper, we present the first magnetization reversal measurements performed on a single cobalt cluster (counting only a thousand of spins), using the micro-superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) technique by applying a constant magnetic field combined with a radio-frequency (RF) field pulse. First of all, we present the different technical steps necessary to detect the magnetic reversals at low temperature ( T=35 mK) of a well-defined nanoparticle prepared by low energy clusters beam deposition (LECBD). We previously showed that the three-dimensional (3D)-switching Stoner-Wohlfarth astroid represents the magnetic anisotropy of the nanoparticle. Then, an improved device coupled with a gold stripe line, allow us to reverse such macrospin, using a RF pulse. A qualitative understanding of the magnetization reversal by non-linear resonance has been obtained with the Landau-Lifschitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation.

  11. Heavy ions acceleration in RF wells of 2-frequency electromagnetic field and in the inverted FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Dzergach, A.I.; Kabanov, V.S.; Nikulin, M.G.; Vinogradov, S.V.

    1995-03-01

    Last results of the study of heavy ions acceleration by electrons trapped in moving 2-frequency 3-D RF wells are described. A linearized theoretical model of ions acceleration in a polarized spheroidal plasmoid is proposed. The equilibrium state of this plasmoid is described by the modified microcanonical distribution of the Courant-Snyder invariant ({open_quotes}quasienergy{close_quotes} of electrons). Some new results of computational simulation of the acceleration process are given. The method of computation takes into account the given cylindrical field E{sub 011}({var_phi},r,z) and the self fields of electrons and ions. The results of the computation at relatively short time intervals confirm the idea and estimated parameters of acceleration. The heavy ion accelerator using this principle may be constructed with the use of compact cm band iris-loaded and biperiodical waveguides with double-sided 2-frequency RF feeding. It can accelerate heavy ions with a charge number Z{sub i} from small initial energies {approximately} 50 keV/a.u. with the rate {approximately} Z{sub i} {center_dot} 10 MeV/m. Semirelativistic ions may be accelerated with similar rate also in the inverted FEL.

  12. Effects of Anomalous Electron Cross-Field Transport in a Low Temperature Magnetized Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitses, Yevgeny

    2014-10-01

    The application of the magnetic field in a low pressure plasma can cause a spatial separation of low and high energy electrons. This so-called magnetic filter effect is used for many plasma applications, including ion and neutral beam sources, plasma processing of semiconductors and nanomaterials, and plasma thrusters. In spite of successful practical applications, the magnetic filter effect is not well understood. In this work, we explore this effect by characterizing the electron and ion energy distribution functions in a plasma column with crossed electric and magnetic fields. Experimental results revealed a strong dependence of spatial variations of plasma properties on the gas pressure. For xenon and argon gases, below ~ 1 mtorr, the increase of the magnetic field leads to a more uniform profile of the electron temperature. This surprising result is due to anomalously high electron cross-field transport that causes mixing of hot and cold electrons. High-speed imaging and probe measurements revealed a coherent structure rotating in E cross B direction with frequency of a few kHz. Theory and simulations describing this rotating structure has been developed and points to ionization and electrostatic instabilities as their possible cause. Similar to spoke oscillations reported for Hall thrusters, this rotating structure conducts the large fraction of the cross-field current. The use of segmented electrodes with an electrical feedback control is shown to mitigate these oscillations. Finally, a new feature of the spoke phenomenon that has been discovered, namely a sensitive dependence of the rotating oscillations on the gas pressure, can be important for many applications. This work was supported by DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  13. A Theory for the RF Surface Field for Various Metals at the Destructive Breakdown Limit

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Perry B.; /SLAC

    2007-03-06

    By destructive breakdown we mean a breakdown event that results in surface melting over a macroscopic area in a high E-field region of an accelerator structure. A plasma forms over the molten area, bombarding the surface with an intense ion current ({approx} 10{sup 8} A/cm{sup 2}), equivalent to a pressure of about a thousand Atmospheres. This pressure in turn causes molten copper to migrate away from the iris tip, resulting in measurable changes in the iris shape. The breakdown process can be roughly divided into four stages: (1) the formation of ''plasma spots'' at field emission sites, each spot leaving a crater-like footprint; (2) crater clustering, and the formation of areas with hundreds of overlapping craters; (3) surface melting in the region of a crater cluster; (4) the process after surface melting that leads to destructive breakdown. The physics underlying each of these stages is developed, and a comparison is made between the theory and experimental evidence whenever possible. The key to preventing breakdown lies in stage (3). A single plasma spot emits a current of several amperes, a portion of which returns to impact the surrounding area with a power density on the order 10{sup 7} Watt/cm{sup 2}. This power density is not quite adequate to melt the surrounding surface on a time scale short compared to the rf pulse length. In a crater field, however, the impact areas from multiple plasma spots overlap to provide sufficient power density for surface melting over an area on the order of 0.1 mm{sup 2} or more. The key to preventing breakdown is to choose an iris tip material that requires the highest power density (proportional to the square of the rf surface field) for surface melting, taking into account the penetration depth of the impacting electrons. The rf surface field required for surface melting (relative to copper) has been calculated for a large number elementary metals, plus stainless-steel and carbon.

  14. ADX: a high field, high power density, advanced divertor and RF tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaBombard, B.; Marmar, E.; Irby, J.; Terry, J. L.; Vieira, R.; Wallace, G.; Whyte, D. G.; Wolfe, S.; Wukitch, S.; Baek, S.; Beck, W.; Bonoli, P.; Brunner, D.; Doody, J.; Ellis, R.; Ernst, D.; Fiore, C.; Freidberg, J. P.; Golfinopoulos, T.; Granetz, R.; Greenwald, M.; Hartwig, Z. S.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J. W.; Hutchinson, I. H.; Kessel, C.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Leccacorvi, R.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Mahajan, S.; Minervini, J.; Mumgaard, R.; Nygren, R.; Parker, R.; Poli, F.; Porkolab, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Rice, J.; Rognlien, T.; Rowan, W.; Shiraiwa, S.; Terry, D.; Theiler, C.; Titus, P.; Umansky, M.; Valanju, P.; Walk, J.; White, A.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, G.; Zweben, S. J.

    2015-05-01

    The MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center and collaborators are proposing a high-performance Advanced Divertor and RF tokamak eXperiment (ADX)—a tokamak specifically designed to address critical gaps in the world fusion research programme on the pathway to next-step devices: fusion nuclear science facility (FNSF), fusion pilot plant (FPP) and/or demonstration power plant (DEMO). This high-field (⩾6.5 T, 1.5 MA), high power density facility (P/S ˜ 1.5 MW m-2) will test innovative divertor ideas, including an ‘X-point target divertor’ concept, at the required performance parameters—reactor-level boundary plasma pressures, magnetic field strengths and parallel heat flux densities entering into the divertor region—while simultaneously producing high-performance core plasma conditions that are prototypical of a reactor: equilibrated and strongly coupled electrons and ions, regimes with low or no torque, and no fuelling from external heating and current drive systems. Equally important, the experimental platform will test innovative concepts for lower hybrid current drive and ion cyclotron range of frequency actuators with the unprecedented ability to deploy launch structures both on the low-magnetic-field side and the high-magnetic-field side—the latter being a location where energetic plasma-material interactions can be controlled and favourable RF wave physics leads to efficient current drive, current profile control, heating and flow drive. This triple combination—advanced divertors, advanced RF actuators, reactor-prototypical core plasma conditions—will enable ADX to explore enhanced core confinement physics, such as made possible by reversed central shear, using only the types of external drive systems that are considered viable for a fusion power plant. Such an integrated demonstration of high-performance core-divertor operation with steady-state sustainment would pave the way towards an attractive pilot plant, as envisioned in the ARC concept

  15. Rod-filter-field optimization of the J-PARC RF-driven H- ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, A.; Ohkoshi, K.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Yamazaki, S.; Oguri, H.

    2015-04-01

    In order to satisfy the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) second-stage requirements of an H- ion beam of 60mA within normalized emittances of 1.5πmm•mrad both horizontally and vertically, a flat top beam duty factor of 1.25% (500μs×25Hz) and a life-time of longer than 1month, the J-PARC cesiated RF-driven H- ion source was developed by using an internal-antenna developed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). Although rod-filter-field (RFF) is indispensable and one of the most beam performance dominative parameters for the RF-driven H- ion source with the internal-antenna, the procedure to optimize it is not established. In order to optimize the RFF and establish the procedure, the beam performances of the J-PARC source with various types of rod-filter-magnets (RFMs) were measured. By changing RFM's gap length and gap number inside of the region projecting the antenna inner-diameter along the beam axis, the dependence of the H- ion beam intensity on the net 2MHz-RF power was optimized. Furthermore, the fine-tuning of RFM's cross-section (magnetmotive force) was indispensable for easy operation with the temperature (TPE) of the plasma electrode (PE) lower than 70°C, which minimizes the transverse emittances. The 5% reduction of RFM's cross-section decreased the time-constant to recover the cesium effects after an slightly excessive cesiation on the PE from several 10 minutes to several minutes for TPE around 60°C.

  16. A numerical study of field plate configurations in RF SOI LDMOS transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortés, I.; Roig, J.; Flores, D.; Urresti, J.; Hidalgo, S.; Rebollo, J.

    2006-02-01

    The effect of the source field plate architecture on the static and dynamic electrical performances of SOI LDMOS transistors for RF applications is analysed in this paper. Three architectures are envisaged: source field plate SFP, extended gate field plate and independently biased field plate. Moreover, two different drift diffusion profiles are considered: shallow SDD and deep doped DDD diffusion. The resultant drift region is analytically modelled and the impact of geometrical and technological parameters on the transconductance value is determined by means of numerical simulation techniques. Finally, the dependence of the LDMOS capacitances on the field plate configuration is also studied. Simulation results show the trade-off between reliability and transconductance in each field plate configuration. In spite of the power efficiency improvement, the field plate biasing can significantly degrade the SOI LDMOS performances due to hot-carrier and self-heating effects. On the contrary, the SFP configuration leads to an enhanced reliability at the cost of the on-state resistance increase. The SFP structure with deep doped drift (DDD) diffusion provides the best performances in terms of cut-off frequency and self-heating degradation.

  17. Frequency shifts in NIST Cs primary frequency standards due to transverse rf field gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashby, Neil; Barlow, Stephan; Heavner, Thomas; Jefferts, Steven

    2015-03-01

    A single-particle Green's function (propagator) is introduced to study the deflection of laser-cooled cesium atoms in an atomic fountain due to microwave magnetic field gradients in the Ramsey TE011 cavity. The deflection results in a state-dependent loss of atoms at apertures in the physics package, resulting in a frequency bias. A model accounting only for motion in one dimension transverse to the symmetry axis of the fountain is discussed in detail and then generalized to two transverse dimensions. Results for fractional frequency shifts due to transverse field gradients are computed for NIST-F1 and NIST-F2 cesium fountains. The shifts are found to be negligible except in cases of higher rf power applied to the cavities.

  18. Effect of External Magnetic Fields on the Operation of RF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Stratakis, D.; Berg, J.; Gallardo, J.C.; Palmer, R. B.

    2010-12-01

    Recent experiments have shown severe surface damage and a reduction of the maximum accelerating gradient for an rf cavity that is operating under external magnetic fields. This implies that serious problems may occur in lattices where rf cavities and external magnetic fields coexist, such as those of the proposed neutrino factory and muon collider. Although existing data suggest that this magnetic field dependent breakdown is associated with the emission of electrons from locally enhanced field regions on the cavity surface, the mechanism that drives this effect is not yet well understood. Here, we show that such field emitted electrons are accelerated by the cavity and focused by the magnetic field to the other side of the cavity where they heat its surface. We show that if the magnetic field is strong, significant surface deformation can occur that eventually could limit the accelerating gradient of the cavity. Results of our model are compared to the existing experimental data from an 805 MHz cavity. The geometry of the pillbox cavity in our case is more complicated, and the analysis depends on the electron energies, focused dimensions, and angle of impact, but damage may reasonably be expected with similar cyclical heating above 40 C. However, it is not yet known what the mechanism is for such surface damage to cause a cavity to breakdown. One possibility is that if electrons are focused on a location with a high surface gradient, then the local damage will generate new asperities with higher FN enhancement factors, thus initiating breakdown. While our preliminary analysis offers some quantification on the effects of the magnetic fields on the cavity's operation, other theoretical issues were not addressed. For instance, emission from secondary electrons was disregarded, the asperity was placed on axis, the magnetic field was assumed as uniform, the thermal-diffusion calculation ignored the shape of the rise time, and adopted an approximate calculation. On the

  19. Anomalous diffusion of field lines and charged particles in Arnold-Beltrami-Childress force-free magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, Abhay K.; Dasgupta, Brahmananda; Krishnamurthy, V.; Mitra, Dhrubaditya

    2014-07-01

    The cosmic magnetic fields in regions of low plasma pressure and large currents, such as in interstellar space and gaseous nebulae, are force-free in the sense that the Lorentz force vanishes. The three-dimensional Arnold-Beltrami-Childress (ABC) field is an example of a force-free, helical magnetic field. In fluid dynamics, ABC flows are steady state solutions of the Euler equation. The ABC magnetic field lines exhibit a complex and varied structure that is a mix of regular and chaotic trajectories in phase space. The characteristic features of field line trajectories are illustrated through the phase space distribution of finite-distance and asymptotic-distance Lyapunov exponents. In regions of chaotic trajectories, an ensemble-averaged variance of the distance between field lines reveals anomalous diffusion—in fact, superdiffusion—of the field lines. The motion of charged particles in the force-free ABC magnetic fields is different from the flow of passive scalars in ABC flows. The particles do not necessarily follow the field lines and display a variety of dynamical behavior depending on their energy, and their initial pitch-angle. There is an overlap, in space, of the regions in which the field lines and the particle orbits are chaotic. The time evolution of an ensemble of particles, in such regions, can be divided into three categories. For short times, the motion of the particles is essentially ballistic; the ensemble-averaged, mean square displacement is approximately proportional to t2, where t is the time of evolution. The intermediate time region is defined by a decay of the velocity autocorrelation function—this being a measure of the time after which the collective dynamics is independent of the initial conditions. For longer times, the particles undergo superdiffusion—the mean square displacement is proportional to tα, where α > 1, and is weakly dependent on the energy of the particles. These super-diffusive characteristics, both of magnetic

  20. Anomalous diffusion of field lines and charged particles in Arnold-Beltrami-Childress force-free magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, Abhay K.; Dasgupta, Brahmananda; Krishnamurthy, V.; Mitra, Dhrubaditya

    2014-07-15

    The cosmic magnetic fields in regions of low plasma pressure and large currents, such as in interstellar space and gaseous nebulae, are force-free in the sense that the Lorentz force vanishes. The three-dimensional Arnold-Beltrami-Childress (ABC) field is an example of a force-free, helical magnetic field. In fluid dynamics, ABC flows are steady state solutions of the Euler equation. The ABC magnetic field lines exhibit a complex and varied structure that is a mix of regular and chaotic trajectories in phase space. The characteristic features of field line trajectories are illustrated through the phase space distribution of finite-distance and asymptotic-distance Lyapunov exponents. In regions of chaotic trajectories, an ensemble-averaged variance of the distance between field lines reveals anomalous diffusion—in fact, superdiffusion—of the field lines. The motion of charged particles in the force-free ABC magnetic fields is different from the flow of passive scalars in ABC flows. The particles do not necessarily follow the field lines and display a variety of dynamical behavior depending on their energy, and their initial pitch-angle. There is an overlap, in space, of the regions in which the field lines and the particle orbits are chaotic. The time evolution of an ensemble of particles, in such regions, can be divided into three categories. For short times, the motion of the particles is essentially ballistic; the ensemble-averaged, mean square displacement is approximately proportional to t{sup 2}, where t is the time of evolution. The intermediate time region is defined by a decay of the velocity autocorrelation function—this being a measure of the time after which the collective dynamics is independent of the initial conditions. For longer times, the particles undergo superdiffusion—the mean square displacement is proportional to t{sup α}, where α > 1, and is weakly dependent on the energy of the particles. These super-diffusive characteristics

  1. Reduction of the higher-order field distribution in a photocathode rf gun for the X-ray free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Juho; Parc, Yong Woon; Ko, In Soo

    2014-12-01

    The mechanism of the higher-order rf field elimination in the photocathode rf gun used for the X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) machine is discovered. The analysis and the measurement results of the rf field in several models of the rf gun with several holes at the cavity wall are presented. The contribution of the holes to the asymmetrical distribution of the rf field along the azimuthal angle is measured with several model cavities. Using a comparison between the experimental results and the numerically-obtained rf field distribution, we can reveal that the origin of the quadrupole component growing at the cavity with two holes and of the octapole component growing at the cavity with four holes is the superposition of the rf fields in the cavity. Two kinds of model cavities with several holes at the cavity wall have been fabricated, and the rf field distributions of the model cavities have been measured to compare with the theoretical analysis and the numerically-obtained rf field. From the analyses, we decided to adopt an rf gun that has dual feeds and two pumping holes for the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL-XFEL) project.

  2. Full Wave Parallel Code for Modeling RF Fields in Hot Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Joseph; Svidzinski, Vladimir; Evstatiev, Evstati; Galkin, Sergei; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2015-11-01

    FAR-TECH, Inc. is developing a suite of full wave RF codes in hot plasmas. It is based on a formulation in configuration space with grid adaptation capability. The conductivity kernel (which includes a nonlocal dielectric response) is calculated by integrating the linearized Vlasov equation along unperturbed test particle orbits. For Tokamak applications a 2-D version of the code is being developed. Progress of this work will be reported. This suite of codes has the following advantages over existing spectral codes: 1) It utilizes the localized nature of plasma dielectric response to the RF field and calculates this response numerically without approximations. 2) It uses an adaptive grid to better resolve resonances in plasma and antenna structures. 3) It uses an efficient sparse matrix solver to solve the formulated linear equations. The linear wave equation is formulated using two approaches: for cold plasmas the local cold plasma dielectric tensor is used (resolving resonances by particle collisions), while for hot plasmas the conductivity kernel is calculated. Work is supported by the U.S. DOE SBIR program.

  3. Effect of temperature on capacitive RF MEMS switch performance—a coupled-field analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yong; Espinosa, Horacio D.

    2004-08-01

    Three-dimensional multiphysics finite element analysis (FEA) was performed to investigate the reliability of RF MEMS switches at various operational temperatures. The investigated MEMS capacitive switch consists of a freestanding metal membrane actuated by a bottom electrode coated by a dielectric film. Coupled-field simulations between thermal, structural and electrostatic domains were performed. The simulations show that temperature significantly changes both the membrane stress state and out-of-plane geometry. In particular, the membrane buckles when temperature increase, from room temperature, takes place. The buckling temperature, i.e. the upper bound to the operational temperature, is a function of manufacturing residual stress state, membrane initial out-of-plane profile and a mismatch in materials coefficient of thermal expansion. The analysis also shows that temperature reduction, from room temperature to -40 °C, causes an increase in pull-in voltage to values that could compromise the switch reliability as a result of charge build-up in the dielectric layer. Our analyses illustrate that by proper designing of the membrane out-of-plane profile, it is possible to keep the pull-in voltage, at all operational temperatures, within allowable values. This design feature of RF MEMS switches offers an effective way to achieve reliable pull-in voltages in applications where large temperature variations are expected such as in satellites and airplane condition monitoring based on wireless communication.

  4. Achievement of high atomic hydrogen densities in cylindrical rf plasmas with magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantz, Ursel; Briefi, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    Cylindrical rf plasmas in hydrogen with and without an axial magnetic field of up to 120 G are investigated in the pressure range of 0.3 to 10 Pa. The atomic hydrogen density is determined with optical emission spectroscopy, analyzing the Balmer lines and the molecular radiation (Fulcher band). The results obtained by using different coil geometries (4 to 6 turn windings and Nagoya type antenna) as well as different diameters (10 cm and 25 cm) of a quartz, aluminum oxide or aluminum nitride cylinder are compared. RF powers of up to 600 W at a frequency of 13.56 MHz are available for the 10 cm configuration, whereas up to 70 kW power at 1 MHz are used for the 25 cm cylinder. Density ratios of atoms to molecules of up to 0.3 are achieved in both configurations, whereby the achievement in the high power setup is limited by neutral depletion. The influence of the wall material on the atomic densities, and thus the recombination coefficient, will be pointed out.

  5. Anomalous D'yakonov-Perel' spin relaxation in semiconductor quantum wells under a strong magnetic field in the Voigt configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Yu, T.; Wu, M. W.

    2013-06-01

    We report an anomalous scaling of the D’yakonov-Perel’ spin relaxation with the momentum relaxation in semiconductor quantum wells under a strong magnetic field in the Voigt configuration. We focus on the case in which the external magnetic field is perpendicular to the spin-orbit-coupling-induced effective magnetic field and its magnitude is much larger than the latter one. It is found that the longitudinal spin relaxation time is proportional to the momentum relaxation time even in the strong-scattering limit, indicating that the D’yakonov-Perel’ spin relaxation demonstrates Elliott-Yafet-like behavior. Moreover, the transverse spin relaxation time is proportional (inversely proportional) to the momentum relaxation time in the strong- (weak-) scattering limit, both in the opposite trends against the well-established conventional D’yakonov-Perel’ spin relaxation behaviors. We further demonstrate that all the above anomalous scaling relations come from the unique form of the effective inhomogeneous broadening.

  6. SPIRAL field mapping on NSTX for comparison to divertor RF heat deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosea, J. C.; Perkins, R.; Jaworski, M. A.; Kramer, G. J.; Ahn, J.-W.; Bertelli, N.; Gerhardt, S.; Gray, T. K.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Maingi, R.; Phillips, C. K.; Roquemore, L.; Ryan, P. M.; Sabbagh, S.; Taylor, G.; Tritz, K.; Wilson, J. R.; NSTX Team

    2014-02-01

    Field-aligned losses of HHFW power in the SOL of NSTX have been studied with IR cameras and probes, but the interpretation of the data depends somewhat on the magnetic equilibrium reconstruction. Both EFIT02 and LRDFIT04 magnetic equilibria have been used with the SPIRAL code to provide field mappings in the scrape off layer (SOL) on NSTX from the midplane SOL in front of the HHFW antenna to the divertor regions, where the heat deposition spirals are measured. The field-line mapping spiral produced at the divertor plate with LRDFIT04 matches the HHFW-produced heat deposition best, in general. An independent method for comparing the field-line strike patterns on the outer divertor for the two equilibria is provided by measuring Langmuir probe characteristics in the vicinity of the outer vessel strike radius (OVSR) and observing the effect on floating potential, saturation current, and zero-probe-voltage current (IV=0) with the crossing of the OVSR over the probe. Interestingly, these comparisons also reveal that LRDFIT04 gives the more accurate location of the predicted OVSR, and confirm that the RF power flow in the SOL is essentially along the magnetic field lines. Also, the probe characteristics and IV=0 data indicate that current flows under the OVSR in the divertor tiles in most cases studied.

  7. Experimental Measurements of the Dynamic Electric Field Topology Associated with Magnetized RF Sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Elijah; Caughman, J. B. O.; Shannon, S. C.; Isler, R. C.; Klepper, C. C.

    2011-10-01

    The dynamic Stark effect is a phenomenon in which photon(s) associated with an oscillating electric field are absorbed or emitted with the photon associated with an electronic transition. This multiphoton process leads to the formation of satellites in the spectrum at integer multiples of the frequency associated with the dynamic electric field. Utilizing the dynamic Stark effect the electric field parameters can be determined from the time-averaged and phase resolved emission spectra. Currently two methods are available to calculate the emission spectrum associated with an atomic system in the presence of a dynamic electric field: the quasi-static method and the Floquet method. The methodology and applicability of the quasi-static and Floquet methods will be discussed. The RF sheath electric field parameters are determined, utilizing a generalized dynamic Stark effect model and a novel line shape analysis package, from the time-averaged and phase resolved optical emission spectra. Results will be presented for working gases of hydrogen and helium. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Dept of Energy under contract DE-AC-05-00OR22725.

  8. Exploiting adiabatically switched RF-field for manipulating spin hyperpolarization induced by parahydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Kiryutin, Alexey S.; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V.; Lukzen, Nikita N.; Ivanov, Konstantin L.; Vieth, Hans-Martin

    2015-12-21

    A method for precise manipulation of non-thermal nuclear spin polarization by switching a RF-field is presented. The method harnesses adiabatic correlation of spin states in the rotating frame. A detailed theory behind the technique is outlined; examples of two-spin and three-spin systems prepared in a non-equilibrium state by Para-Hydrogen Induced Polarization (PHIP) are considered. We demonstrate that the method is suitable for converting the initial multiplet polarization of spins into net polarization: compensation of positive and negative lines in nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, which is detrimental when the spectral resolution is low, is avoided. Such a conversion is performed for real two-spin and three-spin systems polarized by means of PHIP. Potential applications of the presented technique are discussed for manipulating PHIP and its recent modification termed signal amplification by reversible exchange as well as for preparing and observing long-lived spin states.

  9. Functional neuroimaging of inner fields-of-view with 2D-selective RF excitations.

    PubMed

    Finsterbusch, Jürgen

    2013-09-01

    Echo-planar imaging is widely used in functional neuroimaging but suffers from its pronounced sensitivity to field inhomogeneities that cause geometric distortions and image blurring which both limit the effective in-plane resolution achievable. In this work, it is shown how inner-field-of-view techniques based on 2D-selective RF excitations (2DRF) can be applied to reduce the field-of-view in the phase-encoding direction without aliasing and increase the in-plane resolution accordingly. Free-induction-decay (FID) EPI and echo-train-shifted (T2*-weighted) and standard (T2-weighted) spin-echo (SE) EPI with in-plane resolutions of up to 0.5×1.0mm(2) (slice thickness 5mm) were acquired at 3T. Unwanted signal contributions of 2DRF side excitations were shifted out of the object (FID-EPI) or of the refocusing plane by tilting the excitation plane (SE-EPI). Brain activation in healthy volunteers was investigated with checkerboard and finger-tapping block-design paradigms. Brain activation could be detected with all sequences and contrasts, most reliably with FID-EPI due to its higher signal amplitude and the longer 2DRF excitation that are more sensitive to magnetic field inhomogeneities. In conclusion, inner-FOV EPI based on 2DRF excitations could help to improve the spatial resolution of fMRI of focal target regions, e.g., for applications in the spinal cord. PMID:23602726

  10. Beam collimation and energy spectrum compression of laser-accelerated proton beams using solenoid field and RF cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, J.; Gu, Y. Q.; Zhu, B.; Hong, W.; Zhao, Z. Q.; Zhou, W. M.; Cao, L. F.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a new method of laser produced proton beam collimation and spectrum compression using a combination of a solenoid field and a RF cavity. The solenoid collects laser-driven protons efficiently within an angle that is smaller than 12 degrees because it is mounted few millimeters from the target, and collimates protons with energies around 2.3 MeV. The collimated proton beam then passes through a RF cavity to allow compression of the spectrum. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations demonstrate the proton beam transport in the solenoid and RF electric fields. Excellent energy compression and collection efficiency of protons are presented. This method for proton beam optimization is suitable for high repetition-rate laser acceleration proton beams, which could be used as an injector for a conventional proton accelerator.

  11. Extremely Large Magnetoresistance at Low Magnetic Field by Coupling the Nonlinear Transport Effect and the Anomalous Hall Effect.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhaochu; Xiong, Chengyue; Zhang, Xu; Guo, Zhen-Gang; Cai, Jianwang; Zhang, Xiaozhong

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall effect of a magnetic material is coupled to the nonlinear transport effect of a semiconductor material in a simple structure to achieve a large geometric magnetoresistance (MR) based on a diode-assisted mechanism. An extremely large MR (>10(4) %) at low magnetic fields (1 mT) is observed at room temperature. This MR device shows potential for use as a logic gate for the four basic Boolean logic operations. PMID:26857904

  12. Spin-orbit coupling and perpendicular Zeeman field for fermionic cold atoms: Observation of the intrinsic anomalous Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Chuanwei

    2010-08-15

    We propose a scheme for generating Rashba spin-orbit coupling and a perpendicular Zeeman field simultaneously for cold fermionic atoms in a harmonic trap through the coupling between atoms and laser fields. The realization of Rashba spin-orbit coupling and a perpendicular Zeeman field provides opportunities for exploring many topological phenomena using cold fermionic atoms. We focus on the intrinsic anomalous Hall effect and show that it may be observed through the response of atomic density to a rotation of the harmonic trap.

  13. Note on anomalous Higgs-boson couplings in effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchalla, G.; Catà, O.; Celis, A.; Krause, C.

    2015-11-01

    We propose a parametrization of anomalous Higgs-boson couplings that is both systematic and practical. It is based on the electroweak chiral Lagrangian, including a light Higgs boson, as the effective field theory (EFT) at the electroweak scale v. This is the appropriate framework for the case of sizeable deviations in the Higgs couplings of order 10% from the Standard Model, considered to be parametrically larger than new-physics effects in the sector of electroweak gauge interactions. The role of power counting in identifying the relevant parameters is emphasized. The three relevant scales, v, the scale of new Higgs dynamics f, and the cut-off Λ = 4 πf, admit expansions in ξ =v2 /f2 and f2 /Λ2. The former corresponds to an organization of operators by their canonical dimension, the latter by their loop order or chiral dimension. In full generality the EFT is thus organized as a double expansion. However, as long as ξ ≫ 1 / 16π2 the EFT systematics is closer to the chiral counting. The leading effects in the consistent approximation provided by the EFT, relevant for the presently most important processes of Higgs production and decay, are given by a few (typically six) couplings. These parameters allow us to describe the properties of the Higgs boson in a general and systematic way, and with a precision adequate for the measurements to be performed at the LHC. The framework can be systematically extended to include loop corrections and higher-order terms in the EFT.

  14. High field side launch of RF waves: A new approach to reactor actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, G. M.; Baek, S. G.; Bonoli, P. T.; Faust, I. C.; LaBombard, B. L.; Lin, Y.; Mumgaard, R. T.; Parker, R. R.; Shiraiwa, S.; Vieira, R.; Whyte, D. G.; Wukitch, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Launching radio frequency (RF) waves from the high field side (HFS) of a tokamak offers significant advantages over low field side (LFS) launch with respect to both wave physics and plasma material interactions (PMI). For lower hybrid (LH) waves, the higher magnetic field opens the window between wave accessibility (n∥≡c k∥/ω >√{1 -ωpi 2/ω2+ωpe 2/ωce 2 }+ωp e/|ωc e| ) and the condition for strong electron Landau damping (n∥˜√{30 /Te } with Te in keV), allowing LH waves from the HFS to penetrate into the core of a burning plasma, while waves launched from the LFS are restricted to the periphery of the plasma. The lower n∥ of waves absorbed at higher Te yields a higher current drive efficiency as well. In the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF), HFS launch allows for direct access to the mode conversion layer where mode converted waves absorb strongly on thermal electrons and ions, thus avoiding the generation of energetic minority ion tails. The absence of turbulent heat and particle fluxes on the HFS, particularly in double null configuration, makes it the ideal location to minimize PMI damage to the antenna structure. The quiescent SOL also eliminates the need to couple LH waves across a long distance to the separatrix, as the antenna can be located close to plasma without risking damage to the structure. Improved impurity screening on the HFS will help eliminate the long-standing issues of high Z impurity accumulation with ICRF. Looking toward a fusion reactor, the HFS is the only possible location for a plasma-facing RF antenna that will survive long-term. By integrating the antenna into the blanket module it is possible to improve the tritium breeding ratio compared with an antenna occupying an equatorial port plug. Blanket modules will require remote handling of numerous cooling pipes and electrical connections, and the addition of transmission lines will not substantially increase the level of complexity. The obvious engineering

  15. Electric Field Measurements of the Capacitively Coupled Magnetized RF Sheath Utilizing Passive Optical Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Elijah Henry

    A major challenge facing magnetic confinement fusion is the implementation of reliable plasma heating systems. Ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) is a key technique utilized to achieve the ion temperatures necessary for desirable fusion reaction rates. ICRH systems are designed to couple energy into the core plasma ions through a resonant interaction with an electromagnetic wave in the radio frequency range. The interaction of the wave with the scrape off layer plasma establishes an electric field which terminates directly on the plasma facing surfaces and is referred to as the near-field. In order to bridge the gap between the theoretical and actual performance of ICRF antennas, experimental measurement of this electric field is highly desired. However, due to the large amount of power launched by ICRF antennas only non-local measurements have thus far been obtained. The research presented in this dissertation is centered on the development of a non-perturbative diagnostic to locally measure the near-field with high spatial and temporal resolution. The main objective of the research presented in this dissertation is to develop and validate a spectroscopic diagnostic capable of measuring local time periodic electric fields. The development phase of the diagnostic consisted of atomic physics formulation and was carried out in two steps. The first involved the calculation of the electronic structure of the one and two-electron atom utilizing the hydrogenic wave function. The second involved the calculation of the spectral line profile based on the electric dipole connection operator. The validate phase of the diagnostic consisted of implementation of the atomic physics to measure the electric field topology associated with the capacitively coupled magnetized RF sheath using passive OES. The experimental measurements are then compared to a simple one-dimensional analytical model providing the validation of the developed atomic physics.

  16. POWER DENSITY, FIELD INTENSITY, AND CARRIER FREQUENCY DETERMINANTS OF RF-ENERGY-INDUCED CALCIUM-ION EFFLUX FROM BRAIN TISSUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    To explain a carrier frequency dependence reported for radiofrequency (RF)-induced calcium-ion efflux from brain tissue, a chick-brain hemisphere bathed in buffer solution is modeled as a sphere within the uniform field of the incident electromagnetic wave. Calculations on a sphe...

  17. A Coupled Field Multiphysics Modeling Approach to Investigate RF MEMS Switch Failure Modes under Various Operational Conditions.

    PubMed

    Sadek, Khaled; Lueke, Jonathan; Moussa, Walied

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the reliability of capacitive shunt RF MEMS switches have been investigated using three dimensional (3D) coupled multiphysics finite element (FE) analysis. The coupled field analysis involved three consecutive multiphysics interactions. The first interaction is characterized as a two-way sequential electromagnetic (EM)-thermal field coupling. The second interaction represented a one-way sequential thermal-structural field coupling. The third interaction portrayed a two-way sequential structural-electrostatic field coupling. An automated substructuring algorithm was utilized to reduce the computational cost of the complicated coupled multiphysics FE analysis. The results of the substructured FE model with coupled field analysis is shown to be in good agreement with the outcome of previously published experimental and numerical studies. The current numerical results indicate that the pull-in voltage and the buckling temperature of the RF switch are functions of the microfabrication residual stress state, the switch operational frequency and the surrounding packaging temperature. Furthermore, the current results point out that by introducing proper mechanical approaches such as corrugated switches and through-holes in the switch membrane, it is possible to achieve reliable pull-in voltages, at various operating temperatures. The performed analysis also shows that by controlling the mean and gradient residual stresses, generated during microfabrication, in conjunction with the proposed mechanical approaches, the power handling capability of RF MEMS switches can be increased, at a wide range of operational frequencies. These design features of RF MEMS switches are of particular importance in applications where a high RF power (frequencies above 10 GHz) and large temperature variations are expected, such as in satellites and airplane condition monitoring. PMID:22408490

  18. A Coupled Field Multiphysics Modeling Approach to Investigate RF MEMS Switch Failure Modes under Various Operational Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sadek, Khaled; Lueke, Jonathan; Moussa, Walied

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the reliability of capacitive shunt RF MEMS switches have been investigated using three dimensional (3D) coupled multiphysics finite element (FE) analysis. The coupled field analysis involved three consecutive multiphysics interactions. The first interaction is characterized as a two-way sequential electromagnetic (EM)-thermal field coupling. The second interaction represented a one-way sequential thermal-structural field coupling. The third interaction portrayed a two-way sequential structural-electrostatic field coupling. An automated substructuring algorithm was utilized to reduce the computational cost of the complicated coupled multiphysics FE analysis. The results of the substructured FE model with coupled field analysis is shown to be in good agreement with the outcome of previously published experimental and numerical studies. The current numerical results indicate that the pull-in voltage and the buckling temperature of the RF switch are functions of the microfabrication residual stress state, the switch operational frequency and the surrounding packaging temperature. Furthermore, the current results point out that by introducing proper mechanical approaches such as corrugated switches and through-holes in the switch membrane, it is possible to achieve reliable pull-in voltages, at various operating temperatures. The performed analysis also shows that by controlling the mean and gradient residual stresses, generated during microfabrication, in conjunction with the proposed mechanical approaches, the power handling capability of RF MEMS switches can be increased, at a wide range of operational frequencies. These design features of RF MEMS switches are of particular importance in applications where a high RF power (frequencies above 10 GHz) and large temperature variations are expected, such as in satellites and airplane condition monitoring. PMID:22408490

  19. A monopole/loop dual-tuned RF coil for ultrahigh field MRI.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xinqiang; Xue, Rong; Zhang, Xiaoliang

    2014-08-01

    Proton and heteronuclear MRI/MRS using dual-tuned (DT) coils could provide both anatomical and metabolic images without repositioning the subject. However, it is technologically challenging to attain sufficiently electromagnetic (EM) decoupling between the heteronuclear channel and proton channel, and keep the imaging areas and profiles of two nuclear channels highly matched. In this study, a hybrid monopole/loop technique was proposed for DT coil design and this technique was validated by implementing and testing a DT (1)H/(23)Na coil for MR imaging at 7T. The RF fields of the monopole ((1)H channel) and regular L/C loop ((23)Na channel) were orthogonal and intrinsically EM decoupled. Bench measurement results demonstrated the isolation between the two nuclear channels was better than -28 dB at both nuclear frequencies. Compared with the conventional DT coil using trap circuits, the monopole/loop DT coil had higher MR sensitivity for sodium imaging. The experimental results indicated that the monopole/loop technique might be a simple and efficient design for multinuclear imaging at ultrahigh fields. Additionally, the proposed DT coils based on the monopole/loop technique can be used as building blocks in designing multichannel DT coil arrays. PMID:25202657

  20. A monopole/loop dual-tuned RF coil for ultrahigh field MRI

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xinqiang

    2014-01-01

    Proton and heteronuclear MRI/MRS using dual-tuned (DT) coils could provide both anatomical and metabolic images without repositioning the subject. However, it is technologically challenging to attain sufficiently electromagnetic (EM) decoupling between the heteronuclear channel and proton channel, and keep the imaging areas and profiles of two nuclear channels highly matched. In this study, a hybrid monopole/loop technique was proposed for DT coil design and this technique was validated by implementing and testing a DT 1H/23Na coil for MR imaging at 7T. The RF fields of the monopole (1H channel) and regular L/C loop (23Na channel) were orthogonal and intrinsically EM decoupled. Bench measurement results demonstrated the isolation between the two nuclear channels was better than -28 dB at both nuclear frequencies. Compared with the conventional DT coil using trap circuits, the monopole/loop DT coil had higher MR sensitivity for sodium imaging. The experimental results indicated that the monopole/loop technique might be a simple and efficient design for multinuclear imaging at ultrahigh fields. Additionally, the proposed DT coils based on the monopole/loop technique can be used as building blocks in designing multichannel DT coil arrays. PMID:25202657

  1. Large reduction of the depinning field for a transverse domain wall under application of rf and dc currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaxas, P. J.; Anane, A.; Cros, V.; Grollier, J.; Deranlot, C.; Petroff, F.; Fert, A.; Ulysse, C.; Faini, G.

    2010-03-01

    A new generation of proposed spintronic devices are based on domain wall (DW) motion (DW-MRAM, DW logic, racetrack memory...). However, reliable depinning of domain walls remains elusive, especially in zero field. Here, we have studied the combined effect of rf and dc currents on the depinning of transverse walls in the soft NiFe layer of a 100 nm wide Co/Cu/NiFe spin valve wire. Using the GMR effect, we ensure that the domain wall is always prepared at the same intrinsic defect and then measure the depinning field for different applied dc and rf currents. Notably, for a narrow range of rf frequencies at around 3GHz, we evidence a strong reduction in the depinning field (from ˜80 Oe to ˜30 Oe). Our results are suggestive of a very efficient resonant depinning effect in our spin valve wire which depends not only on the rf power but also on the polarity and amplitude of the accompanying dc current.

  2. Using a modified 3D-printer for mapping the magnetic field of RF coils designed for fetal and neonatal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavoulas, Alexander; Vaiopoulos, Nicholas; Hedström, Erik; Xanthis, Christos G.; Sandalidis, Harilaos G.; Aletras, Anthony H.

    2016-08-01

    An experimental setup for characterizing the magnetic field of MRI RF coils was proposed and tested. The setup consisted of a specially configured 3D-printer, a network analyzer and a mid-performance desktop PC. The setup was tested on a single loop RF coil, part of a phased array for fetal imaging. Then, the setup was used for determining the magnetic field characteristics of a high-pass birdcage coil used for neonatal MR imaging with a vertical static field. The scattering parameter S21, converted into power ratio, was used for mapping the B1 magnetic field. The experimental measurements from the loop coil were close to the theoretical results (R = 0.924). A high degree of homogeneity was measured for the neonatal birdcage RF coil. The development of MR RF coils is time consuming and resource intensive. The proposed experimental setup provides an alternative method for magnetic field characterization of RF coils used in MRI.

  3. Using a modified 3D-printer for mapping the magnetic field of RF coils designed for fetal and neonatal imaging.

    PubMed

    Vavoulas, Alexander; Vaiopoulos, Nicholas; Hedström, Erik; Xanthis, Christos G; Sandalidis, Harilaos G; Aletras, Anthony H

    2016-08-01

    An experimental setup for characterizing the magnetic field of MRI RF coils was proposed and tested. The setup consisted of a specially configured 3D-printer, a network analyzer and a mid-performance desktop PC. The setup was tested on a single loop RF coil, part of a phased array for fetal imaging. Then, the setup was used for determining the magnetic field characteristics of a high-pass birdcage coil used for neonatal MR imaging with a vertical static field. The scattering parameter S21, converted into power ratio, was used for mapping the B1 magnetic field. The experimental measurements from the loop coil were close to the theoretical results (R=0.924). A high degree of homogeneity was measured for the neonatal birdcage RF coil. The development of MR RF coils is time consuming and resource intensive. The proposed experimental setup provides an alternative method for magnetic field characterization of RF coils used in MRI. PMID:27310429

  4. Transmit Array Spatial Encoding (TRASE) using broadband WURST pulses for RF spatial encoding in inhomogeneous B0 fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockmann, Jason P.; Cooley, Clarissa Z.; Guerin, Bastien; Rosen, Matthew S.; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2016-07-01

    Transmit Array Spatial Encoding (TRASE) is a promising new MR encoding method that uses transmit RF (B1+) phase gradients over the field-of-view to perform Fourier spatial encoding. Acquisitions use a spin echo train in which the transmit coil phase ramp is modulated to jump from one k-space point to the next. This work extends the capability of TRASE by using swept radiofrequency (RF) pulses and a quadratic phase removal method to enable TRASE where it is arguably most needed: portable imaging systems with inhomogeneous B0 fields. The approach is particularly well-suited for portable MR scanners where (a) inhomogeneous B0 fields are a byproduct of lightweight magnet design, (b) heavy, high power-consumption gradient coil systems are a limitation to siting the system in non-conventional locations and (c) synergy with the use of spin echo trains is required to overcome intra-voxel dephasing (short T2∗) in the inhomogeneous field. TRASE does not use a modulation of the B0 field to encode, but it does suffer from secondary effects of the inhomogeneous field. Severe artifacts arise in TRASE images due to off-resonance effects when the RF pulse does not cover the full bandwidth of spin resonances in the imaging FOV. Thus, for highly inhomogeneous B0 fields, the peak RF power needed for high-bandwidth refocusing hard pulses becomes very expensive, in addition to requiring RF coils that can withstand thousands of volts. In this work, we use swept WURST RF pulse echo trains to achieve TRASE imaging in a highly inhomogeneous magnetic field (ΔB0/B0 ∼ 0.33% over the sample). By accurately exciting and refocusing the full bandwidth of spins, the WURST pulses eliminate artifacts caused by the limited bandwidth of the hard pulses used in previous realizations of TRASE imaging. We introduce a correction scheme to remove the unwanted quadratic phase modulation caused by the swept pulses. Also, a phase alternation scheme is employed to mitigate artifacts caused by mixture of

  5. Transmit Array Spatial Encoding (TRASE) using broadband WURST pulses for RF spatial encoding in inhomogeneous B0 fields.

    PubMed

    Stockmann, Jason P; Cooley, Clarissa Z; Guerin, Bastien; Rosen, Matthew S; Wald, Lawrence L

    2016-07-01

    Transmit Array Spatial Encoding (TRASE) is a promising new MR encoding method that uses transmit RF (B1(+)) phase gradients over the field-of-view to perform Fourier spatial encoding. Acquisitions use a spin echo train in which the transmit coil phase ramp is modulated to jump from one k-space point to the next. This work extends the capability of TRASE by using swept radiofrequency (RF) pulses and a quadratic phase removal method to enable TRASE where it is arguably most needed: portable imaging systems with inhomogeneous B0 fields. The approach is particularly well-suited for portable MR scanners where (a) inhomogeneous B0 fields are a byproduct of lightweight magnet design, (b) heavy, high power-consumption gradient coil systems are a limitation to siting the system in non-conventional locations and (c) synergy with the use of spin echo trains is required to overcome intra-voxel dephasing (short T2(∗)) in the inhomogeneous field. TRASE does not use a modulation of the B0 field to encode, but it does suffer from secondary effects of the inhomogeneous field. Severe artifacts arise in TRASE images due to off-resonance effects when the RF pulse does not cover the full bandwidth of spin resonances in the imaging FOV. Thus, for highly inhomogeneous B0 fields, the peak RF power needed for high-bandwidth refocusing hard pulses becomes very expensive, in addition to requiring RF coils that can withstand thousands of volts. In this work, we use swept WURST RF pulse echo trains to achieve TRASE imaging in a highly inhomogeneous magnetic field (ΔB0/B0∼0.33% over the sample). By accurately exciting and refocusing the full bandwidth of spins, the WURST pulses eliminate artifacts caused by the limited bandwidth of the hard pulses used in previous realizations of TRASE imaging. We introduce a correction scheme to remove the unwanted quadratic phase modulation caused by the swept pulses. Also, a phase alternation scheme is employed to mitigate artifacts caused by mixture of

  6. Six loop analytical calculation of the field anomalous dimension and the critical exponent η in O(n)-symmetric φ4 model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batkovich, D. V.; Chetyrkin, K. G.; Kompaniets, M. V.

    2016-05-01

    We report on a completely analytical calculation of the field anomalous dimension γφ and the critical exponent η for the O (n)-symmetric φ4 model at the record six loop level. We successfully compare our result for γφ with n = 1 with the predictions based on the method of the Borel resummation combined with a conformal mapping (Kazakov et al., 1979 [40]). Predictions for seven loop contribution to the field anomalous dimensions are given.

  7. Dust particles under the influence of crossed electric and magnetic fields in the sheath of an rf discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Puttscher, M. Melzer, A.

    2014-12-15

    Experimental studies on the interaction of micron-sized dust particles in plasmas with external magnetic fields are presented. The particles are levitated in the sheath region of an rf discharge by gravity and electric field force under the presence of a horizontal magnetic field of up to 50 mT. It is observed that the dust particles are pushed either in the E{sup →}×B{sup →}- or in the opposite direction depending on magnetic field strength, particle properties, and discharge conditions. This transport behavior is described by a competition between horizontal ambipolar electric field force and ion and neutral drag.

  8. Anomalously High Geothermal Gradients in the Buckman Well Field, Santa Fe County, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollack, A.; Munda, R.; Farrell, T. F.; Kelley, S. A.; Frost, J.; Jiracek, G. R.

    2013-12-01

    Temperature as a function of depth was measured in ten wells in the Santa Fe, NM area as part of the Summer of Applied Geophysics Experience (SAGE) program. Eight of the wells are within 5.5 km of the city's Buckman municipal well field and two wells are at La Tierra, 16.5 km to the SE. Geothermal gradients increase from east to west towards the Buckman area, from 20°C/km at La Tierra to 76°C/km at Buckman. Within the Buckman well field, two wells on its eastern side were determined to have temperature gradients of 32°C/km and 42°C/km. Only 300 m west, the geothermal gradient sharply increases, and measured gradients reach 76 °C/km (well number SF4A), 62°C/km (SF4B), and 68°C/km (SF3A) in three shallow (<100 m) monitoring drill holes. Both local and regional causes may explain the geothermal anomaly. The short spatial wavelength of the horizontal gradient increase argues for a localized source. The unusually high gradients in three of the wells may be associated with fault-controlled, effective shallow-source, warm water upflow or with lateral flow in a shallow aquifer. On the regional level, the east to west increase in temperature gradients can be explained by deep circulating groundwater flow in the Espanola Basin and upwelling near the Rio Grande. Another possible explanation comes from gravity data gathered by SAGE over several years that shows a local NW-striking structural high in the area that could force localized convective upflow. Regional aeromag maps indicate magnetic lows exactly underneath the anomalous wells. These may be interpreted as buried volcanic plugs beneath the Buckman well field, acting as conduits for upwelling warmer waters. They may also indicate hydrothermally altered rock beneath the surface. A more nontraditional cause of the sharp thermal anomaly is also possible. The geothermal gradient anomaly coincides with the dramatic discovery by InSAR in 1993-2000 of localized ground subsidence due to excessive water well pumping

  9. Nonlocal and local magnetization dynamics excited by an RF magnetic field in magnetic multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriyama, Takahiro

    A microwave study in spintronic devices has been actively pursued in the past several years due to the fertile physics and potential applications. On one hand, a passive use of microwave can be very helpful to analyze and understand the magnetization dynamics in spintronic devices. Examples include ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements, and various microwave spectrum analyses in ferromagnetic materials. The most important chrematistic parameter for the phenomenological analysis on the magnetization dynamics is, so called, the Gilbert damping constant. In this work, a relatively new measurement technique, a flip-chip FMR measurement, to conduct the ferromagnetic resonance measurements has been developed. The measurement technique is equally comparable to a conventional FMR measurement. The Gilbert damping constants were extracted for single ferromagnetic layer, spin vale structures, and magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). On the other hand, an active use of microwave yields a great potential for interesting phenomena which give new functionalities into spintronic devices. For instance, a spin wave excitation by an rf field can be used to reduce the switching field of a ferromagnet, i.e. microwave assisted magnetization reversal, which could be a potential application in advanced recording media. More interestingly, a precessing magnetization driven by an rf field can generate a pure spin current into a neighboring layer, i.e. spin pumping effect, which is one of the candidates for generating a pure spin current. A ferromagnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) is one of the important devices in spintronics, which is also the key device to investigate the local and nonlocal magnetization dynamics in this work. Therefore, it is also important to develop high quality MTJs. My work starts from the development of MTJ with AlOx and MgO tunnel barriers where it was found it is crucial to find the proper condition for forming a few nanometers thick tunnel barrier. After obtaining

  10. Noninvasive quantitative mapping of conductivity and dielectric distributions using RF wave propagation effects in high-field MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Han

    2003-06-01

    In this paper I show with phantom and animal experiments a non-invasive and quantitative method for measuring the conductivity and dielectric distributions based on high field magnetic resonance imaging. High field MRI is accompanied by significant RF wave propagation effects. They are observed as phase and magnitude variations of the image that cannot be removed by optimizing the static field homogeneity, or by improving the RF coils. These variations reflect the RF field distribution in the sample, and in fact obey a modified Helmholtz equation. By mapping both the phase and magnitude of the field with MRI techniques, both the conductivity and the dielectric constant are determined non-invasively. In phantom experiments at 1.5 tesla, conductivity values were measured at 4 mm resolution to 0.5 S/m accuracy. At 4.7 tesla, the accuracy was improved to 0.2 S/m, and the dielectric constant was measured to an accuracy of 5 (relative to vacuum) for 2cm regions.

  11. RF excitation using time interleaved acquisition of modes (TIAMO) to address B1 inhomogeneity in high-field MRI.

    PubMed

    Orzada, Stephan; Maderwald, Stefan; Poser, Benedikt Andreas; Bitz, Andreas K; Quick, Harald H; Ladd, Mark E

    2010-08-01

    As the field strength and, therefore, the operational frequency in MRI is increased, the wavelength approaches the size of the human head/body, resulting in wave effects, which cause signal decreases and dropouts. Several multichannel approaches have been proposed to try to tackle these problems, including RF shimming, where each element in an array is driven by its own amplifier and modulated with a certain (constant) amplitude and phase relative to the other elements, and Transmit SENSE, where spatially tailored RF pulses are used. In this article, a relatively inexpensive and easy to use imaging scheme for 7 Tesla imaging is proposed to mitigate signal voids due to B(1)(+) field inhomogeneity. Two time-interleaved images are acquired using a different excitation mode for each. By forming virtual receive elements, both images are reconstructed together using GRAPPA to achieve a more homogeneous image, with only small SNR and SAR penalty in head and body imaging at 7 Tesla. PMID:20574991

  12. Anomalous thermal hysteresis in the high-field magnetic moments of magnetic nanoparticles embedded in multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guo-Meng; Wang, Jun; Ren, Yang; Beeli, Pieder

    2012-02-01

    We report high-temperature (300-1120 K) magnetic properties of Fe and Fe3O4 nanoparticles embedded in multi-walled carbon nanotubes. We unambiguously show that the magnetic moments of Fe and Fe3O4 nanoparticles are seemingly enhanced by a factor of about 3 compared with what they would be expected to have for free (unembedded) magnetic nanoparticles. What is more intriguing is that the enhanced moments were completely lost when the sample was heated up to 1120 K and the lost moments at 1120 K were completely recovered through several thermal cycles below 1020 K. The anomalous thermal hysteresis of the high-field magnetic moments is unlikely to be explained by existing physical models except for the high-field paramagnetic Meissner effect due to the existence of ultrahigh temperature superconductivity in the multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

  13. Investigation of analog/RF performance of staggered heterojunctions based nanowire tunneling field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Avik; Sarkar, Angsuman

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, the analog/RF performance of an III-V semiconductor based staggered hetero-tunnel-junction (HETJ) n-type nanowire (NW) tunneling FET (n-TFET) is investigated, for the first time. The device performance figure-of-merits governing the analog/RF performance such as transconductance (gm), transconductance-to-drive current ratio (gm/IDS), output resistance (Rout), intrinsic gain and unity-gain cutoff frequency (fT) have been studied. The analog/RF performance parameters is compared between HETJ NW TFET and a homojunction (HJ) NW n-type TFET of similar dimensions. In addition to enhanced ION and subthreshold swing, a significant improvement in the analog/RF performance parameters obtained by the HETJ n-TFET over HJ counterpart for use in analog/mixed signal System-on-Chip (SoC) applications is reported. Moreover, the analog/RF performance parameters of a III-V based staggered HETJ NW TFET is also compared with a heterojunction (HETJ) NW n-type MOSFET having same material as HETJ n-TFET and equal dimension in order to provide a systematic comparison between HETJ-TFET and HETJ-MOSFET for use in analog/mixed-signal applications. The results reveal that HETJ n-TFET provides higher Rout and hence, a higher intrinsic gain, an improved gm/IDS ratio, and reasonable fT at lower values of gate-overdrive voltage as compared to the HETJ NW n-MOSFET.

  14. Computational electromagnetic analysis in a human head model with EEG electrodes and leads exposed to RF-field sources at 915 MHz and 1748 MHz.

    PubMed

    Angelone, Leonardo M; Bit-Babik, Giorgi; Chou, Chung-Kwang

    2010-07-01

    An electromagnetic analysis of a human head with EEG electrodes and leads exposed to RF-field sources was performed by means of Finite-Difference Time-Domain simulations on a 1-mm(3) MRI-based human head model. RF-field source models included a half-wave dipole, a patch antenna, and a realistic CAD-based mobile phone at 915 MHz and 1748 MHz. EEG electrodes/leads models included two configurations of EEG leads, both a standard 10-20 montage with 19 electrodes and a 32-electrode cap, and metallic and high resistive leads. Whole-head and peak 10-g average SAR showed less than 20% changes with and without leads. Peak 1-g and 10-g average SARs were below the ICNIRP and IEEE guideline limits. Conversely, a comprehensive volumetric assessment of changes in the RF field with and without metallic EEG leads showed an increase of two orders of magnitude in single-voxel power absorption in the epidermis and a 40-fold increase in the brain during exposure to the 915 MHz mobile phone. Results varied with the geometry and conductivity of EEG electrodes/leads. This enhancement confirms the validity of the question whether any observed effects in studies involving EEG recordings during RF-field exposure are directly related to the RF fields generated by the source or indirectly to the RF-field-induced currents due to the presence of conductive EEG leads. PMID:20681803

  15. Anomalous metamagnetic-like transition in a FeRh/Fe3Pt interface occurring at T ≈ 120 K in the field-cooled-cooling curves for low magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem-Sugui, S.; Alvarenga, A. D.; Noce, R. D.; Guimarães, R. B.; Mejia, C. Salazar; Salim, H.; Gandra, F. G.

    2012-09-01

    We report on the magnetic properties of a special configuration of a FeRh thin film. An anomalous behavior on the magnetisation vs. temperature was observed when low magnetic fields are applied in the plane of a thin layer of FeRh deposited on ordered Fe3Pt. The anomalous effect resembles a metamagnetic transition and occur only in the field-cooled-cooling magnetisation curve at temperatures near 120 K in samples without any heat treatment.

  16. Multipacting analysis and electromagnetic field computation by the boundary integral equation method in RF cavities and waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yla-Oijala, Pasi

    Electron multipacting is a serious problem in many rf components operating in vacuum. Multipacting can cause remarkable power losses and heating of the walls. This phenomenon starts if certain resonant conditions for electron trajectories are fulfilled and if the impacted surface has a secondary yield larger than one. In this work new computational methods have been developed which combine the standard trajectory calculations with advanced searching and analyzing methods for multipacting resonances. These methods have been applied to the analysis of electron multipacting in TESLA superconducting cavities and input power couplers with ceramic windows. TESLA is an international linear collider research and development project. Since even small errors in the rf field may destroy the trajectory calculation of a relativistic electron, the electromagnetic fields must be known accurately, especially close to the surfaces. The electromagnetic field computation is carried out by the boundary integral equation method. Due to the singularities of the integral equations, the numerical computations become rather involved, especially when computing the fields near the boundaries. Therefore, in this work special integration techniques and algorithms have been developed. In the axisymmetric geometries the numerical efficiency of various boundary integral equations has been studied.

  17. Self-induced steady-state magnetic field in the negative ion sources with localized rf power deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivarova, A.; Todorov, D.; Lishev, St.

    2016-02-01

    The study is in the scope of a recent activity on modeling of SPIDER (Source for Production of Ions of Deuterium Extracted from RF plasma) which is under development regarding the neutral beam injection heating system of ITER. The regime of non-ambipolarity in the source, established before, is completed here by introducing in the model the steady state magnetic field, self-induced in the discharge due to the dc current flowing in it. Strong changes in the discharge structure are reported.

  18. Self-induced steady-state magnetic field in the negative ion sources with localized rf power deposition.

    PubMed

    Shivarova, A; Todorov, D; Lishev, St

    2016-02-01

    The study is in the scope of a recent activity on modeling of SPIDER (Source for Production of Ions of Deuterium Extracted from RF plasma) which is under development regarding the neutral beam injection heating system of ITER. The regime of non-ambipolarity in the source, established before, is completed here by introducing in the model the steady state magnetic field, self-induced in the discharge due to the dc current flowing in it. Strong changes in the discharge structure are reported. PMID:26932036

  19. Anomalous Spectral Shift of Near- and Far-Field Plasmonic Resonances in Nanogaps

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The near-field and far-field spectral response of plasmonic systems are often assumed to be identical, due to the lack of methods that can directly compare and correlate both responses under similar environmental conditions. We develop a widely tunable optical technique to probe the near-field resonances within individual plasmonic nanostructures that can be directly compared to the corresponding far-field response. In tightly coupled nanoparticle-on-mirror constructs with nanometer-sized gaps we find >40 meV blue-shifts of the near-field compared to the dark-field scattering peak, which agrees with full electromagnetic simulations. Using a transformation optics approach, we show such shifts arise from the different spectral interference between different gap modes in the near- and far-field. The control and tuning of near-field and far-field responses demonstrated here is of paramount importance in the design of optical nanostructures for field-enhanced spectroscopy, as well as to control near-field activity monitored through the far-field of nano-optical devices. PMID:27077075

  20. An investigation into the effectiveness of ELF protective clothing when exposed to RF fields between 65 MHz and 3 GHz.

    PubMed

    Findlay, R P; Dimbylow, P J

    2012-05-01

    Protective garments are worn by electric power workers to shield the body against electromagnetic fields. This paper uses the finite-difference time-domain method to calculate SAR in the heterogeneous human voxel model NORMAN, clad in a protective suit and exposed to radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields between 65 MHz and 3 GHz. The representation of the suit was produced for this work by the modelling and voxelization of a surface-rendered object, based on the dimensions of the male voxel phantom. The calculations showed that the peak-localized SAR in the head was higher than that calculated for a model without a protective suit for a number of exposure situations. These localized SAR values could be up to three times the values of those calculated for a model without a protective suit for a particular frequency. It is thought that the SAR hotspots in the head are caused by resonances in a cavity, which in this case is the conductive hood of the suit. This work shows that the increase in the peak-localized SAR in the head due to wearing the suit meant that, in certain situations, the ICNIRP and IEEE reference levels were no longer conservative. Therefore, it is important that power line workers exposed to RF fields wear the correct high-frequency protective suits with conducting visors. PMID:22510683

  1. An investigation into the effectiveness of ELF protective clothing when exposed to RF fields between 65 MHz and 3 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Findlay, R. P.; Dimbylow, P. J.

    2012-05-01

    Protective garments are worn by electric power workers to shield the body against electromagnetic fields. This paper uses the finite-difference time-domain method to calculate SAR in the heterogeneous human voxel model NORMAN, clad in a protective suit and exposed to radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields between 65 MHz and 3 GHz. The representation of the suit was produced for this work by the modelling and voxelization of a surface-rendered object, based on the dimensions of the male voxel phantom. The calculations showed that the peak-localized SAR in the head was higher than that calculated for a model without a protective suit for a number of exposure situations. These localized SAR values could be up to three times the values of those calculated for a model without a protective suit for a particular frequency. It is thought that the SAR hotspots in the head are caused by resonances in a cavity, which in this case is the conductive hood of the suit. This work shows that the increase in the peak-localized SAR in the head due to wearing the suit meant that, in certain situations, the ICNIRP and IEEE reference levels were no longer conservative. Therefore, it is important that power line workers exposed to RF fields wear the correct high-frequency protective suits with conducting visors.

  2. Measurements and Modeling of the RF Fields from an Interdigital Line Antenna for Lower Hybrid Experiments in MST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caughman, J. B. O.; Carter, M. D.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Ryan, P. M.; Thomas, M. A.; Goetz, J. A.

    2003-10-01

    A system for launching lower hybrid slow waves at 800 MHz has been developed on MST, and the antenna used to launch the lower hybrid waves is being analyzed. The antenna is an enclosed interdigital line using λ/4 resonators with an opening in the cavity through which the wave is coupled to the plasma. The RF fields are measured as a function of distance away from the antenna in 3 dimensions using electric and magnetic field probes. The power deposition is being measured with a heat deposition technique where a simple mirror, contoured to the shape of the antenna, is used to act as a load under moderate power from the antenna ( 100 W). The power deposition in the thin metallic coating of the mirror is imaged with an infrared camera. The RF fields in vacuum are being modeled using Microwave Studio^TM. Plasma effects on power absorption and coupling are modeled using the RANT/GLOSI codes. Details of the measurement technique and comparison between the measurements and the modeling results will be presented.

  3. Infrared thermography analysis of thermal diffusion induced by RF magnetic field on agar phantoms loaded with magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bante-Guerra, Jose; Macías, J. D.; Caballero-Aguilar, L.; Vales-Pinzón, C.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2013-02-01

    Recently, several treatments for fighting malignant tumors have been designed. However these procedures have well known inconveniences, depending on their applicability, tumor size and side effects, among others. Magnetic hyperthermia is a safe, non-invasive method for cancer therapy. This treatment is applied via elevation of target tissue temperature by dissipation of heat from Magnetic Nanoparticles (MNPs), previously located within the tumor. The induction of heat causes cell death and therefore the removal of the tumor. In this work the thermal diffusion in phantoms of agar loaded with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is studied using the infrared thermography technique, which is widely used in biology/medicine (e.g. skin temperature mapping). Agar is one of the materials used to simulate different types of body tissues, these samples are known as "phantoms". Agar is of natural origin, low cost and high degree of biocompatibility. In this work the agar gel was embedded with MNPs by coprecipitation and placed in an alternating magnetic field radiation. As a consequence, the energy from the radiation source is dissipated as heat and then transferred from the MNP to the gel, increasing its temperature. For the temperature analysis, the samples of agar gel were stimulated by RF magnetic field generated by coils. Heating was measured with infrared thermography using a Thermovision A20M infrared camera. Thermographic images allowed obtaining the dependence of thermal diffusion in the phantom as a function of the magnitude of the applied RF magnetic field and the load of magnetic particles.

  4. Anomalous arsenic contents in Lower Pennsylvanian Coals, Warrior field, northwestern Alabama, USA: Evidence for fluid flow during Alleghanian thrusting

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, J.R.; Goldhaber, M.B.; Pashin, J.C.; Offield, T.W.; Finkelman, R.B.

    1998-12-31

    This paper summarizes initial results from a study of the geology and geochemistry of anomalous arsenic (As) contents in bituminous coals from the Lower Pennsylvanian Pottsville Formation, Warrior field, northwestern Alabama. Since 1977, the US Geological Survey has chemically analyzed 913 core and mine samples of coal and shaley coal from the Warrior field. These analyses document arsenic contents in coal of up to 1500 ppm (whole-coal, remnant-moisture basis) which are some of the highest contents reported for all United States coals. Warrior field coals also have elevated contents of copper (Cu), molybdenum (Mo), and antimony (Sb). For the approximately 13,000 samples of United States coals analyzed by the US Geological Survey, mean arsenic content is about 24 ppm. Nearly 80% of the 103 arsenic analyses greater than three standard deviations above this mean are from Alabama. A figure illustrates the distribution of arsenic contents in Warrior field coals and compares this distribution with the substantially lower arsenic contents in Paleocene coals from the Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana, and Middle Pennsylvanian coals from the Illinois basin, Illinois, Indiana and western Kentucky.

  5. Anomalous hysteresis as evidence for a magnetic-field-induced chiral superconducting state in LiFeAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Urbano, R. R.; Goswami, P.; Tarantini, C.; Lv, B.; Kuhns, P.; Reyes, A. P.; Chu, C. W.; Balicas, L.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetometry measurements in high-quality LiFeAs single crystals reveal a change in the sign of the magnetic hysteresis in the vicinity of the upper critical field Hc2, from a clear diamagnetic response dominated by the pinning of vortices to a considerably smaller net hysteretic response of opposite sign, which disappears at Hc2. If the diamagnetic response at high fields results from pinned vortices and associated screening supercurrents, this sign change must result from currents circulating in the opposite sense, which give rise to a small field-dependent magnetic moment below Hc2. This behavior seems to be extremely sensitive to the sample quality or stoichiometry, as we have observed it only in a few fresh crystals, which also display the de Haas van Alphen effect. We provide arguments against the surface superconductivity, the flux compression, and the random π junction scenarios, which have been previously put forward to explain a paramagnetic Meissner effect, below the lower critical field Hc1. The observed anomalous hysteresis at high fields will be compatible with the existence of chiral gap wave functions, which possess a field-dependent magnetic moment. Within a Landau-Ginzburg framework, we demonstrate how a (dx2-y2+idxy) or a (px+ipy) chiral superconducting component can be stabilized in the mixed state of s± superconductor, due to the combined effects of the magnetic field and the presence of competing pairing channels. The realization of a particular chiral pairing depends on the microscopic details of the strengths of the competing pairing channels.

  6. Superconducting surface impedance under radiofrequency field

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xiao, Binping P.; Reece, Charles E.; Kelley, Michael J.

    2013-04-26

    Based on BCS theory with moving Cooper pairs, the electron states distribution at 0K and the probability of electron occupation with finite temperature have been derived and applied to anomalous skin effect theory to obtain the surface impedance of a superconductor under radiofrequency (RF) field. We present the numerical results for Nb and compare these with representative RF field-dependent effective surface resistance measurements from a 1.5 GHz resonant structure.

  7. The ANL experiment for a wake field accelerator using an rf structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, A.G.; Schoessow, P.; Simpson, J.

    1986-08-27

    Experiments are planned at ANL to study a new accelerating concept that has been developed during the last few years named the WAKEATRON. This requires a very special, simple configuration of the beams and of the rf structure involved. The basic concepts are explained. Like most proposed experimental work, this too was initiated by a considerable amount of computational work, both analytical and numerical, on which we would like to report. We will then describe details of the planned experiments we will carry out at ANL to check some of our predictions for this concept. These experiments concentrate on beam and cavity geometry applicable to the Wakeatron.

  8. Anomalous Increase in Nematic-Isotropic Transition Temperature in Dimer Molecules Induced by a Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salili, S. M.; Tamba, M. G.; Sprunt, S. N.; Welch, C.; Mehl, G. H.; Jákli, A.; Gleeson, J. T.

    2016-05-01

    We have determined the nematic-isotropic transition temperature as a function of an applied magnetic field in three different thermotropic liquid crystalline dimers. These molecules are comprised of two rigid calamitic moieties joined end to end by flexible spacers with odd numbers of methylene groups. They show an unprecedented magnetic field enhancement of nematic order in that the transition temperature is increased by up to 15 K when subjected to a 22 T magnetic field. The increase is conjectured to be caused by a magnetic-field-induced decrease of the average bend angle in the aliphatic spacers connecting the rigid mesogenic units of the dimers.

  9. Efficiency enhancement of anomalous-Doppler electron cyclotron masers with tapered magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Chao-Ran; Hou, Zhi-Ling; Kong, Ling-Bao E-mail: pkliu@pku.edu.cn; Beijing Key Laboratory of Harmful Chemicals Analysis and School of Science, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 ; Liu, Pu-Kun E-mail: pkliu@pku.edu.cn; Du, Chao-Hai; Jin, Hai-Bo

    2014-02-15

    The efficiency of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers (ECM) is usually low, thus limiting the practical applications. Here, a method of tapered magnetic field is introduced for the efficiency enhancement of the slow-wave ECM. The numerical calculations show that the tapered magnetic-field method can enhance the efficiency of slow-wave ECM significantly. The effect of beam electron velocity spread on the efficiency has also been studied. Although the velocity spread reduces the efficiency, a great enhancement of efficiency can still be obtained by the tapered magnetic field method.

  10. Field and photo-emission in a short-pulse, high-charge Cesium telluride RF photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewski, Eric E.

    A new high-charge RF gun is now operating at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The 1.5 cell 1.3 GHz gun uses a Cesium telluride photocathode driven with a 248 nm laser to provide short-pulse, high charge electron beams for the new 75 MeV drive beamline. The high-gradient RF gun (peak field on the cathode > 80MV/m) is a key piece of the facility upgrade. The large Cs2Te photocathode (diameter > 30 mm) was fabricated in-house. The photo-injector will be used to generate high-charge, short pulse, single bunches (Q > 100 nC) and bunch-trains (Q > 1000 nC) for wakefield experiments, typically involving dielectric-loaded accelerating structures. Details of the photocathode fabrication process and the results of associated diagnostic measurements are presented, including QE measurements and work function measurements performed with a Kelvin probe. Fieldemitted dark current from the Cs2Te cathode was measured during RF conditioning and characterized. Fowler-Nordheim plots of the data are presented and compared to similar measurements made using a copper cathode in the initial phase of conditioning. The results for cesium telluride exhibited non-linear regions within the Fowler-Nordheim plots similar to previous experimental results for other p-type semiconductors. Results of quantum efficiency (QE) studies are presented with the cathode operating in both single and bunch-train modes. QE uniformity and lifetime studies are presented. During commissioning, the cesium telluride photocathode produced bunch-charge of 100 nC, breaking the previous record. No evidence of bunch-train position-dependence of QE was found when generating four-bunch trains with total charge up to 200 nC.

  11. Rod-filter-field optimization of the J-PARC RF-driven H{sup −} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, A. Ohkoshi, K.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Yamazaki, S.; Oguri, H.

    2015-04-08

    In order to satisfy the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) second-stage requirements of an H{sup −} ion beam of 60mA within normalized emittances of 1.5πmm•mrad both horizontally and vertically, a flat top beam duty factor of 1.25% (500μs×25Hz) and a life-time of longer than 1month, the J-PARC cesiated RF-driven H{sup −} ion source was developed by using an internal-antenna developed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). Although rod-filter-field (RFF) is indispensable and one of the most beam performance dominative parameters for the RF-driven H{sup −} ion source with the internal-antenna, the procedure to optimize it is not established. In order to optimize the RFF and establish the procedure, the beam performances of the J-PARC source with various types of rod-filter-magnets (RFMs) were measured. By changing RFM’s gap length and gap number inside of the region projecting the antenna inner-diameter along the beam axis, the dependence of the H{sup −} ion beam intensity on the net 2MHz-RF power was optimized. Furthermore, the fine-tuning of RFM’s cross-section (magnetmotive force) was indispensable for easy operation with the temperature (T{sub PE}) of the plasma electrode (PE) lower than 70°C, which minimizes the transverse emittances. The 5% reduction of RFM’s cross-section decreased the time-constant to recover the cesium effects after an slightly excessive cesiation on the PE from several 10 minutes to several minutes for T{sub PE} around 60°C.

  12. A 0.5 GHz to 20.0 GHz RF generator instrument-on-a-card using MMIC and field programmable gate arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepine, Robert A.; Martuscello, Anthony R.

    An instrument-on-a-card (IAC) has been developed which uses monolithic microwave integrated circuit technology and field programmable gate arrays to provide a +20-dBm RF stimulus capability over the frequency range of 0.5 to 20.0 GHz. It is capable of being tuned in 0.15-Hz steps, in 200 microsec per step. The entire frequency range can be swept in less than 1 s. Pulse and arbitrary amplitude modulation capabilities are provided along with RF frequency agility. Within the IAC, enhanced electromagnetic interference (EMI) performance is achieved by isolating the RF circuitry from the rest of the VXI circuitry. This is accomplished, in the three-slot-wide C-size VXI module, by means of an RF-tight, shielded compartment.

  13. Anomalous self-generated electrostatic fields in nanosecond laser-plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lancia, L.; Antici, P.; Grech, M.; Weber, S.; Marques, J.-R.; Romagnani, L.; Bourgeois, N.; Audebert, P.; Fuchs, J.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Bellue, A.; Feugeas, J.-L.; Nicolaie, Ph.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Grismayer, T.; Lin, T.; Nkonga, B.; Kodama, R.

    2011-03-15

    Electrostatic (E) fields associated with the interaction of a well-controlled, high-power, nanosecond laser pulse with an underdense plasma are diagnosed by proton radiography. Using a current three-dimensional wave propagation code equipped with nonlinear and nonlocal hydrodynamics, we can model the measured E-fields that are driven by the laser ponderomotive force in the region where the laser undergoes filamentation. However, strong fields of up to 110 MV/m measured in the first millimeter of propagation cannot be reproduced in the simulations. This could point to the presence of unexpected strong thermal electron pressure gradients possibly linked to ion acoustic turbulence, thus emphasizing the need for the development of full kinetic collisional simulations in order to properly model laser-plasma interaction in these strongly nonlinear conditions.

  14. Anomalous Cross-Field Current and Fluctuating Equilibrium of Magnetized Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rypdal, K.; Garcia, O.E.; Paulsen, J.

    1997-09-01

    It is shown by simple physical arguments and fluid simulations that electrostatic flute-mode fluctuations can sustain a substantial cross-field current in addition to mass and energy transport. The simulations show that this current determines essential features of the fluctuating plasma equilibrium, and explain qualitatively the experimental equilibria and the coherent flute-mode structures observed in a simple magnetized torus. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Measured performance of the GTA rf systems

    SciTech Connect

    Denney, P.M.; Jachim, S.P.

    1993-06-01

    This paper describes the performance of the RF systems on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). The RF system architecture is briefly described. Among the RF performance results presented are RF field flatness and stability, amplitude and phase control resolution, and control system bandwidth and stability. The rejection by the RF systems of beam-induced disturbances, such as transients and noise, are analyzed. The observed responses are also compared to computer-based simulations of the RF systems for validation.

  16. Measured performance of the GTA rf systems

    SciTech Connect

    Denney, P.M.; Jachim, S.P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the performance of the RF systems on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). The RF system architecture is briefly described. Among the RF performance results presented are RF field flatness and stability, amplitude and phase control resolution, and control system bandwidth and stability. The rejection by the RF systems of beam-induced disturbances, such as transients and noise, are analyzed. The observed responses are also compared to computer-based simulations of the RF systems for validation.

  17. Anomalously strong vertical magnetic fields from distant ELF/VLF sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silber, Israel; Price, Colin; Galanti, Eli; Shuval, Abraham

    2015-07-01

    There are many sources of very low frequency (VLF—3-30 kHz) and extremely low frequency (ELF—3-3000 Hz) radiation in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide (e.g., lightning and ELF/VLF communication transmitters). At distances of thousands of kilometers from these sources, the vertical component of the ELF/VLF AC magnetic fields is expected to be very weak and several orders of magnitude lower than the horizontal magnetic components. However, measurements in Israel show a relatively strong vertical magnetic component in both the ELF and VLF bands, at the same order of magnitude as the horizontal components. Our measurements suggest that the real Earth-ionosphere waveguide might often be very different from the theoretical waveguide used in model calculations. In addition, our results imply that using only the horizontal components for direction finding or the absolute magnetic field strength may result in errors, since often a significant fraction of the magnetic field energy hides in the vertical component.

  18. Development of gas cluster ion beam surface treatments for reducing field emission and breakdown in RF cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, D R; Degenkolb, E; Wu, A T; Insepov, Z

    2006-11-01

    Sub-micron-scale surface roughness and contamination cause field emission that can lead to high voltage breakdown of electrodes, and these are limiting factors in the development of high gradient RF technology. We are studying various Gas Cluster Ion Beam (GCIB) treatments to smooth, clean, etch and/or chemically alter electrode surfaces to allow higher fields and accelerating gradients, and to reduce the time and cost of conditioning high voltage electrodes. For this paper, we have processed Nb, Stainless Steel, and Ti electrode materials using beams of Ar, O2, or NF3 +O2 clusters with accelerating potentials up to 35 kV. Using a Scanning Field Emission Microscope (SFEM), we have repeatedly seen a dramatic reduction in the number of field emission sites on Nb coupons treated with GCIB. Smoothing effects on Stainless steel and Ti substrates have been evaluated using AFM imaging and show that 200-nm wide polishing scratch marks are greatly attenuated. A 150-mm diameter GCIB treated stainless steel electrode has now shown virtually no DC field emission current at gradients over 20 MV/m.

  19. Development of Gas Cluster Ion Beam Surface Treatments for Reducing Field Emission and Breakdown in RF cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, D. R.; Degenkolb, E.; Wu, A. T.; Insepov, Z.

    2006-11-27

    Sub-micron-scale surface roughness and contamination cause field emission that can lead to high voltage breakdown of electrodes, and these are limiting factors in the development of high gradient RF technology. We are studying various Gas Cluster Ion Beam (GCIB) treatments to smooth, clean, etch and/or chemically alter electrode surfaces to allow higher fields and accelerating gradients, and to reduce the time and cost of conditioning high voltage electrodes. For this paper, we have processed Nb, Stainless Steel, and Ti electrode materials using beams of Ar, O2, or NF3 +O2 clusters with accelerating potentials up to 35 kV. Using a Scanning Field Emission Microscope (SFEM), we have repeatedly seen a dramatic reduction in the number of field emission sites on Nb coupons treated with GCIB. Smoothing effects on Stainless steel and Ti substrates have been evaluated using AFM imaging and show that 200-nm wide polishing scratch marks are greatly attenuated. A 150-mm diameter GCIB treated stainless steel electrode has now shown virtually no DC field emission current at gradients over 20 MV/m.

  20. RF Performance of Diamond Metel-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor at Elevated Temperatures and Analysis of its Equivalent Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Haitao; Kasu, Makoto; Ueda, Kenji; Yamauchi, Yoshiharu; Maeda, Narihiko; Sasaki, Satoshi; Makimoto, Toshiki

    2006-04-01

    Temperature dependent DC and RF characteristics of p-type diamond metal-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MESFETs) on hydrogen-terminated surfaces are investigated. The device is thermally stable up to 100 °C, because it does not deteriorate at all at higher temperatures. Temperature coefficients of transconductance (gm), drain conductance (gds), gate-source capacitance (Cgs), gate-drain capacitance (Cgd), cut-off frequency ( fT), and maximum drain current (Ids) were obtained from small-signal equivalent circuit analysis. The cut-off frequency ( fT) is almost totally independent of temperature. Intrinsic gm, gds, and Cgs decrease with increasing temperature. Cgd is almost totally independent of temperature. The threshold voltage shifts to the negative side with increasing temperature. We propose a band model of an Al-gate contact/H-terminated diamond to explain the temperature dependence of these components.

  1. A modified capacitance model of RF MEMS shunt switch incorporating fringing field effects of perforated beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, Koushik; Kumar, Mithlesh; Agarwal, Saurabh; Baishya, Srimanta

    2015-12-01

    This paper deals with the approach to accurately model the capacitance of non-uniform meander based RF MEMS shunt switch with perforated structure. Here the general analytical model of capacitance is proposed for both up state and down state condition of the switch. The model also accounts for fringing capacitance due to beam thickness and etched holes on the beam. Calculated results are validated with the simulated results of full 3D FEM solver Coventorware in both the conditions of the switch. Variation of Up-state and Down-state capacitances with different dielectric thicknesses and voltages are plotted and error of analytical value is estimated and analyzed. Three benchmark models of parallel plate capacitance are modified for MEMS switch operation and their results are compared with the proposed model. Percentage contribution of fringing capacitance in up-state and down-state is approx. 25% and 2%, respectively, of the total capacitance. The model shows good accuracy with the mean error of -4.45% in up-state and -5.78% in down-state condition for a wide range of parameter variations and -2.13% for ligament efficiency of μ = 0.3.

  2. Coupling Factor Determination in the Control of Unintentionally Generated RF Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCollum, Matthew B.; Clark, Tony L.

    1999-01-01

    Radiated emissions and susceptibility requirements imposed in bands where intentional RF reception or transmission does not occur is problematical. It is often desired to compare radiated emissions with radiated susceptibility performance to assess system level compatibility. For reasons purely theoretical and because of practical measurement limitations, this not realistic. McCollum and Clark proposed a limit and test method that provided a direct comparison of radiated emissions and radiated susceptibility performance in those cases where only unintentional emissions and reception are of interest (non-tunable electronics). This test method, referred to as bulk current emissions (BCE) testing, and its associated limit is a complementary test method to bulk current injection testing and radiated susceptibility testing. Previous work utilized victim and culprit circuits with low common-mode loop impedance. Forward work identified in this publication was to determine how different loop impedance on culprit and victim circuits affected cable-to-cable coupling and the corresponding BCE test limit. Cable coupling factors for victim and culprit circuits with different loop impedance are investigated.

  3. Weakened magnetic braking as the origin of anomalously rapid rotation in old field stars.

    PubMed

    van Saders, Jennifer L; Ceillier, Tugdual; Metcalfe, Travis S; Aguirre, Victor Silva; Pinsonneault, Marc H; García, Rafael A; Mathur, Savita; Davies, Guy R

    2016-01-14

    A knowledge of stellar ages is crucial for our understanding of many astrophysical phenomena, and yet ages can be difficult to determine. As they become older, stars lose mass and angular momentum, resulting in an observed slowdown in surface rotation. The technique of 'gyrochronology' uses the rotation period of a star to calculate its age. However, stars of known age must be used for calibration, and, until recently, the approach was untested for old stars (older than 1 gigayear, Gyr). Rotation periods are now known for stars in an open cluster of intermediate age (NGC 6819; 2.5 Gyr old), and for old field stars whose ages have been determined with asteroseismology. The data for the cluster agree with previous period-age relations, but these relations fail to describe the asteroseismic sample. Here we report stellar evolutionary modelling, and confirm the presence of unexpectedly rapid rotation in stars that are more evolved than the Sun. We demonstrate that models that incorporate dramatically weakened magnetic braking for old stars can--unlike existing models--reproduce both the asteroseismic and the cluster data. Our findings might suggest a fundamental change in the nature of ageing stellar dynamos, with the Sun being close to the critical transition to much weaker magnetized winds. This weakened braking limits the diagnostic power of gyrochronology for those stars that are more than halfway through their main-sequence lifetimes. PMID:26727162

  4. SnTe field effect transistors and the anomalous electrical response of structural phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Haitao Zhu, Hao; Yuan, Hui; Li, Qiliang; You, Lin; Kopanski, Joseph J.; Richter, Curt A.; Zhao, Erhai

    2014-07-07

    SnTe is a conventional thermoelectric material and has been newly found to be a topological crystalline insulator. In this work, back-gate SnTe field-effect transistors have been fabricated and fully characterized. The devices exhibit n-type transistor behaviors with excellent current-voltage characteristics and large on/off ratio (>10{sup 6}). The device threshold voltage, conductance, mobility, and subthreshold swing have been studied and compared at different temperatures. It is found that the subthreshold swings as a function of temperature have an apparent response to the SnTe phase transition between cubic and rhombohedral structures at 110 K. The abnormal and rapid increase in subthreshold swing around the phase transition temperature may be due to the soft phonon/structure change which causes the large increase in SnTe dielectric constant. Such an interesting and remarkable electrical response to phase transition at different temperatures makes the small SnTe transistor attractive for various electronic devices.

  5. Weakened magnetic braking as the origin of anomalously rapid rotation in old field stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Saders, Jennifer L.; Ceillier, Tugdual; Metcalfe, Travis S.; Silva Aguirre, Victor; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; García, Rafael A.; Mathur, Savita; Davies, Guy R.

    2016-01-01

    A knowledge of stellar ages is crucial for our understanding of many astrophysical phenomena, and yet ages can be difficult to determine. As they become older, stars lose mass and angular momentum, resulting in an observed slowdown in surface rotation. The technique of ‘gyrochronology’ uses the rotation period of a star to calculate its age. However, stars of known age must be used for calibration, and, until recently, the approach was untested for old stars (older than 1 gigayear, Gyr). Rotation periods are now known for stars in an open cluster of intermediate age (NGC 6819; 2.5 Gyr old), and for old field stars whose ages have been determined with asteroseismology. The data for the cluster agree with previous period-age relations, but these relations fail to describe the asteroseismic sample. Here we report stellar evolutionary modelling, and confirm the presence of unexpectedly rapid rotation in stars that are more evolved than the Sun. We demonstrate that models that incorporate dramatically weakened magnetic braking for old stars can—unlike existing models—reproduce both the asteroseismic and the cluster data. Our findings might suggest a fundamental change in the nature of ageing stellar dynamos, with the Sun being close to the critical transition to much weaker magnetized winds. This weakened braking limits the diagnostic power of gyrochronology for those stars that are more than halfway through their main-sequence lifetimes.

  6. B0 mapping with multi-channel RF coils at high field.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Simon; Jovicich, Jorge

    2011-10-01

    Mapping the static magnetic field via the phase evolution over gradient echo scans acquired at two or more echo times is an established method. A number of possibilities exist, however, for combining phase data from multi-channel coils, denoising and thresholding field maps for high field applications. Three methods for combining phase images when no body/volume coil is available are tested: (i) Hermitian product, (ii) phase-matching over channels, and (iii) a new approach based on calculating separate field maps for each channel. The separate channel method is shown to yield field maps with higher signal-to-noise ratio than the Hermitian product and phase-matching methods and fewer unwrapping errors at low signal-to-noise ratio. Separate channel combination also allows unreliable voxels to be identified via the standard deviation over channels, which is found to be the most effective means of denoising field maps. Tests were performed using multichannel coils with between 8 and 32 channels at 3 T, 4 T, and 7 T. For application in the correction of distortions in echo-planar images, a formulation is proposed for reducing the local gradient of field maps to eliminate signal pile-up or swapping artifacts. Field maps calculated using these techniques, implemented in a freely available MATLAB toolbox, provide the basis for an effective correction for echo-planar imaging distortions at high fields. PMID:21608027

  7. Exploration of the origin of anomalous dependence for near-threshold harmonics in {{\\rm{H}}}_{2}^{+} on the ellipticity of driving laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasiri Avanaki, K.; Telnov, Dmitry A.; Chu, Shih-I.

    2016-06-01

    The anomalous dependence of near-threshold harmonics in the {{{H}}}2+ molecular ion on the ellipticity of the driving near-infrared laser field is studied theoretically based on accurate solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in prolate spheroidal coordinates with the help of the generalized pseudospectral method. For these harmonics, the maximum radiation energy corresponds to a non-zero ellipticity of the driving field. Our analysis reveals that the origin of the phenomenon lies in the near-resonant excitation of π-symmetry molecular orbitals. The excited states responsible for the anomalous ellipticity dependence of different near-threshold harmonics are identified. The effect is confirmed at the equilibrium internuclear separation R = 2 a.u. as well as for stretched molecules at R = 3 a.u.

  8. RF-PECVD synthesis of carbon nanowalls and their field emission properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Linfan; Chen, Jiangtao; Yang, Bingjun; Sun, Dongfei; Jiao, Tifeng

    2015-12-01

    Carbon nanowalls (CNWs) were successfully fabricated on various substrates by radio frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition using gas mixtures of acetylene, argon and hydrogen without aid of any catalyst or substrate pretreatment. The influence of synthesis parameters on the field emission behaviors of CNWs was investigated in depth. The results showed that the morphology and microstructure of CNWs could be adjusted by growth parameters (temperature, pressure and gas flow rate), and CNWs with sharp edges displayed good field emission properties. Especially, the sample prepared under the pressure of 300 Pa and the temperature of 650 °C with H2 flow rate of 120 sccm exhibited the best field emission performance (the turn-on and threshold fields were 4.7 and 6.0 V/μm, respectively). In addition, the field emission characteristics of CNWs after stability test had no obvious deterioration; however, the morphology and microstructure of CNWs changed.

  9. A target field design of open multi-purpose RF coil for musculoskeletal MR imaging at 3T.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Zhang, Rui; Zhou, Diange; Wang, Xiaoying; Huang, Kefu; Zhang, Jue

    2016-10-01

    Musculoskeletal MR imaging under multi-angle situations plays an increasingly important role in assessing joint and muscle tissues system. However, there are still limitations due to the closed structures of most conventional RF coils. In this study, a time-harmonic target-field method was employed to design open multi-purpose coil (OMC) for multi-angle musculoskeletal MR imaging. The phantom imaging results suggested that the proposed OMC could achieve homogeneously distributed magnetic field and high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 239.04±0.83 in the region of interest (ROI). The maximum temperature in the heating hazard test was 16°C lower than the standard regulation, which indicated the security of the designed OMC. Furthermore, to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed OMC for musculoskeletal MR imaging, especially for multi-angle imaging, a healthy volunteer was examined for MR imaging of elbow, ankle and knee using OMC. The in vivo imaging results showed that the proposed OMC is effective for MR imaging of musculoskeletal tissues at different body parts, with satisfied B1 field homogeneity and SNR. Moreover, the open structure of the OMC could provide a large joint movement region. The proposed open multi-purpose coil is feasible for musculoskeletal MR imaging, and potentially, it is more suitable for the evaluation of musculoskeletal tissues under multi-angle conditions. PMID:27114344

  10. Consideration of the effects of intense tissue heating on the RF electromagnetic fields during MRI: simulations for MRgFUS in the hip.

    PubMed

    Xin, Sherman Xuegang; Gu, Shiyong; Carluccio, Giuseppe; Collins, Christopher M

    2015-01-01

    Due to the strong dependence of tissue electrical properties on temperature, it is important to consider the potential effects of intense tissue heating on the RF electromagnetic fields during MRI, as can occur in MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery. In principle, changes of the RF electromagnetic fields could affect both efficacy of RF pulses, and the MRI-induced RF heating (SAR) pattern. In this study, the equilibrium temperature distribution in a whole-body model with 2 mm resolution before and during intense tissue heating up to 60 °C at the target region was calculated. Temperature-dependent electric properties of tissues were assigned to the model to establish a temperature-dependent electromagnetic whole-body model in a 3T MRI system. The results showed maximum changes in conductivity, permittivity, [absolute value]B(1)(+)[absolute value] and SAR of about 25%, 6%, 2%, and 20%, respectively. Though the B1 field and SAR distributions are both temperature-dependent, the potential harm to patients due to higher SARs is expected to be minimal and the effects on the B1 field distribution should have minimal effect on images from basic MRI sequences. PMID:25503104

  11. Consideration of the effects of intense tissue heating on the RF electromagnetic fields during MRI: simulations for MRgFUS in the hip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuegang Xin, Sherman; Gu, Shiyong; Carluccio, Giuseppe; Collins, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the strong dependence of tissue electrical properties on temperature, it is important to consider the potential effects of intense tissue heating on the RF electromagnetic fields during MRI, as can occur in MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery. In principle, changes of the RF electromagnetic fields could affect both efficacy of RF pulses, and the MRI-induced RF heating (SAR) pattern. In this study, the equilibrium temperature distribution in a whole-body model with 2 mm resolution before and during intense tissue heating up to 60 °C at the target region was calculated. Temperature-dependent electric properties of tissues were assigned to the model to establish a temperature-dependent electromagnetic whole-body model in a 3T MRI system. The results showed maximum changes in conductivity, permittivity, ≤ft|\\mathbf{B}1+\\right|, and SAR of about 25%, 6%, 2%, and 20%, respectively. Though the B1 field and SAR distributions are both temperature-dependent, the potential harm to patients due to higher SARs is expected to be minimal and the effects on the B1 field distribution should have minimal effect on images from basic MRI sequences.

  12. Wake field of electron beam accelerated in a RF-gun of free electron laser ``ELSA''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salah, Wa'el; Dolique, J.-M.

    1999-07-01

    Wake field effects driven by a coasting relativistic charged particle beam have been studied for various cavity geometries. In the particular case of a cylindrical "pill-box" cavity, an analytical expression of the ( E, B)( x, t) map has been obtained as a development on the complete base cavity normal modes. We extend this method to the case of an accelerated beam, which leaves the downstream face of the cavity with a thermal velocity, and becomes relativistic in a few cm. This situation is very different from the classical wake of an ultrarelativistic beam for two reasons: (a) in the case of an ultrarelativistic beam, the field directly generated by beam particles in their wake can be neglected, and the so-called wake field is the electromagnetic linear reponse of the cavity to the exciting signal which is the beam. For a transrelativistic beam, the direct field must be taken into account and added to cavity reponse, which is no longer linear, except for low-intensity beam; (b) causality prevents any beam's field influence at a distance from the emissive cathode greater than ct.

  13. A toy model of fractal glioma development under RF electric field treatment.

    PubMed

    Iomin, A

    2012-06-01

    A toy model for glioma treatment by a radio frequency electric field is suggested. This low-intensity, intermediate-frequency alternating electric field is known as the tumor-treating field (TTF). In the framework of this model the efficiency of this TTF is estimated, and the interplay between the TTF and the migration-proliferation dichotomy of cancer cells is considered. The model is based on a modification of a comb model for cancer cells, where the migration-proliferation dichotomy becomes naturally apparent. Considering glioma cancer as a fractal dielectric composite of cancer cells and normal tissue cells, a new effective mechanism of glioma treatment is suggested in the form of a giant enhancement of the TTF. This leads to the irreversible electroporation that may be an effective non-invasive method of treating brain cancer. PMID:22661268

  14. Characterization of personal RF electromagnetic field exposure and actual absorption for the general public.

    PubMed

    Joseph, W; Vermeeren, G; Verloock, L; Heredia, Mauricio Masache; Martens, Luc

    2008-09-01

    In this paper, personal electromagnetic field exposure of the general public due to 12 different radiofrequency sources is characterized. Twenty-eight different realistic exposure scenarios based upon time, environment, activity, and location have been defined and a relevant number of measurements were performed with a personal exposure meter. Indoor exposure in office environments can be higher than outdoor exposure: 95th percentiles of field values due to WiFi ranged from 0.36 to 0.58 V m(-1), and for DECT values of 0.33 V m(-1) were measured. The downlink signals of GSM and DCS caused the highest outdoor exposures up to 0.52 V m(-1). The highest total field exposure occurred for mobile scenarios (inside a train or bus) from uplink signals of GSM and DCS (e.g., mobile phones) due to changing environmental conditions, handovers, and higher required transmitted signals from mobile phones due to penetration through windows while moving. A method to relate the exposure to the actual whole-body absorption in the human body is proposed. An application is shown where the actual absorption in a human body model due to a GSM downlink signal is determined. Fiftieth, 95th, and 99 th percentiles of the whole-body specific absorption rate (SAR) due to this GSM signal of 0.58 microW kg(-1), 2.08 microW kg(-1), and 5.01 microW kg(-1) are obtained for a 95th percentile of 0.26 V m(-1). A practical usable function is proposed for the relation between the whole-body SAR and the electric fields. The methodology of this paper enables epidemiological studies to make an analysis in combination with both electric field and actual whole-body SAR values and to compare exposure with basic restrictions. PMID:18695413

  15. A Theory for the Comparative RF Surface Fields at Destructive Breakdown for Various Metels

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Perry; /SLAC

    2006-03-20

    By destructive breakdown we mean a breakdown event that results in surface melting over large areas on the iris tip region of an accelerator structure. The melting is the result of the formation of macroscopic areas of plasma in contact with the surface. The plasma bombards the surface with an intense ion current ({approx}10{sup 8} A/cm{sup 2}), which is equivalent to a pressure on the order of a thousand Atmospheres. A radial gradient in the pressure produces a ponderomotive force that causes molten copper to migrate away from the iris tip, resulting in a measurable change in the iris shape. This distortion in the iris shape in turn produces an error in the cell-to-cell phase shift of the accelerating wave with a consequent loss in synchronism with the electron beam and a reduction in the effective accelerating gradient. Assuming a long lifetime is desired for the structure, such breakdowns must be avoided or at least limited in number. The accelerating gradient at which these breakdowns begin to occur imposes, therefore, an absolute limit on an operationally attainable gradient. The destructive breakdown limit (DBL) on the accelerating gradient depends on a number of factors, such as the geometry of the irises and coupler, the accuracy of the cell-to-cell tuning (''field flatness''), and the properties of the metal used in the high E-field regions of the structure. In this note we consider only the question of the dependence of the DBL on the metal used in the high surface field areas of the structure. There are also various types of non-destructive breakdowns (NDB's) that occur during the ''processing'' period that, after the initial application of high power, is necessary to bring the gradient up to the desired operating level. During this period, as the input power and gradient are gradually increased, thousands of such NDB's occur. These breakdowns produce a collapse in the fields in the structure as energy stored in the fields is absorbed at the breakdown

  16. Photo-Induced Anomalous Deformation of Poly(N-Isopropylacrylamide) Gel Hybridized with an Inorganic Nanosheet Liquid Crystal Aligned by Electric Field.

    PubMed

    Inadomi, Takumi; Ikeda, Shogo; Okumura, Yasushi; Kikuchi, Hirotsugu; Miyamoto, Nobuyoshi

    2014-09-16

    Poly-(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPA) hydrogel films doped with uniaxially aligned liquid crystalline (LC) nanosheets adsorbed with a dye are synthesized and its anomalous photothermal deformation is demonstrated. The alignment of the nanosheet LC at the cm-scale is easily achieved by the application of an in-plane or out-of-plane AC electric field during photo-polymerization. A photoresponsive pattern is printable onto the gel with μm-scale resolution by adsorption of the dye through a pattern-holed silicone rubber. When the gel is irradiated with light, only the colored part is photothermally deformed. Interestingly, the photo-irradiated gel shows temporal expansion along one direction followed by anisotropic shrinkage, which is an anomalous behavior for a conventional PNIPA gel. PMID:25228493

  17. Microparticles in a Collisional Rf Plasma Sheath under Hypergravity Conditions as Probes for the Electric Field Strength and the Particle Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Beckers, J.; Stoffels, W. W.; Dijk, J. van; Kroesen, G. M. W.; Ockenga, T.; Wolter, M.; Kersten, H.

    2011-03-18

    We used microparticles under hypergravity conditions, induced by a centrifuge, in order to measure nonintrusively and spatially resolved the electric field strength as well as the particle charge in the collisional rf plasma sheath. The measured electric field strengths demonstrate good agreement with the literature, while the particle charge shows decreasing values towards the electrode. We demonstrate that it is indeed possible to measure these important quantities without changing or disturbing the plasma.

  18. Kinetic theory of spin-polarized systems in electric and magnetic fields with spin-orbit coupling. I. Kinetic equation and anomalous Hall and spin-Hall effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morawetz, K.

    2015-12-01

    The coupled kinetic equation for density and spin Wigner functions is derived including spin-orbit coupling, electric and magnetic fields, and self-consistent Hartree mean fields suited for SU(2) transport. The interactions are assumed to be with scalar and magnetic impurities as well as scalar and spin-flip potentials among the particles. The spin-orbit interaction is used in a form suitable for solid state physics with Rashba or Dresselhaus coupling, graphene, extrinsic spin-orbit coupling, and effective nuclear matter coupling. The deficiencies of the two-fluid model are worked out consisting of the appearance of an effective in-medium spin precession. The stationary solution of all these systems shows a band splitting controlled by an effective medium-dependent Zeeman field. The self-consistent precession direction is discussed and a cancellation of linear spin-orbit coupling at zero temperature is reported. The precession of spin around this effective direction caused by spin-orbit coupling leads to anomalous charge and spin currents in an electric field. Anomalous Hall conductivity is shown to consist of the known results obtained from the Kubo formula or Berry phases and a symmetric part interpreted as an inverse Hall effect. Analogously the spin-Hall and inverse spin-Hall effects of spin currents are discussed which are present even without magnetic fields showing a spin accumulation triggered by currents. The analytical dynamical expressions for zero temperature are derived and discussed in dependence on the magnetic field and effective magnetizations. The anomalous Hall and spin-Hall effect changes sign at higher than a critical frequency dependent on the relaxation time.

  19. Radio Frequency (RF) Trap for Confinement of Antimatter Plasmas Using Rotating Wall Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, William Herbert, III; Pearson, J. Boise

    2004-01-01

    Perturbations associated with a rotating wall electric field enable the confinement of ions for periods approaching weeks. This steady state confinement is a result of a radio frequency manipulation of the ions. Using state-of-the-art techniques it is shown that radio frequency energy can produce useable manipulation of the ion cloud (matter or antimatter) for use in containment experiments. The current research focuses on the improvement of confinement systems capable of containing and transporting antimatter.

  20. Increase of Efficiency of Gyrotron by Optimizing Conditions of RF-field Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Kuklin, V. M.; Lapshin, V. I.; Puzyrkov, S. Yu

    2006-01-15

    Dependence of efficiency and output power on parameter which is equal to ratio of total emission power to accumulated energy is considered in simplified model of gyrotron. It is shown that this parameter changes with changing of emission conditions at the generator output, which leads to the change of field distribution inside of gyrotron as well. Behavior of efficiency and output power is introduced in the vicinity of their maximal values.

  1. INTERCOMPARISON OF PERFORMANCE OF RF COIL GEOMETRIES FOR HIGH FIELD MOUSE CARDIAC MRI

    PubMed Central

    Constantinides, Christakis; Angeli, S.; Gkagkarellis, S.; Cofer, G.

    2012-01-01

    Multi-turn spiral surface coils are constructed in flat and cylindrical arrangements and used for high field (7.1 T) mouse cardiac MRI. Their electrical and imaging performances, based on experimental measurements, simulations, and MRI experiments in free space, and under phantom, and animal loading conditions, are compared with a commercially available birdcage coil. Results show that the four-turn cylindrical spiral coil exhibits improved relative SNR (rSNR) performance to the flat coil counterpart, and compares fairly well with a commercially available birdcage coil. Phantom experiments indicate a 50% improvement in the SNR for penetration depths ≤ 6.1 mm from the coil surface compared to the birdcage coil, and an increased penetration depth at the half-maximum field response of 8 mm in the 4-spiral cylindrical coil case, in contrast to 2.9 mm in the flat 4-turn spiral case. Quantitative comparison of the performance of the two spiral coil geometries in anterior, lateral, inferior, and septal regions of the murine heart yield maximum mean percentage rSNR increases of the order of 27–167% in vivo post-mortem (cylindrical compared to flat coil). The commercially available birdcage outperforms the cylindrical spiral coil in rSNR by a factor of 3–5 times. The comprehensive approach and methodology adopted to accurately design, simulate, implement, and test radiofrequency coils of any geometry and type, under any loading conditions, can be generalized for any application of high field mouse cardiac MRI. PMID:23204945

  2. RF potentials analysis using TOPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanesio, Daniele; Sorba, Marco; Maggiora, Riccardo

    2008-11-01

    Radio-frequency (RF) heating is fully dependent on edge plasma conditions and particularly on the acceleration of charged particles which can damage the antennas and surroundings. Rectified RF field induces drifts on ions that can hit the first wall, causing hot spots, sputtering, impurities, fuel dilution and, eventually, disruption. These phenomena mainly depend on the antenna geometry and materials, on the plasma density profile at the edge and on the connection patterns. The heat flux attributed to accelerated ions is somehow proportional to the RF potential in front of the antenna. Because of this, the understanding of the RF potential generation in front of the antenna is crucial for every high RF power systems, in order to predict the deleterious particle flux and therefore mitigate its effect by means of a proper design. The TOPICA code, an innovative tool realized for the analysis and design of ICRH and LH antennas, has been upgraded to evaluate the RF potential in front of the antenna. The solution of the Maxwell's equations in plasma combined with the RF field map at the plasma edge (standard outputs of TOPICA calculation) allow for the computation of the RF fields also in the plasma region. A new TOPICA module has been developed to account for a rigorous procedure to obtain the RF potentials and RF potential mitigation techniques through antenna geometrical modifications have been studied and will be presented.

  3. Overcoming high-field RF problems with non-magnetic Cartesian feedback transceivers.

    PubMed

    Hoult, D I; Foreman, D; Kolansky, G; Kripiakevich, D

    2008-03-01

    In extending human MR to field strengths approaching 10 T, the wavelength of electromagnetic radiation at the proton Larmor frequency becomes less than human body size and conventional radio-frequency coil circumference. Consequently, radio-frequency magnetic fields are better generated by an array of small coils than by one large coil. In this article, the primary problem of array coil interactions during transmission is examined, and a standard proposed whereby secondary induced currents should be less than 1% of the primary coil current. The use of cancellation methods and of power amplifiers with high output impedance to reduce interactions is examined in the light of this standard and found wanting. Non-magnetic Cartesian feedback transceivers functioning at the magnet entrance are then proposed as a solution that both reduces instrumentation cost and increases the bandwidth over which the standard may be met. The compromises inherent in instrument design are detailed and examples given of the innovative circuitry used. It is shown experimentally that when connected to interacting coils, two Cartesian feedback instruments function stably in accord with theory and such that the proposed standard is typically attained over a bandwidth of 22 kHz during transmission (much greater during signal reception)-enough for all current MR protocols. PMID:18026763

  4. Wireless hippocampal neural recording via a multiple input RF receiver to construct place-specific firing fields.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Bae; Manns, Joseph R; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports scientifically meaningful in vivo experiments using a 32-channel wireless neural recording system (WINeR). The WINeR system is divided into transmitter (Tx) and receiver (Rx) parts. On the Tx side, we had WINeR-6, a system-on-a-chip (SoC) that operated based on time division multiplexing (TDM) of pulse width modulated (PWM) samples. The chip was fabricated in a 0.5-µm CMOS process, occupying 4.9 × 3.3 mm(2) and consuming 15 mW from ±1.5V supplies. The Rx used two antennas with separate pathways to down-convert the RF signal from a large area. A time-to-digital converter (TDC) in an FPGA converted the PWM pulses into digitized samples. In order to further increase the wireless coverage area and eliminate blind spots within a large experimental arena, two receivers were synchronized. The WINeR system was used to record epileptic activities from a rat that was injected with tetanus toxin (TT) in the dorsal hippocampus. In a different in vivo experiment, place-specific firing fields of place cells, which are parts of the hippocampal-dependent memory, were mapped from a series of behavioral experiments from a rat running in a circular track. Results from the same animal were compared against a commercial hard-wired recording system to evaluate the quality of the wireless recordings. PMID:23366004

  5. Anomalous Arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    In this composite image of spiral galaxy M106 (NGC 4258), optical data from the Digitized Sky Survey is shown as yellow, radio data from the Very Large Array appears as purple, X-ray data from Chandra is coded blue, and infrared data from the Spitzer Space Telescope appears red. Two anomalous arms, which aren't visible at optical wavelengths, appear as purple and blue emission.

  6. Mini-RF PSR Observations: Water Ice or Rocks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fa, W.; Cai, Y.

    2016-05-01

    The enhanced CPRs in the interior of anomalous craters in Mini-RF images are most probably caused by meter-scale rocks, suggesting that ice deposits, if present, are not the only physical agent causing the enhanced CPR.

  7. Research on heating, instabilities, turbulence and RF emission from electric field dominated plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, J. R.; Alexeff, Igor

    1989-07-01

    This contract has supported four research programs: (1) a program of research on plasma turbulence; (2) a program of research on plasma heating by collisional magnetic pumping; (3) a research program on the Orbitron submillimeter maser; and (4) the initial phase of a program on plasma cloaking of military targets for protection against radar and directed microwave energy weapons. Progress in these areas is documented in the text of this final report and in the twenty archival publications included in the appendices to this report. In addition to the above four research areas, work was continued on plasma diagnostic development, and the development of new state-of-the-art data analysis and reduction methods, including software development for online reduction of Langmuir probe, capacitive probe, and other diagnostic information. Also being developed is the capability to analyze electrostatic potential fluctuations by the methods of nonlinear dynamics. An important part of the research program was the training of graduate and undergraduate research assistants in state-of-the-art methods in the fields of high temperature plasma physics, plasma diagnostics, communications, and related areas.

  8. RF Sheath Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2007-11-01

    RF sheath formation on the antennas and walls in ICRF-heated experiments can reduce the heating efficiency, limit the coupled power, and cause damage to plasma-facing structures. The sheaths are driven by a slow wave component of the rf field due to a mismatch between the magnetic field and the boundary (antenna or wall). Quantitative modeling of the highly nonlinear sheaths may now be feasible for the first time in massively-parallel-processing (MPP) codes developed in the RF SciDAC project. Recently, a new approach to sheath modeling was proposed,ootnotetextD.A. D'Ippolito and J.R. Myra, Phys. Plasmas 13, 102508 (2006). in which the sheath physics is incorporated into the RF wave computation by using a modified boundary condition (BC) on the RF fields in both wave propagation and antenna codes. Here, we illustrate the use of the sheath BC for near-field sheaths by a model calculation that includes electromagnetic effects and a simple antenna coupling model. Properties of the model (such as the role of sheath-plasma waves) and implications for antenna codes such as TOPICAootnotetextV. Lancellotti et al., Nucl. Fusion 46, S476 (2006). will be discussed.

  9. AC/RF Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2015-02-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  10. Anomalous field-induced magnetoresistance behavior in Pr0.5Sr0.5MnO3 at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dhirendra; Shahee, Aga; Rawat, Rajeev; Lalla, N. P.

    2012-06-01

    Low-temperature (LT) XRD and magnetoresistance (MR) have been studied in the single phase polycrystalline Pr0.5Sr0.5MnO3 with space-group I4/mcm. The resistance-vs-temperature (R-T) variation at zero-field show a broad paramagnetic to ferromagnetic metallic (FMM) transition at Tc ˜ 240K and it further undergoes FMM to antiferromagnetic insulating (AFMI) transition at TN ˜ 90K with a broad hysteresis indicates a disorder broadened first order phase transition (FOPT). The zero-field cooled (ZFC) MR at 5K shows an open loop with virgin curve lying outside the envelope curve. This anomalous behavior vanishes with increasing temperature. This has been attributed to field-induced transformation of AFMI to FMM phase, which remains arrested down to zero magnetic field at 5K.

  11. Auxiliary coil controls temperature of RF induction heater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Auxiliary coil controls the temperature of an RF induction furnace that is powered by a relatively unstable RF generator. Manual or servoed adjustments of the relative position of the auxiliary coil, which is placed in close proximity to the RF coil, changes the looseness of the RF coil and hence the corresponding heating effect of its RF field.

  12. Dependence of beam emittance on plasma electrode temperature and rf-power, and filter-field tuning with center-gapped rod-filter magnets in J-PARC rf-driven H- ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, A.; Koizumi, I.; Ohkoshi, K.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Yamazaki, S.; Oguri, H.

    2014-02-01

    The prototype rf-driven H- ion-source with a nickel plated oxygen-free-copper (OFC) plasma chamber, which satisfies the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) 2nd stage requirements of a H- ion beam current of 60 mA within normalized emittances of 1.5 π mm mrad both horizontally and vertically, a flat top beam duty factor of 1.25% (500 μs × 25 Hz) and a life-time of more than 50 days, was reported at the 3rd international symposium on negative ions, beams, and sources (NIBS2012). The experimental results of the J-PARC ion source with a plasma chamber made of stainless-steel, instead of nickel plated OFC used in the prototype source, are presented in this paper. By comparing these two sources, the following two important results were acquired. One was that the about 20% lower emittance was produced by the rather low plasma electrode (PE) temperature (TPE) of about 120 °C compared with the typically used TPE of about 200 °C to maximize the beam current for the plasma with the abundant cesium (Cs). The other was that by using the rod-filter magnets with a gap at each center and tuning the gap-lengths, the filter-field was optimized and the rf-power necessary to produce the J-PARC required H- ion beam current was reduced typically 18%. The lower rf-power also decreases the emittances.

  13. Dependence of beam emittance on plasma electrode temperature and rf-power, and filter-field tuning with center-gapped rod-filter magnets in J-PARC rf-driven H{sup −} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, A. Koizumi, I.; Ohkoshi, K.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Yamazaki, S.; Oguri, H.

    2014-02-15

    The prototype rf-driven H{sup −} ion-source with a nickel plated oxygen-free-copper (OFC) plasma chamber, which satisfies the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) 2nd stage requirements of a H{sup −} ion beam current of 60 mA within normalized emittances of 1.5 π mm mrad both horizontally and vertically, a flat top beam duty factor of 1.25% (500 μs × 25 Hz) and a life-time of more than 50 days, was reported at the 3rd international symposium on negative ions, beams, and sources (NIBS2012). The experimental results of the J-PARC ion source with a plasma chamber made of stainless-steel, instead of nickel plated OFC used in the prototype source, are presented in this paper. By comparing these two sources, the following two important results were acquired. One was that the about 20% lower emittance was produced by the rather low plasma electrode (PE) temperature (T{sub PE}) of about 120 °C compared with the typically used T{sub PE} of about 200 °C to maximize the beam current for the plasma with the abundant cesium (Cs). The other was that by using the rod-filter magnets with a gap at each center and tuning the gap-lengths, the filter-field was optimized and the rf-power necessary to produce the J-PARC required H{sup −} ion beam current was reduced typically 18%. The lower rf-power also decreases the emittances.

  14. Theory and simulation of high-brightness electron beam production from laser-irradiated photocathodes in the presence of dc and rf electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.E.; Peter, W.

    1986-01-01

    To take advantage of properties of laser-controlled photodiodes to produce electron beams, a new set of diode design criteria are needed. An analytical and numerical study of the geometrical and temporal factors that affect the design of high-brightness electron beams is presented. This study extends our previous work on this concept to include the effects of laser pulse shape, and emittance effects in the presence of rf fields. In general, the diode will not be space-charge limited. Therefore, the conventional Pierce electrode shapes are not appropriate. Furthermore, the finite temporal profile of the electron beams introduces a time-dependent space charge into the design problem. The approach taken here to minimize the emittance growth from the temporal profile of the space charge is to operate at low perveance. To obtain high currents, large electric fields are required. We exploit the fact that the electron emission is controlled by the laser and is independent of the voltage on the diode. The diode can then be driven by an rf field. In principle, operating at higher frequency allows higher breakdown limits, so the perveance can be made very small. However, operating at too high an rf frequency introduces other detrimental effects.

  15. Spatial and temporal RF electromagnetic field exposure of children and adults in indoor micro environments in Belgium and Greece.

    PubMed

    Vermeeren, Günter; Markakis, Ioannis; Goeminne, Francis; Samaras, Theodoros; Martens, Luc; Joseph, Wout

    2013-11-01

    Personal radio frequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) exposure, or exposimetry, is gaining importance in the bioelectromagnetics community but only limited data on personal exposure is available in indoor areas, namely schools, crèches, homes, and offices. Most studies are focused on adult exposure, whereas indoor microenvironments, where children are exposed, are usually not considered. A method to assess spatial and temporal indoor exposure of children and adults is proposed without involving the subjects themselves. Moreover, maximal possible daily exposure is estimated by combining instantaneous spatial and temporal exposure. In Belgium and Greece, the exposure is measured at 153 positions spread over 55 indoor microenvironments with spectral equipment. In addition, personal exposimeters (measuring EMFs of people during their daily activities) captured the temporal exposure variations during several days up to one week at 98 positions. The data were analyzed using the robust regression on order statistics (ROS) method to account for data below the detection limit. All instantaneous and maximal exposures satisfied international exposure limits and were of the same order of magnitude in Greece and Belgium. Mobile telecommunications and radio broadcasting (FM) were most present. In Belgium, digital cordless phone (DECT) exposure was present for at least 75% in the indoor microenvironments except for schools. Temporal variations of the exposure were mainly due to variations of mobile telecommunication signals. The exposure was higher during daytime than at night due to the increased voice and data traffic on the networks. Total exposure varied the most in Belgian crèches (39.3%) and Greek homes (58.2%). PMID:23872299

  16. Micro-emitter heating by rf current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, V.; Petrov, V. M.

    2016-05-01

    One factor limiting the accelerating gradients in radiofrequency (rf) cavities are field emission currents emitted by micro-emitters. The value of emitter heating power plays a key role in theories of an rf cavity processing allowing to enhance the accelerating gradient. In this paper, the emitter heating by rf current is studied. This heating mechanism associates with a large heating power (by several orders of magnitude higher than the power of field emission current) and demonstrates explicit dependence on the frequency of the electromagnetic rf field (scales with the square of the rf field frequency).

  17. Electron's anomalous magnetic-moment effects on electron-hydrogen elastic collisions in the presence of a circularly polarized laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Elhandi, S.; Taj, S.; Attaourti, Y.; Manaut, B.; Oufni, L.

    2010-04-15

    The effect of the electron's anomalous magnetic moment on the relativistic electronic dressing for the process of electron-hydrogen atom elastic collisions is investigated. We consider a laser field with circular polarization and various electric field strengths. The Dirac-Volkov states taking into account this anomaly are used to describe the process in the first order of perturbation theory. The correlation between the terms coming from this anomaly and the electric field strength gives rise to the strong dependence of the spinor part of the differential cross section (DCS) with respect to these terms. A detailed study has been devoted to the nonrelativistic regime as well as the moderate relativistic regime. Some aspects of this dependence as well as the dynamical behavior of the DCS in the relativistic regime have been addressed.

  18. RF plugging of mirror plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kotelnikov, I.A.; Kuzmin, S.G.

    1996-12-01

    Discovery of superconducting materials that operate at high temperatures revives interest in the use of rf field for plasma confinement. This paper discusses feasibility of a scheme where resonant rf cavities are attached to the mirror ends of an open system for plasma confinement. 9 refs., 9 figs.

  19. Multi-harmonic RF test stand for RF breakdown studies

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Y.; Shchelkunov, S.; Yakovlev, V. P.; Solyak, N.; Kuzikov, S. V.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    2012-12-21

    A multi-harmonic RF test stand is under construction at Yale Beam Physics Laboratory. It includes a frequency multiplier which can generate high power harmonics efficiently that are phase locked to the fundamental drive frequency. In a bi-modal asymmetric cavity powered by this RF source, the cavity may experience reduced exposure time to peak fields and sweeping of peak fields across their surfaces, and strong asymmetry between surfaces that may experience cathode-and anode-like fields; these phenomena are to be assessed for their influence on RF breakdown probabilities.

  20. Effects of Hot Carriers on DC and RF Performances of Deep Submicron p-Channel Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors with Various Oxide Layer Thicknesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Mao-Chyuan; Fang, Yean-Kuen; Liao, Wen-Shiang; Chen, David C.; Yeh, Chune-Sin; Chien, Shan-Chieh

    2008-04-01

    In this work, the effects of hot carriers on the DC and RF performances of 45 nm p-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (PMOSFETs) with various oxide layer thicknesses were investigated in detail by RF automatic measurements. It was found that a PMOSFET with a thinner oxide layer suffers more serious damage from hot carriers than that with a thicker oxide layer. Also, the greatest degradation occurs at the bias condition when gate stress voltage Vgstr is equal to drain stress voltage Vdstr, and it was found that the degradation of the cutoff frequency fT is dependent on transconductance gm only. This is different from conventional long-channel devices, in which the greatest degradation takes place at Vgstr = Vdstr/2 and when fT is dependent on both gm and the total gate capacitance Cgg (=Cgs+Cgd).

  1. Non-uniformity correction of human brain imaging at high field by RF field mapping of B1+ and B1-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hidehiro; Takaya, Nobuhiro; Mitsumori, Fumiyuki

    2011-10-01

    A new method of non-uniform image correction is proposed. Image non-uniformity is originated from the spatial distribution of RF transmission and reception fields, represented as B1+ and B1-, respectively. In our method, B1+ mapping was performed invivo by a phase method. In B1- mapping, images with multiple TEs were acquired with a multi-echo adiabatic spin echo (MASE) sequence which enables homogeneous excitation. By T2 fitting of these images an M0 map ( M0MASE) was obtained, in which signal intensity was expressed as the product of B1- and M0(1-e). The ratio of this M0MASE map to the B1+ map showed a similar spatial pattern in different human brains. These ratios of M0MASE to B1+ in 24 subjects were averaged and then fitted with a spatially polynomial function to obtain a ratio map of B1-/B1+(α). Uniform image was achieved in spin echo (SE), MASE and inversion recovery turboFLASH (IRTF) images using measured B1+ and calculated B1- by αB1+. Water fractions in gray and white matters obtained from the M0 images corrected by this method were in good agreement with previously reported values. From these experimental results, the proposed method of non-uniformity correction is validated at 4.7 T imaging.

  2. Nd2Sn2O7 : An all-in-all-out pyrochlore magnet with no divergence-free field and anomalously slow paramagnetic spin dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertin, A.; Dalmas de Réotier, P.; Fâk, B.; Marin, C.; Yaouanc, A.; Forget, A.; Sheptyakov, D.; Frick, B.; Ritter, C.; Amato, A.; Baines, C.; King, P. J. C.

    2015-10-01

    We report measurements performed on a polycrystalline sample of the pyrochlore compound Nd2Sn2O7 . It undergoes a second order magnetic phase transition at Tc≈0.91 K to a noncoplanar all-in-all-out magnetic structure of the Nd3 + magnetic moments. The thermal behavior of the low temperature specific heat fingerprints excitations with linear dispersion in a three-dimensional lattice. The temperature independent spin-lattice relaxation rate measured below Tc and the anomalously slow paramagnetic spin dynamics detected up to ≈30 Tc are suggested to be due to magnetic short-range correlations in unidimensional spin clusters, i.e., spin loops. The observation of a spontaneous field in muon spin relaxation measurements is associated with the absence of a divergence-free field for the ground state of an all-in-all-out pyrochlore magnet as predicted recently.

  3. DC characteristics and analog/RF performance of novel polarity control GaAs-Ge based tunnel field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigam, Kaushal; Kondekar, Pravin; Sharma, Dheeraj

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, for the first time, DC characteristics and analog/RF performance of polarity control GaAs-Ge hetero TFET (GaAs-Ge H-TFET) structure have been analysed, using electrically doped dynamically configurable concept. For this, we have considered a hetero structure with two distinctive gates (Control gate and Polarity gate). Polarity gate induces p+ region at the source side and n+ region at the drain side, instead of relying on the abrupt doping profile at the junctions. Therefore, the fabrication process of the proposed device avoids ion-implantation, photo masking and complicated thermal budget. Hence, it shows high immunity against process variations, doping control issues and random dopant fluctuations (RDF). In order to optimize the device performance, interfacing of III-V groups materials with IV group semiconductor is done for hetero-junction. The introduction of hetero-junction and band gap engineering offer higher ION/IOFF ratio (5.1 × 1012), steep sub-threshold slope (18 mV/decade) and significantly change in analog/RF performance. The analog/RF figures of merit are analysed in term of transconductance (gm), output conductance (gds), gate to source capacitance (Cgs), gate to drain capacitance (Cgd), cutoff frequency (fT) and gain bandwidth (GBW) product. The proposed work would be beneficial for low power high frequency applications. The simulation results presented in this paper were carried out by using 2-D ATLAS.

  4. A Conceptual Model to Link Anomalously High Temperature Gradients in the Cerros del Rio Volcanic Field to Regional Flow in the Espanola Basin, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillingham, E. J.; Keller, S. N.; McCullough, K. R.; Watters, J.; Weitering, B.; Wilce, A. M.; Folsom, M.; Kelley, S.; Pellerin, L.

    2015-12-01

    Temperature-depth well data along with electromagnetic (EM) data were collected by students of the Summer of Applied Geophysics Experience (SAGE) 2015 field season in the Espanola Basin, New Mexico. The data from this year, in addition to data acquired since 2013, were used to construct a conceptual east-west cross-section of the Espanola Basin and the adjacent highlands in order to evaluate the regional flow system. Vertical geothermal gradients from several monitoring wells were measured using a thermistor. Anomalously warm geothermal gradients were mapped in the Cerros del Rio volcanic field in the basin just east of the Rio Grande. Temperature gradients are up to 70℃/km, while the background geothermal gradients in the Rio Grande rift zone generally show 28℃-35℃/km. This anomaly extends to the Buckman well field, which supplies water to the city of Santa Fe. Overpumping of this well field has led to subsidence in the past. However, discharge temperature plots indicate that the temperature gradients of the Buckman field may be rebounding as pumping is reduced. Audiomagnetotelluric (AMT) and transient electromagnetic (TEM) data were acquired in the vicinity of three monitoring wells. TEM and AMT methods complement each other with the former having depths of investigation of less than ten to hundreds of meters and AMT having depths of investigation comparable to the wells deeper than 500m. These datasets were used collectively to image the subsurface stratigraphy and, more specifically, the hydrogeology related to shallow aquifers. The EM data collected at these wells showed a trend indicating a shallow aquifer with a shallower resistive layer of approximately 100 ohm-m at 70-100 meters depth. Beneath this resistive layer we resolved a more conductive, clay-rich layer of 10 ohm-m. These resistivity profiles compliment the electrical logs provided by Jet West, which indicate shallower sandstone interbedded with silt on top of more silt-dominant layers. Our

  5. Anomalous diffusion in the evolution of soccer championship scores: Real data, mean-field analysis, and an agent-based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Roberto; Vainstein, Mendeli H.; Gonçalves, Sebastián; Paula, Felipe S. F.

    2013-08-01

    Statistics of soccer tournament scores based on the double round robin system of several countries are studied. Exploring the dynamics of team scoring during tournament seasons from recent years we find evidences of superdiffusion. A mean-field analysis results in a drift velocity equal to that of real data but in a different diffusion coefficient. Along with the analysis of real data we present the results of simulations of soccer tournaments obtained by an agent-based model which successfully describes the final scoring distribution [da Silva , Comput. Phys. Commun.CPHCBZ0010-465510.1016/j.cpc.2012.10.030 184, 661 (2013)]. Such model yields random walks of scores over time with the same anomalous diffusion as observed in real data.

  6. RF transformer

    DOEpatents

    Smith, James L.; Helenberg, Harold W.; Kilsdonk, Dennis J.

    1979-01-01

    There is provided an improved RF transformer having a single-turn secondary of cylindrical shape and a coiled encapsulated primary contained within the secondary. The coil is tapered so that the narrowest separation between the primary and the secondary is at one end of the coil. The encapsulated primary is removable from the secondary so that a variety of different capacity primaries can be utilized with one secondary.

  7. Photovoltaic properties of ferroelectric BaTiO3 thin films RF sputter deposited on silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dharmadhikari, V. S.; Grannemann, W. W.

    1982-01-01

    Ferroelectric thin films of BaTiO3 have been successfully deposited on n-type silicon substrates at temperatures above 500 C by RF sputtering in an O2/Ar atmosphere. Analysis by X-ray diffraction patterns show that films deposited at room temperature are amorphous. At temperatures above 500 C, crystalline BaTiO3 films with a tetragonal structure are obtained. The polarization-electric field (P-E) hysteresis loops and a broad peak in the dielectric constant versus temperature curve at Curie point indicate that the RF sputtered BaTiO3 films are ferroelectric. An anomalous photovoltaic effect is observed in these thin films which is related to the remanent polarization of the material. The results on open-circuit and short-circuit measurements provide an important basis for a better understanding of the role of photovoltaic field, photovoltaic current, and the pyroelectric properties in photoferroelectric domain switching.

  8. Investigation of the B1 field distribution and RF power deposition in a birdcage coil as functions of the number of coil legs at 4.7 T, 7.0 T, and 11.7 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jeung-Hoon; Han, Sang-Doc; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2015-06-01

    The proper design of birdcage (BC) coils plays a very important role in the acquisition of highresolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of small animals such as rodents. In this context, we investigate multiple-leg (8-, 16-, 32-, 64-, and 128-leg) BC coils operating at ultra-high fields (UHF) of 7.0 T and 11.7 T and a high-field (HF) of 4.7 T for rodent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Primarily, Our study comparatively examines the parameters of the radiofrequency (RF) transmission (|B1 +|)-field, the magnetic flux (|B1|)-field, and RF power deposition (RF-PD) as functions of the number of BC-coil legs via finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations under realistic loading conditions with a biological phantom. In particular, the specific ratio |E/B1 +| is defined for predicting RF-PD values in different coil structures. Our results indicate that the optimal number of legs of the BC coil can be chosen for different resonance frequencies of 200 MHz, 300 MHz, and 500 MHz and that this choice can be lead to superior |B1 +|-field intensity and |B1|-field homogeneity and decreased RF-PD. We believe that our approach to determining the optimal number of legs for a BC coil can contribute to rodent MR imaging.

  9. High-field actively detuneable transverse electromagnetic (TEM) coil with low-bias voltage for high-power RF transmission.

    PubMed

    Avdievich, Nikolai I; Bradshaw, Ken; Kuznetsov, Andrey M; Hetherington, Hoby P

    2007-06-01

    The design and construction of a 4T (170 MHz) transverse electromagnetic (TEM) actively detuneable quadrature head coil is described. Conventional schemes for active detuning require high negative bias voltages (>300 V) to prevent leakage of RF pulses with amplitudes of 1-2 kW. To extend the power handling capacity and avoid the use of high DC bias voltages, we developed an alternate method of detuning the volume coil. In this method the PIN diodes in the detuning circuits are shorted when the RF volume coil is tuned, and negatively biased with -12 V when the coil is detuned. To preserve the high Q(U)/Q(L) ratio of the TEM coil, we modified the method of Nabetani and Watkins (Proceedings of the 13th Annual Meeting of ISMRM, Kyoto, Japan, 2004, abstract 1574) by utilizing a high-impedance (approximately 200 Omega), lumped-element, quarter-wavelength transformer. A Q(U) of 500 was achieved for the detuneable TEM, such that incorporation of the detuning network had minimal effect (<1 dB) on the performance of the coil in vivo. PMID:17534919

  10. Lossless anomalous dispersion and an inversionless gain doublet via dressed interacting ground states

    SciTech Connect

    Weatherall, James Owen; Search, Christopher P.

    2010-02-15

    Transparent media exhibiting anomalous dispersion have been of considerable interest since Wang, Kuzmich, and Dogariu [Nature 406, 277 (2000)] first observed light propagate with superluminal and negative group velocities without absorption. Here, we propose an atomic model exhibiting these properties, based on a generalization of amplification without inversion in a five-level dressed interacting ground-state system. The system consists of a {Lambda} atom prepared as in standard electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), with two additional metastable ground states coupled to the {Lambda} atom ground states by two rf-microwave fields. We consider two configurations by which population is incoherently pumped into the ground states of the atom. Under appropriate circumstances, we predict a pair of new gain lines with tunable width, separation, and height. Between these lines, absorption vanishes but dispersion is large and anomalous. The system described here is a significant improvement over other proposals in the anomalous dispersion literature in that it permits additional coherent control over the spectral properties of the anomalous region, including a possible 10{sup 4}-fold increase over the group delay observed by Wang, Kuzmich, and Dogariu.