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Sample records for anomalous skin effect

  1. Anomalous Skin Effect for Anisotropic Electron Velocity Distribution Function

    SciTech Connect

    Igor Kaganovich; Edward Startsev; Gennady Shvets

    2004-02-19

    The anomalous skin effect in a plasma with a highly anisotropic electron velocity distribution function (EVDF) is very different from skin effect in a plasma with the isotropic EVDF. An analytical solution was derived for the electric field penetrated into plasma with the EVDF described as a Maxwellian with two temperatures Tx >> Tz, where x is the direction along the plasma boundary and z is the direction perpendicular to the plasma boundary. The skin layer was found to consist of two distinctive regions of width of order nTx/w and nTz/w, where nTx,z/w = (Tx,z/m)1/2 is the thermal electron velocity and w is the incident wave frequency.

  2. Anomalous skin effects in a weakly magnetized degenerate electron plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, G.; Sarfraz, M.; Shah, H. A.

    2014-09-01

    Fully relativistic analysis of anomalous skin effects for parallel propagating waves in a weakly magnetized degenerate electron plasma is presented and a graphical comparison is made with the results obtained using relativistic Maxwellian distribution function [G. Abbas, M. F. Bashir, and G. Murtaza, Phys. Plasmas 18, 102115 (2011)]. It is found that the penetration depth for R- and L-waves for degenerate case is qualitatively small in comparison with the Maxwellian plasma case. The quantitative reduction due to weak magnetic field in the skin depth in R-wave for degenerate plasma is large as compared to the non-degenerate one. By ignoring the ambient magnetic field, previous results for degenerate field free case are salvaged [A. F. Alexandrov, A. S. Bogdankevich, and A. A. Rukhadze, Principles of Plasma Electrodynamics (Springer-Verlag, Berlin/Heidelberg, 1984), p. 90].

  3. Anomalous skin effects in a weakly magnetized degenerate electron plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Abbas, G. Sarfraz, M.; Shah, H. A.

    2014-09-15

    Fully relativistic analysis of anomalous skin effects for parallel propagating waves in a weakly magnetized degenerate electron plasma is presented and a graphical comparison is made with the results obtained using relativistic Maxwellian distribution function [G. Abbas, M. F. Bashir, and G. Murtaza, Phys. Plasmas 18, 102115 (2011)]. It is found that the penetration depth for R- and L-waves for degenerate case is qualitatively small in comparison with the Maxwellian plasma case. The quantitative reduction due to weak magnetic field in the skin depth in R-wave for degenerate plasma is large as compared to the non-degenerate one. By ignoring the ambient magnetic field, previous results for degenerate field free case are salvaged [A. F. Alexandrov, A. S. Bogdankevich, and A. A. Rukhadze, Principles of Plasma Electrodynamics (Springer-Verlag, Berlin/Heidelberg, 1984), p. 90].

  4. Surface impedance in the anomalous skin effect regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzanowski, Janusz; Kirkiewicz, Józef

    2008-12-01

    An analytical solution of the surface impedance is obtained using the kinetic equation with the collision integral that takes into account the Fermi liquid effects. It is assumed that the reflection of electrons is purely diffusive. Particular attention is paid to the influence of external magnetic field and polarization of the incident wave on the real and imagine part of the surface impedance.

  5. Predicting molecular scale skin-effect in electrochemical impedance due to anomalous subdiffusion mediated adsorption phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushagra, Arindam

    2016-02-01

    Anomalous subdiffusion governs the processes which are not energetically driven, on a molecular scale. This paper proposes a model to predict the response of electrochemical impedance due to such diffusion process. Previous works considered the use of fractional calculus to predict the impedance behaviour in response to the anomalous diffusion. Here, we have developed an expression which predicts the skin-effect, marked by an increase in the impedance with increasing frequency, in this regime. Negative inductances have also been predicted as a consequence of the inertial response of adsorbed species upon application of frequency-mediated perturbations. It might help the researchers in the fields of impedimetric sensors to choose the working frequency and those working in the field of batteries to choose the parameters, likewise. This work would shed some light into the molecular mechanisms governing the impedance when exposed to frequency-based perturbations like electromagnetic waves (microwaves to ionizing radiations) and in charge storage devices like batteries etc.

  6. Anomalous skin effects in relativistic parallel propagating weakly magnetized electron plasma waves

    SciTech Connect

    Abbas, Gohar; Bashir, M. F.; Murtaza, G.

    2011-10-15

    Fully relativistic analysis of anomalous skin effects for parallel propagating waves in a weakly magnetized electron plasma is presented and general expressions for longitudinal and transverse permittivites are derived. It is found that the penetration depth for R- and L-waves increases as we move from non-relativistic to highly relativistic regime. The ambient magnetic field reduces/enhances the skin effects for R-wave/L-wave as the strength of the field is increased. In general, the weak magnetic field effects are pronounced for the weakly relativistic regime as compared with other relativistic cases. The results are also graphically illustrated. On switching off the magnetic field, previous results for field free case are retrieved [A. F. Alexandrov, A. S. Bogdankevich, and A. A. Rukhadze, Priniples of Plasma Electrodynamics (Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, 1984), Vol. 9, p. 106].

  7. Optical properties of metals: Infrared emissivity in the anomalous skin effect spectral region

    SciTech Connect

    Echániz, T.

    2014-09-07

    When the penetration depth of an electromagnetic wave in a metal is similar to the mean free path of the conduction electrons, the Drude classical theory is no longer satisfied and the skin effect becomes anomalous. Physical parameters of this theory for twelve metals were calculated and analyzed. The theory predicts an emissivity peak ε{sub peak} at room temperature in the mid-infrared for smooth surface metals that moves towards larger wavelengths as temperature decreases. Furthermore, the theory states that ε{sub peak} increases with the emission angle but its position, λ{sub peak}, is constant. Copper directional emissivity measurements as well as emissivity obtained using optical constants data confirm the predictions of the theory. Considering the relationship between the specularity parameter p and the sample roughness, it is concluded that p is not the simple parameter it is usually assumed to be. Quantitative comparison between experimental data and theoretical predictions shows that the specularity parameter can be equal to one for roughness values larger than those predicted. An exhaustive analysis of the experimental optical parameters shows signs of a reflectance broad peak in Cu, Al, Au, and Mo around the wavelength predicted by the theory for p = 1.

  8. Characteristics of anomalous skin effect and evolution of power absorption regions in a cylindrical radio frequency inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Z. F.; Sun, B.; Huo, W. G.

    2015-06-15

    In a low-pressure radio-frequency (13.56 MHz), inductively coupled argon plasma generated by a normal cylindrical rf coil, electric field, current density, and absorbed power density is calculated from magnetic field measured with a phase-resolved magnetic probe. The anomalous skin effect (ASE) for the cylindrical rf coil is compared to those previously reported for the planar and re-entrant cylindrical rf coils. Physical reasons for our observed characteristics of ASE are presented. With the increasing discharge power, the size and the number of negative and positive power absorption regions evolve into several distinct patterns. For the low discharge power (at 156.9 W), there is one area of positive and one area of negative power absorption in the radial direction. For the medium discharge power (279 W–683.5 W), there are two areas of negative and two areas of positive power absorption. For the even higher discharge power (above 803.5 W), the number of areas is the same as that of the medium discharge power, but the size of the inner positive and negative power absorption areas is approximately doubled and halved, respectively, while the outer positive and negative power absorption areas slightly shrinks. The evolution of positive and negative power absorption regions is explained as a result of electron thermal diffusion and the energy conversion between rf current and electric field. The spatial decays of electric field and current density are also elucidated by linking them with the positive and negative power absorption pattern.

  9. Nonlocal Anomalous Hall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Steven S.-L.; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall (AH) effect is deemed to be a unique transport property of ferromagnetic metals, caused by the concerted action of spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also occurs in a nonmagnetic metal (Pt) in contact with a magnetic insulator [yttrium iron garnet (YIG)], even when precautions are taken to ensure that there is no induced magnetization in the metal. We propose a theory of this effect based on the combined action of spin-dependent scattering from the magnetic interface and the spin-Hall effect in the bulk of the metal. At variance with previous theories, we predict the effect to be of first order in the spin-orbit coupling, just as the conventional anomalous Hall effect—the only difference being the spatial separation of the spin-orbit interaction and the magnetization. For this reason we name this effect the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect and predict that its sign will be determined by the sign of the spin-Hall angle in the metal. The AH conductivity that we calculate from our theory is in order of magnitude agreement with the measured values in Pt /YIG structures.

  10. Anomalous Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaosa, Naoto; Sinova, Jairo; Onoda, Shigeki; MacDonald, A. H.; Ong, N. P.

    2010-04-01

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE) occurs in solids with broken time-reversal symmetry, typically in a ferromagnetic phase, as a consequence of spin-orbit coupling. Experimental and theoretical studies of the AHE are reviewed, focusing on recent developments that have provided a more complete framework for understanding this subtle phenomenon and have, in many instances, replaced controversy by clarity. Synergy between experimental and theoretical works, both playing a crucial role, has been at the heart of these advances. On the theoretical front, the adoption of the Berry-phase concepts has established a link between the AHE and the topological nature of the Hall currents. On the experimental front, new experimental studies of the AHE in transition metals, transition-metal oxides, spinels, pyrochlores, and metallic dilute magnetic semiconductors have established systematic trends. These two developments, in concert with first-principles electronic structure calculations, strongly favor the dominance of an intrinsic Berry-phase-related AHE mechanism in metallic ferromagnets with moderate conductivity. The intrinsic AHE can be expressed in terms of the Berry-phase curvatures and it is therefore an intrinsic quantum-mechanical property of a perfect crystal. An extrinsic mechanism, skew scattering from disorder, tends to dominate the AHE in highly conductive ferromagnets. The full modern semiclassical treatment of the AHE is reviewed which incorporates an anomalous contribution to wave-packet group velocity due to momentum-space Berry curvatures and correctly combines the roles of intrinsic and extrinsic (skew-scattering and side-jump) scattering-related mechanisms. In addition, more rigorous quantum-mechanical treatments based on the Kubo and Keldysh formalisms are reviewed, taking into account multiband effects, and demonstrate the equivalence of all three linear response theories in the metallic regime. Building on results from recent experiment and theory, a

  11. Nonlocal anomalous Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shulei; Vignale, Giovanni

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) is a distinctive transport property of ferromagnetic metals arising from spin orbit coupling (SOC) in concert with spontaneous spin polarization. Nonetheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also appears in a nonmagnetic metal in contact with a magnetic insulator. The main puzzle lies in the apparent absence of spin polarized electrons in the non-magnetic metal. Here, we theoretically demonstrate that the scattering of electrons from a rough metal-insulator interface is generally spin-dependent, which results in mutual conversion between spin and charge currents flowing in the plane of the layer. It is the current-carrying spin polarized electrons and the spin Hall effect in the bulk of the metal layer that conspire to generate the AH current. This novel AHE differs from the conventional one only in the spatial separation of the SOC and the magnetization, so we name it as nonlocal AHE. In contrast to other previously proposed mechanisms (e.g., spin Hall AHE and magnetic proximity effect (MPE)), the nonlocal AHE appears on the first order of spin Hall angle and does not rely on the induced moments in the metal layer, which make it experimentally detectable by contrasting the AH current directions of two layered structures such as Pt/Cu/YIG and β -Ta/Cu/YIG (with a thin inserted Cu layer to eliminate the MPE). We predict that the directions of the AH currents in these two trilayers would be opposite since the spin Hall angles of Pt and β -Ta are of opposite signs. Work supported by NSF Grants DMR-1406568.

  12. Magnetic effects in anomalous dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Blume, M.

    1992-12-31

    Spectacular enhancements of magnetic x-ray scattering have been predicted and observed experimentally. These effects are the result of resonant phenomena closely related to anomalous dispersion, and they are strongest at near-edge resonances. The theory of these resonances will be developed with particular attention to the symmetry properties of the scatterer. While the phenomena to be discussed concern magnetic properties the transitions are electric dipole or electric quadrupole in character and represent a subset of the usual anomalous dispersion phenomena. The polarization dependence of the scattering is also considered, and the polarization dependence for magnetic effects is related to that for charge scattering and to Templeton type anisotropic polarization phenomena. It has been found that the strongest effects occur in rare-earths and in actinides for M shell edges. In addition to the scattering properties the theory is applicable to ``forward scattering`` properties such as the Faraday effect and circular dichroism.

  13. Anomalous Hall effect in localization regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lin; Zhu, Kai; Yue, Di; Tian, Yuan; Jin, Xiaofeng

    2016-06-01

    The anomalous Hall effect in the ultrathin film regime is investigated in Fe(001)(1-3 nm) films epitaxial on MgO(001). The logarithmic localization correction to longitudinal resistivity and anomalous Hall resistivity are observed at low temperature. We identify that the coefficient of skew scattering has a reduction from metallic to localized regime, while the contribution of side jump has inconspicuous change except for a small drop below 10 K. Furthermore, we discover that the intrinsic anomalous Hall conductivity decreases with the reduction of thickness below 2 nm. Our results provide unambiguous experimental evidence to clarify the problem of localization correction to the anomalous Hall effect.

  14. Tunneling Anomalous and Spin Hall Effects.

    PubMed

    Matos-Abiague, A; Fabian, J

    2015-07-31

    We predict, theoretically, the existence of the anomalous Hall effect when a tunneling current flows through a tunnel junction in which only one of the electrodes is magnetic. The interfacial spin-orbit coupling present in the barrier region induces a spin-dependent momentum filtering in the directions perpendicular to the tunneling current, resulting in a skew tunneling even in the absence of impurities. This produces an anomalous Hall conductance and spin Hall currents in the nonmagnetic electrode when a bias voltage is applied across the tunneling heterojunction. If the barrier is composed of a noncentrosymmetric material, the anomalous Hall conductance and spin Hall currents become anisotropic with respect to both the magnetization and crystallographic directions, allowing us to separate this interfacial phenomenon from the bulk anomalous and spin Hall contributions. The proposed effect should be useful for proving and quantifying the interfacial spin-orbit fields in metallic and metal-semiconductor systems. PMID:26274432

  15. Experimental realization of quantized anomalous Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Qi-Kun

    2014-03-01

    Anomalous Hall effect was discovered by Edwin Hall in 1880. In this talk, we report the experimental observation of the quantized version of AHE, the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in thin films of Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3 magnetic topological insulator. At zero magnetic field, the gate-tuned anomalous Hall resistance exhibits a quantized value of h /e2 accompanied by a significant drop of the longitudinal resistance. The longitudinal resistance vanishes under a strong magnetic field whereas the Hall resistance remains at the quantized value. The realization of QAHE paves a way for developing low-power-consumption electronics. Implications on observing Majorana fermions and other exotic phenomena in magnetic topological insulators will also be discussed. The work was collaborated with Ke He, Yayu Wang, Xucun Ma, Xi Chen, Li Lv, Dai Xi, Zhong Fang and Shoucheng Zhang.

  16. Anomalous Hall effect in Weyl superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednik, G.; Zyuzin, A. A.; Burkov, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    We present a theory of the anomalous Hall effect in a topological Weyl superconductor with broken time reversal symmetry. Specifically, we consider a ferromagnetic Weyl metal with two Weyl nodes of opposite chirality near the Fermi energy. In the presence of inversion symmetry, such a metal experiences a weak-coupling Bardeen–Cooper–Schrieffer instability, with pairing of parity-related eigenstates. Due to the nonzero topological charge, carried by the Weyl nodes, such a superconductor is necessarily topologically nontrivial, with Majorana surface states coexisting with the Fermi arcs of the normal Weyl metal. We demonstrate that, surprisingly, the anomalous Hall conductivity of such a superconducting Weyl metal coincides with that of a nonsuperconducting one, under certain conditions, in spite of the nonconservation of charge in a superconductor. We relate this to the existence of an extra (nearly) conserved quantity in a Weyl metal, the chiral charge.

  17. Anomalous Hall Effect in a Kagome Ferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Linda; Wicker, Christina; Suzuki, Takehito; Checkelsky, Joseph; Joseph Checkelsky Team

    The ferromagnetic kagome lattice is theoretically known to possess topological band structures. We have synthesized large single crystals of a kagome ferromagnet Fe3Sn2 which orders ferromagnetically well above room temperature. We have studied the electrical and magnetic properties of these crystals over a broad temperature and magnetic field range. Both the scaling relation of anomalous Hall effect and anisotropic magnetic susceptibility show that the ferromagnetism of Fe3Sn2 is unconventional. We discuss these results in the context of magnetism in kagome systems and relevance to the predicted topological properties in this class of compounds. This research is supported by DMR-1231319.

  18. The Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect: Theory and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao-Xing; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Qi, Xiao-Liang

    2016-03-01

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect is defined as a quantized Hall effect realized in a system without an external magnetic field. The quantum anomalous Hall effect is a novel manifestation of topological structure in many-electron systems and may have potential applications in future electronic devices. In recent years, the quantum anomalous Hall effect was proposed theoretically and realized experimentally. In this review article, we provide a systematic overview of the theoretical and experimental developments in this field.

  19. Anomalous piezoresistance effect in ultrastrained silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Lugstein, A; Steinmair, M; Steiger, A; Kosina, H; Bertagnolli, E

    2010-08-11

    In this paper we demonstrate that under ultrahigh strain conditions p-type single crystal silicon nanowires possess an anomalous piezoresistance effect. The measurements were performed on vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) grown Si nanowires, monolithically integrated in a microelectro-mechanical loading module. The special setup enables the application of pure uniaxial tensile strain along the <111> growth direction of individual, 100 nm thick Si nanowires while simultaneously measuring the resistance of the nanowires. For low strain levels (nanowire elongation less than 0.8%), our measurements revealed the expected positive piezoresistance effect, whereas for ultrahigh strain levels a transition to anomalous negative piezoresistance was observed. For the maximum tensile strain of 3.5%, the resistance of the Si nanowires decreased by a factor of 10. Even at these high strain amplitudes, no fatigue failures are observed for several hundred loading cycles. The ability to fabricate single-crystal nanowires that are widely free of structural defects will it make possible to apply high strain without fracturing to other materials as well, therefore in any application where crystallinity and strain are important, the idea of making nanowires should be of a high value. PMID:20698638

  20. Photoinduced Anomalous Hall Effects in Weyl Semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Ching-Kit; Lee, Patrick A.; Burch, Kenneth S.; Han, Jung Hoon; Ran, Ying

    We examine theoretically the interplay between chiral photons and chiral electrons in Weyl semimetals. Owing to its monopole nature, a three-dimensional Weyl node is topologically-robust against a circularly polarized light. A driven Weyl system exhibits node shifts in the momentum space, in sharp contrast to the gap opening in a driven two-dimensional Dirac system. We show that the node shift leads to a change of the Chern vector which gives arise to a net photoinduced anomalous Hall conductivity, in the plane perpendicular to the light propagation. We shall describe the basic idea behind this generic photoinduced Hall effect, illustrate it with a concrete microscope model, and estimate its feasibility based on current optical experimental techniques.

  1. Anomalous Wien Effects in Supercooled Ionic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patro, L. N.; Burghaus, O.; Roling, B.

    2016-05-01

    We have measured conductivity spectra of several supercooled monocationic and dicationic ionic liquids in the nonlinear regime by applying ac electric fields with large amplitudes up to about 180 kV /cm . Thereby, higher harmonic ac currents up to the 7th order were detected. Our results point to the existence of anomalous Wien effects in supercooled ionic liquids. Most ionic liquids studied here exhibit a conductivity-viscosity relation, which is close to the predictions of the Nernst-Einstein and Stokes-Einstein equations, as observed for classical strong electrolytes like KCl. These "strong" ionic liquids show a much stronger nonlinearity of the conductivity than classical strong electrolytes. On the other hand, the conductivity-viscosity relation of the ionic liquid [P6 ,6 ,6 ,14][Cl ] points to ion association effects. This "weak" ionic liquid shows a strength of the nonlinear effect, which is comparable to classical weak electrolytes. However, the nonlinearity increases quadratically with the field. We suggest that a theory for explaining these anomalies will have to go beyond the level of Coulomb lattice gas models.

  2. Anomalous Wien Effects in Supercooled Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Patro, L N; Burghaus, O; Roling, B

    2016-05-01

    We have measured conductivity spectra of several supercooled monocationic and dicationic ionic liquids in the nonlinear regime by applying ac electric fields with large amplitudes up to about 180  kV/cm. Thereby, higher harmonic ac currents up to the 7th order were detected. Our results point to the existence of anomalous Wien effects in supercooled ionic liquids. Most ionic liquids studied here exhibit a conductivity-viscosity relation, which is close to the predictions of the Nernst-Einstein and Stokes-Einstein equations, as observed for classical strong electrolytes like KCl. These "strong" ionic liquids show a much stronger nonlinearity of the conductivity than classical strong electrolytes. On the other hand, the conductivity-viscosity relation of the ionic liquid [P_{6,6,6,14}][Cl] points to ion association effects. This "weak" ionic liquid shows a strength of the nonlinear effect, which is comparable to classical weak electrolytes. However, the nonlinearity increases quadratically with the field. We suggest that a theory for explaining these anomalies will have to go beyond the level of Coulomb lattice gas models. PMID:27203333

  3. Anomalous Nernst Effect with Magnetocrystalline Anisotropy (110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesman, Carlos; Costa Neto, Jose; Department of Physics-UFRN Team

    2014-03-01

    When a ferromagnetic material is submitted to a temperature gradient and the magnetic field generates voltage on the edges of the samples, this is called the Anomalous Nernst Effect (ANE). The Heusler alloys that currently exhibit this effect are the most promising for spintronics and spin caloritronics. In this study we perform a theoretical investigation of voltage curves associated to the ANE, when the material displays magnetocrystalline anisotropy for experimental results in two configurations, ANE versus applied magnetic field and planar angle variations of ANE. We analyzed three types of magnetocrystalline anisotropy: cubic anisotropy (100) with C4 symmetry, uniaxial anisotropy with C2 symmetry and cubic anisotropy (110). The aim was to prove that cubic anisotropy (110) is equivalent to anisotropy (100) combined with uniaxial anisotropy. Theoretical fitting of experimental ANE data demonstrates this total equivalence and that a new interpretation with the use of cubic anisotropy (110) may be due to the atomic arrangement of the so-called full-Heusler. Comparative analyses of Co2FeAl and Co2MnGe alloys will be presented. CNPq, CAPES, FAPERN.

  4. Anomalous cross field electron transport in a Hall effect thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Boniface, C.; Garrigues, L.; Hagelaar, G. J. M.; Boeuf, J. P.; Gawron, D.; Mazouffre, S.

    2006-10-16

    The origin of anomalous electron transport across the magnetic field in the channel of a Hall effect thruster has been the subject of controversy, and the relative importance of electron-wall collisions and plasma turbulence on anomalous transport is not clear. From comparisons between Fabry-Perot measurements and hybrid model calculations of the ion velocity profile in a 5 kW Hall effect thruster, we deduce that one and the same mechanism is responsible for anomalous electron transport inside and outside the Hall effect thruster channel. This suggests that the previous assumption that Bohm anomalous conductivity is dominant outside the thruster channel whereas electron-wall conductivity prevails inside the channel is not valid.

  5. Linear Magnetization Dependence of the Intrinsic Anomalous Hall Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, C.; Yao, Y.; Niu, Q.; Weitering, Harm H

    2006-01-01

    The anomalous Hall effect is investigated experimentally and theoretically for ferromagnetic thin films of Mn{sub 5}Ge{sub 3}. We have separated the intrinsic and extrinsic contributions to the experimental anomalous Hall effect and calculated the intrinsic anomalous Hall conductivity from the Berry curvature of the Bloch states using first-principles methods. The intrinsic anomalous Hall conductivity depends linearly on the magnetization, which can be understood from the long-wavelength fluctuations of the spin orientation at finite temperatures. The quantitative agreement between theory and experiment is remarkably good, not only near 0 K but also at finite temperatures, up to about -240 K (0.8T{sub c}).

  6. Large anomalous Nernst effect in a skyrmion crystal.

    PubMed

    Mizuta, Yo Pierre; Ishii, Fumiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Thermoelectric properties of a model skyrmion crystal were theoretically investigated, and it was found that its large anomalous Hall conductivity, corresponding to large Chern numbers induced by its peculiar spin structure leads to a large transverse thermoelectric voltage through the anomalous Nernst effect. This implies the possibility of finding good thermoelectric materials among skyrmion systems, and thus motivates our quests for them by means of the first-principles calculations as were employed in this study. PMID:27306142

  7. Large anomalous Nernst effect in a skyrmion crystal

    PubMed Central

    Mizuta, Yo Pierre; Ishii, Fumiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Thermoelectric properties of a model skyrmion crystal were theoretically investigated, and it was found that its large anomalous Hall conductivity, corresponding to large Chern numbers induced by its peculiar spin structure leads to a large transverse thermoelectric voltage through the anomalous Nernst effect. This implies the possibility of finding good thermoelectric materials among skyrmion systems, and thus motivates our quests for them by means of the first-principles calculations as were employed in this study. PMID:27306142

  8. Large anomalous Nernst effect in a skyrmion crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuta, Yo Pierre; Ishii, Fumiyuki

    2016-06-01

    Thermoelectric properties of a model skyrmion crystal were theoretically investigated, and it was found that its large anomalous Hall conductivity, corresponding to large Chern numbers induced by its peculiar spin structure leads to a large transverse thermoelectric voltage through the anomalous Nernst effect. This implies the possibility of finding good thermoelectric materials among skyrmion systems, and thus motivates our quests for them by means of the first-principles calculations as were employed in this study.

  9. Phenomenological Spin Transport Theory Driven by Anomalous Nernst Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Tomohiro

    2016-07-01

    Several experimental efforts such as material investigation and structure improvement have been made recently to find a large anomalous Nernst effect in ferromagnetic metals. Here, we develop a theory of spin transport driven by the anomalous Nernst effect in a diffusive ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic multilayer. Starting from a phenomenological formula of a spin-dependent electric current, the theoretical formulas of electric voltage and spin torque generated by the anomalous Nernst effect are derived. The magnitude of the electric voltage generated from the spin current via the inverse spin Hall effect is on the order of 0.1 µV for currently available experimental parameter values. The temperature gradient necessary to switch the magnetization is quite larger than the typical experimental value. The separation of the contributions of the Seebeck and transverse spin Seebeck effects is also discussed.

  10. Anomalous Hall effect in YIG|Pt bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Sibylle Schlitz, Richard; Geprägs, Stephan; Opel, Matthias; Huebl, Hans; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.; Gross, Rudolf

    2015-03-30

    We measure the ordinary and the anomalous Hall effect in a set of yttrium iron garnet|platinum (YIG|Pt) bilayers via magnetization orientation dependent magnetoresistance experiments. Our data show that the presence of the ferrimagnetic insulator YIG leads to an anomalous Hall effect like voltage in Pt, which is sensitive to both Pt thickness and temperature. Interpretation of the experimental findings in terms of the spin Hall anomalous Hall effect indicates that the imaginary part of the spin mixing conductance G{sub i} plays a crucial role in YIG|Pt bilayers. In particular, our data suggest a sign change in G{sub i} between 10 K and 300 K. Additionally, we report a higher order Hall effect contribution, which appears in thin Pt films on YIG at low temperatures.

  11. Anomalous Hall Effect in a 2D Rashba Ferromagnet.

    PubMed

    Ado, I A; Dmitriev, I A; Ostrovsky, P M; Titov, M

    2016-07-22

    Skew scattering on rare impurity configurations is shown to dominate the anomalous Hall effect in a 2D Rashba ferromagnet. The mechanism originates in scattering on rare impurity pairs separated by distances of the order of the Fermi wavelength. The corresponding theoretical description goes beyond the conventional noncrossing approximation. The mechanism provides the only contribution to the anomalous Hall conductivity in the most relevant metallic regime and strongly modifies previously obtained results for lower energies in the leading order with respect to impurity strength. PMID:27494487

  12. Effective field theory: A modern approach to anomalous couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Degrande, Céline; Centre for Particle Physics and Phenomenology , Université Catholique de Louvain, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve ; Greiner, Nicolas; Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München ; Kilian, Wolfgang; University of Siegen, Fachbereich Physik, D-57068 Siegen ; Mattelaer, Olivier; Mebane, Harrison; Stelzer, Tim; Willenbrock, Scott; Zhang, Cen; Centre for Particle Physics and Phenomenology , Université Catholique de Louvain, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve

    2013-08-15

    We advocate an effective field theory approach to anomalous couplings. The effective field theory approach is the natural way to extend the standard model such that the gauge symmetries are respected. It is general enough to capture any physics beyond the standard model, yet also provides guidance as to the most likely place to see the effects of new physics. The effective field theory approach also clarifies that one need not be concerned with the violation of unitarity in scattering processes at high energy. We apply these ideas to pair production of electroweak vector bosons. -- Highlights: •We discuss the advantages of effective field theories compared to anomalous couplings. •We show that one need not be concerned with unitarity violation at high energy. •We discuss the application of effective field theory to weak boson physics.

  13. Anomalous thermomagnetic effects in an epitaxial and irradiated graphene monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xingfei; Xu, Yafang; Jin, Guojun

    2015-12-01

    We study valley-dependent anomalous thermomagnetic effects, including the Nernst and Ettingshausen effects, in a graphene monolayer that is subjected to a staggered sublattice potential and off-resonant circularly polarized light. It is found that a topological phase transition in this system can significantly affect the signs of the Nernst conductivity as well as the Ettingshausen thermal conductivity, which provides an alternative method to characterize the phase transition between band and topological insulators. At the topological phase-transition point, pure valley-polarized electric and heat currents are generated. In contrast to traditional thermomagnetism, an anomalous thermomagnetic figure of merit is formulated and used to characterize conversion efficiency. The theoretical approach, including numerical calculations and analytical treatment, can also be used to study the same properties of other graphenelike materials.

  14. Anomalous transport induced by sheath instability in Hall effect thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Taccogna, Francesco; Schneider, Ralf

    2009-06-22

    It is well recognized to ascribe the anomalous cross-field conductivity inside Hall-effect thrusters to fluctuation-induced transport due to gradient-driven instabilities (Rayleigh or electron drift) and to electron-wall interaction (near-wall conductivity). In this letter, we have performed numerical experiments showing the possibility of another mechanism inducing azimuthal fluctuations: the lateral sheath instability. It is created by a negative differential resistance of the current-voltage I-V characteristic of the floating wall as a consequence of high secondary electron emission. The contribution from this effect to the anomalous axial current is calculated and it accounts of more than 80% of the experimental value.

  15. Anomalous magnetization reversal due to proximity effect of antiphase boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofin, R. G. S.; Wu, Han-Chun; Shvets, I. V.

    2011-12-01

    Here we report anomalous double switching hysteresis loop and high coercivity (˜0.1 T) in Fe3O4(110) thin films. Our analytical model based on spin chains confined within small antiphase boundary domains (APBDs) suggests a significant proximity effect of antiferromagnetic antiphase boundaries (APBs). Furthermore, the calculated domain size (D) follows the well-known scaling relation D=Ct. The results suggest that the interface exchange coupling between neighboring magnetic domains through antiferromagnetic APBs is responsible for the double switching hysteresis. Our findings could help advance the studies of anomalous properties of magnetic materials originating from growth defects. This effect can be utilized for the tunability of exchange bias in devices.

  16. Normal and anomalous Doppler effects in periodic waveguide cyclotron maser

    SciTech Connect

    Korol, M.; Jerby, E.

    1995-12-31

    A linear analysis of the periodic-waveguide cyclotron (PWC) maser shows that the PWC interaction with fast-waves possesses properties of the known anomalous Doppler resonance interaction if the wave impedance of the resonant spatial harmonic, Z{sub n}, is much smaller than the free space impedance, i.e. if Z{sub n} {much_lt} Z{sub 0}. The feasibility of a fast-wave PWC interaction in a low impedance waveguide is examined theoretically in this paper. A practical scheme of a slotted-waveguide PWC operating in the fundamental harmonic near cutoff is proposed for a future experiment. The possible advantages of the quasi-anomalous Doppler effect in the fast-wave-PWC operating regime are the alleviation of the initial electron rotation and a high-efficiency operation.

  17. Scaling of the anomalous Hall effect in lower conductivity regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karel, J.; Bordel, C.; Bouma, D. S.; de Lorimier-Farmer, A.; Lee, H. J.; Hellman, F.

    2016-06-01

    The scaling of the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) was investigated using amorphous and epitaxial Fe x Si1‑x (0.43 < x < 0.71) magnetic thin films by varying the longitudinal conductivity (σxx) using two different approaches: modifying the carrier mean free path (l) with chemical or structural disorder while holding the carrier concentration (nh) constant or varying n h and keeping l constant. The anomalous Hall conductivity (σxy) , when suitably normalized by magnetization and n h , is shown to be independent of σxx for all samples. This observation suggests a primary dependence on an intrinsic mechanism, unsurprising for the epitaxial high conductivity films where the Berry phase curvature mechanism is expected, but remarkable for the amorphous samples. That the amorphous samples show this scaling indicates a local atomic level description of a Berry phase, resulting in an intrinsic AHE in a system that lacks lattice periodicity.

  18. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in stable dumbbell stanene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huisheng; Zhang, Jiayong; Zhao, Bao; Zhou, Tong; Yang, Zhongqin

    2016-02-01

    Topological property of the dumbbell (DB) stanene, more stable than the stanene with a honeycomb lattice, is investigated by using ab initio methods. The magnetic DB stanene demonstrates an exotic quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect due to inversion of the Sn spin-up px,y and spin-down pz states. The QAH gap is found to be opened at Γ point rather than the usual K and K' points, beneficial to observe the effect in experiments. When a 3% tensile strain is applied, a large nontrivial gap (˜50 meV) is achieved. Our results provide another lighthouse for realizing QAH effects in two-dimensional systems.

  19. Anomalous Hall Effect in a Feromagnetic Rare-Earth Cobalite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoilov, A. V.; Yeh, N. C.; Vasquez, R. P.

    1996-01-01

    Rare-Earth manganites and cobalites with the perovskite structure have been a subject of great recent interest because their electrical resistance changes significantly when a magnetic field is applied...we have studied the Hall effect in thin film La(sub 0.5)Ca(sub 0.5)CoO(sub 3) material and have obtained convincing evidence fo the so called anomalous Hall effect, typical for magnetic metals...Our results suggest that near the ferromagnetic ordering temperature, the dominant electron scattering mechanism is the spin fluctuation.

  20. Enhanced Thermoelectric Performance and Anomalous Seebeck Effects in Topological Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yong; Gan, Zhongxue; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2014-06-01

    Improving the thermoelectric figure of merit zT is one of the greatest challenges in material science. The recent discovery of topological insulators (TIs) offers new promise in this prospect. In this work, we demonstrate theoretically that zT is strongly size dependent in TIs, and the size parameter can be tuned to enhance zT to be significantly greater than 1. Furthermore, we show that the lifetime of the edge states in TIs is strongly energy dependent, leading to large and anomalous Seebeck effects with an opposite sign to the Hall effect. These striking properties make TIs a promising material for thermoelectric science and technology.

  1. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in topological insulator memory

    SciTech Connect

    Jalil, Mansoor B. A.; Tan, S. G.; Siu, Z. B.

    2015-05-07

    We theoretically investigate the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in a magnetically coupled three-dimensional-topological insulator (3D-TI) system. We apply the generalized spin-orbit coupling Hamiltonian to obtain the Hall conductivity σ{sup xy} of the system. The underlying topology of the QAHE phenomenon is then analyzed to show the quantization of σ{sup xy} and its relation to the Berry phase of the system. Finally, we analyze the feasibility of utilizing σ{sup xy} as a memory read-out in a 3D-TI based memory at finite temperatures, with comparison to known magnetically doped 3D-TIs.

  2. Anomalous effects in lattice QCD with staggered fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaehler, Adrian Leslie

    1999-12-01

    In this thesis we investigate the role of the anomaly in lattice QCD, paying particular attention to the role of topology, and the effects of suppressing the fermion determinant in numerical simulations. QCD with staggered fermions is studied just above the deconfining phase transition, where anomalous effects are expected to contribute a residual breaking of chiral symmetry, and where that residual breaking is expected to manifest itself as a source of unphysical divergences in the quenched approximation. These divergences are expected to arise from exact zero eigenvalues in the spectrum of the Dirac operator, which would be suppressed by the fermion determinant in an un-quenched simulation. The signal for this anomalous divergence is investigated first in a semi-classical environment in which smooth backgrounds allow us to better understand the manner in which these effects appear in the staggered fermion formulation. An older study on a 163 x 4 lattice is revisited and a new study is conducted on a 323 x 8 lattice. No signal is found in either study. An exploratory study on a 323 x 12 lattice is presented. In this case however, the spatial volume is insufficient to avoid tunneling into the confined phase, and other Z 3 phases in which there are known to be small eigenvalues resulting from chiral symmetry breaking, unrelated to the anomaly.

  3. Nonlinear dynamics induced anomalous Hall effect in topological insulators

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guanglei; Xu, Hongya; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    We uncover an alternative mechanism for anomalous Hall effect. In particular, we investigate the magnetisation dynamics of an insulating ferromagnet (FM) deposited on the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator (TI), subject to an external voltage. The spin-polarised current on the TI surface induces a spin-transfer torque on the magnetisation of the top FM while its dynamics can change the transmission probability of the surface electrons through the exchange coupling and hence the current. We find a host of nonlinear dynamical behaviors including multistability, chaos, and phase synchronisation. Strikingly, a dynamics mediated Hall-like current can arise, which exhibits a nontrivial dependence on the channel conductance. We develop a physical understanding of the mechanism that leads to the anomalous Hall effect. The nonlinear dynamical origin of the effect stipulates that a rich variety of final states exist, implying that the associated Hall current can be controlled to yield desirable behaviors. The phenomenon can find applications in Dirac-material based spintronics. PMID:26819223

  4. Nonlinear dynamics induced anomalous Hall effect in topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guanglei; Xu, Hongya; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    We uncover an alternative mechanism for anomalous Hall effect. In particular, we investigate the magnetisation dynamics of an insulating ferromagnet (FM) deposited on the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator (TI), subject to an external voltage. The spin-polarised current on the TI surface induces a spin-transfer torque on the magnetisation of the top FM while its dynamics can change the transmission probability of the surface electrons through the exchange coupling and hence the current. We find a host of nonlinear dynamical behaviors including multistability, chaos, and phase synchronisation. Strikingly, a dynamics mediated Hall-like current can arise, which exhibits a nontrivial dependence on the channel conductance. We develop a physical understanding of the mechanism that leads to the anomalous Hall effect. The nonlinear dynamical origin of the effect stipulates that a rich variety of final states exist, implying that the associated Hall current can be controlled to yield desirable behaviors. The phenomenon can find applications in Dirac-material based spintronics.

  5. Nonlinear dynamics induced anomalous Hall effect in topological insulators.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guanglei; Xu, Hongya; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    We uncover an alternative mechanism for anomalous Hall effect. In particular, we investigate the magnetisation dynamics of an insulating ferromagnet (FM) deposited on the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator (TI), subject to an external voltage. The spin-polarised current on the TI surface induces a spin-transfer torque on the magnetisation of the top FM while its dynamics can change the transmission probability of the surface electrons through the exchange coupling and hence the current. We find a host of nonlinear dynamical behaviors including multistability, chaos, and phase synchronisation. Strikingly, a dynamics mediated Hall-like current can arise, which exhibits a nontrivial dependence on the channel conductance. We develop a physical understanding of the mechanism that leads to the anomalous Hall effect. The nonlinear dynamical origin of the effect stipulates that a rich variety of final states exist, implying that the associated Hall current can be controlled to yield desirable behaviors. The phenomenon can find applications in Dirac-material based spintronics. PMID:26819223

  6. Anomalous photoelectric effect of a polycrystalline topological insulator film.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongbin; Yao, Jiandong; Shao, Jianmei; Li, Hai; Li, Shuwei; Bao, Dinghua; Wang, Chengxin; Yang, Guowei

    2014-01-01

    A topological insulator represents a new state of quantum matter that possesses an insulating bulk band gap as well as a spin-momentum-locked Dirac cone on the surface that is protected by time-reversal symmetry. Photon-dressed surface states and light-induced surface photocurrents have been observed in topological insulators. Here, we report experimental observations of an anomalous photoelectric effect in thin films of Bi2Te3, a polycrystalline topological insulator. Under illumination with non-polarised light, transport measurements reveal that the resistance of the topological surface states suddenly increases when the polycrystalline film is illuminated. The resistance variation is positively dependent on the light intensity but has no relation to the applied electric field; this finding can be attributed to the gap opening of the surface Dirac cone. This observation of an anomalous photoelectric effect in polycrystalline topological insulators offers exciting opportunities for the creation of photodetectors with an unusually broad spectral range. Moreover, polycrystalline topological insulator films provide an attractive material platform for exploring the nature and practical application of topological insulators. PMID:25069391

  7. Effects of scale-free avalanche walks on anomalous diffusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Joo

    2016-07-01

    Effects of scale-free avalanche walks on anomalous diffusions have been studied by introducing simple non-Markovian walk models. The scale-free avalanche walk is realized as a walker goes to one direction consistently in a time interval, the distribution of which follows a power-law. And it is applied to the memory models, in which the entire history of a walk process is memorized or the memory for the latest step is enhanced with time. The power-law avalanche walk with memory effects strengthens the persistence between steps and thus makes the Hurst exponent be larger than the cases without avalanche walks, while does not affect the anti-persistent nature.

  8. Precise quantization of anomalous Hall effect near zero magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Bestwick, A. J.; Fox, E. J.; Kou, Xufeng; Pan, Lei; Wang, Kang L.; Goldhaber-Gordon, D.

    2015-05-04

    In this study, we report a nearly ideal quantum anomalous Hall effect in a three-dimensional topological insulator thin film with ferromagnetic doping. Near zero applied magnetic field we measure exact quantization in the Hall resistance to within a part per 10,000 and a longitudinal resistivity under 1 Ω per square, with chiral edge transport explicitly confirmed by nonlocal measurements. Deviations from this behavior are found to be caused by thermally activated carriers, as indicated by an Arrhenius law temperature dependence. Using the deviations as a thermometer, we demonstrate an unexpected magnetocaloric effect and use it to reach near-perfect quantization by cooling the sample below the dilution refrigerator base temperature in a process approximating adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration.

  9. Investigating dissipation in the quantum anomalous Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Eli; Bestwick, Andrew; Goldhaber-Gordon, David; Feng, Yang; Ou, Yunbo; He, Ke; Wang, Yayu; Xue, Qi-Kun; Kou, Xufeng; Pan, Lei; Wang, Kang

    In the quantum anomalous Hall effect, a magnetic exchange gap in a 3D topological insulator gives rise to dissipationless chiral edge states. Though the effect has recently been realized in a family of ferromagnetically-doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3 topological insulator thin films, experiments to date have found non-vanishing longitudinal resistance, contrary to initial theoretical expectations. Proposed sources of this dissipation include extra gapless or activated quasi-helical edge states, thermally activated 2D conduction, and variable-range hopping. Here, we discuss transport measurements of Corbino disk and non-local geometries to identify the mechanism of non-ideal behavior. This work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, under Award No. 19-7503.

  10. Eczema's Effects More Than Skin Deep

    MedlinePlus

    ... of eczema and its effect on the skin's appearance may contribute to a greater risk of mental health disorders, such as anxiety and depression, Silverberg said. Controlling flare-ups of eczema symptoms ...

  11. Anomalous Hall effect in magnetic disordered alloys: Effects of spin orbital coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, L.; Gao, W. B.; Zhou, S. M.; Shi, Z.; He, P.; Miao, J.; Jiang, Y.

    2013-12-28

    For disordered ternary Fe{sub 0.5}(Pd{sub 1−x}Pt{sub x}){sub 0.5} alloy films, the anomalous Hall effect obeys the conventional scaling law ρ{sub AH}=aρ{sub xx}+bρ{sub xx}{sup 2} with the longitudinal resistivity ρ{sub xx} and anomalous Hall resistivity ρ{sub AH}. Contributed by the intrinsic term and the extrinsic side-jump one, the scattering-independent anomalous Hall conductivity b increases with increasing Pt/Pd concentration. In contrast, the skew scattering parameter a is mainly influenced by the residual resistivity. The present results will facilitate the theoretical studies of the anomalous Hall effect in magnetic disordered alloys.

  12. Anomalous Nernst Effect of Perpendicularly Magnetic Anisotropy TbFeCo Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Ryo; Komine, Takashi; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we investigated anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) of perpendicularly magnetized TbFeCo thin films with various Tb content, and especially studied the relation between ANE and anomalous Hall effect. As a result, the hysteresis of anomalous Nernst coefficient showed the same behavior as that of anomalous Hall resistivity, and the sign of anomalous Nernst coefficient was consistent with that of anomalous Hall voltage in any Tb content, whereas the Seebeck coefficient and the resistivity were almost constant even if the applied magnetic field was varied. Taking into account of thermoelectric coefficient tensor, it was revealed that the off-diagonal thermopower corresponding to the ANE in TbFeCo thin films is the product of Hall angle and Seebeck coefficient.

  13. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Skin and Nail Changes

    MedlinePlus

    N ational C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Skin and Nail Changes “I was glad to ... human services national institutes of health Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Skin and Nail Changes Protect your skin from ...

  14. Anomalous supercurrent switching in graphene under proximity effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levchenko, Alex; Coskun, U. C.; Brenner, M.; Hymel, T.; Vakaryuk, V.; Bezryadin, A.

    2012-02-01

    We report a study of hysteretic current-voltage characteristics in superconductor-graphene-superconductor (SGS) junctions. The stochastic nature of the phase slips is characterized by measuring the distribution of the switching currents. We find that in SGS junctions the dispersion of the switching current scales with temperature as σIT^αG with αG 1/3. This observation is in sharp contrast with the known Josephson junction behavior where σIT^αJ with αJ=2/3. We propose an explanation using a modified version of Kurkijarvi's theory for the flux stability in rf-SQUID and attribute this anomalous effect to the temperature dependence of the critical current which persists down to low temperatures.

  15. Skin thickness effects on in vivo LXRF

    SciTech Connect

    Preiss, I.L.; Washington, W. II

    1995-12-31

    The analysis of lead concentration in bone utilizing LXRF can be adversely effected by overlying issue. A quantitative measure of the attenuation of the 10.5 keV Pb L a x-ray signal by skin and skin equivalent plastic has been conducted. Concentration ranges in plaster of Paris and goat bone from 7 to 90 ppm with attenuators of Lucite{reg_sign} and pig skin were examined. It is concluded that no quantitative or semi quantitative analysis can be achieved if overlying sue thickness exceeds 3 mm for Ph concentrations of less than 30 porn Ph in bone.

  16. Psychosocial effect of common skin diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Barankin, Benjamin; DeKoven, Joel

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To increase awareness of the psychosocial effect of acne, atopic dermatitis, and psoriasis. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A literature review was based on a MEDLINE search (1966 to 2000). Selected articles from the dermatologic and psychiatric literature, as well as other relevant medical journals, were reviewed and used as the basis for discussion of how skin disease affects patients' lives and of appropriate management. Studies in the medical literature provide mainly level III evidence predominantly based on descriptive studies and expert opinion. MAIN MESSAGE: Dermatologic problems can result in psychosocial effects that seriously affect patients' lives. More than a cosmetic nuisance, skin disease can produce anxiety, depression, and other psychological problems that affect patients' lives in ways comparable to arthritis or other disabling illnesses. An appreciation for the effects of sex, age, and location of lesions is important, as well as the bidirectional relationship between skin disease and psychological distress. This review focuses on the effects of three common skin diseases seen by family physicians: acne, atopic dermatitis, and psoriasis. CONCLUSION: How skin disease affects psychosocial well-being is underappreciated. Increased understanding of the psychiatric comorbidity associated with skin disease and a biopsychosocial approach to management will ultimately improve patients' lives. PMID:12046366

  17. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in magnetic topological insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Lian, Biao; Zhang, Shou -Cheng

    2015-08-25

    The search for topologically non-trivial states of matter has become an important goal for condensed matter physics. Here, we give a theoretical introduction to the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect based on magnetic topological insulators in two-dimensions (2D) and three-dimensions (3D). In 2D topological insulators, magnetic order breaks the symmetry between the counter-propagating helical edge states, and as a result, the quantum spin Hall effect can evolve into the QAH effect. In 3D, magnetic order opens up a gap for the topological surface states, and chiral edge state has been predicted to exist on the magnetic domain walls. We present the phase diagram in thin films of a magnetic topological insulator and review the basic mechanism of ferromagnetic order in magnetically doped topological insulators. We also review the recent experimental observation of the QAH effect. Furthermore, we discuss more recent theoretical work on the coexistence of the helical and chiral edge states, multi-channel chiral edge states, the theory of the plateau transition, and the thickness dependence in the QAH effect.

  18. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in magnetic topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Lian, Biao; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2015-12-01

    The search for topologically non-trivial states of matter has become an important goal for condensed matter physics. Here, we give a theoretical introduction to the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect based on magnetic topological insulators in two-dimensions (2D) and three-dimensions (3D). In 2D topological insulators, magnetic order breaks the symmetry between the counter-propagating helical edge states, and as a result, the quantum spin Hall effect can evolve into the QAH effect. In 3D, magnetic order opens up a gap for the topological surface states, and chiral edge state has been predicted to exist on the magnetic domain walls. We present the phase diagram in thin films of a magnetic topological insulator and review the basic mechanism of ferromagnetic order in magnetically doped topological insulators. We also review the recent experimental observation of the QAH effect. We discuss more recent theoretical work on the coexistence of the helical and chiral edge states, multi-channel chiral edge states, the theory of the plateau transition, and the thickness dependence in the QAH effect.

  19. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in magnetic topological insulators

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Jing; Lian, Biao; Zhang, Shou -Cheng

    2015-08-25

    The search for topologically non-trivial states of matter has become an important goal for condensed matter physics. Here, we give a theoretical introduction to the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect based on magnetic topological insulators in two-dimensions (2D) and three-dimensions (3D). In 2D topological insulators, magnetic order breaks the symmetry between the counter-propagating helical edge states, and as a result, the quantum spin Hall effect can evolve into the QAH effect. In 3D, magnetic order opens up a gap for the topological surface states, and chiral edge state has been predicted to exist on the magnetic domain walls. We presentmore » the phase diagram in thin films of a magnetic topological insulator and review the basic mechanism of ferromagnetic order in magnetically doped topological insulators. We also review the recent experimental observation of the QAH effect. Furthermore, we discuss more recent theoretical work on the coexistence of the helical and chiral edge states, multi-channel chiral edge states, the theory of the plateau transition, and the thickness dependence in the QAH effect.« less

  20. Origin of Anomalous Piezoresistive Effects in VLS Grown Si Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Although the various effects of strain on silicon are subject of intensive research since the 1950s the physical background of anomalous piezoresistive effects in Si nanowires (NWs) is still under debate. Recent investigations concur in that due to the high surface-to-volume ratio extrinsic surface related effects superimpose the intrinsic piezoresistive properties of nanostructures. To clarify this interplay of piezoresistive effects and stress related surface potential modifications, we explored a particular tensile straining device (TSD) with a monolithic embedded vapor–liquid–solid (VLS) grown Si NW. Integrating the suspended NW in a gate all around (GAA) field effect transistor (FET) configuration with a transparent gate stack enables optical and field modulated electrical characterization under high uniaxial tensile strain applied along the ⟨111⟩ Si NW growth direction. A model based on stress-induced carrier mobility change and surface charge modulation is proposed to interpret the actual piezoresistive behavior of Si NWs. By controlling the nature and density of surface states via passivation the “true” piezoresistance of the NWs is found to be comparable with that of bulk Si. This demonstrates the indispensability of application-specific NW surface conditioning and the modulation capability of Si NWs properties for sensor applications. PMID:25651106

  1. Origin of anomalous piezoresistive effects in VLS grown Si nanowires.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Karl; Bertagnolli, Emmerich; Lugstein, Alois

    2015-03-11

    Although the various effects of strain on silicon are subject of intensive research since the 1950s the physical background of anomalous piezoresistive effects in Si nanowires (NWs) is still under debate. Recent investigations concur in that due to the high surface-to-volume ratio extrinsic surface related effects superimpose the intrinsic piezoresistive properties of nanostructures. To clarify this interplay of piezoresistive effects and stress related surface potential modifications, we explored a particular tensile straining device (TSD) with a monolithic embedded vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) grown Si NW. Integrating the suspended NW in a gate all around (GAA) field effect transistor (FET) configuration with a transparent gate stack enables optical and field modulated electrical characterization under high uniaxial tensile strain applied along the ⟨111⟩ Si NW growth direction. A model based on stress-induced carrier mobility change and surface charge modulation is proposed to interpret the actual piezoresistive behavior of Si NWs. By controlling the nature and density of surface states via passivation the "true" piezoresistance of the NWs is found to be comparable with that of bulk Si. This demonstrates the indispensability of application-specific NW surface conditioning and the modulation capability of Si NWs properties for sensor applications. PMID:25651106

  2. The effect of heat on skin permeability

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung-Hwan; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Yeu-Chun; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2008-01-01

    Although the effects of long exposure (≫ 1 s) to moderate temperatures (≤ 100 °C) have been well characterized, recent studies suggest that shorter exposure (< 1 s) to higher temperatures (> 100 °C) can dramatically increase skin permeability. Previous studies suggest that by keeping exposures short, thermal damage can be localized to the stratum corneum without damaging deeper tissue. Initial clinical trials have progressed to Phase II (see http://clinicaltrials.gov), which indicates the procedure can be safe. Because the effect of heating under these conditions has received little systematic or mechanistic study, we heated full-thickness skin, epidermis and stratum corneum samples from human and porcine cadavers to temperatures ranging from 100°C to 315°C for times ranging from 100 ms to 5 s. Tissue samples were analyzed using skin permeability measurements, differential scanning calorimetry, thermomechanical analysis, thermal gravimetric analysis, brightfield and confocal microscopy, and histology. Skin permeability was shown to be a very strong function of temperature and a less strong function of the duration of heating. At optimal conditions used in this study, transdermal delivery of calcein was increased up to 760-fold by rapidly heating the skin at high temperature. More specifically, skin permeability was increased (I) by a few fold after heating to approximately 100°C – 150°C, (II) by one to two orders of magnitude after heating to approximately 150°C – 250°C and (III) by three orders of magnitude after heating above 300°C. These permeability changes were attributed to (I) disordering of stratum corneum lipid structure, (II) disruption of stratum corneum keratin network structure and (III) decomposition and vaporization of keratin to create micron-scale holes in the stratum corneum, respectively. We conclude that heating the skin with short, high temperature pulses can increase skin permeability by orders of magnitude due to structural

  3. Origin of anomalous inverse notch effect in bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, J.; Zhou, H. F.; Wang, Z. T.; Li, Y.; Gao, H. J.

    2015-11-01

    Understanding notch-related failure is crucial for the design of reliable engineering structures. However, substantial controversies exist in the literature on the notch effect in bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), and the underlying physical mechanism responsible for the apparent confusion is still poorly understood. Here we investigate the physical origin of an inverse notch effect in a Zr-based metallic glass, where the tensile strength of the material is dramatically enhanced, rather than decreased (as expected from the stress concentration point of view), by introduction of a notch. Our experiments and molecular dynamics simulations show that the seemingly anomalous inverse notch effect is in fact caused by a transition in failure mechanism from shear banding at the notch tip to cavitation and void coalescence. Based on our theoretical analysis, the transition occurs as the stress triaxiality in the notched sample exceeds a material-dependent threshold value. Our results fill the gap in the current understanding of BMG strength and failure mechanism by resolving the conflicts on notch effects and may inspire re-interpretation of previous reports on BMG fracture toughness where pre-existing notches were routinely adopted.

  4. Skin effect and interaction of short laser pulses with dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozmus, W.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    1990-12-01

    Interaction of intense, subpicosecond laser pulses with plasmas is discussed. A self-consistent analytical model of the anomalous and normal skin effects in plasmas with steplike density profile is proposed. The heat transport is described by classical Spitzer conductivity with new boundary conditions accounting for laser absorption in the thin skin layer. Self-similar solutions for the heat-conduction problem are obtained, and the scaling laws for important plasma parameters are also discussed. Predictions are found to be consistent with recent experimental results.

  5. Proximity-Induced Anomalous Hall Effect in Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiyong; Tang, Chi; Sachs, Raymond; Barlas, Yafis; Shi, Jing

    2014-03-01

    Pre-patterned graphene devices are transferred from SiO2/Si to atomically flat magnetic insulator thin films, yttrium iron garnet (YIG) deposited by a laser molecular beam epitaxial system on gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG) substrate. Room temperature Raman spectroscopy reveals both single-layer graphene and YIG characteristic peaks. In addition to the ordinary Hall effect, there is a clear non-linear Hall component correlated with the magnetization of the YIG films, which we attribute to the anomalous Hall effect (AHE). The magnitude of AHE in graphene/YIG devices decreases as temperature increases. With device-to-device variations, in some devices, AHE persists to room temperature, indicating a strong proximity-induced exchange interaction. By sweeping top gate voltages, one can tune the carrier density across the Dirac point. We also find that the carrier mobility is not significantly different in graphene/YIG. As the graphene is tuned from the electron- to hole-type, the ordinary Hall changes the sign as expected, but the sign of the AHE contribution remains the same. It suggests that AHE does not simply originate from the carrier density change which is responsible for the ordinary Hall effect, but is related to the spin-orbit interaction in the system. This work was supported in part by DOE and NSF.

  6. Anomalous conductivity and secondary electron emission in Hall effect thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Garrigues, L.; Hagelaar, G. J. M.; Boniface, C.; Boeuf, J. P.

    2006-12-15

    This paper is devoted to the study of the effects of electron-wall interactions on cross magnetic field electron momentum and energy losses in Hall effect thrusters. By coupling a semianalytical model of the wall sheath similar to models used by several authors in this context, with a two-dimensional hybrid simulation of a Hall effect thruster, we find that the cross magnetic field conductivity enhanced by electron-wall collisions and secondary electron emission is not sufficient to explain the conductivity deduced from experiments. Calculated current-voltage curves including electron-wall collisions from a standard sheath model as the sole 'anomalous' conductivity mechanism do not reproduce the measurements, especially at high discharge voltages, and for various wall ceramics. Results also show that a one-dimensional description of electron-wall collisions with a constant radial plasma density profile as used by many authors leads to an overestimation of the contribution of electron-wall interactions to cross magnetic field conductivity.

  7. Enhancement of the anomalous Hall effect in ternary alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauber, Katarina; Hönemann, Albert; Fedorov, Dmitry V.; Gradhand, Martin; Mertig, Ingrid

    2015-06-01

    We consider ternary alloys of the composition Cu(Mn 1 -wTw) , where T corresponds to different nonmagnetic impurities. As was discovered by Fert et al. [J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 24, 231 (1981)], 10.1016/0304-8853(81)90079-2, the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in the binary Cu(Mn) alloy can be significantly enhanced by means of codoping using 5 d impurities. Moreover, they attempted to quantify the spin Hall effect (SHE) in Cu (T ) binary alloys via the AHE measured in the related ternary alloys. Here, we present a theoretical study serving as a detailed background of the experimental findings by clarifying the conditions required for a maximal enhancement of the AHE as well as the relations between both Hall effects. Based on the proposed approach, we perform first-principles calculations for several Cu(Mn 1 -wTw)[T = Au, Bi, Ir, Lu, Sb, or Ta] alloys, which are underpinned by theoretical investigations via Matthiessen's rule.

  8. Gamma Radiation Effects on Peanut Skin Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    de Camargo, Adriano Costa; de Souza Vieira, Thais Maria Ferreira; Regitano-D’Arce, Marisa Aparecida Bismara; Calori-Domingues, Maria Antonia; Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange Guidolin

    2012-01-01

    Peanut skin, which is removed in the peanut blanching process, is rich in bioactive compounds with antioxidant properties. The aims of this study were to measure bioactive compounds in peanut skins and evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on their antioxidant activity. Peanut skin samples were treated with 0.0, 5.0, 7.5, or 10.0 kGy gamma rays. Total phenolics, condensed tannins, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity were evaluated. Extracts obtained from the peanut skins were added to refined-bleached-deodorized (RBD) soybean oil. The oxidative stability of the oil samples was determined using the Oil Stability Index method and compared to a control and synthetic antioxidants (100 mg/kg BHT and 200 mg/kg TBHQ). Gamma radiation changed total phenolic content, total condensed tannins, total flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity. All extracts, gamma irradiated or not, presented increasing induction period (h), measured by the Oil Stability Index method, when compared with the control. Antioxidant activity of the peanut skins was higher than BHT. The present study confirmed that gamma radiation did not affect the peanut skin extracts’ antioxidative properties when added to soybean oil. PMID:22489142

  9. Gamma radiation effects on peanut skin antioxidants.

    PubMed

    de Camargo, Adriano Costa; de Souza Vieira, Thais Maria Ferreira; Regitano-D'Arce, Marisa Aparecida Bismara; Calori-Domingues, Maria Antonia; Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange Guidolin

    2012-01-01

    Peanut skin, which is removed in the peanut blanching process, is rich in bioactive compounds with antioxidant properties. The aims of this study were to measure bioactive compounds in peanut skins and evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on their antioxidant activity. Peanut skin samples were treated with 0.0, 5.0, 7.5, or 10.0 kGy gamma rays. Total phenolics, condensed tannins, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity were evaluated. Extracts obtained from the peanut skins were added to refined-bleached-deodorized (RBD) soybean oil. The oxidative stability of the oil samples was determined using the Oil Stability Index method and compared to a control and synthetic antioxidants (100 mg/kg BHT and 200 mg/kg TBHQ). Gamma radiation changed total phenolic content, total condensed tannins, total flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity. All extracts, gamma irradiated or not, presented increasing induction period (h), measured by the Oil Stability Index method, when compared with the control. Antioxidant activity of the peanut skins was higher than BHT. The present study confirmed that gamma radiation did not affect the peanut skin extracts' antioxidative properties when added to soybean oil. PMID:22489142

  10. Biological effects of rutin on skin aging.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seong Jin; Lee, Sung-Nae; Kim, Karam; Joo, Da Hye; Shin, Shanghun; Lee, Jeongju; Lee, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Jihyun; Kwon, Seung Bin; Kim, Min Jung; Ahn, Kyu Joong; An, In-Sook; An, Sungkwan; Cha, Hwa Jun

    2016-07-01

    Rutin, a quercetin glycoside is a member of the bioflavonoid family which is known to possess antioxidant properties. In the present study, we aimed to confirm the anti‑aging effects of rutin on human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) and human skin. We examined the effects of rutin using a cell viability assay, senescence-associated-β-galactosidase assay, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and by measuring reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging activity in vitro. To examine the effects of rutin in vivo, rutin‑containing cream was applied to human skin. A double-blind clinical study was conducted in 40 subjects aged between 30-50 years and divided into control and experimental groups. The test material was applied for 4 weeks. After 2 and 4 weeks, dermal density, skin elasticity, the length and area of crow's feet, and number of under-eye wrinkles following the application of either the control or the rutin-containing cream were analyzed. Rutin increased the mRNA expression of collagen, type I, alpha 1 (COL1A1) and decreased the mRNA expression of matrix metallopeptidase 1 (MMP1) in HDFs. We verified that ROS scavenging activity was stimulated by rutin in a dose‑dependent manner and we identified that rutin exerted protective effects under conditions of oxidative stress. Furthermore, rutin increased skin elasticity and decreased the length, area and number of wrinkles. The consequences of human aging are primarily visible on the skin, such as increased wrinkling, sagging and decreased elasticity. Overall, this study demonstrated the biological effects of rutin on ROS-induced skin aging. PMID:27220601

  11. Anomalous Hall effect in Cr doped FeSi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadam, Sankararao; Lakhani, Archana; Singh, Durgesh; Prasad, Rudra; Ganesan, V.

    2016-05-01

    Investigations of economically affordable bulk materials for the spin based electronics are in huge demand. In this direction, electrical and Hall transport properties of the polycrystalline Cr doped Kondo insulator FeSi, i.e Fe0.975Cr0.025Si is reported. Well agreement between temperature dependence of the Hall and linear resistivity are observed. The observed minimum at ~19K in the resistivity is attributed to the ferromagnetic transition temperature (TC). Anomalous Hall resistivity is seen in the itinerant ferromagnet, Fe0.975Cr0.025Si well below the TC. The obtained Hall resistivity is comparable with that of the spintronic material Fe0.9Co0.1Si. The present study proves that the electrical transport properties of bulk materials made by low cost elements such as Fe, Cr and Si exhibits large magnetic field effects and are useful for the spintronics applications, unlike spintronics material (Ga, Mn)As that demand higher costs.

  12. Field-effect modulation of anomalous Hall effect in diluted ferromagnetic topological insulator epitaxial films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, CuiZu; Liu, MinHao; Zhang, ZuoCheng; Wang, YaYu; He, Ke; Xue, QiKun

    2016-03-01

    High quality chromium (Cr) doped three-dimensional topological insulator (TI) Sb2Te3 films are grown via molecular beam epitaxy on heat-treated insulating SrTiO3 (111) substrates. We report that the Dirac surface states are insensitive to Cr doping, and a perfect robust long-range ferromagnetic order is unveiled in epitaxial Sb2- x Cr x Te3 films. The anomalous Hall effect is modulated by applying a bottom gate, contrary to the ferromagnetism in conventional diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMSs), here the coercivity field is not significantly changed with decreasing carrier density. Carrier-independent ferromagnetism heralds Sb2- x Cr x Te3 films as the base candidate TI material to realize the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect. These results also indicate the potential of controlling anomalous Hall voltage in future TI-based magneto-electronics and spintronics.

  13. Anomalous Hall effect in the noncollinear antiferromagnet Mn5Si3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sürgers, Christoph; Kittler, Wolfram; Wolf, Thomas; Löhneysen, Hilbert v.

    2016-05-01

    Metallic antiferromagnets with noncollinear orientation of magnetic moments provide a playground for investigating spin-dependent transport properties by analysis of the anomalous Hall effect. The intermetallic compound Mn5Si3 is an intinerant antiferromagnet with collinear and noncollinear magnetic structures due to Mn atoms on two inequivalent lattice sites. Here, magnetotransport measurements on polycrstalline thin films and a single crystal are reported. In all samples, an additional contribution to the anomalous Hall effect attributed to the noncollinear arrangment of magnetic moments is observed. Furthermore, an additional magnetic phase between the noncollinear and collinear regimes above a metamagnetic transition is resolved in the single crystal by the anomalous Hall effect.

  14. Effects of climate changes on skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Balato, Nicola; Megna, Matteo; Ayala, Fabio; Balato, Anna; Napolitano, Maddalena; Patruno, Cataldo

    2014-02-01

    Global climate is changing at an extraordinary rate. Climate change (CC) can be caused by several factors including variations in solar radiation, oceanic processes, and also human activities. The degree of this change and its impact on ecological, social, and economical systems have become important matters of debate worldwide, representing CC as one of the greatest challenges of the modern age. Moreover, studies based on observations and predictive models show how CC could affect human health. On the other hand, only a few studies focus on how this change may affect human skin. However, the skin is the most exposed organ to environment; therefore, it is not surprising that cutaneous diseases are inclined to have a high sensitivity to climate. The current review focuses on the effects of CC on skin diseases showing the numerous factors that are contributing to modify the incidence, clinical pattern and natural course of some dermatoses. PMID:24404995

  15. Anomalous Josephson effect in semiconducting nanowires as a signature of the topologically nontrivial phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterov, Konstantin N.; Houzet, Manuel; Meyer, Julia S.

    2016-05-01

    We study Josephson junctions made of semiconducting nanowires with Rashba spin-orbit coupling, where superconducting correlations are induced by the proximity effect. In the presence of a suitably directed magnetic field, the system displays the anomalous Josephson effect: a nonzero supercurrent in the absence of a phase bias between two superconductors. We show that this anomalous current can be increased significantly by tuning the nanowire into the helical regime. In particular, in a short junction, a large anomalous current is a signature for topologically nontrivial superconductivity in the nanowire.

  16. Magnetic Topological Insulators and Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Xufeng

    The engineering of topological surface states is a key to realize applicable devices based on topological insulators (TIs). Among various proposals, introducing magnetic impurities into TIs has been proven to be an effective way to open a surface gap and integrate additional ferromagnetism with the original topological order. In this Dissertation, we study both the intrinsic electrical and magnetic properties of the magnetic TI thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. By doping transition element Cr into the host tetradymite-type V-VI semiconductors, we achieve robust ferromagnetic order with a strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. With additional top-gating capability, we realize the electric-field-controlled ferromagnetism in the magnetic TI systems, and demonstrate such magneto-electric effects can be effectively manipulated, depending on the interplays between the band topology, magnetic exchange coupling, and structural engineering. Most significantly, we report the observation of quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in the Cr-doped (BiSb)2Te3 samples where dissipationless chiral edge conduction is realized in the macroscopic millimeter-size devices without the presence of any external magnetic field, and the stability of the quantized Hall conductance of e2/h is well-maintained as the film thickness varies across the 2D hybridization limit. With additional quantum confinement, we discover the metal-to-insulator switching between two opposite QAHE states, and reveal the universal QAHE phase diagram in the thin magnetic TI samples. In addition to the uniform magnetic TIs, we further investigate the TI/Cr-doped TI bilayer structures prepared by the modulation-doped growth method. By controlling the magnetic interaction profile, we observe the Dirac hole-mediated ferromagnetism and develop an effective way to manipulate its strength. Besides, the giant spin-orbit torque in such magnetic TI-based heterostructures enables us to demonstrate the current

  17. Thickness Dependence of the Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in Magnetic Topological Insulator Films.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiao; Feng, Yang; Wang, Jing; Ou, Yunbo; Hao, Zhenqi; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Zuocheng; Zhang, Liguo; Lin, Chaojing; Liao, Jian; Li, Yongqing; Wang, Li-Li; Ji, Shuai-Hua; Chen, Xi; Ma, Xucun; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Wang, Yayu; He, Ke; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2016-08-01

    The evolution of the quantum anomalous Hall effect with the thickness of Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2 Te3 magnetic topological insulator films is studied, revealing how the effect is caused by the interplay of the surface states, band-bending, and ferromagnetic exchange energy. Homogeneity in ferromagnetism is found to be the key to high-temperature quantum anomalous Hall material. PMID:27166762

  18. Effect of interstitial low level laser stimulation in skin density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Seulki; Ha, Myungjin; Lee, Sangyeob; Yu, Sungkon; Park, Jihoon; Radfar, Edalat; Hwang, Dong Hyun; Lee, Han A.; Kim, Hansung; Jung, Byungjo

    2016-03-01

    As the interest in skin was increased, number of studies on skin care also have been increased. The reduction of skin density is one of the symptoms of skin aging. It reduces elasticity of skin and becomes the reason of wrinkle formation. Low level laser therapy (LLLT) has been suggested as one of the effective therapeutic methods for skin aging as in hasten to change skin density. This study presents the effect of a minimally invasive laser needle system (MILNS) (wavelength: 660nm, power: 20mW) in skin density. Rabbits were divided into three groups. Group 1 didn't receive any laser stimulation as a control group. Group 2 and 3 as test groups were exposed to MILNS with energy of 8J and 6J on rabbits' dorsal side once a week, respectively. Skin density of rabbits was measured every 12 hours by using an ultrasound skin scanner.

  19. Anomalous Hall effect on the surface of topological Kondo insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, E. J.; Ostrovsky, P. M.; Dzero, M.; Levchenko, A.

    2016-07-01

    We calculate the anomalous Hall conductivity σx y of the surface states in cubic topological Kondo insulators. We consider a generic model for the surface states with three Dirac cones on the (001) surface. The Fermi velocity, the Fermi momentum, and the Zeeman energy in different Dirac pockets may be unequal. The microscopic impurity potential mediates mixed intra- and interband extrinsic scattering processes. Our calculation of σx y is based on the Kubo-Streda diagrammatic approach. It includes diffractive skew scattering contributions originating from the rare two-impurity complexes. Remarkably, these contributions yield anomalous Hall conductivity that is independent of impurity concentration, and thus is of the same order as other known extrinsic side jump and skew scattering terms. We discuss various special cases of our results and the experimental relevance of our study in the context of the recent hysteretic magnetotransport data in SmB6 samples.

  20. A new approach to plasmasphere refilling: Anomalous plasma effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.

    1991-01-01

    During the last 10 months of the grant, both laminar and anomalous plasma processes occurring during the refilling of the outer plasmasphere after magnetic storms are investigated. Theoretical investigations were based on two types of models: (1) two-stream hydrodynamic model in which plasma flows from the conjugate ionospheres are treated as separate fluids and the ion temperature anisotropies are treated self-consistently; and (2) large-scale particle-in-cell code.

  1. Higgs mechanism, phase transitions, and anomalous Hall effect in three-dimensional topological superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira, Flavio S.; Sudbø, Asle; Eremin, Ilya

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate that the Higgs mechanism in three-dimensional topological superconductors exhibits unique features with experimentally observable consequences. The Higgs model we discuss has two superconducting components and an axionlike magnetoelectric term with the phase difference of the superconducting order parameters playing the role of the axion field. Due to this additional term, quantum electromagnetic and phase fluctuations lead to a robust topologically nontrivial state that holds also in the presence of interactions. In this sense, we show that the renormalization flow of the topologically nontrivial phase cannot be continuously deformed into a topologically nontrivial one. One consequence of our analysis of quantum critical fluctuations is the possibility of having a first-order phase transition in the bulk and a second-order phase transition on the surface. We also explore another consequence of the axionic Higgs electrodynamics, namely, the anomalous Hall effect. In the low-frequency London regime an anomalous Hall effect is induced in the presence of an applied electric field parallel to the surface. This anomalous Hall current is induced by a Lorentz-like force arising from the axion term, and it involves the relative superfluid velocity of the superconducting components. The anomalous Hall current has a negative sign, a situation reminiscent of but quite distinct in physical origin from the anomalous Hall effect observed in high-Tc superconductors. In contrast to the latter, the anomalous Hall effect in topological superconductors is nondissipative and occurs in the absence of vortices.

  2. Separation of spin Seebeck effect and anomalous Nernst effect in Co/Cu/YIG

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Dai; Li, Yufan; Qu, D.; Chien, C. L.; Jin, Xiaofeng

    2015-05-25

    The spin Seebeck effect (SSE) and Anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) have been observed in Co/Cu/YIG (yttrium iron garnet) multi-layer structure, where the ferromagnetic insulator YIG acts as the pure spin injector and the ferromagnetic metal Co layer acts as the spin current detector. With the insertion of 5 nm Cu layer, the two ferromagnetic layers are decoupled, thus allowing unambiguous separation of the SSE and ANE contributions under the same experimental conditions in the same sample.

  3. Large anomalous Hall effect in a non-collinear antiferromagnet at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuji, Satoru; Kiyohara, Naoki; Higo, Tomoya

    2015-11-12

    In ferromagnetic conductors, an electric current may induce a transverse voltage drop in zero applied magnetic field: this anomalous Hall effect is observed to be proportional to magnetization, and thus is not usually seen in antiferromagnets in zero field. Recent developments in theory and experiment have provided a framework for understanding the anomalous Hall effect using Berry-phase concepts, and this perspective has led to predictions that, under certain conditions, a large anomalous Hall effect may appear in spin liquids and antiferromagnets without net spin magnetization. Although such a spontaneous Hall effect has now been observed in a spin liquid state, a zero-field anomalous Hall effect has hitherto not been reported for antiferromagnets. Here we report empirical evidence for a large anomalous Hall effect in an antiferromagnet that has vanishingly small magnetization. In particular, we find that Mn3Sn, an antiferromagnet that has a non-collinear 120-degree spin order, exhibits a large anomalous Hall conductivity of around 20 per ohm per centimetre at room temperature and more than 100 per ohm per centimetre at low temperatures, reaching the same order of magnitude as in ferromagnetic metals. Notably, the chiral antiferromagnetic state has a very weak and soft ferromagnetic moment of about 0.002 Bohr magnetons per Mn atom (refs 10, 12), allowing us to switch the sign of the Hall effect with a small magnetic field of around a few hundred oersted. This soft response of the large anomalous Hall effect could be useful for various applications including spintronics--for example, to develop a memory device that produces almost no perturbing stray fields. PMID:26524519

  4. Novel effects of diosgenin on skin aging.

    PubMed

    Tada, Yayoi; Kanda, Naoko; Haratake, Akinori; Tobiishi, Megumi; Uchiwa, Hideyo; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2009-06-01

    Extracts of Dioscorea coomposita or Dioscorea villosa are consumed as supplemental health foods at the time of climacteric. The extracts contain large amounts of the plant steroid, diosgenin. Here, we studied the safety and efficacy of diosgenin against skin aging at the time of climacteric. In vitro, diosgenin enhanced DNA synthesis in a human 3D skin equivalent model, and increased bromodeoxyuridine uptake and intracellular cAMP level in adult human keratinocytes. The increase of bromodeoxyuridine uptake by diosgenin was blocked by an adenylate cyclase inhibitor, but not by antisense oligonucleotides against estrogen receptor alpha, estrogen receptor beta or an orphan G-protein-coupled receptor, GPR30, indicating the involvement of cAMP but not estrogen receptor alpha, estrogen receptor beta or GPR30. In vivo, administration of diosgenin improved the epidermal thickness in the ovariectomized mice, a climacteric model, without altering the degree of fat accumulation. In order to examine the safety of diosgenin, diosgenin and 17beta-estradiol were administered to breast cancer-burdened mice. The results revealed that while 17beta-estradiol accelerated the tumor growth, diosgenin did not show this effect. Our finding, a restoration of keratinocyte proliferation in aged skin, suggests that diosgenin may have potential as a safe health food for climacteric. PMID:19428439

  5. Flutter effect and emission in the region of anomalous and normal doppler effects

    SciTech Connect

    Nemtsov, B.E.

    1986-06-01

    This paper investigates the excitation (flutter) of a membrane in the flow of a liquid of finite depth due to the emission of long gravity waves. It is shown that loss of stability occurs due to predominance of emission of gravity waves of negative energy (anomalous Doppler effect) over waves of positive energy. Estimates of typical increments are presented; the instability develops during a period that approximately equals 1/7 sec.

  6. Skin and bulk temperature difference at Lake Tahoe: A case study on lake skin effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R. Chris; Hook, Simon J.; Schneider, Philipp; Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    2013-09-01

    water, infrared radiometers on satellites measure radiation leaving from the surface skin layer and therefore the retrieved temperature is representative of the skin layer. This is slightly different from the bulk layer deeper in the water where various floating thermometers take temperature measurements to validate satellite measurements. The difference between the bulk and skin temperature (skin effect) must be understood to properly validate schemes that use surface skin temperature to infer bulk temperatures. Further skin temperatures retrieved over inland waters may show different patterns to those retrieved over oceans due to differences in conditions such as wind speed, aerosols, and elevation. We have analyzed the differences between the skin and bulk temperatures at four permanent monitoring stations (buoys) located on Lake Tahoe since 1999 and compared the results with similar studies over the ocean typically obtained from boat cruises. Skin effect distributions were found to be consistent across the buoys; however, the diurnal behavior of the skin effect was slightly different and shown to be related to wind speed measured at an individual buoy. When wind speed was less than 2 m s-1, the skin temperature osclillated and greatly increased the uncertainty in the skin effect reported over Lake Tahoe. When downwelling sky radiation was increased from clouds or high humidity, this led to nighttime skin temperatures that were warmer than bulk temperatures by as much as 0.5 K. The size of the warm skin effect is larger than other ocean studies that observed warm nighttime skin values around 0.1 K. The nighttime skin effect was seen to be more consistent with a smaller standard deviation compared to the daytime skin effect. The nighttime skin behavior had a mean and standard deviation that ranged between 0.3 and 0.5 K and between 0.3 and 0.4 K, respectively. In contrast, daytime skin effect was strongly influenced by direct solar illumination and typically had a

  7. Absence of anomalous Nernst effect in spin Seebeck effect of Pt/YIG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, B. F.; Huang, S. Y.; Qu, D.; Chien, C. L.

    2016-01-01

    The Pt/YIG structure has been widely used to study spin Seebeck effect (SSE), inverse spin Hall effect, and other pure spin current phenomena. However, the magnetic proximity effect in Pt when in contact with YIG, and the potential anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) may compromise the spin current phenomena in Pt/YIG. By inserting a Cu layer of various thicknesses between Pt and YIG, we have separated the signals from the SSE and that of the ANE. It is demonstrated that the thermal voltage in Pt/YIG mainly comes from spin current due to the longitudinal SSE with negligible contribution from the ANE.

  8. Sun’s effect on skin

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The skin uses sunlight to help manufacture vitamin D, which is important for normal bone formation. But sometimes its ultraviolet light can be very detrimental. Within the skin's epidermal (outer) layer ...

  9. Sun’s effect on skin

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The skin uses sunlight to help manufacture vitamin D, which is important for normal bone formation. But sometimes its ultraviolet light can be ... to age prematurely. Suntanning occurs because exposure to sunlight causes the skin to produce more melanin and ...

  10. Anomalous Hall Effect on the surface of topological Kondo insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Elio; Ostrovsky, Pavel; Dzero, Maxim; Levchenko, Alex

    We calculate the anomalous Hall conductivity σxy of surface states on three dimensional topological Kondo insulators with cubic symmetry and multiple Dirac cones. We treat a generic model in which the Fermi velocity, the Fermi momentum and the Zeeman energy in different pockets may be unequal and in which the microscopic impurity potential is short ranged on the scale of the smallest Fermi wavelength. Our calculation of σxy to the zeroth (i.e. leading) order in impurity concentration is based on the Kubo-Smrcka-Streda diagrammatic approach. It also includes certain extrinsic contributions with a single cross of impurity lines, which are of the same order in impurity concentration and were, to the best of our knowledge, scrutinized in a single band model, only. We discuss various special cases of our result and the experimental relevance of our study in the context of recent hysteretic magnetotransport data in SmB6 samples.

  11. Understanding Engineered Nanomaterial Skin Interactions and the Modulatory Effects of UVR Skin Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Jatana, Samreen; DeLouise, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    The study of engineered nanomaterials for the development of technological applications, nanomedicine, and nano-enabled consumer products is an ever expanding discipline as is the concern over the impact of nanotechnology on human environmental health and safety. In this review we discuss the current state of understanding of nanomaterial skin interactions with a specific emphasis on the effects of ultra-violet radiation (UVR) skin exposure. Skin is the largest organ of the body and is typically exposed to UVR on a daily basis. This necessitates the need to understand how UVR skin exposure can influence nanomaterial skin penetration, alter nanomaterial systemic trafficking, toxicity, and skin immune function. We explore the unique dichotomy that UVR has in inducing both deleterious and therapeutic effects on skin. The subject matter covered in this review is broadly informative and will raise awareness of potential increased risks from nanomaterial skin exposure associated with specific occupational and life style choices. The UVR induced immunosuppressive response in skin raises intriguing questions that motivate future research directions in the nanotoxicology and nanomedicine fields. PMID:24123977

  12. Adverse and beneficial effects of plant extracts on skin and skin disorders.

    PubMed

    Mantle, D; Gok, M A; Lennard, T W

    2001-06-01

    Plants are of relevance to dermatology for both their adverse and beneficial effects on skin and skin disorders respectively. Virtually all cultures worldwide have relied historically, or continue to rely on medicinal plants for primary health care. Approximately one-third of all traditional medicines are for treatment of wounds or skin disorders, compared to only 1-3% of modern drugs. The use of such medicinal plant extracts for the treatment of skin disorders arguably has been based largely on historical/anecdotal evidence, since there has been relatively little data available in the scientific literature, particularly with regard to the efficacy of plant extracts in controlled clinical trials. In this article therefore, adverse and beneficial aspects of medicinal plants relating to skin and skin disorders have been reviewed, based on recently available information from the peer-reviewed scientific literature. Beneficial aspects of medicinal plants on skin include: healing of wounds and burn injuries (especially Aloe vera); antifungal, antiviral, antibacterial and acaricidal activity against skin infections such as acne, herpes and scabies (especially tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) oil); activity against inflammatory/immune disorders affecting skin (e.g. psoriasis); and anti-tumour promoting activity against skin cancer (identified using chemically-induced two-stage carcinogenesis in mice). Adverse effects of plants on skin reviewed include: irritant contact dermatitis caused mechanically (spines, irritant hairs) or by irritant chemicals in plant sap (especially members of the Ranunculaceae, Euphorbiaceae and Compositae plant families); phytophotodermatitis resulting from skin contamination by plants containing furocoumarins, and subsequent exposure to UV light (notably members of the Umbelliferae and Rutaceae plant families); and immediate (type I) or delayed hypersensitivity contact reactions mediated by the immune system in individuals sensitized to plants

  13. Effects of surface charge on the anomalous light extinction from metallic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sijercic, Edin; Leung, P. T.

    2016-07-01

    The effects of extraneous surface charges on the anomalous extinction from metallic nanoparticles are studied via an application of the extended Mie theory by Bohren and Hunt. Due to the sensitivity of the higher multipolar resonance on the surface charges, it is found that quenching of the anomalous resonance can be observed with presence of only a modest amount of charges on these particles. The observed effects thus provide a rather sensitive mechanism for the monitoring of the neutrality of these nanoparticles using far field scattering approaches.

  14. Effect of anomalous transport coefficients on the thermal structure of the storm time auroral ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontheim, E. G.; Ong, R. S. B.; Roble, R. G.; Mayr, H. G.; Hoegy, W. H.; Ionson, J. A.; Baron, M. J.; Wickwar, V. B.; Vondrak, R. R.

    1978-01-01

    By analyzing an observed storm time auroral electron temperature profile it is shown that anomalous transport effects strongly influence the thermal structure of the disturbed auroral ionosphere. Such anomalous transport effects are a consequence of plasma turbulence, the existence of which has been established by a large number of observations in the auroral ionosphere. The electron and composite ion energy equations are solved with anomalous electron thermal conductivity and parallel electrical resistivity coefficients. The solutions are parameterized with respect to a phenomenological altitude-dependent anomaly coefficient A and are compared with an observed storm time electron temperature profile above Chatanika. The calculated temperature profile for the classical case (A = 1) disagrees considerably with the measured profile over most of the altitude range up to 450 km. It is shown that an anomaly coefficient with a sharp peak of the order of 10,000 centered around the F2 peak is consistent with observations.

  15. Spontaneous magnetization and anomalous Hall effect in an emergent Dice lattice.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Omjyoti; Przysiężna, Anna; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    Ultracold atoms in optical lattices serve as a tool to model different physical phenomena appearing originally in condensed matter. To study magnetic phenomena one needs to engineer synthetic fields as atoms are neutral. Appropriately shaped optical potentials force atoms to mimic charged particles moving in a given field. We present the realization of artificial gauge fields for the observation of anomalous Hall effect. Two species of attractively interacting ultracold fermions are considered to be trapped in a shaken two dimensional triangular lattice. A combination of interaction induced tunneling and shaking can result in an emergent Dice lattice. In such a lattice the staggered synthetic magnetic flux appears and it can be controlled with external parameters. The obtained synthetic fields are non-Abelian. Depending on the tuning of the staggered flux we can obtain either anomalous Hall effect or its quantized version. Our results are reminiscent of Anomalous Hall conductivity in spin-orbit coupled ferromagnets. PMID:26057635

  16. Spontaneous magnetization and anomalous Hall effect in an emergent Dice lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Omjyoti; Przysiężna, Anna; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2015-06-01

    Ultracold atoms in optical lattices serve as a tool to model different physical phenomena appearing originally in condensed matter. To study magnetic phenomena one needs to engineer synthetic fields as atoms are neutral. Appropriately shaped optical potentials force atoms to mimic charged particles moving in a given field. We present the realization of artificial gauge fields for the observation of anomalous Hall effect. Two species of attractively interacting ultracold fermions are considered to be trapped in a shaken two dimensional triangular lattice. A combination of interaction induced tunneling and shaking can result in an emergent Dice lattice. In such a lattice the staggered synthetic magnetic flux appears and it can be controlled with external parameters. The obtained synthetic fields are non-Abelian. Depending on the tuning of the staggered flux we can obtain either anomalous Hall effect or its quantized version. Our results are reminiscent of Anomalous Hall conductivity in spin-orbit coupled ferromagnets.

  17. Spontaneous magnetization and anomalous Hall effect in an emergent Dice lattice

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Omjyoti; Przysiężna, Anna; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    Ultracold atoms in optical lattices serve as a tool to model different physical phenomena appearing originally in condensed matter. To study magnetic phenomena one needs to engineer synthetic fields as atoms are neutral. Appropriately shaped optical potentials force atoms to mimic charged particles moving in a given field. We present the realization of artificial gauge fields for the observation of anomalous Hall effect. Two species of attractively interacting ultracold fermions are considered to be trapped in a shaken two dimensional triangular lattice. A combination of interaction induced tunneling and shaking can result in an emergent Dice lattice. In such a lattice the staggered synthetic magnetic flux appears and it can be controlled with external parameters. The obtained synthetic fields are non-Abelian. Depending on the tuning of the staggered flux we can obtain either anomalous Hall effect or its quantized version. Our results are reminiscent of Anomalous Hall conductivity in spin-orbit coupled ferromagnets. PMID:26057635

  18. Skin-lightening cosmetics: frequent, potentially severe adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2011-09-01

    Skin-lightening cosmetics are used by many women and men around the world. The products contain a variety of substances, which are often unknown to the users. Most of these products include topical corticosteroids, hydroquinone and mercury salts. Many other substances may be added. Several surveys and cohort studies, including several thousand individuals, have shown that regular application of skin-lightening cosmetics to large surface areas can have irreversible cutaneous adverse effects, such as patchy hyper- or hypopigmentation, skin atrophy, stretch marks and delayed wound healing, and can also mask or, on the contrary, promote or reactivate skin infections. Cases of skin cancer have been attributed to skin-lightening cosmetics. A Senegalese cohort study of 147 women showed a statistically significant increase in the risk of hypertension and diabetes linked to the use of skin-lightening agents. Other systemic adverse effects attributed to skin-lightening cosmetics include Cushing's syndrome, adrenal insufficiency, nephrotic syndrome, neurological disorders, and ocular disorders. Hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis, have also been attributed to these products. Many skin-lightening cosmetics contain substances that can harm the unborn child. For example, tretinoin is teratogenic while salicylic acid is feto-toxic. In practice, users are often unaware of the risk of severe adverse effects associated with skin-lightening cosmetics. Users should be informed of these adverse effects and encouraged to stop using these products, especially when skin disorders appear. PMID:21954516

  19. Effects of anomalous transport on lower hybrid electron heating

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, M.G.; Harvey, R.W.

    1981-02-01

    The transport of electron energy out of tokamaks is known to be far greater than that calculated using classical and neoclassical theory. However, low levels of non-axisymmetric magnetic field turbulence can couple the fast transport of electrons parallel to the magnetic field lines to radial transport, thus providing a plausible explanation for observed energy confinement. These models further predict that the electron loss rate is proportional to v/sub parallel bars/. This has subsequently been found to be consistent with data for runaway electrons in PLT, at energies up to 1 MeV. Recently it has been pointed out by Chan, Chiu and Ohkawa that anomalous transport processes should be taken into account in attempting to determine steady state electron distribution functions for cases involving RF electron tail heating, particularly in view of the v/sub parallel bars/ dependence of the loss rate. In this work these physical processes are modeled through a 2-D nonlinear program which describes the evolution of the electron distribution function in velocity magnitude; (v) and plasma radius (r), and which studies the efficiency of tail electron heating.

  20. Effects of anomalous salt features on caverns in Gulf Coast domes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Early solution miners encountered occasional difficulties with nonsymmetric caverns (including wings'' and chimneys''), gas releases, insoluble stringers, and excessive anhydrite sands.'' Apparently there was no early recognition of trends for these encounters, although certain areas were avoided after problems appeared consistently within them. Solution mining has now matured, and an accumulation of experience indicates that anomalous salt features occur on a number of Gulf Coast domes. Trends incorporating concentrations of anomalous features will be referred to as anomalous zones,'' or AZs (after Kupfer). The main objective of this Project is to determine the effects of AZ encounters on solution-mined caverns and related storage operations in domes. Geological features of salt domes related directly to cavern operations and AZs will be described briefly, but discussions of topics related generally to the evolution of Gulf Coast salt structures are beyond the scope of this Project.

  1. Effects of anomalous salt features on caverns in Gulf Coast domes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    Early solution miners encountered occasional difficulties with nonsymmetric caverns (including ``wings`` and ``chimneys``), gas releases, insoluble stringers, and excessive anhydrite ``sands.`` Apparently there was no early recognition of trends for these encounters, although certain areas were avoided after problems appeared consistently within them. Solution mining has now matured, and an accumulation of experience indicates that anomalous salt features occur on a number of Gulf Coast domes. Trends incorporating concentrations of anomalous features will be referred to as ``anomalous zones,`` or AZs (after Kupfer). The main objective of this Project is to determine the effects of AZ encounters on solution-mined caverns and related storage operations in domes. Geological features of salt domes related directly to cavern operations and AZs will be described briefly, but discussions of topics related generally to the evolution of Gulf Coast salt structures are beyond the scope of this Project.

  2. Large-Chern-number quantum anomalous Hall effect in thin-film topological crystalline insulators.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chen; Gilbert, Matthew J; Bernevig, B Andrei

    2014-01-31

    We theoretically predict that thin-film topological crystalline insulators can host various quantum anomalous Hall phases when doped by ferromagnetically ordered dopants. Any Chern number between ±4 can, in principle, be reached as a result of the interplay between (a) the induced Zeeman field, depending on the magnetic doping concentration, (b) the structural distortion, either intrinsic or induced by a piezoelectric material through the proximity effect, and (c) the thickness of the thin film. We propose a heterostructure to realize quantum anomalous Hall phases with Chern numbers that can be tuned by electric fields. PMID:24580476

  3. Proximity-Induced Ferromagnetism in Graphene Revealed by the Anomalous Hall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiyong; Tang, Chi; Sachs, Raymond; Barlas, Yafis; Shi, Jing

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in single-layer graphene exchange coupled to an atomically flat yttrium iron garnet (YIG) ferromagnetic thin film. The anomalous Hall conductance has magnitude of ˜0.09 (2 e2/h ) at low temperatures and is measurable up to ˜300 K . Our observations indicate not only proximity-induced ferromagnetism in graphene/YIG with a large exchange interaction, but also enhanced spin-orbit coupling that is believed to be inherently weak in ideal graphene. The proximity-induced ferromagnetic order in graphene can lead to novel transport phenomena such as the quantized AHE which are potentially useful for spintronics.

  4. Exploration of Anomalous Gravity Effects by rf-Pumped Magnetized High-T(c) Superconducting Oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Tony; Litchford, Ron; Peters, Randall; Thompson, Byran; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A number of anomalous gravitational effects have been reported in the scientific literature during recent years, but there has been no independent confirmation with regard to any of these claims. Therefore, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, in response to the propulsion challenges specified by NASA's Breakthrough Propulsion Physics (BPP) program, proposed to explore the possibility of observing anomalous gravitation behavior through the manipulation of Josephson junction effects in magnetized high-Tc superconducting oxides. The technical goal was to critically test this revolutionary physical claim and provide a rigorous, independent, empirical confirmation (or refutation) of anomalous effects related to the manipulation of gravity by radio frequency (rf)-pumped magnetized type-2 superconductors. Because the current empirical evidence for gravity modification is anecdotal, our objective was to design, construct, and meticulously implement a discriminating experiment, which would put these observations on a more firm footing within the scientific community. Our approach is unique in that we advocate the construction of an extremely sensitive torsion balance with which to measure gravity modification effects by rf-pumped type-2 superconductor test masses. This paper reviews the anecdotal evidence for anomalous gravity effects, describes the design and development of a simplified torsion balance experiment for empirically investigating these claims, and presents the results of preliminary experiments.

  5. Anomalous Hall effects in pseudo-single-crystal γ'-Fe4N thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabara, Kazuki; Tsunoda, Masakiyo; Kokado, Satoshi

    2016-05-01

    The anomalous Hall effects (AHE) were investigated at various temperatures for the pseudo-single-crystal Fe4N films, deposited on MgO substrates with changing the degree of order (S) of the nitrogen site. Both the anomalous Hall resistivity and the longitudinal resistivity simply decrease with lowering temperature for all the specimens. The AHE of the Fe4N films is presumed to arise from an intrinsic mechanism because of the relationship between the anomalous Hall resistivity and longitudinal resistivity. The anomalous Hall conductivity, σAH, exhibits a specific behavior at low temperature. In the case of the film with S = 0.93, the σAH drastically drops below 50 K, while it simply increases with lowering temperature in the range of 50-300 K. This low-temperature anomaly decays with decreasing S of the film and nearly vanishes in the films with low S. The threshold temperature and the dependence on S of the low-temperature anomaly of the σAH well correspond to those of the anisotropic magnetoresistance effects in the Fe4N films, reported in the literatures. From these results, it is suggested that the low-temperature anomaly of the σAH originates from the crystal field effect which reflects the structural transformation from a cubic to a tetragonal symmetry below 50 K and provides a modulation of the orbital angular momentum of the 3d orbitals at the Fermi level.

  6. Anomalous scaling in two models of passive scalar advection: effects of anisotropy and compressibility.

    PubMed

    Antonov, N V; Honkonen, J

    2001-03-01

    The problem of the effects of compressibility and large-scale anisotropy on anomalous scaling behavior is considered for two models describing passive advection of scalar density and tracer fields. The advecting velocity field is Gaussian, delta correlated in time, and scales with a positive exponent epsilon. Explicit inertial-range expressions for the scalar correlation functions are obtained; they are represented by superpositions of power laws with nonuniversal amplitudes and universal anomalous exponents (dependent only on epsilon and alpha, the compressibility parameter). The complete set of anomalous exponents for the pair correlation functions is found nonperturbatively, in any space dimension d, using the zero-mode technique. For higher-order correlation functions, the anomalous exponents are calculated to O(epsilon(2)) using the renormalization group. As in the incompressible case, the exponents exhibit a hierarchy related to the degree of anisotropy: the leading contributions to the even correlation functions are given by the exponents from the isotropic shell, in agreement with the idea of restored small-scale isotropy. As the degree of compressibility increases, the corrections become closer to the leading terms. The small-scale anisotropy reveals itself in the odd ratios of correlation functions: the skewness factor slowly decreases going down to small scales for the incompressible case, but starts to increase if alpha is large enough. The higher odd dimensionless ratios (hyperskewness, etc.) increase, thus signaling persistent small-scale anisotropy; this effect becomes more pronounced for larger values of alpha. PMID:11308763

  7. Anomalous DRELL-YAN Asymmetry from Hadronic or QCD Vacuum Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boer, Daniël

    The anomalously large cos (2π) asymmetry measured in the Drell-Yan process is discussed. Possible origins of this large deviation from the Lam-Tung relation are considered with emphasis on the comparison of two particular proposals: one that suggests it arises from a QCD vacuum effect and one that suggests it is a hadronic effect. Experimental signatures distinguishing these effects are discussed.

  8. Skin moisturizing effects of panthenol-based formulations.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Flávio B; Gaspar, Lorena R; Maia Campos, Patrícia M B G

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the skin moisturizing efficacy of formulations containing different concentrations of panthenol. Formulations supplemented with or without 0.5%, 1.0%, or 5.0% panthenol were applied daily to the forearms of healthy subjects. Skin conditions in terms of moisture and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) were analyzed before and after 15- and 30-day periods of application. The formulations were also applied after skin washing with sodium laureth sulphate (SLES) to evaluate the immediate effects on TEWL and skin moisture. Panthenol-containing formulations (1.0% and 5.0%) produced significant decreases in TEWL after 30-day applications. In skin washed with SLES, significant reduction of TEWL was evident two hours after application of formulations loaded with panthenol when compared with control and vehicle. It is concluded that skin integrity is maintained by the improved protective effect of 1.0% panthenol added to the formulation. PMID:21982351

  9. Temperature, pressure, and compositional effects on anomalous or "self" preservation of gas hydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stern, L.A.; Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    2003-01-01

    We previously reported on a thermal regime where pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate is preserved metastably in bulk at up to 75 K above its nominal temperature stability limit of 193 K at 0.1 MPa, following rapid release of the sample pore pressure. Large fractions (>50 vol.%) of methane hydrate can be preserved for 2-3 weeks by this method, reflecting the greatly suppressed rates of dissociation that characterize this "anomalous preservation" regime. This behavior contrasts that exhibited by methane hydrate at both colder (193-240 K) and warmer (272-290 K) isothermal test conditions, where dissociation rates increase monotonically with increasing temperature. Here, we report on recent experiments that further investigate the effects of temperature, pressure, and composition on anomalous preservation behavior. All tests conducted on sI methane hydrate yielded self-consistent results that confirm the highly temperature-sensitive but reproducible nature of anomalous preservation behavior. Temperature-stepping experiments conducted between 250 and 268 K corroborate the relative rates measured previously in isothermal preservation tests, and elevated pore-pressure tests showed that, as expected, dissociation rates are further reduced with increasing pressure. Surprisingly, sII methane-ethane hydrate was found to exhibit no comparable preservation effect when rapidly depressurized at 268 K, even though it is thermodynamically stable at higher temperatures and lower pressures than sI methane hydrate. These results, coupled with SEM imaging of quenched sample material from a variety of dissociation tests, strongly support our earlier arguments that ice-"shielding" effects provided by partial dissociation along hydrate grain surfaces do not serve as the primary mechanism for anomalous preservation. The underlying physical-chemistry mechanism(s) of anomalous preservation remains elusive, but appears to be based more on textural or morphological changes within the hydrate

  10. Effect of Seasonal Variation of Anomalous Condition on Radio Propagation in Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmanuel, Israel; Adeyemi, Babatunde; Ogolo, Emmanuel; Adediji, Adekunle

    Daily variation of effective earth radius factor and seasonal variation of refractivity gradients from surface to around 1000 m above ground level in the tropospheric layer are presented based on observation from the meteorological data obtain from ECMWF database. Thirty four years (1979 -2014) of data from surface and profile of Era Interim of the temperature and relative humidity are used to determine the surface anomalous propagation over some selected location I Nigeria. Estimation of anomalous propagation are observed for onset and peak of rainy and dry seasons. The occurrence of anomalous strongly depends on the local time and synoptic weather conditions which have an appreciable on the refractivity vertical profile, especially the seasonal north - south movement of inter tropical Convergence Zone (ITCD) which provide wet and dry seasonal variations of anomalous were also determined. Spatial distribution of refractivity gradient for both wet and dry seasons are also obtained. The highest occurrence of duct were noticed in the night and morning (00:00 UTC and 06:00UTC) across the country though it was low in the northern part of the country, while low or no occurrence of duct were observed in the afternoon and evening (12:00 UTC and 18:00 UTC). Also percentage occurrence of duct were also high and low during the wet and dry seasons respectively.

  11. Reaction of glycation and human skin: the effects on the skin and its components, reconstructed skin as a model.

    PubMed

    Pageon, H

    2010-06-01

    Skin is affected by the aging process and numerous modifications are observed. In human, with time the skin becomes drier, thinner, spots appear, elasticity decreases and stiffening increases, together with the appearance of wrinkles. These observations result from the overlapping of an intrinsic chronological aging (individual, genetic) and of an extrinsic aging (dependent on external factors like UV, pollution and lifestyle). One of the causes of aging is the appearance of the Advanced Glycosylation End Products (AGEs) during life. The glycation reaction results from a non-enzymatic reaction between a sugar and a free amine group of Lys, Arg amino acids in proteins. This reaction does not occur only in the skin, indeed, AGEs are also found in the kidney, lens, vessels, etc. These products are also responsible, because of their localization, of some pathologies related to diabetes. AGEs provoke biological modifications implying an activation of molecules synthesis (extracellular matrix, cytokines) and enzyme activation of matrix degradation (metalloproteinases). The UV effect on AGEs (like pentosidine) generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the extracellular matrix which could lead to additional deleterious effects. Molecules are described in the literature as inhibitors to this irreversible reaction i.e. aminoguanidine. To understand the consequences of the glycation in the skin, a system of reconstructed skin was developed with a collagen modified by glycation for the dermal component. In this system we observed that dermis and epidermis are both modified due to glycation (macromolecules synthesis, cytokines, metalloproteinases) and it is possible to test inhibitors of this reaction. In conclusion, in skin, glycation is involved in a very complex aging process and simultaneously affect, directly and indirectly, certain cells, their synthesis and the organization of the matrix. PMID:19896301

  12. Prospect of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall effect in doped kagome lattice Mott insulators.

    PubMed

    Guterding, Daniel; Jeschke, Harald O; Valentí, Roser

    2016-01-01

    Electronic states with non-trivial topology host a number of novel phenomena with potential for revolutionizing information technology. The quantum anomalous Hall effect provides spin-polarized dissipation-free transport of electrons, while the quantum spin Hall effect in combination with superconductivity has been proposed as the basis for realizing decoherence-free quantum computing. We introduce a new strategy for realizing these effects, namely by hole and electron doping kagome lattice Mott insulators through, for instance, chemical substitution. As an example, we apply this new approach to the natural mineral herbertsmithite. We prove the feasibility of the proposed modifications by performing ab-initio density functional theory calculations and demonstrate the occurrence of the predicted effects using realistic models. Our results herald a new family of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall insulators at affordable energy/temperature scales based on kagome lattices of transition metal ions. PMID:27185665

  13. Prospect of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall effect in doped kagome lattice Mott insulators

    PubMed Central

    Guterding, Daniel; Jeschke, Harald O.; Valentí, Roser

    2016-01-01

    Electronic states with non-trivial topology host a number of novel phenomena with potential for revolutionizing information technology. The quantum anomalous Hall effect provides spin-polarized dissipation-free transport of electrons, while the quantum spin Hall effect in combination with superconductivity has been proposed as the basis for realizing decoherence-free quantum computing. We introduce a new strategy for realizing these effects, namely by hole and electron doping kagome lattice Mott insulators through, for instance, chemical substitution. As an example, we apply this new approach to the natural mineral herbertsmithite. We prove the feasibility of the proposed modifications by performing ab-initio density functional theory calculations and demonstrate the occurrence of the predicted effects using realistic models. Our results herald a new family of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall insulators at affordable energy/temperature scales based on kagome lattices of transition metal ions. PMID:27185665

  14. Prospect of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall effect in doped kagome lattice Mott insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guterding, Daniel; Jeschke, Harald O.; Valentí, Roser

    2016-05-01

    Electronic states with non-trivial topology host a number of novel phenomena with potential for revolutionizing information technology. The quantum anomalous Hall effect provides spin-polarized dissipation-free transport of electrons, while the quantum spin Hall effect in combination with superconductivity has been proposed as the basis for realizing decoherence-free quantum computing. We introduce a new strategy for realizing these effects, namely by hole and electron doping kagome lattice Mott insulators through, for instance, chemical substitution. As an example, we apply this new approach to the natural mineral herbertsmithite. We prove the feasibility of the proposed modifications by performing ab-initio density functional theory calculations and demonstrate the occurrence of the predicted effects using realistic models. Our results herald a new family of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall insulators at affordable energy/temperature scales based on kagome lattices of transition metal ions.

  15. The framing effect and skin conductance responses

    PubMed Central

    Ring, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Individuals often rely on simple heuristics when they face complex choice situations under uncertainty. Traditionally, it has been proposed that cognitive processes are the main driver to evaluate different choice options and to finally reach a decision. Growing evidence, however, highlights a strong interrelation between judgment and decision-making (JDM) on the one hand, and emotional processes on the other hand. This also seems to apply to judgmental heuristics, i.e., decision processes that are typically considered to be fast and intuitive. In this study, participants are exposed to different probabilities of receiving an unpleasant electric shock. Information about electric shock probabilities is either positively or negatively framed. Integrated skin conductance responses (ISCRs) while waiting for electric shock realization are used as an indicator for participants' emotional arousal. This measure is compared to objective probabilities. I find evidence for a relation between emotional body reactions measured by ISCRs and the framing effect. Under negative frames, participants show significantly higher ISCRs while waiting for an electric shock to be delivered than under positive frames. This result might contribute to a better understanding of the psychological processes underlying JDM. Further studies are necessary to reveal the causality underlying this finding, i.e., whether emotional processes influence JDM or vice versa. PMID:26300747

  16. Effective Action for Fermions with Anomalous Magnetic Moment from Foldy-Wouthuysen Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barducci, A.; Giachetti, R.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we calculate the effective action for neutral particles with anomalous magnetic moment in an external magnetic and electric field. We show that we can take advantage from the Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation (FWT) for such systems, determined in our previous works: indeed, by this transformation we have explicitly evaluated the diagonalized Hamiltonian, allowing to present a closed form for the corresponding effective action and for the partition function at finite temperature from which the thermodynamical potentials can be calculated.

  17. Stacking order dependence of inverse spin Hall effect and anomalous Hall effect in spin pumping experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Il; Kim, Dong-Jun; Seo, Min-Su; Park, Byong-Guk; Park, Seung-Young

    2015-05-01

    The dependence of the measured DC voltage on the non-magnetic material (NM) in NM/CoFeB and CoFeB/NM bilayers is studied under ferromagnetic resonance conditions in a TE011 resonant cavity. The directional change of the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) voltage VISHE for the stacking order of the bilayer can separate the pure VISHE and the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) voltage VAHE utilizing the method of addition and subtraction. The Ta and Ti NMs show a broad deviation of the spin Hall angle θISH, which originates from the AHE in accordance with the high resistivity of NMs. However, the Pt and Pd NMs show that the kinds of NMs with low resistivity are consistent with the previously reported θISH values. Therefore, the characteristics that NM should simultaneously satisfy to obtain a reasonable VISHE value in bilayer systems are large θISH and low resistivity.

  18. Finite-volume effects in the muon anomalous magnetic moment on the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubin, Christopher; Blum, Thomas; Chau, Peter; Golterman, Maarten; Peris, Santiago; Tu, Cheng

    2016-03-01

    We investigate finite-volume effects in the hadronic vacuum polarization, with an eye toward the corresponding systematic error in the muon anomalous magnetic moment. We consider both recent lattice data as well as lowest-order, finite-volume chiral perturbation theory, in order to get a quantitative understanding. Even though leading-order chiral perturbation theory does not provide a good description of the hadronic vacuum polarization, it turns out that it gives a good representation of finite-volume effects. We find that finite-volume effects cannot be ignored when the aim is a few percent level accuracy for the leading-order hadronic contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment, even when using ensembles with mπL ≳4 and mπ˜200 MeV .

  19. Anomalously large isotope effect in the glass transition of water

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gainaru, Catalin; Agapov, Alexander L.; Fuentes-Landete, Violeta; Amann-Winkel, Katrin; Nelson, Helge; Köster, Karsten W.; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Novikov, Vladimir N.; Richert, Ranko; Böhmer, Roland; et al

    2014-11-24

    Here we present the discovery of an unusually large isotope effect in the structural relaxation and the glass transition temperature Tg of water. Dielectric relaxation spectroscopy of low-density as well as of vapor deposited amorphous water reveal Tg differences of 10±2K between H2O and D2O, sharply contrasting with other hydrogen bonded liquids for which H/D exchange increases Tg by typically less than 1K. We show that the large isotope effect and the unusual variation of relaxation times in water at low temperatures can be explained in terms of quantum effects. Thus, our findings shed new light on water's peculiar low-temperaturemore » dynamics and the possible role of quantum effects in its structural relaxation, and possibly in dynamics of other low molecular weight liquids.« less

  20. Anomalously large isotope effect in the glass transition of water

    SciTech Connect

    Gainaru, Catalin; Agapov, Alexander L.; Fuentes-Landete, Violeta; Amann-Winkel, Katrin; Nelson, Helge; Köster, Karsten W.; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Novikov, Vladimir N.; Richert, Ranko; Böhmer, Roland; Loerting, Thomas; Sokolov, Alexei P.

    2014-11-24

    Here we present the discovery of an unusually large isotope effect in the structural relaxation and the glass transition temperature Tg of water. Dielectric relaxation spectroscopy of low-density as well as of vapor deposited amorphous water reveal Tg differences of 10±2K between H2O and D2O, sharply contrasting with other hydrogen bonded liquids for which H/D exchange increases Tg by typically less than 1K. We show that the large isotope effect and the unusual variation of relaxation times in water at low temperatures can be explained in terms of quantum effects. Thus, our findings shed new light on water's peculiar low-temperature dynamics and the possible role of quantum effects in its structural relaxation, and possibly in dynamics of other low molecular weight liquids.

  1. Photoprotective and anti-skin-aging effects of eicosapentaenoic acid in human skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon Ho; Cho, Soyun; Lee, Serah; Kim, Kyu Han; Cho, Kwang Hyun; Eun, Hee Chul; Chung, Jin Ho

    2006-05-01

    Skin aging can be attributed to photoaging (extrinsic) and chronological (intrinsic) aging. Photoaging and intrinsic aging are induced by damage to human skin attributable to repeated exposure to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and to the passage of time, respectively. In our previous report, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) was found to inhibit UV-induced matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) expression in human dermal fibroblasts. Therefore, we investigated the effects of EPA on UV-induced skin damage and intrinsic aging by applying EPA topically to young and aged human skin, respectively. By immunohistochemical analysis and Western blotting, we found that topical application of EPA reduced UV-induced epidermal thickening and inhibited collagen decrease induced by UV light. It was also found that EPA attenuated UV-induced MMP-1 and MMP-9 expression by inhibiting UV-induced c-Jun phosphorylation, which is closely related to UV-induced activator protein-1 activation, and by inhibiting JNK and p38 activation. EPA also inhibited UV-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression without altering COX-1 expression. Moreover, it was found that EPA increased collagen and elastic fibers (tropoelastin and fibrillin-1) expression by increasing transformin growth factor-beta expression in aged human skin. Together, these results demonstrate that topical EPA has potential as an anti-skin-aging agent. PMID:16467281

  2. Revisiting the Anomalous rf Field Penetration into a Warm Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Oleg V. Polomarov; Constantine E. Theodosiou

    2005-06-24

    Radio-frequency [rf] waves do not penetrate into a plasma and are damped within it. The electric field of the wave and plasma current are concentrated near the plasma boundary in a skin layer. Electrons can transport the plasma current away from the skin layer due to their thermal motion. As a result, the width of the skin layer increases when electron temperature effects are taken into account. This phenomenon is called anomalous skin effect. The anomalous penetration of the rf electric field occurs not only for transversely propagating to the plasma boundary wave (inductively coupled plasmas) but also for the wave propagating along the plasma boundary (capacitively coupled plasmas). Such anomalous penetration of the rf field modifies the structure of the capacitive sheath. Recent advances in the nonlinear, non-local theory of the capacitive sheath are reported. It is shown that separating the electric field profile into exponential and non-exponential parts yields an efficient qualitative and quantitative description of the anomalous skin effect in both inductively and capacitively coupled plasma.

  3. Anomalously increased effective thermal conductivities of ethylene glycol-based nanofluids containing copper nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Eastman, J. A.; Choi, S. U. S.; Li, S.; Yu, W.; Thompson, L. J.

    2001-02-05

    It is shown that a ''nanofluid'' consisting of copper nanometer-sized particles dispersed in ethylene glycol has a much higher effective thermal conductivity than either pure ethylene glycol or ethylene glycol containing the same volume fraction of dispersed oxide nanoparticles. The effective thermal conductivity of ethylene glycol is shown to be increased by up to 40% for a nanofluid consisting of ethylene glycol containing approximately 0.3 vol% Cu nanoparticles of mean diameter <10 nm. The results are anomalous based on previous theoretical calculations that had predicted a strong effect of particle shape on effective nanofluid thermal conductivity, but no effect of either particle size or particle thermal conductivity.

  4. Giant Anomalous Hall Effect in the Chiral Antiferromagnet Mn3Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyohara, Naoki; Tomita, Takahiro; Nakatsuji, Satoru

    2016-06-01

    The external field control of antiferromagnetism is a significant subject both for basic science and technological applications. As a useful macroscopic response to detect magnetic states, the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) is known for ferromagnets, but it has never been observed in antiferromagnets until the recent discovery in Mn3Sn . Here we report another example of the AHE in a related antiferromagnet, namely, in the hexagonal chiral antiferromagnet Mn3Ge . Our single-crystal study reveals that Mn3Ge exhibits a giant anomalous Hall conductivity |σx z|˜60 Ω-1 cm-1 at room temperature and approximately 380 Ω-1 cm-1 at 5 K in zero field, reaching nearly half of the value expected for the quantum Hall effect per atomic layer with Chern number of unity. Our detailed analyses on the anisotropic Hall conductivity indicate that in comparison with the in-plane-field components |σx z| and |σz y|, which are very large and nearly comparable in size, we find |σy x| obtained in the field along the c axis to be much smaller. The anomalous Hall effect shows a sign reversal with the rotation of a small magnetic field less than 0.1 T. The soft response of the AHE to magnetic field should be useful for applications, for example, to develop switching and memory devices based on antiferromagnets.

  5. Evidence for Anomalous Effects on the Current Evolution in Tokamak Operating Scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Casper, T; Jayakumar, R; Allen, S; Holcomb, C; Makowski, M; Pearlstein, L; Berk, H; Greenfield, C; Luce, T; Petty, C; Politzer, P; Wade, M; Murakami, M; Kessel, C

    2006-10-03

    Alternatives to the usual picture of advanced tokamak (AT) discharges are those that form when anomalous effects alter the plasma current and pressure profiles and those that achieve stationary characteristics through mechanisms so that a measure of desired AT features is maintained without external current-profile control. Regimes exhibiting these characteristics are those where the safety factor (q) evolves to a stationary profile with the on-axis and minimum q {approx} 1 and those with a deeply hollow current channel and high values of q. Operating scenarios with high fusion performance at low current and where the inductively driven current density achieves a stationary configuration with either small or non-existing sawteeth may enhance the neutron fluence per pulse on ITER and future burning plasmas. Hollow current profile discharges exhibit high confinement and a strong ''box-like'' internal transport barrier (ITB). We present results providing evidence for current profile formation and evolution exhibiting features consistent with anomalous effects or with self-organizing mechanisms. Determination of the underlying physical processes leading to these anomalous effects is important for scaling of current experiments for application in future burning plasmas.

  6. Large anomalous Hall effect in a non-collinear antiferromagnet Mn3Sn at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higo, Tomoya; Kiyohara, Naoki; Nakatsuji, Satoru

    Recent development in theoretical and experimental studies have provided a framework for understanding the anomalous Hall effect using Berry-phase concepts, and this perspective has led to predictions that, under certain conditions, a large anomalous Hall effect may appear in spin liquids and antiferromagnets. In this talk, we will present experimental results showing that the antiferromagnet Mn3Sn, which has a non-collinear 120-degree spin order, exhibits a large anomalous Hall effect. The magnitude of the Hall conductivity is ~ 20 Ω-1 cm-1 at room temperature and > 100 Ω-1 cm-1 at low temperatures. We found that a main component of the Hall signal, which is nearly independent of a magnetic field and magnetization, can change the sign with the reversal of a small applied field, corresponding to the rotation of the staggered moments of the non-collinear antiferromagnetic spin order which carries a very small net moment of a few of mμB. Supported by PRESTO, JST, and Grants-in-Aid for Program for Advancing Strategic International Networks to Accelerate the Circulation of Talented Researchers (No. R2604) and Scientific Research on Innovative Areas (15H05882 and 15H05883) from JSPS.

  7. Anomalous Hall effect in NiPt thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golod, T.; Rydh, A.; Krasnov, V. M.

    2011-08-01

    We have studied the Hall effect in sputtered NixPt1-x thin films with different Ni concentrations. Temperature, magnetic field, and angular dependencies are analyzed and the phase diagram of NiPt thin films is obtained. It is found that films with sub-critical Ni concentration exhibit cluster-glass behavior at low temperatures with a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy below the freezing temperature. Films with super-critical Ni concentration are ferromagnetic with parallel anisotropy. At the critical concentration the state of the film is strongly frustrated. Such films demonstrate canted magnetization with the easy axis rotating as a function of temperature. The magnetism appears via consecutive paramagnetic-cluster glass-ferromagnetic transitions, rather than a single second-order phase transition. But most remarkably, the extraordinary Hall effect changes sign at the critical concentration. We suggest that this is associated with a reconstruction of the electronic structure of the alloy at the normal metal-ferromagnet quantum phase transition.

  8. Chemical reaction at ferromagnet/oxide interface and its influence on anomalous Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yi-Wei; Teng, Jiao E-mail: ghyu@mater.ustb.edu.cn; Zhang, Jing-Yan; Liu, Yang; Chen, Xi; Li, Xu-Jing; Feng, Chun; Wang, Hai-Cheng; Li, Ming-Hua; Yu, Guang-Hua E-mail: ghyu@mater.ustb.edu.cn; Wu, Zheng-Long

    2014-09-08

    Chemical reactions at the ferromagnet/oxide interface in [Pt/Fe]{sub 3}/MgO and [Pt/Fe]{sub 3}/SiO{sub 2} multilayers before and after annealing were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results show that Fe atoms at the Fe/MgO interface were completely oxidized in the as-grown state and significantly deoxidized after vacuum annealing. However, only some of the Fe atoms at the Fe/SiO{sub 2} interface were oxidized and rarely deoxidized after annealing. The anomalous Hall effect was modified by this interfacial chemical reaction. The saturation anomalous Hall resistance (R{sub xy}) was greatly increased in the [Pt/Fe]{sub 3}/MgO multilayers after annealing and was 350% higher than that in the as-deposited film, while R{sub xy} of the [Pt/Fe]{sub 3}/SiO{sub 2} multilayer only increased 10% after annealing.

  9. Engineering the quantum anomalous Hall effect in graphene with uniaxial strains

    SciTech Connect

    Diniz, G. S. Guassi, M. R.; Qu, F.

    2013-12-28

    We theoretically investigate the manipulation of the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in graphene by means of the uniaxial strain. The values of Chern number and Hall conductance demonstrate that the strained graphene in presence of Rashba spin-orbit coupling and exchange field, for vanishing intrinsic spin-orbit coupling, possesses non-trivial topological phase, which is robust against the direction and modulus of the strain. Besides, we also find that the interplay between Rashba and intrinsic spin-orbit couplings results in a topological phase transition in the strained graphene. Remarkably, as the strain strength is increased beyond approximately 7%, the critical parameters of the exchange field for triggering the quantum anomalous Hall phase transition show distinct behaviors—decrease (increase) for strains along zigzag (armchair) direction. Our findings open up a new platform for manipulation of the QAHE by an experimentally accessible strain deformation of the graphene structure, with promising application on novel quantum electronic devices with high efficiency.

  10. Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in Hg_1-yMn_yTe Quantum Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chao-Xing; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-19

    The quantum Hall effect is usually observed when the two-dimensional electron gas is subjected to an external magnetic field, so that their quantum states form Landau levels. In this work we predict that a new phenomenon, the quantum anomalous Hall effect, can be realized in Hg{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}Te quantum wells, without the external magnetic field and the associated Landau levels. This effect arises purely from the spin polarization of the Mn atoms, and the quantized Hall conductance is predicted for a range of quantum well thickness and the concentration of the Mn atoms. This effect enables dissipationless charge current in spintronics devices.

  11. Prediction of Near-Room-Temperature Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect on Honeycomb Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Binghai; Wu, Shu-Chun; Shan, Guangcun

    2015-03-01

    Recently, this long-sought quantum anomalous Hall effect was realized in the magnetic topological insulator. However, the requirement of an extremely low temperature (~ 30 mK) hinders realistic applications. Based on honeycomb lattices comprised of Sn and Ge, which are found to be 2D topological insulators, we propose a quantum anomalous Hall platform with large energy gap of 0.34 and 0.06 eV, respectively. The ferromagnetic order forms in one sublattice of the honeycomb structure by controlling the surface functionalization rather than dilute magnetic doping, which is expected to be visualized by spin polarized STM in experiment. Strong coupling between the inherent quantum spin Hall state and ferromagnetism results in considerable exchange splitting and consequently an ferromagnetic insulator with large energy gap. The estimated mean-field Curie temperature is 243 and 509 K for Sn and Ge lattices, respectively. The large energy gap and high Curie temperature indicate the feasibility of the quantum anomalous Hall effect in the near-room-temperature and even room-temperature regions. We thank the helpful discussions with C. Felser, S. Kanugo, C.-X. Liu, Z. Wang, Y. Xu, K. Wu, and Y. Zhou.

  12. Large anomalous Hall effect driven by a nonvanishing Berry curvature in the noncolinear antiferromagnet Mn3Ge.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Ajaya K; Fischer, Julia Erika; Sun, Yan; Yan, Binghai; Karel, Julie; Komarek, Alexander C; Shekhar, Chandra; Kumar, Nitesh; Schnelle, Walter; Kübler, Jürgen; Felser, Claudia; Parkin, Stuart S P

    2016-04-01

    It is well established that the anomalous Hall effect displayed by a ferromagnet scales with its magnetization. Therefore, an antiferromagnet that has no net magnetization should exhibit no anomalous Hall effect. We show that the noncolinear triangular antiferromagnet Mn3Ge exhibits a large anomalous Hall effect comparable to that of ferromagnetic metals; the magnitude of the anomalous conductivity is ~500 (ohm·cm)(-1) at 2 K and ~50 (ohm·cm)(-1) at room temperature. The angular dependence of the anomalous Hall effect measurements confirms that the small residual in-plane magnetic moment has no role in the observed effect except to control the chirality of the spin triangular structure. Our theoretical calculations demonstrate that the large anomalous Hall effect in Mn3Ge originates from a nonvanishing Berry curvature that arises from the chiral spin structure, and that also results in a large spin Hall effect of 1100 (ħ/e) (ohm·cm)(-1), comparable to that of platinum. The present results pave the way toward the realization of room temperature antiferromagnetic spintronics and spin Hall effect-based data storage devices. PMID:27152355

  13. Solid-armature railguns without the velocity-skin effect

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, M.

    1991-01-01

    If the velocity-skin effect could be eliminated, solid-armature railguns might reach high velocity ({ge} 6 km/s) without forcing most of the armature current to pass through an arc. Even then, magnetic diffusion (the normal'' skin effect) will limit acceleration. In this paper, the performance limits for railguns which are free from the velocity-skin effect are investigated by deriving the upper limits for a specific kind of power supply. Previous performance estimates made for solid-armature railguns are examined in the light of these results and are found to be relatively very optimistic. A railgun design which limits the velocity-skin effect and which may allow improved performance for solid armatures is described. 6 refs.

  14. Solid-armature railguns without the velocity-skin effect

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, M.

    1991-12-31

    If the velocity-skin effect could be eliminated, solid-armature railguns might reach high velocity ({ge} 6 km/s) without forcing most of the armature current to pass through an arc. Even then, magnetic diffusion (the ``normal`` skin effect) will limit acceleration. In this paper, the performance limits for railguns which are free from the velocity-skin effect are investigated by deriving the upper limits for a specific kind of power supply. Previous performance estimates made for solid-armature railguns are examined in the light of these results and are found to be relatively very optimistic. A railgun design which limits the velocity-skin effect and which may allow improved performance for solid armatures is described. 6 refs.

  15. Large anomalous Hall effect driven by a nonvanishing Berry curvature in the noncolinear antiferromagnet Mn3Ge

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Ajaya K.; Fischer, Julia Erika; Sun, Yan; Yan, Binghai; Karel, Julie; Komarek, Alexander C.; Shekhar, Chandra; Kumar, Nitesh; Schnelle, Walter; Kübler, Jürgen; Felser, Claudia; Parkin, Stuart S. P.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that the anomalous Hall effect displayed by a ferromagnet scales with its magnetization. Therefore, an antiferromagnet that has no net magnetization should exhibit no anomalous Hall effect. We show that the noncolinear triangular antiferromagnet Mn3Ge exhibits a large anomalous Hall effect comparable to that of ferromagnetic metals; the magnitude of the anomalous conductivity is ~500 (ohm·cm)−1 at 2 K and ~50 (ohm·cm)−1 at room temperature. The angular dependence of the anomalous Hall effect measurements confirms that the small residual in-plane magnetic moment has no role in the observed effect except to control the chirality of the spin triangular structure. Our theoretical calculations demonstrate that the large anomalous Hall effect in Mn3Ge originates from a nonvanishing Berry curvature that arises from the chiral spin structure, and that also results in a large spin Hall effect of 1100 (ħ/e) (ohm·cm)−1, comparable to that of platinum. The present results pave the way toward the realization of room temperature antiferromagnetic spintronics and spin Hall effect–based data storage devices. PMID:27152355

  16. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Infrared Signature Suppression of Aircraft Skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jian Wei; Wang, Qiang; Kwon, Oh Joon

    During typical supersonic cruising, the temperature of the aircraft skin rises above 300 K due to aerodynamic heating. In this situation, aircraft-skin infrared (IR) suppression, used to minimize the radiation contrast from the background is a crucial survival technology. In the present study, a technique to evaluate the effectiveness of IR suppression of aircraft skin is proposed. For this purpose, a synthetic procedure based on numerical simulations has been developed. In this procedure, the thermal status of aircraft skin is obtained using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method for complex aircraft geometries. An IR signature model is proposed using a reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) technique. The detection range and the IR contrast are adopted as the performance indicators for the evaluation of the aircraft IR suppression. The influence of these factors related to the aircraft-skin radiation, such as aircraft-skin emissivity, surface temperature distribution and flight speed, on the IR contrast and the detection range is also studied. As a test case, the effectiveness of various IR suppression schemes was analyzed for a typical air combat situation. Then, the method is applied to clarify the contribution of each aircraft component to the IR suppression of the overall IR radiation. The results show that aircraft-skin temperature control and emissivity control are effective means to reduce the IR radiation and to achieve lower detection. The results can be used as a practical guide for designing future stealth aircraft.

  17. Radiation effects control: Eyes, skin. [space environment simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hightower, D.; Smathers, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    Adverse effects on the lens of the eye and the skin due to exposure to proton radiation during manned space flight were evaluated. Actual proton irradiation which might be encountered in space was simulated. Irradiation regimes included single acute exposures, daily fractionated exposures, and weekly fractionated exposures. Animals were exposed and then maintained and examined periodically until data sufficient to meet the objective were obtained. No significant skin effects were noted and no serious sight impairment was exhibited.

  18. Effect of contraceptives on the skin.

    PubMed

    1988-10-01

    Combined oral contraceptives (COCs) affect the skin 3 different ways. They decrease the amount of androgenic hormones produced in the ovaries and adrenal gland. They also limit the quantity of biologically active circulating testosterone. Finally, estrogen markedly decreases oil production in the sebaceous glands. Physicians should prescribe to women with acne a COC that is low in progestogen and high in estrogen. A biphasic pill with no more than 500 mcg norethisterone/day meets these requirements. If a woman is taking systemic antibiotics to treat acne, however, the physician should prescribe a biphasic pill containing 50 mcg ethinyl estradiol. Even though many believe that using COCs causes hair loss, there is little evidence to support it. Nevertheless, if a woman has indeed experienced hair loss, she should take a COC with a high estrogen to progestogen ratio. As in some pregnant women, cholasma may occur in women taking COCs when not protected from sunlight. Physicians need to prescribe the lowest possible dose of hormones in these women and counsel them to shield their face from sunlight. To err on the side of safety, women who have had a malignant melanoma should not use a hormonal contraceptive. In addition, women who have experienced many bouts of skin candidiasis should use an alternative contraceptive. Other skin disorders that they have been found to be more prevalent in women taking COCs include erythema nodosum, accelerated systemic lupus erythematosus, porphyria cutanea tarda, herpes gestationis, spider naevus, and telangiectasia. There also exists an association between dermatitis and barrier methods and spermicides. Some articles have suggested that copper containing IUDs have also cause a variety of skin disorders. PMID:3240155

  19. Anomalous coupling, top-mass and parton-shower effects in W + W - production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellm, J.; Gieseke, S.; Greiner, N.; Heinrich, G.; Plätzer, S.; Reuschle, C.; von Soden-Fraunhofen, J. F.

    2016-05-01

    We calculate the process ppto {W}+{W}-to {e}+{ν}_e{μ}-{overline{ν}}_{μ } at NLO QCD, including also effective field theory (EFT) operators mediating the ggW + W - interaction, which first occur at dimension eight. We further combine the NLO and EFT matrix elements produced by G oS am with the H erwig7/M atchbox framework, which offers the possibility to study the impact of a parton shower. We assess the effects of the anomalous couplings by comparing them to top-mass effects as well as uncertainties related to variations of the renormalisation, factorisation and hard shower scales.

  20. Anisotropic intrinsic anomalous Hall effect in ordered 3dPt alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongbin; Blügel, Stefan; Mokrousov, Yuriy

    2011-07-01

    By performing first-principles calculations, we investigate the intrinsic anomalous Hall conductivity (AHC) and its anisotropy in ordered L10 FePt, CoPt, and NiPt ferromagnets and their intermediate alloys. We demonstrate that the AHC in this family of compounds depends strongly on the direction of the magnetization M in the crystal. We predict that such pronounced orientational dependence in combination with the general decreasing trend of the AHC when going from FePt to NiPt leads to a sign change of the AHC upon rotating the magnetization direction in the crystal of CoPt alloy. We also suggest that, for a range of concentration x in CoxNi1-xPt and FexCo1-xPt alloys, it is possible to achieve a complete quenching of the anomalous Hall current for a certain direction of the magnetization in the crystal. By analyzing the spin-resolved AHC in 3dPt alloys, we endeavor to relate the overall trend of the AHC in these compounds to the changes in their densities of d states around the Fermi energy upon varying the atomic number. Moreover, we show the generality of the phenomenon of anisotropic anomalous Hall effect by demonstrating its occurrence within the three-band tight-binding model.

  1. Thermal conduction effects in human skin.

    PubMed

    Stoll, A M; Chianta, M A; Piergallini, J R

    1979-08-01

    To determine the maximum permissible temperature any material may attain without causing pain or burn on contact with bare skin, over 2000 observations were made of pain threshold during contact with materials at elevated temperatures. Six materials were used representing the full range of thermal properties from good conductors to good insulators. Time to pain threshold was converted to time to threshold blister on the basis of the relationship between pain and burn established earlier for radiant and for convective heating. Calculated times to blister were used to predict the material temperatures causative of "touch-burn". Experimentally produced threshold blisters at the predicted temperature-times verified the predictions. Graphs and equations were generated for determining safe temperatures for any material in contact with bare skin for 1-5 s solely from a knowledge of its thermal properties. Conversely, the thermal inertia (k rho c) of the optimal material for a specific use and skin contact can be predicted from a knowledge of the maximum material temperature and length of contact time anticipated. PMID:496745

  2. Ice Ih anomalies: Thermal contraction, anomalous volume isotope effect, and pressure-induced amorphization.

    PubMed

    Salim, Michael A; Willow, Soohaeng Yoo; Hirata, So

    2016-05-28

    Ice Ih displays several anomalous thermodynamic properties such as thermal contraction at low temperatures, an anomalous volume isotope effect (VIE) rendering the volume of D2O ice greater than that of H2O ice, and a pressure-induced transition to the high-density amorphous (HDA) phase. Furthermore, the anomalous VIE increases with temperature, despite its quantum-mechanical origin. Here, embedded-fragment ab initio second-order many-body perturbation (MP2) theory in the quasiharmonic approximation (QHA) is applied to the Gibbs energy of an infinite, proton-disordered crystal of ice Ih at wide ranges of temperatures and pressures. The quantum effect of nuclei moving in anharmonic potentials is taken into account from first principles without any empirical or nonsystematic approximation to either the electronic or vibrational Hamiltonian. MP2 predicts quantitatively correctly the thermal contraction at low temperatures, which is confirmed to originate from the volume-contracting hydrogen-bond bending modes (acoustic phonons). It qualitatively reproduces (but underestimates) the thermal expansion at higher temperatures, caused by the volume-expanding hydrogen-bond stretching (and to a lesser extent librational) modes. The anomalous VIE is found to be the result of subtle cancellations among closely competing isotope effects on volume from all modes. Consequently, even ab initio MP2 with the aug-cc-pVDZ and aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets has difficulty reproducing this anomaly, yielding qualitatively varied predictions of the sign of the VIE depending on such computational details as the choice of the embedding field. However, the temperature growth of the anomalous VIE is reproduced robustly and is ascribed to the librational modes. These solid-state MP2 calculations, as well as MP2 Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, find a volume collapse and a loss of symmetry and long-range order in ice Ih upon pressure loading of 2.35 GPa or higher. Concomitantly, rapid softening of

  3. Ice Ih anomalies: Thermal contraction, anomalous volume isotope effect, and pressure-induced amorphization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salim, Michael A.; Willow, Soohaeng Yoo; Hirata, So

    2016-05-01

    Ice Ih displays several anomalous thermodynamic properties such as thermal contraction at low temperatures, an anomalous volume isotope effect (VIE) rendering the volume of D2O ice greater than that of H2O ice, and a pressure-induced transition to the high-density amorphous (HDA) phase. Furthermore, the anomalous VIE increases with temperature, despite its quantum-mechanical origin. Here, embedded-fragment ab initio second-order many-body perturbation (MP2) theory in the quasiharmonic approximation (QHA) is applied to the Gibbs energy of an infinite, proton-disordered crystal of ice Ih at wide ranges of temperatures and pressures. The quantum effect of nuclei moving in anharmonic potentials is taken into account from first principles without any empirical or nonsystematic approximation to either the electronic or vibrational Hamiltonian. MP2 predicts quantitatively correctly the thermal contraction at low temperatures, which is confirmed to originate from the volume-contracting hydrogen-bond bending modes (acoustic phonons). It qualitatively reproduces (but underestimates) the thermal expansion at higher temperatures, caused by the volume-expanding hydrogen-bond stretching (and to a lesser extent librational) modes. The anomalous VIE is found to be the result of subtle cancellations among closely competing isotope effects on volume from all modes. Consequently, even ab initio MP2 with the aug-cc-pVDZ and aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets has difficulty reproducing this anomaly, yielding qualitatively varied predictions of the sign of the VIE depending on such computational details as the choice of the embedding field. However, the temperature growth of the anomalous VIE is reproduced robustly and is ascribed to the librational modes. These solid-state MP2 calculations, as well as MP2 Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, find a volume collapse and a loss of symmetry and long-range order in ice Ih upon pressure loading of 2.35 GPa or higher. Concomitantly, rapid softening of

  4. Spin Seebeck Effect vs. Anomalous Nernst Effect in Ta/CoFeB /Ta Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bowen; Xu, Yadong; Schneider, Mike; Shi, Jing; Univ of California-Riverside Team; Everspin Technologies Inc. Team

    2014-03-01

    We have studied the spin Seebeck effect (SSE) and anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) in a vertical trilayer structure under a vertical temperature gradient. The structure consists of a 3nm CoFeB layer sandwiched by β-phase tantalum (Ta) layers. The samples are deposited by magnetron sputtering. The existence of Ta β-phase is verified by the resistivity and its negative temperature coefficient of resistance(TCR). Under a fixed vertical temperature gradient, the measured transverse thermoelectric voltage is linearly proportional to the total sample resistance when the Ta thickness exceeds 2 nm, which can be explained by a shunting resistor model. When the Ta thickness is below 2 nm, the voltage deviates from the linear resistance dependence and merges to the ANE voltage of the CoFeB single layer, due to a weakened inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) in Ta thinner than the spin diffusion length. In the linear regime, the slope contains both a varying SSE and a fixed ANE responses, thus the SSE contribution could be quantitatively separated out from the ANE of CoFeB. Our results indicate a large SSE from the β-phase Ta due to its large Spin Hall Angle. This work was supported by CNN/DMEA and DOE.

  5. Anomalous Josephson Effect in Junctions with Rashba Spin-Orbit Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterov, Konstantin; Houzet, Manuel; Meyer, Julia

    2015-03-01

    We study two-dimensional double-barrier SINIS Josephson junctions in which the inversion symmetry in the normal part is broken by Rashba spin-orbit coupling. In the presence of a suitably oriented Zeeman field in the normal part, the system displays the anomalous Josephson effect: the current is nonzero even at zero phase difference between two superconductors. We investigate this effect by means of the Ginzburg-Landau formalism and microscopic Green's functions approach in the clean limit. This work was supported in part by the Grants No. ANR-12-BS04-0016-03 and an EU-FP7 Marie Curie IRG.

  6. UV doses and skin effects during psoriasis climate therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randeberg, Lise L.; Hernandez-Palacios, Julio; Lilleeng, Mila; Nilsen, Lill Tove; Krogstad, Anne-Lene

    2011-03-01

    Psoriasis is a common autoimmune disease with inflammatory symptoms affecting skin and joints. One way of dealing with psoriasis is by controlled solar UV exposure treatment. However, this treatment should be optimized to get the best possible treatment effect and to limit negative side effects such as erythema and an increased risk of skin cancer. In this study 24 patients at Valle Marina Treatment Center in Gran Canaria were monitored throughout a treatment period of three weeks starting at the beginning of November. The total UV dose to the location was monitored by UV-meters placed on the roof of the treatment centere, and the patients wore individual film dosimeters throughout the treatment period. Skin parameters were accessed by reflection spectroscopy (400-850nm). This paper presents preliminary findings from the skin measurements in the visible part of the spectrum, such as blood oxygenation, erythema and melanin indexes. Reflection spectroscopy was found to be a good tool for such treatment monitoring.

  7. Stacking order dependence of inverse spin Hall effect and anomalous Hall effect in spin pumping experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sang-Il; Seo, Min-Su; Park, Seung-Young; Kim, Dong-Jun; Park, Byong-Guk

    2015-05-07

    The dependence of the measured DC voltage on the non-magnetic material (NM) in NM/CoFeB and CoFeB/NM bilayers is studied under ferromagnetic resonance conditions in a TE{sub 011} resonant cavity. The directional change of the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) voltage V{sub ISHE} for the stacking order of the bilayer can separate the pure V{sub ISHE} and the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) voltage V{sub AHE} utilizing the method of addition and subtraction. The Ta and Ti NMs show a broad deviation of the spin Hall angle θ{sub ISH}, which originates from the AHE in accordance with the high resistivity of NMs. However, the Pt and Pd NMs show that the kinds of NMs with low resistivity are consistent with the previously reported θ{sub ISH} values. Therefore, the characteristics that NM should simultaneously satisfy to obtain a reasonable V{sub ISHE} value in bilayer systems are large θ{sub ISH} and low resistivity.

  8. Extremely large magnetoresistance and magnetic logic by coupling semiconductor nonlinear transport effect and anomalous Hall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaozhong; Luo, Zhaochu

    Size limitation of silicon FET hinders the further scaling down of silicon based CPU. To solve this problem, spin based magnetic logic devices were proposed but almost all of them could not be realized experimentally except for NOT logic operation. A magnetic field controlled reconfigurable semiconductor logic using InSb was reported. However, InSb is very expensive and not compatible with the silicon technology. Based on our Si based magnetoresistance (MR) device, we developed a Si based reconfigurable magnetic logic device, which could do all four Boolean logic operations including AND, OR, NOR and NAND. By coupling nonlinear transport effect of semiconductor and anomalous Hall effect of magnetic material, we propose a PMA material based MR device with a remarkable non local MR of >20000 % at ~1 mT. Based on this MR device, we further developed a PMA material based magnetic logic device which could do all four Boolean logic operations. This makes it possible that magnetic material does both memory and logic. This may result in a memory-logic integrated system leading to a non von Neumann computer

  9. Effect of passive and iontophoretic skin pretreatments with terpenes on the in vitro skin transport of piroxicam.

    PubMed

    Doliwa, A; Santoyo, S; Ygartua, P

    2001-10-23

    The enhancing effect of several terpenes (thymol, menthone and 1,8-cineole) in the percutaneous permeation of piroxicam (Px), either passive or iontophoretically, was investigated. These terpenes were applied, on the skin membrane, as a passive and iontophoretic skin pretreatment. Px was delivered from carbopol gels containing hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (2% w/w Px). An increase in Px flux values, both passive and iontophoretic after skin pretreatment with 5% terpenes/50% EtOH, was found to be in the following order: thymol>menthone>1,8-cineole. Iontophoretic skin pretreatment with terpenes produced a slight increase in the passive flux of Px, in comparison with the passive skin pretreatment. This result indicated that iontophoresis could modify the skin morphology and consequently, increase the passive transport of Px. However, when Px was transported iontophoretically, passive skin pretreatment with terpenes, produced higher flux values than iontophoretic skin pretreatment. These results could be explained by the fact that with the iontophoretic pretreatment, terpenes could penetrate into the skin and limitate the movement of the ionized species, across the skin, during the iontophoretic experiments. The amount of Px retained in the skin after all experiments was related to flux values across skin. PMID:11604256

  10. Effect of reactive skin decontamination lotion on skin wound healing in laboratory rats.

    PubMed

    Walters, Thomas J; Kauvar, David S; Reeder, Joanna; Baer, David G

    2007-03-01

    Reactive skin decontamination lotion (RSDL) is a proposed replacement for the existing skin and equipment decontamination kit. Because RSDL may need to be used to decontaminate wounded personnel, we conducted an assessment of the effect of this agent on wound healing. A skin incision model using male Sprague Dawley rats (n = 19 rats/group) was used. A 7.0-cm incision was made through the skin, and RSDL was (experimental group) or was not (control group) applied to the open wound; the wound edges were then approximated with sutures. Seven days later, animals were euthanized and wound samples were taken. Healing was assessed by measuring mechanical strength, collagen content, and histological appearance. RSDL-treated wounds had 23% lower tensile strength (p < 0.05) and 11% lower collagen content (p < 0.05) than did the untreated control wounds. Histological assessments did not differ significantly between groups. The results of this investigation demonstrate that the application of RSDL directly to an open wound impairs wound strength and decreases collagen content in the early phases of wound healing. This may have clinical implications for the treatment and outcomes of chemical casualty combat trauma. PMID:17436779

  11. Anisotropic intrinsic anomalous Hall effect in epitaxial Fe films on GaAs(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lin; Li, Yufan; Xu, Jianli; Hou, Dazhi; Jin, Xiaofeng

    2013-04-01

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in epitaxial Fe films on GaAs(111) has been investigated as a function of film thickness and temperature. The intrinsic contribution from the Berry curvature is singled out from the extrinsic ones and determined to be 821 Ω-1 cm-1, which agrees to the theoretical prediction of 842 Ω-1 cm-1 and is considerably smaller than 1100 Ω-1 cm-1 for Fe(001). This result provides a direct experimental evidence for the anisotropy of the intrinsic AHE in single crystal Fe, reflecting its electronic band structure.

  12. Nonadiabatic effects in ultracold molecules via anomalous linear and quadratic Zeeman shifts.

    PubMed

    McGuyer, B H; Osborn, C B; McDonald, M; Reinaudi, G; Skomorowski, W; Moszynski, R; Zelevinsky, T

    2013-12-13

    Anomalously large linear and quadratic Zeeman shifts are measured for weakly bound ultracold 88Sr2 molecules near the intercombination-line asymptote. Nonadiabatic Coriolis coupling and the nature of long-range molecular potentials explain how this effect arises and scales roughly cubically with the size of the molecule. The linear shifts yield nonadiabatic mixing angles of the molecular states. The quadratic shifts are sensitive to nearby opposite f-parity states and exhibit fourth-order corrections, providing a stringent test of a state-of-the-art ab initio model. PMID:24483652

  13. Global Constraints on Anomalous Triple Gauge Couplings in the Effective Field Theory Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falkowski, Adam; González-Alonso, Martín; Greljo, Admir; Marzocca, David

    2016-01-01

    We present a combined analysis of LHC Higgs data (signal strengths) together with LEP-2 W W production measurements. To characterize possible deviations from the standard model (SM) predictions, we employ the framework of an effective field theory (EFT) where the SM is extended by higher-dimensional operators suppressed by the mass scale of new physics Λ . The analysis is performed consistently at the order Λ-2 in the EFT expansion keeping all the relevant operators. While the two data sets suffer from flat directions, together they impose stringent model-independent constraints on the anomalous triple gauge couplings.

  14. 3d Transition Metal Adsorption Induced the valley-polarized Anomalous Hall Effect in Germanene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, P.; Sun, L. Z.

    2016-06-01

    Based on DFT + U and Berry curvature calculations, we study the electronic structures and topological properties of 3d transition metal (TM) atom (from Ti to Co) adsorbed germanene (TM-germanene). We find that valley-polarized anomalous Hall effect (VAHE) can be realized in germanene by adsorbing Cr, Mn, or Co atoms on its surface. A finite valley Hall voltage can be easily detected in their nanoribbon, which is important for valleytronics devices. Moreover, different valley-polarized current and even reversible valley Hall voltage can be archived by shifting the Fermi energy of the systems. Such versatile features of the systems show potential in next generation electronics devices.

  15. Comparison of anomalous Doppler resonance effects with molybdenum and graphite limiters on HT-7

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y. M.; Gao, X.; Ling, B. L.; Liu, Y.; Zhang, S. B.; Han, X.; Ti, A.; Li, E. Z.

    2012-01-01

    The material of limiter in HT-7 tokamak was changed from graphite to molybdenum in the last experimental campaign. The pitch angle scattering of runaway electrons due to anomalous Doppler resonance effects was observed. The experimental results agree very well with the stable boundary condition expected from the linear resistive theory but only agree with that from the nonlinear evolutionary of runaway-electron distribution theory in low electric field region. The current carried by runaway electrons is the same under different limiter conditions. PMID:22509090

  16. Global Constraints on Anomalous Triple Gauge Couplings in the Effective Field Theory Approach.

    PubMed

    Falkowski, Adam; González-Alonso, Martín; Greljo, Admir; Marzocca, David

    2016-01-01

    We present a combined analysis of LHC Higgs data (signal strengths) together with LEP-2 WW production measurements. To characterize possible deviations from the standard model (SM) predictions, we employ the framework of an effective field theory (EFT) where the SM is extended by higher-dimensional operators suppressed by the mass scale of new physics Λ. The analysis is performed consistently at the order Λ(-2) in the EFT expansion keeping all the relevant operators. While the two data sets suffer from flat directions, together they impose stringent model-independent constraints on the anomalous triple gauge couplings. PMID:26799011

  17. Hysteretic magnetoresistance and unconventional anomalous Hall effect in the frustrated magnet TmB4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunku, Sai Swaroop; Kong, Tai; Ito, Toshimitsu; Canfield, Paul C.; Shastry, B. Sriram; Sengupta, Pinaki; Panagopoulos, Christos

    2016-05-01

    We study TmB4, a frustrated magnet on the Archimedean Shastry-Sutherland lattice, through magnetization and transport experiments. The lack of anisotropy in resistivity shows that TmB4 is an electronically three-dimensional system. The magnetoresistance (MR) is hysteretic at low temperature even though a corresponding hysteresis in magnetization is absent. The Hall resistivity shows unconventional anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and is linear above saturation despite a large MR. We propose that complex structures at magnetic domain walls may be responsible for the hysteretic MR and may also lead to the AHE.

  18. Hysteretic magnetoresistance and unconventional anomalous Hall effect in the frustrated magnet TmB4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunku, Sai Swaroop; Kong, Tai; Ito, Toshimitsu; Canfield, Paul C.; Shastry, B. Sriram; Sengupta, Pinaki; Panagopoulos, Christos

    We study TmB4, a frustrated magnet on the Archimedean Shastry-Sutherland lattice, through magnetization and transport experiments. The lack of anisotropy in resistivity shows that TmB4 is an electronically three-dimensional system. The magnetoresistance (MR) is hysteretic at low-temperature even though a corresponding hysteresis in magnetization is absent. The Hall resistivity shows unconventional anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and is linear above saturation despite a large MR. We suggest that both hysteretic MR and AHE arise from the formation of complex non-coplanar structures at magnetic domain walls. Current address: Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University.

  19. Hysteretic magnetoresistance and unconventional anomalous Hall effect in the frustrated magnet TmB4

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sunku, Sai Swaroop; Kong, Tai; Ito, Toshimitsu; Canfield, Paul C.; Shastry, B. Sriram; Sengupta, Pinaki; Panagopoulos, Christos

    2016-05-11

    We study TmB4, a frustrated magnet on the Archimedean Shastry-Sutherland lattice, through magnetization and transport experiments. The lack of anisotropy in resistivity shows that TmB4 is an electronically three-dimensional system. The magnetoresistance (MR) is hysteretic at low temperature even though a corresponding hysteresis in magnetization is absent. The Hall resistivity shows unconventional anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and is linear above saturation despite a large MR. In conclusion, we propose that complex structures at magnetic domain walls may be responsible for the hysteretic MR and may also lead to the AHE.

  20. Nonadiabatic Effects in Ultracold Molecules via Anomalous Linear and Quadratic Zeeman Shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuyer, B. H.; Osborn, C. B.; McDonald, M.; Reinaudi, G.; Skomorowski, W.; Moszynski, R.; Zelevinsky, T.

    2013-12-01

    Anomalously large linear and quadratic Zeeman shifts are measured for weakly bound ultracold $^{88}$Sr$_2$ molecules near the intercombination-line asymptote. Nonadiabatic Coriolis coupling and the nature of long-range molecular potentials explain how this effect arises and scales roughly cubically with the size of the molecule. The linear shifts yield nonadiabatic mixing angles of the molecular states. The quadratic shifts are sensitive to nearby opposite $f$-parity states and exhibit fourth-order corrections, providing a stringent test of a state-of-the-art \\textit{ab initio} model.

  1. Pretreatment effects of moxibustion on the skin permeation and skin and muscle concentrations of salicylate in rats.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dianxiu; Tazawa, Yuko; Ishii, Hiroshi; Todo, Hiroaki; Sugibayashi, Kenji

    2011-04-01

    The effect of moxibustion on the in vitro and in vivo skin permeation of salicylate was evaluated in rats. First, the effect of moxibustion pretreatment on the elimination pharmacokinetics of salicylate after i.v. injection in rats was determined: no clear difference was observed in the plasma profiles of salicylate (SA) with or without moxibustion pretreatment. However, much higher skin and muscle concentrations of salicylate were observed after its i.v. injection. Next, an in vitro skin permeation study of SA was performed after moxibustion pretreatment. Moxibustion pretreatment increased the skin permeation of SA, and the extent of the increase in SA skin permeation was related to the strength of moxibustion ignition. More intense treatments produced higher skin permeation. A similar enhancement effect on the skin permeation of SA was observed in in vivo studies. Interestingly, the skin/plasma and muscle/plasma ratios of SA were markedly increased by moxibustion pretreatment. These results were due to the induction of enhanced skin permeation and lower clearance into the cutaneous vessels by moxibustion ignition. Combination treatment involving moxibustion and the topical application of drugs such as NSAID may be useful for increasing local pharmaceutical effects by enhancing the drug concentration in the skin and muscle underneath the topical application site. PMID:21256938

  2. Quantum phase transitions and anomalous Hall effect in a pyrochlore Kondo lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grefe, Sarah; Ding, Wenxin; Si, Qimiao

    The metallic variant of the pyrochlore iridates Pr2Ir2O7 has shown characteristics of a possible chiral spin liquid state [PRL 96 087204 (2006), PRL 98, 057203 (2007), Nature 463, 210 (2010)] and quantum criticality [Nat. Mater. 13, 356 (2014)]. An important question surrounding the significant anomalous Hall response observed in Pr2Ir2O7 is the nature of the f-electron local moments, including their Kondo coupling with the conduction d-electrons. The heavy effective mass and related thermodynamic characteristics indicate the involvement of the Kondo effect in this system's electronic properties. In this work, we study the effects of Kondo coupling on candidate time-reversal-symmetry-breaking spin liquid states on the pyrochlore lattice. Representing the f-moments as slave fermions Kondo-coupled to conduction electrons, we study the competition between Kondo-singlet formation and chiral spin correlations and determine the zero-temperature phase diagram. We derive an effective chiral interaction between the local moments and the conduction electrons and calculate the anomalous Hall response across the quantum phase transition from the Kondo destroyed phase to the Kondo screened phase. We discuss our results' implications for Pr2Ir2O7 and related frustrated Kondo-lattice systems.

  3. Effect of skin wettedness on sweat gland response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadel, E. R.; Stolwijk, J. A. J.

    1973-01-01

    Investigation of the effect of skin wettedness upon sweating rate. Several techniques were used to gain a better understanding of the quantitative nature of this effect. The results include the finding that the evaporative power of the environment has a profound effect on the relationship between body temperature and sweating rate.

  4. Extremely Large Magnetoresistance at Low Magnetic Field by Coupling the Nonlinear Transport Effect and the Anomalous Hall Effect.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhaochu; Xiong, Chengyue; Zhang, Xu; Guo, Zhen-Gang; Cai, Jianwang; Zhang, Xiaozhong

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall effect of a magnetic material is coupled to the nonlinear transport effect of a semiconductor material in a simple structure to achieve a large geometric magnetoresistance (MR) based on a diode-assisted mechanism. An extremely large MR (>10(4) %) at low magnetic fields (1 mT) is observed at room temperature. This MR device shows potential for use as a logic gate for the four basic Boolean logic operations. PMID:26857904

  5. Effects of a Skin Neuropeptide (Substance P) on Cutaneous Microflora

    PubMed Central

    Mijouin, Lily; Hillion, Mélanie; Ramdani, Yasmina; Jaouen, Thomas; Duclairoir-Poc, Cécile; Follet-Gueye, Marie-Laure; Lati, Elian; Yvergnaux, Florent; Driouich, Azzedine; Lefeuvre, Luc; Farmer, Christine; Misery, Laurent; Feuilloley, Marc G. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Skin is the largest human neuroendocrine organ and hosts the second most numerous microbial population but the interaction of skin neuropeptides with the microflora has never been investigated. We studied the effect of Substance P (SP), a peptide released by nerve endings in the skin on bacterial virulence. Methodology/Principal Findings Bacillus cereus, a member of the skin transient microflora, was used as a model. Exposure to SP strongly stimulated the cytotoxicity of B. cereus (+553±3% with SP 10−6 M) and this effect was rapid (<5 min). Infection of keratinocytes with SP treated B. cereus led to a rise in caspase1 and morphological alterations of the actin cytoskeleton. Secretome analysis revealed that SP stimulated the release of collagenase and superoxide dismutase. Moreover, we also noted a shift in the surface polarity of the bacteria linked to a peel-off of the S-layer and the release of S-layer proteins. Meanwhile, the biofilm formation activity of B. cereus was increased. The Thermo unstable ribosomal Elongation factor (Ef-Tu) was identified as the SP binding site in B. cereus. Other Gram positive skin bacteria, namely Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis also reacted to SP by an increase of virulence. Thermal water from Uriage-les-Bains and an artificial polysaccharide (Teflose®) were capable to antagonize the effect of SP on bacterial virulence. Conclusions/Significance SP is released in sweat during stress and is known to be involved in the pathogenesis of numerous skin diseases through neurogenic inflammation. Our study suggests that a direct effect of SP on the skin microbiote should be another mechanism. PMID:24250813

  6. Effects of 900 MHz radiofrequency radiation on skin hydroxyproline contents.

    PubMed

    Çam, Semra Tepe; Seyhan, Nesrin; Kavaklı, Cengiz; Çelikbıçak, Ömür

    2014-09-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the possible effect of pulse-modulated radiofrequency radiation (RFR) on rat skin hydroxyproline content, since skin is the first target of external electromagnetic fields. Skin hydroxyproline content was measured using liquid chromatography mass spectrometer method. Two months old male wistar rats were exposed to a 900 MHz pulse-modulated RFR at an average whole body specific absorption rate (SAR) of 1.35 W/kg for 20 min/day for 3 weeks. The radiofrequency (RF) signals were pulse modulated by rectangular pulses with a repetition frequency of 217 Hz and a duty cycle of 1:8 (pulse width 0.576 ms). A skin biopsy was taken at the upper part of the abdominal costa after the exposure. The data indicated that whole body exposure to a pulse-modulated RF radiation that is similar to that emitted by the global system for mobile communications (GSM) mobile phones caused a statistically significant increase in the skin hydroxyproline level (p = 0.049, Mann-Whitney U test). Under our experimental conditions, at a SAR less than the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection safety limit recommendation, there was evidence that GSM signals could alter hydroxyproline concentration in the rat skin. PMID:24760629

  7. Effects of a new topical combination on sensitive skin.

    PubMed

    Fauger, A; Lhoste, A; Chavagnac-Bonneville, M; Sayag, M; Jourdan, E; Ardiet, N; Perichaud, C; Trompezinski, S; Misery, L

    2015-01-01

    Using well-tolerated cosmetics or those with soothing effects is recommended to treat sensitive skin. However, we lack clinical studies. Two clinical trials were performed on sensitive skin in France and Thailand. The primary objective was to evaluate the preventive soothing effect. The secondary objectives were to evaluate the immediate soothing effect, product tolerance, and impact on quality of life. Evaluation methods included a stinging test and scoring erythema and stinging intensity. We also assessed tolerance, quality of life using the Dermatology Life Quality Index, and cosmetic qualities. The clinical trials were performed in France and Thailand to test efficacy in two different environments and on different ethnic skin. Interesting effects were observed in patients with sensitive skin in France and Thailand: a preventive soothing effect, a soothing effect on erythema, and an immediate soothing effect. In vivo biometrological, sodium lauryl sulfate, and capsaicin tests confirmed these data. A favorable effect on quality of life was also noted. The product was appreciated by volunteers for its efficacy, tolerance, and cosmetic qualities. A preliminary study on the effects on interleukin 8 was also included in the paper. PMID:26454972

  8. Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in Low-buckled Honeycomb Lattice with In-plane Magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yafei; Pan, Hui; Yang, Fei; Li, Xin; Qiao, Zhenhua; Zhenhua Qiao's group Team; Hui Pan's group Team

    With out-of-plane magnetization, the quantum anomalous Hall effect has been extensively studied in quantum wells and two-dimensional atomic crystal layers. Here, we investigate the possibility of realizing quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in honeycomb lattices with in-plane magnetization. We show that the QAHE can only occur in low-buckled honeycomb lattice where both intrinsic and intrinsic Rashba spin-orbit coupling appear spontaneously. The extrinsic Rashba spin-orbit coupling is detrimental to this phase. In contrast to the out-of-plane magnetization induced QAHE, the QAHE from in-plane magnetization is achieved in the vicinity of the time reversal symmetric momenta at M points rather than Dirac points. In monolayer case, the QAHE can be characterized by Chern number  = +/- 1 whereas additional phases with Chern number  = +/- 2 appear in chiral stacked bilayer system. The Chern number strongly depends on the orientation of the magnetization. The bilayer system also provides additional tunability via out-of-plane electric field, which can reduce the critical magnetization strength required to induce QAHE. It can also lead to topological phase transitions from  = +/- 2 to +/- 1 and finally to 0 Equal contribution from Yafei Ren and Hui Pan.

  9. Large anomalous Hall effect in Pt interfaced with perpendicular anisotropy ferrimagnetic insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chi; Sellappan, Pathikumar; Liu, Yawen; Garay, Javier; Shi, Jing; Shines Team

    We demonstrate the strain induced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) in a ferrimagnetic insulator (FMI), Tm3Fe5O12 (TIG) and the first observation of large anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in TIG/Pt bilayers. Atomically flat TIG films were deposited by a laser molecular beam epitaxy system on (111)-orientated substituted gadolinium gallium garnet substrates. The strength of PMA could be effectively tuned by controlling the oxygen pressure during deposition. Sharp squared anomalous Hall hysteresis loops were observed in bilayers of TIG/Pt over a range of thicknesses of Pt, with the maximum AHE conductivity reaching 1 S/cm at room temperature. The AHE vanishes when a 5 nm Cu layer was inserted between Pt and TIG, strongly indicating the proximity-induced ferromagnetism in Pt. The large AHE in the bilayer structures demonstrates a potential use of PMA-FMI related heterostructures in spintronics. This work was supported as part of the SHINES, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences under Award # SC0012670.

  10. Semiclassical wave packet study of anomalous isotope effect in ozone formation.

    PubMed

    Vetoshkin, Evgeny; Babikov, Dmitri

    2007-10-21

    We applied the semiclassical initial value representation method to calculate energies, lifetimes, and wave functions of scattering resonances in a two-dimensional potential for O+O2 collision. Such scattering states represent the metastable O3* species and play a central role in the process of ozone formation. Autocorrelation functions for scattering states were computed and then analyzed using the Prony method, which permits one to extract accurate energies and widths of the resonances. We found that the results of the semiclassical wave packet propagation agree well with fully quantum results. The focus was on the 16O16O18O isotopomer and the anomalous isotope effect associated with formation of this molecule, either through the 16O16O+18O or the 16O+16O18O channels. An interesting correlation between the local vibration mode character of the metastable states and their lifetimes was observed and explained. New insight is obtained into the mechanism by which the long-lived resonances in the delta zero-point energy part of spectrum produce the anomalously large isotope effect. PMID:17949154

  11. Effect of glove occlusion on the skin barrier.

    PubMed

    Tiedemann, Daniel; Clausen, Maja Lisa; John, Swen Malthe; Angelova-Fischer, Irena; Kezic, Sanja; Agner, Tove

    2016-01-01

    Wet work tasks are the most common exposures leading to occupational irritant contact dermatitis. Use of liquid-proof gloves is recommended when performing wet work, however, gloves may also contribute to impairment of the skin barrier and development of irritant contact dermatitis. The aim of this study is to review the literature on the effects of glove occlusion on skin barrier function. The PubMed database was searched up to 1 February 2015 for articles on the association between glove occlusion and skin barrier function, including human studies only and in English. Only experimental studies including assessment of the skin barrier function were included in the data analysis. Thirteen articles were identified, 8 with focus on occlusion alone, 7 with focus on occlusion in combination with irritant exposure (some overlapping), and 2 field studies. In conclusion, data from the literature showed that the negative effect of occlusion in itself is limited, and that only extensive and long-term occlusion will cause barrier impairment. However, studies investigating combined effect of occlusion and exposure to soaps/detergents indicate that occlusion significantly enhances the skin barrier damage caused by detergents/soaps in a dose-response fashion. PMID:26364588

  12. Anomalous Hall effect in the prospective spintronic material Eu1-x Gd x O integrated with Si.

    PubMed

    Parfenov, Oleg E; Averyanov, Dmitry V; Tokmachev, Andrey M; Taldenkov, Alexander N; Storchak, Vyacheslav G

    2016-06-01

    Remarkable properties of EuO make it a versatile spintronic material. Despite numerous experimental and theoretical studies of EuO, little is known about the anomalous Hall effect in this ferromagnet. So far, the effect has not been observed in bulk EuO, though has been detected in EuO films with uncontrolled distribution of defects. In the present work doping is taken under control: epitaxial films of Gd-doped EuO are synthesized integrated with Si using molecular beam epitaxy and characterized with x-ray diffraction and magnetization measurements. Nanoscale transport studies reveal the anomalous Hall effect in the ferromagnetic region for samples with different Gd concentration. The saturated anomalous Hall effect conductivity value of 5.0 S·cm(-1) in Gd-doped EuO is more than an order of magnitude larger than those reported so far for Eu chalcogenides doped with anion vacancies. PMID:27165844

  13. Anomalous Hall effect in the prospective spintronic material Eu1‑x Gd x O integrated with Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parfenov, Oleg E.; Averyanov, Dmitry V.; Tokmachev, Andrey M.; Taldenkov, Alexander N.; Storchak, Vyacheslav G.

    2016-06-01

    Remarkable properties of EuO make it a versatile spintronic material. Despite numerous experimental and theoretical studies of EuO, little is known about the anomalous Hall effect in this ferromagnet. So far, the effect has not been observed in bulk EuO, though has been detected in EuO films with uncontrolled distribution of defects. In the present work doping is taken under control: epitaxial films of Gd-doped EuO are synthesized integrated with Si using molecular beam epitaxy and characterized with x-ray diffraction and magnetization measurements. Nanoscale transport studies reveal the anomalous Hall effect in the ferromagnetic region for samples with different Gd concentration. The saturated anomalous Hall effect conductivity value of 5.0 S·cm‑1 in Gd-doped EuO is more than an order of magnitude larger than those reported so far for Eu chalcogenides doped with anion vacancies.

  14. Anisotropic Nanomechanics of Boron Nitride Nanotubes: Nanostructured "Skin" Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Menon, Madhu; Cho, KyeongJae

    2000-01-01

    The stiffness and plasticity of boron nitride nanotubes are investigated using generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics and ab-initio total energy methods. Due to boron-nitride BN bond buckling effects, compressed zigzag BN nanotubes are found to undergo novel anisotropic strain release followed by anisotropic plastic buckling. The strain is preferentially released towards N atoms in the rotated BN bonds. The tubes buckle anisotropically towards only one end when uniaxially compressed from both. A "skin-effect" model of smart nanocomposite materials is proposed which will localize the structural damage towards the 'skin' or surface side of the material.

  15. Anomalous Hall effect in monodisperse CoO-coated Co nanocluster-assembled films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. B.; Mi, W. B.; Wang, L. S.; Zeng, D. Q.; Chen, Y. Z.; Peng, D. L.

    2016-03-01

    We have fabricated the uniform CoO-coated Co nanocluster-assembled films at various oxygen gas flow rates (fO) by using a plasma-gas-condensation method and studied their anomalous Hall effect (AHE). The longitudinal resistivity (ρxx) of all the films exhibits a minimum at a temperature of Tmin. With the increase of fO, Tmin shifts from 150 to 300 K and has no longer change when fO is up to 0.10 sccm. The saturated AHE resistivity (ρxyA) presents a near linear increase as fO rises. The anomalous Hall coefficient (Rs) at fO=0.20 sccm is 4.9×10-9 Ω cm G-1 at 300 K, which is almost three orders of magnitude larger than bulk Co. Moreover, at fO=0 and 0.05 sccm, the scaling exponents γ=1.2 and 1.24 in ρ,SUB>xyA ∝ ρxxγ are obtained in the region of 325-375 K; At fO=0.10, 0.15 and 0.20 sccm, ρxyA decreases with the increase of ρxx on a double-logarithmic scale, following a new scaling relation of log (ρxyA/ρxx) = a0 + b0 log ρxx in two temperature ranges of 5-300 K and 325-375 K.

  16. Pumping conductance, the intrinsic anomalous Hall effect, and statistics of topological invariants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlhaus, Jan; Ilan, Roni; Freed, Daniel; Freedman, Michael; Moore, Joel E.

    2015-06-01

    The pumping conductance of a disordered two-dimensional Chern insulator scales with increasing size and fixed disorder strength to sharp plateau transitions at well-defined energies between ordinary and quantum Hall insulators. When the disorder strength is scaled to zero as system size increases, the "metallic" regime of fluctuating Chern numbers can extend over the whole band. A simple argument leads to a sort of weighted equipartition of Chern number over minibands in a finite system with periodic boundary conditions: even though there must be strong fluctuations between disorder realizations, the mean Chern number at a given energy is determined by the clean Berry curvature distribution, as in the intrinsic anomalous Hall effect formula for metals. This estimate is compared to numerical results using recently developed operator algebra methods, and indeed the dominant variation of average Chern number is explained by the intrinsic anomalous Hall formula. A mathematical appendix provides more precise definitions and a model for the full distribution of Chern numbers.

  17. Electric field induced quantum anomalous Hall effect in two-dimensional antiferromagnetic triphenyl-lead lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Jung; Li, Chaokai; Feng, Ji; Zhang, Zhenyu; Cho, Jun-Hyung

    The tuning of topological states is of significant fundamental and practical importance in contemporary condensed matter physics, for which the extension to two-dimensional (2D) organometallic systems is particularly attractive. Using first-principles calculations, we find that a 2D hexagonal triphenyl-lead lattice composed of only main group elements is susceptible to a magnetic instability, characterized by a antiferromagnetic (AFM) insulating state with a renormalized valley gaps with gap difference of 24 meV due to the spin and valley coupling. This AFM state will be subject to a anomalous valley Hall effect under the action of Berry curvature-induced spin and valley currents via, for example, injection of circularly polarized light. Furthermore, such a AFM band insulator can be tuned into a topologically nontrivial quantum anomalous Hall state with a Chern number of one by the application of an out-of-plane electric field. These findings further enrich our understanding of 2D hexagonal organometallic lattices for potential applications in spintronics and valleytronics.

  18. Anomalous Hall effects in amorphous Ni74 Mn24 Pt2 film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öner, Yildirhan

    2005-04-01

    Hall resistivity and magnetic measurements for the amorphous Ni74Mn24Pt2 film have been carried out as a function of magnetic field up to 120 kOe in a wide temperature range. The anomalous Hall coefficient, Rs , the ordinary Hall coefficient R0 , the total hysteresis width of the Hall resistivity ΔH are deduced for several temperatures in the temperature range of 1.5-150 K. The Hall voltage was observed in the zero external fields at the temperature below T=10K for both zero field cooling (ZFC) and field cooling (FC) cases. The Hall resistivity hysteresis curves become completely symmetric with respect to the field axis at the temperatures above 15 K where the unidirectional fields lost its rigidity All these anomalous effects have been explained in terms of asymmetric spin-orbit scattering of the conduction electron, which are polarized to the direction of the unidirectional exchange field. It is concluded that the surface becomes dominant at low temperatures. This assertion has been supported by the susceptibility measurements.

  19. Anomalous scaling in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: Effects of anisotropy and compressibility in the kinematic approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, N. V.; Kostenko, M. M.

    2015-11-01

    The field-theoretic renormalization group and the operator product expansion are applied to the model of passive vector (magnetic) field advected by a random turbulent velocity field. The latter is governed by the Navier-Stokes equation for compressible fluid, subject to external random force with the covariance ∝δ (t -t') k4 -d -y , where d is the dimension of space and y is an arbitrary exponent. From physics viewpoints, the model describes magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the so-called kinematic approximation, where the effects of the magnetic field on the dynamics of the fluid are neglected. The original stochastic problem is reformulated as a multiplicatively renormalizable field-theoretic model; the corresponding renormalization group equations possess an infrared attractive fixed point. It is shown that various correlation functions of the magnetic field and its powers demonstrate anomalous scaling behavior in the inertial-convective range already for small values of y . The corresponding anomalous exponents, identified with scaling (critical) dimensions of certain composite fields ("operators" in the quantum-field terminology), can be systematically calculated as series in y . The practical calculation is performed in the leading one-loop approximation, including exponents in anisotropic contributions. It should be emphasized that, in contrast to Gaussian ensembles with finite correlation time, the model and the perturbation theory presented here are manifestly Galilean covariant.

  20. Anomalous scaling in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: Effects of anisotropy and compressibility in the kinematic approximation.

    PubMed

    Antonov, N V; Kostenko, M M

    2015-11-01

    The field-theoretic renormalization group and the operator product expansion are applied to the model of passive vector (magnetic) field advected by a random turbulent velocity field. The latter is governed by the Navier-Stokes equation for compressible fluid, subject to external random force with the covariance ∝ δ(t-t')k(4-d-y), where d is the dimension of space and y is an arbitrary exponent. From physics viewpoints, the model describes magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the so-called kinematic approximation, where the effects of the magnetic field on the dynamics of the fluid are neglected. The original stochastic problem is reformulated as a multiplicatively renormalizable field-theoretic model; the corresponding renormalization group equations possess an infrared attractive fixed point. It is shown that various correlation functions of the magnetic field and its powers demonstrate anomalous scaling behavior in the inertial-convective range already for small values of y. The corresponding anomalous exponents, identified with scaling (critical) dimensions of certain composite fields ("operators" in the quantum-field terminology), can be systematically calculated as series in y. The practical calculation is performed in the leading one-loop approximation, including exponents in anisotropic contributions. It should be emphasized that, in contrast to Gaussian ensembles with finite correlation time, the model and the perturbation theory presented here are manifestly Galilean covariant. PMID:26651785

  1. Anomalous memory effect in the breakdown of low-pressure argon in a long discharge tube

    SciTech Connect

    Meshchanov, A. V.; Korshunov, A. N.; Ionikh, Yu. Z.; Dyatko, N. A.

    2015-08-15

    The characteristics of breakdown of argon in a long tube (with a gap length of 75 cm and diameter of 2.8 cm) at pressures of 1 and 5 Torr and stationary discharge currents of 5–40 mA were studied experimentally. The breakdown was initiated by paired positive voltage pulses with a rise rate of ∼10{sup 8}–10{sup 9} V/s and duration of ∼1–10 ms. The time interval between pairs was varied in the range of Τ ∼ 0.1–1 s, and that between pulses in a pair was varied from τ = 0.4 ms to ≈Τ/2. The aim of this work was to detect and study the so-called “anomalous memory effect” earlier observed in breakdown in nitrogen. The effect consists in the dynamic breakdown voltage in the second pulse in a pair being higher than in the first pulse (in contrast to the “normal” memory effect, in which the relation between the breakdown voltages is opposite). It is found that this effect is observed when the time interval between pairs of pulses is such that the first pulse in a pair is in the range of the normal memory effect of the preceding pair (under the given conditions, Τ ≈ 0.1–0.4 s). In this case, at τ ∼ 10 ms, the breakdown voltage of the second pulse is higher than the reduced breakdown voltage of the first pulse. Optical observations of the ionization wave preceding breakdown in a long tube show that, in the range of the anomalous memory effect and at smaller values of τ, no ionization wave is detected before breakdown in the second pulse. A qualitative interpretation of the experimental results is given.

  2. Precise Quantization of the Anomalous Hall Effect near Zero Magnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Bestwick, A J; Fox, E J; Kou, Xufeng; Pan, Lei; Wang, Kang L; Goldhaber-Gordon, D

    2015-05-01

    We report a nearly ideal quantum anomalous Hall effect in a three-dimensional topological insulator thin film with ferromagnetic doping. Near zero applied magnetic field we measure exact quantization in the Hall resistance to within a part per 10 000 and a longitudinal resistivity under 1  Ω per square, with chiral edge transport explicitly confirmed by nonlocal measurements. Deviations from this behavior are found to be caused by thermally activated carriers, as indicated by an Arrhenius law temperature dependence. Using the deviations as a thermometer, we demonstrate an unexpected magnetocaloric effect and use it to reach near-perfect quantization by cooling the sample below the dilution refrigerator base temperature in a process approximating adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration. PMID:26001016

  3. Anomalous electron heating effects on the E region ionosphere in TIEGCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Wang, Wenbin; Oppenheim, Meers; Dimant, Yakov; Wiltberger, Michael; Merkin, Slava

    2016-03-01

    We have recently implemented a new module that includes both the anomalous electron heating and the electron-neutral cooling rate correction associated with the Farley-Buneman Instability (FBI) in the thermosphere-ionosphere electrodynamics global circulation model (TIEGCM). This implementation provides, for the first time, a modeling capability to describe macroscopic effects of the FBI on the ionosphere and thermosphere in the context of a first-principle, self-consistent model. The added heating sources primarily operate between 100 and 130 km altitude, and their magnitudes often exceed auroral precipitation heating in the TIEGCM. The induced changes in E region electron temperature in the auroral oval and polar cap by the FBI are remarkable with a maximum Te approaching 2200 K. This is about 4 times larger than the TIEGCM run without FBI heating. This investigation demonstrates how researchers can add the important effects of the FBI to magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere models and simulators.

  4. Analog of the spin-orbit-induced anomalous Hall effect with quantized radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Jonas

    2010-05-15

    We demonstrate how the term describing the interaction between a single two-level atom and two cavity field modes may attain a Rashba form. As an outcome, cavity QED provides a testbed for studies of phenomena reminiscent of the spin-orbit induced anomalous Hall effect. The effective magnetic field, deriving from the non-Abelian gauge potentials rendered by the Rashba coupling, induces a transverse force acting on the phase space distributions. Thereby, the phase space distributions build up a transverse motion manifesting itself in spiral trajectories, rather than circular ones obtained for a zero magnetic field as one would acquire for the corresponding Abelian gauge potentials. Utilizing realistic experimental parameters, the phenomenon is numerically verified, ascertain that it should be realizable with current techniques.

  5. Sunscreen effects in skin analyzed by photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dos Anjos, F. H.; Rompe, P. C. B.; Mansanares, A. M.; da Silva, E. C.; Acosta-Avalos, D.; Barja, P. R.

    2005-06-01

    In this work, photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) was employed to characterize samples of commercially available sunscreen (SPF15) and the system formed by sunscreen plus skin (topically applied sunscreen). Measurements were performed at 70Hz, in the wavelength range that corresponds to most of the ultraviolet (UV) radiation that reaches Earth. The absorption spectrum of sunscreen was obtained in vitro and in situ., showing that the sunscreen analyzed presents an effective absorption of the UV radiation After that, the PAS technique was used to monitor the absorption kinetics of sunscreen applied to human skin (abdomen) samples, characterizing alterations in the human skin after application of sunscreen. This was done by applying the sunscreen in a skin sample and recording the absorption spectra in regular time intervals, up to 90 minutes after application. Measurements show that light absorption by the system sunscreen plus skin stabilizes between 25 and 45 minutes after sunscreen application. This agrees with the instructions given by the producers about the need of applying the sunscreen at least 30 minutes before sun exposition. The requirement to periodically reapply the sunscreen is confirmed by the progressive decrease in the level of UV absorption as a function of time.

  6. Health system costs of skin cancer and cost-effectiveness of skin cancer prevention and screening: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Louisa G; Rowell, David

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to review the literature for malignant melanoma, basal and squamous cell carcinomas to understand: (a) national estimates of the direct health system costs of skin cancer and (b) the cost-effectiveness of interventions for skin cancer prevention or early detection. A systematic review was performed using Medline, Cochrane Library and the National Health Service Economic Evaluation Databases as well as a manual search of reference lists to identify relevant studies up to 31 August 2013. A narrative synthesis approach was used to summarize the data. National cost estimates were adjusted for country-specific inflation and presented in 2013 euros. The CHEERS statement was used to assess the quality of the economic evaluation studies. Sixteen studies reporting national estimates of skin cancer costs and 11 cost-effectiveness studies on skin cancer prevention or early detection were identified. Relative to the size of their respective populations, the annual direct health system costs for skin cancer were highest for Australia, New Zealand, Sweden and Denmark (2013 euros). Skin cancer prevention initiatives are highly cost-effective and may also be cost-saving. Melanoma early detection programmes aimed at high-risk individuals may also be cost-effective; however, updated analyses are needed. There is a significant cost burden of skin cancer for many countries and health expenditure for this disease will grow as incidence increases. Public investment in skin cancer prevention and early detection programmes show strong potential for health and economic benefits. PMID:25089375

  7. In vitro photodynamic effect of aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines on melanoma skin cancer and healthy normal skin cells.

    PubMed

    Maduray, K; Odhav, B; Nyokong, T

    2012-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy is a medical treatment that uses an inactive dye/drug and lasers as a light source to activate the dye/drug to produce a toxic form of oxygen that destroys the cancer cells. This study aimed at investigating the cytotoxic effects of different concentrations of aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines in its inactive and active state (laser induced) on melanoma skin cancer cells, healthy normal skin fibroblast and keratinocyte cells. Experimentally, 3 × 10⁴ cells/ml were seeded in 24-well plates before treatment with different concentrations of aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines. After 2h, cells were irradiated with a light dose of 4.5 J/cm². Post-irradiated cells were incubated for 24h before cell viability was measured using the CellTiter-Blue Viability Assay. Results showed that aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines at high concentrations were cytotoxic to melanoma cells in the absence of laser activation. In the presence of laser activation of aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines at a concentration of 40 μg/ml decreased cell viability of melanoma cells to 45%, fibroblasts to 78% and keratinocytes to 73%. At this photosensitizing concentration of aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines the efficacy of the treatment light dose 4.5 J/cm² and the cell death mechanism induced by photoactivated aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines was evaluated. A light dose of 4.5 J/cm² was more efficient in killing a higher number of melanoma cells and a lower number of fibroblast and keratinocyte cells than the other light doses of 2.5 J/cm², 7.5 J/cm² and 10.5 J/cm². Apoptosis features such as blebbing, nucleus condensation, nucleus fragmentation and the formation of apoptotic bodies were seen in the photodynamic therapy treated melanoma skin cancer cells. This in vitro photodynamic therapy study concludes that using aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines at a photosensitizing concentration of 40 μg/ml in combination with a laser dose of 4.5 J/cm² was potentially lethal

  8. Inhibitory effect of corn silk on skin pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sang Yoon; Lee, Yeonmi; Kim, Sung Soo; Ju, Hyun Min; Baek, Ji Hwoon; Park, Chul-Soo; Lee, Dong-Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the inhibitory effect of corn silk on melanin production was evaluated. This study was performed to investigate the inhibitory effect of corn silk on melanin production in Melan-A cells by measuring melanin production and protein expression. The corn silk extract applied on Melan-A cells at a concentration of 100 ppm decreased melanin production by 37.2% without cytotoxicity. This was a better result than arbutin, a positive whitening agent, which exhibited a 26.8% melanin production inhibitory effect at the same concentration. The corn silk extract did not suppress tyrosinase activity but greatly reduced the expression of tyrosinase in Melan-A cells. In addition, corn silk extract was applied to the human face with hyperpigmentation, and skin color was measured to examine the degree of skin pigment reduction. The application of corn silk extract on faces with hyperpigmentation significantly reduced skin pigmentation without abnormal reactions. Based on the results above, corn silk has good prospects for use as a material for suppressing skin pigmentation. PMID:24595276

  9. 3d Transition Metal Adsorption Induced the valley-polarized Anomalous Hall Effect in Germanene

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, P.; Sun, L. Z.

    2016-01-01

    Based on DFT + U and Berry curvature calculations, we study the electronic structures and topological properties of 3d transition metal (TM) atom (from Ti to Co) adsorbed germanene (TM-germanene). We find that valley-polarized anomalous Hall effect (VAHE) can be realized in germanene by adsorbing Cr, Mn, or Co atoms on its surface. A finite valley Hall voltage can be easily detected in their nanoribbon, which is important for valleytronics devices. Moreover, different valley-polarized current and even reversible valley Hall voltage can be archived by shifting the Fermi energy of the systems. Such versatile features of the systems show potential in next generation electronics devices. PMID:27312176

  10. Theory of Multifarious Quantum Phases and Large Anomalous Hall Effect in Pyrochlore Iridate Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Kyusung; Kim, Yong Baek

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically investigate emergent quantum phases in the thin film geometries of the pyrochore iridates, where a number of exotic quantum ground states are proposed to occur in bulk materials as a result of the interplay between electron correlation and strong spin-orbit coupling. The fate of these bulk phases as well as novel quantum states that may arise only in the thin film platforms, are studied via a theoretical model that allows layer-dependent magnetic structures. It is found that the magnetic order develop in inhomogeneous fashions in the thin film geometries. This leads to a variety of magnetic metal phases with modulated magnetic ordering patterns across different layers. Both the bulk and boundary electronic states in these phases conspire to promote unusual electronic properties. In particular, such phases are akin to the Weyl semimetal phase in the bulk system and they would exhibit an unusually large anomalous Hall effect. PMID:27418293

  11. Evidence of local effects in anomalous refraction and focusing properties of dodecagonal photonic quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Gennaro, Emiliano; Miletto, Carlo; Savo, Salvatore; Andreone, Antonello; Morello, Davide; Galdi, Vincenzo; Castaldi, Giuseppe; Pierro, Vincenzo

    2008-05-01

    We present the key results from a comprehensive study of the refraction and focusing properties of a two-dimensional dodecagonal photonic “quasicrystal” (PQC), which was carried out via both full-wave numerical simulations and microwave measurements on a slab made of alumina rods inserted in a parallel-plate waveguide. We observe an anomalous refraction and focusing in several frequency regions, which confirm some recently published results. However, our interpretation, which is based on numerical and experimental evidence, substantially differs from the one in terms of “effective negative refractive index” that was originally proposed. Instead, our study highlights the critical role played by short-range interactions associated with local order and symmetry.

  12. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in atomic crystal layers from in-plane magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yafei; Zeng, Junjie; Deng, Xinzhou; Yang, Fei; Pan, Hui; Qiao, Zhenhua

    2016-08-01

    We theoretically demonstrate that with in-plane magnetization, the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) can be realized in two-dimensional atomic crystal layers with preserved inversion symmetry but broken out-of-plane mirror reflection symmetry. By taking the honeycomb lattice system as an example, we find that the low-buckled structure satisfying the symmetry criteria is crucial to induce QAHE. The topologically nontrivial bulk gap carrying a Chern number of C =±1 opens in the vicinity of the saddle points M , where the band dispersion exhibits strong anisotropy. We further show that the QAHE with electrically tunable Chern number can be achieved in Bernal-stacked multilayer systems, and the applied interlayer potential differences can dramatically decrease the critical magnetization to make the QAHE experimentally feasible.

  13. The temperature dependent anomalous Hall effect in La-Ca-Mn-O films

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y.; Miller, D. J.; Jiang, J. S.; Pearson, J.; Bader, S. D.

    1999-10-27

    The colossal magnetoresistance of La{sub 1{minus}x}Ca{sub x}MnO{sub 3} has been reported in many experiments. The authors present their study of the anomalous Hall effect in epitaxial La{sub 0.67}Ca{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3} thin films. They have measured the temperature dependence of resistivity, magnetization and AHE coefficients between 300K and 5K for the samples grown on different substrates. From these studies, the relation between the resistivity and AHE coefficient as well as the temperature dependence of AHE coefficient are explored. The results show that the direction of AHE is reversed below approximately 100K. This sign reversal is discussed in term of the change of band structure and the co-existence of hole-like and electron-like conduction.

  14. Theory of Multifarious Quantum Phases and Large Anomalous Hall Effect in Pyrochlore Iridate Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kyusung; Kim, Yong Baek

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically investigate emergent quantum phases in the thin film geometries of the pyrochore iridates, where a number of exotic quantum ground states are proposed to occur in bulk materials as a result of the interplay between electron correlation and strong spin-orbit coupling. The fate of these bulk phases as well as novel quantum states that may arise only in the thin film platforms, are studied via a theoretical model that allows layer-dependent magnetic structures. It is found that the magnetic order develop in inhomogeneous fashions in the thin film geometries. This leads to a variety of magnetic metal phases with modulated magnetic ordering patterns across different layers. Both the bulk and boundary electronic states in these phases conspire to promote unusual electronic properties. In particular, such phases are akin to the Weyl semimetal phase in the bulk system and they would exhibit an unusually large anomalous Hall effect. PMID:27418293

  15. Theory for the anomalous electron transport in Hall effect thrusters. II. Kinetic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafleur, T.; Baalrud, S. D.; Chabert, P.

    2016-05-01

    In Paper I [T. Lafleur et al., Phys. Plasmas 23, 053502 (2016)], we demonstrated (using particle-in-cell simulations) the definite correlation between an anomalously high cross-field electron transport in Hall effect thrusters (HETs), and the presence of azimuthal electrostatic instabilities leading to enhanced electron scattering. Here, we present a kinetic theory that predicts the enhanced scattering rate and provides an electron cross-field mobility that is in good agreement with experiment. The large azimuthal electron drift velocity in HETs drives a strong instability that quickly saturates due to a combination of ion-wave trapping and wave-convection, leading to an enhanced mobility many orders of magnitude larger than that expected from classical diffusion theory. In addition to the magnetic field strength, B0, this enhanced mobility is a strong function of the plasma properties (such as the plasma density) and therefore does not, in general, follow simple 1 /B02 or 1 /B0 scaling laws.

  16. Magnetization, anomalous Barkhausen effect, and core loss of Supermendur under high temperature cycling.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedra, J. M.; Schwarze, G. E.

    1971-01-01

    The magnetization and core loss of Supermendur were measured up to 900 C under conditions of slow temperature cycling in vacuum. As a consequence of this heating, the coercivity at 25 C increased from 21 A/m to about 110 A/m. This increase is less than previously reported. A prominent anomalous Barkhausen effect, pinched-in hysteresis loops, and a magnetic viscosity field in excess of 20 A/m were observed in the range of 600 to 700 C. At 850 C, Supermendur had a coercivity of 23 A/m, a saturation induction exceeding 1.5 T, a core loss of 26 W/kg at 400 Hz, and a maximum induction of 1.5 T. Supermendur may be useful for high temperature soft magnetic material applications where some history dependence of properties and instability of minor loops at lower temperatures is acceptable.

  17. Theory of Multifarious Quantum Phases and Large Anomalous Hall Effect in Pyrochlore Iridate Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Kyusung; Kim, Yong Baek

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically investigate emergent quantum phases in the thin film geometries of the pyrochore iridates, where a number of exotic quantum ground states are proposed to occur in bulk materials as a result of the interplay between electron correlation and strong spin-orbit coupling. The fate of these bulk phases as well as novel quantum states that may arise only in the thin film platforms, are studied via a theoretical model that allows layer-dependent magnetic structures. It is found that the magnetic order develop in inhomogeneous fashions in the thin film geometries. This leads to a variety of magnetic metal phases with modulated magnetic ordering patterns across different layers. Both the bulk and boundary electronic states in these phases conspire to promote unusual electronic properties. In particular, such phases are akin to the Weyl semimetal phase in the bulk system and they would exhibit an unusually large anomalous Hall effect.

  18. 3d Transition Metal Adsorption Induced the valley-polarized Anomalous Hall Effect in Germanene.

    PubMed

    Zhou, P; Sun, L Z

    2016-01-01

    Based on DFT + U and Berry curvature calculations, we study the electronic structures and topological properties of 3d transition metal (TM) atom (from Ti to Co) adsorbed germanene (TM-germanene). We find that valley-polarized anomalous Hall effect (VAHE) can be realized in germanene by adsorbing Cr, Mn, or Co atoms on its surface. A finite valley Hall voltage can be easily detected in their nanoribbon, which is important for valleytronics devices. Moreover, different valley-polarized current and even reversible valley Hall voltage can be archived by shifting the Fermi energy of the systems. Such versatile features of the systems show potential in next generation electronics devices. PMID:27312176

  19. Extrinsic anomalous Hall effect in epitaxial Mn{sub 4}N films

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, M.; Wu, S. X. Ren, L. Z.; Zhou, W. Q.; Wang, Y. J.; Wang, G. L.; Li, S. W.

    2015-01-19

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in ferrimagnetic Mn{sub 4}N epitaxial films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy is investigated. The longitudinal conductivity σ{sub xx} is within the superclean regime, indicating Mn{sub 4}N is a highly conducting material. We further demonstrate that the AHE signal in 40-nm-thick films is mainly due to the extrinsic contributions based on the analysis fitted by ρ{sub AH}=a′ρ{sub xx0}+bρ{sub xx}{sup 2} and σ{sub AH}∝σ{sub xx}. Our study not only provide a strategy for further theoretical work on antiperovskite manganese nitrides but also shed promising light on utilizing their extrinsic AHE to fabricate spintronic devices.

  20. Anomalous TWTA output power spikes and their effect on a digital satellite communications system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Brian D.; Kerczewski, Robert J.; Svoboda, James S.

    1992-01-01

    Several 30 GHz, 60 W traveling wave tube amplifiers (TWTA) were manufactured for the NASA Lewis Research Center's High Burst Rate Link Evaluation Terminal Project. An unusual operating problem characterized by anomalous nonperiodic output power spikes, common to all of the TWTAs proved during testing to significantly affect the performance of a digitally-modulated data transmission test system. Modifications made to the TWTAs significantly curtailed the problem and allowed acceptable system performance to be obtained. This paper presents a discussion of the TWTA output power spike problem, possible causes of the problem, and the solutions implemented by the manufacturer which improved the TWTA performance to an acceptable level. The results of the testing done at NASA Lewis on the TWTAs both before and after the improvement made by Hughes are presented, and the effects of the output power spikes on the performance of the test system are discussed.

  1. Beer and beer compounds: physiological effects on skin health.

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Becker, T; Qian, F; Ring, J

    2014-02-01

    Beer is one of the earliest human inventions and globally the most consumed alcoholic beverage in terms of volume. In addition to water, the 'German Beer Purity Law', based on the Bavarian Beer Purity Law from 1516, allows only barley, hops, yeasts and water for beer brewing. The extracts of these ingredients, especially the hops, contain an abundance of polyphenols such as kaempferol, quercetin, tyrosol, ferulic acid, xanthohumol/isoxanthohumol/8-prenylnaringenin, α-bitter acids like humulone and β-bitter acids like lupulone. 8-prenylnaringenin is the most potent phytoestrogen known to date. These compounds have been shown to possess various anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, anti-angiogenic, anti-melanogenic, anti-osteoporotic and anti-carcinogenic effects. Epidemiological studies on the association between beer drinking and skin disease are limited while direct evidence of beer compounds in clinical application is lacking. Potential uses of these substances in dermatology may include treatment of atopic eczema, contact dermatitis, pigmentary disorders, skin infections, skin ageing, skin cancers and photoprotections, which require an optimization of the biostability and topical delivery of these compounds. Further studies are needed to determine the bioavailability of these compounds and their possible beneficial health effects when taken by moderate beer consumption. PMID:23802910

  2. Effect of Age on Tooth Shade, Skin Color and Skin-Tooth Color Interrelationship in Saudi Arabian Subpopulation

    PubMed Central

    Haralur, Satheesh B

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dental restoration or prosthesis in harmony with adjacent natural teeth color is indispensable part for the successful esthetic outcome. The studies indicate is existence of correlation between teeth and skin color. Teeth and skin color are changed over the aging process. The aim of the study was to explore the role of age on the tooth and skin color parameters, and to investigate the effect of ageing on teeth-skin color correlation. Materials and Methods: Total of 225 Saudi Arabian ethnic subjects was divided into three groups of 75 each. The groups were divided according to participant’s age. The participant’s age for Group I, Group II, and Group III was 18-29 years, 30-50 years, and above 50 years, respectively. The tooth color was identified by spectrophotometer in CIE Lab parameters. The skin color was registered with skin surface photography. The data were statistically analyzed with one-way ANOVA and correlation tests with SPSS 18 software. Results: The Group I had the highest ‘L’ value of 80.26, Group III recorded the least value of 76.66. The Group III had highest yellow value ‘b’ at 22.72, while Group I had 19.19. The skin ‘L’ value was highest in the young population; the elder population had the increased red value ‘a’ in comparison to younger subjects. The ‘L’ tooth color parameter had a strong positive linear correlation with skin color in young and adult subjects. While Group III teeth showed the strong positive correlation with ‘b’ parameter at malar region. Conclusion: The elder subjects had darker and yellow teeth in comparison with younger subjects. The reddening of the skin was observed as age-related skin color change. The age had a strong influence on the teeth-skin color correlation. PMID:26464536

  3. Vacuum effects in magnetic field with with account for fermion anomalous magnetic moment and axial-vector interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubnov, Andrey; Gubina, Nadezda; Zhukovsky, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    We study vacuum polarization effects in the model of Dirac fermions with additional interaction of an anomalous magnetic moment with an external magnetic field and fermion interaction with an axial-vector condensate. The proper time method is used to calculate the one-loop vacuum corrections with consideration for different configurations of the characteristic parameters of these interactions.

  4. Effects of Essential Oils and Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids on Canine Skin Equivalents: Skin Lipid Assessment and Morphological Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Cerrato, S.; Ramió-Lluch, L.; Fondevila, D.; Rodes, D.; Brazis, P.; Puigdemont, A.

    2013-01-01

    A canine skin equivalent model has been validated for the assessment of a topical formulation effects. Skin equivalents were developed from freshly isolated cutaneous canine fibroblasts and keratinocytes, after enzymatic digestion of skin samples (n = 8) from different breeds. Fibroblasts were embedded into a collagen type I matrix, and keratinocytes were seeded onto its surface at air-liquid interface. Skin equivalents were supplemented with essential oils and polyunsaturated fatty acid formulation or with vehicle. Skin equivalents were histopathologically and ultrastructurally studied, and the three main lipid groups (free fatty acids, cholesterol, and ceramides) were analyzed. Results showed that the culture method developed resulted in significant improvements in cell retrieval and confluence. Treated samples presented a thicker epidermis with increased number of viable cell layers, a denser and compact stratum corneum, and a more continuous basal membrane. Regarding lipid profile, treated skin equivalents showed a significant increase in ceramide content (51.7 ± 1.3) when compared to untreated (41.6  ±  1.4) samples. Ultrastructural study evidenced a compact and well-organized stratum corneum in both treated and control skin equivalents. In conclusion, cell viability and ceramides increase, after lipid supplementation, are especially relevant for the treatment of skin barrier disruptions occurring in canine atopic dermatitis. PMID:26464904

  5. Anomalous is ubiquitous

    SciTech Connect

    Eliazar, Iddo; Klafter, Joseph

    2011-09-15

    Brownian motion is widely considered the quintessential model of diffusion processes-the most elemental random transport processes in Science and Engineering. Yet so, examples of diffusion processes displaying highly non-Brownian statistics-commonly termed 'Anomalous Diffusion' processes-are omnipresent both in the natural sciences and in engineered systems. The scientific interest in Anomalous Diffusion and its applications is growing exponentially in the recent years. In this Paper we review the key statistics of Anomalous Diffusion processes: sub-diffusion and super-diffusion, long-range dependence and the Joseph effect, Levy statistics and the Noah effect, and 1/f noise. We further present a theoretical model-generalizing the Einstein-Smoluchowski diffusion model-which provides a unified explanation for the prevalence of Anomalous Diffusion statistics. Our model shows that what is commonly perceived as 'anomalous' is in effect ubiquitous. - Highlights: > The article provides an overview of Anomalous Diffusion (AD) statistics. > The Einstein-Smoluchowski diffusion model is extended and generalized. > The generalized model universally generates AD statistics. > A unified 'universal macroscopic explanation' for AD statistics is established. > AD statistics are shown to be fundamentally connected to robustness.

  6. Evaluation of skin viability effect on ethosome and liposome-mediated psoralen delivery via cell uptake.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Tai; Shen, Li-Na; Wu, Zhong-Hua; Zhao, Ji-Hui; Feng, Nian-Ping

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated the effect of skin viability on its permeability to psoralen delivered by ethosomes, as compared with liposomes. With decreasing skin viability, the amount of liposome-delivered psoralen that penetrated through the skin increased, whereas skin deposition of psoralen from both ethosomes and liposomes reduced. Psoralen delivery to human-immortalized epidermal cells was more effective using liposomes, whereas delivery to human embryonic skin fibroblast cells was more effective when ethosomes were used. These findings agreed with those of in vivo studies showing that skin psoralen deposition from ethosomes and liposomes first increased and then plateaued overtime, which may indicate gradual saturation of intracellular drug delivery. It also suggested that the reduced deposition of ethosome- or liposome-delivered psoralen in skin with reduced viability may relate to reduced cellular uptake. This work indicated that the effects of skin viability should be taken into account when evaluating nanocarrier-mediated drug skin permeation. PMID:25070929

  7. Assessing vehicle effects on skin absorption using artificial membrane assays.

    PubMed

    Karadzovska, Daniela; Riviere, Jim E

    2013-12-18

    A vast number of variations in drug/vehicle combinations may come into contact with skin. Evaluating the effect of potential drug, vehicle and skin interactions for all possible combinations is a daunting task. A practical solution is a rapid screening technique amenable to high throughput approaches (e.g. 96-well plates). In this study, three artificial membranes (isopropyl myristate (IPM), certramides and Strat-M™) were evaluated for their ability to predict the skin permeability of caffeine, cortisone, diclofenac sodium, mannitol, salicylic acid and testosterone applied in propylene glycol, water and ethanol as unsaturated and saturated concentrations. Resultant absorption data was compared to porcine skin diffusion cell data. The correlations (r(2)) between membrane and diffusion cell data from saturated and unsaturated concentrations were 0.38, 0.47 and 0.56 for the Strat-M™, certramide and IPM membranes, respectively. This relationship improved when only saturated concentrations were evaluated (r(2) = 0.60, 0.63 and 0.66 for the Strat-M™, certramide and IPM membranes, respectively). A correlation between membrane retention and the amount remaining in skin had r(2) values of 0.73 (Strat-M™), 0.67 (certramides), and 0.67 (IPM). Quantitative structure-permeability relationship models for each membrane identified different physicochemical factors influencing the absorption process. Although further investigations exploring complex topical formulations are required, these results suggest potential use as an initial screening approach to assist in narrowing the selection of formulations to be evaluated with a more biologically intact model, thereby assisting in the development of new topical formulations. PMID:23474357

  8. Effects of permafrost microorganisms on skin wound reparation.

    PubMed

    Kalenova, L F; Novikova, M A; Subbotin, A M

    2015-02-01

    Local application of ointment with Bacillus spp. strain MG8 (15,000-20,000 living bacterial cells), isolated from permafrost specimens, on the skin wound of about 60 mm(2) stimulated the reparation processes in experimental mice. A possible mechanism stimulating the regeneration of the damaged tissues under the effect of MG8 could be modulation of the immune system reactivity with more rapid switchover to humoral immunity anti-inflammatory mechanisms aimed at de novo synthesis of protein. PMID:25708330

  9. Application of focused-beam flat-sample method to synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction with anomalous scattering effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, M.; Katsuya, Y.; Matsushita, Y.

    2013-03-01

    The focused-beam flat-sample method (FFM), which is a method for high-resolution and rapid synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction measurements by combination of beam focusing optics, a flat shape sample and an area detector, was applied for diffraction experiments with anomalous scattering effect. The advantages of FFM for anomalous diffraction were absorption correction without approximation, rapid data collection by an area detector and good signal-to-noise ratio data by focusing optics. In the X-ray diffraction experiments of CoFe2O4 and Fe3O4 (By FFM) using X-rays near the Fe K absorption edge, the anomalous scattering effect between Fe/Co or Fe2+/Fe3+ can be clearly detected, due to the change of diffraction intensity. The change of observed diffraction intensity as the incident X-ray energy was consistent with the calculation. The FFM is expected to be a method for anomalous powder diffraction.

  10. Anomalous Hall effect sensors based on magnetic element doped topological insulator thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yan; Zhang, Zhen; Nlebedim, Ikenna; Jiles, David

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) is recently discovered in magnetic element doped topological insulators (TIs), which promises low power consumption highly efficient spintronics and electronics. This discovery broaden the family of Hall effect (HE) sensors. In this work, both HE and AHE sensor based on Mn and Cr doped Bi2Te3 TI thin films will be systematically studied. The influence of Mn concentration on sensitivity of MnxBi2-xTe3 HE sensors will be discussed. The Hall sensitivity increase 8 times caused by quantum AHE will be reported. AHE senor based on Cr-doped Bi2Te3 TI thin films will also be studied and compared with Mn doped Bi2Te3 AHE sensor. The influence of thickness on sensitivity of CrxBi2-xTe3 AHE sensors will be discussed. Ultrahigh Hall sensitivity is obtained in Cr doped Bi2Te3. The largest Hall sensitivity can reach 2620 Ω/T in sensor which is almost twice higher than that of the normal semiconductor HE sensor. Our work indicates that magnetic element doped topological insulator with AHE are good candidates for ultra-sensitive Hall effect sensors.

  11. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in time-reversal-symmetry breaking topological insulators.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cui-Zu; Li, Mingda

    2016-03-31

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE), the last member of Hall family, was predicted to exhibit quantized Hall conductivity σ(yx) = e2/h without any external magnetic field. The QAHE shares a similar physical phenomenon with the integer quantum Hall effect (QHE), whereas its physical origin relies on the intrinsic topological inverted band structure and ferromagnetism. Since the QAHE does not require external energy input in the form of magnetic field, it is believed that this effect has unique potential for applications in future electronic devices with low-power consumption. More recently, the QAHE has been experimentally observed in thin films of the time-reversal symmetry breaking ferromagnetic (FM) topological insulators (TI), Cr- and V- doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3. In this topical review, we review the history of TI based QAHE, the route to the experimental observation of the QAHE in the above two systems, the current status of the research of the QAHE, and finally the prospects for future studies. PMID:26934535

  12. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in time-reversal-symmetry breaking topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Cui-Zu; Li, Mingda

    2016-03-01

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE), the last member of Hall family, was predicted to exhibit quantized Hall conductivity {σyx}=\\frac{{{e}2}}{h} without any external magnetic field. The QAHE shares a similar physical phenomenon with the integer quantum Hall effect (QHE), whereas its physical origin relies on the intrinsic topological inverted band structure and ferromagnetism. Since the QAHE does not require external energy input in the form of magnetic field, it is believed that this effect has unique potential for applications in future electronic devices with low-power consumption. More recently, the QAHE has been experimentally observed in thin films of the time-reversal symmetry breaking ferromagnetic (FM) topological insulators (TI), Cr- and V- doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3. In this topical review, we review the history of TI based QAHE, the route to the experimental observation of the QAHE in the above two systems, the current status of the research of the QAHE, and finally the prospects for future studies.

  13. Anomalous Hall effect in Pt thin films induced by ionic gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Sunao; Takahashi, Kei S.; Hatano, Takafumi; Kawasaki, Masashi; Tokura, Yoshinori; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2014-03-01

    Pt is an exchange-enhanced paramagnetic material, in which the Stoner criterion for ferromagnetism is nearly satisfied and thus external stimuli may induce unconventional magnetic characteristics. For example, nano-structure formation such as particles[2] or wires[3] provides Pt with ferromagnetic-like properties even at room temperature. In this presentation, we report that a nonmagnetic perturbation in the form of a gate voltage applied through an ionic liquid induces a nonlinear Hall effect in Pt thin films,[4] which resembles the anomalous Hall effect induced by the contact to yttrium iron garnet.[5] Analysis of detailed temperature and magnetic field experiments indicates that the evolution of the nonlinear Hall effect can be explained in terms of large local moments. The applied electric field triggers an electrochemical reaction at the solid/liquid interface and induces magnetic moments as large as ~10 μB that follow the Langevin function. This work was supported by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSAP) through its `Funding Program for World-Leading Innovative R&D on Science and Technology (FIRST Program)'.

  14. Roughness effects on fine-scale anisotropy and anomalous scaling in atmospheric flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katul, G. G.; Porporato, A.; Poggi, D.

    2009-03-01

    The effects of surface roughness on various measures of fine-scale intermittency within the inertial subrange were analyzed using two data sets that span the roughness "extremes" encountered in atmospheric flows, an ice sheet and a tall rough forest, and supplemented by a large number of existing literature data. Three inter-related problems pertaining to surface roughness effects on (i) anomalous scaling in higher-order structure functions, (ii) generalized dimensions and singularity spectra of the componentwise turbulent kinetic energy, and (iii) scalewise measures such local flatness factors and stretching exponents were addressed. It was demonstrated that surface roughness effects do not impact the fine-scale intermittency in u (the longitudinal velocity component), consistent with previous laboratory experiments. However, fine-scale intermittency in w (the vertical velocity component) increased with decreasing roughness. The consequence of this external intermittency (i.e., surface roughness induced) is that the singularity spectra of the scaling exponents are much broader for w when compared u in the context of the multifractal formalism for the local kinetic energy (instead of the usual conservative cascade studied for the dissipation rate). The scalewise evolution of the flatness factors and stretching exponents collapse when normalized using a global Reynolds number Rt=σLI/ν, where σ is the velocity standard deviation, LI is the integral length scale, and ν is the fluid viscosity.

  15. Effects of skin and hydraulic fractures on SVE wells.

    PubMed

    Bradner, Graham C; Murdoch, Lawrence C

    2005-05-01

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) systems are intended to cause substantial volumes of air to flow through the subsurface with the purpose of removing volatile contaminants. The effectiveness of SVE can be influenced by any effect that changes the specific gas capacity (discharge as a function of vacuum) of a well. Skins of low permeability material enveloping a well bore are widely recognized to affect the performance of wells used to recover water, natural gas, or petroleum, and skin can also significantly diminish the performance of an SVE well. Skins a few mm thick consisting of material whose gas phase permeability is 0.01 of the formation can reduce the specific gas capacity of an SVE well by factors of 2 to 10 or more. Hydraulic fractures created in the vicinities of shallow wells commonly resemble sand-filled layers shaped like flat-lying disks or gently dipping saucers. The contrast between the gas-phase permeability of the sand in the fracture and that of the formation is particularly important, with significant effects requiring the ratio to be greater than approximately 50. Shallow hydraulic fractures filled with several tenths of m3 of sand in formations that are several orders of magnitude less permeable than that of the enveloping formation should increase specific gas capacity by factors of 10 or more. Field tests of the effects of hydraulic fractures on the performance of SVE were conducted by creating four wells intersecting fractures and a suite of control wells created using conventional methods in silty saprolite. Specific gas capacities ranged over more than an order of magnitude for 10 wells completed within a small area (2 m2) and at the same depth. Specific capacities correlate to the drilling method that was used to create the bore for the well: lowest values occurred in wells drilled with a machine auger, slightly better results were obtained using a Shelby tube, and the best results were obtained from conventional wells bored with a hand auger

  16. Anomalous spectral response in heterojunction PbTe/PbSnTe infrared detectors - A new effect: Two Peak Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Shuxing; Chen Boliang; Yuan Shixin )

    1991-03-01

    In the measurements of the spectral responses of PbTe/PbSnTe p-n heterojunction infrared detectors, the authors have discovered that there is an anomalous phenomenon in a few detectors when reverse bias is applied: there is not only a response peak in the 8-14 {mu}m long-wavelength range, but also another response peak in the 3-6 {mu}m short-wavelength range. They have also discovered that when reverse bias is increased, the heights of both spectral peaks can be adjusted, and the height of short-wavelength peak may be quickly increased, even if its long-wavelength peak is exceeded. This is an unreported new phenomenon up to now. It is shortly called anomalous phenomenon,' or Two Peak Effect' (TPE). This paper describes the new effect TPE' firstly, and makes a theoretical explanation. On the basis of this effect, it would be possible to make a new type of IR detector, which is quite different from the available detectors.

  17. Thermal effects of X-band microwaves on skin tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kyo D.; Yoon, Hargsoon; Lee, Kunik; Kim, Jaehwan; Choi, Sang H.

    2012-04-01

    Microwave can be used as a power carrier to implanted medical devices wirelessly, which is regarded as one of the attractive features for medical applications. The loss mechanism of microwave transmission through lossy media often appears as a thermal effect due to the absorption of microwave. Such a thermal effect on human tissue has not rigorously studied yet. The thermal effect on living tissues was experimentally tested with animal skins to understand the absorption characteristics of microwave. In this paper, the frequency range of microwave used for the tests was from 6 GHz to 13 GHz.

  18. The foreign exchange market: return distributions, multifractality, anomalous multifractality and the Epps effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drożdż, Stanisław; Kwapień, Jarosław; Oświȩcimka, Paweł; Rak, Rafał

    2010-10-01

    We present a systematic study of various statistical characteristics of high-frequency returns from the foreign exchange market. This study is based on six exchange rates forming two triangles: EUR-GBP-USD and GBP-CHF-JPY. It is shown that the exchange rate return fluctuations for all of the pairs considered are well described by the non-extensive statistics in terms of q-Gaussians. There exist some small quantitative variations in the non-extensivity q-parameter values for different exchange rates (which depend also on the time scales studied), and this can be related to the importance of a given exchange rate in the world's currency trade. Temporal correlations organize the series of returns such that they develop the multifractal characteristics for all of the exchange rates, with a varying degree of symmetry of the singularity spectrum f(α), however. The most symmetric spectrum is identified for the GBP/USD. We also form time series of triangular residual returns and find that the distributions of their fluctuations develop disproportionately heavier tails as compared to small fluctuations, which excludes description in terms of q-Gaussians. The multifractal characteristics of these residual returns reveal such anomalous properties as negative singularity exponents and even negative singularity spectra. Such anomalous multifractal measures have so far been considered in the literature in connection with diffusion-limited aggregation and with turbulence. Studying the cross-correlations among different exchange rates, we found that market inefficiency on short time scales leads to the occurrence of the Epps effect on much longer time scales, but comparable to the ones for the stock market. Although the currency market is much more liquid than the stock markets and has a much greater transaction frequency, the building up of correlations takes up to several hours—a duration that does not differ much from what is observed in the stock markets. This may suggest

  19. Strong and Anomalous Thermal Expansion Precedes the Thermosalient Effect in Dynamic Molecular Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Manas K.; Centore, Roberto; Causà, Mauro; Tuzi, Angela; Borbone, Fabio; Naumov, Panče

    2016-01-01

    The ability of thermosalient solids, organic analogues of inorganic martensites, to move by rapid mechanical reconfiguration or ballistic event remains visually appealing and potentially useful, yet mechanistically elusive phenomenon. Here, with a material that undergoes both thermosalient and non-thermosalient phase transitions, we demonstrate that the thermosalient effect is preceded by anomalous thermal expansion of the unit cell. The crystal explosion occurs as sudden release of the latent strain accumulated during the anisotropic, exceedingly strong expansion of the unit cell with αa = 225.9 × 10−6 K−1, αb = 238.8 × 10−6 K−1 and αc = −290.0 × 10−6 K−1, the latter being the largest negative thermal expansivity observed for an organic compound thus far. The results point out to the occurence of the thermosalient effect in phase transitions as means to identify new molecular materials with strong positive and/or negative thermal expansion which prior to this work could only be discovered serendipitously. PMID:27403616

  20. Strong and Anomalous Thermal Expansion Precedes the Thermosalient Effect in Dynamic Molecular Crystals.

    PubMed

    Panda, Manas K; Centore, Roberto; Causà, Mauro; Tuzi, Angela; Borbone, Fabio; Naumov, Panče

    2016-01-01

    The ability of thermosalient solids, organic analogues of inorganic martensites, to move by rapid mechanical reconfiguration or ballistic event remains visually appealing and potentially useful, yet mechanistically elusive phenomenon. Here, with a material that undergoes both thermosalient and non-thermosalient phase transitions, we demonstrate that the thermosalient effect is preceded by anomalous thermal expansion of the unit cell. The crystal explosion occurs as sudden release of the latent strain accumulated during the anisotropic, exceedingly strong expansion of the unit cell with αa = 225.9 × 10(-6) K(-1), αb = 238.8 × 10(-6) K(-1) and αc = -290.0 × 10(-6) K(-1), the latter being the largest negative thermal expansivity observed for an organic compound thus far. The results point out to the occurence of the thermosalient effect in phase transitions as means to identify new molecular materials with strong positive and/or negative thermal expansion which prior to this work could only be discovered serendipitously. PMID:27403616

  1. Anomalously Large Polarization Effect Responsible for Excitonic Red Shifts in PbSe Quantum Dot Solids

    SciTech Connect

    A Wolcott; V Doyeux; C Nelson; R Gearba; K Lei; K Yager; A dolocan; K Williams; D Nguyen; X Zhu

    2011-12-31

    The formation of solid thin films from colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) is often accompanied by red shifts in excitonic transitions, but the mechanisms responsible for the red shifts are under debate. We quantitatively address this issue using optical absorption spectroscopy of two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) arrays of PbSe QDs with controlled inter-QD distance, which was determined by the length of alkanedithiol linking molecules. With decreasing inter-QD distance, the first and second exciton absorption peaks show increasing red shifts. Using thin films consisting of large and isolated QDs embedded in a matrix of small QDs, we determine that a dominant contribution to the observed red shift is due to changes in polarization of the dielectric environment surrounding each QD ({approx}88%), while electronic or transition dipole coupling plays a lesser role. However, the observed red shifts are more than 1 order of magnitude larger than theoretical predictions based on the dielectric polarization effect for spherical QDs. We attribute this anomalously large polarization effect to deviations of the exciton wave functions from eigenfunctions of the idealized spherical quantum well model.

  2. Strong and Anomalous Thermal Expansion Precedes the Thermosalient Effect in Dynamic Molecular Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Manas K.; Centore, Roberto; Causà, Mauro; Tuzi, Angela; Borbone, Fabio; Naumov, Panče

    2016-07-01

    The ability of thermosalient solids, organic analogues of inorganic martensites, to move by rapid mechanical reconfiguration or ballistic event remains visually appealing and potentially useful, yet mechanistically elusive phenomenon. Here, with a material that undergoes both thermosalient and non-thermosalient phase transitions, we demonstrate that the thermosalient effect is preceded by anomalous thermal expansion of the unit cell. The crystal explosion occurs as sudden release of the latent strain accumulated during the anisotropic, exceedingly strong expansion of the unit cell with αa = 225.9 × 10‑6 K‑1, αb = 238.8 × 10‑6 K‑1 and αc = ‑290.0 × 10‑6 K‑1, the latter being the largest negative thermal expansivity observed for an organic compound thus far. The results point out to the occurence of the thermosalient effect in phase transitions as means to identify new molecular materials with strong positive and/or negative thermal expansion which prior to this work could only be discovered serendipitously.

  3. Resonant cavity mode dependence of anomalous and inverse spin Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sang-Il; Seo, Min-Su; Park, Seung-young

    2014-05-07

    The direct current electric voltage induced by the Inverse Spin Hall Effect (ISHE) and Anomalous Hall Effect (AHE) was investigated in the TE{sub 011} and TE{sub 102} cavities. The ISHE and AHE components were distinguishable through the fitting of the voltage spectrum. The unwanted AHE was minimized by placing the DUT (Device Under Test) at the center of both the TE{sub 011} and TE{sub 102} cavities. The voltage of ISHE in the TE{sub 011} cavity was larger than that in the TE{sub 102} cavity due to the higher quality factor of the former. Despite optimized centering, AHE voltage from TE{sub 011} cavity was also higher. The reason was attributed to the E-field distribution inside the cavity. In the case of the TE{sub 011} cavity, the DUT was easily exposed to the E-field in all directions. Therefore, the parasitic AHE voltage in the TE{sub 102} cavity was less sensitive than that in the TE{sub 011} cavity to decentering problem.

  4. Anomalous Hall effect in L 10-MnAl films with controllable orbital two-channel Kondo effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L. J.; Nie, S. H.; Zhao, J. H.

    2016-05-01

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in strongly disordered magnetic systems has been buried in persistent confusion despite its long history. We report the AHE in perpendicularly magnetized L 10-MnAl epitaxial films with a variable orbital two-channel Kondo (2CK) effect arising from the strong coupling of conduction electrons and the structural disorders of two-level systems. The AHE is observed to excellently scale with ρAH/f =a0ρx x 0+b ρxx 2 at high temperatures where phonon scattering prevails. In contrast, significant deviation occurs at low temperatures where the orbital 2CK effect becomes important, suggesting a negative AHE contribution. The deviation of the scaling agrees with the orbital 2CK effect in the breakdown temperatures and deviation magnitudes.

  5. Effect of microplasma irradiation on skin barrier function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Kazuo; Tran, Nhat An; Blajan, Marius

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of atmospheric-pressure argon microplasma irradiation (AAMI) to promote drug delivery through skin. Yucatan micropig skin was used as a biological object for evaluation of in vitro percutaneous absorption. The changes in lipids, proteins and water content of the pig stratum corneum (SC) after AAMI were compared to those of a tape stripping test (TST) and plasma jet irradiation (PJI) using attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis. The significant reduction in the methylene stretching modes absorbance resulted in the disturbance in the SC lipids caused by AAMI was observed at 2850 and 2920 cm-1. Moreover, as the result of TST, trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL) after both AAMI and PJI were also increased, that could lead to a decrease of barrier function of SC, and could enhance the transdermal absorption of drugs. Under the conditions of this study, TEWL value of 5 minutes AAMI (35.92 +/- 3.48 g/m2h) was approximately the same as that value of 10 times TST (34.30 +/- 3.54 g/m2h), that makes the effect of these manipulations on the surfaces is considered to be at the same levels. Furthermore, unlike the obtained microscopic observation from PJI, there was no thermal damage observed on the skins after AAMI.

  6. A histologic evaluation of the effects of skin refrigerants in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Hanke, C W; O'Brian, J J

    1987-06-01

    The effects of a number of commonly used skin refrigerants were studied in controlled freezing experiments on guinea pig skin. Frigiderm and Fluro Ethyl produced very little effect on the skin compared to colder preparations such as Cryosthesia -30 degrees C and Cryosthesia -60 degrees C. PMID:3584631

  7. Effect of UVB 311 nm irradiation on normal human skin.

    PubMed

    Viac, J; Goujon, C; Misery, L; Staniek, V; Faure, M; Schmitt, D; Claudy, A

    1997-06-01

    Ultraviolet radiation B (UVB) on the skin induces erythema, inflammation and modifications of the immune system. These changes have been reported after excessive short-term or long-term exposure to broad spectrum UVB. In this study, we examined the effects of local repetitive UVB irradiation of 311 nm wavelength on the skin of seven young volunteers. Skin biopsies were taken before and after UVB irradiation, and we immunohistochemically analyzed the expression of CD1a and HLA-DR antigens of Langerhans cells (LC), the possible infiltration of dermis/epidermis by CD11b macrophages, the modifications or the induction of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), E-selectin and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) involved in the binding of leukocytes to the endothelial surface and the development of perivascular infiltrates of LFA-1+ mononuclear cells. We also determined the expression of substance P receptors (SPR) using biotinylated substance P (SPB). Exposure of UVB 311 nm induced a drastic reduction of CD1a+ cells and a moderate increase of HLA-DR+ dendritic cells in the epidermis without infiltration by CD11b macrophages. An increase of the binding of SPB to upper layer epidermal cells was noted in five of seven biopsies. In the dermis, vessel-associated ICAM-1 expression increased and an induction of E-selectin occurred on nearly 20 to 40% of endothelial cells, but VCAM-1 expression remained undetectable. The percentage of LFA-1+ cells did not change significantly after irradiation. These observations may be compatible with a selective role of UVB 311 nm on the skin immune response. PMID:9372527

  8. Neutral cloud theory of the Jovian nebula: Anomalous ionization effect of superthermal electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbosa, D. D.

    1994-01-01

    The standard model of the Jovian nebula postulates that its particle source is the extended cloud of neutral sulfur and oxygen atoms that escape from the satellite Io and become ionized through electron impact from the corotating plasma. Its energy source is the gyroenergy acquired by newly formed pickup ions as they are swept up to corotation velocity by the planetary magnetic field. Elastic collisions between plasma ions and electrons cool the ions and heat the electrons, while inelastic collisions cool the electrons and excite the ions to radiate intense line emission, which is the primary energy-loss mechanism for the plasma. This neutral cloud theory of the Io plasma torus, as it has come to be known, has been the subject of recent critcism which asserts that the theory cannot account for the observed charge state of the plasma which features O(+) and S(2+) as the dominant ions. It is shown in this work that the inclusion of a small population of super-thermal electrons is required to achieve the correct ion partitioning among various charge states. It is also argued that the anomalous ionization effect of the superthermal electrons is responsible for the overall spatial bifurcation of the nebula into a hot multiply charged plasma region outside of 5.7 Jovian radii and a cool singly ionized plasma inside this distance.

  9. Chern half metals: a new class of topological materials to realize the quantum anomalous Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jun; Zhu, Zhenyue; Wu, Ruqian

    2015-03-11

    New topological insulators that demonstrate the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) are a cutting-edge research topic in condensed matter physics and materials science. So far, the QAHE has been observed only in Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3 at extremely low temperature. Therefore, it is important to find new materials with large topological band gap and high thermal stability for the realization of the QAHE. On the basis of first-principles and tight-binding model calculations, we discovered a new class of topological phase, Chern half metal, which manifests the QAHE in one spin channel while is metallic in the other spin channel, in Co or Rh deposited graphene. The QAHE is robust in these sytems for the adatom coverage ranging from 2% to 6%. Meanwhile, these systems have large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy energies of 5.3 and 11.5 meV, necessary for the observation of the QAHE at reasonably high temperature. PMID:25689149

  10. High-Temperature Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in n -p Codoped Topological Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Shifei; Qiao, Zhenhua; Deng, Xinzhou; Cubuk, Ekin D.; Chen, Hua; Zhu, Wenguang; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Zhang, S. B.; Xu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2016-07-01

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) is a fundamental quantum transport phenomenon that manifests as a quantized transverse conductance in response to a longitudinally applied electric field in the absence of an external magnetic field, and it promises to have immense application potential in future dissipationless quantum electronics. Here, we present a novel kinetic pathway to realize the QAHE at high temperatures by n -p codoping of three-dimensional topological insulators. We provide a proof-of-principle numerical demonstration of this approach using vanadium-iodine (V-I) codoped Sb2 Te3 and demonstrate that, strikingly, even at low concentrations of ˜2 % V and ˜1 % I, the system exhibits a quantized Hall conductance, the telltale hallmark of QAHE, at temperatures of at least ˜50 K , which is 3 orders of magnitude higher than the typical temperatures at which it has been realized to date. The underlying physical factor enabling this dramatic improvement is tied to the largely preserved intrinsic band gap of the host system upon compensated n -p codoping. The proposed approach is conceptually general and may shed new light in experimental realization of high-temperature QAHE.

  11. Magnetic modulation doping in topological insulators toward higher-temperature quantum anomalous Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogi, M.; Yoshimi, R.; Tsukazaki, A.; Yasuda, K.; Kozuka, Y.; Takahashi, K. S.; Kawasaki, M.; Tokura, Y.

    2015-11-01

    Quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE), which generates dissipation-less edge current without external magnetic field, is observed in magnetic-ion doped topological insulators (TIs) such as Cr- and V-doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3. The QAHE emerges when the Fermi level is inside the magnetically induced gap around the original Dirac point of the TI surface state. Although the size of gap is reported to be about 50 meV, the observable temperature of QAHE has been limited below 300 mK. We attempt magnetic-Cr modulation doping into topological insulator (Bi,Sb)2Te3 films to increase the observable temperature of QAHE. By introducing the rich-Cr-doped thin (1 nm) layers at the vicinity of both the surfaces based on non-Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3 films, we have succeeded in observing the QAHE up to 2 K. The improvement in the observable temperature achieved by this modulation-doping appears to be originating from the suppression of the disorder in the surface state interacting with the rich magnetic moments. Such a superlattice designing of the stabilized QAHE may pave a way to dissipation-less electronics based on the higher-temperature and zero magnetic-field quantum conduction.

  12. High-Temperature Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in n-p Codoped Topological Insulators.

    PubMed

    Qi, Shifei; Qiao, Zhenhua; Deng, Xinzhou; Cubuk, Ekin D; Chen, Hua; Zhu, Wenguang; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Zhang, S B; Xu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2016-07-29

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) is a fundamental quantum transport phenomenon that manifests as a quantized transverse conductance in response to a longitudinally applied electric field in the absence of an external magnetic field, and it promises to have immense application potential in future dissipationless quantum electronics. Here, we present a novel kinetic pathway to realize the QAHE at high temperatures by n-p codoping of three-dimensional topological insulators. We provide a proof-of-principle numerical demonstration of this approach using vanadium-iodine (V-I) codoped Sb_{2}Te_{3} and demonstrate that, strikingly, even at low concentrations of ∼2%  V and ∼1% I, the system exhibits a quantized Hall conductance, the telltale hallmark of QAHE, at temperatures of at least ∼50  K, which is 3 orders of magnitude higher than the typical temperatures at which it has been realized to date. The underlying physical factor enabling this dramatic improvement is tied to the largely preserved intrinsic band gap of the host system upon compensated n-p codoping. The proposed approach is conceptually general and may shed new light in experimental realization of high-temperature QAHE. PMID:27517787

  13. Magnetic modulation doping in topological insulators toward higher-temperature quantum anomalous Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Mogi, M. Yoshimi, R.; Yasuda, K.; Kozuka, Y.; Tsukazaki, A.; Takahashi, K. S.; Kawasaki, M.; Tokura, Y.

    2015-11-02

    Quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE), which generates dissipation-less edge current without external magnetic field, is observed in magnetic-ion doped topological insulators (TIs) such as Cr- and V-doped (Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3}. The QAHE emerges when the Fermi level is inside the magnetically induced gap around the original Dirac point of the TI surface state. Although the size of gap is reported to be about 50 meV, the observable temperature of QAHE has been limited below 300 mK. We attempt magnetic-Cr modulation doping into topological insulator (Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3} films to increase the observable temperature of QAHE. By introducing the rich-Cr-doped thin (1 nm) layers at the vicinity of both the surfaces based on non-Cr-doped (Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3} films, we have succeeded in observing the QAHE up to 2 K. The improvement in the observable temperature achieved by this modulation-doping appears to be originating from the suppression of the disorder in the surface state interacting with the rich magnetic moments. Such a superlattice designing of the stabilized QAHE may pave a way to dissipation-less electronics based on the higher-temperature and zero magnetic-field quantum conduction.

  14. Large anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnetic insulator-topological insulator heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Alegria, L. D.; Petta, J. R.; Ji, H.; Cava, R. J.; Yao, N.; Clarke, J. J.

    2014-08-04

    We demonstrate the van der Waals epitaxy of the topological insulator compound Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} on the ferromagnetic insulator Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6}. The layers are oriented with (001)Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}||(001)Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6} and (110)Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}||(100)Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6}. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy indicates the formation of a sharp interface. At low temperatures, bilayers consisting of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} on Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6} exhibit a large anomalous Hall effect (AHE). Tilted field studies of the AHE indicate that the easy axis lies along the c-axis of the heterostructure, consistent with magnetization measurements in bulk Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6}. The 61 K Curie temperature of Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6} and the use of near-stoichiometric materials may lead to the development of spintronic devices based on the AHE.

  15. The Anomalous Hall effect in MnSi and FexTaS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Minhyea

    2007-03-01

    In a high-purity ferromagnet with long carrier lifetime τ, e.g. MnSi, the ordinary Hall conductivity σH^N can dominate the intrinsic Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) conductivity σH^A. We show that the large magnetoresistance provides a way to separate accurately the two Hall currents. Below TC, we find that the AHE conductivity is strictly proportional to the magnetization M, viz. σH^A = SHM with a parameter SH that is independent of both temperature T and field H. This implies that σH^A is strictly independent of τ. In the layered, hard ferromagnet FexTaS2, the large coercivity leads to abrupt reversals of M when it switches. We show that this provides an accurate way to separate σH^A from σH^N. Again, σH^A is independent of T from 5 to 50 K. We compare the observed constancy at low T with theories for the AHE. We also describe a Hall anomaly recently observed in MnSi under pressure. This anomaly appears to arise from strong sensitivity of the Hall current to the spin texture, possibly reflecting its finite chirality. The dependence of the anomaly to T and H will be reported. **This work is done in collaboration with Y. Onose, J. G. Checkelsky, E. Morosan, R. J. Cava, Y. Tokura and N. P. Ong.

  16. Evaluation of analgesic effect of skin-to-skin contact compared to oral glucose in preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Freire, Nájala Borges de Sousa; Garcia, João Batista Santos; Lamy, Zeni Carvalho

    2008-09-30

    Nonpharmacological interventions are important alternatives for pain relief during minor procedures in preterm neonates. Skin-to-skin contact or kangaroo mother care is a human and efficient way of caring for low-weight preterm neonates. The aim of the present study was to assess the analgesic effect of kangaroo care compared to oral glucose on the response of healthy preterm neonates to a low-intensity acute painful stimulus. Ninety-five preterm neonates with a postmenstrual age of 28-36 weeks were randomly assigned to three groups in a single-blind manner. In group 1 (isolette, n=33), the neonate was in the prone position in the isolette during heel lancing and did not receive analgesia. In group 2 (kangaroo method, n=31), the neonate was held in skin-to-skin contact for 10 min before and during the heel-lancing procedure. In group 3 (glucose, n=31), the neonate was in the prone position in the isolette and received oral glucose (1 ml, 25%) 2 min before heel lancing. A smaller variation in heart rate (p=0.0001) and oxygen saturation (p=0.0012), a shorter duration of facial activity (brow bulge, eye squeeze and nasolabial furrowing) (p=0.0001), and a lower PIPP (Premature Infant Pain Profile) score (p=0.0001) were observed in group 2. In conclusion, skin-to-skin contact produced an analgesic effect in preterm newborns during heel lancing. PMID:18434021

  17. Laminar separation control effects of shortfin mako shark skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Michael Thomas

    Shark skin is investigated as a means of laminar flow separation control due to its preferential flow direction as well as the potential for scales to erect and obstruct low-momentum backflow resulting from an adverse pressure gradient acting on the boundary layer. In this study, the effect of the scales on flow reversal is observed in laminar flow conditions. This is achieved by comparing the flow over a pectoral fin from a shortfin mako shark to that over the same fin that is painted to neutralize the effect of the scales on the flow. The effect of the scales on flow reversal is also observed by comparing the flow over a smooth PVC cylinder to that over the same cylinder with samples of mako shark skin affixed to the entire circumference of the cylinder. These samples were taken from the flank region of the shark because the scales at this location have been shown to have the greatest angle of erection compared to the scales on the rest of the shark's body. Scales at this location have an average crown length of 220 microm with a maximum bristling angle of proximately 50 degrees. Because these scales have the highest bristling angle, they have the best potential for separation control. All data was taken using time-resolved Digital Particle Image Velocimetry. The flow over the pectoral fin was analyzed at multiple angles of attack. It was found that the shark skin had the effect of decreasing the size of the separated region over both the pectoral fin and the cylinder as well as decreasing the magnitudes of the reversing flow found in these regions. For all Reynolds numbers tested, drag reduction over 28% was found when applying the sharkskin to the cylinder.

  18. Air pollution and skin diseases: Adverse effects of airborne particulate matter on various skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Eun; Cho, Daeho; Park, Hyun Jeong

    2016-05-01

    Environmental air pollution encompasses various particulate matters (PMs). The increased ambient PM from industrialization and urbanization is highly associated with morbidity and mortality worldwide, presenting one of the most severe environmental pollution problems. This article focuses on the correlation between PM and skin diseases, along with related immunological mechanisms. Recent epidemiological studies on the cutaneous impacts of PM showed that PM affects the development and exacerbation of skin diseases. PM induces oxidative stress via production of reactive oxygen species and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1α, and IL-8. In addition, the increased production of ROS such as superoxide and hydroxyl radical by PM exposure increases MMPs including MMP-1, MMP-2, and MMP-9, resulting in the degradation of collagen. These processes lead to the increased inflammatory skin diseases and skin aging. In addition, environmental cigarette smoke, which is well known as an oxidizing agent, is closely related with androgenetic alopecia (AGA). Also, ultrafine particles (UFPs) including black carbon and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) enhance the incidence of skin cancer. Overall, increased PM levels are highly associated with the development of various skin diseases via the regulation of oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines. Therefore, anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory drugs may be useful for treating PM-induced skin diseases. PMID:27018067

  19. Release and skin permeation studies of Naproxen from hydrophillic gels and effect of terpenes as enhancers on its skin permeation.

    PubMed

    Ray, S; Ghosal, S K

    2003-04-01

    The skin permeation parameters of Naproxen through albino mouse abdominal skin was investigated. Out of 5 formulations those prepared from carbomer gels showed promising results and were chosen for investigating enhancing effect of various terpene alcohol viz. Geraniol and Nerolidol and cyclic terpenes viz menthol and thymol on skin permeation of Naproxen. Out of the four terpenes studied Geraniol exhibited the highest enhancing effect with enhancement ratio 4.6, while Nerolidol had an enhancement ratio 4.2. The cyclic terpenes had less prompt enhancing effect compared to the alcohol terpenes, out of the two, methol showed the largest effect with an enhancement ratio of about 3.7 and thymol had an enhancement ratio of 3.5. PMID:12806832

  20. Effects of Anomalous Electron Cross-Field Transport in a Low Temperature Magnetized Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitses, Yevgeny

    2014-10-01

    The application of the magnetic field in a low pressure plasma can cause a spatial separation of low and high energy electrons. This so-called magnetic filter effect is used for many plasma applications, including ion and neutral beam sources, plasma processing of semiconductors and nanomaterials, and plasma thrusters. In spite of successful practical applications, the magnetic filter effect is not well understood. In this work, we explore this effect by characterizing the electron and ion energy distribution functions in a plasma column with crossed electric and magnetic fields. Experimental results revealed a strong dependence of spatial variations of plasma properties on the gas pressure. For xenon and argon gases, below ~ 1 mtorr, the increase of the magnetic field leads to a more uniform profile of the electron temperature. This surprising result is due to anomalously high electron cross-field transport that causes mixing of hot and cold electrons. High-speed imaging and probe measurements revealed a coherent structure rotating in E cross B direction with frequency of a few kHz. Theory and simulations describing this rotating structure has been developed and points to ionization and electrostatic instabilities as their possible cause. Similar to spoke oscillations reported for Hall thrusters, this rotating structure conducts the large fraction of the cross-field current. The use of segmented electrodes with an electrical feedback control is shown to mitigate these oscillations. Finally, a new feature of the spoke phenomenon that has been discovered, namely a sensitive dependence of the rotating oscillations on the gas pressure, can be important for many applications. This work was supported by DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  1. Note on anomalous Higgs-boson couplings in effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchalla, G.; Catà, O.; Celis, A.; Krause, C.

    2015-11-01

    We propose a parametrization of anomalous Higgs-boson couplings that is both systematic and practical. It is based on the electroweak chiral Lagrangian, including a light Higgs boson, as the effective field theory (EFT) at the electroweak scale v. This is the appropriate framework for the case of sizeable deviations in the Higgs couplings of order 10% from the Standard Model, considered to be parametrically larger than new-physics effects in the sector of electroweak gauge interactions. The role of power counting in identifying the relevant parameters is emphasized. The three relevant scales, v, the scale of new Higgs dynamics f, and the cut-off Λ = 4 πf, admit expansions in ξ =v2 /f2 and f2 /Λ2. The former corresponds to an organization of operators by their canonical dimension, the latter by their loop order or chiral dimension. In full generality the EFT is thus organized as a double expansion. However, as long as ξ ≫ 1 / 16π2 the EFT systematics is closer to the chiral counting. The leading effects in the consistent approximation provided by the EFT, relevant for the presently most important processes of Higgs production and decay, are given by a few (typically six) couplings. These parameters allow us to describe the properties of the Higgs boson in a general and systematic way, and with a precision adequate for the measurements to be performed at the LHC. The framework can be systematically extended to include loop corrections and higher-order terms in the EFT.

  2. Intrinsic quantum anomalous Hall effect in the kagome lattice Cs2LiMn3F12

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xu, Gang; Lian, Biao; Zhang, Shou -Cheng

    2015-10-27

    In a kagome lattice, the time reversal symmetry can be broken by a staggered magnetic flux emerging from ferromagnetic ordering and intrinsic spin-orbit coupling, leading to several well-separated nontrivial Chern bands and intrinsic quantum anomalous Hall effect. Based on this idea and ab initio calculations, we propose the realization of the intrinsic quantum anomalous Hall effect in the single layer Cs2Mn3F12 kagome lattice and on the (001) surface of a Cs2LiMn3F12 single crystal by modifying the carrier coverage on it, where the band gap is around 20 meV. Furthermore, a simplified tight binding model based on the in-plane ddσ antibondingmore » states is constructed to understand the topological band structures of the system.« less

  3. Intrinsic Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in the Kagome Lattice Cs2 LiMn3 F12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gang; Lian, Biao; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Zhang's Group Team

    In a kagome lattice, the time reversal symmetry can be broken by a staggered magnetic flux emerging from the ferromagnetic ordering and intrinsic spin-orbit coupling, leading to several well-separated nontrivial Chern bands and intrinsic quantum anomalous Hall effect. Based on this idea and ab initio calculations, we propose the realization of the intrinsic quantum anomalous Hall effect in the single layer Cs2Mn3F12 kagome lattice and on the (001) surface of a Cs2LiMn3F12 single crystal by modifying the carrier coverage on it, where the band gap is around 20 meV. Moreover, a simplified tight binding model based on the inplane dd σ antibonding states is constructed to understand the topological band structures of the system.

  4. Intrinsic Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in the Kagome Lattice Cs2 LiMn3 F12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gang; Lian, Biao; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2015-10-01

    In a kagome lattice, the time reversal symmetry can be broken by a staggered magnetic flux emerging from ferromagnetic ordering and intrinsic spin-orbit coupling, leading to several well-separated nontrivial Chern bands and intrinsic quantum anomalous Hall effect. Based on this idea and ab initio calculations, we propose the realization of the intrinsic quantum anomalous Hall effect in the single layer Cs2Mn3F12 kagome lattice and on the (001) surface of a Cs2LiMn3F12 single crystal by modifying the carrier coverage on it, where the band gap is around 20 meV. Moreover, a simplified tight binding model based on the in-plane d d σ antibonding states is constructed to understand the topological band structures of the system.

  5. Studies of xenon ECR plasma: search for a better understanding of the gas-mixing and anomalous effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P.; Mal, Kedar; Kanjilal, D.

    2014-12-01

    Pure and oxygen-mixed xenon plasmas were produced using 10 GHz all-permanent-magnet electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source. The charge state distributions (CSDs) of highly abundant isotopes (129Xe, 131 Xe and 132 Xe) were studied by extracting the ions from the plasma and analyzed them in mass and energy using a large acceptance analyzer-switching dipole magnet. In earlier studies (Drentje 1992 Rev. Sci. Instrum. 63 2875, Kawai et al 2001 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 10 451), the CSD of oxygen and nitrogen ECR plasmas showed that isotopic intensity ratio of ions varies with the charge state (anomalous effect). The anomalous effect in the pure and oxygen-mixed xenon ECR plasma was absent up to +13 charge state. With oxygen, a very small positive gas-mixing effect on the charge state beyond +8 was observed. In this paper, we present CSDs of xenon isotopes with and without oxygen mixing (at optimized ion source parameters) and compare the intensity of isotopes for various charge states to shed light on the previously noticed anomalous effect in the ECR plasma.

  6. Subdiffusion in an external potential: Anomalous effects hiding behind normal behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedotov, Sergei; Korabel, Nickolay

    2015-04-01

    We propose a model of subdiffusion in which an external force is acting on a particle at all times not only at the moment of jump. The implication of this assumption is the dependence of the random trapping time on the force with the dramatic change of particles behavior compared to the standard continuous time random walk model in the long time limit. Constant force leads to the transition from non-ergodic subdiffusion to ergodic diffusive behavior. However, we show this behavior remains anomalous in a sense that the diffusion coefficient depends on the external force and on the anomalous exponent. For quadratic potential we find that the system remains non-ergodic. The anomalous exponent in this case defines not only the speed of convergence but also the stationary distribution which is different from standard Boltzmann equilibrium.

  7. Protective effect of gelatin and gelatin hydrolysate from salmon skin on UV irradiation-induced photoaging of mice skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tiejun; Hou, Hu; Lu, Jiaohan; Zhang, Kai; Li, Bafang

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of gelatin (SG) isolated from salmon skin and its hydrolysate (SGH) on photoaging skin, and the mechanism responsible for anti-photoaging. The average molecular weights of SG and SGH were 65 kDa and 873 Da, respectively. The amino acid compositions of SG and SGH were similar. Both of them were abundant in hydrophobic amino acids. Twenty-five peptides were identified from SGH. SG and SGH could improve UV irradiation-induced pathological changes of macroscopical tissue texture and skin morphology. Hydroxyproline content is an indicator of matrix collagen content, SG and SGH could inhibit the decrease of hydroxyproline content in photoaging skin in a dose dependent manner. In addition, SG and SGH could alleviate UV irradiation-induced oxidative damages to skin by increasing the activities of total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and catalase (CAT), increasing the content of glutathione (GSH) and decreasing the content of malonaldehyde (MDA). Moreover, SG and SGH could enhance immune regulation system by increasing the thymus index. Thus, the anti-photoaging mechanisms of SG and SGH were by inhibiting the depletion of antioxidant defense components, involving in the synthesis of collagen and enhancing the function of immune system. Besides, SGH showed a better result in protecting skin from photoaging than SG.

  8. Protective effect of gelatin and gelatin hydrolysate from salmon skin on UV irradiation-induced photoaging of mice skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tiejun; Hou, Hu; Lu, Jiaohan; Zhang, Kai; Li, Bafang

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of gelatin (SG) isolated from salmon skin and its hydrolysate (SGH) on photoaging skin, and the mechanism responsible for anti-photoaging. The average molecular weights of SG and SGH were 65 kDa and 873 Da, respectively. The amino acid compositions of SG and SGH were similar. Both of them were abundant in hydrophobic amino acids. Twenty-five peptides were identified from SGH. SG and SGH could improve UV irradiation-induced pathological changes of macroscopical tissue texture and skin morphology. Hydroxyproline content is an indicator of matrix collagen content, SG and SGH could inhibit the decrease of hydroxyproline content in photoaging skin in a dose dependent manner. In addition, SG and SGH could alleviate UV irradiation-induced oxidative damages to skin by increasing the activities of total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and catalase (CAT), increasing the content of glutathione (GSH) and decreasing the content of malonaldehyde (MDA). Moreover, SG and SGH could enhance immune regulation system by increasing the thymus index. Thus, the anti-photoaging mechanisms of SG and SGH were by inhibiting the depletion of antioxidant defense components, involving in the synthesis of collagen and enhancing the function of immune system. Besides, SGH showed a better result in protecting skin from photoaging than SG.

  9. Dynamic hysteresis modeling including skin effect using diffusion equation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Souad; Louai, Fatima Zohra; Nait-Said, Nasreddine; Benabou, Abdelkader

    2016-07-01

    An improved dynamic hysteresis model is proposed for the prediction of hysteresis loop of electrical steel up to mean frequencies, taking into account the skin effect. In previous works, the analytical solution of the diffusion equation for low frequency (DELF) was coupled with the inverse static Jiles-Atherton (JA) model in order to represent the hysteresis behavior for a lamination. In the present paper, this approach is improved to ensure the reproducibility of measured hysteresis loops at mean frequency. The results of simulation are compared with the experimental ones. The selected results for frequencies 50 Hz, 100 Hz, 200 Hz and 400 Hz are presented and discussed.

  10. [Effect of UV index in the skin exposure].

    PubMed

    Gerbaudo, Mabel; Dionisio de Cabalier, María E

    2010-01-01

    This research was conducted from October 2003 to March 2005, collecting data through the measuring authorized volunteers measuring their photoexposition . It worked with the equipment (Safesun from Optix Tech, Inc.), available for measuring. The radiation impact of solar on the city of Cordoba, was chosen measurements for a clear spot on the terrace of the Observatory Environmental Laprida located at 854, in a position that excedes level approximately 30 meters from Piazza San Martin (centerhistoric city). It had two fixed radiation sensors total solar and ultraviolet A radiation sensor manual ultraviolet calibrated according to the erythemal response of skin measuring human ultraviolet index and the maximum exposure timer ecommended for different skin types (Safesun from Optix Tech, Inc.).The aim of this study was to measure the rate and exposure ultraviolet (UV) to evaluate the erythemal effect on most sensitive areas of the face and neck to noon fotoexposición solar in the four annual seasons, and thus promote extending protection regulations to prevent the effects harmful UV non-ionizing radiation. The analysis of the data, UV index values indicate that from the Winter season is observed to undergo the risk of exposure excessive radiation at noon solar day is measured with high Fall UV index is high in spring and high-very high and with days end in the Summer season daily with UV index very high and extreme. This risk remains in the four annual seasons and according to the criteria of the World Health Organization is need to perform significant work to develop measures, education campaigns and outreach, which tend to diminish the sun exposure, hours with the highest incidence of lightning ultraviolet in the four annual seasons. The global environmental degradation and thus destruction of the ozone layer, has been a direct cause of the increase in ultraviolet radiation on earth, which resulted increased rates of cancer incidence and prevalence skin, within the

  11. Evaluation of the effect of skin cleaning procedures on the dermal absorption of chemicals.

    PubMed

    Dennerlein, Kathrin; Jäger, Thomas; Göen, Thomas; Kilo, Sonja; Schaller, Karl Heinz; Drexler, Hans; Korinth, Gintautas

    2015-08-01

    To reduce the internal exposure, skin decontamination is the most important measure after dermal contact to chemicals. However, no harmonized skin cleaning procedure for experimental ex vivo studies is published. In our study, the impact of two skin cleaning techniques on dermal penetration kinetics and intradermal deposition of 1,4-dioxane, 5% hydrofluoric acid (HF, detected in terms of fluoride ions), and anisole was evaluated to develop a reliable ex vivo skin cleaning method using the diffusion cell technique. After exposure (duration: 3 min (HF); 1h (1,4-dioxane and anisole)) of excised human skin (n=6-8) decontamination was performed by (I) water-soaked cotton swabs or (II) direct application of water on the exposure area. The effect of skin cleaning was investigated by analysing the concentration time course of chemicals in the receptor fluid of diffusion cells and by determining the deposition in skin. Both skin cleaning procedures reduced the amount of fluoride in the skin compartments (p<0.05) and the receptor fluid (p<0.1). However, the effect of cleaning on the dermal absorption of the organic test compounds was not significant. The results demonstrate the suitability of the applied ex vivo protocol for investigating the effectiveness of skin cleaning measures following dermal exposure. In addition, data reveal that the determination of test compounds in both, skin compartments as well as receptor fluid as equivalent for the systemic uptake needs to be considered in studies assessing the effectiveness of skin decontamination procedures. PMID:25790729

  12. The effect of pimecrolimus on expression of genes associated with skin barrier dysfunction in atopic dermatitis skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Grzanka, Alicja; Zebracka-Gala, Jadwiga; Rachowska, Regina; Bozek, Andrzej; Kowalska, Małgorzata; Jarzab, Jerzy

    2012-03-01

    The mechanism of action of pimecrolimus (PIM) on atopic lesions is still under consideration. Thus far, we have evidence of its anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activity, and recent papers focus on its effect on epidermal barrier function. This study analysed changes in the expression of genes associated with skin barrier dysfunction in atopic dermatitis (AD) skin lesions after 2 weeks of exposure to PIM 1% cream. A real-time quantitative PCR analysis of selected epidermal differentiation complex genes and three alternative pathway keratins was performed in skin biopsies from 11 individuals with AD before and after PIM exposure. The real-time quantitative PCR analysis was compared to non-lesional skin in the same patients. Involucrin, a small proline-rich region (SPRR) 2C gene, and alternative pathway keratin 16 showed significant over-expression in lesional skin followed by significant decrease after PIM therapy. The SPRR1A gene, S100A9, and keratin 6A were also increased; however, the decrease after PIM treatment was not significant. The changes in S100 A2, A7 and A8 followed a similar course with borderline significance. SPRR4 had a significant decrease in expression in lesional versus non-lesional skin, which persisted after PIM treatment. No significant changes were detected in mRNA expression levels of filaggrin and loricrin. Our results suggest that PIM can be effective in restoring the epidermal barrier in patients with AD at least in part by its impact on expression of genes, which are important for the normal barrier function of skin. PMID:22142393

  13. Anomalous Arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    In this composite image of spiral galaxy M106 (NGC 4258), optical data from the Digitized Sky Survey is shown as yellow, radio data from the Very Large Array appears as purple, X-ray data from Chandra is coded blue, and infrared data from the Spitzer Space Telescope appears red. Two anomalous arms, which aren't visible at optical wavelengths, appear as purple and blue emission.

  14. Effects of calcitriol on random skin flap survival in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Kai-liang; Zhang, Yi-hui; Lin, Ding-sheng; Tao, Xian-yao; Xu, Hua-zi

    2016-01-01

    Calcitriol, a metabolite of vitamin D, is often used in osteoporosis clinics. However, the material has other bioactivities; for example, it accelerates angiogenesis, has anti-inflammatory properties, and inhibits oxidative stress. We investigated the effects of calcitriol in a random skin flap rat model. “McFarlane flap” models were established in 84 male Sprague Dawley rats, divided into two groups. One group received intraperitoneal injections of calcitriol (2 μg/kg/day) whereas control rats received intraperitoneal injections of saline. The percentage flap survival area and tissue water content were measured 7 days later, which showed that calcitriol improved flap survival area and reduced tissue edema. It also increased the mean vessel density and upregulated levels of VEGF mRNA/protein, both of which promote flap angiogenesis. Moreover, it decreased leukocyte and macrophage infiltration, reduced the inflammatory proteins IL1β and IL6, increased SOD activity, decreased MDA content, and upregulated the level of autophagy. Overall, our results suggest that calcitriol promotes skin flap survival by accelerating angiogenesis, having anti-inflammatory effects, reducing oxidative stress, and promoting autophagy. PMID:26732750

  15. Effects of calcitriol on random skin flap survival in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kai-liang; Zhang, Yi-hui; Lin, Ding-sheng; Tao, Xian-yao; Xu, Hua-zi

    2016-01-01

    Calcitriol, a metabolite of vitamin D, is often used in osteoporosis clinics. However, the material has other bioactivities; for example, it accelerates angiogenesis, has anti-inflammatory properties, and inhibits oxidative stress. We investigated the effects of calcitriol in a random skin flap rat model. "McFarlane flap" models were established in 84 male Sprague Dawley rats, divided into two groups. One group received intraperitoneal injections of calcitriol (2 μg/kg/day) whereas control rats received intraperitoneal injections of saline. The percentage flap survival area and tissue water content were measured 7 days later, which showed that calcitriol improved flap survival area and reduced tissue edema. It also increased the mean vessel density and upregulated levels of VEGF mRNA/protein, both of which promote flap angiogenesis. Moreover, it decreased leukocyte and macrophage infiltration, reduced the inflammatory proteins IL1β and IL6, increased SOD activity, decreased MDA content, and upregulated the level of autophagy. Overall, our results suggest that calcitriol promotes skin flap survival by accelerating angiogenesis, having anti-inflammatory effects, reducing oxidative stress, and promoting autophagy. PMID:26732750

  16. The positive effect of skin transpiration in peach fruit growth.

    PubMed

    Morandi, Brunella; Manfrini, Luigi; Losciale, Pasquale; Zibordi, Marco; Corelli-Grappadelli, Luca

    2010-09-01

    The effect of fruit transpiration on the mechanisms driving peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) daily growth was investigated. In peach, fruit water losses increase during the season and might play a key role in determining fruit growth. Skin transpiration was reduced during the cell expansion stage by enclosing fruit in plastic bags fitted with holes. In the first year, diameter changes of bagged and control fruit were precisely monitored for 15 days, and percentage dry matter and soluble solids content were determined during the experiment and at harvest. In the second year, midday fruit water potential, daily patterns of fruit growth and of vascular and transpiration flows were monitored. Bagging reduced fruit daily growth on some days, and negatively affected both fruit dry matter percentage and soluble solids content. Fruit transpiration rate was reduced during the midday hours, thus increasing midday fruit water potential and lowering xylem inflows. In accordance with the Münch hypothesis on traslocation, these conditions likely decreased the necessary gradient needed for the transport of phloem sap to sink organs, as in the afternoon, bagged fruit showed lower phloem inflows. These data suggest that skin transpiration in peach has a positive effect on fruit growth, as it enhances fruit phloem import. PMID:20417987

  17. The Photoprotective Effect of S-Methylmethionine Sulfonium in Skin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won-Serk; Seo, Hyun-Min; Kim, Wang-Kyun; Choi, Joon-Seok; Kim, Ikyon; Sung, Jong-Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    S-Methylmethionine sulfonium (SMMS) was reported to have wound-healing effects; we therefore have investigated the photoprotective effect of SMMS in the present study. SMMS increased the viability of keratinocyte progenitor cells (KPCs) and human dermal fibroblasts (hDFs) following ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation, and reduced the UVB-induced apoptosis in these cells. SMMS increased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), and the inhibitor of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway significantly decreased the SMMS-induced viability of KPCs and hDFs. In addition, SMMS attenuated the UVB-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in KPCs and hDFs. SMMS induced the collagen synthesis and reduced the matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression in UVB-irradiated hDFs. In animal studies, application of 5% and 10% SMMS before and after UVB-irradiation significantly decreased the UVB-induced erythema index and depletion of Langerhans cells. In summary, SMMS protects KPCs and hDFs from UVB irradiation, and reduces UVB-induced skin erythema and immune suppression. Therefore, SMMS can be used as a cosmetic raw material, and protect skin from UVB. PMID:26225962

  18. Anomalous polymer dynamics is non-Markovian: memory effects and the generalized Langevin equation formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panja, Debabrata

    2010-06-01

    Any first course on polymer physics teaches that the dynamics of a tagged monomer of a polymer is anomalously subdiffusive, i.e., the mean-square displacement of a tagged monomer increases as tα for some α < 1 until the terminal relaxation time τ of the polymer. Beyond time τ the motion of the tagged monomer becomes diffusive. Classical examples of anomalous dynamics in polymer physics are single polymeric systems, such as phantom Rouse, self-avoiding Rouse, self-avoiding Zimm, reptation, translocation through a narrow pore in a membrane, and many-polymeric systems such as polymer melts. In this pedagogical paper I report that all these instances of anomalous dynamics in polymeric systems are robustly characterized by power-law memory kernels within a unified generalized Langevin equation (GLE) scheme, and therefore are non-Markovian. The exponents of the power-law memory kernels are related to the relaxation response of the polymers to local strains, and are derived from the equilibrium statistical physics of polymers. The anomalous dynamics of a tagged monomer of a polymer in these systems is then reproduced from the power-law memory kernels of the GLE via the fluctuation-dissipation theorem (FDT). Using this GLE formulation I further show that the characteristics of the drifts caused by a (weak) applied field on these polymeric systems are also obtained from the corresponding memory kernels.

  19. Effect of skin-pass rolling direction on magnetic properties of semiprocessed nonoriented electrical steel sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Kurosaki, Y.; Shimazu, T.; Shiozaki, M.

    1999-09-01

    Effect of skin-pass rolling direction on magnetic properties and directionality in semiprocessed nonoriented electrical steel sheets produced by skin-pass rolling process was studied. Skin-pass rolling direction greatly affects magnetic properties and directionality. By control of skin-pass rolling direction, the value of B{sub 50} in the required directions such as 0{degree}, 90{degree} and circumferential direction can be adjusted and the value of B{sub 50} is higher than that of the usual skin-pass rolling direction of 0{degree}. The textures of the steel sheets developed after batch annealing varied with the skin-pass rolling directions and this result indicates that the residual strain energy by skin-pass rolling varies with skin-pass rolling directions.

  20. Pulsed-power driven reconnection and the inverse skin effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenly, John; Seyler, Charles; Zhao, Xuan

    2014-10-01

    The COBRA 1 MA generator at Cornell is used to drive magnetic reconnection experiments using wire plasmas. Typically two parallel wires are driven, accumulating magnetic and thermal energy during the current rise. This stored energy is converted into plasma flow kinetic energy by reconnection, driven by the ``inverse skin effect'' when the driving voltage reverses after peak current. The reversed voltage reverses the Poynting flux so that magnetic energy is being removed from the load, reducing the magnetic field at the boundary on a time scale short compared with resistive penetration time. Reversed current in the outer plasma drives reconnection of flux and creates supersonic and superalfvenic outflows. This effect may have relevance to other pulsed-power driven plasmas, such as the phenomenon of ``trailing mass'' in imploding Z-pinches. Recent measurements including first data from Thomson scattering will be presented. Supported by US DOE NNSA Grant DE-NA0001855.

  1. Conflicting effects of DMSO on mouse skin tumorigenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Jacoby, W.T.; Weiss, H.S.

    1986-03-05

    A number of solvents, including dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), when substituted for acetone as the vehicle for the potent promoter phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) in the two-stage mouse skin cancer model, tend to inhibit tumorigenesis. DMSO was investigated further because the literature is ambiguous concerning its effect in both single and multi-stage carcinogenesis. As solvent for the complete carcinogen benzo(a)pyrene (BaP, 125 mg in 40 ..mu..l 2x/wk), tumor yield increased an avg of 245% (3 trials in C3H mice) compared to acetone/BaP. However, in the two-stage model (CD-1 mice initiated with 50-100 ..mu..g DMBA) DMSO as the vehicle for PMA (5 ..mu..g in 40 ..mu..l 2x/wk) reduced tumor yield to 34% of the PMA/acetone controls. To test whether the inhibition was an in vitro effect, 40 ..mu..l DMSO was applied at the initiation site, the back, up to one hr before PMA/acetone. In three trials tumor yield averaged 23% of controls. To determine whether the DMSO effect was directly on initiated cells or indirectly via the systemic circulation, 40 ..mu..l DMSO was applied prior to promotion at a site distant from initiation/promotion, the abdomen. In three trials, DMSO enhanced tumor yield by 194%. DMSO itself had no initiating or promotion effects. Thus, it appears that DMSO may either inhibit or enhance mouse skin tumorigenesis depending on its method of application.

  2. New developments in the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections: considerations for the effective use of dalbavancin

    PubMed Central

    Juul, Janelle J; Mullins, Caitlin F; Peppard, William J; Huang, Angela M

    2016-01-01

    Dalbavancin, an intravenous glycopeptide, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in May 2014 for use in adult patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections. The recommended dosing regimen for effective use of dalbavancin is 1,000 mg followed by a 500 mg dose after 1 week. Two multinational, identically designed, non-inferiority trials, DISCOVER 1 and 2, demonstrated similar early clinical success with dalbavancin compared to vancomycin with an option to switch to oral linezolid. In a recently published non-inferiority trial, a single-dose regimen of dalbavancin was compared to the traditional two-dose administration and was found to have a non-inferior clinical response. In the aforementioned trials, dalbavancin was well tolerated, with patients experiencing transient adverse events of mild to moderate severity. The prolonged half-life, excellent skin and soft tissue penetration, bactericidal activity against Gram-positive bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and convenient dosing make dalbavancin a reasonable option for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections in adult patients who have tried and failed other therapies. PMID:26937194

  3. EFFECT OF PRE-EVISCERATION, SKIN-ON CARCASS DECONTAMINATION SANITATION STRATEGIES FOR REDUCING BACTERIAL CONTAMINATION OF BEEF DURING SKINNING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effectiveness of pre-evisceration, skin-on carcass sanitation on reducing bacterial contamination of beef carcasses was tested using 3 cattle per treatment and 3 cattle as controls at each of 3 abattoirs in southern Wisconsin. The sanitation procedure included stunning, bleeding, tying off the e...

  4. Unambiguous separation of the inverse spin Hall and anomalous Nernst effects within a ferromagnetic metal using the spin Seebeck effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Stephen M.; Hoffman, Jason; Pearson, John E.; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2014-09-01

    The longitudinal spin Seebeck effect is measured on the ferromagnetic insulator Fe3O4 with the ferromagnetic metal Co0.2Fe0.6B0.2 (CoFeB) as the spin detector. By using a non-magnetic spacer material between the two materials (Ti), it is possible to decouple the two ferromagnetic materials and directly observe pure spin flow from Fe3O4 into CoFeB. It is shown that in a single ferromagnetic metal, the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) and anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) can occur simultaneously with opposite polarity. Using this and the large difference in the coercive fields between the two magnets, it is possible to unambiguously separate the contributions of the spin Seebeck effect from the ANE and observe the degree to which each effect contributes to the total response. These experiments show conclusively that the ISHE and ANE in CoFeB are separate phenomena with different origins and can coexist in the same material with opposite response to a thermal gradient.

  5. Unambiguous separation of the inverse spin Hall and anomalous Nernst effects within a ferromagnetic metal using the spin Seebeck effect

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Stephen M. Hoffman, Jason; Pearson, John E.; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2014-09-01

    The longitudinal spin Seebeck effect is measured on the ferromagnetic insulator Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} with the ferromagnetic metal Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.6}B{sub 0.2} (CoFeB) as the spin detector. By using a non-magnetic spacer material between the two materials (Ti), it is possible to decouple the two ferromagnetic materials and directly observe pure spin flow from Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} into CoFeB. It is shown that in a single ferromagnetic metal, the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) and anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) can occur simultaneously with opposite polarity. Using this and the large difference in the coercive fields between the two magnets, it is possible to unambiguously separate the contributions of the spin Seebeck effect from the ANE and observe the degree to which each effect contributes to the total response. These experiments show conclusively that the ISHE and ANE in CoFeB are separate phenomena with different origins and can coexist in the same material with opposite response to a thermal gradient.

  6. Effect of olive and sunflower seed oil on the adult skin barrier: implications for neonatal skin care.

    PubMed

    Danby, Simon G; AlEnezi, Tareq; Sultan, Amani; Lavender, Tina; Chittock, John; Brown, Kirsty; Cork, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Natural oils are advocated and used throughout the world as part of neonatal skin care, but there is an absence of evidence to support this practice. The goal of the current study was to ascertain the effect of olive oil and sunflower seed oil on the biophysical properties of the skin. Nineteen adult volunteers with and without a history of atopic dermatitis were recruited into two randomized forearm-controlled mechanistic studies. The first cohort applied six drops of olive oil to one forearm twice daily for 5 weeks. The second cohort applied six drops of olive oil to one forearm and six drops of sunflower seed oil to the other twice daily for 4 weeks. The effect of the treatments was evaluated by determining stratum corneum integrity and cohesion, intercorneocyte cohesion, moisturization, skin-surface pH, and erythema. Topical application of olive oil for 4 weeks caused a significant reduction in stratum corneum integrity and induced mild erythema in volunteers with and without a history of atopic dermatitis. Sunflower seed oil preserved stratum corneum integrity, did not cause erythema, and improved hydration in the same volunteers. In contrast to sunflower seed oil, topical treatment with olive oil significantly damages the skin barrier, and therefore has the potential to promote the development of, and exacerbate existing, atopic dermatitis. The use of olive oil for the treatment of dry skin and infant massage should therefore be discouraged. These findings challenge the unfounded belief that all natural oils are beneficial for the skin and highlight the need for further research. PMID:22995032

  7. Calculations of the neutron skin and its effect in atomic parity violation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B. A.; Derevianko, A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2009-03-15

    We perform calculations for the neutron skin of nuclei and its contribution to atomic parity nonconservation (PNC) in many isotopes of Cs, Ba, Sm, Dy, Yb, Tl, Pb, Bi, Fr, and Ra. Three problems are addressed: (i) neutron-skin-induced errors to single-isotope PNC, (ii) the possibility of measuring neutron skin using atomic PNC, and (iii) neutron-skin-induced errors for ratios of PNC effects in different isotopes. In the latter case the correlations in the neutron skin values for different isotopes lead to cancellations of the errors; this makes the isotopic ratio method a competitive tool in a search for new physics beyond the standard model.

  8. Effect of entropy on anomalous transport in electron-temperature-gradient-modes

    SciTech Connect

    Yaqub Khan, M.; Iqbal, J.; Ul Haq, A.

    2014-05-15

    Due to the interconnection of entropy with temperature and density of plasma, it would be interesting to investigate plasma related phenomena with respect to entropy. By employing Braginskii transport equations, it is proved that entropy is proportional to a function of potential and distribution function of entropy is re-defined, ∇S–drift in obtained. New dispersion relation is derived; it is found that the anomalous transport depends on the gradient of the entropy.

  9. Transient Anomalous Subdiffusion: Effects of Specific and Non-specific Probe Binding with Actin Gels

    PubMed Central

    Sanabria, Hugo; Waxham, M. Neal

    2010-01-01

    When signaling molecules diffuse through the cytosol they encounter a wide variety of obstacles that hinder their mobility in space and time. Some of those factors include, but are not limited to, interactions with mobile and immobile targets or obstacles. Besides finding a crowded environment inside the cell, macromolecules assemble into molecular complexes that drive specific biological functions adding additional complexity to their diffusion. Thus, simple models of diffusion often fail to explain mobility through the cell interior and new approaches are needed. Here we used fluorescent correlation spectroscopy to measure diffusion of three molecules of similar size with different surface properties diffusing in actin gels. The fluorescent probes were a) quantum dots, b) yellow-green fluorescent spheres and c) the β isoform of Ca2+ calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II tagged with green fluorescent protein. We compared various models for fitting the autocorrelation function (ACF) including single component, two-component, and anomalous diffusion. The two-component and anomalous diffusion models were superior and were largely indistinguishable based on a goodness of fit criteria. To better resolve differences between these two models, we modified the ACF to observe temporal variations in diffusion. We found in both simulated and experimental data, a transient anomalous subdiffusion between two freely diffusing regimes produced by binding interactions of the diffusive tracers with actin gels. PMID:20038146

  10. Transmission of phototherapy through human skin: dosimetry adjustment for effects of skin color, body composition, wavelength, and light coupling to skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussbaum, Ethne L.; Van Zuylen, Jeff

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To examine factors that affect penetration of phototherapy. Methods: Age, sex, height, and weight were recorded; skin color, skinfold thickness, and light transmission through a skinfold were measured over biceps and triceps muscles, and at the anterior waistline. Light was generated using two 23-diode LED arrays at 840 nm and 660 nm with surface area of 7 cm2. Photon irradiation was measured using an Optical Power Meter consisting of a 1x1-cm2 light detector placed in the centre of the illuminated 7 cm2 spot. Transmission was measured using three skin-diode coupling conditions. Results: Penetration of LED irradiation increased when diodes were coupled to skin with pressure. Red light attenuated more rapidly than infrared light and the attenuation of red light increased as skin color darkened. Penetration of red and infrared light decreased as the amount of subcutaneous fat increased. There were gender effects on penetration of infrared light at normal and low BMI values. Conclusions: When using divergent light sources for phototherapy, radiant exposure should take into account individual physical characteristics, irradiation wavelength and diode configuration of the laser therapy system.

  11. Nonstochastic effects of different energy beta emitters on pig skin.

    PubMed

    Peel, D M; Hopewell, J W; Wells, J; Charles, M W

    1984-08-01

    Circular areas of pig skin from 1- to 40-mm diameter were irradiated with beta emitters of high, medium, and low energies, 90Sr, 170Tm, and 147Pm, respectively. The study provides information for radiological protection problems of localized skin exposures. During the first 16 weeks after irradiation 90Sr produced a first reaction due to epithelial cell death followed by a second reaction attributable to damage to the dermal blood vessels. 170Tm and 147Pm produced the epithelial reaction only. The epithelial dose response varied as a function of beta energy. The doses required to produce moist desquamation in 50% of 15- to 22.5-mm fields (ED50) were 30-45 Gy from 90Sr, approximately 80 Gy from 170Tm, and approximately 500 Gy from 147Pm. A model involving different methods of epithelial repopulation is proposed to explain this finding. An area effect was observed in the epithelial response to 90Sr irradiation. The ED50 for moist desquamation ranged from approximately 25 Gy for a 40-mm source to approximately 450 Gy for a 1-mm source. The 5-, 9-, and 19-mm 170Tm sources all produced an ED50 of approximately 80 Gy, while the value for the 2-mm source was approximately 250 Gy. It is also suggested that the area effects could be explained by different modes of epithelial repopulation after irradiation. After high energy beta irradiation repopulation would be mainly from the field periphery, while after lower energy irradiation repopulation from hair follicle epithelium would predominate. PMID:6463213

  12. Effect of intense THz pulses on expression of genes associated with skin cancer and inflammatory skin conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titova, Lyubov V.; Ayesheshim, Ayesheshim K.; Purschke, David; Golubov, Andrey; Rodriguez-Juarez, Rocio; Woycicki, Rafal; Hegmann, Frank A.; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2014-03-01

    The growing experimental evidence suggests that broadband, picosecond-duration THz pulses may influence biological systems and functions. While the mechanisms by which THz pulse-induced biological effects are not yet known, experiments using in vitro cell cultures, tissue models, as well as recent in vivo studies have demonstrated that THz pulses can elicit cellular and molecular changes in exposed cells and tissues in the absence of thermal effects. Recently, we demonstrated that intense, picosecond THz pulses induce phosphorylation of H2AX, indicative of DNA damage, and at the same time activate DNA damage response in human skin tissues. We also find that intense THz pulses have a profound impact on global gene expression in human skin. Many of the affected genes have important functions in epidermal differentiation and have been implicated in skin cancer and inflammatory skin conditions. The observed THzinduced changes in expression of these genes are in many cases opposite to disease-related changes, suggesting possible therapeutic applications of intense THz pulses.

  13. The effect of sunscreen on skin elastase activity induced by ultraviolet-A irradiation.

    PubMed

    Tsukahara, Kazue; Moriwaki, Shigeru; Hotta, Mitsuyuki; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Sugiyama-Nakagiri, Yoriko; Sugawara, Satoshi; Kitahara, Takashi; Takema, Yoshinori

    2005-12-01

    It has been reported that application of sunscreens prevents the photoaging of skin in animal models and in humans. We irradiated the dorsal skin of hairless mice with ultraviolet-A (UVA), and investigated the effects of sunscreens on skin elastase activity and on skin properties. Six-week-old female HR/ICR hairless mice were used in these experiments. After being treated with either a UVA sunscreen (also containing ultraviolet-B (UVB) sunscreen to eliminate any slight UVB in the UVA lamps; Protection Factor of UVA (PFA)=6, Sun Protection Factor (SPF)=20) or a vehicle, the dorsal skins of mice were irradiated with the UVA lamps at 22.3 J/cm(2)/d, 5 times a week. At the end of 15 weeks skin properties were evaluated and elastase activities were measured. In the vehicle control group, UVA irradiation increased the brightness and yellowing of the skin, decreased the water content of the stratum corneum, increased skin thickness, decreased skin elasticity, increased skin elastase activity, and decreased the ability of the skin to recover in a pinch test, as compared to an unirradiated group. All these differences were statistically significant. In the UVA sunscreen group, both the UVA induced skin damage and the increase in skin elastase activity were significantly inhibited, as compared to the vehicle group. However, as compared to the unirradiated group, skin elastase activity was significantly increased and immediate extensibility of skin (Ue) was significantly decreased, thereby indicating that the UVA sunscreen did not prevent photoaging to the same level as the unirradiated group. These results suggest the partial efficacy of the topical photoprotection from UVA by the sunscreen in inhibiting elastase activation, and also suggest the possibility of reducing photoaging. PMID:16327169

  14. Mutagenic effects of alpha particles in normal human skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.J.; Carpenter, S.; Hanks, T.

    1992-12-31

    Alpha-irradiation to the bronchial airways from inhaled radon progeny increases the risk of developing lung cancer. The molecular mechanism of radon-induced lung cancer is not clear, but one of the most important genetic effects of ionizing radiation is the induction of gene mutation. Mutations, especially those associated with visible chromosome abnormalities in humans, have been associated with cancer. Therefore, our objective is to use a well-defined model system to determine the mutagenic potential of alpha particles in normal human skin cells and to define this action at the molecular level. Normal human skin fibroblasts were irradiated with alpha particles (3.59 MeV, LET 115 keV {mu}m{sup {minus}1}) emitted from the decay of {sup 238}Pu. Mutagenicity was determined at the X-linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) locus. Results from this study indicate that beta particles were more efficient in mutation induction than gamma rays. Based on the initial slopes of the dose-response curves, the RBE for mutation is about 8 for alpha particles. HPRT-deficient mutants which are resistant to 6-thioguanine have been isolated and analyzed by the Southern blot technique. To date, we have characterized 69 gamma-ray-induced and 195 alpha-particle-induced HPRT-deficient mutants. Our data indicate that more than 50% of all gamma-ray-induced mutants have band patterns identical to that observed for the normal structural HPRT gene, whereas the remaining mutants (45%) contain either a rearrangement, partial deletion, or total deletion of the HPRT gene. In contrast, only 30% of alpha-particle-induced human HPRT mutants contain a normal Southern blot pattern, and about 50% indicate total deletion of the HPRT gene. Our results support the notion that high-LET radiation produces more unrepaired or misrepaired DNA damage than do gamma rays.

  15. Antioxidant and Anti-inflammatory Effects of Peanut Skin Extracts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peanut skins are regarded as a low economic value by-product of the peanut industry; however, they contain high levels of bioactive compounds including catechins and procyanidins, which are known for their health-promoting properties. The in vitro antioxidant activity of peanut skin extracts (PSE) ...

  16. Effect of microwaves at X-band on guinea-pig skin in tissue culture: 3. Effect of pulsed microwaves on skin respiration and biochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Carney, S. A.; Lawrence, J. C.; Ricketts, C. R.

    1970-01-01

    Carney, S. A., Lawrence, J. C., and Ricketts, C. R. (1970).Brit. J. industr. Med.,27, 72-76. Effect of microwaves at X-band on guinea-pig skin in tissue culture. 3. Effect of pulsed microwaves on skin respiration and biochemistry. Small pieces of guinea-pig skin were exposed to known power densities of pulsed microwaves at X-band (9·6 GHz). The pulse duration was 0·25 microsecond and the pulse repetition frequency 4 KHz. The peak power was thus 1,000 times the mean power. Otherwise conditions were closely comparable with those of previous experiments using continuous microwaves. After exposure the skin was maintained on a nutrient medium in vitro. The respiration of the skin and the uptake of 35S-sulphate, 32P-phosphate, and 14C-L-proline into skin constituents were reduced by exposure. The reduction was very similar to that observed after exposure to the same mean power density of continuous microwaves. The effects are believed to be attributable to heating of the skin. PMID:5418922

  17. Effect of diffusive direction across the skin on the penetration profile of chemicals in vitro.

    PubMed

    Morofuji, Ryo; Hikima, Tomohiro; Tojo, Kakuji

    2013-01-01

    Skin has various types of transporters and is a biochemically active organ. These aspects of skin influence the distribution of chemicals in skin and their elimination from skin. The biochemical and histological variations of the skin must be taken into account when conducting transdermal penetration research. Here we used hairless mouse skin to investigate the percutaneous absorption of chemicals in vitro from the stratum corneum (SC) side to the viable skin (VS) side (forward direction) and from the VS side to the SC side (backward direction). We examined the effects of molecular weight, lipophilicity (Log Ko/w), electric charge, and the molecular structure of penetrants. The penetration flux of verapamil hydrochloride (VRP) for the backward direction was 3.2 times larger than that for the forward direction. The flux values of benzoic acid (BA) and para-hydroxybenzoic acid (pHBA) for the forward direction were 2.1 and 4.6 times larger than those for the backward direction, respectively. This directional difference was caused by the active transporter for VRP, the histological distribution of BA solubility, and the intermolecular hydrogen bonding between pHBA and skin tissue in the stripped skin. Across intact skin, in contrast, there was no difference in the skin penetration profile between the forward direction and backward directions. PMID:24189420

  18. Spin-orbit coupling and perpendicular Zeeman field for fermionic cold atoms: Observation of the intrinsic anomalous Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Chuanwei

    2010-08-15

    We propose a scheme for generating Rashba spin-orbit coupling and a perpendicular Zeeman field simultaneously for cold fermionic atoms in a harmonic trap through the coupling between atoms and laser fields. The realization of Rashba spin-orbit coupling and a perpendicular Zeeman field provides opportunities for exploring many topological phenomena using cold fermionic atoms. We focus on the intrinsic anomalous Hall effect and show that it may be observed through the response of atomic density to a rotation of the harmonic trap.

  19. Magnetic interactions in FePt/soft magnetic underlayer double-layered structure observed by anomalous Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sarbanoo; Ito, Sukefumi; Kitagawa, Taku; Nakagawa, Shigeki

    2005-05-01

    The effect of magnetic interactions between an FePt recording layer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and a soft magnetic layer of FeCoB (or NiFe) was investigated using the anomalous Hall voltage measurement method. The nucleation field and the slope around the coercivity of the Hall hysteresis loop revealed by the recording layer were found to significantly decrease depending on the type of interface. The coercivity corresponding to the in-plane magnetization components of the soft magnetic layer was found to increase while coexisting with an FePt layer.

  20. Anomalous abundances of solar energetic particles and coronal gas: Coulomb effects and First Ionization Potential (FIP) ordering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The first ionization potential (FIP) ordering of elemental abundances in solar energetic particles and in the corona which can both be explained Coulomb effects is discussed. Solar energetic particles (SEP) and coronal gas have anomalous abundances relative to the photosphere. The anomalies are similar in both cases: which led to the conclusion that SEP acceleration is not selective, but merely preserves the source abundances. It is argued that SEP acceleration can be selective, because identical selectivity operates to determine the coronal abundances. The abundance anomalies are ordered by first ionization potential (FIP).

  1. Transport studies on Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3 thin films with nearly quantized anomalous Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Minhao; Richardella, Anthony; Kandala, Abhinav; Wang, Wudi; Yazdani, Ali; Samarth, Nitin; Ong, N. Phuan

    2015-03-01

    We describe measurements of the quantum anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnetic Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3 thin films (6-8 QL thickness) grown on (111) SrTiO3 (STO) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. The Fermi level is tuned close to the neutral point by tuning the growth flux ratios of Cr, Bi and Sb. Transport measurements were carried out in a dilution fridge at a base temperature of 20 mK. By tuning the chemical potential with a back gate on the STO substrate, we observed an anomalous Hall effect as high as 0.95h/e2, with a coercive field ~ 0.15 T and a narrow transition between positive/negative Hall plateaus. Transport measurements in a non-local configuration showed a Hall-effect-like non-local resistance with a systematic dependence on the back gate voltage and with pronounced peaks which resembled the non-local resistance of the quantum Hall effect. The non-local signal has a maximum that coincides with the maximum in Hall conductivity, indicating the edge channel as its origin. Our results show that the edge channel manifests itself in various transport properties even though the Hall resistance is not perfectly quantized. Supported by DARPA SPAWAR Grant No. N66001-11-1-4110 and MURI grant on Topological Insulators (ARO W911NF-12-1-0461).

  2. Antioxidant, antimelanogenic, and skin-protective effect of sesamol.

    PubMed

    Srisayam, Montra; Weerapreeyakul, Natthida; Barusrux, Sahapat; Kanokmedhakul, Kwanjai

    2014-01-01

    Sesame contains high nutritional value and important bioactive lignans which are good for health-promoting effects including sesamol. Sesamol is found in trace amounts in sesame. The biological action from the trace amounts of sesamol found might indicate its efficacy. This paper presents a systematic study of the antimelanogenic and skin-protective effects (antioxidant) of sesamol and positive compounds. The results showed that sesamol had the most scavenging 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl hydrate (DPPH·) radical with an IC50 value < 14.48 µM. The antioxidant power (Ferric reducing antioxidant power value) of sesamol at a concentration of 0.1129 µM was 189.88 ± 17.56 µM FeSO4. Sesamol inhibited lipid peroxidation with an IC50 value of 6.15 ± 0.2 µM. Moreover, sesamol possessed a whitening effect by inhibition of mushroom tyrosinase at an IC50 value of 1.6 µM and an inhibition of cellular tyrosinase with 23.55 ± 8.25% inhibition at a concentration of 217.2 µM. Sesamol exhibited high antioxidant and anti-tyrosinase activity compared to the positive control, kojic acid and β-arbutin. Sesamol from edible sesame seed could therefore have an alternative cosmeceutical purpose. PMID:24797023

  3. The effect of skin aging on the percutaneous penetration of chemicals through human skin

    SciTech Connect

    Roskos, K.V.

    1989-01-01

    Despite much research into the mechanisms of cutaneous aging and the identification of significant age-associated biological and biophysical changes within the skin, the question how does aging affect percutaneous absorption (PA) in vivo remains unanswered. The author has made in vivo measurements of PA in young (18-40 years) and old (> 65 years) subjects. Standard radiotracer methodology was employed and PA was quantified from the urinary excretion profiles of {sup 14}C radiolabel (corrected for incomplete renal elimination). Testosterone (TST), estradiol (EST), hydrocortisone (HC), benzoic acid (BA), acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and caffeine (CAFF) have been studied. Penetration of HC, BA, ASA, and CAFF were significantly lower in aged subjects whereas TST and EST absorption were not distinguishable from the young controls. Thus it appears that aging can affect PA in vivo and that relatively hydrophilic compounds may be most sensitive. Work was done to elucidate whether the observations were related to documented skin aging changes. Cutaneous microcirculation efficiency suspected to decline with increasing age, could not be correlated with the observed penetration changes. However, in vivo infrared spectroscopic studies of aged stratum corneum (SC) reveal a decreased amount of epidermal lipid. The diminished lipid content implies a diminished dissolution medium for compounds administered to the skin surface. They hypothesize that the compounds most affected by a loss of SC lipids would be those compounds whose overall solubility is lowest (compounds with lower octanol-water partition coefficients, eg., HC, BA, ASA and CAFF). Conversely, a diminished lipid content may not affect dissolution into the SC of highly lipophilic compounds (e.g., TST and EST).

  4. Effects of vinpocetine on random skin flap survival in rats.

    PubMed

    Xiao-Xiao, Tao; Sen-Min, Wu; Ding-Sheng, Lin

    2013-07-01

    The effect of vinpocetine on flap survival, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents were evaluated in this study. The McFarlane flap model was established in 20 rats and evaluated within two groups. Postoperative celiac injection was given for 7 days in the two groups: vinpocetine was applied in Group 1, and the same volume of saline was applied in Group 2. Flap necrosis was measured on day 7 by cellophane in all groups. VEGF expression was determined using immunohistochemical methods on tissue samples taken after 7 days of injections. SOD and MDA contents were examined according to the Kit (reagent instructions). Vinpocetine significantly reduced necrosis area in Group 1 (p < 0.05). VEGF expression and SOD contents were significantly increased in Group 1 compared with Group 2 (p < 0.01), whereas MDA level was reduced (p < 0.05). This experimental study demonstrates that vinpocetine improves survival of random skin flaps, promotes neovascularization, and increases VEGF expression. Meanwhile, vinpocetine has a protective effect against ischemia-reperfusion injury by improving SOD vitality and decreasing MDA value. PMID:23588551

  5. Giant gap quantum spin Hall effect and valley-polarized quantum anomalous Hall effect in cyanided bismuth bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei-xiao; Zhang, Chang-wen; Ding, Meng; Zhang, Bao-min; Li, Ping; Li, Feng; Ren, Miao-juan; Wang, Pei-ji; Zhang, Run-wu; Hu, Shu-jun; Yan, Shi-shen

    2016-08-01

    Bismuth (Bi) has attracted a great deal of attention for its strongest spin–orbit coupling (SOC) strength among main group elements. Although quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) state is predicted in half-hydrogenated Bi honeycomb monolayers Bi2H, the experimental results are still missing. Halogen atoms (X = F, Cl and Br) were also frequently used as modifications, but Bi2X films show a frustrating metallic character that masks the QAH effects. Here, first-principle calculations are performed to predict the full-cyanided bismuthene (Bi2(CN)2) as 2D topological insulator supporting quantum spin Hall state with a record large gap up to 1.10 eV, and more importantly, half-cyanogen saturated bismuthene (Bi2(CN)) as a Chern insulator supporting a valley-polarized QAH state, with a Curie temperature to be 164 K, as well as a large gap reaching 0.348 eV which could be further tuned by bi-axial strain and SOC strength. Our findings provide an appropriate and flexible material family candidate for spintronic and valleytronic devices.

  6. Treatment of Skin Inflammation with Benzoxaborole Phosphodiesterase Inhibitors: Selectivity, Cellular Activity, and Effect on Cytokines Associated with Skin Inflammation and Skin Architecture Changes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chen; Virtucio, Charlotte; Zemska, Olga; Baltazar, Grober; Zhou, Yasheen; Baia, Diogo; Jones-Iatauro, Shannon; Sexton, Holly; Martin, Shamra; Dee, Joshua; Mak, Yvonne; Meewan, Maliwan; Rock, Fernando; Akama, Tsutomu; Jarnagin, Kurt

    2016-09-01

    lymphopoietin expression in mouse skin. Skin thinning is a major dose-limiting side effect of glucocorticoids. By contrast, repeated application of compd3 did not thin mouse skin. These findings show the potential benefits and safety of benzoxaborole PDE4 inhibitors for the treatment of psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. PMID:27353073

  7. Effect of microplasma irradiation on skin barrier function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Kazuo; Tran, An N.; Blajan, Marius

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we introduce the feasibility of atmospheric-pressure argon microplasma irradiation (AAMI) to promote percutaneous absorption. A hairless Yucatan micropig skin was used for this ex vivo study. After AAMI, the disturbance in the stratum corneum (SC) lipids was observed using attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Also, an increase in transepidermal water loss and no physical damage on pig skins were confirmed by microscopic observation. These results of AAMI were compared with those of a plasma jet irradiation (PJI) and a tape stripping test (TST) leading to the conclusion that AAMI reduces the barrier function of the skin and could also enhance the transdermal absorption of drugs.

  8. Effect of microstructure on anomalous strain-rate-dependent behaviour of bacterial cellulose hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xing; Shi, Zhijun; Lau, Andrew; Liu, Changqin; Yang, Guang; Silberschmidt, Vadim V

    2016-05-01

    This study is focused on anomalous strain-rate-dependent behaviour of bacterial cellulose (BC) hydrogel that can be strain-rate insensitive, hardening, softening, or strain-rate insensitive in various ranges of strain rate. BC hydrogel consists of randomly distributed nanofibres and a large content of free water; thanks to its ideal biocompatibility, it is suitable for biomedical applications. Motivated by its potential applications in complex loading conditions of body environment, its time-dependent behaviour was studied by means of in-aqua uniaxial tension tests at constant temperature of 37 °C at various strain rates ranging from 0.000 1s(-1) to 0.3s(-1). Experimental results reflect anomalous strain-rate-dependent behaviour that was not documented before. Micro-morphological observations allowed identification of deformation mechanisms at low and high strain rates in relation to microstructural changes. Unlike strain-rate softening behaviours in other materials, reorientation of nanofibres and kinematics of free-water flow dominate the softening behaviour of BC hydrogel at high strain rates. PMID:26952406

  9. Quantum Anomalous Hall effect in a Topological Insulator coupled to a Skyrmion Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmick, Tonmoy; Barlas, Yafis; Yin, Gen; Lake, Roger

    A Skyrmion is a topologically protected spin texture characterized by a topological charge that has been experimentally observed in both bulk B20 compounds and thin films. In a quantum anomalous Hall phase, a material develops a topologically nontrivial electronic structure giving rise to quantized hall conductivity without any external magnetic field. We predict that a conventional bulk topological insulating material (e.g. Bi2 Se3, Bi2 Te3 Sb2 Te3) in proximity with a Skyrmion crystal, with a weak exchange coupling, will be driven into an anomalous Hall insulating phase characterized by a nonzero integer chern number in the gap. We have calculated band structure, identified the gaps, and calculated the chern number at those gaps. The calculations show that the non trivial topological properties of the Skyrmion spin texture can be imprinted on the Dirac electrons of the topological insulator. Electronic structure calculations were supported by the NSF (ECCS-1408168). Micromagnetic simulations were supported by SHINES Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences under Award #DE-SC0012670.

  10. Anomalous rf magnetoresistance in copper at 4/degree/K

    SciTech Connect

    Halama, H.J.; Prodell, A.G.; Rogers, J.T.; De Panfilis, S.; Melissinos, A.C.; Moskowitz, B.E.; Semertzidis, Y.K.; Wuensch, W.U.; Fowler, W.B.; Nezrick, F.A.

    1988-03-01

    We have measured the effect of a magnetic field on the surface resistance of polycrystalline Cu at f = 1.2 GHz and at 4.4/degree/K; under these conditions the surface resistance is well into the anomalous skin effect regime but has not reached its limiting value. We find that the transverse and longitudinal magnetoresistance are an order of magnitude smaller than the DC magnetoresistance and depend quadratically on the field. At low fields we observe a decrease in surface resistance with increasing field which can be interpreted as a size effect of the TF surface current. 17 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Effectiveness Evaluation of Skin Covers against Intravascular Brachytherapy Sources Using VARSKIN3 Code

    PubMed Central

    Baghani, H R; Nazempour, A R; Aghamiri, S M R; Hosseini Daghigh, S M; Mowlavi, A A

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objective: The most common intravascular brachytherapy sources include 32P, 188Re, 106Rh and 90Sr/90Y. In this research, skin absorbed dose for different covering materials in dealing with these sources were evaluated and the best covering material for skin protection and reduction of absorbed dose by radiation staff was recognized and recommended. Method: Four materials including polyethylene, cotton and two different kinds of plastic were proposed as skin covers and skin absorbed dose at different depths for each kind of the materials was calculated separately using the VARSKIN3 code. Results: The results suggested that for all sources, skin absorbed dose was minimized when using polyethylene. Considering this material as skin cover, maximum and minimum doses at skin surface were related to 90Sr/90Y and 106Rh, respectively. Conclusion: polyethylene was found the most effective cover in reducing skin dose and protecting the skin. Furthermore, proper agreement between the results of VARSKIN3 and other experimental measurements indicated that VRASKIN3 is a powerful tool for skin dose calculations when working with beta emitter sources. Therefore, it can be utilized in dealing with the issue of radiation protection. PMID:25505758

  12. Skin effect and completion options in the ras burdran reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, T.R.; Moftah, I.

    1985-03-01

    High positive skin factors were encountered in early production wells drilled in Unit I of the Nubian Sandstone reservoir of the Ras Budran oil field. Laboratory tests and theoretical analyses were conducted, from which it was concluded that the observed skin factors could not be explained by conventional formation damage mechanisms. Alternative mechanisms are proposed, based upon the presence of low permeability quartzfilled fractures. These give rise to a heterogeneity. Types of completion potentially able to improve well productivity are identified.

  13. Sunscreen effects in skin analyzed by photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Anjos, Fernanda H.; Rompe, Paula C. B.; Batista, Roberta R.; Martin, Airton A.; Mansanares, Antonio M.; da Silva, Edson C.; Acosta-Avalos, Daniel; Barja, Paulo R.

    2004-06-01

    In the photoacoustic technique, the signal is proportional to the heat produced in a sample as a consequence of modulated light absorption. This technique allows the spectroscopic characterization of multilayer systems: as the thermal diffusion length varies with the light modulation frequency, one can obtain the depth profile of the sample by analyzing the frequency-dependence of the signal. As the photoacoustic signal depends on thermal and optical properties of the sample, structural changes in the system under analysis account for signal variations in time. In this work, photoacoustic spectroscopy was used to characterize samples of sunscreen and the system formed by sunscreen plus skin. We used photoacoustic spectroscopy to monitor the absorption kinetics of sunscreen applied to samples of human skin, characterizing alterations in the human skin after application of sunscreen. Measurements used 250W Xe arc lamp as light source, for wavelengths between 240nm and 400nm. This range corresponds to most of the UV radiation that reaches Earth. Skin samples were about 0,5cm diameter. The absorption spectra of sunscreen was obtained. Finally, photoacoustics was employed to monitor the absorption kinetics of the sunscreen applied to skin samples. This was done by applying sunscreen in a skin sample and recording the photoacoustic spectra in regular time intervals, up to 90 minutes after application. According to measurements, light absorption by the system sunscreen plus skin stabilizes between 25 and 45 minutes after sunscreen application. Results show that this technique can be utilized to monitor drug delivery and farmacokinetics in skin samples.

  14. Effects of hair removal alexandrite laser on biometric parameters of the skin.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Shiva; Abolhasani, Ehsan; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammadali

    2016-04-01

    The effects of alexandrite laser (AL) on skin parameters such as melanin content, skin layer depth, elasticity, and density have not been investigated through biometric methods. We aim to assess the effect of AL on the skin parameters through biometric devices to determine whether it has positive effects on treated region. In this pretest-posttest study, we recruited patients who attended Laser Clinic of Skin and Stem Cell Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, from January through December 2014. Patients had to be free of any dermatologic conditions and lesion at the site of treatment or any contraindication to laser therapy. Baseline measurements were performed and patients received four sessions of AL therapy (spot size, 12 mm; fluence, 12 J/cm(2); and pulse width, 5 Hz) with 4-week intervals. Four weeks after the last treatment session, the same parameters were assessed that included skin color, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), dermis and epidermis density and depth (through skin ultrasonography), melanin content, erythema intensity, and skin elasticity. Biometric parameters of 33 patients (27 females [81.8%]), with mean (SD) age of 35.7 (9.5) years were evaluated. The mean percent changes of skin parameters were as follows: skin color, 5.88% through Visioface and by 56.8% through Colorimeter devices (became lighter); melanin content, -15.95%; TEWL, -2.96%; elasticity, +14.88%; dermis depth -19.01%; and dermis density, +1580.11% (P < 0.001 for changes in each parameter). AL could decrease melanin content of the skin and make the skin thinner while it could increase elasticity and density of epidermis and dermis, which might indicate increased collagen content of skin. PMID:26861986

  15. Inhibition of collagen synthesis and changes in skin morphology in murine graft-versus-host disease and tight skin mice: effect of halofuginone.

    PubMed

    Levi-Schaffer, F; Nagler, A; Slavin, S; Knopov, V; Pines, M

    1996-01-01

    The effect of halofuginone, a plant alkaloid known to inhibit collagen type I synthesis, on skin collagen content and skin morphology was evaluated in two in vivo models of scleroderma: the murine chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGvHD) and the tight skin mouse. Skin collagen was assessed by hydroxyproline levels in skin biopsies and by immunohistochemistry using anti-collagen type I antibodies. Daily intraperitoneal injections of halofuginone (1 microgram/mouse) for 52 d starting 3 d before spleen cell transplantation, abrogated the increase in skin collagen and prevented the thickening of the dermis and the loss of the subdermal fat, all of which are characteristic of the cGvHD mice. Halofuginone had a minimal effect on collagen content of the control mice. The halofuginone-dependent decrease in skin collagen content was concentration-dependent and was not accompanied by changes in body weight in either the cGvHD or the control mice. Injections of halofuginone (1 microgram/mouse) for 45 d caused a decrease in the collagen content and dermis width in tight skin mice, but did not affect the dermis width of control mice. Collagen content determination from skin biopsies confirmed the immunohistochemical results in the same mice. The low concentration of halofuginone needed to prevent collagen deposition in fibrotic skin without affecting body weight suggests that halofuginone may serve as a novel and promising anti-fibrotic therapy. PMID:8592087

  16. Proinflammatory Effects of Diesel Exhaust Nanoparticles on Scleroderma Skin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mastrofrancesco, A.; Alfè, M.; Rosato, E.; Gargiulo, V.; Beatrice, C.; Di Blasio, G.; Zhang, B.; Su, D. S.; Picardo, M.; Fiorito, S.

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are complex disorders of unknown etiology thought to result from interactions between genetic and environmental factors. We aimed to verify whether environmental pollution from diesel engine exhaust nanoparticulate (DEP) of actually operating vehicles could play a role in the development of a rare immune-mediated disease, systemic sclerosis (SSc), in which the pathogenetic role of environment has been highlighted. The effects of carbon-based nanoparticulate collected at the exhaust of newer (Euro 5) and older (Euro 4) diesel engines on SSc skin keratinocytes and fibroblasts were evaluated in vitro by assessing the mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1α, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α) and fibroblast chemical mediators (metalloproteases 2, 3, 7, 9, and 12; collagen types I and III; VEGF). DEP was shown to stimulate cytokine gene expression at a higher extent in SSc keratinocytes versus normal cells. Moreover, the mRNA gene expression of all MMPs, collagen types, and VEGF genes was significantly higher in untreated SSc fibroblasts versus controls. Euro 5 particle exposure increased the mRNA expression of MMP-2, -7, and -9 in SSc fibroblasts in a dose dependent manner and only at the highest concentration in normal cells. We suggest that environmental DEP could trigger the development of SSc acting on genetically hyperreactive cell systems. PMID:24982919

  17. Effect of chicken skin on the quality characteristics of semi-dried restructured jerky.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Han, Doo-Jeong; Choi, Ji-Hun; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Song, Dong-Heon; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Kim, Young-Boong; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of skin on the textural properties of semi-dried jerky produced with different acid treatments. Jerky was prepared with no skin (control) or with 1, 3, or 5% chicken skin. After hand mixing (for 3 min) and tumbling (for 30 min) to distribute the curing ingredients, the cured meats were dried for 180 min at 55°C, for 180 min at 65°C, and finally for 60 min at 75°C. The presence of skin was shown to result in a higher fat content, TBA value, and metmyoglobin due to the high fat content of the skin. In contrast, acid treatment decreased the TBA value and metmyoglobin in jerky relative to samples that were not subjected to acid treatment. The presence of skin also improved the moisture contents, processing yields, and mechanical tenderness. PMID:26944980

  18. The effects of narrowbands of visible light upon some skin disorders: a review.

    PubMed

    Greaves, A J

    2016-08-01

    This review article focuses on clinical studies published in the fields of (i) photorejuvenation and anti-ageing, (ii) oily or acne-prone skin and related imperfections, (iii) skin pigmentation and lightening, (iv) dandruff and other Malassezia-related skin disorders and (v) prevention and reversal of hair loss using non-thermal, non-ablative devices (principally light-emitting diodes). It mainly focuses on clinical proof of performance and also on in vitro studies that support the clinical findings. The mode of action of narrowbands of visible light upon the skin is only briefly discussed since their biological effects have been previously reviewed. PMID:26708128

  19. Preventive effect of antihistaminics on mouse skin photosensitization with hematoporphyrin derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Nai-wu; Yan, Li-xue

    1993-03-01

    Beta-carotene 100 mg/kg per day or vitamin C 50 mg/kg per day was administered orally for two days and did not prevent mouse skin photosensitization caused by hematoporphyrin derivative (HpD). However, (beta) -carotene 100 mg/kg per day administered intramuscularly for two days prevented mouse skin reaction. Cimetidine and benadryl 10 mg/kg per day, P.O.X 2, effectively prevented mouse skin reaction. This suggests histamine may be involved in skin photoreaction induced by HpD.

  20. Thermally Driven Pure Spin and Valley Currents via the Anomalous Nernst Effect in Monolayer Group-VI Dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-Qin; Zhu, Zhen-Gang; Su, Gang; Jauho, A-P

    2015-12-11

    The spin and valley-dependent anomalous Nernst effects are analyzed for monolayer MoS_{2} and other group-VI dichalcogenides. We find that pure spin and valley currents can be generated perpendicular to the applied thermal gradient in the plane of these two-dimensional materials. This effect provides a versatile platform for applications of spin caloritronics. A spin current purity factor is introduced to quantify this effect. When time reversal symmetry is violated, e.g., two-dimensional materials on an insulating magnetic substrate, a dip-peak feature appears for the total Nernst coefficient. For the dip state it is found that carriers with only one spin and from one valley are driven by the temperature gradient. PMID:26705646

  1. Shining Light on Skin Pigmentation: The Darker and the Brighter Side of Effects of UV Radiation†

    PubMed Central

    Maddodi, Nityanand; Jayanthy, Ashika; Setaluri, Vijayasaradhi

    2012-01-01

    The term barrier function as applied to human skin often connotes the physical properties of this organ that provide protection from its surrounding environment. This term does not generally include skin pigmentation. However, skin pigmentation, which is the result of melanin produced in melanocytes residing the basal layer of the skin and exported to the keratinocytes in the upper layers, serves equally important protective function. Indeed, changes in skin pigmentation are often the most readily recognized indicators of exposure of skin to damaging agents, especially to natural and artificial radiation in the environment. Several recent studies have shed new light on a) the mechanisms of involved in selective effects of subcomponents of UV radiation on human skin pigmentation and b) the interactive influences between keratinocytes and melanocytes, acting as ‘epidermal melanin unit’, that manifest as changes in skin pigmentation in response to exposure to various forms of radiation. This article provides a concise review of our current understanding of the effects of the non-ionizing solar radiation, at cellular and molecular levels, on human skin pigmentation. PMID:22404235

  2. Emerging magnetism and anomalous Hall effect in iridate-manganite heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Nichols, John; Gao, Xiang; Lee, Shinbuhm; Meyer, Tricia L; Freeland, John W; Lauter, Valeria; Yi, Di; Liu, Jian; Haskel, Daniel; Petrie, Jonathan R; Guo, Er-Jia; Herklotz, Andreas; Lee, Dongkyu; Ward, Thomas Z; Eres, Gyula; Fitzsimmons, Michael R; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2016-01-01

    Strong Coulomb repulsion and spin-orbit coupling are known to give rise to exotic physical phenomena in transition metal oxides. Initial attempts to investigate systems, where both of these fundamental interactions are comparably strong, such as 3d and 5d complex oxide superlattices, have revealed properties that only slightly differ from the bulk ones of the constituent materials. Here we observe that the interfacial coupling between the 3d antiferromagnetic insulator SrMnO3 and the 5d paramagnetic metal SrIrO3 is enormously strong, yielding an anomalous Hall response as the result of charge transfer driven interfacial ferromagnetism. These findings show that low dimensional spin-orbit entangled 3d-5d interfaces provide an avenue to uncover technologically relevant physical phenomena unattainable in bulk materials. PMID:27596572

  3. When Chiral Photons Meet Chiral Fermions: Photoinduced Anomalous Hall Effects in Weyl Semimetals.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ching-Kit; Lee, Patrick A; Burch, Kenneth S; Han, Jung Hoon; Ran, Ying

    2016-01-15

    The Weyl semimetal is characterized by three-dimensional linear band touching points called Weyl nodes. These nodes come in pairs with opposite chiralities. We show that the coupling of circularly polarized photons with these chiral electrons generates a Hall conductivity without any applied magnetic field in the plane orthogonal to the light propagation. This phenomenon comes about because with all three Pauli matrices exhausted to form the three-dimensional linear dispersion, the Weyl nodes cannot be gapped. Rather, the net influence of chiral photons is to shift the positions of the Weyl nodes. Interestingly, the momentum shift is tightly correlated with the chirality of the node to produce a net anomalous Hall signal. Application of our proposal to the recently discovered TaAs family of Weyl semimetals leads to an order-of-magnitude estimate of the photoinduced Hall conductivity which is within the experimentally accessible range. PMID:26824561

  4. Tunneling Seebeck and Anomalous Nernst effects in three-dimensional topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chenghao; Scharf, Benedikt; Matos-Abiague, Alex; Zutic, Igor

    We theoretically investigate the longitudinal (Seebeck) and transverse (Nernst) thermopowers generated by thermally-induced tunneling across a magnetic barrier on the surface of a three-dimensional insulator. As a manifestation of Klein tunneling, the tunneling Seebeck coefficient exhibits oscillatory behavior with respect to the barrier thickness. Moreover, in spite of the absence of a source of spin polarization (only the barrier is magnetic), the tunneling anomalous Nernst coefficient is not only finite but can even be much larger than its Seebeck counterpart. This work was supported by DFG Grant No. SCHA 1899/1-1 (B.S.), U.S. ONR Grant No. N000141310754 (B.S., A.M.-A.), U.S. DOE, Office of Science BES, under Award DE-SC0004890 (I.Z.).

  5. Effects of tretinoin on wound healing in aged skin.

    PubMed

    de Campos Peseto, Danielle; Carmona, Erica Vilaça; Silva, Kellyn Cristina da; Guedes, Flavia Roberta Valente; Hummel Filho, Fernando; Martinez, Natalia Peres; Pereira, José Aires; Rocha, Thalita; Priolli, Denise Gonçalves

    2016-03-01

    Aged and adult populations have differences in the structural, biological, and healing properties of skin. Comparative studies of healing under the influence of retinoids in both these populations are very important and, to the best of our knowledge, have not been performed to date. The purpose of this study was to compare the activities of topical tretinoin in aged and adult animal models of wound healing by secondary intention. Male aged rats (24 months old, n = 7) and adult rats (6 months old, n = 8) were used. The rats were assigned to the following groups according to the dates on which wound samples were excised (day 14 or 21 after model creation): treated group, control group, and naive group. Topical application of tretinoin cream was used only on the proximal wound and was applied daily for 7 days. Wound healing areas were measured using metal calipers, and morphological analysis was performed. Slides were stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin, Masson's trichrome, and periodic acid-Schiff stains. Statistical analysis adopted a 5% coefficient for rejection of the null hypothesis. Although aged animals showed skin repair, complete reepithelialization was found on day 21 in some animals of both groups (treated and control). In aged rats, the wound area was significantly smaller in treated wounds than in untreated wounds, resulting in a larger scar area compared with the adult group. When treated wounds were compared, no differences were found between the wound areas in adult and aged rats. As expected, the collagen concentration was higher in normal skin from adult rats than in normal skin from aged animals, but there was no difference when aged skin was treated with tretinoin. These results indicate that tretinoin increases collagen synthesis in aged skin and returns the healing process to a normal state of skin healing. PMID:26834030

  6. β-irradiation (166Ho patch)-induced skin injury in mini-pigs: effects on NF-κB and COX-2 expression in the skin

    PubMed Central

    Rhim, Kyung-Jin; Jang, Won-Seok; Lee, Sun-Joo; Son, Yeonghoon; Lee, Seung-Sook; Park, Sunhoo

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the detrimental effect of β-emission on pig skin was evaluated. Skin injury was modeled in mini-pigs by exposing the animals to 50 and 100 Gy of β-emission delivered by 166Ho patches. Clinicopathological and immunohistochemical changes in exposed skin were monitored for 18 weeks after β-irradiation. Radiation induced desquamation at 2~4 weeks and gradual repair of this damage was evident 6 weeks after irradiation. Changes in basal cell density and skin depth corresponded to clinically relevant changes. Skin thickness began to decrease 1 week after irradiation, and the skin was thinnest 4 weeks after irradiation. Skin thickness increased transiently during recovery from irradiation-induced skin injury, which was evident 6~8 weeks after irradiation. Epidermal expression of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) differed significantly between the untreated and irradiated areas. One week after irradiation, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression was mostly limited to the basal cell layer and scattered among these cells. High levels of COX-2 expression were detected throughout the full depth of the skin 4 weeks after irradiation. These findings suggest that NF-κB and COX-2 play roles in epidermal cell regeneration following β-irradiation of mini-pig skin. PMID:24962420

  7. Discriminating between Z'-boson effects and effects of anomalous gauge couplings in the double production of W ± bosons at a linear collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Vasili V.; Pankov, A. A.

    2013-06-01

    The potential of the International Linear electron-positron Collider (ILC) for seeking, in the annihilation production of W ±-boson pairs, signals induced by new neutral gauge bosons predicted by models belonging to various classes and featuring an extended gauge sector is studied. Limits that will be obtained at ILC for the parameters and masses of Z' bosons are compared with present-day and future data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The possibility of discriminating between the effects of Z-Z' mixing and signals induced by anomalous gauge couplings (AGC) is demonstrated within theoretically motivated trilinear gauge models involving several free anomalous parameters. It is found that the sensitivity of ILC to the effects of Z-Z' mixing in the process e + e - → W + W - and its ability to discriminate between these two new-physics scenarios, Z' and AGC, become substantially higher upon employing polarized initial ( e + e -) and final ( W ±) states.

  8. Giant anomalous Hall effect in Fe-based microwires grown by focused-electron-beam-induced deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdoba, R.; Lavrijsen, R.; Fernández-Pacheco, A.; Ibarra, M. R.; Schoenaker, F.; Ellis, T.; Barcones-Campo, B.; Kohlhepp, J. T.; Swagten, H. J. M.; Koopmans, B.; Mulders, J. J. L.; De Teresa, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    We report the temperature dependence of the resistivity, the anisotropic magnetoresistance and the Hall effect of iron microwires grown by focused-electron-beam-induced deposition. By modifying the growth conditions in a controllable way, we study wires with iron compositions varying from 45% to 70%, which present different electrical conduction mechanisms, with resistivity values differing over three orders of magnitude. The magnetoresistance depends highly on the composition, and it can be understood by a subtle interplay between the anisotropic magnetoresistance and intergrain magnetoresistance due to their complex microstructure, consisting of an iron-carbon-oxygen amorphous matrix. A giant value for the anomalous Hall effect is found, which we explain by a large contribution of the skew scattering mechanism. The present results emphasize the correlation between the exotic microstructure of the microwires, and their magnetotransport properties.

  9. Thermoelectric Signal Enhancement by Reconciling the Spin Seebeck and Anomalous Nernst Effects in Ferromagnet/Non-magnet Multilayers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyeong-Dong; Kim, Dong-Jun; Yeon Lee, Hae; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Kyung-Min; Jeong, Jong-Ryul; Lee, Ki-Suk; Song, Hyon-Seok; Sohn, Jeong-Woo; Shin, Sung-Chul; Park, Byong-Guk

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of ferromagnetic (FM) materials in thermoelectric devices allows one to have a simpler structure and/or independent control of electric and thermal conductivities, which may further remove obstacles for this technology to be realized. The thermoelectricity in FM/non-magnet (NM) heterostructures using an optical heating source is studied as a function of NM materials and a number of multilayers. It is observed that the overall thermoelectric signal in those structures which is contributed by spin Seebeck effect and anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) is enhanced by a proper selection of NM materials with a spin Hall angle that matches to the sign of the ANE. Moreover, by an increase of the number of multilayer, the thermoelectric voltage is enlarged further and the device resistance is reduced, simultaneously. The experimental observation of the improvement of thermoelectric properties may pave the way for the realization of magnetic-(or spin-) based thermoelectric devices. PMID:26020492

  10. Metallic transport and large anomalous Hall effect at room temperature in ferrimagnetic Mn{sub 4}N epitaxial thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Xi; Shigematsu, Kei; Chikamatsu, Akira Fukumura, Tomoteru; Hirose, Yasushi; Hasegawa, Tetsuya

    2014-08-18

    We report the electrical transport properties of ferrimagnetic Mn{sub 4}N (001) epitaxial thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition on MgO (001) substrates. The Mn{sub 4}N thin films were tetragonally distorted with a ratio of out-of-plane to in-plane lattice constants of 0.987 and showed perpendicular magnetic anisotropy with an effective magnetic anisotropy constant of 0.16 MJ/m{sup 3}, which is comparable with that of a recently reported molecular-beam-epitaxy-grown film. The thin films exhibited metallic transport with a room temperature resistivity of 125 μΩ cm in addition to a large anomalous Hall effect with a Hall angle tangent of 0.023.

  11. Thermoelectric Signal Enhancement by Reconciling the Spin Seebeck and Anomalous Nernst Effects in Ferromagnet/Non-magnet Multilayers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyeong-Dong; Kim, Dong-Jun; Yeon Lee, Hae; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Kyung-Min; Jeong, Jong-Ryul; Lee, Ki-Suk; Song, Hyon-Seok; Sohn, Jeong-Woo; Shin, Sung-Chul; Park, Byong-Guk

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of ferromagnetic (FM) materials in thermoelectric devices allows one to have a simpler structure and/or independent control of electric and thermal conductivities, which may further remove obstacles for this technology to be realized. The thermoelectricity in FM/non-magnet (NM) heterostructures using an optical heating source is studied as a function of NM materials and a number of multilayers. It is observed that the overall thermoelectric signal in those structures which is contributed by spin Seebeck effect and anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) is enhanced by a proper selection of NM materials with a spin Hall angle that matches to the sign of the ANE. Moreover, by an increase of the number of multilayer, the thermoelectric voltage is enlarged further and the device resistance is reduced, simultaneously. The experimental observation of the improvement of thermoelectric properties may pave the way for the realization of magnetic-(or spin-) based thermoelectric devices. PMID:26020492

  12. Anomalous degradation of low-field mobility in short-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natori, Kenji; Iwai, Hiroshi; Kakushima, Kuniyuki

    2015-12-01

    The anomalous degradation of the low-field mobility observed in short-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors is analyzed by collating various reported data in experiments and simulations. It is inferred that the degradation is not caused by the channel scattering of the carriers. The origin is proposed to be the backscattering of channel carriers on injection into the drain. The expression of the low-field mobility, including the backscattering effect, is derived. The inverse of the low-field mobility is a linear function of the inverse of channel length, the expression of which reproduces that empirically derived by Bidal's group. By fitting the expression to simulated as well as experimental data, we can estimate the value of parameters related to the channel scattering and also to the backscattering from the drain. We find that these values are in reasonable magnitude.

  13. Excitation wavelength dependence of the anomalous circular photogalvanic effect in undoped InGaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, L. P.; Liu, Y.; Jiang, C. Y.; Qin, X. D.; Li, Y.; Gao, H. S.; Chen, Y. H.

    2014-02-28

    The excitation wavelength dependence of the anomalous circular photogalvanic effect (ACPGE) current arising from the reciprocal spin Hall effect (RSHE) in undoped InGaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells is measured under normal incidence of circularly polarized light at room temperature. We found that the spot location with the maximum ACPGE current is wavelength independent. And the normalized ACPGE current decreases at smaller wavelengths, which can be attributed to the sharp decrease of the spin relaxation time (τ{sub s}) and the hot electron relaxation time (τ{sub 1}) at smaller wavelengths. The study of the excitation wavelength dependence of ACPGE current is a good supplement to the in-depth investigation of RSHE.

  14. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis To Estimate Antibacterial Treatment Effect in Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infection.

    PubMed

    Cates, Jordan E; Mitrani-Gold, Fanny S; Li, Gang; Mundy, Linda M

    2015-08-01

    A systematic literature review and meta-analysis were conducted to estimate the antibacterial treatment effect for linezolid and ceftaroline to inform on the design of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection (ABSSSI) noninferiority trials. The primary endpoints included an early clinical treatment response (ECTR) defined as cessation of lesion spread at 48 to 72 h postrandomization and the test-of-cure (TOC) response defined as total resolution of the infection at 7 to 14 days posttreatment. The systematic review identified no placebo-controlled trials in ABSSSI, 4 placebo-controlled trials in uncomplicated skin and soft tissue infection as a proxy for placebo in ABSSSI, 12 linezolid trials in ABSSSI, 3 ceftaroline trials in ABSSSI, and 2 trials for nonantibacterial treatment. The ECTR rates at 48 to 72 h and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were 78.7% (95% CI, 61.1 to 96.3%) for linezolid, 74.0% (95% CI, 69.7 to 78.3%) for ceftaroline, and 59.0% (95% CI, 52.8 to 65.3%) for nonantibacterial treatment. The early clinical treatment effect could not be estimated, given no available placebo or proxy for placebo data for this endpoint. Clinical, methodological, and statistical heterogeneity influenced the selection of trials for the meta-analysis of the TOC treatment effect estimation. The pooled estimates of the TOC treatment response were 31.0% (95% CI, 6.2 to 55.9%) for the proxy for placebo, 88.1% (95% CI, 81.0 to 95.1%) for linezolid, and 86.1% (95% CI, 83.7 to 88.6%) for ceftaroline. The TOC clinical treatment effect estimation was 25.1% for linezolid and 27.8% for ceftaroline. The antibacterial treatment effect estimation at TOC will inform on the design and analysis of future noninferiority ABSSSI clinical trials. PMID:25987628

  15. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis To Estimate Antibacterial Treatment Effect in Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cates, Jordan E.; Li, Gang; Mundy, Linda M.

    2015-01-01

    A systematic literature review and meta-analysis were conducted to estimate the antibacterial treatment effect for linezolid and ceftaroline to inform on the design of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection (ABSSSI) noninferiority trials. The primary endpoints included an early clinical treatment response (ECTR) defined as cessation of lesion spread at 48 to 72 h postrandomization and the test-of-cure (TOC) response defined as total resolution of the infection at 7 to 14 days posttreatment. The systematic review identified no placebo-controlled trials in ABSSSI, 4 placebo-controlled trials in uncomplicated skin and soft tissue infection as a proxy for placebo in ABSSSI, 12 linezolid trials in ABSSSI, 3 ceftaroline trials in ABSSSI, and 2 trials for nonantibacterial treatment. The ECTR rates at 48 to 72 h and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were 78.7% (95% CI, 61.1 to 96.3%) for linezolid, 74.0% (95% CI, 69.7 to 78.3%) for ceftaroline, and 59.0% (95% CI, 52.8 to 65.3%) for nonantibacterial treatment. The early clinical treatment effect could not be estimated, given no available placebo or proxy for placebo data for this endpoint. Clinical, methodological, and statistical heterogeneity influenced the selection of trials for the meta-analysis of the TOC treatment effect estimation. The pooled estimates of the TOC treatment response were 31.0% (95% CI, 6.2 to 55.9%) for the proxy for placebo, 88.1% (95% CI, 81.0 to 95.1%) for linezolid, and 86.1% (95% CI, 83.7 to 88.6%) for ceftaroline. The TOC clinical treatment effect estimation was 25.1% for linezolid and 27.8% for ceftaroline. The antibacterial treatment effect estimation at TOC will inform on the design and analysis of future noninferiority ABSSSI clinical trials. PMID:25987628

  16. Effects of postmilking teat treatment on the colonization of Staphylococcus aureus on chapped teat skin.

    PubMed

    Fox, L K; Nagy, J A; Hillers, J K; Cronrath, J D; Ratkowsky, D A

    1991-06-01

    Sixteen Holstein cows were used to test the effect of postmilking teat treatment on colonization and intramammary infection by Staphylococcus aureus on chapped teats. Treatments were (1) chapping the teat and using 1% I2/10% glycerin postdip solution, (2) 1% I2/10% glycerin postdip solution on nonchapped teats, (3) chapping the teat and using 10% glycerin postdip solution, (4) chapping the teat and not using a postdip solution. All mammary glands were free of S aureus teat skin colonization and intramammary infection at the start of the study. Teats selected for chapping were dipped in 1N NaOH prior to 3 applications of S aureus broth culture; cultures were applied at 12-hour intervals on all teats. Treatments were applied after each milking for 30 days and were initiated after the second broth dip. Teat skin swab specimens and milk samples were collected before treatment application. Teat skin condition was scored daily. Nonchapped teats (treatment 2) did not support skin or orifice colonization by S aureus. Treatment-1 teats healed most rapidly and supported less colonization in skin and orifice than did treatment-3 and -4 teats. Teat skin scores and skin colonization were lower for treatment-3 than treatment-4 teats. A correlation between teat skin colonization and teat skin conditions was found. Two intramammary infections were found in treatment-4 quarters and 1 in a treatment-3 quarter.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1883082

  17. Effect of Force of Microneedle Insertion on the Permeability of Insulin in Skin

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Karmen; Han, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Many experiments conducted in the literature have investigated the effect of microneedles (MNs) on insulin permeation across skin. There are also a number of articles that deal with the effect of MN insertion force in skin. However, there is little known on quantifying the relationship between the effect of MN insertion force and the amount of insulin permeated for given MNs. This issue is addressed in this article. MNs of 1100 µm and 1400 µm are used to conduct in vitro permeability experiments on porcine skin, using insulin. Histological images of MN treated skin are obtained from a microtome and the viscoelastic properties of the skin sample are measured using a rheometer. An in-house insertion force device is utilized that can reproducibly apply a specified force on MNs for a set period of time using compressed air. It is deduced that when porcine skin was pretreated with an applied force of 60.5 N and 69.1 N, the resultant amount of insulin permeated was approximately 3 µg and 25 µg over a 4-hour period for the MNs used. The amount of MN force applied to porcine skin was shown to be related to the amount of insulin permeated. An increase in insertion force increase the amount of insulin permeated. It was also demonstrated that using insufficient force may have reduced or prevented the amount of insulin passing through the skin, regardless of the geometry of the MNs. PMID:24876604

  18. Oncogenic Radiation Abscopal Effects In Vivo: Interrogating Mouse Skin

    SciTech Connect

    Mancuso, Mariateresa; Leonardi, Simona; Giardullo, Paola; Pasquali, Emanuela; Tanori, Mirella; De Stefano, Ilaria; Casciati, Arianna; Naus, Christian C.; Pazzaglia, Simonetta; Saran, Anna

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate the tissue dependence in transmission of abscopal radiation signals and their oncogenic consequences in a radiosensitive mouse model and to explore the involvement of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) in mediating radiation tumorigenesis in off-target mouse skin. Methods and Materials: Patched1 heterozygous (Ptch1{sup +/−}) mice were irradiated at postnatal day 2 (P2) with 10 Gy of x-rays. Individual lead cylinders were used to protect the anterior two-thirds of the body, whereas the hindmost part was directly exposed to radiation. To test the role of GJICs and their major constituent connexin43 (Cx43), crosses between Ptch1{sup +/−} and Cx43{sup +/−} mice were similarly irradiated. These mouse groups were monitored for their lifetime, and skin basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) were counted and recorded. Early responses to DNA damage - Double Strand Breaks (DSBs) and apoptosis - were also evaluated in shielded and directly irradiated skin areas. Results: We report abscopal tumor induction in the shielded skin of Ptch1{sup +/−} mice after partial-body irradiation. Endpoints were induction of early nodular BCC-like tumors and macroscopic infiltrative BCCs. Abscopal tumorigenesis was significantly modulated by Cx43 status, namely, Cx43 reduction was associated with decreased levels of DNA damage and oncogenesis in out-of-field skin, suggesting a key role of GJIC in transmission of oncogenic radiation signals to unhit skin. Conclusions: Our results further characterize the nature of abscopal responses and the implications they have on pathologic processes in different tissues, including their possible underlying mechanistic bases.

  19. Anomalous Hall effect in ZnxFe3-xO4: Universal scaling law and electron localization below the Verwey transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedrecy, N.; Hamieh, M.; Hebert, C.; Escudier, M.; Becerra, L.; Perriere, J.

    2016-08-01

    We show that the well-established universal scaling σxyAHE ˜ σxx1.6 between anomalous Hall and longitudinal conductivities in the low conductivity regime (σxx < 104 Ω-1 cm-1) transforms into the scaling σxyAHE ˜ σxx2 at the onset of strong electron localization. The crossover between the two relations is observed in magnetite-derived ZnxFe3-xO4 thin films where an insulating/hopping regime follows a bad metal/hopping regime below the Verwey transition temperature Tv. Our results demonstrate that electron localization effects come into play in the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) modifying significantly the scaling exponent. In addition, the thermal evolution of the anomalous Hall resistivity suggests the existence of spin polarons whose size would decrease below Tv.

  20. Effects of glycerol on human skin damaged by acute sodium lauryl sulphate treatment.

    PubMed

    Atrux-Tallau, Nicolas; Romagny, Céline; Padois, Karine; Denis, Alain; Haftek, Marek; Falson, Françoise; Pirot, Fabrice; Maibach, Howard I

    2010-08-01

    Glycerol, widely used as humectant, is known to protect against irritants and to accelerate recovery of irritated skin. However, most studies were done with topical formulations (i.e. emulsions) containing glycerol in relatively high amounts, preventing drawing conclusions from direct effects. In this study, acute chemical irritations were performed on the forearm with application of a 10% sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) aqueous solution under occlusion for 3 h. Then, glycerol aqueous solutions from 1 to 10% were applied under occlusion for 3 h. After elimination of moist excess consecutive to occlusive condition, in ambient air for 15 and 30 min, skin barrier function was investigated by dual measurement of skin hydration and transepidermal water loss (TEWL). Treatments with SLS solution under occlusion significantly increased TEWL and decreased skin hydration as assessed by capacitance measurements. The SLS irritant property was raised by the occlusion and the water barrier function as well as water content appeared impaired. Recovery with glycerol at low doses was remarkable through a mechanism that implies its hygroscopic properties and which is saturable. This precocious effect acts through skin rehydration by enhancing water-holding capacity of stratum corneum that would facilitate the late physiological repair of impaired skin barrier. Thus, glycerol appears to substitute for natural moisturizing factors that have been washed out by the detergent action of SLS, enhancing skin hydration but without restoring skin barrier function as depicted by TEWL values that remained high. Thus, irritant contact dermatitis treated with glycerol application compensate for skin dehydration, favouring physiological process to restore water barrier function of the impaired skin. Empirical use of glycerol added topical formulations onto detergent altered skin was substantiated in the present physicochemical approach. PMID:20043170

  1. Electrical measurement of moisturizing effect on skin hydration and barrier function in psoriasis patients.

    PubMed

    Rim, J H; Jo, S J; Park, J Y; Park, B D; Youn, J I

    2005-07-01

    Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) in psoriatic skin lesions seems to be related to the severity of the psoriasis, and the electrical capacitance and conductance of the skin are indicators of the hydration level of the stratum corneum. We compared the characteristics of these electrical measurements, in assessing the persistent effect of a moisturizing cream on skin hydration and barrier function in psoriasis patients. Seventeen Korean psoriasis patients were recruited. Their right leg was treated with the moisturizer twice daily for 6 weeks, while their left leg was used as the control site. For each patient, one psoriatic plaque on each leg was selected as the involved psoriatic lesion. Uninvolved psoriatic skin was regarded as the apparently healthy looking skin 4-5 cm away from the periphery of the psoriatic lesion. The TEWL, electrical capacitance and conductance were measured, in order to evaluate the barrier function and hydration level of the stratum corneum. The clinical and biophysical data for each patient were recorded at the start of the study and after 2, 4 and 6 weeks. The degree of skin dryness at the applied area improved progressively. The electrical capacitance at the treated psoriatic lesion increased significantly after 2 weeks, and this improvement was maintained during the entire study period. However, no noticeable change was observed in the electrical conductance. The TEWL showed an inverse pattern to that of the skin capacitance, decreasing during the study period. The skin capacitance and TEWL exhibited good correlation with the visual assessment of skin dryness, but the skin conductance did not. Our data suggest that electrical capacitance and TEWL may be useful in the evaluation of the effect of a moisturizer on the hydration status and barrier function of psoriatic skin. PMID:15953083

  2. The Effects of Mucopolysaccharide Polysulphate on Hydration and Elasticity of Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Wanitphakdeedecha, Rungsima; Eimpunth, Sasima; Manuskiatti, Woraphong

    2011-01-01

    Background. Mucopolysaccharide polysulphate (MPS) has been used in medicine as an anti-inflammatory and antithrombotic agent for over 50 years. Its chemical structure permits considerable hydrogen bonding with adjacent water molecules, which effectively leads to hydration of the surrounding tissue. In addition, it stimulates endogenous hyaluronate synthesis, resulting in an increase in water-binding capacity and viscoelasticity of the skin. Objective. To study the efficacy of 0.1% MPS on hydration and elasticity of human skin. Methods. The first part of this study was a randomized double blind placebo-controlled study which included 60 female volunteers aged 30–45 years with dry skin, defined by Corneometer CM 825. The volunteers were treated with either 0.1% MPS or vehicle control. All subjects were asked to apply 1 g of cream to their face twice daily for a total period of 4 weeks. Skin hydration and elasticity were measured at baseline and week 4 with Corneometer CM 825 and cutometer MPA 580, respectively, at forehead and both cheeks. The second part of this study focused on the efficacy of 0.1% MPS on skin hydration after single application. 20 female volunteers aged 30–45 years with dry skin, defined by Corneometer CM 825, were recruited to the study. All subjects were asked to apply 2 g of 0.1% MPS cream on entirely randomly selected forearm. Skin hydration at the middle of both forearms was measured at baseline, immediately after application, and every 1 hour after application for a period of 10 hours. Results. 57 subjects (28 in vehicle control group, 29 in MPS) completed treatment protocol. The baseline skin hydration of both groups was not significantly different (P = 0.47). Hower, there was a statistically significant difference in skin hydration at 4 weeks between MPS and placebo group (P = 0.01). Skin elasticity was significantly improved at week 4 in both groups (vehicle-control, P < 0.01, and MPS, P < 0.01). However, no significant

  3. Effects of micronutrient supplements on u.v.-induced skin damage.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M J; Jackson, M J; McArdle, F; Storey, A; Jones, S A; McArdle, A; Rhodes, L E

    2002-05-01

    Development of an orally-administered systemic agent that could reduce the effects of u.v. exposure on skin could potentially have a major effect on the incidence of skin cancers and photo-ageing. A number of micronutrients have been suggested to have metabolic properties that could induce this protection, and our data indicate that n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are particularly effective in this role. The mechanisms of action of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids appear to depend on their anti-inflammatory properties, acting to reduce the u.v.-induced release of cytokines and other mediators from a variety of skin cell types. PMID:12133200

  4. Optimizing proximity induced anomalous Hall effect in (BixSb1-x)2 Te3/YIG heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zilong; Tang, Chi; Shi, Jing; Chang, Cuizu; Wei, Peng; Moodera, Jagadeesh S.

    2015-03-01

    The spontaneously broken time reversal symmetry leads to an energy gap in the Dirac spectrum of the surface states of a topological insulator (TI) which gives rise to the quantized anomalous Hall effect (QAHE). QAHE has been observed in TI doped with Cr. Here we explore an alternative route by coupling the surface states of TI with yttrium iron garnet (YIG) ferrimagnetic insulator (FI). Just as in Cr-doped TI, a major challenge is to reduce the bulk conduction which overwhelms the surface state contribution. We have successfully grown 5 quintuple layer thick ternary TI (BixSb1-x)2 Te3 on atomically flat YIG films, in which the Fermi level of TI can be controlled by the Bi:Sb ratio. We have observed the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in TI/YIG heterostructure over a wide range of carrier density and in both electron and hole types induced by varying the Bi:Sb ratio from 0:1 to 1:0. Both Rxx and RAH undergo systematic and dramatic changes as the Bi:Sb ratio is varied. The maximum RAH occurs near the p-n cross-over region at Bi:Sb ratio ~0.2:0.8, which is nearly two orders of magnitude greater than the minimum value at Bi:Sb ratio ~1:0. As the Bi:Sb ratio is varied, we find that RAH scales quadratically with Rxx, indicating the scattering rate independent AHE. The electric field effect study further demonstrates the existence of robust AHE while the Fermi level of TI is tuned. This research was supported by UC Lab fees program and a DOE/BES award at UCR, and by NSF/DMR at MIT.

  5. The moisturizing effects of glycolipid biosurfactants, mannosylerythritol lipids, on human skin.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shuhei; Morita, Tomotake; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Yanagidani, Shusaku; Sogabe, Atsushi; Kitamoto, Dai; Kitagawa, Masaru

    2012-01-01

    Glycolipid biosurfactants, such as mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs), are produced by different yeasts belonging to the genus Pseudozyma and have been attracting much attention as new cosmetic ingredients owing to their unique liquid-crystal-forming and moisturizing properties. In this study, the effects of different MEL derivatives on the skin were evaluated in detail using a three-dimensional cultured human skin model and an in vivo human study. The skin cells were cultured and treated with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and the effects of different lipids on the SDS-damaged cells were evaluated on the basis of cell viability. Most MEL derivatives efficiently recovered the viability of the cells and showed high recovery rates (over 80%) comparable with that of natural ceramide. It is interesting that the recovery rate with MEL-A prepared from olive oil was significantly higher than that of MEL-A prepared from soybean oil. The water retention properties of MEL-B were further investigated on human forearm skin in a preliminary study. Compared with the control, the aqueous solution of MEL-B (5 wt%) was estimated to considerably increase the stratum corneum water content in the skin. Moreover, perspiration on the skin surface was clearly suppressed by treatment with the MEL-B solution. These results suggest that MELs are likely to exhibit a high moisturizing action, by assisting the barrier function of the skin. Accordingly, the yeast glycolipids have a strong potential as a new ingredient for skin care products. PMID:22790172

  6. Effect of São Pedro do Sul thermal water on skin irritation.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, M O; Costa, P C; Bahia, M F

    2010-06-01

    Many mineral waters are known for centuries for treating dermatological diseases but there is little scientific evaluation of the effects of these waters in skin. A total of 17 healthy Caucasian volunteers, including men and women, were enrolled in this study. Two skin sites were marked on each volunteer forearm and irritated with sodium lauryl sulphate at 2% (w/v) kept under occlusion for 24 h with Finn chambers. Afterwards, purified water or São Pedro do Sul (SPS) thermal water were applied to the irritated skin sites, and kept under occlusion for 48 h also with Finn chambers. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was used as a measure of the skin barrier function to evaluate the potential anti-irritant effect of the thermal water on skin. Statistically significant differences in the mean TEWL variations were observed for the skin treated with SPS thermal water and with purified water (P = 0.036). The thermal water reduced the degree to which the skin barrier was disrupted compared with purified water alone in 82.4% of the volunteers. The SPS thermal water is anti-irritant and, therefore, can be helpful to relieve skin irritation and in cosmetic formulations to improve the tolerability of the products. PMID:20557578

  7. Skin Cancer, Irradiation, and Sunspots: The Solar Cycle Effect

    PubMed Central

    Zurbenko, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Skin cancer is diagnosed in more than 2 million individuals annually in the United States. It is strongly associated with ultraviolet exposure, with melanoma risk doubling after five or more sunburns. Solar activity, characterized by features such as irradiance and sunspots, undergoes an 11-year solar cycle. This fingerprint frequency accounts for relatively small variation on Earth when compared to other uncorrelated time scales such as daily and seasonal cycles. Kolmogorov-Zurbenko filters, applied to the solar cycle and skin cancer data, separate the components of different time scales to detect weaker long term signals and investigate the relationships between long term trends. Analyses of crosscorrelations reveal epidemiologically consistent latencies between variables which can then be used for regression analysis to calculate a coefficient of influence. This method reveals that strong numerical associations, with correlations >0.5, exist between these small but distinct long term trends in the solar cycle and skin cancer. This improves modeling skin cancer trends on long time scales despite the stronger variation in other time scales and the destructive presence of noise. PMID:25126567

  8. Anomalous transport phenomena in px+i py superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Songci; Andreev, A. V.; Spivak, B. Z.

    2015-09-01

    Spontaneous breaking of time-reversal symmetry in superconductors with the px+i py symmetry of the order parameter allows for a class of effects which are analogous to the anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnets. These effects exist below the critical temperature, T effects. In particular, we consider anomalous Hall thermal conductivity, the polar Kerr effect, the anomalous Hall effect, and the anomalous photo- and acousto-galvanic effects.

  9. Micro-instabilities and anomalous transport effects in collisionless guide field reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz Sepulveda, Patricio Alejandro; Büchner, Jörg; Kilian, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    It is often the case that magnetic reconnection takes place in collisionless plasmas with a current aligned guide magnetic field, such as in the Solar corona. The general characteristics of this process have been exhaustively analyzed with theory and numerical simulations, under different approximations, since some time ago. However, some consequences and properties of the secondary instabilities arising spontaneously -other than tearing instability-, and their dependence on the guide field strength, have not been completely understood yet. For this sake, we use the results of fully kinetic 2D PIC numerical simulations of guide field reconnection. By using a mean field approach for the Generalized Ohm's law that explains the balance of the reconnected electric field, we find that some of the cross-streaming and gradient driven instabilities -in the guide field case- produce an additional anomalous transport term. The latter can be interpreted as a result of the enhanced correlated electromagnetic fluctuations, leading to a slow down of the current carriers and kinetic scale turbulence. We characterize these processes on dependence on the guide field strength, and explore the causal relation with the source of free energy driving the mentioned instabilities. Finally, we show the main consequences that a fully 3D approach have on all those phenomena in contrast to the reduced 2D description.

  10. High-temperature quantum anomalous Hall effect in honeycomb bilayer consisting of Au atoms and single-vacancy graphene

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yan; Wan, Jian-Guo; Ge, Gui-Xian; Song, Feng-Qi; Wang, Guang-Hou

    2015-01-01

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) is predicted to be realized at high temperature in a honeycomb bilayer consisting of Au atoms and single-vacancy graphene (Au2-SVG) based on the first-principles calculations. We demonstrate that the ferromagnetic state in the Au2-SVG can be maintained up to 380 K. The combination of spatial inversion symmetry and the strong SOC introduced by the Au atoms causes a topologically nontrivial band gap as large as 36 meV and a QAHE state with Chern number C = −2. The analysis of the binding energy proved that the honeycomb bilayer is stable and feasible to be fabricated in experiment. The QAHEs in Ta2-SVG and other TM2-SVGs are also discussed. PMID:26574924

  11. High-temperature quantum anomalous Hall effect in honeycomb bilayer consisting of Au atoms and single-vacancy graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yan; Wan, Jian-Guo; Ge, Gui-Xian; Song, Feng-Qi; Wang, Guang-Hou

    2015-11-01

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) is predicted to be realized at high temperature in a honeycomb bilayer consisting of Au atoms and single-vacancy graphene (Au2-SVG) based on the first-principles calculations. We demonstrate that the ferromagnetic state in the Au2-SVG can be maintained up to 380 K. The combination of spatial inversion symmetry and the strong SOC introduced by the Au atoms causes a topologically nontrivial band gap as large as 36 meV and a QAHE state with Chern number C = -2. The analysis of the binding energy proved that the honeycomb bilayer is stable and feasible to be fabricated in experiment. The QAHEs in Ta2-SVG and other TM2-SVGs are also discussed.

  12. Effect of spin-orbit nuclear charge density corrections due to the anomalous magnetic moment on halonuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, A.; Berengut, J. C.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2010-07-15

    In this paper we consider the contribution of the anomalous magnetic moments of protons and neutrons to the nuclear charge density. We show that the spin-orbit contribution to the mean-square charge radius, which has been neglected in recent nuclear calculations, can be important in light halonuclei. We estimate the size of the effect in helium, lithium, and beryllium nuclei. It is found that the spin-orbit contribution represents a approx2% correction to the charge density at the center of the {sup 7}Be nucleus. We derive a simple expression for the correction to the mean-square charge radius due to the spin-orbit term and find that in light halonuclei it may be larger than the Darwin-Foldy term and comparable to finite size corrections. A comparison of experimental and theoretical mean-square radii including the spin-orbit contribution is presented.

  13. Quantized spin waves in single Co/Pt dots detected by anomalous Hall effect based ferromagnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, N. Furuta, M.; Okamoto, S.; Kitakami, O.; Shimatsu, T.

    2014-12-15

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) based ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements were carried out on perpendicularly magnetized Co/Pt multilayer single dots of 0.4–3 μm in diameter. The resonance behavior was measured by detecting the decrease of perpendicular magnetization component due to magnetization precession. Resonance behavior was observed as a clear decrease of Hall voltages, and the obtained resonance fields were consistent with the results of vector-network-analyzer FMR. Spin-waves with cylindrical symmetry became significant by decreasing the dot diameter, and quantized multiple resonances were observed in the dot of 0.4 μm in diameter. The AHE based FMR proposed here is a powerful method to approach magnetization dynamics including spin waves and non-linear behavior excited in a finite nanostructure.

  14. Anomalous Hall effect in the Co-based Heusler compounds Co2FeSi and Co2FeAI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imort, I.-M.; Thomas, P.; Reiss, G.; Thomas, A.

    2012-04-01

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in the Heusler compounds Co2FeSi and Co2FeAl is studied in dependence of the annealing temperature to achieve a general comprehension of its origin. We have demonstrated that the crystal quality affected by annealing processes is a significant control parameter to tune the electrical resistivity ρxx as well as the anomalous Hall resistivity ρahe. Analyzing the scaling behavior of ρahe in terms of ρxx points to a temperature-dependent skew scattering as the dominant mechanism in both Heusler compounds.

  15. Anomalous conductivity in Hall thrusters: Effects of the non-linear coupling of the electron-cyclotron drift instability with secondary electron emission of the walls

    SciTech Connect

    Héron, A.; Adam, J. C.

    2013-08-15

    With the help of an implicit particle-in-cell code, we have shown in a previous paper that the electron-cyclotron drift instability was able to induce anomalous conductivity as well as anomalous heating. As such it can be a major actor among the mechanisms involved in the operation of Hall thrusters. However, experimental results show that the nature of wall material has a significant effect on the behavior of the thruster. The purpose of this paper is to study the plasma-wall interaction in the case where the plasma is heated self-consistently by electrostatic fluctuations induced by the electron-cyclotron drift instability.

  16. Many-electron effects in anomalous elastic scattering of linearly polarized x-ray photons by Xe near the K-edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopersky, A. N.; Yavna, V. A.; Popov, V. A.

    1997-11-01

    Within the non-relativistic approximation the effect of radial monopole rearrangement of electron shells within the field of a vacancy and of the processes of one-photon double excitation - ionization on the differential cross section of anomalous non-zero-angle elastic scattering of linearly polarized x-ray photons by the Xe atom in the region of its 1s-shell ionization threshold is studied. Theoretical results for the anomalous dispersion region of scattering demonstrate a strong dependence of the cross section value on the approximation used.

  17. Evaluation of sunscreen safety by in vitro skin permeation studies: effects of vehicle composition.

    PubMed

    Montenegro, L; Puglisi, G

    2013-01-01

    For sunscreens to be safe and effective, the lowest possible UV-filter percutaneous absorption should be achieved. In this paper, we evaluated in vitro release and permeation through human skin of two UV-filters, octyl methoxycinnammate (OMC) and butyl methoxydibenzoyl methane (BMBM) from six commercial O/W emulsions and we estimated their margin of safety (MoS). OMC and BMBM in vitro release and skin permeation were investigated in Franz-type diffusion cells and permeation data were used to calculate MoS. OMC in vitro skin permeation depended on both its concentration and vehicle composition while BMBM skin permeation depended on its release from the vehicle. MoS values were well beyond the lowest limit accepted for safe products. Although sunscreen skin permeation may depend on many factors, the commercial products investigated are safe under normal "in use" conditions. PMID:23444778

  18. Safety and effectiveness of skin-to-skin contact in the NICU to support neurodevelopment in vulnerable preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Carbasse, Aurélia; Kracher, Sylvie; Hausser, Martine; Langlet, Claire; Escande, Benoît; Donato, Lionel; Astruc, Dominique; Kuhn, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Skin-to-skin contact (SSC) is a cornerstone of neurodevelopmentally supportive and family-oriented care for very low-birth-weight preterm infants (VPIs). However, performing SSC with unstable and/or ventilated VPIs remains challenging for caregiving teams and/or controversial in the literature. We first aimed to assess the safety and effectiveness of SSC with vulnerable VPIs in a neonatal intensive care unit over 12 months. Our second aim was to evaluate the impact of the respiratory support (intubation or not) and of the infant's weight (above or below 1000 g) on the effects of SSC. Vital signs, body temperature, and oxygen requirement data were prospectively recorded by each infant's nurse before (baseline), during (3 time points), and after their first or first 2 SSC episodes. We compared the variations of each parameter from baseline (analysis of variance for repeated measures with post hoc analysis when appropriate). We studied 141 SSCs in 96 VPIs of 28 (24-33) weeks' gestational age, at 12 (0-55) days of postnatal age, and at a postmenstrual age of 30.5 (±1.5) weeks. During SSC, there were statistically significant increases in oxygen saturation (Sao2) (P < .001) with decreases in oxygen requirement (P = .043), a decrease in heart rate toward stability (P < .01) but a transient and moderate decrease in mean axillary temperature following the transfer from bed to mother (P < .05). Apneas/bradycardias requiring minor intervention occurred in 19 (13%) SSCs, without need for SSC termination. These variations were similar for intubated newborns (18%) as compared with newborns on nasal continuous positive airway pressure (52%) or breathing room air (30%). However, ventilated infants exhibited a significant increase in transcutaneous partial pressure of carbon dioxide (TcPco2) (P = .01), although remaining in a clinically acceptable range, and a greater decrease in oxygen requirements during SSC (P < .001) than nonventilated infants. Skin-to-skin contact in the

  19. Investigation of jewelry powders radiating far-infrared rays and the biological effects on human skin.

    PubMed

    Yoo, B H; Park, C M; Oh, T J; Han, S H; Kang, H H; Chang, I S

    2002-01-01

    Far-infrared rays have certain kinds of effects on the human body, especially on skin, blood circulation, and skin cell vitalizing. Some jewelry powders radiate far-infrared rays. Jade has powerful far-infrared ray radiation, and tourmaline has pyroelectric and piezoelectric properties and radiated far-infrared rays. The jewelry powders (fine powdered jade and tourmaline powders) were screened by far-infrared rays for radiation properties and tested for the effects of far-infrared rays on the human skin by temperature observation using an infrared thermal analyzer. PMID:12053208

  20. In vivo transepidermal water loss and skin surface hydration in assessment of moisturization and soap effects.

    PubMed

    Wilson, D; Berardesca, E; Maibach, H I

    1988-10-01

    Synopsis Transepidermal water loss (TEWL), skin surface water loss (SSWL) and water content of the stratum corneum are utilized to assess the hydration effects of moisturizers and soaps. The relationship among these parameters may help differentiating hydration obtained via occlusion or by water-holding in the stratum corneum. Furthermore, skin function (hydration, dehydration, barrier damage) can be studied comparing the data obtained with these techniques. In this study, the effects of glycerol, petrolatum, soaps and commercial moisturizers on the skin are investigated and discussed. PMID:19456923

  1. The effect of skin thickness determined using breast CT on mammographic dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Shihying; Boone, John M.; Yang, Kai; Kwan, Alexander L. C.; Packard, Nathan J.

    2008-04-15

    The effect of breast skin thickness on dosimetry in mammography was investigated. Breast computed tomography (CT) acquisition techniques, combined with algorithms designed for determining specific breast metrics, were useful for estimating skin thickness. A radial-geometry edge detection scheme was implemented on coronal reconstructed breast CT (bCT) images to measure the breast skin thickness. Skin thickness of bilateral bCT volume data from 49 women and unilateral bCT volume data from 2 women (10 healthy women and 41 women with BIRADS 4 and 5 diagnoses) was robustly measured with the edge detection scheme. The mean breast skin thickness ({+-}inter-breast standard deviation) was found to be 1.45{+-}0.30 mm. Since most current published normalized glandular dose (D{sub gN}) coefficients are based on the assumption of a 4-mm breast skin thickness, the D{sub gN} values computed with Monte Carlo techniques will increase up to 18% due to the thinner skin layers (e.g., 6-cm 50% glandular breast, 28 kVp Mo-Mo spectrum). The thinner skin dimensions found in this study suggest that the current D{sub gN} values used for mammographic dosimetry lead to a slight underestimate in glandular dose.

  2. Hairy skin exposure to VX in vitro: effectiveness of delayed decontamination.

    PubMed

    Rolland, P; Bolzinger, M-A; Cruz, C; Josse, D; Briançon, S

    2013-02-01

    The chemical warfare agents such as VX represent a threat for both military and civilians, which involves an immediate need of effective decontamination systems. Since human scalp is usually unprotected compared to other body regions covered with clothes, it could be a preferential site of exposure in case of terrorist acts. The purpose of this study was to determine if skin decontamination could be efficient when performed more than 1h after exposure. In addition, the impact of hairs in skin contamination was investigated. By using in vitro skin models, we demonstrated that about 75% of the applied quantity of VX was recovered on the skin surface 2h after skin exposition, which means that it is worth decontaminating even if contamination occurred 2h before. The stratum corneum reservoir for VX was quickly established and persistent. In addition, the presence of hairs modified the percutaneous penetration of the nerve agent by binding of VX to hairs. Hair shaft has thus to be taken into account in the decontamination process. Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion (RSDL) and Fuller's Earth (FE) were active in the skin decontamination 45min post-exposure, but RSDL was more efficient in reducing the amount of VX either in the skin or in the hair. PMID:22926045

  3. Analysis of anomalous electrical conductivity and magnetic permeability effects using a frequency domain controlled-source electromagnetic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Kyubo; Oh, Seokmin; Seol, Soon Jee; Lee, Ki Ha; Byun, Joongmoo

    2016-03-01

    We present a series of processes for understanding and analysing controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) responses for a conductive and permeable earth. To realize the CSEM response, a new 3-D CSEM forward modelling algorithm based on an edge finite element method for both electrically conductive and magnetically permeable heterogeneities is developed. The algorithm shows highly accurate results in validation tests against a semi-analytic solution for stratified earth and an integral form of the scattered field. We describe the vector behaviour of an anomalous magnetic field originating from a conductive and permeable anomaly when the loop sources are deployed over a conductive half-space. The CSEM response of the conductive and permeable anomaly is classified into three effects originating from: conductivity perturbations, permeability perturbations and the coupling of these two effects. The separated individual results and the corresponding integral equation form of the anomalous field help to better understand the physical behaviour. We confirm the characteristic features of the CSEM response from the conductive and permeable anomaly, for example, (1) the general dominance of the induction effect in the out-of-phase response accompanied by a non-negligible magnetization effect from the magnetic anomaly in a conductive half-space and (2) the dominance of near frequency-independent magnetization effects in the in-phase response at relatively low frequencies and change in ruling part of the in-phase response into the induction effect as the frequency increases. We also demonstrate the effect of coupling mode and show that its maximum contribution is limited to a few per cent level of other two modes, induction and magnetization mode, even when the heterogeneity of our model is strong. In our synthetic survey, using examples of land-based profiling surveys of low induction number and intermediate regime, we find that the effect of magnetization can be used as an

  4. DeoxyArbutin: a novel reversible tyrosinase inhibitor with effective in vivo skin lightening potency.

    PubMed

    Boissy, Raymond E; Visscher, Marty; DeLong, Mitchell A

    2005-08-01

    Modulation of melanogenesis in the melanocytes can be achieved using chemicals that share structural homologies with the substrate tyrosine and as thus competitively inhibit the catalytic function of tyrosinase. We have developed a new tyrosinase inhibitor, deoxyArbutin (dA), based on this premise. DeoxyArbutin demonstrates effective inhibition of mushroom tyrosinase in vitro with a Ki that is 10-fold lower that hydroquinone (HQ) and 350-fold lower than arbutin. In a hairless, pigmented guinea pig model, dA demonstrated rapid and sustained skin lightening that was completely reversible within 8 weeks after halt in topical application. In contrast, HQ induced a short but unsustained skin lightening effect whereas kojic acid and arbutin exhibit no skin lightening effect. Results from a panel of safety tests supported the overall establishment of dA as an actionable molecule. In a human clinical trial, topical treatment of dA for 12 weeks resulted in a significant or slight reduction in overall skin lightness and improvement of solar lentigines in a population of light skin or dark skin individuals, respectively. These data demonstrate that dA has potential tyrosinase inhibitory activity that can result in skin lightening and may be used to ameliorate hyperpigmentary lesions. PMID:16026582

  5. Effects of Olopatadine Hydrochloride, a Histamine H1 Receptor Antagonist, on Histamine-Induced Skin Responses

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Takashi; Ishii, Norito; Hamada, Takahiro; Dainichi, Teruki; Karashima, Tadashi; Nakama, Takekuni; Yasumoto, Shinichiro

    2010-01-01

    Effects of olopatadine hydrochloride, a histamine H1 receptor antagonist, on histamine-induced skin responses were evaluated in 10 healthy subjects in comparison with placebo, fexofenadine hydrochloride, and bepotastine besilate. Olopatadine significantly suppressed histamine-induced wheal, flare, and itch, starting 30 minutes after oral administration. Olopatadine was more effective than fexofenadine and bepotastine. None of the drugs studied impaired performance of word processing tasks. These results suggest that olopatadine can suppress skin symptoms caused by histamine soon after administration. PMID:20886023

  6. Cutting fluids. Their use and effects on the skin

    SciTech Connect

    Zugerman, C.

    1986-04-01

    Metalworking fluids are liquids that flow or are sprayed over metal that is being altered mechanically or physically. Cutting fluids tend to be alkaline and are often soap-like. As such they denature keratin, defat the skin, and remove water from it, causing dryness, fissures, and frank eczematization. Cutting oil dermatitis is a difficult problem for the involved worker who must continue to support his family despite the presence of this progressive, pruritic, and painful eruption. 25 references.

  7. Radiation effect in mouse skin: Dose fractionation and wound healing

    SciTech Connect

    Gorodetsky, R.; Mou, X.D.; Fisher, D.R.; Taylor, J.M.; Withers, H.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Radiation induced dermal injury was measured by the gain in the physical strength of healing wounds in mouse skin. A sigmoid dose response for the inhibition of wound healing 14 days after surgery was found for single doses of X rays. The sparing of dermal damage from fractionation of the X-ray dose was quantified in terms of the alpha/beta ratio in the linear-quadratic (LQ) model, at a wide range of doses per fraction reaching as low as about 1 Gy. The fit and the appropriateness of the LQ model for the skin wound healing assay was examined with the use of the Fe-plot in which inverse total dose is plotted versus dose per fraction for wound strength isoeffects. The alpha/beta ratio of the skin was about 2.5 Gy (95% confidence of less than +/- 1 Gy) and was appropriate over a dose range of 1 Gy to about 8 Gy. The low alpha/beta value is typical for a late responding tissue. This assay, therefore, has the advantage of measuring and forecasting late radiation responses of the dermis within a short time after irradiation.

  8. Effects of Angiotensin II Receptor Signaling during Skin Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Hikaru; Katagata, Yohtaro; Hozumi, Yutaka; Kondo, Shigeo

    2004-01-01

    The tissue angiotensin (Ang) system, which acts independently of the circulating renin Ang system, is supposed to play an important role in tissue repair in the heart and kidney. In the skin, the role of the system for wound healing has remained to be ascertained. Our study demonstrated that oral administration of selective AngII type-1 receptor (AT1) blocker suppressed keratinocyte re-epithelization and angiogenesis during skin wound healing in rats. Immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis indicated the existence of AT1 and AngII type-2 receptor (AT2) in cultured keratinocytes and myofibroblasts. In a bromodeoxyuridine incorporation study, induction of AT1 signaling enhanced the incorporation into keratinocytes and myofibroblasts. Wound healing migration assays revealed that induction of AT1 signaling accelerated keratinocyte re-epithelization and myofibroblasts recovering. In these experiments, induction of AT2 signaling acted vice versa. Taken together, our study suggests that skin wound healing is regulated by balance of opposing signals between AT1 and AT2. PMID:15509535

  9. The effect of saline iontophoresis on skin integrity in human volunteers. I. Methodology and reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Camel, E; O'Connell, M; Sage, B; Gross, M; Maibach, H

    1996-08-01

    This study, conducted in 36 human volunteers, was an evaluation of the effects of saline iontophoresis on skin temperature, irritation, and barrier function. The major objectives were to assess the effects of low-level ionic currents, to validate the proposed methodology of assessment, and to establish reproducibility in repeated saline iontophoresis applications. This was the first of a multistage study designed to assess the safety of 24-hr saline iontophoresis episodes at selected currents and current densities. Since an iontophoresis patch challenges the skin barrier both by occluding the skin surface and by passing ionic current through the skin, the experimental protocol was designed to permit measurement of the contribution of each of these processes to the overall response. In this first stage we investigated the effect of 10 min of current delivery, at 0.1 mA/cm2 on a 1-cm2 area patch and 0.2 mA/cm2 on a 6.5-cm2 area patch compared to unpowered control patches. Twelve subjects were tested under each condition on two separate occasions to examine reproducibility of the response variable measurements. A further 12 subjects were tested once under the 0.2 mA/cm2, 6.5-cm2 condition. Skin irritation was evaluated via repeated measurements of transepidermal water loss, capacitance, skin temperature, skin color, and a visual scoring system, before the iontophoresis episode and after patch removal. No damage to skin barrier function in terms of skin-water loss or skin-water content was detected. Slight, subclinical, short-lasting erythema was observed for both conditions. Assessment of correlation coefficients showed highly statistically significant indications of reproducibility for all five response variables measured. The experimental design, in combination with a repeated measures analysis, provided clear separation of the occlusion and ionic current components of the iontophoretic patch challenge. Further, the repeated measures analysis gave a highly sensitive

  10. The effect of repeated laser stimuli to ink-marked skin on skin temperature-recommendations for a safe experimental protocol in humans.

    PubMed

    Madden, Victoria J; Catley, Mark J; Grabherr, Luzia; Mazzola, Francesca; Shohag, Mohammad; Moseley, G Lorimer

    2016-01-01

    Background. Nd:YAP laser is widely used to investigate the nociceptive and pain systems, generating perpetual and laser-evoked neurophysiological responses. A major procedural concern for the use of Nd:YAP laser stimuli in experimental research is the risk of skin damage. The absorption of Nd:YAP laser stimuli is greater in darker skin, or in pale skin that has been darkened with ink, prompting some ethics boards to refuse approval to experimenters wishing to track stimulus location by marking the skin with ink. Some research questions, however, require laser stimuli to be delivered at particular locations or within particular zones, a requirement that is very difficult to achieve if marking the skin is not possible. We thoroughly searched the literature for experimental evidence and protocol recommendations for safe delivery of Nd:YAP laser stimuli over marked skin, but found nothing. Methods. We designed an experimental protocol to define safe parameters for the use of Nd:YAP laser stimuli over skin that has been marked with black dots, and used thermal imaging to assess the safety of the procedure at the forearm and the back. Results. Using thermal imaging and repeated laser stimulation to ink-marked skin, we demonstrated that skin temperature did not increase progressively across the course of the experiment, and that the small change in temperature seen at the forearm was reversed during the rest periods between blocks. Furthermore, no participant experienced skin damage due to the procedure. Conclusion. This protocol offers parameters for safe, confident and effective experimentation using repeated Nd:YAP laser on skin marked with ink, thus paving the way for investigations that depend on it. PMID:26793428

  11. The effect of repeated laser stimuli to ink-marked skin on skin temperature—recommendations for a safe experimental protocol in humans

    PubMed Central

    Madden, Victoria J.; Catley, Mark J.; Grabherr, Luzia; Mazzola, Francesca; Shohag, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background. Nd:YAP laser is widely used to investigate the nociceptive and pain systems, generating perpetual and laser-evoked neurophysiological responses. A major procedural concern for the use of Nd:YAP laser stimuli in experimental research is the risk of skin damage. The absorption of Nd:YAP laser stimuli is greater in darker skin, or in pale skin that has been darkened with ink, prompting some ethics boards to refuse approval to experimenters wishing to track stimulus location by marking the skin with ink. Some research questions, however, require laser stimuli to be delivered at particular locations or within particular zones, a requirement that is very difficult to achieve if marking the skin is not possible. We thoroughly searched the literature for experimental evidence and protocol recommendations for safe delivery of Nd:YAP laser stimuli over marked skin, but found nothing. Methods. We designed an experimental protocol to define safe parameters for the use of Nd:YAP laser stimuli over skin that has been marked with black dots, and used thermal imaging to assess the safety of the procedure at the forearm and the back. Results. Using thermal imaging and repeated laser stimulation to ink-marked skin, we demonstrated that skin temperature did not increase progressively across the course of the experiment, and that the small change in temperature seen at the forearm was reversed during the rest periods between blocks. Furthermore, no participant experienced skin damage due to the procedure. Conclusion. This protocol offers parameters for safe, confident and effective experimentation using repeated Nd:YAP laser on skin marked with ink, thus paving the way for investigations that depend on it. PMID:26793428

  12. The effects of equine skin preparation on transdermal drug penetration in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Paul C.; Cross, Sheree E.

    2006-01-01

    An increasing number of formulations are applied to equine skin, yet variable penetration can affect efficacy, or the incidence of adverse effects, or both. To investigate the effects of common methods of skin preparation on transdermal drug penetration in vitro, we clipped, harvested, and froze skin samples from 5 Thoroughbred geldings. Thawed samples were prepared as follows: control (no preparation); cleaned with aqueous chlorhexidine (Aq-C, 0.1% w/v); cleaned with alcoholic chlorhexidine (Al-C, 0.5% w/v); shaved (Sh); or tape-stripped (Ta) with the use of adhesive tape. The samples were then placed in diffusion cells, and 2 g of methylsalicylate (MeSa) gel (Dencorub) was applied to the stratum corneum side. The penetration of MeSa and its analyte, salicylate (Sa), through the skin samples was measured over 10 h. Compared with control skin, significantly more MeSa penetrated through skin prepared with Al-C or Sh (P < 0.01) or with Aq-C or Ta (P < 0.05), and significantly more Sa was recovered in the receptor phase from skin prepared with Aq-C, Al-C, or Sh (P < 0.05) or with Ta (P < 0.01). A significantly higher rate of penetration and shorter lag time were also noted for MeSa with all the prepared skin samples, compared with the control samples. The results show that clinical techniques routinely used to clean or prepare skin can significantly affect the rate and extent of penetration of a topically applied drug. This may result in greater systemic availability of active drug, which could lead to enhanced efficacy and, possibly, a higher incidence of adverse effects. PMID:17042388

  13. The effect of dietary and/or cosmetic argan oil on postmenopausal skin elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Qiraouani Boucetta, Kenza; Charrouf, Zoubida; Aguenaou, Hassan; Derouiche, Abdelfattah; Bensouda, Yahya

    2015-01-01

    Background During menopause, the decrease of estrogenic secretion induces the disruption of skin functioning, thus causing the decline in skin elasticity characteristic of skin aging. The purpose of this study was to evaluate in postmenopausal women the effect of daily consumption and/or application of argan oil on skin elasticity. Materials and methods Sixty postmenopausal women consumed butter during the stabilization period and were randomly divided into two groups for the intervention period: the treatment group of 30 participants received dietary argan oil, the control group of 30 participants received olive oil, and both groups applied cosmetic argan oil in the left volar forearm during a 60-day period. Assessments of skin elasticity parameters, ie, the three R-parameters (R2 or gross-elasticity of the skin, R5 or net elasticity of the skin, and R7 or biological elasticity), and the resonance running time (RRT) at both volar forearms of the two groups were performed during three visits: before starting oils consumption and application, after 30 days of oils consumption and application, and after 60 days of oils consumption and application. Results The consumption of argan oil led to a significant increase of gross-elasticity of the skin (R2) (P<0.001), net elasticity of the skin (R5) (P<0.001), biological elasticity (R7) (P<0.001), and a significant decrease of RRT (P=0.002). The application of argan oil led to a significant increase of gross-elasticity of the skin (R2) (P<0.001), net elasticity of the skin (R5) (P<0.001), biological elasticity (R7) (P=0.001), and a significant decrease of RRT (P<0.001). Conclusion Our findings suggest that the daily consumption and/or topical application of argan oil have an anti-aging effect on the skin demonstrated by the improvement of skin elasticity, characterized by an increase of R-parameters (R2, R5, and R7) and a decrease of RRT. PMID:25673976

  14. Skin-whitening and skin-condition-improving effects of topical oxidized glutathione: a double-blind and placebo-controlled clinical trial in healthy women

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Fumiko; Hashizume, Erika; Chan, Gertrude P; Kamimura, Ayako

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Glutathione is a tripeptide consisting of cysteine, glycine, and glutamate and functions as a major antioxidant. It is synthesized endogenously in humans. Glutathione protects thiol protein groups from oxidation and is involved in cellular detoxification for maintenance of the cell environment. Reduced glutathione (GSH) has a skin-whitening effect in humans through its tyrosinase inhibitory activity, but in the case of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) this effect is unclear. We examined the skin-whitening and skin-condition effects of topical GSSG in healthy women. Subjects and methods The subjects were 30 healthy adult women aged 30 to 50 years. The study design was a randomized, double-blind, matched-pair, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Subjects applied GSSG 2% (weight/weight [w/w]) lotion to one side of the face and a placebo lotion to the other side twice daily for 10 weeks. We objectively measured changes in melanin index values, moisture content of the stratum corneum, smoothness, wrinkle formation, and elasticity of the skin. The principal investigator and each subject also used subjective scores to investigate skin whitening, wrinkle reduction, and smoothness. Analysis of variance was used to evaluate differences between groups. Results The skin melanin index was significantly lower with GSSG treatment than with placebo from the early weeks after the start of the trial through to the end of the study period (at 10 weeks, P<0.001). In addition, in the latter half of the study period GSSG-treated sites had significant increases in moisture content of the stratum corneum, suppression of wrinkle formation, and improvement in skin smoothness. There were no marked adverse effects from GSSG application. Conclusion Topical GSSG is safe and effectively whitens the skin and improves skin condition in healthy women. PMID:25378941

  15. Effects of skin blood flow and temperature on skin--electrode impedance and offset potential: measurements at low alternating current density.

    PubMed

    Smith, D C

    1992-01-01

    Skin--electrode impedance was determined at 100 Hz and 1 kHz between two disposable electrodes, 5 cm apart, at current densities < 65 microA.cm-2. Measurements were made on the volar skin of the forearm during cooling on cardiopulmonary bypass, and on the dorsum of the foot in the absence of skin blood flow during aortic aneurysm repair. Both the resistive and reactive components of the skin-electrode impedence showed an inverse linear relationship to temperature between 26 and 36 degrees C. The magnitude of the impedance change was different for each patient studied; resistance changes ranged from 0.03 to 23.2 k omega. Degrees C-1 at 100 Hz and from 0.03 to 2.7 k omega. Degrees C-1 at 1 kHz, while reactance changes ranged from 0.4 to 2.1 k omega. Degrees C-1 at 100 Hz and from 0.04 to 0.18 k omega. Degrees C-1 at 1 kHz. Changes in skin-electrode impedance were not due to changes in skin blood flow. There was no consistent change in offset potential with temperature. Although the skin-electrode impedance increases as temperature falls, it is concluded that temperature effects at the skin-electrode interface are not responsible for the observed failure of evoked electromyography during clinical monitoring of neuromuscular function. PMID:1404312

  16. The Effect of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells on Full-Thickness Skin Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Haojie; Huang, Hong; Chen, Deyun; Han, Yan; Han, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of ASCs on full-thickness skin grafts. Specifically, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of ASCs that are mediated via regulation of the phenotypes of activated macrophages. Methods. ASCs were isolated, cultured, and injected under full-thickness skin grafts in 15 rats (ASC group). An additional 15 rats served as controls (PBS group). Skin graft survival assessment and vascularization detection were assessed with H&E staining and laser Doppler blood flowmetry (LDF). The effects of ASCs on angiogenesis, anti-inflammation, collagen accumulation-promoting, and antiscarring were assessed. Results. We found that the skin graft survival rate was significantly increased in the ASC group. The neovascularization, collagen deposition, collagen type I to type III ratio, and levels of VEGF and TGF-β3 in the ASC group were markedly higher than those in the PBS group at day 14. Additionally, in the ASC group, the levels of iNOS, IL-1β, and TNF-α were remarkably decreased, whereas the levels of IL-10 and Arg-1 were substantially increased. Conclusions. Our results confirm that ASCs transplantation can effectively improve full-thickness skin graft survival. Additionally, the anti-inflammatory role of ASCs may indirectly contribute to skin graft survival via its effect on macrophage polarization. PMID:27413735

  17. The Effect of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells on Full-Thickness Skin Grafts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Hao, Haojie; Huang, Hong; Chen, Deyun; Han, Yan; Han, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of ASCs on full-thickness skin grafts. Specifically, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of ASCs that are mediated via regulation of the phenotypes of activated macrophages. Methods. ASCs were isolated, cultured, and injected under full-thickness skin grafts in 15 rats (ASC group). An additional 15 rats served as controls (PBS group). Skin graft survival assessment and vascularization detection were assessed with H&E staining and laser Doppler blood flowmetry (LDF). The effects of ASCs on angiogenesis, anti-inflammation, collagen accumulation-promoting, and antiscarring were assessed. Results. We found that the skin graft survival rate was significantly increased in the ASC group. The neovascularization, collagen deposition, collagen type I to type III ratio, and levels of VEGF and TGF-β3 in the ASC group were markedly higher than those in the PBS group at day 14. Additionally, in the ASC group, the levels of iNOS, IL-1β, and TNF-α were remarkably decreased, whereas the levels of IL-10 and Arg-1 were substantially increased. Conclusions. Our results confirm that ASCs transplantation can effectively improve full-thickness skin graft survival. Additionally, the anti-inflammatory role of ASCs may indirectly contribute to skin graft survival via its effect on macrophage polarization. PMID:27413735

  18. Photo- and gas-tuned, reversible thermoelectric properties and anomalous photo-thermoelectric effects of platinum-loaded tungsten trioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kenta; Watanabe, Takuya; Kakemoto, Hirofumi; Irie, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    We report the photo- and gas-controllable properties of platinum-loaded tungsten trioxide (Pt/WO3), which is of interest for developing practical applications of WO3 as well as for interpreting such phenomena from scientific viewpoints. Here, a Pt/WO3 thin film generated a thermoelectric power due to the ultraviolet-light-induced band-gap excitation (photochromic (PC) reaction) and/or dark storage in formic acid vapor (gaschromic (GC) reaction) in the absence of O2, resulting from the generation of W5+ ions. After such chromic reactions, the electrical conductivity (σ) is increased, whereas the absolute value of the Seebeck coefficient (S) is decreased. The changes in σ and S and their rate of change for consistency increased in the order of: during the PC reaction < during the GC reaction < during simultaneous PC and GC reactions. The opposite behaviors, a decrease in σ and an increase in S, were exhibited by Pt/WO3 in the presence of O2 after dark storage or visible-light irradiation. This reversible cycle could be repeated. Moreover, anomalous, nontrivial photo-thermoelectric effects (a photoconductive effect (photoconductivity, σphoto) and a photo-Seebeck effect (photo-Seebeck coefficient, Sphoto)) were also detected in response to the visible-light irradiation of Pt/WO3 in the absence of O2 after chromic reactions. Under visible-light irradiation, both σphoto and the absolute value of Sphoto are increased. After the irradiation, both values were decreased, that is, σ and the absolute value of S were smaller than σphoto and the absolute value of Sphoto, respectively. These effects are likely to be due to the photoinduced charge carriers and the accumulated electrons in Pt contributing to the increase in σphoto. In addition, electrons are extracted from the W5+ state, decreasing the number of W5+ in HxWO3 and thus contributing to the increase in Sphoto. After light irradiation, the accumulated electrons in Pt are returned to the energetically favorable W

  19. Effect of boundary conditions on the classical skin depth and nonlocal behavior in inductively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rehman, Aman-ur; Pu Yikang

    2005-09-15

    When the finiteness of plasma geometry is taken into account, the expression for classical skin depth is different from the one obtained for an unbounded plasma (for both the planar and cylindrical geometries). This change in the expression of the classical skin depth also changes the nonlocality parameter, which is defined as the square of the ratio of the effective mean free path to the classical skin depth. It is concluded that it is the compactness of the geometry due to the metallic boundary condition (E=0) that impacts nonlocal heating (particularly in the low-frequency regime) rather than the shape of the geometry.

  20. Berry phase mechanism of the anomalous Hall effect in a disordered two-dimensional magnetic semiconductor structure

    PubMed Central

    Oveshnikov, L. N.; Kulbachinskii, V. A.; Davydov, A. B.; Aronzon, B. A.; Rozhansky, I. V.; Averkiev, N. S.; Kugel, K. I.; Tripathi, V.

    2015-01-01

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE) arises from the interplay of spin-orbit interactions and ferromagnetic order and is a potentially useful probe of electron spin polarization, especially in nanoscale systems where direct measurement is not feasible. While AHE is rather well-understood in metallic ferromagnets, much less is known about the relevance of different physical mechanisms governing AHE in insulators. As ferromagnetic insulators, but not metals, lend themselves to gate-control of electron spin polarization, understanding AHE in the insulating state is valuable from the point of view of spintronic applications. Among the mechanisms proposed in the literature for AHE in insulators, the one related to a geometric (Berry) phase effect has been elusive in past studies. The recent discovery of quantized AHE in magnetically doped topological insulators - essentially a Berry phase effect - provides strong additional motivation to undertake more careful search for geometric phase effects in AHE in the magnetic semiconductors. Here we report our experiments on the temperature and magnetic field dependences of AHE in insulating, strongly-disordered two-dimensional Mn delta-doped semiconductor heterostructures in the hopping regime. In particular, it is shown that at sufficiently low temperatures, the mechanism of AHE related to the Berry phase is favoured. PMID:26596472

  1. Berry phase mechanism of the anomalous Hall effect in a disordered two-dimensional magnetic semiconductor structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oveshnikov, L. N.; Kulbachinskii, V. A.; Davydov, A. B.; Aronzon, B. A.; Rozhansky, I. V.; Averkiev, N. S.; Kugel, K. I.; Tripathi, V.

    2015-11-01

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE) arises from the interplay of spin-orbit interactions and ferromagnetic order and is a potentially useful probe of electron spin polarization, especially in nanoscale systems where direct measurement is not feasible. While AHE is rather well-understood in metallic ferromagnets, much less is known about the relevance of different physical mechanisms governing AHE in insulators. As ferromagnetic insulators, but not metals, lend themselves to gate-control of electron spin polarization, understanding AHE in the insulating state is valuable from the point of view of spintronic applications. Among the mechanisms proposed in the literature for AHE in insulators, the one related to a geometric (Berry) phase effect has been elusive in past studies. The recent discovery of quantized AHE in magnetically doped topological insulators - essentially a Berry phase effect - provides strong additional motivation to undertake more careful search for geometric phase effects in AHE in the magnetic semiconductors. Here we report our experiments on the temperature and magnetic field dependences of AHE in insulating, strongly-disordered two-dimensional Mn delta-doped semiconductor heterostructures in the hopping regime. In particular, it is shown that at sufficiently low temperatures, the mechanism of AHE related to the Berry phase is favoured.

  2. Berry phase mechanism of the anomalous Hall effect in a disordered two-dimensional magnetic semiconductor structure.

    PubMed

    Oveshnikov, L N; Kulbachinskii, V A; Davydov, A B; Aronzon, B A; Rozhansky, I V; Averkiev, N S; Kugel, K I; Tripathi, V

    2015-01-01

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE) arises from the interplay of spin-orbit interactions and ferromagnetic order and is a potentially useful probe of electron spin polarization, especially in nanoscale systems where direct measurement is not feasible. While AHE is rather well-understood in metallic ferromagnets, much less is known about the relevance of different physical mechanisms governing AHE in insulators. As ferromagnetic insulators, but not metals, lend themselves to gate-control of electron spin polarization, understanding AHE in the insulating state is valuable from the point of view of spintronic applications. Among the mechanisms proposed in the literature for AHE in insulators, the one related to a geometric (Berry) phase effect has been elusive in past studies. The recent discovery of quantized AHE in magnetically doped topological insulators - essentially a Berry phase effect - provides strong additional motivation to undertake more careful search for geometric phase effects in AHE in the magnetic semiconductors. Here we report our experiments on the temperature and magnetic field dependences of AHE in insulating, strongly-disordered two-dimensional Mn delta-doped semiconductor heterostructures in the hopping regime. In particular, it is shown that at sufficiently low temperatures, the mechanism of AHE related to the Berry phase is favoured. PMID:26596472

  3. Berry phase mechanism of the anomalous Hall effect in a disordered two-dimensional magnetic semiconductor structure.

    SciTech Connect

    Oveshnikov, L. N.; Kulbachinskii, V. A.; Davydov, A. B.; Aronzon, B. A.; Rozhansky, I. V.; Averkiev, N. S.; Kugel, K. I.; Tripathi, V.

    2015-11-24

    In this study, the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) arises from the interplay of spin-orbit interactions and ferromagnetic order and is a potentially useful probe of electron spin polarization, especially in nanoscale systems where direct measurement is not feasible. While AHE is rather well-understood in metallic ferromagnets, much less is known about the relevance of different physical mechanisms governing AHE in insulators. As ferromagnetic insulators, but not metals, lend themselves to gatecontrol of electron spin polarization, understanding AHE in the insulating state is valuable from the point of view of spintronic applications. Among the mechanisms proposed in the literature for AHE in insulators, the one related to a geometric (Berry) phase effect has been elusive in past studies. The recent discovery of quantized AHE in magnetically doped topological insulators - essentially a Berry phase effect - provides strong additional motivation to undertake more careful search for geometric phase effects in AHE in the magnetic semiconductors. Here we report our experiments on the temperature and magnetic field dependences of AHE in insulating, strongly-disordered two-dimensional Mn delta-doped semiconductor heterostructures in the hopping regime. In particular, it is shown that at sufficiently low temperatures, the mechanism of AHE related to the Berry phase is favoured.

  4. Berry phase mechanism of the anomalous Hall effect in a disordered two-dimensional magnetic semiconductor structure.

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Oveshnikov, L. N.; Kulbachinskii, V. A.; Davydov, A. B.; Aronzon, B. A.; Rozhansky, I. V.; Averkiev, N. S.; Kugel, K. I.; Tripathi, V.

    2015-11-24

    In this study, the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) arises from the interplay of spin-orbit interactions and ferromagnetic order and is a potentially useful probe of electron spin polarization, especially in nanoscale systems where direct measurement is not feasible. While AHE is rather well-understood in metallic ferromagnets, much less is known about the relevance of different physical mechanisms governing AHE in insulators. As ferromagnetic insulators, but not metals, lend themselves to gatecontrol of electron spin polarization, understanding AHE in the insulating state is valuable from the point of view of spintronic applications. Among the mechanisms proposed in the literature for AHEmore » in insulators, the one related to a geometric (Berry) phase effect has been elusive in past studies. The recent discovery of quantized AHE in magnetically doped topological insulators - essentially a Berry phase effect - provides strong additional motivation to undertake more careful search for geometric phase effects in AHE in the magnetic semiconductors. Here we report our experiments on the temperature and magnetic field dependences of AHE in insulating, strongly-disordered two-dimensional Mn delta-doped semiconductor heterostructures in the hopping regime. In particular, it is shown that at sufficiently low temperatures, the mechanism of AHE related to the Berry phase is favoured.« less

  5. The role of the skin barrier in modulating the effects of common skin microbial species on the inflammation, differentiation and proliferation status of epidermal keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Skin resident microbial species are often thought of either as pathogenic or commensal. However, little is known about the role of the skin barrier in modulating their potential for causing disease. To investigate this question we measured the effects of three microbial species commonly found on the skin (Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Propionibacterium acnes) on a reconstructed human epidermal model by either applying the bacteria on the model surface (intact barrier) or adding them to the culture medium (simulating barrier breach). Results When added to the medium, all of the tested species induced inflammatory responses and keratinocyte cell death with species-specific potency. P. acnes and S. epidermidis induced specific alterations in the expression of keratinocyte differentiation and proliferation markers, suggesting a barrier reparation response. S. aureus induced complete keratinocyte cell death. On the contrary, topically applied S. epidermidis and P. acnes caused no inflammatory response even when tested at high concentrations, while topical S. aureus induced a weak reaction. None of the tested species were able to alter the expression of keratinocyte differentiation or expression markers, when applied topically. Conclusions We show that the skin barrier prevents the effects of common skin bacteria on epidermal keratinocyte inflammation, differentiation and proliferation and highlight the importance of skin barrier in defending against the pathogenic effects of common skin bacteria. PMID:24245826

  6. Skin turgor

    MedlinePlus

    Doughy skin; Poor skin turgor; Good skin turgor; Decreased skin turgor ... Call your health care provider if: Poor skin turgor occurs with vomiting, diarrhea, or fever. The skin is very slow to return to normal, or the skin "tents" up ...

  7. Flavanone silibinin treatment attenuates nitrogen mustard-induced toxic effects in mouse skin

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Anil K.; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Inturi, Swetha; Kumar, Dileep; Orlicky, David J.; Agarwal, Chapla; White, Carl W.; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2015-05-15

    Currently, there is no effective antidote to prevent skin injuries by sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM), which are vesicating agents with potential relevance to chemical warfare, terrorist attacks, or industrial/laboratory accidents. Our earlier report has demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of silibinin, a natural flavanone, in reversing monofunctional alkylating SM analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide-induced toxic effects in mouse skin. To translate this effect to a bifunctional alkylating vesicant, herein, efficacy studies were carried out with NM. Topical application of silibinin (1 or 2 mg) 30 min after NM exposure on the dorsal skin of male SKH-1 hairless mice significantly decreased NM-induced toxic lesions at 24, 72 or 120 h post-exposure. Specifically, silibinin treatment resulted in dose-dependent reduction of NM-induced increase in epidermal thickness, dead and denuded epidermis, parakeratosis and microvesication. Higher silibinin dose also caused a 79% and 51%reversal in NM-induced increases in myeloperoxidase activity and COX-2 levels, respectively. Furthermore, silibinin completely prevented NM-induced H2A.X phosphorylation, indicating reversal of DNA damage which could be an oxidative DNA damage as evidenced by high levels of 8-oxodG in NM-exposed mouse skin that was significantly reversed by silibinin. Together, these findings suggest that attenuation of NM-induced skin injury by silibinin is due to its effects on the pathways associated with DNA damage, inflammation, vesication and oxidative stress. In conclusion, results presented here support the optimization of silibinin as an effective treatment of skin injury by vesicants. - Highlights: • Silibinin treatment attenuated nitrogen mustard (NM)-induced skin injury. • Silibinin affects pathways associated with DNA damage, inflammation and vesication. • The efficacy of silibinin could also be associated with oxidative stress. • These results support testing and optimization of

  8. Landau Damping and Anomalous Skin Effect in Low-pressure Gas Discharges: Self-consistent Treatment of Collisionless Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Oleg V. Polomarov; Constantine E. Theodosiou

    2004-01-30

    In low-pressure discharges, where the electron mean free path is larger or comparable with the discharge length, the electron dynamics is essentially nonlocal. Moreover, the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) deviates considerably from a Maxwellian. Therefore, an accurate kinetic description of the low-pressure discharges requires knowledge of the nonlocal conductivity operator and calculation of the non-Maxwellian EEDF. The previous treatments made use of simplifying assumptions: a uniform density profile and a Maxwellian EEDF. In the present study a self-consistent system of equations for the kinetic description of nonlocal, nonuniform, nearly collisionless plasmas of low-pressure discharges is reported. It consists of the nonlocal conductivity operator and the averaged kinetic equation for calculation of the non-Maxwellian EEDF. This system was applied to the calculation of collisionless heating in capacitively and inductively coupled plasmas. In particular, the importance of accounting for the nonuniform plasma density profile for computing the current density profile and the EEDF is demonstrated. The enhancement of collisionless heating due to the bounce resonance between the electron motion in the potential well and the external radio-frequency electric field is investigated. It is shown that a nonlinear and self-consistent treatment is necessary for the correct description of collisionless heating.

  9. Effect of lipopolysaccharide on the biological characteristics of human skin fibroblasts and hypertrophic scar tissue formation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongming; Hu, Chao; Li, Fengyu; Liang, Liming; Liu, Lingying

    2013-06-01

    Burn injury-mediated destruction of the skin barrier normally induces microbial invasion, in turn leading to the development of systemic infection and occasional septic shock by the release of endotoxins. The objective of this work was to study the influence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the biological characteristics of normal skin fibroblasts and to elucidate the influence of LPS in the initial stage of skin wound healing. Twenty patients with hypertrophic scar in proliferative stage were selected randomly and primary cultures were established from fibroblasts derived from their hypertrophic scar tissue and normal skin. Normal skin fibroblasts of passage 3 were stimulated with different concentrations of LPS. LPS stimulated the proliferation and collagen synthesis of fibroblasts within a certain extent of concentrations (0.005-0.5 μg/mL) (P < 0.05), whereas at a concentration of 1 μg/mL inhibited the proliferation and collagen synthesis of fibroblasts (P < 0.05). Collagen synthesis by normal skin fibroblasts after LPS stimulation mimicked those derived from hypertrophic scar tissue. LPS of 0.1 μg/mL had significant effect on normal skin fibroblasts-continuous passage of these fibroblasts resulted in ultrastructural pattern similar to fibroblasts derived from hypertrophic scar tissue, and the findings was substantiated by hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry detection of proliferation cell nuclear antigen, type I procollagen and α-smooth muscle actin. Our results suggest that LPS might convert normal skin fibroblasts to hypertrophic scar tissue fibroblasts and participate in the formation of hypertrophic scar; hence, appropriate concentration of LPS may have no effect or be beneficial to skin wound healing, whereas excessive concentration of LPS may delay the time of wound healing. PMID:23653386

  10. Effect of perorally administered pivmecillinam on the normal oropharyngeal, intestinal and skin microflora.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, A; Edlund, C; Svenungsson, B; Emtestam, L; Nord, C E

    2001-06-01

    To study the ecological effects of pivmecillinam on the human oropharyngeal, intestinal and skin microflora, 15 healthy volunteers were given pivmecillinam tablets 400 mg twice daily for 7 days. Saliva, stool and skin specimens were taken before (days -3 and 0) and on the 2nd, 4th and 7th days during the administration period and 14 and 21 days after the start of administration. Mecillinam caused no major changes in the aerobic or anaerobic oropharyngeal microflora. In the aerobic intestinal microflora there was a decrease in the numbers of Escherichia coli while no changes occurred in the anaerobic microflora. In the skin microflora there was a transient decrease in the numbers of Propionibacterium spp. underneath the wing of the nose. The major effect of pivmecillinam was seen on E. coli and to some extent on Propionibacterium spp. No further ecological disturbances were noticed in the oropharyngeal, intestinal or skin microflora. PMID:11450889

  11. The subjective assessment of the effect and satisfaction with dermocosmetics use by patients with skin disturbances

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Atopic dermatitis and different constellations and the severity of symptoms that not meet the criteria for this diagnosis are a common skin disturbances. An important component of the treatment of these diseases and the proper care of sensitive and dry skin is local dermocosmetics use. Aim To assess the frequency of skin disturbances and the effect and satisfaction with Atoperal products use as well as the source of information about these products. Material and methods A questionnaire survey about the type of skin disturbances, the subjective assessment of the effect and satisfaction with Atoperal products use and source of information about these products was performed by 787 general practitioners, internists, pediatricians, dermatologists, allergists and pulmonologists and 252 pharmacists in a group of 51 085 subjects with skin disturbances. Results In the group interviewed by doctors, the most common skin problem was atopic dermatitis (52.5%) and in the group interviewed by pharmacists, pruritus (70.0%). In both groups, respondents after Atoperal products use most frequently reported improving of the skin hydration and greasiness of the skin and reduction of itching. In both groups, over 90.0% of respondents were satisfied or very satisfied with Atoperal products use. In the group surveyed by doctors, 75.5% of respondents obtained information about these products from doctors and 17.4% from pharmacists, while in the group surveyed by pharmacists, 48.9% from pharmacists and 36.1% from doctors. Conclusions Atopic dermatitis was most frequently diagnosed in a group surveyed by doctors. The main skin disturbance that occurred in a group surveyed by pharmacists was skin pruritus. The main effect of Atoperal products use, independent of the place of the survey, included improving of skin hydration and greasiness of the skin and reduction of itching. In a study population, there was a high level of satisfaction from the use of Atoperal products. Doctors

  12. Effects of eight vehicles on transdermal lidocaine penetration in sheep skin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bayldon, W; Narishetty, S; De Rose, G; Rothwell, J; Mills, P C

    2014-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of vehicles on penetration and retention of lidocaine applied to sheep skin in vitro. Thoracic skin from two sheep was clipped of wool and stored at -20 °C, until used. Skin samples were defrosted and mounted in Franz-type diffusion cells, and then one of the following formulations, each saturated with lidocaine, was added: sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) 0.5% in water, SLS 1% in water, dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) 50% in water (wt/wt), DMSO 100%, isopropyl myristate 100% (IPM), water alone, diethylene glycol monoethyl ether (DGME) 50% in water (wt/wt) and DGME 100%. The penetration of lidocaine in each skin sample was measured over 8 h. Significantly greater lidocaine skin concentrations and flux (J(SS)) were achieved with the nonaqueous vehicles, DMSO 100% (P < 0.00001 and P < 0.01, respectively), followed by DGME 100% and IPM (P < 0.00001 and P < 0.01, respectively). The lag time (t(lag)) for lidocaine penetration in the DMSO 100% vehicle was significantly shorter (P < 0.01) compared with all other vehicles except water. Improved transdermal penetration of lidocaine in the DMSO 100% vehicle was likely due to skin barrier disruption, as determined by differences in pre- and post-treatment transepidermal water loss (TEWL). This study has shown that nonaqueous vehicles enhanced penetration of lidocaine in sheep skin to a greater extent than aqueous vehicles, which has implications for topically applied local anaesthesia in sheep. PMID:23980624

  13. Effects of some terpenes on the in vitro permeation of LHRH through newborn pig skin.

    PubMed

    Songkro, S; Rades, T; Becket, G

    2009-02-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of oxygen containing terpenes (carvacrol, menthol and carvone) at 5%w/v in hydroalcoholic mixtures (40% ethanol) on the permeation of LHRH across newborn pig skin in vitro. In addition, the amount of LHRH retained in the skin after 24 h of diffusion was determined. It was found that the passive permeation of LHRH was very limited. Although percutaneous absorption of LHRH improved in the presence of the enhancers, a significant enhancement was observed only with carvacrol, an aromatic terpene. The rank order of enhancement ratio for skin permeation was found to be carvacrol > carvone > menthol. The enhancers also affected the retention of LHRH in the skin. The rank order of enhancement ratio for skin retention was carvone > carvacrol > menthol. The results of the in vitro skin metabolism study of LHRH using fresh newborn pig skin showed that the degradation products were detected and the amount of the degraded LHRH increased with increasing duration of incubation time. PMID:19320284

  14. Effect of skin hydration on the dynamics of fingertip gripping contact

    PubMed Central

    André, T.; Lévesque, V.; Hayward, V.; Lefèvre, P.; Thonnard, J.-L.

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of fingertip contact manifest themselves in the complex skin movements observed during the transition from a stuck state to a fully developed slip. While investigating this transition, we found that it depended on skin hydration. To quantify this dependency, we asked subjects to slide their index fingertip on a glass surface while keeping the normal component of the interaction force constant with the help of visual feedback. Skin deformation inside the contact region was imaged with an optical apparatus that allowed us to quantify the relative sizes of the slipping and sticking regions. The ratio of the stuck skin area to the total contact area decreased linearly from 1 to 0 when the tangential force component increased from 0 to a maximum. The slope of this relationship was inversely correlated to the normal force component. The skin hydration level dramatically affected the dynamics of the contact encapsulated in the course of evolution from sticking to slipping. The specific effect was to reduce the tendency of a contact to slip, regardless of the variations of the coefficient of friction. Since grips were more unstable under dry skin conditions, our results suggest that the nervous system responds to dry skin by exaggerated grip forces that cannot be simply explained by a change in the coefficient of friction. PMID:21490002

  15. Influence of an anomalous dimension effect on thermal instability in amorphous-InGaZnO thin-film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Kuan-Hsien; Chou, Wu-Ching E-mail: wuchingchou@mail.nctu.edu.tw; Chang, Ting-Chang E-mail: wuchingchou@mail.nctu.edu.tw; Chen, Hua-Mao; Tai, Ya-Hsiang; Tsai, Ming-Yen; Hung, Pei-Hua; Chu, Ann-Kuo; Wu, Ming-Siou; Hung, Yi-Syuan; Hsieh, Tien-Yu; Yeh, Bo-Liang

    2014-10-21

    This paper investigates abnormal dimension-dependent thermal instability in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors. Device dimension should theoretically have no effects on threshold voltage, except for in short channel devices. Unlike short channel drain-induced source barrier lowering effect, threshold voltage increases with increasing drain voltage. Furthermore, for devices with either a relatively large channel width or a short channel length, the output drain current decreases instead of saturating with an increase in drain voltage. Moreover, the wider the channel and the shorter the channel length, the larger the threshold voltage and output on-state current degradation that is observed. Because of the surrounding oxide and other thermal insulating material and the low thermal conductivity of the IGZO layer, the self-heating effect will be pronounced in wider/shorter channel length devices and those with a larger operating drain bias. To further clarify the physical mechanism, fast I{sub D}-V{sub G} and modulated peak/base pulse time I{sub D}-V{sub D} measurements are utilized to demonstrate the self-heating induced anomalous dimension-dependent threshold voltage variation and on-state current degradation.

  16. Influence of an anomalous dimension effect on thermal instability in amorphous-InGaZnO thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kuan-Hsien; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chou, Wu-Ching; Chen, Hua-Mao; Tsai, Ming-Yen; Wu, Ming-Siou; Hung, Yi-Syuan; Hung, Pei-Hua; Hsieh, Tien-Yu; Tai, Ya-Hsiang; Chu, Ann-Kuo; Yeh, Bo-Liang

    2014-10-01

    This paper investigates abnormal dimension-dependent thermal instability in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors. Device dimension should theoretically have no effects on threshold voltage, except for in short channel devices. Unlike short channel drain-induced source barrier lowering effect, threshold voltage increases with increasing drain voltage. Furthermore, for devices with either a relatively large channel width or a short channel length, the output drain current decreases instead of saturating with an increase in drain voltage. Moreover, the wider the channel and the shorter the channel length, the larger the threshold voltage and output on-state current degradation that is observed. Because of the surrounding oxide and other thermal insulating material and the low thermal conductivity of the IGZO layer, the self-heating effect will be pronounced in wider/shorter channel length devices and those with a larger operating drain bias. To further clarify the physical mechanism, fast ID-VG and modulated peak/base pulse time ID-VD measurements are utilized to demonstrate the self-heating induced anomalous dimension-dependent threshold voltage variation and on-state current degradation.

  17. Quantum anomalous Hall effect and a nontrivial spin-texture in ultra-thin films of magnetic topological insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Duong, Le Quy; Das, Tanmoy; Feng, Y. P.; Lin, Hsin

    2015-05-07

    We study the evolution of quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect for a Z{sub 2} topological insulator (TI) thin films in a proximity induced magnetic phase by a realistic layered k·p model with interlayer coupling. We examine three different magnetic configurations in which ferromagnetic (FM) layer(s) is added either from one side (FM-TI), from both sides (FM-TI-FM), or homogeneously distributed (magnetically doped) in a TI slab. We map out the thickness-dependent topological phase diagram under various experimental conditions. The critical magnetic exchange energy for the emergence of QAH effect in the latter two cases decreases monotonically with increasing number of quintuple layers (QLs), while it becomes surprisingly independent of the film thickness in the former case. The gap size of the emergent QAH insulator depends on the non-magnetic “parent” gap of the TI thin film and is tuned by the FM exchange energy, opening a versatile possibility to achieve room-temperature QAH insulator in various topological nanomaterials. Finally, we find that the emergent spin-texture in the QAH effect is very unconventional, non-“hedgehog” type; and it exhibits a chiral out-of-plane spin-flip texture within the same valence band which is reminiscent of dynamical “skyrmion” pattern, except our results are in the momentum space.

  18. Quantum anomalous Hall effect and a nontrivial spin-texture in ultra-thin films of magnetic topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, Le Quy; Das, Tanmoy; Feng, Y. P.; Lin, Hsin

    2015-05-01

    We study the evolution of quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect for a Z2 topological insulator (TI) thin films in a proximity induced magnetic phase by a realistic layered k.p model with interlayer coupling. We examine three different magnetic configurations in which ferromagnetic (FM) layer(s) is added either from one side (FM-TI), from both sides (FM-TI-FM), or homogeneously distributed (magnetically doped) in a TI slab. We map out the thickness-dependent topological phase diagram under various experimental conditions. The critical magnetic exchange energy for the emergence of QAH effect in the latter two cases decreases monotonically with increasing number of quintuple layers (QLs), while it becomes surprisingly independent of the film thickness in the former case. The gap size of the emergent QAH insulator depends on the non-magnetic "parent" gap of the TI thin film and is tuned by the FM exchange energy, opening a versatile possibility to achieve room-temperature QAH insulator in various topological nanomaterials. Finally, we find that the emergent spin-texture in the QAH effect is very unconventional, non-"hedgehog" type; and it exhibits a chiral out-of-plane spin-flip texture within the same valence band which is reminiscent of dynamical "skyrmion" pattern, except our results are in the momentum space.

  19. Cytotoxic Effects of the Ethanol Bane Skin Extract in Human Prostate Cancer Pc3 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Maryam; Kazerouni, Faranak; Namaki, Saeed; Darbandi Tamijani, Hassan; Rahimipour, Hooman; Boroumand, Nasrin; Barghi, Siyamak; Ebrahimi, Nazanin; Gheibi Hayat, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is extensively supposed that vegetarian diet could affect cancer progress and increase the influence of formal chemotherapy. Objectives: The present study was designed to determine the effect of the ethanol Bane skin extract against chemo resistant prostate cancer PC3 cells. Materials and Methods: PC3 and L929 cells were cultivated and then incubated in the ethanol Bane skin extract with various concentrations of 0.78, 1.5, 3.13, 6.25, 12.5 mg/mL in 3 times 24, 48, 72 hours. Cytotoxic effect of the ethanol Bane skin extract on PC3 and L929 cells was examined by MTT assay after 24, 48, and 72 hours. Morphology of PC3 cells was evaluated by Gimsa staining. Results: The ethanol Bane skin extract inhibited proliferation and caused cell death with IC50 values of 2.8 mg/mL on PC3 cells and the IC50 was 6.1 mg/mL on l929 cells. Morphological changes and apoptotic bodies were observed in PC3 cells faced with the ethanol Bane skin extract by staining with Gimsa. Conclusions: The ethanol Bane skin extract could repress the growth of PC3 cell line. This inhibitory effect of the Bane extract depended on the dose and the time on PC3. The result of this study shows that the ethanol Bane skin extract includes photochemical and inhibitory function against proliferation and inducer of apoptosis in human prostate cancer PC3 cells and also has less cytotoxic effect on l929 than PC3 cells. The ethanol Bane skin extract might be a good candidate for the new herbal anticancer drug. PMID:27482333

  20. Calcipotriol delivery into the skin as emulgel for effective permeation

    PubMed Central

    Naga Sravan Kumar Varma, V.; Maheshwari, P.V.; Navya, M.; Reddy, Sharath Chandra; Shivakumar, H.G.; Gowda, D.V.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work is to formulate and evaluate an emulgel containing calcipotriol for treatment of psoriasis. Emulgels have emerged as a promising drug delivery system for the delivery of hydrophobic drugs. Isopropyl alcohol and polyethylene glycol have been employed as permeation enhancers. Formulation chart is made with seven formulations, evaluated for physical parameters, drug content, viscosity, thixotropy, spreadability, extrudability, mucoadhesion, diffusion studies, skin irritation test along with short term stability studies. Carbopolis is reported to have a direct influence on appearance and viscosity of final formulation. The photomicroscopic evaluations showed the presence of spherical globules in size range of 10–15 μm. Rheograms revealed that all the formulations exhibited pseudoplastic flow. Optimized formulation (F6) had shown 86.42 ± 2.0% drug release at the end of 8 h study. The release rate through dialysis membrane and rat skin is higher when compared to commercial calcipotriol ointment. Hence it is concluded that calcipotriol can be delivered topically with enhanced penetration properties when formulated as emulgel. PMID:25561873

  1. Tocopheryl acetate nanoemulsions stabilized with lipid-polymer hybrid emulsifiers for effective skin delivery.

    PubMed

    Nam, Yoon Sung; Kim, Jin-Woong; Park, Jaeyoon; Shim, Jongwon; Lee, Jong Suk; Han, Sang Hoon

    2012-06-01

    Tocopheryl acetate is used as the oil component of nanoemulsions using a mixture of unsaturated phospholipids and polyethylene oxide-block-poly(ε-caprolactone) (PEO-b-PCL). This study investigates the effects of the lipid-polymer composition on the size and surface charge of nanoemulsions, microviscosity of the interfacial layer, and skin absorption of tocopheryl acetate. The lipid-polymer hybrid system exhibits excellent colloidal dispersion stability, which is comparable to that of polymer-based nanoemulsions. If lipids are used as emulsifiers, nanoemulsions show poor dispersion stability despite a good skin absorption enhancing effect. The amount of tocopheryl acetate absorbed by the skin increases with an increased lipid-to-polymer ratio, as determined using the hairless guinea pig skin loaded in a Franz-type diffusion cell. An 8:2 (w/w) mixture of unsaturated phospholipids and PEO-b-PCL exhibits the most efficient delivery of tocopheryl acetate into the skin. Our results show that tocopheryl acetate is absorbed almost twice as fast by the lipid-polymer hybrid system than the nanoemulsions stabilized with PEO-b-PCL. This study suggests that the lipid-polymer hybrid system can be used as an effective means of optimizing nanoemulsions in terms of dispersion stability and skin delivery capability. PMID:22326341

  2. Skin regeneration effect and chemical composition of essential oil from Artemisia Montana.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Mi-So; Won, Kyung-Jong; Kim, Do Yoon; Hwang, Dae Il; Yoon, Seok Won; Kim, Bokyung; Lee, Hwan Myung

    2014-11-01

    Artemisia montana Pampan (Compositae) (AMP) contains various compounds, including phenolic acids, alkaloids, and essential oil. It has been widely used in oriental medicine due to a variety of biological effects. However, the biological activity of the essential oil from AMP (AMPEO) on skin has not been investigated. In the present study, AMPEO was evaluated for its composition and its effect on cellular events (migration and proliferation) related to skin regeneration using normal human keratinocytes (HaCats). AMPEO, which was extracted by steam distillation, contained 42 components. AMPEO increased proliferation in HaCats in a dose-dependent manner (EC 50, 8.5 ng/mL) and did not affect migration. AMPEO also enhanced the phosphorylation of Akt and ERK 1/2 and induced the synthesis of type IV collagen, but not type I collagen in HaCats. In addition, AMPEO promoted wound closure in the dorsal side skin of rat tail. These results demonstrated that AMPEO extracted by steam distillation induced proliferation and synthesis of type IV collagen in human skin keratinocytes, and may thereby exert positive effects on skin regeneration and wound healing in human skin. PMID:25532296

  3. Wet decontamination-induced stratum corneum hydration--effects on the skin barrier function to diethylmalonate.

    PubMed

    Loke, W K; U, S H; Lau, S K; Lim, J S; Tay, G S; Koh, C H

    1999-01-01

    Decontamination of chemical agents from the skin uses both dry and wet decontamination processes. Recent studies have shown that wet decontamination frequently results in stratum corneum hydration. To evaluate the hydration effect of wet decontamination on the skin barrier function and hence on the decontamination efficiency, a series of comparative studies were carried out on human skin contaminated with the nerve agent simulant diethylmalonate, using decontamination media having different salinity and surfactants. The results showed that, compared to non-decontaminated skin, remnant diethylmalonate on decontaminated skin penetrated at an accelerated rate in the immediate 2 h following decontamination. This transient enhancement effect, ranging from 20 to 98%, was depended on the nature of the decontamination media used and was more obvious in skin samples that were decontaminated 1 h postexposure. All decontamination media exhibited this effect, with the greatest enhancement observed in the following order: anionic surfactant > cationic surfactant > non-ionic surfactant > deionized water > 0.9% saline > 9% saline. PMID:10439344

  4. Theoretical study of the voltage and concentration dependence of the anomalous mole fraction effect in single calcium channels. New insights into the characterization of multi-ion channels.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, D L; Rasmusson, R L; Strauss, H C

    1988-01-01

    Several recent independent studies on macroscopic Ca currents have demonstrated the anomalous mole fraction effect in mixtures of Ca and Ba at concentrations of 10 mM or less. Recently, Hess and Tsien (1984; Nature 309) proposed a dual binding site model, based upon Eyring rate theory, to account for this effect in L-type cardiac Ca channels. This model predicts that the anomalous mole fraction effect can be accounted for solely in terms of open single channel permeation properties; it was able to adequately reproduce the effect for macroscopic Ca currents recorded in 10 mM solutions. However, the electrochemical gradients under which single Ca channel current recordings are routinely made with the patch clamp technique vary dramatically from those used for macroscopic Ca currents. To properly assess the general validity of the Hess and Tsien model at the single Ca channel level, the effects of both large electrical potentials and elevated divalent concentrations must be understood. Computer simulations were therefore carried out using the original parameters used by Hess and Tsien under conditions designed to mimic those used in patch clamp studies. The permeation behavior generated by this model is quite complex. In particular, hyperpolarization and increased divalent concentration combine to reduce and ultimately abolish the anomalous mole fraction effect. It may therefore be very difficult to observe the anomalous mole fraction effect at the single Ca channel level; the dual-site model displays a relationship between current and mole fraction generally associated with a single-site model under the conditions frequently employed to resolve single Ca channel activity. Nonetheless, analysis of such monotonic mole fraction behavior can still be used as a test for the general validity of the dual-site model. Apparent Kms for Ca and Ba can be extracted from such monotonic behavior, and may not only be functions of membrane potential but may also depend upon the total

  5. Clinical studies with disposable diapers containing absorbent gelling materials: evaluation of effects on infant skin condition.

    PubMed

    Campbell, R L; Seymour, J L; Stone, L C; Milligan, M C

    1987-12-01

    Disposable infant diapers with absorbent gelling material (cross-linked sodium polyacrylates) incorporated into the core were clinically evaluated for their effect on infant skin condition. Absorbent gelling materials tightly hold water and provide pH control by a buffering capacity as well as by helping to segregate urine apart from feces. Four clinical studies were conducted with each following a rigid protocol that controlled for variables of diet and age in addition to the diaper material that may influence the development of diaper dermatitis and helped to control for any inherent bias in the study. This allowed for the controlled assessment of skin condition with respect to diaper type. Absorbent gelling material-containing disposable, conventional (100% cellulose core) disposable, and home-laundered cloth diapers were test products. In these studies 1614 infants were initially enrolled with 522 of them assigned to absorbent gelling material disposable, 738 to conventional disposable, and 354 to home-laundered cloth diapers. Objective measurements of skin wetness (transepidermal water loss) and skin pH, as well as double-blind grading of diaper dermatitis, were the measures of skin condition. Absorbent gelling material disposable diapers were associated with significantly reduced skin wetness, closer to normal skin pH, and lower degrees of diaper dermatitis when compared to conventional disposable or home-laundered cloth diapers. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that better control in the diaper area of skin wetness, skin pH, and the prevention of the mixing of urine and feces produces a better diaper environment. PMID:3323274

  6. Effect of compositions in nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) on skin hydration and occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Loo, CH; Basri, M; Ismail, R; Lau, HLN; Tejo, BA; Kanthimathi, MS; Hassan, HA; Choo, YM

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To study the effects of varying lipid concentrations, lipid and oil ratio, and the addition of propylene glycol and lecithin on the long-term physical stability of nanostructured lipid nanocarriers (NLC), skin hydration, and transepidermal water loss. Methods The various NLC formulations (A1–A5) were prepared and their particle size, zeta potential, viscosity, and stability were analyzed. The formulations were applied on the forearms of the 20 female volunteers (one forearm of each volunteer was left untreated as a control). The subjects stayed for 30 minutes in a conditioned room with their forearms uncovered to let the skin adapt to the temperature (22°C ± 2°C) and humidity (50% ± 2%) of the room. Skin hydration and skin occlusion were recorded at day one (before treatment) and day seven (after treatment). Three measurements for skin hydration and skin occlusion were performed in each testing area. Results NLC formulations with the highest lipid concentration, highest solid lipid concentration, and additional propylene glycol (formulations A1, A2, and A5) showed higher physical stability than other formulations. The addition of propylene glycol into an NLC system helped to reduce the particle size of the NLC and enhanced its long-term physical stability. All the NLC formulations were found to significantly increase skin hydration compared to the untreated controls within 7 days. All NLC formulations exhibited occlusive properties as they reduced the transepidermal water loss within 7 days. This effect was more pronounced with the addition of propylene glycol or lecithin into an NLC formulation, whereby at least 60% reduction in transepidermal water loss was observed. Conclusion NLCs with high lipid content, solid lipid content, phospholipid, and lecithin are a highly effective cosmetic delivery system for cosmetic topical applications that are designed to boost skin hydration. PMID:23293516

  7. Anomalous Structural Transition and Electrical Transport Behaviors in Compressed Zn2SnO4: Effect of Interface

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiwa; Ke, Feng; Li, Yan; Wang, Li; Liu, Cailong; Zeng, Yi; Yao, Mingguang; Han, Yonghao; Ma, Yanzhang; Gao, Chunxiao

    2015-01-01

    The interface effect is one of the most important factors that strongly affect the structural transformations and the properties of nano-/submicro-crystals under pressure. However, characterization of the granular boundary changes in materials is always challenging. Here, using tetrakaidecahedral Zn2SnO4 microcrystals as an example, we employed alternating current impedance, X-ray diffraction methods and transmission electron microscopy to elucidate the effect of the interface on the structure and electrical transport behavior of the Zn2SnO4 material under pressure. We clearly show that grain refinement of the initial microcrystals into nanocrystals (approximately 5 nm) occurs at above 12.5 GPa and is characterized by an anomalous resistance variation without a structural phase transition. A new phase transition pathway from the cubic to hexagonal structure occurs at approximately 29.8 GPa in Zn2SnO4. The unexpected grain refinement may explain the new structural transition in Zn2SnO4, which is different from the previous theoretical prediction. Our results provide new insights into the link between the structural transition, interface changes and electrical transport properties of Zn2SnO4. PMID:26399167

  8. French Maritime Pine Bark Extract (Pycnogenol®) Effects on Human Skin: Clinical and Molecular Evidence.

    PubMed

    Grether-Beck, Susanne; Marini, Alessandra; Jaenicke, Thomas; Krutmann, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Nutritional strategies to benefit skin health are of growing importance. Current approaches mainly involve nutritional supplements containing antioxidants which were initially designed to protect human skin against ultraviolet radiation-induced damage. Within recent years, however, a growing number of studies suggests that the beneficial effects of these products clearly extend beyond photoprotection. In this review we take the nutritional supplement Pycnogenol®, which is based on an extract prepared from French marine pine bark extract, as an example to illustrate this development. Accordingly, the existing data provide compelling evidence that Pycnogenol® intake does not only provide photoprotection, but may be used to (i) reduce hyperpigmentation of human skin and (ii) improve skin barrier function and extracellular matrix homeostasis. PMID:26492562

  9. Synchronization of skin ablation and microjet injection for an effective transdermal drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hun-jae; Yeo, Seonggu; Yoh, Jack J.

    2016-04-01

    An Er:YAG laser with 2940-nm wavelength and 150-µs pulse duration was built for the purpose of combined ablation and microjet injection. A shorter pulse duration compared to common erbium lasers in dentistry is desirable for a synchronization of skin ablation and subsequent microjet injection into target skin for transdermal injection of liquid dose. A single laser beam is split into two for an optimal energy of pre-ablation of skin and the residual energy allocated to a microjet ejection. A newly designed injector consists of an L-shaped chamber and a parabolic mirror in a single unit, and the handheld laser is a part of an integrated system requiring no optical fiber. Through various injection tests using the porcine skin, the effectiveness of the new delivery system is herein evaluated.

  10. Effect of Tension and Curvature of Skin on Insertion Characteristics of Microneedle Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto; Takano, Naoki; Nishiyabu, Kazuaki; Miki, Norihisa; Ami, Yoshimichi

    Recent MEMS (micro electro mechanical system) fabrication techniques have made it possible to produce painless microneedles precisely enough to be inserted into epidermis layer penetrating the stratum corneum of human skin. This paper presents a testing procedure to evaluate the insertion characteristics of microneedle array using cultured human skin considering the tension and the curvature. First, the biaxial strain applied to the cultured human skin was measured by optical technique with image processing. It was found that almost constant strain could be successfully given within a certain area and that error factors in the experiment except the thickness variation of the cultured skin were negligible. Next, using a microneedle square array for brain machine interface (BMI) application, the effects of biaxial tension and the curvature on insertion characteristics were discussed. Within the above mentioned area with high strain, the needles were successfully inserted.

  11. Vehicle effects on in vitro release and skin permeation of octylmethoxycinnamate from microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Montenegro, L; Carbone, C; Puglisi, G

    2011-02-28

    The high content of surfactants is one of the major limits to microemulsions (MEs) use in pharmaceutical and cosmetic field. In this work MEs with low surfactant content were prepared by the phase inversion temperature (PIT) method using different oil phases and emulsifiers. The effects of vehicle composition on in vitro release and skin permeation of octylmethoxycinnamte (OMC), one of the most used UVB filter, was evaluated. These MEs showed droplet sizes in the range 32-77nm and a single peak in size distribution. MEs prepared using the most lipophilic lipids (decyl oleate or cetyl stearyl isononanoate) showed the lowest stability. In vitro release and skin permeation profiles were affected by both lipophilicty and structure of the lipid used as internal phase and the formulation that released the lowest amount of OMC provided the lowest active compound skin permeation. It is noteworthy that no OMC release and skin permeation were observed using oleth-20/glyceryl oleate as emulsifiers. Furthermore, a skin permeation enhancement effect was observed depending on the vehicle components. The results of this work suggest that PIT MEs could provide controlled skin drug delivery by choosing proper associations of oil phase lipids and emulsifiers. PMID:21129459

  12. Acute effects of cigarette smoke exposure on experimental skin flaps

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, J.; Jenkins, R.A.; Kurihara, K.; Schultz, R.C.

    1985-04-01

    Random vascular patterned caudally based McFarlane-type skin flaps were elevated in groups of Fischer 344 rats. Groups of rats were then acutely exposed on an intermittent basis to smoke generated from well-characterized research filter cigarettes. Previously developed smoke inhalation exposure protocols were employed using a Maddox-ORNL inhalation exposure system. Rats that continued smoke exposure following surgery showed a significantly greater mean percent area of flap necrosis compared with sham-exposed groups or control groups not exposed. The possible pathogenesis of this observation as well as considerations and correlations with chronic human smokers are discussed. Increased risks of flap necrosis by smoking in the perioperative period are suggested by this study.

  13. Effects of magnesium deficiency--more than skin deep.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Navin Chandrakanth; Weir, Christopher; Alfraji, Sumaya; Grice, Jeff; Roberts, Michael S; Barnard, Ross T

    2014-10-01

    Dead Sea and magnesium salt therapy are two of the oldest forms of treatment for skin disease and several other disorders, supported by a body of largely anecdotal evidence. In this paper we review possible pathways for penetration of magnesium ions through the epidermis to reach the circulation, in turn replenishing cellular magnesium levels. We also discuss mechanisms for intercellular movement of magnesium ions and possible mechanisms for the interaction between magnesium ions and inflammatory mediators. Upon addition of magnesium ions in vitro, the expression of inflammatory mediators such as tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) and nuclear factor κβ (NFκβ) is down regulated. Dysregulation of these and other inflammatory mediators has been linked to several inflammatory disorders, including asthma, arthritis, atherosclerosis and neuroinflammation. PMID:24928863

  14. Effects of radioactive hot particles on pig skin

    SciTech Connect

    Kaurin, D.G.; Baum, J.W.; Schaefer, C.W.

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of these studies was to determine the incidence and severity of lesions resulting from very localized deposition of dose to skin from small (< 0.5 mm) discrete radioactive particles as produced in the work environments of nuclear reactors. Hanford mini-pigs were exposed, both on a slightly off the skin, to localized replicate doses from 0.31 to 64 Gy (averaged over 1 cm{sup 2} at 70 {mu}m depth unless noted otherwise) using Sc-46, Yb-175, Tm-170, and fissioned UC{sub 2} isotopes having maximum beta-particle energies from about 0.3 to 3 MeV. Erythema and scabs (indicating ulceration) were scored for up to 71 days post-irradiation. The responses followed normal cumulative probability distributions, and therefore, no true threshold could be defined. Hence, 10 and 50% scab incidence rates were deduced using probit analyses. The lowest dose which produced 10% incidence was about 1 Gy for Yb-175 (0.5 MeV maximum energy) beta particle exposures, and about 3 to 9 Gy for other isotopes. The histopathology of lesions was determined at several doses. Single exposures to doses as large as 1,790 Gy were also given, and results were observed for up to 144 days post-exposure. Severity of detriment was estimated by analyzing the results in terms of lesion diameter, persistence, and infection. Over 1,100 sites were exposed. Only two exposed sites became infected after doses near 5000 Gy; the lesions healed quickly on treatment. 105 refs., 145 figs., 47 tabs.

  15. A study of the human skin-whitening effects of resveratryl triacetate.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Ja Hyun; Seok, Jin Kyung; An, Sang Mi; Baek, Ji Hwoon; Koh, Jae Sook; Boo, Yong Chool

    2015-04-01

    Resveratrol has a variety of bioactivities that include its anti-melanogenic effects, but its use in cosmetics has been challenging partly because of its chemical instability. Resveratryl triacetate (RTA) is a prodrug that can enhance stability. The purpose of this study was to examine the skin safety and whitening effects of RTA in human subjects. The primary skin irritation potentials of RTA and resveratrol were tested at 0.1 and 0.5 % on human subjects. Resveratrol at a concentration of 0.5 % induced weak skin irritation, whereas RTA did not induce any skin responses. The skin-whitening efficacy of a cosmetic formulation containing 0.4 % RTA was evaluated in two different test models. In the artificial tanning model, the test product and the control product were applied twice daily to the skin of the forearms of 22 human subjects after pigmentation induction by ultraviolet irradiation. Applying the test and the control products to the artificial tanning model for 8 weeks increased the individual topology angles (ITA°) by 17.06 and 13.81 %, respectively, a difference that was statistically significant (p < 0.05). In the hyperpigmentation model, the test product and the control product were applied twice daily to the faces of 21 human subjects. The averaged intensity of the hyperpigmented spots decreased by 2.67 % in the test group and 1.46 % in the control group, a difference that was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Therefore, RTA incorporated into cosmetic formulations can whiten human skin without inducing skin irritation. PMID:25750159

  16. Effects of a cellulose mask synthesized by a bacterium on facial skin characteristics and user satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Amnuaikit, Thanaporn; Chusuit, Toon; Raknam, Panithi; Boonme, Prapaporn

    2011-01-01

    Background Cellulose masks obtained from natural sources such as bacteria are of interest as cosmetic devices for the treatment of dry skin because they not only improve hydration of the skin, but have low toxicity and are biodegradable. The aims of this study were to determine the in vivo effects of a cellulose mask obtained from Acetobacter xylinum on skin characteristics and to evaluate user satisfaction with the product. Methods Thirty healthy Thai volunteers aged 21–40 years participated in the study. The volunteers were randomly separated into a control group and an experimental group. For the control group, volunteers were assigned to apply moist towels to the face for 25 minutes. For the experimental group, the volunteers were assigned to apply the masks, ie, translucent patches which could be fitted onto the face for the same period. The following week, the groups were changed over to the alternative treatment. Skin moisture, sebum, elasticity, texture, dullness, and desquamation levels were assessed using a system used for routine skin counseling before applying the trial product and five minutes after its removal. Degree of satisfaction with use of the cellulose mask was investigated using a five-point rating scale. Results The cellulose mask increased moisture levels in the skin significantly more than moist towels (P < 0.05) after a single application. No obvious effects on other skin characteristics were found. The cellulose mask product rated around 4/5 on the satisfaction rating scale. Conclusions A single application of the trial cellulose mask enhanced moisture uptake by facial skin. Users also reported being satisfied with the trial product. PMID:22915933

  17. Flashing anomalous color contrast.

    PubMed

    Pinna, Baingio; Spillmann, Lothar; Werner, John S

    2004-01-01

    A new visual phenomenon that we call flashing anomalous color contrast is described. This phenomenon arises from the interaction between a gray central disk and a chromatic annulus surrounded by black radial lines. In an array of such figures, the central gray disk no longer appears gray, but assumes a color complementary to that of the surrounding annulus. The induced color appears: (1) vivid and saturated; (2) self-luminous, not a surface property; (3) flashing with eye or stimulus movement; (4) floating out of its confines; and (5) stronger in extrafoveal than in foveal vision. The strength of the effect depends on the number, length, width, and luminance contrast of the radial lines. The results suggest that the chromatic ring bounding the inner tips of the black radial lines induces simultaneous color contrast, whereas the radial lines elicit, in conjunction with the gray disk and the ring, the flashing, vividness, and high saturation of the effect. The stimulus properties inducing the illusion suggest that flashing anomalous color contrast may be based on asynchronous interactions among multiple visual pathways. PMID:15518215

  18. Anomalous correlation effects and unique phase diagram of electron-doped FeSe revealed by photoemission spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wen, C. H. P.; Xu, H. C.; Chen, C.; Huang, Z. C.; Lou, X.; Pu, Y. J.; Song, Q.; Xie, B. P.; Abdel-Hafiez, Mahmoud; Chareev, D. A.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Peng, R.; Feng, D. L.

    2016-01-01

    FeSe layer-based superconductors exhibit exotic and distinctive properties. The undoped FeSe shows nematicity and superconductivity, while the heavily electron-doped KxFe2−ySe2 and single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 possess high superconducting transition temperatures that pose theoretical challenges. However, a comprehensive study on the doping dependence of an FeSe layer-based superconductor is still lacking due to the lack of a clean means of doping control. Through angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy studies on K-dosed thick FeSe films and FeSe0.93S0.07 bulk crystals, here we reveal the internal connections between these two types of FeSe-based superconductors, and obtain superconductivity below ∼46 K in an FeSe layer under electron doping without interfacial effects. Moreover, we discover an exotic phase diagram of FeSe with electron doping, including a nematic phase, a superconducting dome, a correlation-driven insulating phase and a metallic phase. Such an anomalous phase diagram unveils the remarkable complexity, and highlights the importance of correlations in FeSe layer-based superconductors. PMID:26952215

  19. Anomalous correlation effects and unique phase diagram of electron-doped FeSe revealed by photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, C. H. P.; Xu, H. C.; Chen, C.; Huang, Z. C.; Lou, X.; Pu, Y. J.; Song, Q.; Xie, B. P.; Abdel-Hafiez, Mahmoud; Chareev, D. A.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Peng, R.; Feng, D. L.

    2016-03-01

    FeSe layer-based superconductors exhibit exotic and distinctive properties. The undoped FeSe shows nematicity and superconductivity, while the heavily electron-doped KxFe2-ySe2 and single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 possess high superconducting transition temperatures that pose theoretical challenges. However, a comprehensive study on the doping dependence of an FeSe layer-based superconductor is still lacking due to the lack of a clean means of doping control. Through angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy studies on K-dosed thick FeSe films and FeSe0.93S0.07 bulk crystals, here we reveal the internal connections between these two types of FeSe-based superconductors, and obtain superconductivity below ~46 K in an FeSe layer under electron doping without interfacial effects. Moreover, we discover an exotic phase diagram of FeSe with electron doping, including a nematic phase, a superconducting dome, a correlation-driven insulating phase and a metallic phase. Such an anomalous phase diagram unveils the remarkable complexity, and highlights the importance of correlations in FeSe layer-based superconductors.

  20. Anomalous correlation effects and unique phase diagram of electron-doped FeSe revealed by photoemission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wen, C H P; Xu, H C; Chen, C; Huang, Z C; Lou, X; Pu, Y J; Song, Q; Xie, B P; Abdel-Hafiez, Mahmoud; Chareev, D A; Vasiliev, A N; Peng, R; Feng, D L

    2016-01-01

    FeSe layer-based superconductors exhibit exotic and distinctive properties. The undoped FeSe shows nematicity and superconductivity, while the heavily electron-doped KxFe2-ySe2 and single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 possess high superconducting transition temperatures that pose theoretical challenges. However, a comprehensive study on the doping dependence of an FeSe layer-based superconductor is still lacking due to the lack of a clean means of doping control. Through angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy studies on K-dosed thick FeSe films and FeSe0.93S0.07 bulk crystals, here we reveal the internal connections between these two types of FeSe-based superconductors, and obtain superconductivity below ∼46 K in an FeSe layer under electron doping without interfacial effects. Moreover, we discover an exotic phase diagram of FeSe with electron doping, including a nematic phase, a superconducting dome, a correlation-driven insulating phase and a metallic phase. Such an anomalous phase diagram unveils the remarkable complexity, and highlights the importance of correlations in FeSe layer-based superconductors. PMID:26952215

  1. Theory for the anomalous electron transport in Hall effect thrusters. I. Insights from particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafleur, T.; Baalrud, S. D.; Chabert, P.

    2016-05-01

    Using a 1D particle-in-cell simulation with perpendicular electric, E0, and magnetic, B0, fields, and modelling the azimuthal direction (i.e., the E0 × B0 direction), we study the cross-field electron transport in Hall effect thrusters (HETs). For low plasma densities, the electron transport is found to be well described by classical electron-neutral collision theory, but at sufficiently high densities (representative of typical HETs), a strong instability is observed to significantly enhance the electron mobility, even in the absence of electron-neutral collisions. This instability is associated with correlated high-frequency (of the order of MHz) and short-wavelength (of the order of mm) fluctuations in both the electric field and the plasma density, which are shown to be the cause of the anomalous transport. Saturation of the instability is observed to occur due to a combination of ion-wave trapping in the E0 × B0 direction, and convection in the E0 direction.

  2. Theory of the Dirac half metal and quantum anomalous Hall effect in Mn-intercalated epitaxial graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuanchang; West, Damien; Huang, Huaqing; Li, Jia; Zhang, S. B.; Duan, Wenhui

    2015-11-01

    The prospect of a Dirac half metal, a material which is characterized by a band structure with a gap in one spin channel but a Dirac cone in the other, is of both fundamental interest and a natural candidate for use in spin-polarized current applications. However, while the possibility of such a material has been reported based on model calculations [H. Ishizuka and Y. Motome, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 237207 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.237207], it remains unclear what material system might realize such an exotic state. Using first-principles calculations, we show that the experimentally accessible Mn-intercalated epitaxial graphene on SiC(0001) transits to a Dirac half metal when the coverage is >1 /3 monolayer. This transition results from an orbital-selective breaking of quasi-two-dimensional inversion symmetry, leading to symmetry breaking in a single spin channel which is robust against randomness in the distribution of Mn intercalates. Furthermore, the inclusion of spin-orbit interaction naturally drives the system into the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) state. Our results thus not only demonstrate the practicality of realizing the Dirac half metal beyond a toy model, but also open up an avenue to the realization of the QAH effect.

  3. Ultrahigh sensitivity of anomalous Hall effect sensor based on Cr-doped Bi2Te3 topological insulator thin films

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ni, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Nlebedim, I. C.; Jiles, D. C.

    2016-07-01

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) was recently discovered in magnetic element-doped topological insulators (TIs), which promises low power consumption and high efficiency spintronics and electronics. This discovery broadens the family of Hall sensors. In this paper, AHE sensors based on Cr-doped Bi2Te3 topological insulator thin films are studied with two thicknesses (15 and 65 nm). It is found, in both cases, that ultrahigh Hall sensitivity can be obtained in Cr-doped Bi2Te3. Hall sensitivity reaches 1666 Ω/T in the sensor with the 15 nm TI thin film, which is higher than that of the conventional semiconductor HE sensor. The AHE of 65more » nm sensors is even stronger, which causes the sensitivity increasing to 2620 Ω/T. Furthermore, after comparing Cr-doped Bi2Te3 with the previously studied Mn-doped Bi2Te3 TI Hall sensor, the sensitivity of the present AHE sensor shows about 60 times higher in 65 nm sensors. Furthermore, the implementation of AHE sensors based on a magnetic-doped TI thin film indicates that the TIs are good candidates for ultrasensitive AHE sensors.« less

  4. Predicting clutter during anomalous propagation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Susan C.; Maurer, Donald E.; Musser, Keith L.

    1988-06-01

    Excessive clutter caused by anomalous propagation conditions severely degrades radar performance in many regions of the world. This article describes methods that can be used to predict anomalous clutter amplitude for site-specific radar parameters, terrain features, and atmospheric conditions and to predict the effects of radar Doppler processing on evaporation-ducted sea clutter.

  5. Ductile and Compacted Graphite Iron Casting Skin -- Evaluation, Effect on Fatigue Strength and Elimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonmee, Sarum

    Compacted graphite (CG) iron features a good combination of tensile strength, impact resistance, thermal conductivity and damping capacity. This combination makes CG iron a material of choice for various applications, especially for the automobile industry. The mechanical properties of CG iron listed in the standards (i.e. ASTM) are for machined specimens. However, since most iron castings retain the original casting surface (a.k.a. casting skin), the actual performance of the part could be significantly different from that of the machined specimens. Recent studies have shown the negative effect of the casting skin, but little quantification of its effect on mechanical properties is available. Further, the understanding of its mechanism of formation is at best incomplete. In this research, the effect of the casting skin on mechanical properties in CG and ductile irons (DI) is explored. The differences in tensile and fatigue properties between as-cast and machined samples were quantified and correlated to the casting skin features. It was found that the presence of the casting skin was accountable for 9% reduction of tensile strength and up to 32% reduction of fatigue strength (for CG iron with 40% nodularity). Several mechanisms of the casting skin formation are proposed in this research. The formation of ferritic and pearlitic rims is explained by decarburizing/carburizing reactions at the mold/metal interface. Mg depletion and solidification kinetics effect were identified as the formation mechanisms of the graphite degradation. A 2-D thermal diffusion model was formulated based on Mg depletion theory. The model can be used to predict the casting skin thickness when Mg depletion is the dominant mechanism. Furthermore, using the asymmetric Fe-Gr phase diagram, some instances of casting skin formation were explained based on solidification kinetics theory. The experimental microstructural evidence and the theoretical progress were conducive to the development of

  6. The anomalous Hall effect and related transport phenomena in ferromagnetic spinel copper chromium selenium bromide, manganese-doped chalcopyrite copper gallium ditelluride, and ruthenate bismuth ruthenate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wei-Li

    One of the interesting and unsettled transport phenomena is the, so called, "anomalous Hall Effect". It generally refers to the phenomenon of a non-linear field dependence of the Hall resistivity rhoxy. An emerging idea relates to the "gauge field O" experienced by electrons. It gives rise to Berry phase accumulation. In ferromagnets, a non-vanishing O( k⃗ ) is related to the spin-orbit coupling and the time-reversal asymmetry. We show that, in the ferromagnetic spinel CuCr2Se 4-xBrx, the anomalous Hall conductivity sigma xy (normalized to per carrier, at 5K) remains unchanged with a 1000-fold increase in resistivity. From the anomalous Nernst effect, we uncover a simple relation for the off-diagonal Peltier conductivity tensor alphaxy, which is a measure of a transverse electrical current density generated per unit of applied temperature gradient. They both strongly support the anomalous-velocity theory based on the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling of the electrons. An alternative way to procure O is from the spin-chirality effect. In the Mn-doped chalcopyrite semiconductor CuGaTe2, with a few percent doping, the orbitals of the Mn ions overlap to form an impurity band. Therefore, the electrons will accumulate Berry phase while hopping around the Mn ions that have a non-collinear magnetic ground state. We observed the enhanced and non-monotonic field dependence of rhoxy, which may be understood from the spin-chirality effect. Finally, we studied the Hall effect and thermopower in the ruthenate Bi3Ru3O 11. From the Hall effect, we observed field-tuning of electron and hole populations. We also found a large field dependence of the thermopower at low temperature. The origin of the colossal field-dependence in the thermopower is still an open question, but it is linked to the unusual electronic properties in the Bi3Ru3O11.

  7. Childhood exposure to ultraviolet radiation and harmful skin effects: Epidemiological evidence

    PubMed Central

    Green, Adèle C.; Wallingford, Sarah C.; McBride, Penelope

    2012-01-01

    We review the general amount and patterns of exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation that children and teenagers experience and the spectrum of UV-related skin damage that can occur as a result. Data about the amount of solar UV received by children and teenagers are relatively few but suggest that around 40–50% of total UV to age 60 occurs before age 20. Among white children, those with the palest complexions suffer the most damage. Comparisons of prevalence and incidence of outcomes in children and teenagers sharing common ancestry, but living at different latitudes, show that prevalence rates of photoaging and melanocytic naevi are higher in Australian compared with British children, and similarly for melanoma. Genetic risk for the majority of the melanomas in teens is a function of genes controlling naevus propensity and pigmentation in the skin. High numbers of naevi and freckles, red hair, blue eyes, inability to tan, as well as a family history are the primary determinants of melanoma among adolescents. Beyond the signs of skin damage seen in children are the latent effects observed later in adulthood. Childhood is believed to be a susceptible window for long-term harmful effects of UV, as evidenced by clear differences in skin cancer risk between child and adult migrants from high to low latitudes. Effective UV radiation protection from childhood is necessary to control both immediate and long-term harmful effects on children’s skin. PMID:21907230

  8. Cytotoxic effects of five commonly abused skin toning (bleaching) creams on Allium cepa root tip mitosis.

    PubMed

    Udengwu, O S; Chukwujekwu, J C

    2008-09-15

    The Allium test was used to study the cytotoxic effects of five commonly abused skin toning creams--Ikb, Tura, Top gel, Dorot and Mililo. These creams are commonly used by some black skinned people (especially the females) as skin lightening (bleaching) agents. The results showed that all the five bleaching creams were mito-depressive in action. They exhibited both chromatoclassic and mitoclassic effects. Their depressive effects were found to increase with duration of treatment. The induced abnormalities included chromosome contraction, spindle breakages, c-metaphase, star anaphase, chromosome stickiness and sticky bridges, precocious chromosome movement as well as endomitosis. It is suggested that since all eukaryotic cells are basically the same, these observed abnormalities could be similar to the effects these chemicals have on human skin when they are applied. Some of these are known to cause alteration in melanin formation as well as the biosynthesis of the enzyme tyrosinase. Furthermore, since certain points on the chromosomes called fragile sites have been implicated in oncogenesis, the observed abnormalities may be part of (or include) the switching on mechanisms of such genes, which could be responsible for the transformation of normal skin cells to malignant cells in those who abuse these creams. PMID:19137826

  9. Screening for potential hazard effects from four nitramines on human eye and skin.

    PubMed

    Fjellsbø, Lise Marie; Van Rompay, An R; Hooyberghs, Jef; Nelissen, Inge; Dusinska, Maria

    2013-06-01

    Amines have potential to be used in CO2 capture and storage (CCS) technology, but as they can be released into the environment and be degraded into more toxic compounds, such as nitrosamines and nitramines, there have been concerns about their negative impact on human health. We investigated the potential toxic effects from acute exposure to dimethylnitramine (DMA-NO2), methylnitramine (MA-NO2), ethanolnitramine (MEA-NO2) and 2-methyl-2-(nitroamino)-1-propanol (AMP-NO2). The eye irritation, and skin sensitization, irritation and corrosion potential of these substances have been evaluated in vitro using the Bovine Corneal Opacity and Permeability (BCOP) assay, VITOSENS® assay, Reconstructed Human Epidermis (RHE) skin irritation test and Corrositex Skin corrosion test, respectively. Exposure to DMA-NO2 induced a mild eye irritation response, while MA-NO2, MEA-NO2 and AMP-NO2 were shown to be very severe eye irritants. MA-NO2 and MEA-NO2 were tested for skin sensitization and found to be non-sensitizers to the skin. In addition, none of the four test substances was irritant or corrosive to the skin. PMID:23416265

  10. Effect of Colorspace Transformation, the Illuminance Component, and Color Modeling on Skin Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Jayaram, S; Schmugge, S; Shin, M C; Tsap, L V

    2004-03-22

    Skin detection is an important preliminary process in human motion analysis. It is commonly performed in three steps: transforming the pixel color to a non-RGB colorspace, dropping the illumination component of skin color, and classifying by modeling the skin color distribution. In this paper, we evaluate the effect of these three steps on the skin detection performance. The importance of this study is a new comprehensive colorspace and color modeling testing methodology that would allow for making the best choices for skin detection. Combinations of nine colorspaces, the presence of the absence of the illuminance component, and the two color modeling approaches are compared. The performance is measured by using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve on a large dataset of 805 images with manual ground truth. The results reveal that (1) the absence of the illuminance component decreases performance, (2) skin color modeling has a greater impact than colorspace transformation, and (3) colorspace transformations can improve performance in certain instances. We found that the best performance was obtained by transforming the pixel color to the SCT, HSI, or CIELAB colorspaces, keeping the illuminance component, and modeling the color with the histogram approach.

  11. The effect of environmental humidity and temperature on skin barrier function and dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Engebretsen, K A; Johansen, J D; Kezic, S; Linneberg, A; Thyssen, J P

    2016-02-01

    Physicians are aware that climatic conditions negatively affect the skin. In particular, people living in equator far countries such as the Northern parts of Europe and North America are exposed to harsh weather during the winter and may experience dry and itchy skin, or deterioration of already existing dermatoses. We searched the literature for studies that evaluated the mechanisms behind this phenomenon. Commonly used meteorological terms such as absolute humidity, relative humidity and dew point are explained. Furthermore, we review the negative effect of low humidity, low temperatures and different seasons on the skin barrier and on the risk of dermatitis. We conclude that low humidity and low temperatures lead to a general decrease in skin barrier function and increased susceptible towards mechanical stress. Since pro-inflammatory cytokines and cortisol are released by keratinocytes, and the number of dermal mast cells increases, the skin also becomes more reactive towards skin irritants and allergens. Collectively, published data show that cold and dry weather increase the prevalence and risk of flares in patients with atopic dermatitis. PMID:26449379

  12. Effect of Acupuncture Manipulations at LI4 or LI11 on Blood Flow and Skin Temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Weihui; Ahn, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Acupuncture induces physiological changes, and patients have reported warm or cool sensations with "Burning Fire" (BF) or "Penetrating Cool" (PC) manipulations. This study aimed to evaluate whether these techniques had distinct effects on skin temperature and blood flow and to examine whether skin temperature correlated with blood flow. The participants were 25 healthy volunteers, each receiving acupuncture manipulations on points LI4 and LI11 bilaterally. Skin temperatures and blood flow were recorded continuously on both arms. The study found that acupuncture significantly increased skin temperature on the needling arm by 0.3514°C on average, but decreased it on the contralateral arm by 0.2201°C on average. Blood flow decreased significantly in both arms during needling (-3.4% and -5.97% for the ipsilateral and the contralateral sides, respectively), but the changes in skin temperature did not correlate with the changes in blood flow. Furthermore, these changes were not significantly different between acupuncture techniques and acupuncture points. In conclusion, acupuncture changes local skin temperature and blood flow independent of the manipulation technique. Moreover, blood flow may not be affected by the increased temperature on the needling arm. These results help to verify traditional Chinese medicine concepts and may help in establishing standards for acupuncture treatments. PMID:27342886

  13. Effect of unsaturated menthol analogues on the in vitro penetration of 5-fluorouracil through rat skin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yang; Wang, Jian; Cun, Dongmei; Wang, Manli; Jiang, Juan; Xi, Honglei; Cui, Hongxia; Xu, Yongnan; Cheng, Maosheng; Fang, Liang

    2013-02-25

    To explore the structure-activity relationship for terpenes as transdermal penetration enhancers, unsaturated menthol analogues were synthesized in our study, including p-menth-1-en-3-ol (Compd 1), p-menth-4-en-3-ol (Compd 2), p-menth-4(8)-en-3-ol (Compd 3) and p-menth-8-en-3-ol (Compd 4). Their enhancing activity on the penetration of 5-fluorouracil through rat skin was evaluated by in vitro experiments. Attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, molecular modeling and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) were introduced to investigate the enhancer induced alteration in different skin lipid domains. The results indicated that Compd 3 achieved the highest enhancement ability with an enhancement ratio of 3.08. Other analogues were less effective than Compd 3, and no significant difference was found between them and menthol. Treatment of rat skin with these enhancers did not produce any shift in the stretching vibration of the methylene in hydrophobic lipid chains, but significantly improved the polar pathway across the rat skin as suggested by the increased TEWL. Molecular modeling results suggested that polar head groups of the skin lipids provided the main binding site for enhancer action. These findings indicated that the studied compounds enhanced drug transport by interacting with the polar domain of the skin lipid, instead of by affecting the arrangement of the hydrophobic chains. PMID:23333756

  14. Skin alterations induced by long-term exposure to uranium and their effect on permeability.

    PubMed

    Ubios, A M; Marzorati, M; Cabrini, R L

    1997-05-01

    The skin is a probable route of incorporation of uranium by percutaneous absorption. The changes in epidermal thickness and their effect on skin permeability after uranium exposure are reported herein. Two experiments (A and B) were performed in Wistar rats weighing 60 g. In experiment A the animals were exposed to U3O8 (0.012 g d(-1)) in 30 daily topical applications. In experiment B the animals were treated as in experiment A, followed by a period of non-exposure of 60 d. Samples of the treated area of skin were taken for histologic studies and for the study of the skin permeability. The epidermal thickness was measured on the histological sections. Epidermis was thinner in experimental than in control animals in both experiments. The values in the control groups were 41.05 +/- 14.03 microm (A) and 38.92 +/- 16.50 microm (B) and 21.35 +/- 10.29 microm (A) and 24.06 +/- 16.50 microm (B) in the experimental groups, the differences being statistically significant. Skin permeability was measured placing skin samples in a diffusion cell, in which the upper compartment was filled with a staining solution. The determinations were made with a spectrophotometer. The results revealed that the skin permeability in both experimental groups was higher than in the respective controls, 65% in experiment A and 77% in experiment B. The results revealed that a long term uranium exposure leads to an epidermal atrophy which in turn results in an increased permeability of the skin. PMID:9106712

  15. Insights into bacterial colonization of intensive care patients' skin: the effect of chlorhexidine daily bathing.

    PubMed

    Cassir, N; Papazian, L; Fournier, P-E; Raoult, D; La Scola, B

    2015-05-01

    Skin is a major reservoir of bacterial pathogens in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. The aim of this study was to assess the skin bacterial richness and diversity in ICU patients and the effect of CHG daily bathing on skin microbiota. Twenty ICU patients were included during an interventional period with CHG daily bathing (n = 10) and a control period (n = 10). At day seven of hospitalization, eight skin swab samples (nares, axillary vaults, inguinal creases, manubrium and back) were taken from each patient. The bacterial identification was performed by microbial culturomics. We used the Shannon index to compare the diversity. We obtained 5,000 colonies that yielded 61 bacterial species (9.15 ± 3.7 per patient), including 15 (24.5 %) that had never been cultured from non-pathological human skin before, and three (4.9 %) that had never been cultured from human samples before. Notably, Gram-negative bacteria were isolated from all sites. In the water-and-soap group, there was a higher risk of colonization with Gram-negative bacteria (OR = 6.05, 95 % CI [1.67-21.90]; P = 0.006). In the CHG group, we observed more patients colonized by sporulating bacteria (9/10 vs. 3/10; P = 0.019) with a reduced skin bacterial richness (P = 0.004) and lower diversity (0.37, 95 % CI [0.33; 0.42] vs. 0.50, 95 % CI [0.48; 0.52]). Gram-negative bacteria are frequent and disseminated components of the transient skin flora in ICU patients. CHG daily bathing is associated with a reduction in Gram-negative bacteria colonization together with substantial skin microbiota shifts. PMID:25604707

  16. Using MODIS Skin Temperature to Assess Urban Heat Island Effect and Biosphere-Atmosphere-Land Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, M. S.; Dickinson, R.; Shepherd, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Two surface temperatures have been used in global change studies - 2-m surface air temperature (Tair) and skin temperature (Tskin). Skin temperature provides additional new information about the Earth surface because its physical meaning and magnitude differ from Tair. We will present two examples to reveal the advantages of using Tskin in studying land-atmosphere-biosphere interactions: an urban system and a Tibetan system. Ten-years of NASA MODIS skin temperature observations reveal new features related to the urban heat island effect (UHI). For example, the UHI is evident in both daytime and nighttime instead of being a nocturnal phenomenon traditionally referred from Tair. UHI is partially due to both albedo and emissivity reduction and partially due to soil moisture modification by urban surfaces (i.e., a change in Bowen ratio). Furthermore, urban aerosols affect surface insloation, which leads to a reduction in surface skin temperature. In summary, clearly the UHI is a result of land-atmosphere-biosphere interactions. Skin temperatures also provide detailed information for remote regions that are difficult to access, in particular, the Tibetan Plateau. Tskin shows a slight increase during 2000-2010, nevertheless, such an increase is only statistically significant for summer urban regions. Different land covers have varying patterns and seasonality of skin temperature. In particular, skin temperature and vegetation index (NDVI) have close relationships for their extremes. Such extremes are also a function of season and land cover. In conclusion, skin temperature is very useful in our understanding on biosphere-land-and atmosphere interactions. Further work is needed to examine the implications of these finding for scientific research and societal applications.

  17. Intrinsic quantum spin Hall and anomalous Hall effects in h-Sb/Bi epitaxial growth on a ferromagnetic MnO2 thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jian; Sun, Qiang; Wang, Qian; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Jena, Puru

    2016-05-01

    Exploring a two-dimensional intrinsic quantum spin Hall state with a large band gap as well as an anomalous Hall state in realizable materials is one of the most fundamental and important goals for future applications in spintronics, valleytronics, and quantum computing. Here, by combining first-principles calculations with a tight-binding model, we predict that Sb or Bi can epitaxially grow on a stable and ferromagnetic MnO2 thin film substrate, forming a flat honeycomb sheet. The flatness of Sb or Bi provides an opportunity for the existence of Dirac points in the Brillouin zone, with its position effectively tuned by surface hydrogenation. The Dirac points in spin up and spin down channels split due to the proximity effects induced by MnO2. In the presence of both intrinsic and Rashba spin-orbit coupling, we find two band gaps exhibiting a large band gap quantum spin Hall state and a nearly quantized anomalous Hall state which can be tuned by adjusting the Fermi level. Our findings provide an efficient way to realize both quantized intrinsic spin Hall conductivity and anomalous Hall conductivity in a single material.Exploring a two-dimensional intrinsic quantum spin Hall state with a large band gap as well as an anomalous Hall state in realizable materials is one of the most fundamental and important goals for future applications in spintronics, valleytronics, and quantum computing. Here, by combining first-principles calculations with a tight-binding model, we predict that Sb or Bi can epitaxially grow on a stable and ferromagnetic MnO2 thin film substrate, forming a flat honeycomb sheet. The flatness of Sb or Bi provides an opportunity for the existence of Dirac points in the Brillouin zone, with its position effectively tuned by surface hydrogenation. The Dirac points in spin up and spin down channels split due to the proximity effects induced by MnO2. In the presence of both intrinsic and Rashba spin-orbit coupling, we find two band gaps exhibiting a large

  18. Skin Dictionary

    MedlinePlus

    ... your skin, hair, and nails Skin dictionary Camp Discovery Good Skin Knowledge lesson plans and activities Video library Find a ... your skin, hair, and nails Skin dictionary Camp Discovery Good Skin Knowledge lesson plans and activities Video library Find a ...

  19. Skin graft

    MedlinePlus

    Skin transplant; Skin autografting; FTSG; STSG; Split thickness skin graft; Full thickness skin graft ... site. Most people who are having a skin graft have a split-thickness skin graft. This takes ...

  20. Discriminating between Z Prime -boson effects and effects of anomalous gauge couplings in the double production of W{sup {+-}} bosons at a linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Vasili V.; Pankov, A. A.

    2013-06-15

    The potential of the International Linear electron-positron Collider (ILC) for seeking, in the annihilation production of W{sup {+-}}-boson pairs, signals induced by new neutral gauge bosons predicted by models belonging to various classes and featuring an extended gauge sector is studied. Limits that will be obtained at ILC for the parameters and masses of Z Prime bosons are compared with present-day and future data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The possibility of discriminating between the effects of Z-Z Prime mixing and signals induced by anomalous gauge couplings (AGC) is demonstrated within theoretically motivated trilinear gauge models involving several free anomalous parameters. It is found that the sensitivity of ILC to the effects of Z-Z Prime mixing in the process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} and its ability to discriminate between these two new-physics scenarios, Z Prime and AGC, become substantially higher upon employing polarized initial (e{sup +}e{sup -}) and final (W{sup {+-}}) states.

  1. 5-Aminolevulinic Acid-based Photodynamic Intense Pulsed Light Therapy Shows Better Effects in the Treatment of Skin Photoaging in Asian Skin

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Leihong Flora; Gold, Michael H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of photodynamic intense pulsed light therapy on skin photoaging in Asian skin. Methods: This was a prospective, single-blinded, controlled, clinical trial with 40 patients enrolled. The enrolled patients applied 5% 5-aminolevulinic acid on the left side of the face while a placebo was applied on the right side of the face. After a one-hour incubation, the patients received intense pulsed light therapy. After four treatment cycles, the pH values, transepidermal water loss of the dermis of the forehead and canthus skin, as well as the moisture capacity of stratum corneum and the global score of photoaging were assessed. Results: The pH value of forehead and canthus skin, moisture capacity of stratum corneum, and the dermis of forehead and canthus skin of the photodynamic intense pulsed light therapy treated sides were significantly higher than those of the control sides in all of the patients. The photoaging score decreased after the therapy on both sides, with the photodynamic intense pulsed light therapy treated sides decreasing more than the control sides (P<0.01). Conclusion: 5-aminolevulinic acid photodynamic intense pulsed light therapy showed better effects in the treatment of skin photoaging compared to intense pulsed light therapy alone. PMID:20725543

  2. Skin effect mitigation in laser processed multi-walled carbon nanotube/copper conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Keramatnejad, K.; Zhou, Y. S.; Gao, Y.; Rabiee Golgir, H.; Wang, M.; Lu, Y. F.; Jiang, L.; Silvain, J.-F.

    2015-10-21

    In this study, laser-processed multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/Cu conductors are introduced as potential passive components to mitigate the skin effect of Cu at high frequencies (0–10 MHz). Suppressed skin effect is observed in the MWCNT/Cu conductors compared to primitive Cu. At an AC frequency of 10 MHz, a maximum AC resistance reduction of 94% was observed in a MWCNT/Cu conductor after being irradiated at a laser power density of 189 W/cm{sup 2}. The reduced skin effect in the MWCNT/Cu conductors is ascribed to the presence of MWCNT channels which are insensitive to AC frequencies. The laser irradiation process is observed to play a crucial role in reducing contact resistance at the MWCNT-Cu interfaces, removing impurities in MWCNTs, and densifying MWCNT films.

  3. New derivation method and simulation of skin effect in biological tissue.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaoli; Zhou, Qianxiang; Liu, Zhongqi; Xie, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Based on the electrical properties of biological tissues, bioimpedance measurement technology can be employed to collect physiologic and pathologic information by measuring changes in human bioimpedance. When an alternating current (AC) is applied as a detection signal to a tissue, the current field distribution, which is affected by skin effect, is related to both the bioimpedance of the tissue and the AC frequency. These relations would possibly reduce the accuracy and reliability of the measurement. In this study, an electromagnetic theory-based method, in which cylindrical conductor were divided into layers, was used to obtain current field distribution models of human limbs. Model simulations were conducted in MATLAB. The skin effect phenomenon and its characteristics in human tissues at different frequencies were observed, thus providing essential data on skin effect, which are useful in the development of bioimpedance measurement technology. PMID:26406033

  4. Effects of Cosmetic Formulations Containing Hydroxyacids on Sun-Exposed Skin: Current Applications and Future Developments

    PubMed Central

    Kornhauser, Andrija; Coelho, Sergio G.; Hearing, Vincent J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes recent data on the effects of various skin formulations containing hydroxyacids (HAs) and related products on sun-exposed skin. The most frequently used classes of these products, such as α- and β-hydroxyacids, polyhydroxy acids, and bionic acids, are reviewed, and their application in cosmetic formulations is described. Special emphasis is devoted to the safety evaluation of these formulations, particularly on the effects of their prolonged use on sun-exposed skin. We also discuss the important contribution of cosmetic vehicles in these types of studies. Data on the effects of HAs on melanogenesis and tanning are also included. Up-to-date methods and techniques used in those explorations, as well as selected future developments in the cosmetic area, are presented. PMID:22675344

  5. Numerical simulation of filling a magnetic flux tube with a cold plasma: Anomalous plasma effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra; Leung, W. C.

    1995-01-01

    Large-scale models of plasmaspheric refilling have revealed that during the early stage of the refilling counterstreaming ion beams are a common feature. However, the instability of such ion beams and its effect on refilling remain unexplored. In order to learn the basic effects of ion beam instabilities on refilling, we have performed numerical simulations of the refilling of an artificial magnetic flux tube. (The shape and size of the tube are assumed so that the essential features of the refilling problem are kept in the simulation and at the same time the small scale processes driven by the ion beams are sufficiently resolved.) We have also studied the effect of commonly found equatorially trapped warm and/or hot plasma on the filling of a flux tube with a cold plasma. Three types of simulation runs have been performed.

  6. Anomalous effect of disorder on spin fluctuations in non-centrosymmetric superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelstein, Victor M.

    2008-09-01

    The spin susceptibility tensor χsij(T) of an impure superconductor (SC) with broken mirror symmetry has been evaluated and a great effect of impurity scattering has been shown. As opposed to conventional singlet superconductors, where the ordinary impurity scattering is known to have no effect on χs(T) , the spin susceptibility of a polar symmetry superconductor with s -wave pairing can be isotropic and equal to its value in the normal state in the “dirty” limit Tcτ≪1 , while the superconductor stays in a full-gap state. The effect is bound up with spin-flip transitions which accompany the electron scattering in conductors with the band spin-orbit coupling.

  7. Anomalous ligand effect in gold(I)-catalyzed intramolecular hydroamination of alkynes.

    PubMed

    Gaggioli, Carlo Alberto; Ciancaleoni, Gianluca; Biasiolo, Luca; Bistoni, Giovanni; Zuccaccia, Daniele; Belpassi, Leonardo; Belanzoni, Paola; Tarantelli, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    We analyzed the ligand electronic effect in a gold(I)-catalyzed intramolecular alkyne hydroamination, through a DFT and charge-displacement function (CDF) study. We found that, in the presence of π-electron conjugation between the alkyne and the nucleophilic functionality, electron poor ligands modify the coordination mode and the geometric parameters of the substrate in such a way that, contrary to expectations, the activation barrier of the nucleophilic attack increases. This remarkable effect is due to the competition between alkyne activation and nucleophile deactivation. The general relevance of these findings is highlighted. PMID:25738820

  8. Intrinsic quantum anomalous Hall effect in the kagome lattice Cs2LiMn3F12

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Gang; Lian, Biao; Zhang, Shou -Cheng

    2015-10-27

    In a kagome lattice, the time reversal symmetry can be broken by a staggered magnetic flux emerging from ferromagnetic ordering and intrinsic spin-orbit coupling, leading to several well-separated nontrivial Chern bands and intrinsic quantum anomalous Hall effect. Based on this idea and ab initio calculations, we propose the realization of the intrinsic quantum anomalous Hall effect in the single layer Cs2Mn3F12 kagome lattice and on the (001) surface of a Cs2LiMn3F12 single crystal by modifying the carrier coverage on it, where the band gap is around 20 meV. Furthermore, a simplified tight binding model based on the in-plane ddσ antibonding states is constructed to understand the topological band structures of the system.

  9. Effects of Turmeric (Curcuma longa) on Skin Health: A Systematic Review of the Clinical Evidence.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Alexandra R; Branum, Amy; Sivamani, Raja K

    2016-08-01

    Turmeric (Curcuma longa), a commonly used spice throughout the world, has been shown to exhibit antiinflammatory, antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anti-neoplastic properties. Growing evidence shows that an active component of turmeric, curcumin, may be used medically to treat a variety of dermatologic diseases. This systematic review was conducted to examine the evidence for the use of both topical and ingested turmeric/curcumin to modulate skin health and function. The PubMed and Embase databases were systematically searched for clinical studies involving humans that examined the relationship between products containing turmeric, curcumin, and skin health. A total of 234 articles were uncovered, and a total of 18 studies met inclusion criteria. Nine studies evaluated the effects of ingestion, eight studies evaluated the effects of topical, and one study evaluated the effects of both ingested and topical application of turmeric/curcumin. Skin conditions examined include acne, alopecia, atopic dermatitis, facial photoaging, oral lichen planus, pruritus, psoriasis, radiodermatitis, and vitiligo. Ten studies noted statistically significant improvement in skin disease severity in the turmeric/curcumin treatment groups compared with control groups. Overall, there is early evidence that turmeric/curcumin products and supplements, both oral and topical, may provide therapeutic benefits for skin health. However, currently published studies are limited and further studies will be essential to better evaluate efficacy and the mechanisms involved. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27213821

  10. The Effect of the iBEAM Evo Carbon Fiber Tabletop on Skin Sparing

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, John B. Godwin, Guy A.

    2011-10-01

    Replicating the attenuation properties of the treatment tabletop are of primary importance for accurate treatment planning; however, the effect of the tabletop on the skin-sparing properties of x-rays can be overlooked. Under some conditions, the reaction of skin to the radiation can be so serious as to be the dose-limiting organ for radiotherapy treatment. Hence, an understanding of the magnitude of the reduction in skin sparing is important. Because of the development of image-guided radiotherapy, modern tabletops have been developed without the use of metal supports that otherwise provided the necessary level of rigidity. Rigidity is instead provided by compressed foam within a carbon-fiber shell, which, although it provides artefact-free imaging and high levels of rigidity, has an adverse affect on the dose in the build-up region. Representative of this type is the iBEAM evo tabletop, whose effect on the skin dose was determined at 6-MV, 10-MV, and 18-MV x-rays. Skin dose was found to increase by 60-70% owing to the tabletop, with the effect increasing with field size and decreasing with energy. By considering an endpoint of erythema, a radiobiological advantage of selecting 10 MV over 6 MV for applicable treatments was demonstrated.

  11. Protective effects of black rice bran against chemically-induced inflammation of mouse skin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated the inhibitory effects of black rice (cv. LK1-3-6-12-1-1) bran against 12-O-tetradecanolylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced skin edema and 2,4-dinitroflurobenzene (DNFB)-induced allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) in inflammatory mouse models. We also determined the effects of the bran...

  12. Anomalous Global Effects Induced by "Blind" Distractors in Visual Hemifield Defects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Stigchel, S.; Nijboer, T. C. W.; Bergsma, D. P.; Abegg, M.; Barton, J. J. S.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has revealed that a stimulus presented in the blind visual field of participants with visual hemifield defects can evoke oculomotor competition, in the absence of awareness. Here we studied three cases to determine whether a distractor in a blind hemifield would be capable of inducing a "global effect", a shift of saccade…

  13. Quantum Oscillations without a Fermi Surface and the Anomalous de Haas-van Alphen Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knolle, Johannes; Cooper, Nigel R.

    2015-10-01

    The de Haas-van Alphen effect (dHvAE), describing oscillations of the magnetization as a function of magnetic field, is commonly assumed to be a definite sign for the presence of a Fermi surface (FS). Indeed, the effect forms the basis of a well-established experimental procedure for accurately measuring FS topology and geometry of metallic systems, with parameters commonly extracted by fitting to the Lifshitz-Kosevich (LK) theory based on Fermi liquid theory. Here we show that, in contrast to this canonical situation, there can be quantum oscillations even for band insulators of certain types. We provide simple analytic formulas describing the temperature dependence of the quantum oscillations in this setting, showing strong deviations from LK theory. We draw connections to recent experiments and discuss how our results can be used in future experiments to accurately determine, e.g., hybridization gaps in heavy-fermion systems.

  14. Effect of structural defects on anomalous ultrasound propagation in solids during second-order phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Prudnikov, P. V. Prudnikov, V. V.; Nosikhin, E. A.

    2008-05-15

    The effect of structural defects on the critical ultrasound absorption and ultrasound velocity dispersion in Ising-like three-dimensional systems is studied. A field-theoretical description of the dynamic effects of acoustic-wave propagation in solids during phase transitions is performed with allowance for both fluctuation and relaxation absorption mechanisms. The temperature and frequency dependences of the scaling functions of the absorption coefficient and the ultrasound velocity dispersion are calculated in a two-loop approximation for homogeneous and structurally disordered systems, and their asymptotic behavior in hydrodynamic and critical regions is separated. As compared to a homogeneous system, the presence of structural defects in it is shown to cause a stronger increase in the sound absorption coefficient and the sound velocity dispersion even in the hydrodynamic region as the critical temperature is reached. As compared to homogeneous analogs, structurally disordered systems should exhibit stronger temperature and frequency dependences of the acoustic characteristics in the critical region.

  15. The Skindex instruments to measure the effects of skin disease on quality of life.

    PubMed

    Chren, Mary-Margaret

    2012-04-01

    Skindex-29 and Skindex-16 are validated measures of the effects of skin diseases on patients' quality of life. This article reviews the development of both versions of Skindex, discusses their measurement properties and interpretability, and gives examples of how they have been used and adapted for dermatologic research internationally. Studies of quality of life in patients with nonmelanoma skin cancer are described to illustrate the use of Skindex to understand quality of life and to compare effectiveness of different treatments for this highly prevalent condition. PMID:22284137

  16. Anomalous effective magnetoconductivity in disordered bipolar semiconductors: Theory and experimental simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaikovsky, Isaak; Alperovich, Leonid; Gurvich, Yuri; Melnikov, Andrey; Biryukov, Sergey

    2002-05-01

    We present the results of measuring transverse conductivity α⊥c of bipolar heterogeneous semiconductors in classical strong magnetic fields. A stochastic distribution of current carriers (electrons and holes) was created by interband illumination through special masks. The main parameters of crystalline p-Si:B placed in liquid He were the concentrations of the main and compensating impurities, 7×1015 and 4×1012 cm-3, respectively; and the mobilities of electrons and holes, 1×106 and 5×104 cm2/V s, respectively. An anomaly in α⊥c was observed: the ratio of α⊥c for heterogeneous and homogeneous samples depended on magnetic field in a nonmonotonic way, i.e., alternation of increasing and decreasing regions of relative α⊥c for H=0-10 kGs and monotonic growth for H=10-40 kGs. To explain this effect, a theory is presented which is a development of the α⊥c theory for heterogeneous semiconductors with one kind of carrier. It is shown that the effect is due to the redistribution of roles of electrons and holes in magnetoconductivity of homogeneous semiconductors. This effect has high sensitivity to degree of disorder and can be used for detection of small irregularities and as a diagnostic of semiconductor purity.

  17. Flavanone silibinin treatment attenuates nitrogen mustard-induced toxic effects in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anil K; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Inturi, Swetha; Kumar, Dileep; Orlicky, David J; Agarwal, Chapla; White, Carl W; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2015-05-15

    Currently, there is no effective antidote to prevent skin injuries by sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM), which are vesicating agents with potential relevance to chemical warfare, terrorist attacks, or industrial/laboratory accidents. Our earlier report has demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of silibinin, a natural flavanone, in reversing monofunctional alkylating SM analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide-induced toxic effects in mouse skin. To translate this effect to a bifunctional alkylating vesicant, herein, efficacy studies were carried out with NM. Topical application of silibinin (1 or 2mg) 30 min after NM exposure on the dorsal skin of male SKH-1 hairless mice significantly decreased NM-induced toxic lesions at 24, 72 or 120 h post-exposure. Specifically, silibinin treatment resulted in dose-dependent reduction of NM-induced increase in epidermal thickness, dead and denuded epidermis, parakeratosis and microvesication. Higher silibinin dose also caused a 79% and 51%reversal in NM-induced increases in myeloperoxidase activity and COX-2 levels, respectively. Furthermore, silibinin completely prevented NM-induced H2A.X phosphorylation, indicating reversal of DNA damage which could be an oxidative DNA damage as evidenced by high levels of 8-oxodG in NM-exposed mouse skin that was significantly reversed by silibinin. Together, these findings suggest that attenuation of NM-induced skin injury by silibinin is due to its effects on the pathways associated with DNA damage, inflammation, vesication and oxidative stress. In conclusion, results presented here support the optimization of silibinin as an effective treatment of skin injury by vesicants. PMID:25791923

  18. Mechanistic Effects of Long-Term Ultraviolet B Irradiation Induce Epidermal and Dermal Changes in Human Skin Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Hachiya, Akira; Sriwiriyanont, Penkanok; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Ohuchi, Atsushi; Kitahara, Takashi; Takema, Yoshinori; Kitzmiller, William J.; Visscher, Marty O.; Tsuboi, Ryoji; Boissy, Raymond E.

    2009-01-01

    UVB irradiation has been reported to induce photoaging and suppress systemic immune function that could lead to photocarcinogenesis. However, because of the paucity of an UVB-induced photodamaged skin model, precise and temporal mechanism(s) underlying the deleterious effects of long-term UVB exposure on human skin have yet to be delineated. In this study, we established a model using human skin xenografted onto severe combined immunodeficient mice, which were subsequently challenged by repeated UVB irradiation for 6 weeks. Three-dimensional optical image analysis of skin replicas and noninvasive biophysical measurements illustrated a significant increase in skin surface roughness, similar to premature photoaging, and a significant loss of skin elasticity after long-term UVB exposure. Resembling authentically aged skin, UVB-exposed samples exhibited significant increases in epithelial keratins (K6, K16, K17), elastins, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-1, MMP-9, MMP-12) as well as degradation of collagens (I, IV, VII). The UVB-induced deterioration of fibrous keratin intermediate filaments was also observed in the stratum corneum. Additionally, similarities in gene expression patterns between our model and chronologically aged skin substantiated the plausible relationship between photodamage and chronological age. Furthermore, severe skin photodamage was observed when neutralizing antibodies against TIMP-1, an endogenous inhibitor of MMPs, were administered during the UVB exposure regimen. Taken together, these findings suggest that our skin xenograft model recapitulates premature photoaged skin and provides a comprehensive tool with which to assess the deleterious effects of UVB irradiation. PMID:19147832

  19. Reduction of skin water loss in the newborn. I. Effect of applying topical agents.

    PubMed Central

    Rutter, N; Hull, D

    1981-01-01

    The waterproofing effect of a number of creams, oils, and greases was examined by measuring water loss from adult skin before and after topical application. Creams had a high water content and were ineffective, oils produced a modest fall in water loss, but paraffin in grease form had a pronounced, sustained waterproofing effect. A paraffin mixture (80% soft, 20% hard paraffin (BP) was then applied to the skin of 3 preterm babies nursed naked in incubators. Overall skin water loss fell by 40 to 60% after application and was still lower than pretreatment levels 6 hours later. The topical application of paraffin offers a new approach to reduction of the high evaporative water and heat losses of preterm babies. PMID:7294868

  20. Transcriptomic analysis of bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) skin biopsies to assess the effects of emerging contaminants.

    PubMed

    Lunardi, Denise; Abelli, Luigi; Panti, Cristina; Marsili, Letizia; Fossi, Maria Cristina; Mancia, Annalaura

    2016-03-01

    Chemicals discovered in water at levels that may be significantly different than expected are referred to as contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) because the risk to environmental health posed by their occurrence/frequency is still unknown. The worldwide distributed compounds perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and bisphenol A (BPA) may fall into this category due to effects on endocrine receptors. We applied an ex vivo assay using small slices of bioptic skin from the bottlenose dolphin, Tursiops truncatus, cultured and treated for 24 h with different PFOA or BPA concentrations to analyze global gene expression. RNA was labeled and hybridized to a species-specific oligomicroarray. The skin transcriptome held information on the contaminant exposure, potentially predictive about long-term effects on health, being the genes affected involved in immunity modulation, response to stress, lipid homeostasis, and development. The transcriptomic signature of dolphin skin could be therefore relevant as classifier for a specific contaminant. PMID:26794494

  1. The inflammatory and cytotoxic effects of a nitric oxide releasing cream on normal skin.

    PubMed

    Ormerod, A D; Copeland, P; Hay, I; Husain, A; Ewen, S W

    1999-09-01

    We describe the pro-inflammatory and cytotoxic effects of nitric oxide in vivo in human skin. Nitrite and ascorbic acid were mixed on the skin of 12 normal volunteers, three times daily, to release nitric oxide. Exposure to nitric oxide was varied by randomizing the concentration of nitrite and duration of application. Nitric oxide treated skin showed significant increases in cells expressing CD3, CD4, CD8, CD68, neutrophil elastase, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, nitrosotyrosine, p53, and apoptotic cells compared with skin treated with ascorbic acid alone. There was no significant increase in mast cells. Following application of nitric oxide there were significantly fewer CD1a positive Langerhans cells in the epidermis. These appeared to lose dendritic morphology and migrate from the epidermis. There was no significant difference in staining for Ki-67, a marker related to proliferating cell nuclear antigen, between active and control skin but staining was greater after exposure to higher dose nitric oxide than the low dose. Apoptosis, cytotoxicity, and p53 staining were relatively greater after 48 h exposure than after 24 h. These results suggest that nitric oxide is pro-inflammatory and is toxic to DNA, leading to the accumulation of p53 and subsequent apoptosis. High-dose nitric oxide paradoxically led to a smaller increase in macrophages and T cells than low dose suggesting an immunosuppressive effect of higher levels. PMID:10469339

  2. Strong Quantum Size Effects in Pb(111) Thin Films Mediated by Anomalous Friedel Oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Yu; Wu, Biao; Li, Chong; Eguiluz, Adolfo G; Weitering, Hanno; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2010-01-01

    Using first-principles calculations within density functional theory, we study Friedel oscillations (FOs) in the electron density at different metal surfaces and their influence on the lattice relaxation and stability of ultrathin metal films.We show that the FOs at the Pb(111) surface decay as 1=x with the distance x from the surface, different from the conventional 1=x2 power law at other metal surfaces. The underlying physical reason for this striking difference is tied to the strong nesting of the two different Fermi sheets along the Pb(111) direction. The interference of the strong FOs emanating from the two surfaces of a Pb(111) film, in turn, not only results in superoscillatory interlayer relaxations around the center of the film, but also determines its stability in the quantum regime. As a simple and generic picture, the present findings also explain why quantum size effects are exceptionally robust in Pb(111) films.

  3. Effect of pore blockage on adsorption isotherms and dynamics: Anomalous adsorption of iodine on activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, S.K.; Liu, F.; Arvind, G.

    2000-04-18

    Isotherm hysteresis and pore-clocking effects of trapped molecules on adsorption dynamics is studied here, using the iodine-carbon system in the 300--343 K temperature range. It is found that a portion of the iodine is strongly adsorbed, and does not desorb, even over very long time scales, while the remainder adsorbs reversibly as a homogeneous monolayer with a Langmuirian isotherm in mesopores. The strongly adsorbed iodine appears to adsorb in micropores and at the mesopore mouths, hindering uptake of the reversible iodine. The uptake data for the adsorption and desorption dynamics of the reversible part is found to be best explained by means of a pore mouth resistance control mechanism. it is concluded that the dynamics of the adsorption and desorption at the pore mouth is important at early stages of the process.

  4. Anomalous diffusion and griffiths effects near the many-body localization transition.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Kartiek; Gopalakrishnan, Sarang; Knap, Michael; Müller, Markus; Demler, Eugene

    2015-04-24

    We explore the high-temperature dynamics of the disordered, one-dimensional XXZ model near the many-body localization (MBL) transition, focusing on the delocalized (i.e., "metallic") phase. In the vicinity of the transition, we find that this phase has the following properties: (i) local magnetization fluctuations relax subdiffusively; (ii) the ac conductivity vanishes near zero frequency as a power law; and (iii) the distribution of resistivities becomes increasingly broad at low frequencies, approaching a power law in the zero-frequency limit. We argue that these effects can be understood in a unified way if the metallic phase near the MBL transition is a quantum Griffiths phase. We establish scaling relations between the associated exponents, assuming a scaling form of the spin-diffusion propagator. A phenomenological classical resistor-capacitor model captures all the essential features. PMID:25955037

  5. Anomalous water molecules and mechanistic effects of water nanotube clusters confined to molecular porous crystals.

    PubMed

    Tadokoro, Makoto; Ohhara, Takashi; Ohhata, Yuhki; Suda, Takaaki; Miyasato, Yuji; Yamada, Takeshi; Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Ichiro; Kurihara, Kazuo; Oguni, Masaharu; Nakasuji, Kazuhiro; Yamamuro, Osamu; Ryota, Kuroki

    2010-02-18

    The movement of water molecules in the limited space present within nanoscale regions, which is different from the molecular motion of bulk water, is significantly affected by strong interfacial interactions with the surrounding outer walls. Hence, most of the water molecules that are confined to nanochannel spaces having widths less than ca. 2 nm can generally be classified together as "structural water". Since the motions of such water molecules are limited by interfacial interactions with the outer wall, the nature of structural water, which is strongly influenced by the interactions, will have different characteristics from normal water. For our investigations on the characteristics of structural water, we have developed a nanoporous crystal with a diameter of ca. 1.6 nm; it was constructed from 1-D hydrophilic channels by self-organization of the designed molecules. A tubelike three-layered water cluster, called a water nanotube (WNT), is formed in each internal channel space and is regulated by H-bonds with the outer wall. The WNT undergoes a glass transition (T(g) = 107 K) and behaves as a liquid; it freezes at 234 K and changes into an icelike nanotube cluster. In this study, the structure of the WNT is investigated through neutron structure analysis, and it is observed to stabilize by a mechanistic anchor effect of structural water. Furthermore, from neutron-scattering experiments, it is seen that a few water molecules around the center of the WNT move approximately with the same diffusion constant as those in bulk water; however, the residence time and average jump length are longer, despite the restrictions imposed by the H-bonding with structural water. The behavior of mobile water within a WNT is investigated; this can be used to elucidate the mechanism for the effect of structural water on vital functions on the cell surface. PMID:20102158

  6. Effects of TPA on short-circuit current across frog skin

    SciTech Connect

    Mauro, T.; O'Brien, T.G.; Civan, M.M.

    1987-02-01

    TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate) is an effective tumor promoter that affects a variety of ion transport processes. To examine the relationship between effects on transport and growth and differentiation, the authors have been studying the actions of TPA on frog skin, a particularly well-characterized epithelium. They have reported that high concentrations of TPA stimulate base-line short-circuit current (I/sub SC/) and inhibit the subsequent natriferic action of vasopressin. The current study of 89 preparations extends those findings. The K/sub m/ of the stimulatory effect of TPA is approx. 3 nM; this high affinity indicates that the transport phenomenon does not simply reflect a nonspecific interaction of phorbol ester with the plasma membranes. TPA acts largely or entirely at the mucosal surface of both split and whole skins; thus the sidedness of the effect does not arise from adsorption onto the underlying connective tissue when TPA is applied to the serosal surface of whole skin. Amiloride, an inhibitor of apical Na entry, abolishes I/sub SC/ across frog skins pretreated with TPA. The phorbol ester also increases I/sub SC/ across split skins, preparations which do not produce net Cl transport. The present results indicate that frog skin is highly responsive to TPA at concentrations known to activate protein kinase C in broken-cell preparations. The actions on I/sub SC/ appear to reflect changes in transepithelial Na transport modulated at the apical membranes. The full biochemical events triggered by TPA remain to be clarified; in part, TPA's actions may be mediated by leukotrienes produced by activation of the lipoxygenase pathway of arachidonic acid metabolism.

  7. Biological effects of brachytherapy using a (32)P-patch on the skin of Sencar mice.

    PubMed

    Salgueiro, M J; Collia, N; Durán, H; Palmieri, M; Medina, V; Ughetti, R; Nicolini, J; Zubillaga, M

    2009-10-01

    In recent years, specially designed patches containing beta emitters have been developed for contact brachytherapy of skin lesions. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the biological effects of the (32)P-patch on the skin of Sencar mice as a result of a brachytherapy treatment. For this purpose, a (32)P-patch was prepared with Chromic (32)P-phosphate and silicone and the classical model of two-stage skin carcinogenesis was reproduced in Sencar mice. Animals were divided in six groups. Four groups received the contact brachytherapy treatments using a scheme of a single session of 40 and 60Gy (SD40 and SD60) and a scheme of two sessions of 40 and 60Gy each (FD40 and FD60). The other two groups were used as controls of the single (CSD) and the fractionated (CFD) treatments. Radiation doses were estimated with equations derived from the MIRD DOSE scheme, and biologically effective doses (BED) were calculated according to equations derived from the linear-quadratic model. The endpoint to evaluate the treatments effects was tumor size after a follow-up period of 44 days. Finally, animals were sacrificed in order to get samples of all tumors for histological analysis and PCNA staining. Erythema, dermatitis and skin ulceration developed in almost all treated animals, but they gradually healed with regeneration of tissue during the follow-up period. Radiation effects on the skin of SD40, SD60, FD40 and FD60 showed a significant reduction of the tumor size with regard to controls, independently of the scheme and the radiation dose considered. PCNA staining scores of control groups were higher than for treated groups, independently of the scheme and the radiation dose considered. This radioactive (32)P-silicone-patch which is easy to prepare and use in the treatment of skin diseases, seems promising as a radioactive device for clinical use. PMID:19525118

  8. Effect of a lipid-rich emollient containing ceramide 3 in experimentally induced skin barrier dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kucharekova, M; Schalkwijk, J; Van De Kerkhof, P C M; Van De Valk, P G M

    2002-06-01

    In the present study we compared the effect of a ceramide 3-containing emollient (Locobase(R) Repair) with a control emollient (vaselinum album/cremor lanette ana) and untreated damaged skin using clinical, bioengineering and immunohistochemical methods in two different models of experimentally induced skin barrier dysfunction. In model A (n = 13) skin barrier dysfunction was inflicted at three investigation sites by tape stripping. In model B (n = 13) the volunteers were patch tested at three investigation sites with sodium dodecyl sulphate (0.2%) for 4 h a day for 4 consecutive days. The investigation sites were treated once a day with the above-mentioned agents. Irritant reaction was assessed daily by erythema scoring and measurements of transepidermal water loss (TEWL). After 5D, punch biopsies were taken from all sites. Immunohistochemical assessment was carried out with respect to epidermal proliferation, epidermal differentiation and Langerhans cells. Tape stripping resulted in an erythematous reaction and an increase of TEWL associated with up-regulation of cycling cells, involucrin and expression of cytokeratin 16. At day 4, ceramide 3-containing emollient significantly decreased (p < 0.03) the erythema score, TEWL and cycling cells in comparison with the untreated site. Repetitive exposure to SDS induced a variable degree of erythema, gradual increase of TEWL, an increase of cycling cells, and up-regulation of involucrin, E-FABP and SKALP. The treatment with the control emollient significantly prevented erythema, increase of TEWL and cycling cells at day 4 compared to the untreated site. In summary, the present study demonstrated that both tested emollients improve skin barrier in different conditions compared to the untreated skin. There is some indication that formulations containing skin-related lipids might be of benefit in barrier disruption following tape stripping. Different models and clinical trials are needed to establish the usefulness in

  9. Skin cooling aids cerebrovascular function more effectively under severe than moderate heat stress.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Rebekah A I; Ainslie, Philip N; Fan, Jui-Lin; Wilson, Luke C; Thomas, Kate N; Cotter, James D

    2010-05-01

    Skin surface cooling has been shown to improve orthostatic tolerance; however, the influence of severe heat stress on cardiovascular and cerebrovascular responses to skin cooling remains unknown. Nine healthy males, resting supine in a water-perfusion suit, were heated to +1.0 and +2.0 degrees C elevation in body core temperature (T (c)). Blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (transcranial Doppler ultrasound), mean arterial pressure (MAP; photoplethysmography), stroke volume (SV; Modelflow), total peripheral resistance (TPR; Modelflow), heart rate (HR; ECG) and the partial pressure of end-tidal carbon dioxide (P(ET)CO(2)) were measured continuously during 1-min baseline and 3-min lower body negative pressure (LBNP, -15 mm Hg) when heated without and again with skin surface cooling. Nine participants tolerated +1 degrees C and six participants reached +2 degrees C. Skin cooling elevated (P = 0.004) MAP ~4% during baseline and LBNP at +1 degrees C T (c). During LBNP, skin cooling increased SV (9%; P = 0.010) and TPR (0.9 mm Hg L(-1) min, P = 0.013) and lowered HR (13 b min(-1), P = 0.012) at +1 degrees C T (c) and +2 degrees C T (c) collectively. At +2 degrees C T (c), skin cooling elevated P(ET)CO(2) ~4.3 mm Hg (P = 0.011) and therefore reduced cerebral vascular resistance ~0.1 mm Hg cm(-1) s at baseline and LBNP (P = 0.012). In conclusion, skin cooling under severe heating and mild orthostatic stress maintained cerebral blood flow more effectively than it did under moderate heating, in conjunction with elevated carbon dioxide pressure, SV and arterial resistance. PMID:19946700

  10. Anomalous Hall effect in epitaxial ferrimagnetic anti-perovskite Mn{sub 4−x}Dy{sub x}N films

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, M.; Wu, S. X. Zhou, W. Q.; Ren, L. Z.; Wang, Y. J.; Wang, G. L.; Li, S. W.

    2015-08-07

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) has been studied for ferrimagnetic antiperovskite Mn{sub 4−x}Dy{sub x}N films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. The introduction of Dy changes the AHE dramatically, even changes its sign, while the variations in magnetization are negligible. Two sign reversals of the AHE (negative-positive-negative) are ascribed to the variation of charge carriers as a result of Fermi surface reconstruction. We further demonstrate that the AHE current J{sub AH} is dissipationless (independent of the scattering rate), by confirming that anomalous Hall conductivity, σ{sub AH}, is proportional to the carrier density n at 5 K. Our study may provide a route to further utilize antiperovskite manganese nitrides in spintronics.

  11. SnTe field effect transistors and the anomalous electrical response of structural phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Haitao Zhu, Hao; Yuan, Hui; Li, Qiliang; You, Lin; Kopanski, Joseph J.; Richter, Curt A.; Zhao, Erhai

    2014-07-07

    SnTe is a conventional thermoelectric material and has been newly found to be a topological crystalline insulator. In this work, back-gate SnTe field-effect transistors have been fabricated and fully characterized. The devices exhibit n-type transistor behaviors with excellent current-voltage characteristics and large on/off ratio (>10{sup 6}). The device threshold voltage, conductance, mobility, and subthreshold swing have been studied and compared at different temperatures. It is found that the subthreshold swings as a function of temperature have an apparent response to the SnTe phase transition between cubic and rhombohedral structures at 110 K. The abnormal and rapid increase in subthreshold swing around the phase transition temperature may be due to the soft phonon/structure change which causes the large increase in SnTe dielectric constant. Such an interesting and remarkable electrical response to phase transition at different temperatures makes the small SnTe transistor attractive for various electronic devices.

  12. Intrinsic quantum spin Hall and anomalous Hall effects in h-Sb/Bi epitaxial growth on a ferromagnetic MnO2 thin film.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian; Sun, Qiang; Wang, Qian; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Jena, Puru

    2016-06-01

    Exploring a two-dimensional intrinsic quantum spin Hall state with a large band gap as well as an anomalous Hall state in realizable materials is one of the most fundamental and important goals for future applications in spintronics, valleytronics, and quantum computing. Here, by combining first-principles calculations with a tight-binding model, we predict that Sb or Bi can epitaxially grow on a stable and ferromagnetic MnO2 thin film substrate, forming a flat honeycomb sheet. The flatness of Sb or Bi provides an opportunity for the existence of Dirac points in the Brillouin zone, with its position effectively tuned by surface hydrogenation. The Dirac points in spin up and spin down channels split due to the proximity effects induced by MnO2. In the presence of both intrinsic and Rashba spin-orbit coupling, we find two band gaps exhibiting a large band gap quantum spin Hall state and a nearly quantized anomalous Hall state which can be tuned by adjusting the Fermi level. Our findings provide an efficient way to realize both quantized intrinsic spin Hall conductivity and anomalous Hall conductivity in a single material. PMID:27181160

  13. Initial Reaction Mechanism of Platinum Nanoparticle in Methanol-Water System and the Anomalous Catalytic Effect of Water.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuangming; Yang, Qingying; Wang, Huanhuan; Zhang, Shuo; Li, Jiong; Wang, Yu; Chu, Wangsheng; Ye, Qing; Song, Li

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the detailed reaction mechanism in the early stage of noble metal nanoparticles is very critical for controlling the final crystal's size, morphology, and properties. Here, we report a systematic study on the initial reaction mechanism of Pt nanoparticles in methanol-water system and demonstrate an anomalous catalytic effect of H2O on the reduction of H2PtCl6 to Pt nanoparticles using a combination of UV-vis, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LCMS), and first-principles calculation methods. The observations reveal the transformation route [PtCl6](2-) → [PtCl5(CH3O)](2-) → [PtCl4](2-) → [PtCl3(CH3O)](2-) → [PtCl2](2-) and finally to form Pt nanoparticles in a pure CH3OH solution. With 10 vol % water adding in the CH3OH solution, a new and distinct chemical reduction pathway is found in which the precursors change from [PtCl6](2-) to [PtCl5(CH3O)(H2O)](2-) to [PtCl4](2-) to [PtCl3(CH3O)(H2O)](2-) to [PtCl2](2-) and to Pt nanoparticles. Notably, the supernumerary water molecular can significantly accelerate the rate of chemical reduction and greatly shorten the reaction time. This work not only elucidates the initial reaction mechanism of Pt nanoparticles but also highlights the pronounced influence of H2O on the reaction pathway, which will provide useful insights for understanding the formation mechanism of noble metal nanoparticles and open up a high efficient way to synthesize new functional nanomaterial. PMID:26258551

  14. The topical use of non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge (DBD): nitric oxide related effects on human skin.

    PubMed

    Heuer, Kiara; Hoffmanns, Martin A; Demir, Erhan; Baldus, Sabrina; Volkmar, Christine M; Röhle, Mirco; Fuchs, Paul C; Awakowicz, Peter; Suschek, Christoph V; Opländer, Christian

    2015-01-30

    Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) devices generate air plasma above the skin containing active and reactive species including nitric oxide (NO). Since NO plays an essential role in skin physiology, a topical application of NO by plasma may be useful in the treatment of skin infections, impaired microcirculation and wound healing. Thus, after safety assessments of plasma treatment using human skin specimen and substitutes, NO-penetration through the epidermis, the loading of skin tissue with NO-derivates in vitro and the effects on human skin in vivo were determined. After the plasma treatment (0-60 min) of skin specimen or reconstructed epidermis no damaging effects were found (TUNEL/MTT). By Franz diffusion cell experiments plasma-induced NO penetration through epidermis and dermal enrichment with NO related species (nitrite 6-fold, nitrate 7-fold, nitrosothiols 30-fold) were observed. Furthermore, skin surface was acidified (~pH 2.7) by plasma treatment (90 s). Plasma application on the forearms of volunteers increased microcirculation fourfold in 1-2 mm and twofold in 6-8 mm depth in the treated skin areas. Regarding the NO-loading effects, skin acidification and increase in dermal microcirculation, plasma devices represent promising tools against chronic/infected wounds. However, efficacy of plasma treatment needs to be quantified in further studies and clinical trials. PMID:25435001

  15. Meloxicam transdermal delivery: effect of eutectic point on the rate and extent of skin permeation

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi-Samani, Soliman; Yousefi, Gholamhossein; Mohammadi, Farhad; Ahmadi, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Drug delivery through the skin can transfer therapeutic levels of drugs for pharmacological effects. Analgesics such as NSAIDs have gastrointestinal side effects and topical dosage forms of these drugs are mainly preferred, especially for local pains. Meloxicam is one of NSAIDs with no topical form in the market. In this research, we attempted to quantify the skin permeation of a meloxicam topical preparation and to show how permeation would be increased by using thymol as an enhancer. The effect of eutectic point of drug and thymol mixture on rate and extent of skin permeation was also studied. Materials and Methods: Different mixtures of thymol and meloxicam (2:8, 4:6, 5:5, 6:4, 8:2) were prepared and their melting point were obtained by differential scanning calorimetry. Then drug permeation was measured using diffusion cells and the Guinea pig skin. Results: Mixtures in ratios 5:5 and 4:6 of meloxicam / thymol showed a new endotherm at 149 and 140°C in DSC thermograms. The permeability of meloxicam from the creams containing 6:4, 5:5 and 4:6 ratios of meloxicam to thymol were 4.71, 15.2, 22.06 µg/cm2 respectively. This was significantly different from the cream of pure meloxicam (3.76 µg/cm2). Conclusion: This study set out to determine that thymol plays as a skin permeation enhancer and increases the meloxicam skin absorption and this enhancement is significant at the eutectic point of drug-enhancer mixture. PMID:24711894

  16. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle Penetration into the Skin and Effects on HaCaT Cells.

    PubMed

    Crosera, Matteo; Prodi, Andrea; Mauro, Marcella; Pelin, Marco; Florio, Chiara; Bellomo, Francesca; Adami, Gianpiero; Apostoli, Pietro; De Palma, Giuseppe; Bovenzi, Massimo; Campanini, Marco; Filon, Francesca Larese

    2015-08-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2NPs) suspensions (concentration 1.0 g/L) in synthetic sweat solution were applied on Franz cells for 24 h using intact and needle-abraded human skin. Titanium content into skin and receiving phases was determined. Cytotoxicity (MTT, AlamarBlue(®) and propidium iodide, PI, uptake assays) was evaluated on HaCat keratinocytes after 24 h, 48 h, and seven days of exposure. After 24 h of exposure, no titanium was detectable in receiving solutions for both intact and damaged skin. Titanium was found in the epidermal layer after 24 h of exposure (0.47 ± 0.33 μg/cm(2)) while in the dermal layer, the concentration was below the limit of detection. Damaged skin, in its whole, has shown a similar concentration (0.53 ± 0.26 μg/cm(2)). Cytotoxicity studies on HaCaT cells demonstrated that TiO2NPs induced cytotoxic effects only at very high concentrations, reducing cell viability after seven days of exposure with EC50s of 8.8 × 10(-4) M (MTT assay), 3.8 × 10(-5) M (AlamarBlue(®) assay), and 7.6 × 10(-4) M (PI uptake, index of a necrotic cell death). Our study demonstrated that TiO2NPs cannot permeate intact and damaged skin and can be found only in the stratum corneum and epidermis. Moreover, the low cytotoxic effect observed on human HaCaT keratinocytes suggests that these nano-compounds have a potential toxic effect at the skin level only after long-term exposure. PMID:26262634

  17. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle Penetration into the Skin and Effects on HaCaT Cells

    PubMed Central

    Crosera, Matteo; Prodi, Andrea; Mauro, Marcella; Pelin, Marco; Florio, Chiara; Bellomo, Francesca; Adami, Gianpiero; Apostoli, Pietro; De Palma, Giuseppe; Bovenzi, Massimo; Campanini, Marco; Larese Filon, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2NPs) suspensions (concentration 1.0 g/L) in synthetic sweat solution were applied on Franz cells for 24 h using intact and needle-abraded human skin. Titanium content into skin and receiving phases was determined. Cytotoxicity (MTT, AlamarBlue® and propidium iodide, PI, uptake assays) was evaluated on HaCat keratinocytes after 24 h, 48 h, and seven days of exposure. After 24 h of exposure, no titanium was detectable in receiving solutions for both intact and damaged skin. Titanium was found in the epidermal layer after 24 h of exposure (0.47 ± 0.33 μg/cm2) while in the dermal layer, the concentration was below the limit of detection. Damaged skin, in its whole, has shown a similar concentration (0.53 ± 0.26 μg/cm2). Cytotoxicity studies on HaCaT cells demonstrated that TiO2NPs induced cytotoxic effects only at very high concentrations, reducing cell viability after seven days of exposure with EC50s of 8.8 × 10−4 M (MTT assay), 3.8 × 10−5 M (AlamarBlue® assay), and 7.6 × 10−4 M (PI uptake, index of a necrotic cell death). Our study demonstrated that TiO2NPs cannot permeate intact and damaged skin and can be found only in the stratum corneum and epidermis. Moreover, the low cytotoxic effect observed on human HaCaT keratinocytes suggests that these nano-compounds have a potential toxic effect at the skin level only after long-term exposure. PMID:26262634

  18. The effects of sulfur mustard exposure and freezing on transdermal penetration of tritiated water through ex vivo pig skin.

    PubMed

    Payne, O J; Graham, S J; Dalton, C H; Spencer, P M; Mansson, R; Jenner, J; Azeke, J; Braue, E

    2013-02-01

    The percutaneous absorption of tritiated water ((3)H(2)O) through sulfur mustard (SM) exposed abdominal pig skin was measured using in vitro Franz-type static diffusion cells. The barrier function to water permeation following exposure to liquid SM for 8 min and excision 3h later did not change significantly. A small, but statistically significant difference (P<0.05) in steady state penetration (Jss), permeability coefficient (Kp) and lag time (t(L)) of (3)H(2)O was observed between fresh skin and skin stored frozen (-20 °C) for up to two weeks. Steady-state penetration and Kp values were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in skin stored frozen compared with fresh skin. Fresh naïve skin had an average Kp of 1.65 × 10(-3) cm h(-1), whereas frozen naïve skin was 2.04 × 10(-3) cm h(-1). Fresh SM exposed skin had a mean Kp of 1.72 × 10(-3) cm h(-1), whereas frozen SM exposed skin was 2.31 × 10(-3) cm h(-1). Lag times were also shorter (P<0.05) in skin that had been stored frozen. Frozen, SM-exposed porcine abdominal skin may be used for in vitro penetration studies, but effects of treatment and storage on the barrier layer should be taken into account. PMID:23041075

  19. Reversal effects of topical retinoic acid on the skin of kidney transplant recipients under systemic corticotherapy.

    PubMed

    De Lacharriére, O; Escoffier, C; Gracia, A M; Teillac, D; Saint Léger, D; Berrebi, C; Debure, A; Lévêque, J L; Kreis, H; De Prost, Y

    1990-11-01

    The systemic long-term corticosteroid treatment administered to kidney graft recipients (KGR) within the framework of the required immunosuppressive therapy induces an atrophy of the skin, from the sixth month onwards. We studied the effect of topical all-trans retinoic acid (0.05%; Galderma Labs.) applied to the forearms of 27 KGR (14 men, 13 women) over a 6-month period. Twenty-four subjects completed the trial. The following results were obtained in the treated forearm versus the untreated forearm (excipient alone): clinically, an increase in skin thickness; by noninvasive techniques, an increase in skin thickness, skin elasticity, skin conductance, and TEWL, and a reduction in the size of the corneocytes. No change in stratum corneum lipid content was observed. A sex-related difference was noted in the response to treatment under our experimental conditions, the female patients responding better. A punch biopsy (4 mm) was performed on both forearms of four patients after the 6-month period. Histologic and ultrastructural examination revealed epidermal and dermal changes evoking increased cellular metabolism in the retinoic acid-treated forearms. PMID:2230213

  20. Human skin penetration and local effects of topical nano zinc oxide after occlusion and barrier impairment.

    PubMed

    Leite-Silva, V R; Sanchez, W Y; Studier, H; Liu, D C; Mohammed, Y H; Holmes, A M; Ryan, E M; Haridass, I N; Chandrasekaran, N C; Becker, W; Grice, J E; Benson, H A E; Roberts, M S

    2016-07-01

    Public health concerns continue to exist over the safety of zinc oxide nanoparticles that are commonly used in sunscreen formulations. In this work, we assessed the effects of two conditions which may be encountered in everyday sunscreen use, occlusion and a compromised skin barrier, on the penetration and local toxicity of two topically applied zinc oxide nanoparticle products. Caprylic/capric triglyceride (CCT) suspensions of commercially used zinc oxide nanoparticles, either uncoated or with a silane coating, were applied to intact and barrier impaired skin of volunteers, without and with occlusion for a period of six hours. The exposure time was chosen to simulate normal in-use conditions. Multiphoton tomography with fluorescence lifetime imaging was used to noninvasively assess zinc oxide penetration and cellular metabolic changes that could be indicative of toxicity. We found that zinc oxide nanoparticles did not penetrate into the viable epidermis of intact or barrier impaired skin of volunteers, without or with occlusion. We also observed no apparent toxicity in the viable epidermis below the application sites. These findings were validated by ex vivo human skin studies in which zinc penetration was assessed by multiphoton tomography with fluorescence lifetime imaging as well as Zinpyr-1 staining and toxicity was assessed by MTS assays in zinc oxide treated skin cryosections. In conclusion, applications of zinc oxide nanoparticles under occlusive in-use conditions to volunteers are not associated with any measurable zinc oxide penetration into, or local toxicity in the viable epidermis below the application site. PMID:27131753

  1. The effects of formulation on the penetration and retention of budesonide in canine skin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ahlstrom, Liisa A; Cross, Sheree E; Mills, Paul C

    2013-06-01

    This study investigated the effects of formulation on the penetration and retention kinetics of budesonide through canine skin in vitro. Full thickness, thoracic, dog skin was mounted in Franz-type diffusion cells and randomly assigned to receive one of three 0.025% (0.25mg/mL) budesonide-containing formulations: Barazone (BZ, a novel formulation), isopropyl myristate (IPM) or propylene glycol (PG). At regular intervals over 84h, the amount of budesonide penetrating or retained within the skin was quantified using high performance liquid chromatography. The restricted (or residual) maximum likelihood mixed model predicted that the flux of budesonide from BZ was 9.2-fold (P<0.001) and 105-fold (P<0.001) greater than from IPM and PG, respectively. Similarly, the skin retention of budesonide from BZ was more than 3-fold (P<0.0001) and nearly 6-fold (P<0.0001) greater than from IPM and PG, respectively. This study has demonstrated that the formulation can greatly affect the skin penetration and retention of budesonide in dogs, and consequently could be selected to maximise drug concentration and retention at the site of action. This has the potential to improve the efficacy and safety of, and owner compliance with, topical glucocorticoid therapy in dogs. PMID:23317657

  2. Development of effective skin cancer treatment and prevention in xeroderma pigmentosum.

    PubMed

    Lambert, W Clark; Lambert, Muriel W

    2015-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare, recessively transmitted genetic disease characterized by increasingly marked dyspigmentation and xerosis (dryness) of sun-exposed tissues, especially skin. Skin cancers characteristically develop in sun-exposed sites at very much earlier ages than in the general population; these are often multiple and hundreds or even thousands may develop. Eight complementation groups have been identified. Seven groups, XP-A…G, are associated with defective genes encoding proteins involved in the nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER) pathway that recognizes and excises mutagenic changes induced in DNA by sunlight; the eighth group, XP-V, is associated with defective translesion synthesis (TLS) bypassing such alterations. The dyspigmentation, xerosis and eventually carcinogenesis in XP patients appear to be due to their cells' failure to respond properly to these mutagenic DNA alterations, leading to mutations in skin cells. A subset of cases, especially those in some complementation groups, may develop neurological degeneration, which may be severe. However, in most XP patients, in the past the multiple skin cancers have led to death at an early age due to either metastases or sepsis. Using either topical 5-fluorouracil or imiquimod, we have developed a protocol that effectively prevents most skin cancer development in XP patients. PMID:25382223

  3. Protective effect of hydrogen-rich saline on ischemia/reperfusion injury in rat skin flap*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ling; Wang, You-bin; Qin, Shi-rui; Ma, Xue-mei; Sun, Xue-jun; Wang, Ming-lian; Zhong, Ru-gang

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Skin damage induced by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) is a multifactorial process that often occurs in plastic surgery. The mechanisms of I/R injury include hypoxia, inflammation, and oxidative damage. Hydrogen gas has been reported to alleviate cerebral I/R injury by acting as a free radical scavenger. Here, we assessed the protective effect of hydrogen-rich saline (HRS) on skin flap I/R injury. Methods: Abdominal skin flaps of rats were elevated and ischemia was induced for 3 h; subsequently, HRS or physiological saline was administered intraperitoneally 10 min before reperfusion. On postoperative Day 5, flap survival, blood perfusion, the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and levels of cytokines were evaluated. Histological examinations were performed to assess inflammatory cell infiltration. Results: Skin flap survival and blood flow perfusion were improved by HRS relative to the controls. The production of malondialdehyde (MDA), an indicator of lipid peroxidation, was markedly reduced. A multiplex cytokine assay revealed that HRS reduced the elevation in the levels of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and growth factors, with the exception of RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted) growth factor. HRS treatment also reduced inflammatory cell infiltration induced by I/R injury. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that HRS mitigates I/R injury by decreasing inflammation and, therefore, has the potential for application as a therapy for improving skin flap survival. PMID:23645175

  4. Effects of topical application of patchouli alcohol on the UV-induced skin photoaging in mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xue-Xuan; Yu, Xiu-Ting; Li, Wen-Jie; Kong, Song-Zhi; Liu, Yu-Hong; Zhang, Xie; Xian, Yan-Fang; Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Su, Zi-Ren; Lin, Zhi-Xiu

    2014-10-15

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, known to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) excessively and elicit inflammatory response, is a potent inducer for skin photoaging. Overproduction of ROS in conjunction with the resulting inflammation stimulate the over-expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which in turn causes degradation of extracellular matrix, leading finally to coarse wrinkling, dryness, and laxity of the skin. In this study, patchouli alcohol (PA, C15H26O), an active chemical ingredient reputed for free radical scavenging and anti-inflammatory properties, was investigated for its anti-photoaging action using a mouse model whose dorsal skin was depilated. The dorsal skin areas of six-week-old mice were smeared with PA solution or vehicle, followed by UV irradiation for nine consecutive weeks. Protective effects of PA were evaluated macroscopically and histologically, as well as by assaying the antioxidant enzymes (SOD, GSH-Px) activities, the contents of inflammatory factors (IL-10, IL-6, TNF-α), and the levels of MMP-1 and MMP-3. Our findings amply demonstrated that PA significantly accelerated the recovery of the UV-induced skin lesions, evidently through anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory action, as well as down-regulation of the MMP-1 and MMP-3 expression. PMID:25033712

  5. Effects of Niacin Restriction on Sirtuin and PARP Responses to Photodamage in Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Benavente, Claudia A.; Schnell, Stephanie A.; Jacobson, Elaine L.

    2012-01-01

    Sirtuins (SIRTs) and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs), NAD+-dependent enzymes, link cellular energy status with responses to environmental stresses. Skin is frequently exposed to the DNA damaging effects of UV irradiation, a known etiology in skin cancer. Thus, understanding the defense mechanisms in response to UV, including the role of SIRTs and PARPs, may be important in developing skin cancer prevention strategies. Here, we report expression of the seven SIRT family members in human skin. SIRTs gene expressions are progressively upregulated in A431 epidermoid carcinoma cells (SIRTs1 and 3), actinic keratoses (SIRTs 2, 3, 5, 6, and 7) and squamous cell carcinoma (SIRTs 1–7). Photodamage induces dynamic changes in SIRT expression with upregulation of both SIRT1 and SIRT4 mRNAs. Specific losses of SIRT proteins occur early after photodamage followed by accumulation later, especially for SIRT4. Niacin restriction, which decreases NAD+, the sirtuin substrate, results in an increase in acetylated proteins, upregulation of SIRTs 2 and 4, increased inherent DNA damage, alterations in SIRT responses to photodamage, abrogation of PARP activation following photodamage, and increased sensitivity to photodamage that is completely reversed by repleting niacin. These data support the hypothesis that SIRTs and PARPs play important roles in resistance to photodamage and identify specific SIRTs that respond to photodamage and may be targets for skin cancer prevention. PMID:22860104

  6. Spectrum of anomalous magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    The equations of anomalous magnetohydrodynamics describe an Abelian plasma where conduction and chiral currents are simultaneously present and constrained by the second law of thermodynamics. At high frequencies the magnetic currents play the leading role, and the spectrum is dominated by two-fluid effects. The system behaves instead as a single fluid in the low-frequency regime where the vortical currents induce potentially large hypermagnetic fields. After deriving the physical solutions of the generalized Appleton-Hartree equation, the corresponding dispersion relations are scrutinized and compared with the results valid for cold plasmas. Hypermagnetic knots and fluid vortices can be concurrently present at very low frequencies and suggest a qualitatively different dynamics of the hydromagnetic nonlinearities.

  7. Anomalous gauge boson couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Barklow, T.; Rizzo, T.; Baur, U.

    1997-01-13

    The measurement of anomalous gauge boson self couplings is reviewed for a variety of present and planned accelerators. Sensitivities are compared for these accelerators using models based on the effective Lagrangian approach. The sensitivities described here are for measurement of {open_quotes}generic{close_quotes} parameters {kappa}{sub V}, {lambda}{sub V}, etc., defined in the text. Pre-LHC measurements will not probe these coupling parameters to precision better than O(10{sup -1}). The LHC should be sensitive to better than O(10{sup -2}), while a future NLC should achieve sensitivity of O(10{sup -3}) to O(10{sup -4}) for center of mass energies ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 TeV.

  8. Pressure-gradient effects on hypersonic turbulent skin friction and boundary-layer profiles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, E. J.; Keener, E. R.

    1972-01-01

    Local skin friction, total-temperature profiles, and pitot-pressure profiles were measured on the wall of a Mach-7.4 wind tunnel. The wall to adiabatic wall temperature ratio was varied from 0.3 to 0.5. Boundary-layer characteristics were compared with those predicted by a finite-difference method. Local skin friction was predicted to within 15%. Pressure-gradient effects on the temperature and Mach number distributions and the shape factor (displacement thickness/momentum thickness) were underpredicted, but the velocity distributions were closely predicted.

  9. Observation of the skin-depth effect on the Casimir force between metallic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Lisanti, Mariangela; Iannuzzi, Davide; Capasso, Federico

    2005-01-01

    We have performed measurements of the Casimir force between a metallic plate and a transparent sphere coated with metallic films of different thicknesses. We have observed that, if the thickness of the coating is less than the skin-depth of the electromagnetic modes that mostly contribute to the interaction, the force is significantly smaller than that measured with a thick bulk-like film. Our results provide direct evidence of the skin-depth effect on the Casimir force between metallic surfaces. PMID:16091459

  10. Observation of the skin-depth effect on the Casimir force between metallic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lisanti, Mariangela; Iannuzzi, Davide; Capasso, Federico

    2005-08-23

    We have performed measurements of the Casimir force between a metallic plate and a transparent sphere coated with metallic films of different thicknesses. We have observed that, if the thickness of the coating is less than the skin-depth of the electromagnetic modes that mostly contribute to the interaction, the force is significantly smaller than that measured with a thick bulk-like film. Our results provide direct evidence of the skin-depth effect on the Casimir force between metallic surfaces. PMID:16091459

  11. The expression of KRT2 and its effect on melanogenesis in alpaca skins.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yucong; Song, Yajun; Geng, Qingling; Ding, Zengfeng; Qin, Yilong; Fan, Ruiwen; Dong, Changsheng; Geng, Jianjun

    2016-06-01

    In order to investigate the effects of the keratin 2 (KRT2) on alpaca melanocyte in vivo and vitro, the immunohistochemistry (IHC), quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), Western blot, and alpaca melanocytes transfection methods were used. The results showed that mRNA and protein expression of KRT2 was highly expressed in brown skin in comparison with that in white skin. Moreover, we found that KRT2 was expressed in alpaca melanocytes in vitro by immunocytochemistry. After transfection with KRT2 in alpaca melanocytes, the relative mRNA and protein expression of KRT2, microphthalmia-associtated transcription factor (MITF), tyrosinase (TYR) and tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TYRP1) in alpaca skin melanocytes was increased with significant differences; a further result was the increase of melanin production. The results suggested that KRT2 functions in alpaca hair color formation, which offered an essential theoretical basis for further exploration of the role of melanogenesis. PMID:27265811

  12. Light and temperature effects on phenolics in dark-skinned grapes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the past decade we refined our understanding of the effects of solar radiation and temperature on the accumulation of phenolic compounds in grapes in the field, particularly dark-skinned cultivars used for red wine. The work was precipitated by nearly universal prescriptive advice a decade pr...

  13. High School Students' Perceptions of How Major Global Environmental Effects Might Cause Skin Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyes, Edward; Stanisstreet, Martin

    1998-01-01

    Quantifies beliefs of high school students about links between skin cancer and global environmental effects. Some students confused the action of heat rays with that of ultraviolet rays and also thought that raised temperatures are culpable. Only one in 10 held the scientifically correct model: that ozone depletion via higher penetration of…

  14. Sagging Skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... Non-ablative Laser Rejuvenation Non-invasive Body Contouring Treatments Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Information Free Skin Cancer Screenings Skin ... Non-ablative Laser Rejuvenation Non-invasive Body Contouring Treatments Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Information Free Skin Cancer Screenings Skin ...

  15. The effect of the moisture content of a local heat source on the blood flow response of the skin.

    PubMed

    Petrofsky, Jerrold Scott; Bains, Gurinder; Raju, Chinna; Lohman, Everett; Berk, Lee; Prowse, Michelle; Gunda, Shashi; Madani, Piyush; Batt, Jennifer

    2009-09-01

    Numerous studies have examined the effect of local and global heating of the body on skin blood flow. However, the effect of the moisture content of the heat source on the skin blood flow response has not been examined. Thirty-three subjects, without diabetes or cardiovascular disease, between the ages of 22 and 32 were examined to determine the relationship between the effects of dry vs. moist heat applied for the same length of time and with the skin clamped at the same skin temperature on the blood flow response of the skin. The skin, heated with an infrared heat lamp (skin temperature monitored with a thermocouple) to 40 degrees C for 15 min, was either kept moist with wet towels or, in a separate experiment, kept dry with Drierite (a desiccant) between the towels to remove any moisture. Before and after heat exposure of the forearm, blood pressure, heart rate, skin moisture content, skin temperature, and skin blood flow were recorded. The results of the experiment showed that there was no change in skin moisture after 15 min exposure to dry heat at 40 degrees C. However, with moist heat, skin moisture increased by 43.7%, a significant increase (P < 0.05). With dry heat, blood flow increased from the resting value by 282.3% whereas with moist heat, blood flow increased by 386% over rest, a significant increase over dry heat (P < 0.05). Thus, with a set increase in skin temperature, moist heat was a better heating modality than dry heat. The reason may be linked to moisture sensitivity in calcium channels in the vascular endothelial cell. PMID:19415313

  16. Pulse testing in the presence of wellbore storage and skin effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ogbe, D.O.; Brigham, W.E.

    1984-08-01

    A pulse test is conducted by creating a series of short-time pressure transients in an active (pulsing) well and recording the observed pressure response at an observation (responding) well. Using the pressure response and flow rate data, the transmissivity and storativity of the tested formation can be determined. Like any other pressure transient data, the pulse-test response is significantly influenced by wellbore storage and skin effects. The purpose of this research is to examine the influence of wellbore storage and skin effects on interference testing in general and on pulse-testing in particular, and to present the type curves and procedures for designing and analyzing pulse-test data when wellbore storage and skin effects are active at either the responding well or the pulsing well. A mathematical model for interference testing was developed by solving the diffusivity equation for radial flow of a single-phase, slightly compressible fluid in an infinitely large, homogeneous reservoir. When wellbore storage and skin effects are present in a pulse test, the observed response amplitude is attenuated and the time lag is inflated. Consequently, neglecting wellbore storage and skin effects in a pulse test causes the calculated storativity to be over-estimated and the transmissivity to be under-estimated. The error can be as high as 30%. New correlations and procedures are developed for correcting the pulse response amplitude and time lag for wellbore storage effects. Using these correlations, it is possible to correct the wellbore storage-dominated response amplitude and time lag to within 3% of their expected values without wellbore storage, and in turn to calculate the corresponding transmissivity and storativity. Worked examples are presented to illustrate how to use the new correction techniques. 45 references.

  17. Skin Diseases: Skin Health and Skin Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... the sun. Photo: PhotoDisc Care for conditions from acne to wrinkles Did you know that your skin ... other skin conditions. Many skin problems, such as acne, also affect your appearance. Your skin can also ...

  18. Therapeutic effect of ethyl acetate extract from Asparagus cochinchinensis on phthalic anhydride-induced skin inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Ji-Eun; Lee, Hyun-Ah; Kim, Ji-Eun; Go, Jun; Seo, Eun-Ji; Yun, Woo-Bin; Kim, Dong-Seob; Son, Hong-Joo; Lee, Chung-Yeoul; Lee, Hee-Seob

    2016-01-01

    Asparagus cochinchinensis has been used to treat various diseases including fever, cough, kidney disease, breast cancer, inflammatory disease and brain disease, while IL-4 cytokine has been considered as key regulator on the skin homeostasis and the predisposition toward allergic skin inflammation. However, few studies have investigated its effects and IL-4 correlation on skin inflammation to date. To quantitatively evaluate the suppressive effects of ethyl acetate extracts of A. cochinchinensis (EaEAC) on phthalic anhydride (PA)-induced skin inflammation and investigate the role of IL-4 during their action mechanism, alterations in general phenotype biomarkers and luciferase-derived signals were measured in IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 transgenic (Tg) mice with PA-induced skin inflammation after treatment with EaEAC for 2 weeks. Key phenotype markers including lymph node weight, immunoglobulin E (IgE) concentration, epidermis thickness and number of infiltrated mast cells were significantly decreased in the PA+EaEAC treated group compared with the PA+Vehicle treated group. In addition, expression of IL-1β and TNF-α was also decreased in the PA+EaEAC cotreated group, compared to PA+Vehicle treated group. Furthermore, a significant decrease in the luciferase signal derived from IL-4 promoter was detected in the abdominal region, submandibular lymph node and mesenteric lymph node of the PA+EaEAC treated group, compared to PA+Vehicle treated group. Taken together, these results suggest that EaEAC treatment could successfully improve PA-induced skin inflammation of IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 Tg mice, and that IL-4 cytokine plays a key role in the therapeutic process of EaEAC. PMID:27051441

  19. Structural and Immunological Effects of Skin Cryoablation in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Kasuya, Akira; Ohta, Isao; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2015-01-01

    Cryoablation is therapeutically applied for various disorders in several organs, and skin diseases are typical targets as this cryotherapy has been widely used for viral warts, benign tumors, and actinic keratosis. The main mechanisms of cryoablation consist of direct freezing effect on skin constituents, thrombosis formation in microcirculation, and subsequent immunological responses. Among them, however, the immunological mechanism remains unelucidated, and it is an issue how the direct freezing injury induces immunological consequences. We established a mouse cryoablation model with liquid nitrogen applied to the shaved back skin, and used this system to study the immunological excitement. After application of liquid nitrogen, the thermal decrease ratio was -25°C/sec or less and the lowest temperature was less than -100°C, which was sufficient to induce ulceration. Destruction of cornified layer and necrosis of epidermal cells were observed in transmission electron microscopy image, and increased transepidermal water loss and skin permeability were detected by the functional measurements. By flow cytometry, antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs), including PDCA1+B220+CD19- plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) and CD11c+ myeloid DCs, as well as neutrophils and macrophages were increased in subcutaneous tissue. In parallel, the mRNA expressions of interferon α1 which are known as pDC-producing cytokines, was elevated. We also found marked degranulation of mast cells, providing a possibility that released histamine attracts pDCs. Finally, FITC migration assay revealed that pDCs and CD11c+ DCs emigrated from the cryoablated skin to the draining lymph nodes. Our study suggests that cryoablation induces destruction of the barrier/epidermis, accumulation of pDCs and CD11c+ DCs to the skin, and migration of DCs to regional lymph nodes. Viral elements or tumor cell lysates released from damaged keratinocytes may stimulate the DCs, thereby leading to antiviral or antitumor effect

  20. Structural and immunological effects of skin cryoablation in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Akira; Ohta, Isao; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2015-01-01

    Cryoablation is therapeutically applied for various disorders in several organs, and skin diseases are typical targets as this cryotherapy has been widely used for viral warts, benign tumors, and actinic keratosis. The main mechanisms of cryoablation consist of direct freezing effect on skin constituents, thrombosis formation in microcirculation, and subsequent immunological responses. Among them, however, the immunological mechanism remains unelucidated, and it is an issue how the direct freezing injury induces immunological consequences. We established a mouse cryoablation model with liquid nitrogen applied to the shaved back skin, and used this system to study the immunological excitement. After application of liquid nitrogen, the thermal decrease ratio was -25°C/sec or less and the lowest temperature was less than -100°C, which was sufficient to induce ulceration. Destruction of cornified layer and necrosis of epidermal cells were observed in transmission electron microscopy image, and increased transepidermal water loss and skin permeability were detected by the functional measurements. By flow cytometry, antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs), including PDCA1+B220+CD19- plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) and CD11c+ myeloid DCs, as well as neutrophils and macrophages were increased in subcutaneous tissue. In parallel, the mRNA expressions of interferon α1 which are known as pDC-producing cytokines, was elevated. We also found marked degranulation of mast cells, providing a possibility that released histamine attracts pDCs. Finally, FITC migration assay revealed that pDCs and CD11c+ DCs emigrated from the cryoablated skin to the draining lymph nodes. Our study suggests that cryoablation induces destruction of the barrier/epidermis, accumulation of pDCs and CD11c+ DCs to the skin, and migration of DCs to regional lymph nodes. Viral elements or tumor cell lysates released from damaged keratinocytes may stimulate the DCs, thereby leading to antiviral or antitumor effect

  1. Effects of Porcine Placenta Extract Ingestion on Ultraviolet B-induced Skin Damage in Hairless Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ki-Bae; Park, Yooheon; Kim, Jae Hwan; Kim, Jin Man; Suh, Hyung Joo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the potential benefits of an oral supplement containing porcine placenta extract (PPE) on skin parameters related to cutaneous physiology and aging. PPEs were administered orally to hairless mice for 12 wk. The effects of oral PPE administration on skin water-holding capacity and Transepidermal Water Loss (TEWL) were similar to those of oral collagen (HYCPU2) administered as a positive control. Magnified photographs and replica images showed a reduction in UVB-induced wrinkle formation after collagen and PPE treatments. PPE treatments ameliorated the thicker skin surface that results from UVB exposure, based on a histological examination of skin tissue. The groups that were orally administered PPE (0.05%, OL; 0.1%, OH group) showed significantly reduced Matrix Metaloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) mRNA expression levels compared with the UVB control (Con), by 33.5% and 35.2%, respectively. The mRNA expression of another collagen-degrading protein, MMP-9, was also significantly lower in the groups that received oral administration of PPE (especially in the OH group) than in the control group. Additionally, oral administration of PPE significantly upregulated tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) and -2 mRNA expression levels compared with expression levels in the control group (p<0.05). This indicates that orally administered PPE activated the expression of Timp-1 and -2, inhibitors of MMP, which is responsible for collagen degradation in skin. Taken together, we propose that long-term oral administration of PPE might have a beneficial effect with respect to skin photo-aging. PMID:26761856

  2. Therapeutic effect of ethyl acetate extract from Asparagus cochinchinensis on phthalic anhydride-induced skin inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sung, Ji-Eun; Lee, Hyun-Ah; Kim, Ji-Eun; Go, Jun; Seo, Eun-Ji; Yun, Woo-Bin; Kim, Dong-Seob; Son, Hong-Joo; Lee, Chung-Yeoul; Lee, Hee-Seob; Hwang, Dae-Youn

    2016-03-01

    Asparagus cochinchinensis has been used to treat various diseases including fever, cough, kidney disease, breast cancer, inflammatory disease and brain disease, while IL-4 cytokine has been considered as key regulator on the skin homeostasis and the predisposition toward allergic skin inflammation. However, few studies have investigated its effects and IL-4 correlation on skin inflammation to date. To quantitatively evaluate the suppressive effects of ethyl acetate extracts of A. cochinchinensis (EaEAC) on phthalic anhydride (PA)-induced skin inflammation and investigate the role of IL-4 during their action mechanism, alterations in general phenotype biomarkers and luciferase-derived signals were measured in IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 transgenic (Tg) mice with PA-induced skin inflammation after treatment with EaEAC for 2 weeks. Key phenotype markers including lymph node weight, immunoglobulin E (IgE) concentration, epidermis thickness and number of infiltrated mast cells were significantly decreased in the PA+EaEAC treated group compared with the PA+Vehicle treated group. In addition, expression of IL-1β and TNF-α was also decreased in the PA+EaEAC cotreated group, compared to PA+Vehicle treated group. Furthermore, a significant decrease in the luciferase signal derived from IL-4 promoter was detected in the abdominal region, submandibular lymph node and mesenteric lymph node of the PA+EaEAC treated group, compared to PA+Vehicle treated group. Taken together, these results suggest that EaEAC treatment could successfully improve PA-induced skin inflammation of IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 Tg mice, and that IL-4 cytokine plays a key role in the therapeutic process of EaEAC. PMID:27051441

  3. Kinetic theory of spin-polarized systems in electric and magnetic fields with spin-orbit coupling. I. Kinetic equation and anomalous Hall and spin-Hall effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morawetz, K.

    2015-12-01

    The coupled kinetic equation for density and spin Wigner functions is derived including spin-orbit coupling, electric and magnetic fields, and self-consistent Hartree mean fields suited for SU(2) transport. The interactions are assumed to be with scalar and magnetic impurities as well as scalar and spin-flip potentials among the particles. The spin-orbit interaction is used in a form suitable for solid state physics with Rashba or Dresselhaus coupling, graphene, extrinsic spin-orbit coupling, and effective nuclear matter coupling. The deficiencies of the two-fluid model are worked out consisting of the appearance of an effective in-medium spin precession. The stationary solution of all these systems shows a band splitting controlled by an effective medium-dependent Zeeman field. The self-consistent precession direction is discussed and a cancellation of linear spin-orbit coupling at zero temperature is reported. The precession of spin around this effective direction caused by spin-orbit coupling leads to anomalous charge and spin currents in an electric field. Anomalous Hall conductivity is shown to consist of the known results obtained from the Kubo formula or Berry phases and a symmetric part interpreted as an inverse Hall effect. Analogously the spin-Hall and inverse spin-Hall effects of spin currents are discussed which are present even without magnetic fields showing a spin accumulation triggered by currents. The analytical dynamical expressions for zero temperature are derived and discussed in dependence on the magnetic field and effective magnetizations. The anomalous Hall and spin-Hall effect changes sign at higher than a critical frequency dependent on the relaxation time.

  4. Skin penetration and antioxidant effect of cosmeto-textiles with gallic acid.

    PubMed

    Alonso, C; Martí, M; Barba, C; Lis, M; Rubio, L; Coderch, L

    2016-03-01

    In this work, the antioxidant gallic acid (GA) has been encapsulated in microspheres prepared with poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) and incorporated into polyamide (PA) obtaining the cosmeto-textile. The topical application of the cosmeto-textile provides a reservoir effect in the skin delivery of GA. The close contact of the cosmeto-textile, containing microsphere-encapsulated GA (ME-GA), with the skin and their corresponding occlusion, may be the main reasons that explain the crossing of active principle (GA) through the skin barrier, located in the stratum corneum, and its penetration into the different compartments of the skin, epidermis and dermis. An ex vivo assessment was performed to evaluate the antioxidant effect of the ME-GA on the stratum corneum (SC) using the thiobarbituric acid-reactive species (TBARS) test. The test is based on a non-invasive ex vivo methodology that evaluates lipid peroxides formed in the outermost layers of the SC from human volunteers after UV radiation to determine the effectiveness of an antioxidant. In this case, a ME-GA cosmeto-textile or ME-GA formulation were applied to the skin in vivo and lipid peroxidation (LPO) in the horny layer were determined after UV irradiation. This methodology may be used as a quality control tool to determine ex vivo the percentage of LPO inhibition on human SC for a variety of antioxidants that are topically applied, in this case GA. Results show that LPO formation was inhibited in human SC when GA was applied directly or embedded in the cosmeto-textile, demonstrating the effectiveness of both applications. The percentage of LPO inhibition obtained after both topical applications was approximately 10% for the cosmeto-textile and 41% for the direct application of microspheres containing GA. This methodology could be used to determine the effectiveness of topically applied antioxidants encapsulated in cosmeto-textiles on human SC. PMID:26848532

  5. Effect of piracetam and nimodipine on full-thickness skin burns in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Sari, Elif; Dincel, Gungor C

    2016-08-01

    The potential of several drugs for full-thickness skin burns has been investigated, but the treatment of such burns remains a challenge in plastic surgery. The present study was designed to determine the effect of systemic and topical administration of piracetam and nimodipine on full-thickness skin burn wound healing. A total of 36 New Zealand male rabbits were divided into six groups. Full-thickness skin burns were produced in all the groups, except the control group. Piracetam was administered systemically (piracetam-IV) and topically (piracetam-C) for 14 days, and nimodipine was administered systemically (nimodipine-IV) and topically (nimodipine-C) over the burn wounds for 14 days. The sham group underwent burn injury but was not administered any drug. After 21 days, gross examination and histopathological analysis were performed and the results were compared statistically. Nimodipine-C and nimodipine-IV had no effect on burn wound healing. However, both piracetam-IV and piracetam-C significantly enhanced the healing of the full-thickness skin burn wounds, although the latter was more effective, useful and practical in burn wound healing. The histopathological features of the wounds in the piracetam-C group were closer to those of the control group than those of the other groups. Piracetam-C rather than piracetam-IV may promote full-thickness burn wound healing in rabbits. PMID:26192365

  6. Effects of wall temperature on skin-friction measurements by oil-film interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottini, H.; Kurita, M.; Iijima, H.; Fukagata, K.

    2015-10-01

    Wind-tunnel skin-friction measurements with thin-oil-film interferometry have been taken on an aluminum sample to investigate the effects of wall temperature on the accuracy of the technique. The sample has been flush-mounted onto a flat plate with an electric heater at its bottom and mirror-smooth temperature-sensitive paint sprayed on its top. The heater has varied the sample temperature from ambient to 328 K, and the paint has permitted wall temperature measurements on the same area of the skin-friction measurements and during the same test. The measured wall temperatures have been used to calculate the correct oil viscosities, and these viscosities and the constant nominal viscosity at 298 K have been used to calculate two different sets of skin-friction coefficients. These sets have been compared to each other and with theoretical values. This comparison shows that the effects of wall temperature on the accuracy of skin-friction measurements are sensible, and more so as wall temperature differs from 298 K. Nonetheless, they are effectively neutralized by the use of wall temperature measurements in combination with the correct oil viscosity-temperature law. In this regard, the special temperature-sensitive paint developed for this study shows advantages with respect to more traditional wall temperature measurement techniques.

  7. Effect of cyclic aromatics on sodium active transport in frog skin

    SciTech Connect

    Blankemeyer, J.T.; Bowerman, M.C. )

    1993-01-01

    A modified glass Ussing-chamber was used to mount the skin. The electrical potential difference (PD) was measured by two 3% agar-frog Ringer's bridges. Current (i.e. short-circuit current, or ISC) was passed by Ag-AgCl electrodes placed so that current density was uniform across the skin. Ringer's solution, bathing each side of the frog skin, was stirred and aerated by gas-lift pumps. The effect of toxicants on the ISC was determined by using the 15 min prior to toxicant administration as a control period, then calculating the change in ISC during the toxicant period as a percent of the control ISC. Phenol and benzene are components of crude oil and crude oil waste. These hydrocarbons and phenanthrene were tested for their effect on frog skin. The results show that the effect of organics on sodium active transport of an epithelium is to alter the active transport of sodium ions. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Some effects of finite spatial resolution on skin friction measurements in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, Russell V.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of finite spatial resolution often cause serious errors in measurements in turbulent boundary layers, with particularly large effects for measurements of fluctuating skin friction and velocities within the sublayer. However, classical analyses of finite spatial resolution effects have generally not accounted for the substantial inhomogeneity and anisotropy of near-wall turbulence. The present study has made use of results from recent computational simulations of wall-bounded turbulent flows to examine spatial resolution effects for measurements made at a wall using both single-sensor probes and those employing two sensing volumes in a V shape. Results are presented to show the effects of finite spatial resolution on a variety of quantitites deduced from the skin friction field.

  9. Measuring the effects of topically applied skin optical clearing agents and modeling the effects and consequences for laser therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkruysse, Wim; Khan, Misbah; Choi, Bernard; Svaasand, Lars O.; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2005-04-01

    Human skin prepared with an optical clearing agent manifests reduced scattering as a result of de-hydration and refractive index matching. This has potentially large effects for laser therapies of several skin lesions such as port wine stain, hair removal and tattoo removal. With most topically applied clearing agents the clearing effect is limited because they penetrate poorly through the intact superficial skin layer (stratum corneum). Agent application modi other than topical are impractical and have limited the success of optical clearing in laser dermatology. In recent reports, however, a mixture of lipofylic and hydrofylic agents was shown to successfully penetrate through the intact stratum corneum layer which has raised new interest in this field. Immediately after application, the optical clearing effect is superficial and, as the agent diffuses through the skin, reduced scattering is manifested in deeper skin layers. For practical purposes as well as to maximize therapeutic success, it is important to quantify the reduced scattering as well as the trans-cutaneous transport dynamics of the agent. We determined the time and tissue depth resolved effects of optically cleared skin by inserting a microscopic reflector array in the skin. Depth dependent light intensity was measured by quantifying the signal of the reflector array with optical coherence tomography. A 1-dimensional mass diffusion model was used to estimate a trans-cutaneous transport diffusion constant for the clearing agent mixture. The results are used in Monte Carlo modeling to determine the optimal time of laser treatment after topical application of the optical clearing agent.

  10. Anomalous extracellular diffusion in rat cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fanrong; Hrabe, Jan; Hrabetova, Sabina

    2015-05-01

    Extracellular space (ECS) is a major channel transporting biologically active molecules and drugs in the brain. Diffusion-mediated transport of these substances is hindered by the ECS structure but the microscopic basis of this hindrance is not fully understood. One hypothesis proposes that the hindrance originates in large part from the presence of dead-space (DS) microdomains that can transiently retain diffusing molecules. Because previous theoretical and modeling work reported an initial period of anomalous diffusion in similar environments, we expected that brain regions densely populated by DS microdomains would exhibit anomalous extracellular diffusion. Specifically, we targeted granular layers (GL) of rat and turtle cerebella that are populated with large and geometrically complex glomeruli. The integrative optical imaging (IOI) method was employed to evaluate diffusion of fluorophore-labeled dextran (MW 3000) in GL, and the IOI data analysis was adapted to quantify the anomalous diffusion exponent dw from the IOI records. Diffusion was significantly anomalous in rat GL, where dw reached 4.8. In the geometrically simpler turtle GL, dw was elevated but not robustly anomalous (dw = 2.6). The experimental work was complemented by numerical Monte Carlo simulations of anomalous ECS diffusion in several three-dimensional tissue models containing glomeruli-like structures. It demonstrated that both the duration of transiently anomalous diffusion and the anomalous exponent depend on the size of model glomeruli and the degree of their wrapping. In conclusion, we have found anomalous extracellular diffusion in the GL of rat cerebellum. This finding lends support to the DS microdomain hypothesis. Transiently anomalous diffusion also has a profound effect on the spatiotemporal distribution of molecules released into the ECS, especially at diffusion distances on the order of a few cell diameters, speeding up short-range diffusion-mediated signals in less permeable

  11. Hydrodynamic function of biomimetic shark skin: effect of denticle pattern and spacing.

    PubMed

    Wen, Li; Weaver, James C; Thornycroft, Patrick J M; Lauder, George V

    2015-12-01

    The structure of shark skin has been the subject of numerous studies and recently biomimetic shark skin has been fabricated with rigid denticles (scales) on a flexible substrate. This artificial skin can bend and generate thrust when attached to a mechanical controller. The ability to control the manufacture of biomimetic shark skin facilitates manipulation of surface parameters and understanding the effects of changing denticle patterns on locomotion. In this paper we investigate the effect of changing the spacing and arrangement of denticles on the surface of biomimetic shark skin on both static and dynamic locomotor performance. We designed 3D-printed flexible membranes with different denticle patterns and spacings: (1) staggered-overlapped, (2) linear-overlapped, and (3) linear-non-overlapped, and compared these to a 3D-printed smooth-surfaced control. These 3D printed shark skin models were then tested in a flow tank with a mechanical flapping device that allowed us to either hold the models in a stationary position or move them dynamically. We swam the membranes at a frequency of 1 Hz with different heave amplitudes (from ±1 cm to ±3 cm) while measuring forces, torques, self-propelled swimming speed, and cost of transport (COT). Static tests revealed drag reduction of denticle patterns compared to a smooth control at low speeds, but increased drag at speeds above 25 cm s(-1). However, during dynamic (swimming) tests, the staggered-overlapped pattern produced the fastest swimming speeds with no significant increase in the COT at lower heave values. For instance, at a heave frequency of 1 Hz and amplitude of ±1 cm, swimming speed of the staggered-overlapped pattern increased by 25.2% over the smooth control. At higher heave amplitudes, significantly faster self-propelled swimming speeds were achieved by the staggered-overlapped pattern, but with higher COT. Only the staggered-overlapped pattern provides a significant swimming performance advantage over the

  12. The effect of skin temperature on performance during a 7.5-km cycling time trial.

    PubMed

    Levels, Koen; de Koning, Jos J; Foster, Carl; Daanen, Hein A M

    2012-09-01

    Aerobic exercise performance is seriously compromised in the heat. Possibly, a high skin temperature causes a rating of perceived exertion (RPE)-mediated decrease in exercise intensity. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of skin temperature on power output during a 7.5-km cycling time trial. Thirteen well-trained male subjects performed a 7.5-km cycling time trial at 15°C and 50% relative humidity (CONTROL), with radiative heat stress during the time trial, and with (PRECOOL) or without (HEAT) precooling. Heat stress was applied by infrared heaters positioned in front of the cycle ergometer between 1.5 and 6.0 km. Skin, rectal, and pill temperature, power output, heart rate, and RPE were measured during the trial. Despite the lower mean skin temperature at the start of the time trial for PRECOOL compared to HEAT (-2.1 ± 0.7°C; P < 0.01) and CONTROL (-1.8 ± 0.6°C; P < 0.05), and a greater increase in mean skin temperature during the heat stress period for PRECOOL (4.5 ± 1.0°C) and HEAT (3.9 ± 0.8°C) than for CONTROL (-0.3 ± 0.6°C; P < 0.01), no differences in power output were found between HEAT (273 ± 45 W) and CONTROL (284 ± 43 W; P = 0.11) and between HEAT and PRECOOL (266 ± 50 W; P = 0.47). Power output during the time trial was greater for CONTROL than for PRECOOL (P < 0.05). Additionally, no differences were observed in core temperature measures, HR, and RPE. Skin temperature does not affect the selection and modulation of exercise intensity in a 7.5-km cycling time trial. PMID:22270485

  13. Effect of orally administered collagen hydrolysate on gene expression profiles in mouse skin: a DNA microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Oba, Chisato; Ito, Kyoko; Ichikawa, Satomi; Morifuji, Masashi; Nakai, Yuji; Ishijima, Tomoko; Abe, Keiko; Kawahata, Keiko

    2015-08-01

    Dietary collagen hydrolysate has been hypothesized to improve skin barrier function. To investigate the effect of long-term collagen hydrolysate administration on the skin, we evaluated stratum corneum water content and skin elasticity in intrinsically aged mice. Female hairless mice were fed a control diet or a collagen hydrolysate-containing diet for 12 wk. Stratum corneum water content and skin elasticity were gradually decreased in chronologically aged control mice. Intake of collagen hydrolysate significantly suppressed such changes. Moreover, we used DNA microarrays to analyze gene expression in the skin of mice that had been administered collagen hydrolysate. Twelve weeks after the start of collagen intake, no significant differences appeared in the gene expression profile compared with the control group. However, 1 wk after administration, 135 genes were upregulated and 448 genes were downregulated in the collagen group. This suggests that gene changes preceded changes of barrier function and elasticity. We focused on several genes correlated with functional changes in the skin. Gene Ontology terms related to epidermal cell development were significantly enriched in upregulated genes. These skin function-related genes had properties that facilitate epidermal production and differentiation while suppressing dermal degradation. In conclusion, our results suggest that altered gene expression at the early stages after collagen administration affects skin barrier function and mechanical properties. Long-term oral intake of collagen hydrolysate improves skin dysfunction by regulating genes related to production and maintenance of skin tissue. PMID:26058835

  14. Characterization of atopic skin and the effect of a hyperforin-rich cream by laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinke, Martina C.; Richter, Heike; Kleemann, Anke; Lademann, Juergen; Tscherch, Kathrin; Rohn, Sascha; Schempp, Christoph M.

    2015-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial inflammatory skin disease that affects both children and adults in an increasing manner. The treatment of AD often reduces subjective skin parameters, such as itching, dryness, and tension, but the inflammation cannot be cured. Laser scanning microscopy was used to investigate the skin surface, epidermal, and dermal characteristics of dry and atopic skin before and after treatment with an ointment rich in hyperforin, which is known for its anti-inflammatory effects. The results were compared to subjective parameters and transepidermal water loss, stratum corneum moisture, and stratum corneum lipids. Using biophysical methods, in particular laser scanning microscopy, it was found that atopic skin has distinct features compared to healthy skin. Treatment with a hyperforin-rich ointment resulted in an improvement of the stratum corneum moisture, skin surface dryness, skin lipids, and the subjective skin parameters, indicating that the barrier is stabilized and improved by the ointment. But in contrast to the improved skin surface, the inflammation in the deeper epidermis/dermis often continues to exist. This could be clearly shown by the reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) measurements. Therefore, RCM measurements could be used to investigate the progress in treatment of atopic dermatitis.

  15. Organ culture of mammalian skin and the effects of ultraviolet light and testosterone on melanocyte morphology and function.

    PubMed

    Glimcher, M E; Garcia, R I; Szabó, G

    1978-05-01

    Scrotal skin of black Long-Evans rats and human thigh skin were maintained in vitro as organ cultures for as long as 14 days, and examined histologically using the combined skin splitting and Dopa techniques. Selected rat skin cultures received testosterone in the culture medium and/or were irradiated with ultraviolet light (290-320 nm UVL). With increased time in culture, scrotal melanocytes round up and there is an increase in epidermal pigmentation. Human skin behaves similarly; after eight days in vitro human melanocytes also become rounded, but remain strongly Dopa-positive. Addition of exogenous testosterone to cultured rat skin maintains dendritic morphology of melanocytes, but cell body size is still reduced. UVL irradiation stimulates melanocytes in rat skin cultures, maintaining their dendritic morphology and increasing epidermal and dermal pigmentation. Cultured skin receiving both UVL and testosterone illustrates a synergistic effect. Electron microscopic examination of cultured rat skin shows the presence of large melanosome complexes in keratinocytes, much larger than those found in vivo. Melanocytes appear to be active as they contain an extensive Golgi zone, rough endoplasmic reticulum, and melanosomes in various stages of formation. Dermis contained many dermal melanocytes and macrophages laden with melanosomes, correlating with the increased visible dermal pigmentation in vitro. This UVL stimulation of melanocytes in our skin organ cultures contrasts with the lack of melanogenic stimulation found in melanoma cell cultures. Our findings suggest that the intact epidermal melanin unit may be necessary for UVL stimulation of melanocytes. PMID:641488

  16. Pauli isotonic oscillatorwith an anomalous magnetic moment in the presence of the Aharonov-Bohm effect: Laplace transform approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshanzamir-Nikou, M.; Goudarzi, H.

    2016-02-01

    A strong magnetic field significantly affects the intrinsic magnetic moment of fermions. In quantum electrodynamics, it was shown that the anomalous magnetic moment of an electron arises kinematically, while it results from a dynamical interaction with an external magnetic field for hadrons (proton). Taking the anomalous magnetic moment of a fermion into account, we find an exact expression for the boundstate energy and the corresponding eigenfunctions of a two-dimensional nonrelativistic spin-1/2 harmonic oscillator with a centripetal barrier (known as the isotonic oscillator) including an Aharonov-Bohm term in the presence of a strong magnetic field. We use the Laplace transform method in the calculations. We find that the singular solution contributes to the phase of the wave function at the origin and the phase depends on the spin and magnetic flux.

  17. Exposure to Non-Extreme Solar UV Daylight: Spectral Characterization, Effects on Skin and Photoprotection

    PubMed Central

    Marionnet, Claire; Tricaud, Caroline; Bernerd, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    The link between chronic sun exposure of human skin and harmful clinical consequences such as photo-aging and skin cancers is now indisputable. These effects are mostly due to ultraviolet (UV) rays (UVA, 320–400 nm and UVB, 280–320 nm). The UVA/UVB ratio can vary with latitude, season, hour, meteorology and ozone layer, leading to different exposure conditions. Zenithal sun exposure (for example on a beach around noon under a clear sky) can rapidly induce visible and well-characterized clinical consequences such as sunburn, predominantly induced by UVB. However, a limited part of the global population is exposed daily to such intense irradiance and until recently little attention has been paid to solar exposure that does not induce any short term clinical impact. This paper will review different studies on non-extreme daily UV exposures with: (1) the characterization and the definition of the standard UV daylight and its simulation in the laboratory; (2) description of the biological and clinical effects of such UV exposure in an in vitro reconstructed human skin model and in human skin in vivo, emphasizing the contribution of UVA rays and (3) analysis of photoprotection approaches dedicated to prevent the harmful impact of such UV exposure. PMID:25546388

  18. Exposure to non-extreme solar UV daylight: spectral characterization, effects on skin and photoprotection.

    PubMed

    Marionnet, Claire; Tricaud, Caroline; Bernerd, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    The link between chronic sun exposure of human skin and harmful clinical consequences such as photo-aging and skin cancers is now indisputable. These effects are mostly due to ultraviolet (UV) rays (UVA, 320-400 nm and UVB, 280-320 nm). The UVA/UVB ratio can vary with latitude, season, hour, meteorology and ozone layer, leading to different exposure conditions. Zenithal sun exposure (for example on a beach around noon under a clear sky) can rapidly induce visible and well-characterized clinical consequences such as sunburn, predominantly induced by UVB. However, a limited part of the global population is exposed daily to such intense irradiance and until recently little attention has been paid to solar exposure that does not induce any short term clinical impact. This paper will review different studies on non-extreme daily UV exposures with: (1) the characterization and the definition of the standard UV daylight and its simulation in the laboratory; (2) description of the biological and clinical effects of such UV exposure in an in vitro reconstructed human skin model and in human skin in vivo, emphasizing the contribution of UVA rays and (3) analysis of photoprotection approaches dedicated to prevent the harmful impact of such UV exposure. PMID:25546388

  19. Sunscreens: topical and systemic approaches for protection of human skin against harmful effects of solar radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, M.A.

    1982-09-01

    This review deals with topical and systemic approaches for protection of human skin against the harmful effects of solar radiation. Two concerns about the deleterious effects of sun exposure involve: (1) acute effects (e.g., sunburn and drug-induced phototoxicity) and (2) potential long-term risks of repeated sun exposures leading to development of solar elastosis, keratoses, induction of both nonmelanoma and melanoma skin cancer, and alteration of immune responses and functions. Action spectra of normal and abnormal reactions of human skin to acute and chronic effects of solar radiation are presented with a view to helping the physician prescribe the appropriate sunscreens. Factors that influence acute effects of sunburn are reviewed. Various artificial methods effective in minimizing or preventing harmful effects of solar radiation, both in normal individuals and in patients with photosensitivity-related problems, are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the commercially available chemical sunscreens and their properties. Sun protection factor (SPF) values of several brand-name formulations determined with a solar simulator under indoor conditions (laboratory) and with solar radiation under natural, field conditions are presented. Factors responsible for variations of SPF values observed under indoor and outdoor conditions are reviewed. Systemic photoprotective agents and their limitations are outlined. The photobiology of melanin pigmentation (the tanning reaction) is briefly discussed, with emphasis on the dangers of using quick-tanning lotions for stimulation of the tanning reaction.

  20. The effects of sodium oxybate on core body and skin temperature regulation in narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    van der Heide, Astrid; Donjacour, Claire E H M; Pijl, Hanno; Reijntjes, Robert H A M; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Lammers, Gert J; Van Someren, Eus J W; Fronczek, Rolf

    2015-10-01

    Patients suffering from narcolepsy type 1 show altered skin temperatures, resembling the profile that is related to sleep onset in healthy controls. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of sodium oxybate, a widely used drug to treat narcolepsy, on the 24-h profiles of temperature and sleep-wakefulness in patients with narcolepsy and controls. Eight hypocretin-deficient male narcolepsy type 1 patients and eight healthy matched controls underwent temperature measurement of core body and proximal and distal skin twice, and the sleep-wake state for 24 h. After the baseline assessment, 2 × 3 g of sodium oxybate was administered for 5 nights, immediately followed by the second assessment. At baseline, daytime core body temperature and proximal skin temperature were significantly lower in patients with narcolepsy (core: 36.8 ± 0.05 °C versus 37.0 ± 0.05 °C, F = 8.31, P = 0.01; proximal: 33.4 ± 0.26 °C versus 34.3 ± 0.26 °C, F = 5.66, P = 0.03). In patients, sodium oxybate administration increased proximal skin temperature during the day (F = 6.46, P = 0.04) to a level similar as in controls, but did not affect core body temperature, distal temperature or distal-proximal temperature gradient. Sodium oxybate administration normalised the predictive value of distal skin temperature and distal-proximal temperature gradient for the onset of daytime naps (P < 0.01). In conclusion, sodium oxybate administration resulted in a partial normalisation of the skin temperature profile, by increasing daytime proximal skin temperature, and by strengthening the known relationship between skin temperature and daytime sleep propensity. These changes seem to be related to the clinical improvement induced by sodium oxybate treatment. A causal relationship is not proven. PMID:25913575