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Sample records for anomalous temperature dependence

  1. Anomalous temperature dependence of the IR spectrum of polyalanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helenius, V.; Korppi-Tommola, J.; Kotila, S.; Nieminen, J.; Lohikoski, R.; Timonen, J.

    1997-12-01

    We have studied the temperature dependence of the infrared spectra of acetanilide (ACN), tryptophan-(alanine) 15, and tyrosine-(alanine) 15. No sidebands of the amide-I vibration were observed in the polypeptides, but two anomalous sidebands of the NH stretch with a similar temperature dependence as that of the anomalous amide-I vibrational mode at 1650 cm -1 of crystalline ACN were detected. Fermi resonance combined with the appearance of a red-shifted sideband of NH stretch through coupling to lattice modes seems to explain this band structure. Observations are indicative of excitons that may occur in polypeptides as well as in single crystals of ACN.

  2. Anomalous Temperature Dependence of the Band Gap in Black Phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Cesar E P; Rocha, A R; Marini, Andrea

    2016-08-10

    Black phosphorus (BP) has gained renewed attention due to its singular anisotropic electronic and optical properties that might be exploited for a wide range of technological applications. In this respect, the thermal properties are particularly important both to predict its room temperature operation and to determine its thermoelectric potential. From this point of view, one of the most spectacular and poorly understood phenomena is indeed the BP temperature-induced band gap opening; when temperature is increased, the fundamental band gap increases instead of decreases. This anomalous thermal dependence has also been observed recently in its monolayer counterpart. In this work, based on ab initio calculations, we present an explanation for this long known and yet not fully explained effect. We show that it arises from a combination of harmonic and lattice thermal expansion contributions, which are in fact highly interwined. We clearly narrow down the mechanisms that cause this gap opening by identifying the peculiar atomic vibrations that drive the anomaly. The final picture we give explains both the BP anomalous band gap opening and the frequency increase with increasing volume (tension effect). PMID:27428304

  3. Anomalous temperature dependence of the fluorescence lifetime of phycobiliproteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimov, E. G.; Schmitt, F.-J.; Hätti, P.; Klementiev, K. E.; Paschenko, V. Z.; Renger, G.; Rubin, A. B.

    2013-05-01

    Using a single photon counting technique we have investigated fluorescence decay spectra of phycobiliproteins with picosecond time resolution. The studies were performed in a wide range of temperatures—from 4 to 300 K. Comparing the fluorescence decay kinetics of samples rapidly frozen in liquid nitrogen with samples that were frozen slowly revealed that the temperature-dependent changes of phycobiliproteins fluorescence lifetime reflect the presence of three different stages, with a phase transition between 273 and 263 K that strongly depends on the rate of freezing. When the temperature decreases from 300 to 273 K, the fluorescence lifetime increases from 1.6 to 1.8 ns. In the region from 273 to 263 K we observed a decrease of the fluorescence lifetime, which strongly depends on the freezing rate: a slight decrease at high freezing rate and a drop down to 200 ps lifetime at slow freezing rate. In the low-temperature regime from 263 to 4 K a linear increase in the fluorescence lifetime was observed for all samples. It was found that the strong temperature dependence of the phycobiliprotein fluorescence, especially in the range between 263 and 273 K, is due to the interaction of the solvent with the chromophore bound to the protein. This feature is explained by a photoisomerization of the phycobiliproteins into a quenching form which is naturally prevented by the protein environment. The formation of ice microcrystals at low freezing rate eliminates this ‘protective’ effect of the protein environment.

  4. Anomalous Temperature Dependence of Magnetic Moment in Monodisperse Antiferromagnetic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillaspie, Dane; Gu, B.; Wang, W.; Shen, J.

    2005-03-01

    1 Condensed Matter Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory*, TN 37831 2 Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Tennessee, TN 37996 3 Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory*, TN 37831 Recent experiments [1] and theory [2] from AFM nanoparticles showed that they exhibit sizable net magnetization, which increases with increasing temperature. In order to further understand such peculiar temperature dependence, we have measured the magnetic properties of monodisperse hematite (α-Fe2O3) nanoparticles, grown using a microemulsion precipitation technique, which minimizes the impact of the particle moment distribution on the measured properties of the samples. Our measured results indicate that the net magnetization of these nanoparticles, when small, indeed increases linearly with increasing temperature. This is in sharp contrast to the bulk-like behavior of α-Fe2O3, which was observed in particles with size larger than 120 nm. [1] M. Seehra et al, Phys. Rev. B 61, 3513 (2000) [2] S. Mørup, C. Frandsen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 217201 (2004) *Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Dept. of Energy under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725

  5. Origin of the anomalous temperature dependence of coercivity in soft ferromagnets

    SciTech Connect

    Moubah, R.; Ahlberg, M.; Zamani, A.; Olsson, A.; Hjörvarsson, B.; Jönsson, P. E.; Shi, S.; Sun, Z.; Carlson, S.; Hallén, A.

    2014-08-07

    We report on the origin of the anomalous temperature dependence of coercivity observed in some soft ferromagnets by studying the magnetic and electronic properties of FeZr films doped using ion implantation by H, He, B, C, and N. The anomalous increase of the coercivity with temperature was observed only in the C- and B-doped samples. Using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we show that the anomalous behavior of the coercivity coincides with the occurrence of an electron charge transfer for those implanted samples. The origin of the anomaly is discussed in terms of (i) magnetic softness, (ii) nature of the Fe-C and -B covalent bonds, and (iii) large charge transfer.

  6. Anomalous temperature dependent magneto-conductance in organic light-emitting diodes with multiple emissive states

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Chen-xiao; Jia, Wei-yao; Huang, Ke-Xun; Zhang, Qiao-ming; Yang, Xiao-hui; Xiong, Zu-hong

    2015-07-13

    The temperature dependence of the magneto-conductance (MC) in organic electron donor-acceptor hybrid and layer heterojunction diodes was studied. The MC value increased with temperature in layer heterojunction and in 10 wt. % hybrid devices. An anomalous decrease of the MC with temperature was observed in 25 wt. %–50 wt. % hybrid devices. Further increasing donor concentration to 75 wt. %, the MC again increased with temperature. The endothermic exciplex-exciton energy transfer and the change in electroplex/exciton ratio caused by change in charge transport with temperature may account for these phenomena. Comparative studies of the temperature evolutions of the IV curves and the electroluminescence and photoluminescence spectra back our hypothesis.

  7. Spin-fluctuation mechanism of anomalous temperature dependence of magnetocrystalline anisotropy in itinerant magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravlev, I. A.; Antropov, V. P.; Belashchenko, K. D.

    2015-11-16

    The origins of the anomalous temperature dependence of magnetocrystalline anisotropy in (Fe1–xCox)2B alloys are elucidated using first-principles calculations within the disordered local moment model. Excellent agreement with experimental data is obtained. The anomalies are associated with the changes in band occupations due to Stoner-like band shifts and with the selective suppression of spin-orbit “hot spots” by thermal spin fluctuations. Under certain conditions, the anisotropy can increase, rather than decrease, with decreasing magnetization. These peculiar electronic mechanisms are in stark contrast to the assumptions of the existing models.

  8. Spin-fluctuation mechanism of anomalous temperature dependence of magnetocrystalline anisotropy in itinerant magnets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhuravlev, I. A.; Antropov, V. P.; Belashchenko, K. D.

    2015-11-16

    The origins of the anomalous temperature dependence of magnetocrystalline anisotropy in (Fe1–xCox)2B alloys are elucidated using first-principles calculations within the disordered local moment model. Excellent agreement with experimental data is obtained. The anomalies are associated with the changes in band occupations due to Stoner-like band shifts and with the selective suppression of spin-orbit “hot spots” by thermal spin fluctuations. Under certain conditions, the anisotropy can increase, rather than decrease, with decreasing magnetization. These peculiar electronic mechanisms are in stark contrast to the assumptions of the existing models.

  9. Anomalous Temperature Dependence of the Dephasing Time in Mesoscopic Kondo Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schopfer, Félicien; Bäuerle, Christopher; Rabaud, Wilfried; Saminadayar, Laurent

    2003-02-01

    We present measurements of the magnetoconductance of long and narrow quasi-one-dimensional gold wires containing magnetic iron impurities in a temperature range extending from 15mK to 4.2K. The dephasing rate extracted from the weak antilocalization shows a pronounced plateau in a tempera­ture region of 300 800mK, associated with the phase breaking due to the Kondo effect. Below the Kondo temperature, the dephasing rate decreases linearly with temperature, in contradiction with standard Fermi-liquid theory. Our data suggest that the formation of a spin glass due to the interactions between the magnetic moments is responsible for the observed anomalous temperature dependence.

  10. Anomalous temperature dependence of layer spacing of de Vries liquid crystals: Compensation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, K.; Kocot, A.; Vij, J. K.; Stevenson, P. J.; Panov, A.; Rodriguez, D.

    2016-06-01

    Smectic liquid crystals that exhibit temperature independent layer thickness offer technological advantages for their use in displays and photonic devices. The dependence of the layer spacing in SmA and SmC phases of de Vries liquid crystals is found to exhibit distinct features. On entering the SmC phase, the layer thickness initially decreases below SmA to SmC (TA-C) transition temperature but increases anomalously with reducing temperature despite the molecular tilt increasing. This anomalous observation is being explained quantitatively. Results of IR spectroscopy show that layer shrinkage is caused by tilt of the mesogen's rigid core, whereas the expansion is caused by the chains getting more ordered with reducing temperature. This mutual compensation arising from molecular fragments contributing to the layer thickness differs from the previous models. The orientational order parameter of the rigid core of the mesogen provides direct evidence for de Vries cone model in the SmA phase for the two compounds investigated.

  11. The temperature dependent anomalous Hall effect in La-Ca-Mn-O films

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y.; Miller, D. J.; Jiang, J. S.; Pearson, J.; Bader, S. D.

    1999-10-27

    The colossal magnetoresistance of La{sub 1{minus}x}Ca{sub x}MnO{sub 3} has been reported in many experiments. The authors present their study of the anomalous Hall effect in epitaxial La{sub 0.67}Ca{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3} thin films. They have measured the temperature dependence of resistivity, magnetization and AHE coefficients between 300K and 5K for the samples grown on different substrates. From these studies, the relation between the resistivity and AHE coefficient as well as the temperature dependence of AHE coefficient are explored. The results show that the direction of AHE is reversed below approximately 100K. This sign reversal is discussed in term of the change of band structure and the co-existence of hole-like and electron-like conduction.

  12. Anomalous temperature dependence of flow stress in a Fe{sub 3}Al alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.H.; Ha, T.K.; Chang, Y.W.

    2000-01-01

    Iron aluminides have attracted much interest since 1930s when the excellent corrosion resistance was noted in alloys with the composition of more than about 18 at.% Al. These alloys have relatively low material cost, due to the reduced usage of strategic elements like Cr, Mo and Ni, and a lower density than stainless steels. Their tensile strength is also comparable to those of ferritic and austenitic steels. These advantages have led the iron aluminide alloys being considered for many applications in industries needing sulfidation and oxidation resistance (1). However, the poor ductility at ambient temperatures and an abrupt drop in strength above 600 C have limited these alloys for structural applications. In the past years, extensive efforts have been devoted to understanding and improving the metallurgical properties of iron aluminides with the aim of producing more strong, ductile, and corrosion-resistant materials for structural applications. These studies have resulted in significant contributions to the understanding of the fabrication and mechanical properties of iron aluminides. Deformation behavior in iron aluminides is now known to depend on composition, temperature, and the presence or absence of ordered structures. Recent studies have demonstrated that improved engineering ductility of 10--15% can be achieved in wrought Fe{sub 3}Al-based iron aluminide alloys, through the control of composition and microstructure. The effect of strain rate on the deformation behavior of Fe{sub 3}Al alloys, especially on the anomalous temperature dependence of strength is of interest recently and more systematic investigation is now necessitated. Load relaxation test has been generally regarded as a very effective technique to measure the strain rate sensitivity over a wider range of strain rates with very little microstructural changes and has been applied to the plasticity of various rate-sensitive materials. In the present study, the iron aluminide alloys with 27

  13. Anomalous temperature dependence of gas chromatographic retention indices of polar compounds on non-polar stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Pavlovskii, Alexander A; Héberger, Károly; Zenkevich, Igor G

    2016-05-01

    Increasing the reliability of both GC and GC-MS identification requires appropriate interlaboratory reproducibility of gas chromatographic retention indices (I). Known temperature dependence, I(T), is the main source of non-reproducibility of these parameters. It can be approximated with a simple linear function I(T). However, since mid-1990s-beginning of 2000s some examples of anomalous temperature dependence, I(T), preferably for polar analytes on non-polar stationary phases were revealed independently by different authors. The effect implies the variations in the sign of the temperature coefficients β=dI/dT for selected compounds and, hence, the appearance of the I-extrema (usually, minima). The current work provides evidence that the character of the anomalous I(Т) dependences (ascending, descending, or with extrema) is strongly influenced by the amounts of analytes injected into the chromatographic column, but these anomalies appeared not to be connected directly with the mass overloading of separation systems. The physicochemical model is proposed to describe the observed anomalies of I(T) dependence. This model is based on three previously known principles of chromatography, namely: The superposition of these objectives allows understanding both the unusual temperature dependence of retention indices, and the influence of the amounts of polar analytes injected into GC column on the parameters of this dependence. PMID:27062719

  14. Anomalous temperature dependence of yield stress and work hardening coefficient of B2-stabilized NiTi alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hosoda, Hideki; Mishima, Yoshinao; Suzuki, Tomoo

    1997-12-31

    Yield stress and work hardening coefficient of B2-stabilized NiTi alloys are investigated using compression tests. Compositions of NiTi alloys are based on Ni-49mol.%Ti, to which Cr, Co and Al are chosen as ternary elements which reduce martensitic transformation temperatures of the B2 phase. Mechanical tests are carried out in liquid nitrogen at 77 K, air at room temperature (R.T.) and in an argon atmosphere between 473 K and 873 K. Only at 77 K, some alloys show characteristic stress-strain curves which indicate stress induced martensitic transformation (SIMT), but the others do not. Work hardening coefficient is found to be between 2 and 11GPa in all the test temperature range. The values are extremely high compared with Young`s modulus of B2 NiTi. Yield stress and work hardening coefficient increase with test temperature between R.T. and about 650 K in most alloys. The anomalous temperature dependence of mechanical properties is not related to SIMT but to precipitation hardening and/or anomalous dislocation motion similar to B2-type CoTi. Solution hardening by adding ternary elements is evaluated to be small for Cr and Co additions, and large for Al addition, depending on difference in atomic size of the ternary element with respect to Ni or Ti.

  15. Anomalous temperature dependence of gas chromatographic retention indices of polar compounds on nonpolar phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenkevich, I. G.; Pavlovskii, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    The character of the temperature dependences of the retention indices RI( T) of polar sorbates on nonpolar stationary phases was found to depend on the dosed amounts of sorbates, but not on column overloading. A physicochemical model was suggested to explain the observed anomalies in RI( T).

  16. Anomalous Temperature Dependence of the Casimir Force for Thin Metal Films

    SciTech Connect

    Yampol'skii, V. A.; Savel'ev, Sergey; Mayselis, Z. A.; Apostolov, S. S.; Nori, Franco

    2008-08-29

    Within the framework of the Drude dispersive model, we predict an unusual nonmonotonic temperature dependence of the Casimir force for thin metal films. For certain conditions, this force decreases with temperature due to the decrease of the metallic conductivity, whereas the force increases at high temperatures due to the increase of the thermal radiation pressure. We consider the attraction of a film to: either (i) a bulk ideal metal with a planar boundary, or (ii) a bulk metal sphere (lens). The experimental observation of the predicted decreasing temperature dependence of the Casimir force can put an end to the long-standing discussion on the role of the electron relaxation in the Casimir effect.

  17. Anomalous temperature dependence of the Casimir force for thin metal films.

    PubMed

    Yampol'skii, V A; Savel'ev, Sergey; Mayselis, Z A; Apostolov, S S; Nori, Franco

    2008-08-29

    Within the framework of the Drude dispersive model, we predict an unusual nonmonotonic temperature dependence of the Casimir force for thin metal films. For certain conditions, this force decreases with temperature due to the decrease of the metallic conductivity, whereas the force increases at high temperatures due to the increase of the thermal radiation pressure. We consider the attraction of a film to: either (i) a bulk ideal metal with a planar boundary, or (ii) a bulk metal sphere (lens). The experimental observation of the predicted decreasing temperature dependence of the Casimir force can put an end to the long-standing discussion on the role of the electron relaxation in the Casimir effect. PMID:18851637

  18. Anomalous temperature-dependent Young's modulus of a cast LAST (Pb-Sb-Ag-Te) thermoelectric material

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Fei; Case, Eldon D; Timm, Edward J; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Trejo, Rosa M

    2010-01-01

    Thermomechanical characterization is important to material evaluation and device design in the development of thermoelectric technology. In this study, we utilize the resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) technique to examine the elastic behavior of a cast LAST (Pb Sb Ag Te) material with a composition of Ag0.86Pb19Sb1.0Te20 between room temperature and 823 K. The temperature-dependent Young s modulus exhibits a monotonically decreasing trend with increasing temperature. However, an abnormal slope change in the Young s modulus temperature curve around 500 K is observed. In addition, hysteresis between heating and cooling data in the temperature range of 450 550 K is observed, which appears to be dependent on the heating/cooling rate during the RUS experiments such that the hysteresis disappears when the heating/cooling rate was decreased from 5 to 2 K min 1. In this study we propose an order disorder transition model for the anomalous temperature-dependent Young s modulus behavior observed in this study.

  19. Temperature dependence anomalous dielectric relaxation in Co doped ZnO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Ansari, Sajid Ali; Nisar, Ambreen; Fatma, Bushara; Khan, Wasi; Chaman, M.; Azam, Ameer; Naqvi, A.H.

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► We prepared Co doped ZnO by facile gel-combustion method. ► Studied temperature dependent dielectric properties in detail. ► Relaxation time shifts toward the higher temperature as increase in Co content. ► SEM analysis shows formation and agglomeration of nanoparticles. ► Dielectric constants, loss and ac conductivity increases with rise in temperature. ► The dielectric constant, loss and ac conductivity decreases as Co ion increases. -- Abstract: We have reported temperature and frequency dependence of dielectric behavior of nanocrystalline Zn{sub 1−x}Co{sub x}O (x = 0.0, 0.01, 0.05 and 0.1) samples prepared by gel-combustion method. The synthesized samples were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and LCR-meter, respectively. The XRD analysis reveals that ZnO has a hexagonal (wurtzite) crystal structure. The morphology and size of the nanoparticles (∼10–25 nm) were observed by SEM for 5% Co doped ZnO sample. In dielectric properties, complex permittivity (ε{sup *} = ε′ − jε″), loss tangent (tan δ) and ac conductivity (σ{sub ac}) in the frequency range 75 kHz to 5 MHz were analyzed with temperature range 150–400 °C. The experimental results indicate that ε′, ε″, tan δ and σ{sub ac} decreases with increase in frequency and temperature. The transition temperature as obtained in dispersion curve of dielectric constant shifts toward higher temperature with increase Co content.

  20. Anomalous temperature-dependent spin-valley polarization in monolayer WS2

    PubMed Central

    Hanbicki, A.T.; Kioseoglou, G.; Currie, M.; Hellberg, C. Stephen; McCreary, K.M.; Friedman, A.L.; Jonker, B.T.

    2016-01-01

    Single layers of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are direct gap semiconductors with nondegenerate valley indices. An intriguing possibility for these materials is the use of their valley index as an alternate state variable. Several limitations to such a utility include strong intervalley scattering, as well as multiparticle interactions leading to multiple emission channels. We prepare single-layer WS2 films such that the photoluminescence is from either the neutral or charged exciton (trion). After excitation with circularly polarized light, the neutral exciton emission has zero polarization. However, the trion emission has a large polarization (28%) at room temperature. The trion emission also has a unique, non-monotonic temperature dependence that is a consequence of the multiparticle nature of the trion. This temperature dependence enables us to determine that intervalley scattering, electron-hole radiative recombination, and Auger processes are the dominant mechanisms at work in this system. Because this dependence involves trion systems, one can use gate voltages to modulate the polarization (or intensity) emitted from TMD structures. PMID:26728976

  1. Anomalous temperature-dependent spin-valley polarization in monolayer WS2.

    PubMed

    Hanbicki, A T; Kioseoglou, G; Currie, M; Hellberg, C Stephen; McCreary, K M; Friedman, A L; Jonker, B T

    2016-01-01

    Single layers of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are direct gap semiconductors with nondegenerate valley indices. An intriguing possibility for these materials is the use of their valley index as an alternate state variable. Several limitations to such a utility include strong intervalley scattering, as well as multiparticle interactions leading to multiple emission channels. We prepare single-layer WS2 films such that the photoluminescence is from either the neutral or charged exciton (trion). After excitation with circularly polarized light, the neutral exciton emission has zero polarization. However, the trion emission has a large polarization (28%) at room temperature. The trion emission also has a unique, non-monotonic temperature dependence that is a consequence of the multiparticle nature of the trion. This temperature dependence enables us to determine that intervalley scattering, electron-hole radiative recombination, and Auger processes are the dominant mechanisms at work in this system. Because this dependence involves trion systems, one can use gate voltages to modulate the polarization (or intensity) emitted from TMD structures. PMID:26728976

  2. Anomalous temperature-dependent spin-valley polarization in monolayer WS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanbicki, A. T.; Kioseoglou, G.; Currie, M.; Hellberg, C. Stephen; McCreary, K. M.; Friedman, A. L.; Jonker, B. T.

    2016-01-01

    Single layers of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are direct gap semiconductors with nondegenerate valley indices. An intriguing possibility for these materials is the use of their valley index as an alternate state variable. Several limitations to such a utility include strong intervalley scattering, as well as multiparticle interactions leading to multiple emission channels. We prepare single-layer WS2 films such that the photoluminescence is from either the neutral or charged exciton (trion). After excitation with circularly polarized light, the neutral exciton emission has zero polarization. However, the trion emission has a large polarization (28%) at room temperature. The trion emission also has a unique, non-monotonic temperature dependence that is a consequence of the multiparticle nature of the trion. This temperature dependence enables us to determine that intervalley scattering, electron-hole radiative recombination, and Auger processes are the dominant mechanisms at work in this system. Because this dependence involves trion systems, one can use gate voltages to modulate the polarization (or intensity) emitted from TMD structures.

  3. Anomalous temperature dependence of the single-particle spectrum in the organic conductor TTF-TCNQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulut, Nejat; Matsueda, Hiroaki; Tohyama, Takami; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2006-03-01

    The angle-resolved photoemission spectrum of the quasi-one-dimensional organic-conductor TTF-TCNQ exhibits an unusual temperature dependence in the sense that a transfer of spectral weight over an energy range of 1eV takes place as the temperature decreases below 260K. In order to investigate the origin of this behavior, we have performed Dynamical Density-Matrix-Renomalization-Group (DDMRG) calculations at zero temperature and Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations at finite temperatures for the single-particle spectral weight of the doped one-dimensional (1D) Hubbard model. We present DDMRG and QMC results for a range of the model parameters of the 1D Hubbard model and make comparisons with the photoemission data. In addition, we present zero-temperature DDMRG results on the doped 1D Hubbard-Holstein model in order to explore how the electron-phonon coupling influences the single-particle spectrum in 1D correlated conductors.

  4. Anomalous temperature dependence of charged exciton photoluminescence polarization in monolayer WS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanbicki, A. T.; Kioseoglou, G.; Currie, M.; Hellberg, C. S.; Friedman, A. L.; McCreary, K. M.; Jonker, B. T.

    2015-03-01

    Monolayer WS2 is a direct-gap transition metal dichalcogenide semiconductor. Its low-dimensional hexagonal structure leads to two inequivalent K-points in the Brillioun zone. The valley index and spin are intrinsically coupled with spin-dependent selection rules that enable populating and interrogating each valley using circularly polarized light. Here, we probe the degree of circular polarization of the emitted photoluminescence (PL) as function of the photo-excitation energy and temperature to elucidate spin-dependent inter- and intra-valley relaxation mechanisms. Monolayer WS2 flakes have PL emission from the free and charged exciton near 2.0 eV. We reproducibly isolate these excitons via appropriate sample preparation. With excitation using positive helicity light, we analyze the PL for positive and negative helicities to determine polarization. Unlike MoS2, we measure significant polarization from the charged exciton for high excitation energies, even at room temperature. There is also an enhancement of polarization of the charged exciton at intermediate temperatures. We discuss the polarization behavior in terms of phonon assisted intervalley scattering processes. This work was supported by internal programs at NRL and the NRL Nanoscience Institute.

  5. Anomalous temperature dependence of the single-particle spectrum in the organic conductor TTF-TCNQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulut, N.; Matsueda, H.; Tohyama, T.; Maekawa, S.

    2006-09-01

    The angle-resolved photoemission spectrum of the organic conductor TTF-TCNQ exhibits an unusual transfer of spectral weight over a wide energy range for temperatures 60Kdependence, and the long-range part of the Coulomb repulsion also needs to be included.

  6. Temperature-dependent reaction pathways for the anomalous hydrocracking of triglycerides in the presence of sulfided Co-Mo-catalyst.

    PubMed

    Anand, Mohit; Sinha, Anil K

    2012-12-01

    Kinetic studies and product profiling was done to understand the anomalous cracking of jathropha oil triglycerides in the presence of sulfided Co-Mo/Al(2)O(3) catalyst. At temperatures between 320 and 340 °C, only deoxygenation and oligomerization reactions took place whereas at temperatures above 340 °C, internal conversions between the products and direct conversion to lighter and middle distillates were favored High pressures (80 bar) and H(2)/feed ratios (>1500) were necessary to minimize oligomerization of the products and to increase the lifespan of the catalyst. Lumped kinetic models were validated with experimental results. Activation energies for the formation of lighter (83 kJ/mol) and middle fractions (126 kJ/mol) were higher than those for the heavy (47 kJ/mol) and deoxygenated (47 kJ/mol) products. Jatropha oil triglycerides hydroconversion pathways were dependent on temperature and the triglycerides could be hydrocracked to lower range hydrocarbons (C5-C14) by increasing the reaction temperatures. PMID:23073102

  7. Influence of anomalous temperature dependence of water density on convection at lateral heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukreev, V. I.; Gusev, A. V.

    2012-12-01

    The article provides results of experimental investigation of a fresh water motion in a flume with limited dimensions at lateral heating. The initial water temperature in the flume ranged from 0 to 22 °C. It is shown that there are qualitative changes of the motion picture in the vicinity of initial temperature in the flume equal to the one at which water has maximal density (approximately 4 °C). At an initial temperature in the flume exceeding or equal to 4 °C, the heated water propagates in the form of a relatively thin surface jet, and at jet reflection from the flume end walls the heated water is accumulated only in the upper layer. When the initial temperature in the flume is below 4 °C the convective instability develops. A part of the heated water sinks to the bottom. The paper provides respective illustrations and quantitative data on the distribution of temperature and velocity.

  8. Communication: Anomalous temperature dependence of the intermediate range order in phosphonium ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Hettige, Jeevapani J.; Kashyap, Hemant K.; Margulis, Claudio J.

    2014-03-21

    In a recent article by the Castner and Margulis groups [Faraday Discuss. 154, 133 (2012)], we described in detail the structure of the tetradecyltrihexylphosphonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)-amide ionic liquid as a function of temperature using X-ray scattering, and theoretical partitions of the computationally derived structure function. Interestingly, and as opposed to the case in most other ionic-liquids, the first sharp diffraction peak or prepeak appears to increase in intensity as temperature is increased. This phenomenon is counter intuitive as one would expect that intermediate range order fades as temperature increases. This Communication shows that a loss of hydrophobic tail organization at higher temperatures is counterbalanced by better organization of polar components giving rise to the increase in intensity of the prepeak.

  9. Anomalous pressure dependence of magnetic ordering temperature in Tb revealed by resistivity measurements to 141 GPa. Comparison with Gd and Dy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lim, J.; Fabbris, G.; Haskel, D.; Schilling, J. S.

    2015-05-26

    In previous studies the pressure dependence of the magnetic ordering temperature To of Dy was found to exhibit a sharp increase above its volume collapse pressure of 73 GPa, appearing to reach temperatures well above ambient at 157 GPa. In a search for a second such lanthanide, electrical resistivity measurements were carried out on neighboring Tb to 141 GPa over the temperature range 3.8 - 295 K. Below Tb’s volume collapse pressure of 53 GPa, the pressure dependence To(P) mirrors that of both Dy and Gd. However, at higher pressures To(P) for Tb becomes highly anomalous. This result, together withmore » the very strong suppression of superconductivity by dilute Tb ions in Y, suggests that extreme pressure transports Tb into an unconventional magnetic state with an anomalously high magnetic ordering temperature.« less

  10. Anomalous pressure dependence of magnetic ordering temperature in Tb revealed by resistivity measurements to 141 GPa. Comparison with Gd and Dy

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, J.; Fabbris, G.; Haskel, D.; Schilling, J. S.

    2015-05-26

    In previous studies the pressure dependence of the magnetic ordering temperature To of Dy was found to exhibit a sharp increase above its volume collapse pressure of 73 GPa, appearing to reach temperatures well above ambient at 157 GPa. In a search for a second such lanthanide, electrical resistivity measurements were carried out on neighboring Tb to 141 GPa over the temperature range 3.8 - 295 K. Below Tb’s volume collapse pressure of 53 GPa, the pressure dependence To(P) mirrors that of both Dy and Gd. However, at higher pressures To(P) for Tb becomes highly anomalous. This result, together with the very strong suppression of superconductivity by dilute Tb ions in Y, suggests that extreme pressure transports Tb into an unconventional magnetic state with an anomalously high magnetic ordering temperature.

  11. Strong localization induced anomalous temperature dependence exciton emission above 300 K from SnO{sub 2} quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, S. S. E-mail: ghli@issp.ac.cn; Li, F. D.; Liu, Q. W.; Xu, S. C.; Luo, Y. Y.; Li, G. H. E-mail: ghli@issp.ac.cn

    2015-05-07

    SnO{sub 2} quantum dots (QDs) are potential materials for deep ultraviolet (DUV) light emitting devices. In this study, we report the temperature and excitation power-dependent exciton luminescence from SnO{sub 2} QDs. The exciton emission exhibits anomalous blue shift, accompanied with band width reduction with increasing temperature and excitation power above 300 K. The anomalous temperature dependences of the peak energy and band width are well interpreted by the strongly localized carrier thermal hopping process and Gaussian shape of band tails states, respectively. The localized wells and band tails at conduction minimum are considered to be induced by the surface oxygen defects and local potential fluctuation in SnO{sub 2} QDs.

  12. Momentum and energy dependence of the anomalous high-energy dispersion in the electronic structure of high temperature superconductors.

    PubMed

    Inosov, D S; Fink, J; Kordyuk, A A; Borisenko, S V; Zabolotnyy, V B; Schuster, R; Knupfer, M; Büchner, B; Follath, R; Dürr, H A; Eberhardt, W; Hinkov, V; Keimer, B; Berger, H

    2007-12-01

    Using high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy we have studied the momentum and photon energy dependence of the anomalous high-energy dispersion, termed waterfalls, between the Fermi level and 1 eV binding energy in several high-T_{c} superconductors. We observe strong changes of the dispersion between different Brillouin zones and a strong dependence on the photon energy around 75 eV, which we associate with the resonant photoemission at the Cu3p-->3d_{x;{2}-y;{2}} edge. We conclude that the high-energy "waterfall" dispersion results from a strong suppression of the photoemission intensity at the center of the Brillouin zone due to matrix element effects and is, therefore, not an intrinsic feature of the spectral function. This indicates that the new high-energy scale in the electronic structure of cuprates derived from the waterfall-like dispersion may be incorrect. PMID:18233401

  13. Momentum and Energy Dependence of the Anomalous High-Energy Dispersion in the Electronic Structure of High Temperature Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inosov, D. S.; Fink, J.; Kordyuk, A. A.; Borisenko, S. V.; Zabolotnyy, V. B.; Schuster, R.; Knupfer, M.; Büchner, B.; Follath, R.; Dürr, H. A.; Eberhardt, W.; Hinkov, V.; Keimer, B.; Berger, H.

    2007-12-01

    Using high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy we have studied the momentum and photon energy dependence of the anomalous high-energy dispersion, termed waterfalls, between the Fermi level and 1 eV binding energy in several high-Tc superconductors. We observe strong changes of the dispersion between different Brillouin zones and a strong dependence on the photon energy around 75 eV, which we associate with the resonant photoemission at the Cu3p→3dx2-y2 edge. We conclude that the high-energy “waterfall” dispersion results from a strong suppression of the photoemission intensity at the center of the Brillouin zone due to matrix element effects and is, therefore, not an intrinsic feature of the spectral function. This indicates that the new high-energy scale in the electronic structure of cuprates derived from the waterfall-like dispersion may be incorrect.

  14. Temperature dependence of the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in Ta/Co2FeAl/MgO structures probed by Anomalous Hall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabor, M. S.; Petrisor, T.; Pop, O.; Colis, S.; Tiusan, C.

    2015-10-01

    We report a detailed study of the temperature dependence of the magnetic anisotropy in Ta/Co2FeAl/MgO structures by means of Anomalous Hall Effect measurements. The volume magnetic anisotropy, although negligible at room temperature, shows a non-negligible value at low temperatures and favors an in-plane easy magnetization axis. The surface magnetic anisotropy, which promotes the perpendicular magnetic easy axis, shows an increase from 0.76 ± 0.05 erg /cm2 at 300 K, up to 1.08 ± 0.04 erg /cm2 at 5 K, attributed to the evolution of the Co2FeAl layer saturation magnetization with temperature.

  15. Anomalous temperature dependence in valence band spectra: A resonant photoemission study of layered perovskite Sr{sub 2}CoO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Pankaj K.; Choudhary, R. J. Phase, D. M.

    2014-05-05

    Valence band spectra (VBS) and its modification across Curie temperature (T{sub C}) of Sr{sub 2}CoO{sub 4} thin film are studied using resonant photoemission spectroscopy. It is found that VBS mainly consists of hybridized states of Co-3d t{sub 2g}e{sub g} and O-2p; however, Co-3d e{sub g} states show its prominence only in the ferromagnetic temperature regime. Below T{sub C}, spectral weight transfer takes place anomalously from high binding energy (B.E.) region to low B.E. region, signifying the enhanced intermediate or low spin state Co{sup 4+} ions. It is suggested that spin-lattice coupling and many-body effects in Sr{sub 2}CoO{sub 4} derived from the strong electron correlations lead to such temperature dependence of VBS.

  16. Anomalous Temperature-Dependent Upconversion Luminescence of α-NaYF₄:Yb³⁺/Er³⁺ Nanocrystals Synthesized by a Microwave-Assisted Hydrothermal Method.

    PubMed

    Tong, Lili; Li, Xiangping; Hua, Ruinian; Tianxiang Peng; Wang, Yizhuo; Zhang, Xizhen; Chen, Baojiu

    2016-01-01

    Yb³⁺/Er³⁺co-doped cubic-(α-) phase NaYF₄ nanocrystals were prepared through a microwave- assisted hydrothermal method. Temperature-dependent upconversion luminescence (UCL) and sensing properties were systematically studied. It is interesting that anomalous temperature- dependent UCL behavior is observed. With increasing temperature (303-573 K), the UCL intensity of Er³⁺ does not quench monotonously but reaches a minimum around 483 K and then increases. However, it was found that the UCL spectra change in a different way with decreasing temperature (573-303 K) from the one measured with increasing temperature. The fluorescence intensity ratio of ²H₁₁/₂ --> ⁴I₁₅/₂ to ⁴S₃/₂ --> ⁴I₁₅/₂ at any measured temperature point remains almost constant in all measurement processes, indicating the consistency of temperature in each spectrum measurement at all temperature points regardless of the heating or the cooling process in our experiments. The results demonstrate that NaYF₄:Yb³⁺/Er³⁺ UC nanocrystal has good sensing stability and may have potential application in the nanoscale thermal sensor. PMID:27398529

  17. Anomalous pressure dependence of the superconducting transition temperature in TlNi2Se2 -xSx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goh, S. K.; Chang, H. C.; Reiss, P.; Alireza, P. L.; Cheung, Y. W.; Lau, S. Y.; Wang, Hangdong; Mao, Qianhui; Yang, Jinhu; Fang, Minghu; Grosche, F. M.; Sutherland, M. L.

    2014-11-01

    We report the pressure dependence of the superconducting transition temperature Tc in TlNi2Se2 -xSx detected via the ac susceptibility method. The pressure-temperature phase diagram constructed for TlNi2Se2 , TlNi2S2 , and TlNi2SeS exhibits two unexpected features: (a) a sudden collapse of the superconducting state at moderate pressure for all three compositions and (b) a dome-shaped pressure dependence of Tc for TlNi2SeS . These results point to the nontrivial role of S substitution and its subtle interplay with applied pressure, as well as interesting superconducting properties of the TlNi2Se2 -xSx system.

  18. Linear Magnetization Dependence of the Intrinsic Anomalous Hall Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, C.; Yao, Y.; Niu, Q.; Weitering, Harm H

    2006-01-01

    The anomalous Hall effect is investigated experimentally and theoretically for ferromagnetic thin films of Mn{sub 5}Ge{sub 3}. We have separated the intrinsic and extrinsic contributions to the experimental anomalous Hall effect and calculated the intrinsic anomalous Hall conductivity from the Berry curvature of the Bloch states using first-principles methods. The intrinsic anomalous Hall conductivity depends linearly on the magnetization, which can be understood from the long-wavelength fluctuations of the spin orientation at finite temperatures. The quantitative agreement between theory and experiment is remarkably good, not only near 0 K but also at finite temperatures, up to about -240 K (0.8T{sub c}).

  19. Anomalous frequency and temperature-dependent scattering and Hund's coupling in the almost quantum critical heavy-fermion system CeFe2Ge2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossé, G.; Pan, LiDong; Li, Yize S.; Greene, L. H.; Eckstein, J.; Armitage, N. P.

    2016-02-01

    We present THz range optical conductivity data of a thin film of the near quantum critical heavy-fermion compound CeFe2Ge2 . Our complex conductivity measurements find a deviation from conventional Drude-like transport in a temperature range previously reported to exhibit unconventional behavior. We calculate the frequency-dependent effective mass and scattering rate using an extended Drude model analysis. We find the inelastic scattering rate can be described by a temperature-dependent power law ωn (T ), where n (T ) approaches ˜1.0 ±0.2 at 1.5 K. This is compared to the ρ ˜T1.5 behavior claimed in dc resistivity data and the ρ ˜T2 expected from Fermi-liquid theory. In addition to a low-temperature mass renormalization, we find an anomalous mass renormalization that persists to high temperature. We attribute this to a Hund's coupling in the Fe states in a manner similar to that recently proposed in the ferropnictides. CeFe2Ge2 appears to be a very interesting system where one may study the interplay between the usual 4 f lattice Kondo effect and this Hund's enhanced Kondo effect in the 3 d states.

  20. Anomalous frequency dependent diamagnetism in metal silicide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Ashutosh; Gunasekera, Jagat; Harriger, Leland; Singh, David J.; Singh, Deepak K.; Leland Harriger Collaboration

    Discovery of superconductivity in PbO-type FeSe has generated a lot of interest. Among the samples we synthesize with similar structure, NiSi has showed anomalous but very interesting results. Nickel silicides are important electronic materials that have been used as contacts for field effect transistors, as interconnects and in nanoelectronic devices. The magnetic properties of NiSi are not well known, however. In this presentation, we report a highly unusual magnetic phenomenon in NiSi. The ac susceptibility measurements on NiSi reveal strong frequency dependence of static and dynamic susceptibilities that are primarily diamagnetic at room temperature. The static susceptibility is found to exhibit a strong frequency dependence of the diamagnetic response below 100K, while dynamic susceptibility showed peak type feature at 10KHz frequency around 50K. Detailed neutron scattering measurements on high quality powder sample of NiSi on SPINS cold spectrometer further revealed an inelastic peak around 1.5meV, even though no magnetic order is detected. The inelastic peak dissipates above 100K, which is where the static susceptibility starts to diverge with frequency. Research is supported by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Grant No. DE-SC0014461.

  1. Deep-level-driven anomalous temperature dependence of lattice constants and energy gaps in MgxZn1-xSe and MgxZn1-xSe:Co2+ single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Wha-Tek

    1999-02-01

    Pure MgxZn1-xSe (type C) single crystals were grown by the closed-tube sublimation method. MgxZn1-xSe (type D) and MgxZn1-xSe:Co2+ single crystals in which deep levels exist were grown by the chemical transport reaction method. The temperature dependence of the optical energy gaps of the MgxZn1-xSe (type C) single crystals fitted well with the Manoogian-Leclerc equation. However, the temperature dependence of the optical energy gaps of the MgxZn1-xSe (type D) and MgxZn1-xSe:Co2+ single crystals was anomalous in the temperature range of 10-70 K. This anomalous temperature dependence was analyzed as originating from a volume dilation effect due to deep-level defects.

  2. Structural origin of the anomalous temperature dependence of the local magnetic moments in the CaFe2As2 family of materials.

    PubMed

    Ortenzi, L; Gretarsson, H; Kasahara, S; Matsuda, Y; Shibauchi, T; Finkelstein, K D; Wu, W; Julian, S R; Kim, Young-June; Mazin, I I; Boeri, L

    2015-01-30

    We report a combination of Fe Kβ x-ray emission spectroscopy and density functional reduced Stoner theory calculations to investigate the correlation between structural and magnetic degrees of freedom in CaFe2(As1-xPx)2. The puzzling temperature behavior of the local moment found in rare earth-doped CaFe2As2 [H. Gretarsson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 047003 (2013)] is also observed in CaFe2(As1-xPx)2. We explain this phenomenon based on first-principles calculations with scaled magnetic interaction. One scaling parameter is sufficient to describe quantitatively the magnetic moments in both CaFe2(As1-xPx)2 (x=0.055) and Ca0.78La0.22Fe2As2 at all temperatures. The anomalous growth of the local moments with increasing temperature can be understood from the observed large thermal expansion of the c-axis lattice parameter combined with strong magnetoelastic coupling. These effects originate from the strong tendency to form As-As dimers across the Ca layer in the CaFe2As2 family of materials. Our results emphasize the dual local-itinerant character of magnetism in Fe pnictides. PMID:25679903

  3. Structural Origin of the Anomalous Temperature Dependence of the Local Magnetic Moments in the CaFe2As2 Family of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortenzi, L.; Gretarsson, H.; Kasahara, S.; Matsuda, Y.; Shibauchi, T.; Finkelstein, K. D.; Wu, W.; Julian, S. R.; Kim, Young-June; Mazin, I. I.; Boeri, L.

    2015-01-01

    We report a combination of Fe K β x-ray emission spectroscopy and density functional reduced Stoner theory calculations to investigate the correlation between structural and magnetic degrees of freedom in CaFe2(As1-xPx) 2 . The puzzling temperature behavior of the local moment found in rare earth-doped CaFe2As2 [H. Gretarsson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 047003 (2013)] is also observed in CaFe2(As1-xPx) 2 . We explain this phenomenon based on first-principles calculations with scaled magnetic interaction. One scaling parameter is sufficient to describe quantitatively the magnetic moments in both CaFe2(As1-xPx) 2 (x =0.055 ) and Ca0.78La0.22Fe2As2 at all temperatures. The anomalous growth of the local moments with increasing temperature can be understood from the observed large thermal expansion of the c -axis lattice parameter combined with strong magnetoelastic coupling. These effects originate from the strong tendency to form As-As dimers across the Ca layer in the CaFe2As2 family of materials. Our results emphasize the dual local-itinerant character of magnetism in Fe pnictides.

  4. Anomalous temperature dependence of the lattice parameters in HoPO{sub 4} and HoVO{sub 4}: Rare earth quadrupolar effects

    SciTech Connect

    Skanthakumar, S.; Loong, C.K.; Soderholm, L.; Nipko, J.; Richardson, J.W. Jr.; Abraham, M.M.; Boatner, L.A.

    1994-07-01

    The temperature dependence of the lattice parameters in tetragonal HoPO{sub 4} and HoVO{sub 4} was measured using neutron powder-diffraction techniques. Below about 100K, the lattice parameter a of HoPO{sub 4} increases with decreasing temperature while c decreases. In HoVO{sub 4}, the above behavior is reversed, that is, a decreases with decreasing temperature while c increases. Similar measurements on nonmagnetic LUP0{sub 4} and LuVO{sub 4} do not show any anomaly. This observation indicates that the unusual temperature dependence of the lattice constants is magnetic in origin. It can be explained in terms of a Ho{sup 3+} quadrupole interaction with the crystalline lattice. In particular, the calculated electronically-generated quadrupole moment of the Ho{sup 3+} in HoPO{sub 4} and HoVO{sub 4} exhibits a temperature dependence similar to that observed in the lattice parameters.

  5. Strong anomalous temperature dependence of the contact hyperfine contribution to the muon Knight shift in HoB 2C 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lorenzi, F.; Gygax, F. N.; Schenck, A.; Tobo, A.; Onodera, H.

    2003-02-01

    Tetragonal HoB 2C 2 is one of the few compounds which show antiferroquadrupolar ordering below the onset of antiferromagnetic order (T Q=4.5 K, T N=5.9 K) . We have started the study of this system with the ultimate aim to learn more about the interaction of the magnetic and quadrupolar degrees of freedom in this context. In the contribution we present results of Knight-shift measurements on a single crystal above TN. The results, firstly, allowed to determine the muon site, which is identified to be the 8i interstitial site, and secondly, revealed an unusual temperature dependence of the contact hyperfine constant Ac.

  6. Anomalous temperature-induced volume contraction in GeTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterji, Tapan; Kumar, C. M. N.; Wdowik, Urszula D.

    2015-02-01

    The recent surge of interest in phase-change materials GeTe, Ge2Sb2Te5 , and related compounds motivated us to revisit the structural phase transition in GeTe in more detail than was done before. The rhombohedral-to-cubic ferroelectric phase transition in GeTe has been studied using high-resolution neutron powder diffraction on a spallation neutron source. We determined the temperature dependence of the structural parameters in a wide temperature range extending from 309 to 973 K. The results of our studies clearly show an anomalous volume contraction of 0.6% at the phase transition from the rhombohedral-to-cubic phase. In order to better understand the phase transition and the associated anomalous volume decrease in GeTe, we have performed phonon calculations based on the density functional theory. Results of the present investigations are also discussed with respect to the experimental data obtained for single crystals of GeTe.

  7. Anomalous metastability in a temperature-driven transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibáñez Berganza, M.; Coletti, P.; Petri, A.

    2014-06-01

    The Langer theory of metastability provides a description of the lifetime and properties of the metastable phase of the Ising model field-driven transition, describing the magnetic-field-driven transition in ferromagnets and the chemical-potential-driven transition of fluids. An immediate further step is to apply it to the study of a transition driven by the temperature, as the one exhibited by the two-dimensional Potts model. For this model, a study based on the analytical continuation of the free energy (Meunier J. L. and Morel A., Eur. Phys. J. B, 13 (2000) 341) predicts the anomalous vanishing of the metastable temperature range in the large-system-size limit, an issue that has been controversial since the eighties. By a GPU algorithm we compare the Monte Carlo dynamics with the theory. For temperatures close to the transition we obtain agreement and characterize the dependence on the system size, which is essentially different with respect to the Ising case. For smaller temperatures, we observe the onset of stationary states with non-Boltzmann statistics, not predicted by the theory.

  8. Anomalous scaling in an age-dependent branching model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller-Schmidt, Stephanie; Tuǧrul, Murat; Eguíluz, Víctor M.; Hernández-García, Emilio; Klemm, Konstantin

    2015-02-01

    We introduce a one-parametric family of tree growth models, in which branching probabilities decrease with branch age τ as τ-α. Depending on the exponent α , the scaling of tree depth with tree size n displays a transition between the logarithmic scaling of random trees and an algebraic growth. At the transition (α =1 ) tree depth grows as (logn) 2. This anomalous scaling is in good agreement with the trend observed in evolution of biological species, thus providing a theoretical support for age-dependent speciation and associating it to the occurrence of a critical point.

  9. Anomalous scaling in an age-dependent branching model.

    PubMed

    Keller-Schmidt, Stephanie; Tuğrul, Murat; Eguíluz, Víctor M; Hernández-García, Emilio; Klemm, Konstantin

    2015-02-01

    We introduce a one-parametric family of tree growth models, in which branching probabilities decrease with branch age τ as τ(-α). Depending on the exponent α, the scaling of tree depth with tree size n displays a transition between the logarithmic scaling of random trees and an algebraic growth. At the transition (α=1) tree depth grows as (logn)(2). This anomalous scaling is in good agreement with the trend observed in evolution of biological species, thus providing a theoretical support for age-dependent speciation and associating it to the occurrence of a critical point. PMID:25768548

  10. On the anomalous temperature behaviour of the permittivity of ? crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnoholovets, Volodymyr

    1996-05-01

    The proton bifurcation for T > 120 K in the 0953-8984/8/20/002/img2 crystal is considered as the origin of a phonon mixture. As a result, a supplementary term describing phonon fluctuations appears in the crystal Hamiltonian. This fluctuation correction forms the basis of a light absorption mechanism for mixed vibrational modes. An anomalous temperature behaviour of two modes that was previously found experimentally is explained in the framework of the present model.

  11. Anomalous magnetoresistance in nanocrystalline gadolinium at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, S. P.; Kaul, S. N.

    2015-02-01

    The results of a detailed investigation of electrical resistivity, ρ(T) and transverse magnetoresistance (MR) in nanocrystalline Gd samples with an average grain size d = 12 nm and 18 nm reveal the following. Besides a major contribution to the residual resistivity, ρr(0), arising from the scattering of conduction electrons from grain surfaces/interfaces/boundaries (which increases drastically as the average grain size decreases, as expected), coherent electron-magnon scattering makes a small contribution to ρr(0), which gets progressively suppressed as the applied magnetic field (H) increases in strength. At low temperatures (T ≲ 40 K) and fields (H = 0 and H = 5 kOe), ρH(T) varies as T3/2 with a change in slope at T+ ≃ 16.5 K. As the field increases beyond 5 kOe, the T3/2 variation of ρH(T) at low temperatures (T ≲ 40 K) changes over to the T2 variation and a slight change in the slope dρH/dT2 at T+(H) disappears at H ⩾ 20 kOe. The electron-electron scattering (Fermi liquid) contribution to the T2 term, if present, is completely swamped by the coherent electron-magnon scattering contribution. As a function of temperature, (negative) MR goes through a dip at a temperature Tmin ≃ T+, which increases with H as H2/3. MR at Tmin also increases in magnitude with H and attains a value as large as ˜15% (17%) for d = 12 nm (18 nm) at H = 90 kOe. This value is roughly five times greater than that reported earlier for crystalline Gd at Tmin ≃ 100 K. Unusually large MR results from an anomalous softening of magnon modes at T ≃ Tmin ≈ 20 K. In the light of our previous magnetization and specific heat results, we show that all the above observations, including the H2/3 dependence of Tmin (with Tmin(H) identified as the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) transition temperature, TBEC(H)), are the manifestations of the BEC of magnons at temperatures T ⩽ TBEC. Contrasted with crystalline Gd, which behaves as a three-dimensional (3D) pure uniaxial dipolar

  12. Effect of entropy on anomalous transport in electron-temperature-gradient-modes

    SciTech Connect

    Yaqub Khan, M.; Iqbal, J.; Ul Haq, A.

    2014-05-15

    Due to the interconnection of entropy with temperature and density of plasma, it would be interesting to investigate plasma related phenomena with respect to entropy. By employing Braginskii transport equations, it is proved that entropy is proportional to a function of potential and distribution function of entropy is re-defined, ∇S–drift in obtained. New dispersion relation is derived; it is found that the anomalous transport depends on the gradient of the entropy.

  13. The temperature dependent amide I band of crystalline acetanilide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruzeiro, Leonor; Freedman, Holly

    2013-10-01

    The temperature dependent anomalous peak in the amide I band of crystalline acetanilide is thought to be due to self-trapped states. On the contrary, according to the present model, the anomalous peak comes from the fraction of ACN molecules strongly hydrogen-bonded to a neighboring ACN molecule, and its intensity decreases because, on average, this fraction decreases as temperature increases. This model provides, for the first time, an integrated and theoretically consistent view of the temperature dependence of the full amide I band and a qualitative explanation of some of the features of nonlinear pump-probe experiments.

  14. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Alamosa Saguache Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1σ and 2σ above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2σ temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2σ were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4217727.601630 m Left: 394390.400264 m Right: 460179.841813 m Bottom: 4156258.036086 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB

  15. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Garfield County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Garfield Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1σ and 2σ above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2σ temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Garfield County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1σ and 2σ were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4442180.552290 m Left: 268655.053363 m Right: 359915.053363 m Bottom: 4312490.552290 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal

  16. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Chaffee County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Chaffee Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1σ and 2σ above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2σ temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Chaffee County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2σ were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4333432.368072 m Left: 366907.700763 m Right: 452457.816015 m Bottom: 4208271.566715 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO

  17. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Routt County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Routt Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1σ and 2σ above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2σ temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Routt County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1σ and 2σ were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4501071.574000 m Left: 311351.975000 m Right: 359411.975000 m Bottom: 4447521.574000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code

  18. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Dolores County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Dolores Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1σ and 2σ above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2σ temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Dolores County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2σ were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4186234.213315 m Left: 212558.673056 m Right: 232922.811862 m Bottom: 4176781.467043 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO

  19. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Archuleta County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Archuleta Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1σ and 2σ above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2σ temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Archuleta County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1σ and 2σ were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies). Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4144825.235807 m Left: 285446.256851 m Right: 350577.338852 m Bottom: 4096962.250137 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO

  20. Effect of microstructure on anomalous strain-rate-dependent behaviour of bacterial cellulose hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xing; Shi, Zhijun; Lau, Andrew; Liu, Changqin; Yang, Guang; Silberschmidt, Vadim V

    2016-05-01

    This study is focused on anomalous strain-rate-dependent behaviour of bacterial cellulose (BC) hydrogel that can be strain-rate insensitive, hardening, softening, or strain-rate insensitive in various ranges of strain rate. BC hydrogel consists of randomly distributed nanofibres and a large content of free water; thanks to its ideal biocompatibility, it is suitable for biomedical applications. Motivated by its potential applications in complex loading conditions of body environment, its time-dependent behaviour was studied by means of in-aqua uniaxial tension tests at constant temperature of 37 °C at various strain rates ranging from 0.000 1s(-1) to 0.3s(-1). Experimental results reflect anomalous strain-rate-dependent behaviour that was not documented before. Micro-morphological observations allowed identification of deformation mechanisms at low and high strain rates in relation to microstructural changes. Unlike strain-rate softening behaviours in other materials, reorientation of nanofibres and kinematics of free-water flow dominate the softening behaviour of BC hydrogel at high strain rates. PMID:26952406

  1. Anomalous Hall conductivity of clean Sr2RuO4 at finite temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Edward; Kallin, Catherine

    2013-07-01

    Building on previous work, we calculate the temperature- and frequency-dependent anomalous Hall conductivity for the putative multiband chiral superconductor Sr2RuO4 using a simple microscopic two-orbital model without impurities. A Hall effect arises in this system without the application of an external magnetic field due to the time-reversal-symmetry breaking chiral superconducting state. The anomalous Hall conductivity is nonzero only when there is more than one superconducting order parameter, involving inter- as well as intra-band Cooper pairing. We find that such a multiband superconducting state gives rise to a distinctive resonance in the frequency-dependence of the Hall conductivity at a frequency close to the inter-orbital hopping energy scale that describes hopping between Ru dxz and dyz orbitals. The detection of this feature, robust to temperature and impurity effects in the superconducting phase, would thus constitute compelling evidence in favour of a multiband origin of superconductivity in Sr2RuO4, with strong superconductivity on the α and β bands. The temperature dependence of the Hall conductivity and Kerr rotation angle are studied within this model at the one-loop approximation.

  2. Magnetization, anomalous Barkhausen effect, and core loss of Supermendur under high temperature cycling.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedra, J. M.; Schwarze, G. E.

    1971-01-01

    The magnetization and core loss of Supermendur were measured up to 900 C under conditions of slow temperature cycling in vacuum. As a consequence of this heating, the coercivity at 25 C increased from 21 A/m to about 110 A/m. This increase is less than previously reported. A prominent anomalous Barkhausen effect, pinched-in hysteresis loops, and a magnetic viscosity field in excess of 20 A/m were observed in the range of 600 to 700 C. At 850 C, Supermendur had a coercivity of 23 A/m, a saturation induction exceeding 1.5 T, a core loss of 26 W/kg at 400 Hz, and a maximum induction of 1.5 T. Supermendur may be useful for high temperature soft magnetic material applications where some history dependence of properties and instability of minor loops at lower temperatures is acceptable.

  3. Thickness Dependence of the Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in Magnetic Topological Insulator Films.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiao; Feng, Yang; Wang, Jing; Ou, Yunbo; Hao, Zhenqi; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Zuocheng; Zhang, Liguo; Lin, Chaojing; Liao, Jian; Li, Yongqing; Wang, Li-Li; Ji, Shuai-Hua; Chen, Xi; Ma, Xucun; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Wang, Yayu; He, Ke; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2016-08-01

    The evolution of the quantum anomalous Hall effect with the thickness of Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2 Te3 magnetic topological insulator films is studied, revealing how the effect is caused by the interplay of the surface states, band-bending, and ferromagnetic exchange energy. Homogeneity in ferromagnetism is found to be the key to high-temperature quantum anomalous Hall material. PMID:27166762

  4. Temperature dependent BRDF facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airola, Marc B.; Brown, Andrea M.; Hahn, Daniel V.; Thomas, Michael E.; Congdon, Elizabeth A.; Mehoke, Douglas S.

    2014-09-01

    Applications involving space based instrumentation and aerodynamically heated surfaces often require knowledge of the bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of an exposed surface at high temperature. Addressing this need, the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) developed a BRDF facility that features a multiple-port vacuum chamber, multiple laser sources covering the spectral range from the longwave infrared to the ultraviolet, imaging pyrometry and laser heated samples. Laser heating eliminates stray light that would otherwise be seen from a furnace and requires minimal sample support structure, allowing low thermal conduction loss to be obtained, which is especially important at high temperatures. The goal is to measure the BRDF of ceramic-coated surfaces at temperatures in excess of 1000°C in a low background environment. Most ceramic samples are near blackbody in the longwave infrared, thus pyrometry using a LWIR camera can be very effective and accurate.

  5. The precise time-dependent solution of the Fokker–Planck equation with anomalous diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Ran; Du, Jiulin

    2015-08-15

    We study the time behavior of the Fokker–Planck equation in Zwanzig’s rule (the backward-Ito’s rule) based on the Langevin equation of Brownian motion with an anomalous diffusion in a complex medium. The diffusion coefficient is a function in momentum space and follows a generalized fluctuation–dissipation relation. We obtain the precise time-dependent analytical solution of the Fokker–Planck equation and at long time the solution approaches to a stationary power-law distribution in nonextensive statistics. As a test, numerically we have demonstrated the accuracy and validity of the time-dependent solution. - Highlights: • The precise time-dependent solution of the Fokker–Planck equation with anomalous diffusion is found. • The anomalous diffusion satisfies a generalized fluctuation–dissipation relation. • At long time the time-dependent solution approaches to a power-law distribution in nonextensive statistics. • Numerically we have demonstrated the accuracy and validity of the time-dependent solution.

  6. Mechanism of Anomalous Ellipticity Dependence of Near-threshold Harmonics in H 2 +

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasiri Avanaki, Kobra; Telnov, Dmitry A.; Chu, Shih-I.

    2016-05-01

    We have studied the mechanism of anomalous dependence of near-threshold harmonics in H2+on ellipticity of driving field with the carrier wavelength 780 nm. The numerical procedure is based on accurate solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in prolate spheroidal coordinates with the help of generalized pseudospectral method. Our analysis reveals that the origin of this phenomenon is mainly in the near-resonant excitation of πu molecular orbitals in H2+.For the lowest affected harmonic, the maximum in the ellipticity dependence of the radiation energy is exclusively due to excitation of the 1πu state; however, for higher near-threshold harmonics, higher-lying excited πu states are playing significant role as well. The closer the harmonic to the threshold, the larger number of excited states make considerable contributions. All these contributions interfere, resulting in the anomalous ellipticity dependence with a maximum at some non-zero value of the ellipticity parameter. In the vicinity of this value, the harmonics with the anomalous dependence are linearly polarized along the minor axis of the polarization ellipse of the driving field and may show strong elliptical polarization as well. This work is partially supported by DOE.

  7. Anomalous low-temperature Coulomb drag in graphene-GaAs heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Gamucci, A; Spirito, D; Carrega, M; Karmakar, B; Lombardo, A; Bruna, M; Pfeiffer, L N; West, K W; Ferrari, A C; Polini, M; Pellegrini, V

    2014-01-01

    Vertical heterostructures combining different layered materials offer novel opportunities for applications and fundamental studies. Here we report a new class of heterostructures comprising a single-layer (or bilayer) graphene in close proximity to a quantum well created in GaAs and supporting a high-mobility two-dimensional electron gas. In our devices, graphene is naturally hole-doped, thereby allowing for the investigation of electron-hole interactions. We focus on the Coulomb drag transport measurements, which are sensitive to many-body effects, and find that the Coulomb drag resistivity significantly increases for temperatures <5-10 K. The low-temperature data follow a logarithmic law, therefore displaying a notable departure from the ordinary quadratic temperature dependence expected in a weakly correlated Fermi-liquid. This anomalous behaviour is consistent with the onset of strong interlayer correlations. Our heterostructures represent a new platform for the creation of coherent circuits and topologically protected quantum bits. PMID:25524426

  8. Large anomalous Hall effect in a non-collinear antiferromagnet at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuji, Satoru; Kiyohara, Naoki; Higo, Tomoya

    2015-11-12

    In ferromagnetic conductors, an electric current may induce a transverse voltage drop in zero applied magnetic field: this anomalous Hall effect is observed to be proportional to magnetization, and thus is not usually seen in antiferromagnets in zero field. Recent developments in theory and experiment have provided a framework for understanding the anomalous Hall effect using Berry-phase concepts, and this perspective has led to predictions that, under certain conditions, a large anomalous Hall effect may appear in spin liquids and antiferromagnets without net spin magnetization. Although such a spontaneous Hall effect has now been observed in a spin liquid state, a zero-field anomalous Hall effect has hitherto not been reported for antiferromagnets. Here we report empirical evidence for a large anomalous Hall effect in an antiferromagnet that has vanishingly small magnetization. In particular, we find that Mn3Sn, an antiferromagnet that has a non-collinear 120-degree spin order, exhibits a large anomalous Hall conductivity of around 20 per ohm per centimetre at room temperature and more than 100 per ohm per centimetre at low temperatures, reaching the same order of magnitude as in ferromagnetic metals. Notably, the chiral antiferromagnetic state has a very weak and soft ferromagnetic moment of about 0.002 Bohr magnetons per Mn atom (refs 10, 12), allowing us to switch the sign of the Hall effect with a small magnetic field of around a few hundred oersted. This soft response of the large anomalous Hall effect could be useful for various applications including spintronics--for example, to develop a memory device that produces almost no perturbing stray fields. PMID:26524519

  9. Anomalously temperature-independent birefringence in biaxial optical crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Grechin, Sergei G; Dmitriev, Valentin G; Dyakov, Vladimir A; Pryalkin, Vladimir I

    2000-01-31

    Temperature-independent birefringence in a biaxial crystal was predicted theoretically and observed experimentally for the first time. The width of the plot against temperature (the range corresponding to the temperature independence of the birefringence) at a fundamental radiation wavelength of 632.8 nm in a KTP crystal 5.9 mm long was more than 160{sup 0}C. (letters to the editor)

  10. Temperature, pressure, and compositional effects on anomalous or "self" preservation of gas hydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stern, L.A.; Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    2003-01-01

    We previously reported on a thermal regime where pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate is preserved metastably in bulk at up to 75 K above its nominal temperature stability limit of 193 K at 0.1 MPa, following rapid release of the sample pore pressure. Large fractions (>50 vol.%) of methane hydrate can be preserved for 2-3 weeks by this method, reflecting the greatly suppressed rates of dissociation that characterize this "anomalous preservation" regime. This behavior contrasts that exhibited by methane hydrate at both colder (193-240 K) and warmer (272-290 K) isothermal test conditions, where dissociation rates increase monotonically with increasing temperature. Here, we report on recent experiments that further investigate the effects of temperature, pressure, and composition on anomalous preservation behavior. All tests conducted on sI methane hydrate yielded self-consistent results that confirm the highly temperature-sensitive but reproducible nature of anomalous preservation behavior. Temperature-stepping experiments conducted between 250 and 268 K corroborate the relative rates measured previously in isothermal preservation tests, and elevated pore-pressure tests showed that, as expected, dissociation rates are further reduced with increasing pressure. Surprisingly, sII methane-ethane hydrate was found to exhibit no comparable preservation effect when rapidly depressurized at 268 K, even though it is thermodynamically stable at higher temperatures and lower pressures than sI methane hydrate. These results, coupled with SEM imaging of quenched sample material from a variety of dissociation tests, strongly support our earlier arguments that ice-"shielding" effects provided by partial dissociation along hydrate grain surfaces do not serve as the primary mechanism for anomalous preservation. The underlying physical-chemistry mechanism(s) of anomalous preservation remains elusive, but appears to be based more on textural or morphological changes within the hydrate

  11. Anomalous ultrasonic attenuation in ferritic steels at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Bevis; Lundin, Peter; Lindh-Ulmgren, Eva; Lévesque, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    An unexpected peak in attenuation has been observed at ∼800°C when heating low carbon steels in a laser-ultrasonic instrument. An explanation is given in terms of enhanced crystalline anisotropy with increasing temperature in the bcc ferrite range combined with subsequent transformation to austenite at still higher temperatures. An analysis based on theoretical models of attenuation in the Rayleigh regime is in good agreement with the experimental observations. PMID:27015796

  12. Analysis of printed organic MOSFET characteristics with a focus on the temperature dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenitani, Hiroshi; Maiti, Tapas Kumar; Hayashi, Takuro; Tanimoto, Yuta; Sato, Kenshiro; Chen, Lei; Kikuchihara, Hideyuki; Miura-Mattausch, Mitiko; Jürgen Mattausch, Hans

    2016-04-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of the device characteristics of printed organic MOSFETs with a focus on the temperature dependence is reported. In particular, an anomalous behavior of the temperature dependence of the I ds-V gs characteristic is observed, which is found to be increased at higher temperature in MOSFETs fabricated with the printing technology. Our analysis suggests that the temperature dependence of the trap density and the carrier transport mechanism are the causes for this anomalous increase at higher temperature. The results obtained with the compact model HiSIM-Organic, developed based on the physics of carrier dynamics in organic materials, confirm these conclusions. Improving stable characteristics in circuit applications are demonstrated to be achievable at higher temperatures, due to these anomalous properties of organic MOSFETs fabricated by applying the printing technology.

  13. Anomalous thickness dependence of quality factor in TiN film resonators grown on functionalized Si substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Peng; Kohler, Tim; Lock, Evgeniya; Rosen, Yaniv; Ramanayaka, Aruna; Guchhait, Samaresh; Osborn, Kevin

    Various properties affect the quality factor of superconducting resonators at millikelvin temperatures including the presence of nanoscale interfacial dielectric films and residual quasiparticles. Superconducting titanium nitride is polycrystalline such that growth phases may also affect the resonator quality. Here, we functionalize Si substrates in different hydrophobic and hydrophilic plasma environments, sputter titanium nitride on top and pattern the latter films into resonators. For each functionalization we study the quality factor dependence on the superconducting film thickness, where the thicknesses are changed only between 25 and 50 nm. As expected, most functionalizations reveal very little quality factor dependence on superconducting film thickness. However, other functionalizations dramatically, and even anomalously, increase or decrease the quality with thickness. For example, oxygen plasma functionalization causes the quality factor to increase by a factor of more than ten at single photon power with increased thickness. We report on the progress towards finding the intrinsic reason for strong quality factor dependences on surface functionalization.

  14. Anomalous Diffusion in Low-temperature-grown AlAs/GaAs Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, I.; Chang, J. C. P.; Woodall, J. M.; Melloch, M. R.; Nolte, D. D.

    1996-03-01

    The interdiffusion of heterojunctions can be detrimental or beneficial for applications. Low-temperature-grown (LTG) GaAs which incorporates excess arsenic has attracted attention as a significant marketable new material system. The recent discovery(I. Lahiri, D. D. Nolte, E. S. Harmon, M. R. Melloch and J. M. Woodall, Appl. Phys. Lett. 66), 2519 (1995) of simultaneous ultrafast lifetimes and sharp excitonic transitions in AlAs/GaAs quantum wells grown at low substrate temperatures has made LTG MQWs an attractive candidate for applications. Excess arsenic in these materials provides a mechanism for enhanced and nonequilibrium interdiffusion. We have measured anomalously low effective migration enthalpies as small as 0.32 eV. This value is much smaller than physically recognized mechanisms, such as the migration enthalpy of 1.7 eV attributed to Ga vacancy diffusion. By performing isochronal and isothermal anneals we have recovered a migration enthalpy consistent with gallium vacancy diffusion, but with a time-dependent diffusion coefficient expected to be caused by the thermal annealing of the vacancies.

  15. Temperature-dependent Luttinger surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ito, T; Chainani, A; Haruna, T; Kanai, K; Yokoya, T; Shin, S; Kato, R

    2005-12-01

    The Luttinger surface of an organic metal (TTF-TCNQ), possessing charge order and spin-charge separated band dispersions, is investigated using temperature-dependent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The Luttinger surface topology, obtained from momentum distribution curves, changes from quasi-2D (dimensional) to quasi-1D with temperature. The high temperature quasi-2D surface exhibits 4kF charge-density-wave (CDW) superstructure in the TCNQ derived holon band, in the absence of 2kF order. Decreasing temperature results in quasi-1D nested 2kF CDW order in the TCNQ spinon band and in the TTF surface. The results establish the link in momentum space between charge order and spin-charge separation in a Luttinger liquid. PMID:16384402

  16. Anomalous Balmer continuum temperatures in the Orion Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Donald L.; Dufour, Reginald J.

    1994-01-01

    New long-slit spectra of the Orion Nebula in the near-ultraviolet were used to calculate the Balmer recombination temperature, T(Bac), from the Balmer discontinuity at 3646 A. The spatially resolved data show a decrease in temperature moving to the west of Theta(sup 1) Ori C, from 8400 K at a distance of 40 sec to a low of 2800 K at a distance of 220 sec. Such values are much lower than previously reported. The effect of scattered starlight on these results is calculated and shown to be less than 10%. Previous studies which found scattered light to be important at the discontinuity are in error. Such low temperatures and their impact on nebular physics and abundances are disconcerting and require further study.

  17. A velocity-dependent anomalous radial transport model for (2-D, 2-V) kinetic transport codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodi, Kowsik; Krasheninnikov, Sergei; Cohen, Ron; Rognlien, Tom

    2008-11-01

    Plasma turbulence constitutes a significant part of radial plasma transport in magnetically confined plasmas. This turbulent transport is modeled in the form of anomalous convection and diffusion coefficients in fluid transport codes. There is a need to model the same in continuum kinetic edge codes [such as the (2-D, 2-V) transport version of TEMPEST, NEO, and the code being developed by the Edge Simulation Laboratory] with non-Maxwellian distributions. We present an anomalous transport model with velocity-dependent convection and diffusion coefficients leading to a diagonal transport matrix similar to that used in contemporary fluid transport models (e.g., UEDGE). Also presented are results of simulations corresponding to radial transport due to long-wavelength ExB turbulence using a velocity-independent diffusion coefficient. A BGK collision model is used to enable comparison with fluid transport codes.

  18. Anomalous scaling of temperature structure functions in turbulent thermal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Penger; He, Xiaozhou; Shang, Xiaodong

    2014-11-01

    The scaling properties of the temperature structure function (SF) are investigated in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection. The measured SFs are found to exhibit good scaling in space and time and the resulting SF exponent is obtained both at the center of the convection cell and near the sidewall. It is found that the difference in the functional form of the measured SF exponents at the two locations in the cell is caused by the change of the geometry of the most dissipative structures in the (inhomogeneous) temperature field from being sheet-like at the cell center to filament-like near the sidewall. The experiment thus provides direct evidence showing that the universality features of turbulent cascade are linked to the degree of anisotropy and inhomogeneity of turbulent statistics. This work was supported by the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong SAR.

  19. Anomalous law of cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Rubí, J. Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2015-03-14

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton’s law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  20. Anomalous law of cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Rubí, J. Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2015-03-01

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  1. Anomalous law of cooling.

    PubMed

    Lapas, Luciano C; Ferreira, Rogelma M S; Rubí, J Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A

    2015-03-14

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics. PMID:25770525

  2. Excitation wavelength dependence of the anomalous circular photogalvanic effect in undoped InGaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, L. P.; Liu, Y.; Jiang, C. Y.; Qin, X. D.; Li, Y.; Gao, H. S.; Chen, Y. H.

    2014-02-28

    The excitation wavelength dependence of the anomalous circular photogalvanic effect (ACPGE) current arising from the reciprocal spin Hall effect (RSHE) in undoped InGaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells is measured under normal incidence of circularly polarized light at room temperature. We found that the spot location with the maximum ACPGE current is wavelength independent. And the normalized ACPGE current decreases at smaller wavelengths, which can be attributed to the sharp decrease of the spin relaxation time (τ{sub s}) and the hot electron relaxation time (τ{sub 1}) at smaller wavelengths. The study of the excitation wavelength dependence of ACPGE current is a good supplement to the in-depth investigation of RSHE.

  3. The anomalous thermal properties of glasses at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohl, R. O.; Salinger, G. L.

    1976-01-01

    While experimentally there is great regularity below 1 deg K in the behavior of a particular thermal property for all amorphous dielectrics it is not understood why these properties should differ from those of crystalline dielectrics, since it would seem that at low temperatures long-wavelength elastic waves, similar in both cases, would determine the thermal properties. A model involving systems having very few levels is used in the present study, although the relation between the model's systems and the nature of the glassy state is not known. It is shown, among other effects, that: specific heat measurements above 0.1 K indicate a distribution of local modes independent of energy; ultrasonic velocity measurements give information about phonon-local mode coupling parameters; and thermal expansion and far infrared experiments indicate a phonon-assisted tunneling model.

  4. Prediction of Near-Room-Temperature Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect on Honeycomb Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Binghai; Wu, Shu-Chun; Shan, Guangcun

    2015-03-01

    Recently, this long-sought quantum anomalous Hall effect was realized in the magnetic topological insulator. However, the requirement of an extremely low temperature (~ 30 mK) hinders realistic applications. Based on honeycomb lattices comprised of Sn and Ge, which are found to be 2D topological insulators, we propose a quantum anomalous Hall platform with large energy gap of 0.34 and 0.06 eV, respectively. The ferromagnetic order forms in one sublattice of the honeycomb structure by controlling the surface functionalization rather than dilute magnetic doping, which is expected to be visualized by spin polarized STM in experiment. Strong coupling between the inherent quantum spin Hall state and ferromagnetism results in considerable exchange splitting and consequently an ferromagnetic insulator with large energy gap. The estimated mean-field Curie temperature is 243 and 509 K for Sn and Ge lattices, respectively. The large energy gap and high Curie temperature indicate the feasibility of the quantum anomalous Hall effect in the near-room-temperature and even room-temperature regions. We thank the helpful discussions with C. Felser, S. Kanugo, C.-X. Liu, Z. Wang, Y. Xu, K. Wu, and Y. Zhou.

  5. Anomalous Fano resonance of massive Dirac particle through a time-dependent barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cunxi; Liu, Jie; Fu, Libin

    2015-06-01

    As is well known Fano resonance arises from the interference between a localized state and a continuum state. Using the standard Floquet theory and the scattering matrix method, we study theoretically the massive Dirac particle transmission over a quantum barrier with an oscillating field. It is found that the massive relativistic particles can generate not only normal Fano resonance in the transmission due to the interference between a localized state (bound state) and the continuum state, but also anomalous Fano resonance due to the interference between a delocalized state (extended state) and the continuum state. The dependence of line shapes on driving parameters for these two kinds of Fano resonances is quite different. For normal Fano resonance the asymmetry parameter is approximately proportional to a power law of the amplitude of the oscillating field, while for the anomalous Fano resonance the asymmetry parameters change slightly with different oscillation amplitudes. In practice, the anomalous Fano resonance can be identified by observing asymmetry parameters in experiment.

  6. Temperature dependence of basalt weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gaojun; Hartmann, Jens; Derry, Louis A.; West, A. Joshua; You, Chen-Feng; Long, Xiaoyong; Zhan, Tao; Li, Laifeng; Li, Gen; Qiu, Wenhong; Li, Tao; Liu, Lianwen; Chen, Yang; Ji, Junfeng; Zhao, Liang; Chen, Jun

    2016-06-01

    The homeostatic balance of Earth's long-term carbon cycle and the equable state of Earth's climate are maintained by negative feedbacks between the levels of atmospheric CO2 and the chemical weathering rate of silicate rocks. Though clearly demonstrated by well-controlled laboratory dissolution experiments, the temperature dependence of silicate weathering rates, hypothesized to play a central role in these weathering feedbacks, has been difficult to quantify clearly in natural settings at landscape scale. By compiling data from basaltic catchments worldwide and considering only inactive volcanic fields (IVFs), here we show that the rate of CO2 consumption associated with the weathering of basaltic rocks is strongly correlated with mean annual temperature (MAT) as predicted by chemical kinetics. Relations between temperature and CO2 consumption rate for active volcanic fields (AVFs) are complicated by other factors such as eruption age, hydrothermal activity, and hydrological complexities. On the basis of this updated data compilation we are not able to distinguish whether or not there is a significant runoff control on basalt weathering rates. Nonetheless, the simple temperature control as observed in this global dataset implies that basalt weathering could be an effective mechanism for Earth to modulate long-term carbon cycle perturbations.

  7. Effects of Anomalous Electron Cross-Field Transport in a Low Temperature Magnetized Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitses, Yevgeny

    2014-10-01

    The application of the magnetic field in a low pressure plasma can cause a spatial separation of low and high energy electrons. This so-called magnetic filter effect is used for many plasma applications, including ion and neutral beam sources, plasma processing of semiconductors and nanomaterials, and plasma thrusters. In spite of successful practical applications, the magnetic filter effect is not well understood. In this work, we explore this effect by characterizing the electron and ion energy distribution functions in a plasma column with crossed electric and magnetic fields. Experimental results revealed a strong dependence of spatial variations of plasma properties on the gas pressure. For xenon and argon gases, below ~ 1 mtorr, the increase of the magnetic field leads to a more uniform profile of the electron temperature. This surprising result is due to anomalously high electron cross-field transport that causes mixing of hot and cold electrons. High-speed imaging and probe measurements revealed a coherent structure rotating in E cross B direction with frequency of a few kHz. Theory and simulations describing this rotating structure has been developed and points to ionization and electrostatic instabilities as their possible cause. Similar to spoke oscillations reported for Hall thrusters, this rotating structure conducts the large fraction of the cross-field current. The use of segmented electrodes with an electrical feedback control is shown to mitigate these oscillations. Finally, a new feature of the spoke phenomenon that has been discovered, namely a sensitive dependence of the rotating oscillations on the gas pressure, can be important for many applications. This work was supported by DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  8. Anomalous Size Dependence of Optical Properties in Black Phosphorus Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xianghong; Li, Yunhai; Shu, Huabing; Wang, Jinlan

    2016-02-01

    Understanding electron transitions in black phosphorus nanostructures plays a crucial role in applications in electronics and optoelectronics. In this work, by employing time-dependent density functional theory calculations, we systematically study the size-dependent electronic, optical absorption, and emission properties of black phosphorus quantum dots (BPQDs). Both the electronic gap and the absorption gap follow an inversely proportional law to the diameter of BPQDs in conformity to the quantum confinement effect. In contrast, the emission gap exhibits anomalous size dependence in the range of 0.8-1.8 nm, which is blue-shifted with the increase of size. The anomaly in fact arises from the structure distortion induced by the excited-state relaxation, and it leads to a huge Stokes shift in small BPQDs. PMID:26750430

  9. Anomalous Pressure Dependence of the Critical Fluctuations in binary blends and diblock copolymers of PDMS and PEE.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, Kell; Schwahn, Dietmar; Frielinghaus, Henrich; Almdal, Kristoffer

    2000-03-01

    The structure factor of binary blends of PDMS and PEE, and the corresponding diblock copolymer PDMS-PEE have been measured by small-angle neutron scattering as a function of both temperature and pressure. The study includes as well dependencies of the polymer molar masses. The phase behavior of both the blend and the diblock copolymer systems shows the similar anomalous trend: with increasing pressure the critical temperature decreases, but upon further increase in pressure the critical temperature also increases. In the block copolymer system this leads with monotonously increasing pressure to first a melting and subsequently an ordering, while the blend goes from two-phase to one-phase and back to two-phase. Based on analysis of the Flory-Huggins type, the origin of this behavior can be associated with changes in the entropic and the enthalpic parts of the interaction parameter. The abnormal behavior seems to be closely related to the characteristics of the PDMS part of the system. An additional result of the pressure dependent structural data is the conformational compressibility. In contrast to theoretical expectations, analysis of the peak position of the experimental structure factor results in a pronounced peak in the conformational compressibility at the order-to-disorder transition temperature.

  10. Anomalous quantum efficiency for photoconduction and its power dependence in metal oxide semiconductor nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R. S.; Wang, W. C.; Lu, M. L.; Chen, Y. F.; Lin, H. C.; Chen, K. H.; Chen, L. C.

    2013-07-01

    The quantum efficiency and carrier lifetime that decide the photoconduction (PC) efficiencies in the metal oxide semiconductor nanowires (NWs) have been investigated. The experimental result surprisingly shows that the SnO2, TiO2, WO3, and ZnO NWs reveal extraordinary quantum efficiencies in common, which are over one to three orders of magnitude lower than the theoretical expectation. The surface depletion region (SDR)-controlled photoconductivity is proposed to explain the anomalous quantum efficiency and its power dependence. The inherent difference between the metal oxide nanostructures such as carrier lifetime, carrier concentration, and dielectric constant leading to the distinct PC performance and behavior are also discussed.The quantum efficiency and carrier lifetime that decide the photoconduction (PC) efficiencies in the metal oxide semiconductor nanowires (NWs) have been investigated. The experimental result surprisingly shows that the SnO2, TiO2, WO3, and ZnO NWs reveal extraordinary quantum efficiencies in common, which are over one to three orders of magnitude lower than the theoretical expectation. The surface depletion region (SDR)-controlled photoconductivity is proposed to explain the anomalous quantum efficiency and its power dependence. The inherent difference between the metal oxide nanostructures such as carrier lifetime, carrier concentration, and dielectric constant leading to the distinct PC performance and behavior are also discussed. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr01635h

  11. Large anomalous Hall effect in a non-collinear antiferromagnet Mn3Sn at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higo, Tomoya; Kiyohara, Naoki; Nakatsuji, Satoru

    Recent development in theoretical and experimental studies have provided a framework for understanding the anomalous Hall effect using Berry-phase concepts, and this perspective has led to predictions that, under certain conditions, a large anomalous Hall effect may appear in spin liquids and antiferromagnets. In this talk, we will present experimental results showing that the antiferromagnet Mn3Sn, which has a non-collinear 120-degree spin order, exhibits a large anomalous Hall effect. The magnitude of the Hall conductivity is ~ 20 Ω-1 cm-1 at room temperature and > 100 Ω-1 cm-1 at low temperatures. We found that a main component of the Hall signal, which is nearly independent of a magnetic field and magnetization, can change the sign with the reversal of a small applied field, corresponding to the rotation of the staggered moments of the non-collinear antiferromagnetic spin order which carries a very small net moment of a few of mμB. Supported by PRESTO, JST, and Grants-in-Aid for Program for Advancing Strategic International Networks to Accelerate the Circulation of Talented Researchers (No. R2604) and Scientific Research on Innovative Areas (15H05882 and 15H05883) from JSPS.

  12. The Metastable Persistence of Vapor-Deposited Amorphous Ice at Anomalously High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David F.; Jenniskens, Peter; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Studies of the gas release, vaporization behavior and infrared (IR) spectral properties of amorphous and crystalline water ice have direct application to cometary and planetary outgassing phenomena and contribute to an understanding of the physical properties of astrophysical ices. Several investigators report anomalous phenomena related to the warming of vapor-deposited astrophysical ice analogs. However gas release, ice volatilization and IR spectral features are secondary or tertiary manifestations of ice structure or morphology. These observations are useful in mimicking the bulk physical and chemical phenomena taking place in cometary and other extraterrestrial ices but do not directly reveal the structural changes which are their root cause. The phenomenological interpretation of spectral and gas release data is probably the cause of somewhat contradictory explanations invoked to account for differences in water ice behavior in similar temperature regimes. It is the microstructure, micromorphology and microchemical heterogeneity of astrophysical ices which must be characterized if the mechanisms underlying the observed phenomena are to be understood. We have been using a modified Transmission Electron Microscope to characterize the structure of vapor-deposited astrophysical ice analogs as a function of their deposition, temperature history and composition. For the present experiments, pure water vapor is deposited at high vacuum onto a 15 K amorphous carbon film inside an Hitachi H-500H TEM. The resulting ice film (approx. 0.05 micrometers thick) is warmed at the rate of 1 K per minute and diffraction patterns are collected at 1 K intervals. These patterns are converted into radial intensity distributions which are calibrated using patterns of crystalline gold deposited on a small part of the carbon substrate. The small intensity contributed by the amorphous substrate is removed by background subtraction. The proportions of amorphous and crystalline material

  13. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Dolored County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Dolores Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Dolores County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2σ were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4186234.213315 m Left: 212558.673056 m Right: 232922.811862 m Bottom: 4176781.467043 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS

  14. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Chaffee County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Chaffee Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Chaffee County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2σ were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4333432.368072 m Left: 366907.700763 m Right: 452457.816015 m Bottom: 4208271.566715 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS

  15. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Routt County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Routt Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Routt County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2σ were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4501071.574000 m Left: 311351.975000 m Right: 359681.975000 m Bottom: 4447251.574000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS

  16. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Archuleta County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Archuleta Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Archuleta County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2σ were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4144691.792023 m Left: 285531.662851 m Right: 348694.182686 m Bottom: 4097005.210304 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984

  17. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Garfield County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Garfield Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Garfield County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2σ were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4441550.552290 m Left: 271445.053363 m Right: 359825.053363 m Bottom: 4312490.552290 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984

  18. Stacking order dependence of inverse spin Hall effect and anomalous Hall effect in spin pumping experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Il; Kim, Dong-Jun; Seo, Min-Su; Park, Byong-Guk; Park, Seung-Young

    2015-05-01

    The dependence of the measured DC voltage on the non-magnetic material (NM) in NM/CoFeB and CoFeB/NM bilayers is studied under ferromagnetic resonance conditions in a TE011 resonant cavity. The directional change of the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) voltage VISHE for the stacking order of the bilayer can separate the pure VISHE and the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) voltage VAHE utilizing the method of addition and subtraction. The Ta and Ti NMs show a broad deviation of the spin Hall angle θISH, which originates from the AHE in accordance with the high resistivity of NMs. However, the Pt and Pd NMs show that the kinds of NMs with low resistivity are consistent with the previously reported θISH values. Therefore, the characteristics that NM should simultaneously satisfy to obtain a reasonable VISHE value in bilayer systems are large θISH and low resistivity.

  19. Anomalous quantum efficiency for photoconduction and its power dependence in metal oxide semiconductor nanowires.

    PubMed

    Chen, R S; Wang, W C; Lu, M L; Chen, Y F; Lin, H C; Chen, K H; Chen, L C

    2013-08-01

    The quantum efficiency and carrier lifetime that decide the photoconduction (PC) efficiencies in the metal oxide semiconductor nanowires (NWs) have been investigated. The experimental result surprisingly shows that the SnO2, TiO2, WO3, and ZnO NWs reveal extraordinary quantum efficiencies in common, which are over one to three orders of magnitude lower than the theoretical expectation. The surface depletion region (SDR)-controlled photoconductivity is proposed to explain the anomalous quantum efficiency and its power dependence. The inherent difference between the metal oxide nanostructures such as carrier lifetime, carrier concentration, and dielectric constant leading to the distinct PC performance and behavior are also discussed. PMID:23779084

  20. Anomalous pressure dependence of thermal conductivities of large mass ratio compounds

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lindsay, Lucas R; Broido, David A.; Carrete, Jesus; Mingo, Natalio; Reinecke, Tom L.

    2015-03-27

    The lattice thermal conductivities (k) of binary compound materials are examined as a function of hydrostatic pressure P using a first-principles approach. Compound materials with relatively small mass ratios, such as MgO, show an increase in k with P, consistent with measurements. Conversely, compounds with large mass ratios (e.g., BSb, BAs, BeTe, BeSe) exhibit decreasing with increasing P, a behavior that cannot be understood using simple theories of k. This anomalous P dependence of k arises from the fundamentally different nature of the intrinsic scattering processes for heat-carrying acoustic phonons in large mass ratio compounds compared to those with smallmore » mass ratios. We find this work demonstrates the power of first principles methods for thermal properties and advances the understanding of thermal transport in non-metals.« less

  1. Anomalous pressure dependence of thermal conductivities of large mass ratio compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, Lucas R; Broido, David A.; Carrete, Jesus; Mingo, Natalio; Reinecke, Tom L.

    2015-03-27

    The lattice thermal conductivities (k) of binary compound materials are examined as a function of hydrostatic pressure P using a first-principles approach. Compound materials with relatively small mass ratios, such as MgO, show an increase in k with P, consistent with measurements. Conversely, compounds with large mass ratios (e.g., BSb, BAs, BeTe, BeSe) exhibit decreasing with increasing P, a behavior that cannot be understood using simple theories of k. This anomalous P dependence of k arises from the fundamentally different nature of the intrinsic scattering processes for heat-carrying acoustic phonons in large mass ratio compounds compared to those with small mass ratios. We find this work demonstrates the power of first principles methods for thermal properties and advances the understanding of thermal transport in non-metals.

  2. Anomalous Volume Phase Transition Temperature of Thermosensitive Semi-Interpenetrating Polymer Network Microgel Suspension by Dielectric Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Man; Zhao, Kongshuang

    2015-10-15

    A new experimental result from dielectric spectroscopy of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)/poly(acrylic acid) semi-interpenetrating polymer network (PNIPAM/PAA SIPN) microgel, which undergoes significant volume phase transition, is reported. Two significant dielectric relaxations were observed around 0.1-0.5 MHz and 1-5 MHz, respectively. The high-frequency relaxation is attributed to the migration of counterions tangentially and radially along the domain formed by linear PAA chains (counterion polarization). The temperature dependence of the domain size obtained from this relaxation shows that the SIPN microgel with higher content of PAA has better thermal response and swelling property. The low-frequency relaxation shows two separate mechanisms below and above the volume phase transition temperature (VPTT), which are dominated by different relaxation processes, respectively: micro-Brownian movement of solvated side groups of PNIPAM dominates when T < VPTT, while the interfacial polarization does when T > VPTT. A dielectric model was proposed to describe the collapsed microspheres suspension, from which the electrical parameters of microgel were calculated. The permittivity of microgel shows that a special ordered arrangement of water molecules is formed in microgel with less PAA. Thermodynamic parameters obtained from Eyring equation reveal that the difference in PAA content has a great influence on the thermodynamics of the phase transition process. Besides, it was found that the VPTT of the SIPN microgel was significantly increased compared with pure PNIPAM hydrogel microspheres. The essence of anomalous VPTT revealed by relaxation mechanism is the difference in composition content leading to different hydrophilic/hydrophobic and electrostatic interaction. Determining the reason for anomalous VPTT is of instructive significance to understand the volume phase transition of complex polymer materials. PMID:26401730

  3. Layer-dependent quantum cooperation of electron and hole states in the anomalous semimetal WTe2

    PubMed Central

    Das, Pranab Kumar; Di Sante, D.; Vobornik, I.; Fujii, J.; Okuda, T.; Bruyer, E.; Gyenis, A.; Feldman, B. E.; Tao, J.; Ciancio, R.; Rossi, G.; Ali, M. N.; Picozzi, S.; Yadzani, A.; Panaccione, G.; Cava, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    The behaviour of electrons and holes in a crystal lattice is a fundamental quantum phenomenon, accounting for a rich variety of material properties. Boosted by the remarkable electronic and physical properties of two-dimensional materials such as graphene and topological insulators, transition metal dichalcogenides have recently received renewed attention. In this context, the anomalous bulk properties of semimetallic WTe2 have attracted considerable interest. Here we report angle- and spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of WTe2 single crystals, through which we disentangle the role of W and Te atoms in the formation of the band structure and identify the interplay of charge, spin and orbital degrees of freedom. Supported by first-principles calculations and high-resolution surface topography, we reveal the existence of a layer-dependent behaviour. The balance of electron and hole states is found only when considering at least three Te–W–Te layers, showing that the behaviour of WTe2 is not strictly two dimensional. PMID:26924386

  4. Stacking order dependence of inverse spin Hall effect and anomalous Hall effect in spin pumping experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sang-Il; Seo, Min-Su; Park, Seung-Young; Kim, Dong-Jun; Park, Byong-Guk

    2015-05-07

    The dependence of the measured DC voltage on the non-magnetic material (NM) in NM/CoFeB and CoFeB/NM bilayers is studied under ferromagnetic resonance conditions in a TE{sub 011} resonant cavity. The directional change of the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) voltage V{sub ISHE} for the stacking order of the bilayer can separate the pure V{sub ISHE} and the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) voltage V{sub AHE} utilizing the method of addition and subtraction. The Ta and Ti NMs show a broad deviation of the spin Hall angle θ{sub ISH}, which originates from the AHE in accordance with the high resistivity of NMs. However, the Pt and Pd NMs show that the kinds of NMs with low resistivity are consistent with the previously reported θ{sub ISH} values. Therefore, the characteristics that NM should simultaneously satisfy to obtain a reasonable V{sub ISHE} value in bilayer systems are large θ{sub ISH} and low resistivity.

  5. Layer-dependent quantum cooperation of electron and hole states in the anomalous semimetal WTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Pranab Kumar; di Sante, D.; Vobornik, I.; Fujii, J.; Okuda, T.; Bruyer, E.; Gyenis, A.; Feldman, B. E.; Tao, J.; Ciancio, R.; Rossi, G.; Ali, M. N.; Picozzi, S.; Yadzani, A.; Panaccione, G.; Cava, R. J.

    2016-02-01

    The behaviour of electrons and holes in a crystal lattice is a fundamental quantum phenomenon, accounting for a rich variety of material properties. Boosted by the remarkable electronic and physical properties of two-dimensional materials such as graphene and topological insulators, transition metal dichalcogenides have recently received renewed attention. In this context, the anomalous bulk properties of semimetallic WTe2 have attracted considerable interest. Here we report angle- and spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of WTe2 single crystals, through which we disentangle the role of W and Te atoms in the formation of the band structure and identify the interplay of charge, spin and orbital degrees of freedom. Supported by first-principles calculations and high-resolution surface topography, we reveal the existence of a layer-dependent behaviour. The balance of electron and hole states is found only when considering at least three Te-W-Te layers, showing that the behaviour of WTe2 is not strictly two dimensional.

  6. Layer-dependent quantum cooperation of electron and hole states in the anomalous semimetal WTe2.

    PubMed

    Das, Pranab Kumar; Di Sante, D; Vobornik, I; Fujii, J; Okuda, T; Bruyer, E; Gyenis, A; Feldman, B E; Tao, J; Ciancio, R; Rossi, G; Ali, M N; Picozzi, S; Yadzani, A; Panaccione, G; Cava, R J

    2016-01-01

    The behaviour of electrons and holes in a crystal lattice is a fundamental quantum phenomenon, accounting for a rich variety of material properties. Boosted by the remarkable electronic and physical properties of two-dimensional materials such as graphene and topological insulators, transition metal dichalcogenides have recently received renewed attention. In this context, the anomalous bulk properties of semimetallic WTe2 have attracted considerable interest. Here we report angle- and spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of WTe2 single crystals, through which we disentangle the role of W and Te atoms in the formation of the band structure and identify the interplay of charge, spin and orbital degrees of freedom. Supported by first-principles calculations and high-resolution surface topography, we reveal the existence of a layer-dependent behaviour. The balance of electron and hole states is found only when considering at least three Te-W-Te layers, showing that the behaviour of WTe2 is not strictly two dimensional. PMID:26924386

  7. Layer-dependent quantum cooperation of electron and hole states in the anomalous semimetal WTe2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Das, Pranab Kumar; Di Sante, D.; Vobornik, I.; Fujii, J.; Okuda, T.; Bruyer, E.; Gyenis, A.; Feldman, B. E.; Tao, J.; Ciancio, R.; et al

    2016-02-29

    The behaviour of electrons and holes in a crystal lattice is a fundamental quantum phenomenon, accounting for a rich variety of material properties. Boosted by the remarkable electronic and physical properties of two-dimensional materials such as graphene and topological insulators, transition metal dichalcogenides have recently received renewed attention. In this context, the anomalous bulk properties of semimetallic WTe2 have attracted considerable interest. We report angle- and spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of WTe2 single crystals, through which we disentangle the role of W and Te atoms in the formation of the band structure and identify the interplay of charge, spin and orbitalmore » degrees of freedom. Supported by first-principles calculations and high-resolution surface topography, we also reveal the existence of a layer-dependent behaviour. The balance of electron and hole states is found only when considering at least three Te–W–Te layers, showing that the behaviour of WTe2 is not strictly two dimensional.« less

  8. Anomalous capacitance in temperature and frequency characteristics of a TiW/p-InP Schottky barrier diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qingsong; Chen, Jun; Tang, Hengjing; Li, Xue

    2016-06-01

    The capacitance-voltage (C–V) and conductance voltage (G/ω–V) characteristics of a TiW/p-InP Schottky barrier diode (SBD) are measured at 310 K in the frequency range from 10 kHz to 1 MHz and the temperature dependency of the diode from 310 K to 400 K at 1 MHz are also investigated. Anomalous peaks and negative capacitances caused by interface states (N ss ) and series resistance (R s) are discussed, which strongly influence the electrical characteristics of SBD. R s is calculated from the measured capacitance (C m ) and conductance (G m ) values, indicating that the effects of R s are apparent at low frequency. The corrected capacitance (C c) and corrected conductance (G c) are both obtained from the C m and G m values by taking into account R s. The experimental results clearly show that the capacitance (C) and conductance (G) values are strongly dependent on the temperature and frequency.

  9. Revised phase diagram and anomalous thermal evolution of the antinodal gap and Raman response in high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuan; Yu, Zuodong; Yin, Weiguo; Lin, Haiqing; Gong, Changde

    The interplay of competing orders is essential to high-temperature superconductivity, which emerges upon suppression of an antiferromagnetic order typically via charge doping. However, where the zero-temperature quantum critical point (QCP) takes place -- in terms of the doping level -- is still elusive for it is hidden by the superconducting dome. The QCP has long been believed to follow the continuous extrapolation of the characteristic temperature (T*) for a normal-state order, but recently T* within the superconducting dome was found to exhibit unexpected back-bending in the cuprate Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ and the iron-pnictide BaFe1-xCoxAs. Here we show that the original and the revised phase diagrams can be understood in terms of weak and moderate competitions, respectively, between superconductivity and a pseudogap state such as d-density-wave, based on Ginzburg-Landau theory and the microscopic extended t-J model. We further illustrate that the anomalous thermal dependences of the measured antinodal gap and Raman response in cuprates can be well understood by a two-step evolution, dominated by superconductivity and pseudogap, respectively.

  10. High-Temperature Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in n -p Codoped Topological Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Shifei; Qiao, Zhenhua; Deng, Xinzhou; Cubuk, Ekin D.; Chen, Hua; Zhu, Wenguang; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Zhang, S. B.; Xu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2016-07-01

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) is a fundamental quantum transport phenomenon that manifests as a quantized transverse conductance in response to a longitudinally applied electric field in the absence of an external magnetic field, and it promises to have immense application potential in future dissipationless quantum electronics. Here, we present a novel kinetic pathway to realize the QAHE at high temperatures by n -p codoping of three-dimensional topological insulators. We provide a proof-of-principle numerical demonstration of this approach using vanadium-iodine (V-I) codoped Sb2 Te3 and demonstrate that, strikingly, even at low concentrations of ˜2 % V and ˜1 % I, the system exhibits a quantized Hall conductance, the telltale hallmark of QAHE, at temperatures of at least ˜50 K , which is 3 orders of magnitude higher than the typical temperatures at which it has been realized to date. The underlying physical factor enabling this dramatic improvement is tied to the largely preserved intrinsic band gap of the host system upon compensated n -p codoping. The proposed approach is conceptually general and may shed new light in experimental realization of high-temperature QAHE.

  11. Magnetic modulation doping in topological insulators toward higher-temperature quantum anomalous Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogi, M.; Yoshimi, R.; Tsukazaki, A.; Yasuda, K.; Kozuka, Y.; Takahashi, K. S.; Kawasaki, M.; Tokura, Y.

    2015-11-01

    Quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE), which generates dissipation-less edge current without external magnetic field, is observed in magnetic-ion doped topological insulators (TIs) such as Cr- and V-doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3. The QAHE emerges when the Fermi level is inside the magnetically induced gap around the original Dirac point of the TI surface state. Although the size of gap is reported to be about 50 meV, the observable temperature of QAHE has been limited below 300 mK. We attempt magnetic-Cr modulation doping into topological insulator (Bi,Sb)2Te3 films to increase the observable temperature of QAHE. By introducing the rich-Cr-doped thin (1 nm) layers at the vicinity of both the surfaces based on non-Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3 films, we have succeeded in observing the QAHE up to 2 K. The improvement in the observable temperature achieved by this modulation-doping appears to be originating from the suppression of the disorder in the surface state interacting with the rich magnetic moments. Such a superlattice designing of the stabilized QAHE may pave a way to dissipation-less electronics based on the higher-temperature and zero magnetic-field quantum conduction.

  12. Magnetic modulation doping in topological insulators toward higher-temperature quantum anomalous Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Mogi, M. Yoshimi, R.; Yasuda, K.; Kozuka, Y.; Tsukazaki, A.; Takahashi, K. S.; Kawasaki, M.; Tokura, Y.

    2015-11-02

    Quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE), which generates dissipation-less edge current without external magnetic field, is observed in magnetic-ion doped topological insulators (TIs) such as Cr- and V-doped (Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3}. The QAHE emerges when the Fermi level is inside the magnetically induced gap around the original Dirac point of the TI surface state. Although the size of gap is reported to be about 50 meV, the observable temperature of QAHE has been limited below 300 mK. We attempt magnetic-Cr modulation doping into topological insulator (Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3} films to increase the observable temperature of QAHE. By introducing the rich-Cr-doped thin (1 nm) layers at the vicinity of both the surfaces based on non-Cr-doped (Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3} films, we have succeeded in observing the QAHE up to 2 K. The improvement in the observable temperature achieved by this modulation-doping appears to be originating from the suppression of the disorder in the surface state interacting with the rich magnetic moments. Such a superlattice designing of the stabilized QAHE may pave a way to dissipation-less electronics based on the higher-temperature and zero magnetic-field quantum conduction.

  13. High-Temperature Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in n-p Codoped Topological Insulators.

    PubMed

    Qi, Shifei; Qiao, Zhenhua; Deng, Xinzhou; Cubuk, Ekin D; Chen, Hua; Zhu, Wenguang; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Zhang, S B; Xu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2016-07-29

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) is a fundamental quantum transport phenomenon that manifests as a quantized transverse conductance in response to a longitudinally applied electric field in the absence of an external magnetic field, and it promises to have immense application potential in future dissipationless quantum electronics. Here, we present a novel kinetic pathway to realize the QAHE at high temperatures by n-p codoping of three-dimensional topological insulators. We provide a proof-of-principle numerical demonstration of this approach using vanadium-iodine (V-I) codoped Sb_{2}Te_{3} and demonstrate that, strikingly, even at low concentrations of ∼2%  V and ∼1% I, the system exhibits a quantized Hall conductance, the telltale hallmark of QAHE, at temperatures of at least ∼50  K, which is 3 orders of magnitude higher than the typical temperatures at which it has been realized to date. The underlying physical factor enabling this dramatic improvement is tied to the largely preserved intrinsic band gap of the host system upon compensated n-p codoping. The proposed approach is conceptually general and may shed new light in experimental realization of high-temperature QAHE. PMID:27517787

  14. Manipulating graphene's lattice to create pseudovector potentials, discover anomalous friction, and measure strain dependent thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitt, Alexander Luke

    Graphene is a single atomic sheet of graphite that exhibits a diverse range of unique properties. The electrons in intrinsic graphene behave like relativistic Dirac fermions; graphene has a record high Young's modulus but extremely low bending rigidity; and suspended graphene exhibits very high thermal conductivity. These properties are made more intriguing because with a thickness of only a single atomic layer, graphene is both especially affected by its environment and readily manipulated. In this dissertation the interaction between graphene and its environment as well as the exciting new physics realized by manipulating graphene's lattice are investigated. Lattice manipulations in the form of strain cause alterations in graphene's electrical dispersion mathematically analogous to the vector potential associated with a magnetic field. We complete the standard description of the strain-induced vector potential by explicitly including the lattice deformations and find new, leading order terms. Additionally, a strain engineered device with large, localized, plasmonically enhanced pseudomagnetic fields is proposed to couple light to pseudomagnetic fields. Accurate strain engineering requires a complete understanding of the interactions between a two dimensional material and its environment, particularly the adhesion and friction between graphene and its supporting substrate. We measure the load dependent sliding friction between mono-, bi-, and trilayer graphene and the commonly used silicon dioxide substrate by analyzing Raman spectra of circular, graphene sealed microchambers under variable external pressure. We find that the sliding friction for trilayer graphene behaves normally, scaling with the applied load, whereas the friction for monolayer and bilayer graphene is anomalous, scaling with the inverse of the strain in the graphene. Both strain and graphene's environment are expected to affect the quadratically dispersed out of plane acoustic phonon. Although

  15. Temperature dependence of thermopower in molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngsang; Lenert, Andrej; Meyhofer, Edgar; Reddy, Pramod

    2016-07-01

    The thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions are of considerable interest due to their promise for efficient energy conversion. While the dependence of thermoelectric properties of junctions on molecular structure has been recently studied, their temperature dependence remains unexplored. Using a custom built variable temperature scanning tunneling microscope, we measured the thermopower and electrical conductance of individual benzenedithiol junctions over a range of temperatures (100 K-300 K). We find that while the electrical conductance is independent of temperature, the thermopower increases linearly with temperature, confirming the predictions of the Landauer theory.

  16. Temperature Dependence of Factors Controlling Isoprene Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Bryan N.; Yoshida, Yasuko; Damon, Megan R.; Douglass, Anne R.; Witte, Jacquelyn C.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the relationship of variability in the formaldehyde (HCHO) columns measured by the Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) to isoprene emissions in the southeastern United States for 2005-2007. The data show that the inferred, regional-average isoprene emissions varied by about 22% during summer and are well correlated with temperature, which is known to influence emissions. Part of the correlation with temperature is likely associated with other causal factors that are temperature-dependent. We show that the variations in HCHO are convolved with the temperature dependence of surface ozone, which influences isoprene emissions, and the dependence of the HCHO column to mixed layer height as OMI's sensitivity to HCHO increases with altitude. Furthermore, we show that while there is an association of drought with the variation in HCHO, drought in the southeastern U.S. is convolved with temperature.

  17. Escherichia coli survival in waters: Temperature dependence

    EPA Science Inventory

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important in evaluating microbial contamination and making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature, a dependency that is routinely expressed using an analogue of the Q10 mo...

  18. E. coli survival in waters: temperature dependence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important for evaluating microbial contamination and in making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature; this dependency is routinely expressed using an analog of the Q10 model. This suggestion...

  19. Hydration-dependent anomalous thermal expansion behaviour in a coordination polymer.

    PubMed

    Lama, Prem; Alimi, Lukman O; Das, Raj Kumar; Barbour, Leonard J

    2016-02-21

    A coordination polymer is shown to possess anomalous anisotropic thermal expansion. Guest water molecules present in the as-synthesised material can be removed upon activation without loss of crystal singularity. The fully dehydrated form shows considerably different thermal expansion behaviour as compared to the hydrate. PMID:26810007

  20. Direct observation of spatiotemporal dependence of anomalous diffusion in inhomogeneous fluid by sampling-volume-controlled fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Akiko; Ushida, Kiminori; Okamoto, Takayuki

    2005-12-01

    The direct observation of a spatiotemporal behavior of anomalous diffusion in aqueous polymer [hyaluronan (HA)] solution was achieved by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) using a modified instrument, enabling continuous change of the confocal volume of a microscope, namely, sampling-volume-controlled (SVC) FCS (SVC-FCS). Since HA chains form a mesh structure with a pore size of about 10-40nm , the observed diffusion coefficient (Dobs) is markedly dependent on the diffusion distance (L) . By SVC-FCS, the curve of the distance dependence of diffusion coefficient was directly obtained as a continuous profile in L=245-600nm showing evidence of anomalous diffusion. On plotting Dobs against either of the sampling time (τobs) or the diffusion distance (L) , Dobs turnover was observed near the anomalous diffusion area. The appearance of this turnover is attributed to the nonuniform mesh structure that can be observed only by a fast observation and that should be dynamically averaged by polymer motions with large τobs . This behavior is similar to that revealed in glass, colloidal systems, and gel solutions using dynamic light scattering, neutron scattering, and other techniques.

  1. Temperature dependence of sapphire fiber Raman scattering

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Bo; Yu, Zhihao; Tian, Zhipeng; Homa, Daniel; Hill, Cary; Wang, Anbo; Pickrell, Gary

    2015-04-27

    Anti-Stokes Raman scattering in sapphire fiber has been observed for the first time. Temperature dependence of Raman peaks’ intensity, frequency shift, and linewidth were also measured. Three anti-Stokes Raman peaks were observed at temperatures higher than 300°C in a 0.72-m-long sapphire fiber excited by a second-harmonic Nd YAG laser. The intensity of anti-Stokes peaks are comparable to that of Stokes peaks when the temperature increases to 1033°C. We foresee the combination of sapphire fiber Stokes and anti-Stokes measurement in use as a mechanism for ultrahigh temperature sensing.

  2. Anomalous results observed in magnetization of bulk high temperature superconductors—A windfall for applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstein, Roy; Parks, Drew; Sawh, Ravi-Persad; Carpenter, Keith; Davey, Kent

    2016-04-01

    Recent experiments on pulsed-zero field cool magnetization of bulk high Jc YBCO (YBa2Cu3O7-δ) have shown unexpected results. For example, reproducible, non-destructive, rapid, giant field leaps (GFLs) to higher penetrated field are observed. The observations are inconsistent with the critical state model (CSM), in several aspects. Additional experiments have been pursued in an attempt to clarify the physics involved in the observed anomalies. Here, we present experimental results for the Jc dependence of the anomalous features. It is found that the sudden field increase in the GFL is a monotonically increasing function of Jc. The ratio of required pulsed field amplitude, BA,max, to obtain maximum trappable field, BT,max, which CSM predicts to be ≥2.0, gradually approaches 1.0 at high Jc. Tests using values of pulsed, applied field BA,max just below the GFL exhibit two additional anomalies: (i) At high Jc, the highest trapped field is up to ˜6 times lower than predicted by CSM, and (ii) the measured Lorentz force as a function of Jc deviates sharply from CSM predictions. The data rule out heating effects and pinning center geometry as possible physical causes of these anomalies. A speculative cause is considered.

  3. Scaling temperature dependent rheology of magnetorheological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Stephen G.; Powell, Louise A.; Becnel, Andrew C.; Wereley, Norman M.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) fluids are suspensions of micron-scale magnetizable particles suspended in a carrier fluid. When field is applied, MR fluids develop a field controllable yield stress and a field independent post-yield viscosity. However, this viscosity has substantial temperature dependence, varying by up to an order of magnitude over the operating temperature range of MR fluid devices. We apply non-Brownian suspension theory to explain this result and find that the majority of this effect should be caused by the temperature dependent behavior of the carrier fluid. Thus, if two fluids share the same carrier fluid, then their fluid properties should scale in temperature similarly. This result is first validated by measuring viscosity across temperature for custom model fluids designed to conform to theory, showing temperature scaling within 5% for both the MR fluids and their carrier fluid. Then, on a series of related commercially available fluids with unknown additive content, we show that the MR fluids exhibit common scaling to within 4%. We also investigate the effects of magnetic hysteresis and find that it induces a negligible increase in yield stress and no measurable change in viscosity. We conclude that our non-dimensional analysis enables the temperature dependence of novel MR fluids to be characterized with fewer experiments.

  4. Temperature dependence of standard model CP violation.

    PubMed

    Brauner, Tomáš; Taanila, Olli; Tranberg, Anders; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2012-01-27

    We analyze the temperature dependence of CP violation effects in the standard model by determining the effective action of its bosonic fields, obtained after integrating out the fermions from the theory and performing a covariant gradient expansion. We find nonvanishing CP violating terms starting at the sixth order of the expansion, albeit only in the C-odd-P-even sector, with coefficients that depend on quark masses, Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements, temperature and the magnitude of the Higgs field. The CP violating effects are observed to decrease rapidly with temperature, which has important implications for the generation of a matter-antimatter asymmetry in the early Universe. Our results suggest that the cold electroweak baryogenesis scenario may be viable within the standard model, provided the electroweak transition temperature is at most of order 1 GeV. PMID:22400822

  5. Investigations of Low Temperature Time Dependent Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Sluys, W A; Robitz, E S; Young, B A; Bloom, J

    2002-09-30

    The objective of this project was to investigate metallurgical and mechanical phenomena associated with time dependent cracking of cold bent carbon steel piping at temperatures between 327 C and 360 C. Boiler piping failures have demonstrated that understanding the fundamental metallurgical and mechanical parameters controlling these failures is insufficient to eliminate it from the field. The results of the project consisted of the development of a testing methodology to reproduce low temperature time dependent cracking in laboratory specimens. This methodology was used to evaluate the cracking resistance of candidate heats in order to identify the factors that enhance cracking sensitivity. The resultant data was integrated into current available life prediction tools.

  6. Temperature dependence of polymer photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazawa, Yuko

    One of many steps to develop a sustainable society is to reduce the use of fossil fuels by replacing them with renewable energy sources, such as solar energy. This dissertation concerns one of the most contemporary methods to harvest solar radiation and covert it to electricity, using thin polymer films. The photovoltaic devices in this study consisted of a thin layer of p-phenylenevinylene (PPV) based semiconducting polymer sandwiched between two metals (semi-transparent ITO and evaporated metal electrode). Two modified device structures were studied, an interfacial heterojunction device, which includes an additional layer of inorganic n-type semiconductor (Ti-oxides) and a bulk heterojunction device, which is formed by blending electron-attracting materials. Both modifications resulted in higher device performances under ambient conditions due to an increased number of dissociation sites. From studies of inorganic solar cells, it is well known that temperature has a large effect on device performance. However, there are only a few studies on organic Solar cells, concerning the temperature dependence. This thesis focuses on understanding the temperature dependent behaviors of polymer photovoltaic devices. Temperature dependence study allows us to examine how the device parameters such as short circuit current (Isc) and open circuit voltage (Voc) are affected by the material properties and the device architectures. The current-voltage relationships were measured in a temperature controlled OXFORD cryostat operating between 150K and 404K. From the dark current-voltage measurements, the field-independent hole mobility (mu0) was extracted, using a space charge limited current analysis. From the photocurrent-voltage measurements, the temperature dependence on Isc, Voc, and fill factor were studied. The temperature characteristics of Isc (T) were compared to that of mu0(T), and two different dependencies were obtained for different device architectures. The temperature

  7. Temperature dependence of magnetoresistance in GdFeCo/Pt heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuno, Takaya; Kim, Kab-Jin; Tono, Takayuki; Kim, Sanghoon; Moriyama, Takahiro; Yoshikawa, Hiroki; Tsukamoto, Arata; Ono, Teruo

    2016-07-01

    The temperature dependence of magnetoresistance is investigated in ferrimagnetic GdFeCo/Pt heterostructures. An anomalous Hall effect (AHE) shows a monotonic behavior in temperature even across the magnetization compensation temperature T M, implying that the FeCo moment is responsible for the magnetotransport properties. An anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) exhibits a steep increase at low temperatures, which we ascribe to the contribution of a weak antilocalization in an amorphous GdFeCo layer. A spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) is found to exist in ferrimagnet/Pt systems and shows a moderate temperature dependence, in contrast to the SMR in YIG/Pt where a significant temperature dependence was observed. These results provide a basic understanding of the magnetotransport in amorphous ferrimagnets/heavy metal heterostructures.

  8. On the role of anomalous ocean surface temperatures for promoting the record Madden-Julian Oscillation in March 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Andrew G.; Hendon, Harry H.; Wang, Guomin

    2016-01-01

    A Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) event dramatically amplified at the beginning of March 2015 as the convective phase traversed an unusually warm central Pacific Ocean. This record amplification also resulted in record amplitude of the MJO based on index measurements since 1974. We explore the possible role of the anomalously high ocean surface temperatures in the equatorial central Pacific for promoting the extraordinary amplification of this MJO event. Forecast sensitivity experiments with the Predictive Ocean Atmosphere Model for Australia show that the enhanced growth of the MJO resulted from amplification of the convective anomaly as it encountered the unusually warm central Pacific. Our results indicate that anomalous sea surface temperature (SST) at the onset of El Niño 2015 promoted the intensification of the MJO. We suggest a two-way interaction whereby initial SST anomalies promoted enhanced MJO activity which then possibly led to enhanced El Niño development.

  9. Temperature dependence of fluid transport in nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Baoxing; Wang, Binglei; Park, Taehyo; Qiao, Yu; Zhou, Qulan; Chen, Xi

    2012-05-01

    Understanding the temperature-dependent nanofluidic transport behavior is critical for developing thermomechanical nanodevices. By using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, the thermally responsive transport resistance of liquids in model carbon nanotubes is explored as a function of the nanopore size, the transport rate, and the liquid properties. Both the effective shear stress and the nominal viscosity decrease with the increase of temperature, and the temperature effect is coupled with other non-thermal factors. The molecular-level mechanisms are revealed through the study of the radial density profile and hydrogen bonding of confined liquid molecules. The findings are verified qualitatively with an experiment on nanoporous carbon.

  10. Temperature dependence of BCF plastic scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wootton, Landon; Beddar, Sam

    2013-05-01

    We examined temperature dependence in plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) made of BCF-60 or BCF-12 scintillating fiber coupled to optical fiber with cyanoacrylate. PSDs were subjected to a range of temperatures using a temperature-controlled water bath and irradiated at each temperature while either the dose was measured using a CCD camera or the spectral output was measured using a spectrometer. The spectrometer was used to examine the intensity and spectral distribution of scintillation light emitted by the PSDs, Cerenkov light generated within the PSD, and light transmitted through an isolated optical coupling. BCF-60 PSDs exhibited a 0.50% decrease and BCF-12 PSDs a 0.09% decrease in measured dose per °C increase, relative to dose measured at 22 °C. Spectrometry revealed that the total intensity of the light generated by BCF-60 and BCF-12 PSDs decreased by 0.32% and 0.13%, respectively, per °C increase. The spectral distribution of the light changed slightly with temperature for both PSDs, accounting for the disparity between the change in measured dose and total light output. The generation of Cerenkov light was temperature independent. However, light transmitted through optical coupling between the scintillator and the optical fiber also exhibited temperature dependence.

  11. Temperature dependence of optically induced cell deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, Anatol; Kiessling, Tobias R.; Stange, Roland; Kaes, Josef A.

    2012-02-01

    The mechanical properties of any material change with temperature, hence this must be true for cellular material. In biology many functions are known to undergo modulations with temperature, like myosin motor activity, mechanical properties of actin filament solutions, CO2 uptake of cultured cells or sex determination of several species. As mechanical properties of living cells are considered to play an important role in many cell functions it is surprising that only little is known on how the rheology of single cells is affected by temperature. We report the systematic temperature dependence of single cell deformations in Optical Stretcher (OS) measurements. The temperature is changed on a scale of about 20 minutes up to hours and compared to defined temperature shocks in the range of milliseconds. Thereby, a strong temperature dependence of the mechanics of single suspended cells is revealed. We conclude that the observable differences arise rather from viscosity changes of the cytosol than from structural changes of the cytoskeleton. These findings have implications for the interpretation of many rheological measurements, especially for laser based approaches in biological studies.

  12. Simultaneous Measurement of Temperature Dependent Thermophysical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czél, Balázs; Gróf, Gyula; Kiss, László

    2011-11-01

    A new evaluation method for a transient measurement of thermophysical properties is presented in this paper. The aim of the research was to couple a new automatic evaluation procedure to the BICOND thermophysical property measurement method to enhance the simultaneous determination of the temperature dependent thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity. The thermophysical properties of two different polymers were measured and compared with the literature data and with the measurement results that were done by well-known, traditional methods. The BICOND method involves a step-down cooling, recording the temperature histories of the inner and the outer surfaces of a hollow cylindrical sample and the thermophysical properties are evaluated from the solution of the corresponding inverse heat conduction using a genetic algorithm-based method (BIGEN) developed by the authors. The BIGEN is able to find the material properties with any kind of temperature dependency, that is illustrated through the measurement results of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) and polyamide (PA) samples.

  13. Compositional dependence of anomalous thermal expansion in perovskite-like ABX3 formates.

    PubMed

    Collings, Ines E; Hill, Joshua A; Cairns, Andrew B; Cooper, Richard I; Thompson, Amber L; Parker, Julia E; Tang, Chiu C; Goodwin, Andrew L

    2016-03-14

    The compositional dependence of thermal expansion behaviour in 19 different perovskite-like metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) of composition [A(I)][M(II)(HCOO)3] (A = alkylammonium cation; M = octahedrally-coordinated divalent metal) is studied using variable-temperature X-ray powder diffraction measurements. While all systems show essentially the same type of thermomechanical response-irrespective of their particular structural details-the magnitude of this response is shown to be a function of A(I) and M(II) cation radii, as well as the molecular anisotropy of A(I). Flexibility is maximised for large M(II) and small A(I), while the shape of A(I) has implications for the direction of framework hingeing. PMID:26477747

  14. Anomalous thermal expansion of InSe layered semiconductors in the low-temperature region

    SciTech Connect

    Krynetskii, I. B.; Kulbachinskii, V. A.; Shabanova, N. P. Tsikunov, A. V.; Kovalenko, R. I.; Rodin, V. V.; Gavrilkin, S. Yu.

    2013-05-15

    The temperature dependence of the linear thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of an InSe single crystal in the (001) plane is measured in the temperature range 7-50 K. A peak in the thermal expansion is detected near T = 10 K, after which the sample shrinks upon heating. The effect of an external magnetic field of up to 6 T, which is parallel to the (001) plane, on the TEC is investigated. The observed partial suppression of the peak and crystal compression by the field indicates the relation of these anomalies to possible electron ordering in InSe layers.

  15. Temperature dependent phonon properties of thermoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellman, Olle; Broido, David; Fultz, Brent

    2015-03-01

    We present recent developments using the temperature dependent effective potential technique (TDEP) to model thermoelectric materials. We use ab initio molecular dynamics to generate an effective Hamiltonian that reproduce neutron scattering spectra, thermal conductivity, phonon self energies, and heat capacities. Results are presented for (among others) SnSe, Bi2Te3, and Cu2Se proving the necessity of careful modelling of finite temperature properties for strongly anharmonic materials. Supported by the Swedish Research Council (VR) Project Number 637-2013-7296.

  16. Entropic changes in liquid gallium clusters: understanding the anomalous melting temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaston, Nicola; Steenbergen, Krista

    Melting in finite-sized materials differs in two ways from the solid-liquid phase transition in bulk systems. First, there is an inherent scaling of the melting temperature below that of the bulk, known as melting point depression. Secondly, at small sizes, changes in melting temperature become non-monotonic, and show a size-dependence that is sensitive to the structure of the particle. Melting temperatures that exceed those of the bulk material have been shown to occur in vacuum, but have still never been ascribed a convincing physical explanation. Here we find answers in the structure of the aggregate liquid phase in small gallium clusters, based on molecular dynamics simulations that reproduce the greater-than-bulk melting behavior observed in experiments, and demonstrate the critical role of a lowered entropy in destabilising the liquid state.

  17. Anomalous organic magnetoresistance from competing carrier-spin-dependent interactions with localized electronic and nuclear spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flatté, Michael E.

    Transport of carriers through disordered electronic energy landscapes occurs via hopping or tunneling through various sites, and can enhance the effects of carrier spin dynamics on the transport. When incoherent hopping preserves the spin orientation of carriers, the magnetic-field-dependent correlations between pairs of spins influence the charge conductivity of the material. Examples of these phenomena have been identified in hopping transport in organic semiconductors and colloidal quantum dots, as well as tunneling through oxide barriers in complex oxide devices, among other materials. The resulting room-temperature magnetic field effects on the conductivity or electroluminescence require external fields of only a few milliTesla. These magnetic field effects can be dramatically modified by changes in the local spin environment. Recent theoretical and experimental work has identified a regime for low-field magnetoresistance in organic semiconductors in which the spin-relaxing effects of localized nuclear spins and electronic spins interfere1. The regime is studied experimentally by the controlled addition of localized electronic spins, through the addition of a stable free radical (galvinoxyl) to a material (MEH-PPV) that exhibits substantial room-temperature magnetoresistance (20 initially suppressed by the doping, as the localized electronic spin mixes one of the two spins whose correlation controls the transport. At intermediate doping, when one spin is fully decohered but the other is not, there is a regime where the magnetoresistance is insensitive to the doping level. For much greater doping concentrations the magnetoresistance is fully suppressed as both spins that control the charge conductivity of the material are mixed. The behavior is described within a theoretical model describing the effect of carrier spin dynamics on the current. Generalizations to amorphous and other disordered crystalline semiconductors will also be described. This work was

  18. Temperature-dependent reflectivity of silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel

    1992-01-01

    The spectral reflectivity of a commercial silicon carbide (SiC) ceramic surface was measured at wavelengths from 2.5 to 14.5 microns and at temperatures ranging from 358 to 520 K using a NASA-developed multiwavelength pyrometer. The SiC surface reflectivity was low at the short wavelengths, decreasing to almost zero at 10 microns, then increasing rapidly to a maximum at approximately 12.5 microns, and decreasing gradually thereafter. The reflectivity maximum increased in magnitude with increasing surface temperature. The wavelength and temperature dependence can be explained in terms of the classical dispersion theory of crystals and the Lorentz electron theory. Electronic transitions between the donor state and the conduction band states were responsible for the dispersion. The concentration of the donor state in SiC was determined to be approximately 4 x 10 exp 18 and its ionization energy was determined to be approximately 71 meV.

  19. Temperature dependent light transmission in ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brojabasi, Surajit; Mahendran, V.; Lahiri, B. B.; Philip, John

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the influence of temperature on the magnetic field induced light transmission in a kerosene based ferrofluid containing oleic acid coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles, where the direction of propagation of light is parallel to the direction of the external magnetic field. At a fixed temperature the transmitted light intensity is found to monotonically increase with incident wavelength due to reduced extinction efficiency at higher wavelength. The transmitted intensity decreases with external magnetic field due to enhanced scattering from the field induced linear chain like structures along the direction of the external magnetic field and due to the build-up of standing waves inside the scattering medium. The extinction of the field induced transmitted light intensity is found to occur at a lower external field as the sample temperature is lowered. The rate of extinction of normalized transmitted light intensity decreased linearly with increasing sample temperature due to slower field induced aggregation kinetics because of an increased Brownian motion of the suspended nanoparticles and a reduced coupling constant. The observed temperature dependent magneto-optical properties of magnetic nanofluids can be exploited for applications in optical devices.

  20. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Alamosa Saguache Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2σ were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4217727.601630 m Left: 394390.400264 m Right: 460179.841813 m Bottom: 4156258.036086 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World

  1. The anomalous Mesopause region temperatures of the 2003-2004 winter season measured from Svalbard (78N 16E)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyrland, M. E.; Sigernes, F.; Mulligan, F.; Deehr, C. S.

    2007-12-01

    This paper reports on the temperature and dynamics of the hydroxyl layer at approx. 87km measured over Longyearbyen (78N 16E) during the 2003-2004 winter. Optical spectra obtained by a Ebert-Fastie spectrometer were used for the temperature derivation. The high number of spectra available enabled spectral analysis of both the hourly and daily averaged temperatures. We were able to identify both the presence of a 16 day wave and a quasi 27 day oscillation in the mesopause region (approx. 87 km) temperatures from this season. The average daily temperature was 228K with a standard deviation of 17K. This is exceptionally high compared to previous and later years reported in the 23 year old time series from Svalbard. The observed temperatures have been compared to temperature data from other height regions above the Arctic (troposphere and stratosphere) and to satellite data from the satellite instrument SABER. In early January 2004 a major stratospheric warming event led to a nearly 2 month long vortex disruption with high-latitude easterlies in the middle to lower stratosphere and correspondingly high temperatures. The upper stratospheric temperatures of the same period were unusually low, while mesopause temperatures were high. The regions of alternating low and high temperatures throughout the atmosphere and the dynamics of these, are clearly coupled through gravity wave activity and general atmospheric circulation. We try to put our data into context with other authors' reports on the anomalous state of the atmosphere during the 2003-2004 boreal winter.

  2. Resonant cavity mode dependence of anomalous and inverse spin Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sang-Il; Seo, Min-Su; Park, Seung-young

    2014-05-07

    The direct current electric voltage induced by the Inverse Spin Hall Effect (ISHE) and Anomalous Hall Effect (AHE) was investigated in the TE{sub 011} and TE{sub 102} cavities. The ISHE and AHE components were distinguishable through the fitting of the voltage spectrum. The unwanted AHE was minimized by placing the DUT (Device Under Test) at the center of both the TE{sub 011} and TE{sub 102} cavities. The voltage of ISHE in the TE{sub 011} cavity was larger than that in the TE{sub 102} cavity due to the higher quality factor of the former. Despite optimized centering, AHE voltage from TE{sub 011} cavity was also higher. The reason was attributed to the E-field distribution inside the cavity. In the case of the TE{sub 011} cavity, the DUT was easily exposed to the E-field in all directions. Therefore, the parasitic AHE voltage in the TE{sub 102} cavity was less sensitive than that in the TE{sub 011} cavity to decentering problem.

  3. Temperature dependent spin structures in Hexaferrite crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Y. C.; Lin, J. G.; Chun, S. H.; Kim, K. H.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the Hexaferrite Ba0.5Sr1.5Zn2Fe12O22 (BSZFO) is studied due to its interesting characteristics of long-wavelength spin structure. Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) is used to probe the magnetic states of BSZFO single crystal and its temperature dependence behavior is analyzed by decomposing the multiple lines of FMR spectra into various phases. Distinguished phase transition is observed at 110 K for one line, which is assigned to the ferro(ferri)-magnetic transition from non-collinear to collinear spin state.

  4. Anomalously High Isotope Ratio 3He/4He and Tritium in Deuterium-Loaded Metal: Evidence for Nuclear Reaction in Metal Hydrides at Low Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Song-Sheng; He, Ming; Wu, Shao-Yong; Qi, Bu-Jia

    2012-01-01

    Anomalous 3He/4He ratios in deuterium-loaded titanium samples are observed to be about 1-4 × 10-1, much greater than the values (<=10-4) in natural objects. Control experiments with the deuterium-unloaded titanium sample and original industrial deuterium gas are also carried out, but no anomalous 3He/4He values are observed. In addition, anomalous tritium in deuterium-loaded titanium samples are also observed. To explain the excess 3He and tritium in the deuterium-loaded titanium samples, it is required that the deuteron-induced nuclear reaction occurs in the samples at low temperature.

  5. Anomalous electrical transport properties of polyvinyl alcohol-multiwall carbon nanotubes composites below room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, G.; Gupta, K.; Meikap, A. K.; Babu, R.; Blau, W. J.

    2011-02-01

    The dc and ac electrical transport property of polyvinyl alcohol-multiwall carbon nanotubes composites has been investigated within a temperature range 77≤T≤300 K and in the frequency range 20 Hz-1 MHz in presence as well as in absence of a transverse magnetic field up to 1 T. The dc conductivity follows variable range hopping model. The magnetoconductivity of the samples changes a sign from positive to negative with an increase in temperature which can be interpreted by the dominancy of the quantum interference effect over the wave function shrinkage effect. The ac conductivity follows a power law whereas the temperature dependence of frequency exponent s can be explained by correlated barrier hopping model. The dielectric behavior of the samples has been governed by the grain and grain boundary resistance and capacitance. The ac conductivity reduces with the application of magnetic field. Although the theoretical model to explain it, is still lacking, we may conclude that this is due to the increase in grain and grain boundary resistance by the application of magnetic field.

  6. Temperature dependence of Young's modulus of titanium dioxide (TIO2) nanotubes: Molecular mechanics modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukyanov, S. I.; Bandura, A. V.; Evarestov, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Temperature dependence of the Young's modulus of cylindrical single-wall nanotubes with zigzag and armchair chiralities and consolidated-wall nanotubes has been studied by the molecular mechanics method with the use of the atom-atom potential. The nanotubes have been obtained by rolling up of crystal layers (111) of TiO2 with fluorite structure. Calculations have been performed for isothermal conditions on the basis of calculating the Helmholtz free energy of the system. The dependence of the Helmholtz free energy of nanotubes on the period has been calculated in the quasi-harmonic approximation as a result of calculation of phonon frequencies. It has been shown that the temperature dependence of the stiffness of nanotubes is determined by their chirality, and some nanotubes exibit anomalous behavior of both the Young's modulus and the period of unit cell with variation in temperature.

  7. Escherichia coli survival in waters: temperature dependence.

    PubMed

    Blaustein, R A; Pachepsky, Y; Hill, R L; Shelton, D R; Whelan, G

    2013-02-01

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important in evaluating microbial contamination and making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature, a dependency that is routinely expressed using an analogue of the Q₁₀ model. This suggestion was made 34 years ago based on 20 survival curves taken from published literature, but has not been revisited since then. The objective of this study was to re-evaluate the accuracy of the Q₁₀ equation, utilizing data accumulated since 1978. We assembled a database of 450 E. coli survival datasets from 70 peer-reviewed papers. We then focused on the 170 curves taken from experiments that were performed in the laboratory under dark conditions to exclude the effects of sunlight and other field factors that could cause additional variability in results. All datasets were tabulated dependencies "log concentration vs. time." There were three major patterns of inactivation: about half of the datasets had a section of fast log-linear inactivation followed by a section of slow log-linear inactivation; about a quarter of the datasets had a lag period followed by log-linear inactivation; and the remaining quarter were approximately linear throughout. First-order inactivation rate constants were calculated from the linear sections of all survival curves and the data grouped by water sources, including waters of agricultural origin, pristine water sources, groundwater and wells, lakes and reservoirs, rivers and streams, estuaries and seawater, and wastewater. Dependency of E. coli inactivation rates on temperature varied among the water sources. There was a significant difference in inactivation rate values at the reference temperature between rivers and agricultural waters, wastewaters and agricultural waters, rivers and lakes, and wastewater and lakes. At specific sites, the Q₁₀ equation was more accurate in rivers and coastal waters than in lakes making the value of

  8. Temperature Dependent Kinetics DNA Charge Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlgamuth, Chris; McWilliams, Marc; Slinker, Jason

    2012-10-01

    Charge transport (CT) through DNA has been extensively studied, and yet the mechanism of this process is still not yet fully understood. Besides the benefits of understanding charge transport through this fundamental molecule, further understanding of this process will elucidate the biological implications of DNA CT and advance sensing technology. Therefore, we have investigated the temperature dependence of DNA CT by measuring the electrochemistry of DNA monolayers modified with a redox-active probe. By using multiplexed electrodes on silicon chips, we compare square wave voltammetry of distinct DNA sequences under identical experimental conditions. We vary the probe length within the well matched DNA duplex in order to investigate distance dependent kinetics. This length dependent study is a necessary step to understanding the dominant mechanism behind DNA CT. Using a model put forth by O'Dea and Osteryoung and applying a nonlinear least squares analysis we are able to determine the charge transfer rates (k), transfer coefficients (α), and the total surface concentration (&*circ;) of the DNA monolayer. Arrhenius like behavior is observed for the multiple probe locations, and the results are viewed in light of and compared to the prominent charge transport mechanisms.

  9. Anomalous polarization dependence of Raman scattering and crystallographic orientation of black phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungcheol; Lee, Jae-Ung; Lee, Jinhwan; Park, Hyo Ju; Lee, Zonghoon; Lee, Changgu; Cheong, Hyeonsik

    2015-11-28

    We investigated polarization dependence of the Raman modes in black phosphorus (BP) using five different excitation wavelengths. The crystallographic orientation was determined by comparing polarized optical microscopy with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis. In polarized Raman spectroscopy, the B2g mode shows the same polarization dependence regardless of the excitation wavelength or the sample thickness. On the other hand, the Ag(1) and Ag(2) modes show a peculiar polarization behavior that depends on the excitation wavelength and the sample thickness. The thickness dependence can be explained by considering the anisotropic interference effect due to the birefringence and dichroism of the BP crystal, but the wavelength dependence cannot be explained. We propose a simple and fail-proof procedure to determine the orientation of a BP crystal by combining polarized Raman scattering with polarized optical microscopy. PMID:26503032

  10. Possible Kondo-Lattice-Enhanced Magnetic Ordering at Anomalously High Temperature in Nd Metal under Extreme Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, James S.; Song, Jing; Soni, Vikas; Lim, Jinhyuk

    Most elemental lanthanides order magnetically at temperatures To well below ambient, the highest being 292 K for Gd. Sufficiently high pressure is expected to destabilize the well localized magnetic 4 f state of the heavy lanthanides, leading to increasing influence of Kondo physics on the RKKY interaction. For pressures above 80 GPa, To for Dy and Tb begins to increase dramatically, extrapolating for Dy to a record-high value near 400 K at 160 GPa. This anomalous increase may be an heretofore unrecognized feature of the Kondo lattice state; if so, one would expect To to pass through a maximum and fall rapidly at even higher pressures. A parallel is suggested to the ferromagnet CeRh3B2 where To = 115 K at ambient pressure, a temperature more than 100-times higher than anticipated from simple de Gennes scaling. Here we discuss recent experiments on Nd where anomalous behavior in To (P) is found to occur at lower pressures, perhaps reflecting the fact that Nd's 4 f wave function is less localized. Work at Washington University is supported by NSF Grant DMR-1104742 and CDAC through NNSA/DOE Grant DE-FC52-08NA28554.

  11. Temperature-Dependent Photoluminescence of Graphene Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadhav, S. T.; Rajoba, S. J.; Patil, S. A.; Han, S. H.; Jadhav, L. D.

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide thin films have been deposited by spray pyrolysis using graphene oxide powder prepared by modified Hummers method. These thin films were characterized by different physico-chemical techniques. The x-ray diffraction studies revealed the structural properties of GO (graphene oxide) while the Raman spectrum showed the presence of D and G and two-dimensional bands. The D/G intensity ratio for spray-deposited GO film is 1.10. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed 67% and 33% atomic percentages of carbon and oxygen, respectively. The ratio of O1s/C1s was found to be 0.49. The temperature-dependent photoluminescence of GO thin film and GO solution showed a blue emission.

  12. Temperature dependent nonlinear metal matrix laminae behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, D. J.; Buesking, K. W.

    1986-01-01

    An analytical method is described for computing the nonlinear thermal and mechanical response of laminated plates. The material model focuses upon the behavior of metal matrix materials by relating the nonlinear composite response to plasticity effects in the matrix. The foundation of the analysis is the unidirectional material model which is used to compute the instantaneous properties of the lamina based upon the properties of the fibers and matrix. The unidirectional model assumes that the fibers properties are constant with temperature and assumes that the matrix can be modelled as a temperature dependent, bilinear, kinematically hardening material. An incremental approach is used to compute average stresses in the fibers and matrix caused by arbitrary mechanical and thermal loads. The layer model is incorporated in an incremental laminated plate theory to compute the nonlinear response of laminated metal matrix composites of general orientation and stacking sequence. The report includes comparisons of the method with other analytical approaches and compares theoretical calculations with measured experimental material behavior. A section is included which describes the limitations of the material model.

  13. Anomalous equivalent potential temperature: an atmospheric feature predicting days with higher risk for fatal outcome in acute ischemic stroke-a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Folyovich, András; Biczó, Dávid; Al-Muhanna, Nadim; Béres-Molnár, Anna K; Fejős, Ádám; Pintér, Ádám; Bereczki, Dániel; Fischer, Antal; Vadasdi, Károly; Pintér, Ferenc

    2015-09-01

    Acute stroke is a life-threatening condition. Fatal outcome is related to risk factors, some of these affected by climatic changes. Forecasting potentially harmful atmospheric processes may therefore be of practical importance in the acute care of stroke patients. We analyzed the history of all patients with acute ischemic stroke (N = 184) confirmed by neuroimaging including those who died (N = 35, 15 males) at our hospital department in the winter months of 2009. Patient data were anonymized, and the human meteorologists were only aware of patients' age, gender, and exact time of death. Of the meteorological parameters, equivalent potential temperature (EPT) has been chosen for analysis. EPT is generally used for forecasting thunderstorms, but in the case of synoptic scale airflow (10(6) m), it is suitable for characterizing the air mass inflowing from different regions. The behavior of measured EPT values was compared to the climatic (30 years) averages. We developed meteorological criteria for anomalous periods of EPT and tested if such periods are associated with higher rate of fatal outcome. The duration of anomalous and non-anomalous periods was nearly equal during the studied 3 months. Stroke onset distributed similarly between anomalous and non-anomalous days; however, of the 35 deaths, 27 occurred during anomalous periods: on average, 0.56 deaths occurred on anomalous days and 0.19 on non-anomalous days. Winter periods meeting the criteria of anomalous EPT may have a significant adverse human-meteorological impact on the outcome in acute ischemic stroke. PMID:26233665

  14. Raman scattering of rare earth sesquioxide Ho2O3: A pressure and temperature dependent study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Sugandha Dogra; Samanta, K.; Singh, Jasveer; Sharma, Nita Dilawar; Bandyopadhyay, A. K.

    2014-10-01

    Pressure and temperature dependent Raman scattering studies on Ho2O3 have been carried out to investigate the structural transition and the anharmonic behavior of the phonons. Ho2O3 undergoes a transition from cubic to monoclinic phase above 15.5 GPa, which is partially reversible on decompression. The anharmonic behavior of the phonon modes of Ho2O3 from 80 K to 440 K has been investigated. We find an anomalous line-width change with temperature. The mode Grüneisen parameter of bulk Ho2O3 was estimated from high pressure Raman investigation up to 29 GPa. Furthermore, the anharmonic components were calculated from the temperature dependent Raman scattering.

  15. Raman scattering of rare earth sesquioxide Ho₂O₃: A pressure and temperature dependent study

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Sugandha Dogra; Samanta, K.; Singh, Jasveer; Sharma, Nita Dilawar; Bandyopadhyay, A. K.

    2014-10-07

    Pressure and temperature dependent Raman scattering studies on Ho₂O₃ have been carried out to investigate the structural transition and the anharmonic behavior of the phonons. Ho₂O₃ undergoes a transition from cubic to monoclinic phase above 15.5 GPa, which is partially reversible on decompression. The anharmonic behavior of the phonon modes of Ho₂O₃ from 80 K to 440 K has been investigated. We find an anomalous line-width change with temperature. The mode Grüneisen parameter of bulk Ho₂O₃ was estimated from high pressure Raman investigation up to 29 GPa. Furthermore, the anharmonic components were calculated from the temperature dependent Raman scattering.

  16. Anomalous dependence of c-axis polarized Fe B1g phonon mode with Fe and Se concentrations in Fe1+yTe1-xSex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Um, Y. J.; Subedi, A.; Toulemonde, P.; Ganin, A. Y.; Boeri, L.; Rahlenbeck, M.; Liu, Y.; Lin, C. T.; Carlsson, S. J. E.; Sulpice, A.; Rosseinsky, M. J.; Keimer, B.; Le Tacon, M.

    2012-02-01

    We report on an investigation of the lattice dynamical properties in a range of Fe1+yTe1-xSex compounds, with special emphasis on the c-axis polarized vibration of Fe with B1g symmetry, a Raman active mode common to all families of Fe-based superconductors. We have carried out a systematic study of the temperature dependence of this phonon mode as a function of Se x and excess Fe y concentrations. In parent compound Fe1+yTe, we observe an unconventional broadening of the phonon between room temperature and magnetic ordering temperature TN. The situation smoothly evolves toward a regular anharmonic behavior as Te is substituted for Se and long-range magnetic order is replaced by superconductivity. Irrespective to Se contents, excess Fe is shown to provide an additional damping channel for the B1g phonon at low temperatures. We performed density functional theory ab initio calculations within the local density approximation to calculate the phonon frequencies, including magnetic polarization and Fe nonstoichiometry in the virtual crystal approximation. We obtained a good agreement with the measured phonon frequencies in the Fe-deficient samples, while the effects of Fe excess are poorly reproduced. This may be due to excess Fe-induced local magnetism and low-energy magnetic fluctuations that cannot be treated accurately within these approaches. As recently revealed by neutron scattering and muon spin rotation studies, these phenomena occur in the temperature range where anomalous decay of the B1g phonon is observed and suggests a peculiar coupling of this mode with local moments and spin fluctuations in Fe1+yTe1-xSex.

  17. Anomalous surface states modify the size-dependent mechanical properties and fracture of silica nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chun; Dávila, Lilian P.

    2014-10-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of amorphous silica nanowires under tension were analyzed for size and surface stress effects on mechanical properties and for structural modifications via bond angle distributions. Their fracture behavior was also investigated beyond the elastic limit. The Young’s moduli of silica nanowires were predicted to be about 75-100 GPa, depending on the nanowire size. The ultimate strength was calculated to be ˜10 GPa, depending on the diameter, which is in excellent agreement with the experiments. The dependence of the Young’s modulus on nanowire diameter is explained in terms of surface compressive stress effects. The fracture behavior of nanowires was also found to be influenced by surface compressive stresses. Bond angle distribution analysis of various nanowires reveals significant compressive surface states, as evidenced by the appearance of a secondary peak in the Si-O-Si bond angle distribution at ˜97°, which is absent in bulk silica. The strain rate was found to have a negligible effect on the Young’s modulus of the silica nanowires, but it has a critical role in determining their fracture mode.

  18. A singular thermodynamically consistent temperature at the origin of the anomalous behavior of liquid water

    PubMed Central

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2012-01-01

    The density maximum of water dominates the thermodynamics of the system under ambient conditions, is strongly P-dependent, and disappears at a crossover pressure Pcross ~ 1.8 kbar. We study this variable across a wide area of the T–P phase diagram. We consider old and new data of both the isothermal compressibility KT(T, P) and the coefficient of thermal expansion αP(T, P). We observe that KT(T) shows a minimum at T* ~ 315±5 K for all the studied pressures. We find the behavior of αP to also be surprising: all the αP(T) curves measured at different P cross at T*. The experimental data show a “singular and universal expansivity point” at T* ~ 315 K and αP(T*) ≃ 0.44 10−3 K−1. Unlike other water singularities, we find this temperature to be thermodynamically consistent in the relationship connecting the two response functions. PMID:23251779

  19. Investigation of temperature-dependent photoluminescence in multi-quantum wells

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yutao; Wang, Lu; Sun, Qingling; Lu, Taiping; Deng, Zhen; Ma, Ziguang; Jiang, Yang; Jia, Haiqiang; Wang, Wenxin; Zhou, Junming; Chen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) is a nondestructive and powerful method to investigate carrier recombination and transport characteristics in semiconductor materials. In this study, the temperature dependences of photoluminescence of GaAs-AlxGa1-xAs multi-quantum wells samples with and without p-n junction were measured under both resonant and non-resonant excitation modes. An obvious increase of photoluminescence(PL) intensity as the rising of temperature in low temperature range (T < 50 K), is observed only for GaAs-AlxGa1-xAs quantum wells sample with p-n junction under non-resonant excitation. The origin of the anomalous increase of integrated PL intensity proved to be associated with the enhancement of carrier drifting because of the increase of carrier mobility in the temperature range from 15 K to 100 K. For non-resonant excitation, carriers supplied from the barriers will influence the temperature dependence of integrated PL intensity of quantum wells, which makes the traditional methods to acquire photoluminescence characters from the temperature dependence of integrated PL intensity unavailable. For resonant excitation, carriers are generated only in the wells and the temperature dependence of integrated PL intensity is very suitable to analysis the photoluminescence characters of quantum wells. PMID:26228734

  20. Temperature dependence of enhanced spin relaxation time in metallic nanoparticles: Experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koda, T.; Mitani, S.; Takahashi, S.; Mizuguchi, M.; Sato, K.; Konno, T. J.; Maekawa, S.; Takanashi, K.

    2016-02-01

    We study the enhanced spin relaxation time of Au nanoparticles in nanopillar-shaped double-barrier junction devices with a stacked Fe/MgO/Au-nanoparticle/MgO/Fe structure. The size of Au nanoparticles located in a current path is deduced from a transmission electron micrograph and the Coulomb blockade behavior in the current-voltage characteristics of the devices. A finite tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) is observed above a critical current and is attributable to spin accumulation in Au nanoparticles. Based on a simple model of TMR due to spin accumulation in a nanoparticle, the spin relaxation time τs is estimated from the magnitude of the critical current. The temperature and bias-voltage region where TMR appears are determined from systematic observations, showing that the appearance of TMR is not associated with the Coulomb blockade but with spin accumulation. We find that the obtained τs is anomalously extended (˜800 ns) at low temperatures and abruptly decreases above a critical temperature. Interestingly, the critical temperature strongly depends on the size of the Au nanoparticles and is much lower than the effective temperature corresponding to the discrete energy spacing. A theoretical analysis for the spin relaxation of electrons with discrete energy levels shows that not only the anomalously extended spin relaxation time, but also the strong temperature dependence of τs arise from the broadening of discrete energy levels due to coupling with phonons in the surrounding matrix. Numerical calculations using reasonable parameter values well reproduce the observed temperature and size dependence of the spin relaxation time in Au nanoparticles.

  1. Anomalous dimensionality dependence of diffusion in a rugged energy landscape: How pathological is one dimension?

    PubMed

    Seki, Kazuhiko; Bagchi, Kaushik; Bagchi, Biman

    2016-05-21

    Diffusion in one dimensional rugged energy landscape (REL) is predicted to be pathologically different (from any higher dimension) with a much larger chance of encountering broken ergodicity [D. L. Stein and C. M. Newman, AIP Conf. Proc. 1479, 620 (2012)]. However, no quantitative study of this difference has been reported, despite the prevalence of multidimensional physical models in the literature (like a high dimensional funnel guiding protein folding/unfolding). Paradoxically, some theoretical studies of these phenomena still employ a one dimensional diffusion description for analytical tractability. We explore the dimensionality dependent diffusion on REL by carrying out an effective medium approximation based analytical calculations and compare them with the available computer simulation results. We find that at an intermediate level of ruggedness (assumed to have a Gaussian distribution), where diffusion is well-defined, the value of the effective diffusion coefficient depends on dimensionality and changes (increases) by several factors (∼5-10) in going from 1d to 2d. In contrast, the changes in subsequent transitions (like 2d to 3d and 3d to 4d and so on) are far more modest, of the order of 10-20% only. When ruggedness is given by random traps with an exponential distribution of barrier heights, the mean square displacement (MSD) is sub-diffusive (a well-known result), but the growth of MSD is described by different exponents in one and higher dimensions. The reason for such strong ruggedness induced retardation in the case of one dimensional REL is discussed. We also discuss the special limiting case of infinite dimension (d = ∞) where the effective medium approximation becomes exact and where theoretical results become simple. We discuss, for the first time, the role of spatial correlation in the landscape on diffusion of a random walker. PMID:27208935

  2. Anomalous dimensionality dependence of diffusion in a rugged energy landscape: How pathological is one dimension?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Kazuhiko; Bagchi, Kaushik; Bagchi, Biman

    2016-05-01

    Diffusion in one dimensional rugged energy landscape (REL) is predicted to be pathologically different (from any higher dimension) with a much larger chance of encountering broken ergodicity [D. L. Stein and C. M. Newman, AIP Conf. Proc. 1479, 620 (2012)]. However, no quantitative study of this difference has been reported, despite the prevalence of multidimensional physical models in the literature (like a high dimensional funnel guiding protein folding/unfolding). Paradoxically, some theoretical studies of these phenomena still employ a one dimensional diffusion description for analytical tractability. We explore the dimensionality dependent diffusion on REL by carrying out an effective medium approximation based analytical calculations and compare them with the available computer simulation results. We find that at an intermediate level of ruggedness (assumed to have a Gaussian distribution), where diffusion is well-defined, the value of the effective diffusion coefficient depends on dimensionality and changes (increases) by several factors (˜5-10) in going from 1d to 2d. In contrast, the changes in subsequent transitions (like 2d to 3d and 3d to 4d and so on) are far more modest, of the order of 10-20% only. When ruggedness is given by random traps with an exponential distribution of barrier heights, the mean square displacement (MSD) is sub-diffusive (a well-known result), but the growth of MSD is described by different exponents in one and higher dimensions. The reason for such strong ruggedness induced retardation in the case of one dimensional REL is discussed. We also discuss the special limiting case of infinite dimension (d = ∞) where the effective medium approximation becomes exact and where theoretical results become simple. We discuss, for the first time, the role of spatial correlation in the landscape on diffusion of a random walker.

  3. High-temperature quantum anomalous Hall effect in honeycomb bilayer consisting of Au atoms and single-vacancy graphene

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yan; Wan, Jian-Guo; Ge, Gui-Xian; Song, Feng-Qi; Wang, Guang-Hou

    2015-01-01

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) is predicted to be realized at high temperature in a honeycomb bilayer consisting of Au atoms and single-vacancy graphene (Au2-SVG) based on the first-principles calculations. We demonstrate that the ferromagnetic state in the Au2-SVG can be maintained up to 380 K. The combination of spatial inversion symmetry and the strong SOC introduced by the Au atoms causes a topologically nontrivial band gap as large as 36 meV and a QAHE state with Chern number C = −2. The analysis of the binding energy proved that the honeycomb bilayer is stable and feasible to be fabricated in experiment. The QAHEs in Ta2-SVG and other TM2-SVGs are also discussed. PMID:26574924

  4. High-temperature quantum anomalous Hall effect in honeycomb bilayer consisting of Au atoms and single-vacancy graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yan; Wan, Jian-Guo; Ge, Gui-Xian; Song, Feng-Qi; Wang, Guang-Hou

    2015-11-01

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) is predicted to be realized at high temperature in a honeycomb bilayer consisting of Au atoms and single-vacancy graphene (Au2-SVG) based on the first-principles calculations. We demonstrate that the ferromagnetic state in the Au2-SVG can be maintained up to 380 K. The combination of spatial inversion symmetry and the strong SOC introduced by the Au atoms causes a topologically nontrivial band gap as large as 36 meV and a QAHE state with Chern number C = -2. The analysis of the binding energy proved that the honeycomb bilayer is stable and feasible to be fabricated in experiment. The QAHEs in Ta2-SVG and other TM2-SVGs are also discussed.

  5. Metallic transport and large anomalous Hall effect at room temperature in ferrimagnetic Mn{sub 4}N epitaxial thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Xi; Shigematsu, Kei; Chikamatsu, Akira Fukumura, Tomoteru; Hirose, Yasushi; Hasegawa, Tetsuya

    2014-08-18

    We report the electrical transport properties of ferrimagnetic Mn{sub 4}N (001) epitaxial thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition on MgO (001) substrates. The Mn{sub 4}N thin films were tetragonally distorted with a ratio of out-of-plane to in-plane lattice constants of 0.987 and showed perpendicular magnetic anisotropy with an effective magnetic anisotropy constant of 0.16 MJ/m{sup 3}, which is comparable with that of a recently reported molecular-beam-epitaxy-grown film. The thin films exhibited metallic transport with a room temperature resistivity of 125 μΩ cm in addition to a large anomalous Hall effect with a Hall angle tangent of 0.023.

  6. Q -dependent electronic excitations in osmium: Pressure- and temperature-induced effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponosov, Yu. S.; Struzhkin, V. V.; Goncharov, A. F.; Streltsov, S. V.

    2008-12-01

    Raman scattering by electrons and phonons has been studied in single crystals of the 5d transition-metal osmium under pressures up to 60 GPa in the temperature range of 10-300 K. An anomalous increase in the electronic light-scattering cross section was found in the pressure range of 20-30 GPa with the use of green and blue excitation wavelengths. At these conditions, we observe an appearance of well-defined electronic peaks at ˜580cm-1 for the wave-vector direction q∥[0001] and at ˜350cm-1 for q∥[101¯0] . The comparison of q dependencies measured and calculated from the first-principles spectra suggests a strong volume- and temperature-dependent renormalization of the energies and damping of the electronic states near the Fermi level.

  7. Exploration of the origin of anomalous dependence for near-threshold harmonics in {{\\rm{H}}}_{2}^{+} on the ellipticity of driving laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasiri Avanaki, K.; Telnov, Dmitry A.; Chu, Shih-I.

    2016-06-01

    The anomalous dependence of near-threshold harmonics in the {{{H}}}2+ molecular ion on the ellipticity of the driving near-infrared laser field is studied theoretically based on accurate solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in prolate spheroidal coordinates with the help of the generalized pseudospectral method. For these harmonics, the maximum radiation energy corresponds to a non-zero ellipticity of the driving field. Our analysis reveals that the origin of the phenomenon lies in the near-resonant excitation of π-symmetry molecular orbitals. The excited states responsible for the anomalous ellipticity dependence of different near-threshold harmonics are identified. The effect is confirmed at the equilibrium internuclear separation R = 2 a.u. as well as for stretched molecules at R = 3 a.u.

  8. Temperature Dependence of Photosynthesis in Cotton

    PubMed Central

    Downton, Joy; Slatyer, R. O.

    1972-01-01

    Cotton plants (Gossypium hirsutum L., var. Deltapine Smooth Leaf) were grown under controlled environmental conditions over a range of day/night temperatures from 20/15 to 40/35 C. Their photosynthetic characteristics were then measured over a comparable temperature range. Net photosynthesis tended stongly to be greatest, and intracellular resistance to CO2 transport to be lowest, when the measurement temperature corresponded to the daytime growth temperature, suggesting pronounced acclimation of the plants to the growth temperature. The preferred growth temperature was close to the 25/20 C regime, since net photosynthesis of these plants, regardless of measurement temperature, was higher and intracellular resistance lower, than in plants from any other regime. Ribulose diphosphate carboxylase activity per unit leaf area was highest in plants grown at 25/20 C, but did not show pronounced changes with growth temperature. Glycolate oxidase activity decreased and NADH-malate dehydrogenase activity tended to increase with increasing growth temperature. In contrast, changes in carbonic anhydrase activity with growth temperature showed a general similarity to changes in photosynthetic rate. This may suggest that the “chemical resistance” component of the intracellular resistance bears a relationship to the amount of carbonic anhydrase in the leaf. PMID:16658208

  9. Temperature Dependence Of Single-Event Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coss, James R.; Nichols, Donald K.; Smith, Lawrence S.; Huebner, Mark A.; Soli, George A.

    1990-01-01

    Report describes experimental study of effects of temperature on vulnerability of integrated-circuit memories and other electronic logic devices to single-event effects - spurious bit flips or latch-up in logic state caused by impacts of energetic ions. Involved analysis of data on 14 different device types. In most cases examined, vulnerability to these effects increased or remain constant with temperature.

  10. On an anomalous kinetic in irradiated polymers around the glass transition temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipara, Mircea I.

    1997-08-01

    Anomalies occurring in irradiated polymers within the glass transition range, as reported by various authors are critically reviewed. A theoretical description for such processes, is developed within the free volume approximation. The discrepancies between the temperature at which such anomalies are noticed and the glass transition temperature have been ascribed to the fact that the volume of radiation-induced radicals is not equal with the segmental one. The agreement between experiment and theory is good.

  11. Temperature Dependence of Phonons in Pyrolitic Graphite

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Brockhouse, B. N.; Shirane, G.

    1977-01-01

    Dispersion curves for longitudinal and transverse phonons propagating along and near the c-axis in pyrolitic graphite at temperatures between 4°K and 1500°C have been measured by neutron spectroscopy. The observed frequencies decrease markedly with increasing temperature (except for the transverse optical ''rippling'' modes in the hexagonal planes). The neutron groups show interesting asymmetrical broadening ascribed to interference between one phonon and many phonon processes.

  12. Anomalous thickness-dependent strain states and strain-tunable magnetization in Zn-doped ferrite epitaxial films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y. J.; Yang, M. M.; Luo, Z. L.; Hu, C. S.; Bao, J.; Huang, H. L.; Zhang, S.; Wang, J. W.; Li, P. S.; Liu, Y.; Zhao, Y. G.; Chen, X. C.; Pan, G. Q.; Jiang, T.; Liu, Y. K.; Li, X. G.; Gao, C.

    2014-05-01

    A series of ZnxFe3-xO4 (ZFO, x = 0.4) thin films were epitaxially deposited on single-crystal (001)-SrTiO3 (STO) substrates by radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The anomalous thickness-dependent strain states of ZFO films were found, i.e., a tensile in-plane strain exists in the thinner ZFO film and which monotonously turns into compressive in the thicker films. Considering the lattice constant of bulk ZFO is bigger than that of STO, this strain state cannot be explained in the conventional framework of lattice-mismatch-induced strain in the hetero-epitaxial system. This unusual phenomenon is proposed to be closely related to the Volmer-Weber film growth mode in the thinner films and incorporation of the interstitial atoms into the island's boundaries during subsequent epitaxial growth of the thicker films. The ZFO/STO epitaxial film is found in the nature of magnetic semiconductor by transport measurements. The in-plane magnetization of the ZFO/STO films is found to increase as the in-plane compressive strain develops, which is further proved in the (001)-ZFO/PMN-PT film where the film strain state can be in situ controlled with applied electric field. This compressive-strain-enhanced magnetization can be attributed to the strain-mediated electric-field-induced in-plane magnetic anisotropy field enhancement. The above results indicate that strain engineering on magnetic oxide semiconductor ZFO films is promising for novel oxide-electronic devices.

  13. Anomalous Increase in Nematic-Isotropic Transition Temperature in Dimer Molecules Induced by a Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salili, S. M.; Tamba, M. G.; Sprunt, S. N.; Welch, C.; Mehl, G. H.; Jákli, A.; Gleeson, J. T.

    2016-05-01

    We have determined the nematic-isotropic transition temperature as a function of an applied magnetic field in three different thermotropic liquid crystalline dimers. These molecules are comprised of two rigid calamitic moieties joined end to end by flexible spacers with odd numbers of methylene groups. They show an unprecedented magnetic field enhancement of nematic order in that the transition temperature is increased by up to 15 K when subjected to a 22 T magnetic field. The increase is conjectured to be caused by a magnetic-field-induced decrease of the average bend angle in the aliphatic spacers connecting the rigid mesogenic units of the dimers.

  14. Temperature dependence of electrical conductivity and lunar temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olhoeft, G. R.; Strangway, D. W.; Sharpe, H.; Frisillo, A. L.

    1974-01-01

    Metallic conduction mechanicsms are probably not important in lunar materials because of the small amounts of free metal and metallic oxides present. This is confirmed by the extremely low conductivities measured to date and the fact that the conductivity increases with temperature. The major conduction mechanicsm appears to be ionic. This conduction mechanism is very strongly controlled by temperature, by deviations from stoichiometry, by electric field strengths, and by oxygen fugacity.

  15. Temperature dependence of free excitons in GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, D. C.; Hoelscher, J.; Litton, C. W.; Collins, T. C.

    2002-11-01

    The excitons involved in this study are the longitudinal and the Gamma5 and Gamma6 free excitons, as well as the donor bound exciton (D0),X. The temperature dependence of the energy positions of the Gamma5, Gamma6, and (D0),X excitons are well accounted for by the Varshni equation (Y. P. Varshni, Physica (Amsterdam) 34, 149 (1967)). In the same temperature range, the energy positions of the longitudinal excitons depart from the predictions of the Varshni equation. The separation between the longitudinal- and transverse-mode free excitons has been previously reported. One component of this separation is the polarizability, which has a temperature dependence. The longitudinal exciton therefore has a band-gap temperature dependence, predicted by the Varshni equation, as well as an additional dependence due to polarizability. This temperature dependence has been accounted for by the Varshni equation, plus an additional linear and a quadratic temperature dependent term.

  16. Temperature dependent electrical resistivity of liquid Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajapati, A. V.; Sonvane, Y. A.; Patel, H. P.; Thakor, P. B.

    2016-05-01

    The present paper deals with the effect of temperature variation on the electrical resistivity (ρ) of liquid Sn(Tin). We have used a new parameter free pseudopotential along with screening Taylor et al and Farid et al local field correction functions. The Percus-Yevick Hard Sphere (PYHS) reference system is used to describe structural information. Zeeman formula has been used for finding resistivity with the variation of temperature. The balanced harmonies between present data and experimental data have been achieved with a minimal deviation. So, we concluded that our newly constructed model potential is an effective one to produce the data of electrical resistivity of liquid Sn(Tin) as a function of temperature.

  17. Temperature Dependent Electrical Properties of PZT Wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, T.; Sen, S.; Seal, A.; Sen, A.

    2016-04-01

    The electrical and electromechanical properties of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) wafers were investigated and compared with PZT bulk. PZT wafers were prepared by tape casting technique. The transition temperature of both the PZT forms remained the same. The transition from an asymmetric to a symmetric shape was observed for PZT wafers at higher temperature. The piezoelectric coefficient (d 33) values obtained were 560 pc/N and 234 pc/N, and the electromechanical coupling coefficient (k p) values were 0.68 and 0.49 for bulk and wafer, respectively. The reduction in polarization after fatigue was only ~3% in case of PZT bulk and ~7% for PZT wafer.

  18. Temperature dependence of the vibrational spectra of acetanilide: Davydov solitons or Fermi coupling?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Clifford T.; Swanson, Basil I.

    1985-03-01

    The unusual temperature dependence of the amide-I region in the IR spectrum of acetanilide (C 6H 5NHCOCH 3) has recently been attributed to a self-trapped Davydov-like soliton. The temperature dependence of the single-crystal Raman scattering, from acetanilide and its ND and 13CO substituted analogs in the phonon and internal mode regions has now been studied. The behavior of the amide-I region in the Raman spectra of the normal isotopic species is similar to that observed earlier in infrared studies. However, on the basis of results obtained from the ND and 13CO substituted species the unusual temperature dependence in the 1650 cm -1 region has been attributed to Fermi coupling of the amide-I fundamental and a combination band involving the in-plane NH deformation and a low-frequency torsional mode. As temperature is lowered, the strong blue-shift of the torsional mode results in a commensurate blue-shift in the combination level thereby increasing the Fermi coupling. Temperature tuning of the Fermi coupling results in the anomalous intensity changes observed in the IR and Raman spectra of the amide-I region for the normal isotopic species.

  19. Evidence for Temperature-Dependent Electron Band Dispersion in Pentacene

    SciTech Connect

    Koch,N.; Vollmer, A.; Salzmann, I.; Nickel, B.; Weiss, H.; Rabe, J.

    2006-01-01

    Evidence for temperature-dependent electron band dispersion in a pentacene thin film polymorph on graphite is provided by angle- and energy-dependent ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. The bands derived from the highest occupied molecular orbital exhibit dispersion of {approx}190 meV at room temperature, and {approx}240 meV at 120 K. Intermolecular electronic coupling in pentacene thin films is thus confirmed to be dependent on temperature and possibly crystal structure, as suggested by additional infrared absorption measurements.

  20. Temperature dependence of soil water potential

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, A.M.O.; Yong, R.N. ); Cheung, S.C.H. )

    1992-12-01

    To understand the process of coupled heat and water transport, the relationship between temperature and soil water potential must be known. Two clays, Avonlea bentonite and Lake Agassiz clay, are being considered as the clay-based sealing materials for the Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal vault. Avonlea bentonite is distinguished from Lake Agassiz clay by its high sealing potential in water. A series of experiments was performed in which the two clays were mixed with equal amounts of sand and were compacted to a dry density of 1.67 Mg/m[sup 3] under various moisture contents and temperatures. A psychrometer was placed within the compacted clay-sand to measure the soil water potential based on the electromotive force measured by the psychrometer. The results indicate that the soil water potential at a particular temperature is higher for both clay-sand mixtures than predicted by the change in the surface tension of water; this effect is much more prominent in the Avonlea bentonite and at low moisture contents. The paper presents empirical equations relating the soil water potential with the moisture content and temperature of the two clay-sand mixtures. 24 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Temperature dependence of gramicidin channel conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hyundeok; Beck, Thomas

    2010-03-01

    The gramicidin channel is the smallest known biological ion channel, and it exhibits cation selectivity. Recently, Dr. John Cuppoletti's group at the University of Cincinnati has shown that the gramicidin channel can function at high temperatures with significant currents. This finding may have implications for fuel cell technologies. In order to explore the effect of temperature on channel conductance, we examined the gramicidin system at 300K, 330K, and 360K by computer simulation. Two forms of gramicidin, the head-to-head helical dimer and the intertwined double helix, were examined. Both the decrease of the free energy barrier and the increase of the diffusion of potassium ions inside the gramicidin channel at high temperatures imply an increase of current. We found that higher temperatures also affect the lifetime of hydrogen bonds, the distribution of the bending angle, the distribution of the distance between dimers, and the size of the pore radius for the helical dimer structure. These finding may be related to the gating of the gramicidin channel.

  2. Quasipermanent magnets of high temperature superconductor - Temperature dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, In-Gann; Liu, Jianxiong; Ren, Yanru; Weinstein, Roy; Kozlowski, Gregory; Oberly, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    We report on persistent field in quasi-permanent magnets of high temperature superconductors. Magnets composed of irradiated Y(1+)Ba2Cu3O7 trapped field Bt = 1.52 T at 77 K and 1.9 T at lower temperature. However, the activation magnet limited Bt at lower temperature. We present data on Jc(H,T) for unirradiated materials, and calculate Bt at various T. Based upon data at 65 K, we calculate Bt in unirradiated single grains at 20 K and find that 5.2 T will be trapped for grain diameter d about 1.2 cm, and 7.9 T for d = 2.3 cm. Irradiated grains will trap four times these values.

  3. Temperature dependence of diffusion properties of soft sticky dipole water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ming-Liang; Brooks, Bernard R.; Ichiye, Toshiko

    2006-04-01

    The isobaric diffusivities for the soft sticky dipole water model between 230 and 330 K were studied in molecular dynamics simulations using Ewald summations for the long-range interactions. This simple single-point, angularly dependent model with parameters optimized at room temperature reproduces the experimental diffusion rates over a wide range of temperatures better than multi-point models. Its ability to reproduce the unusual temperature dependence of the diffusivities of supercooled water indicates the tetrahedral nature of water is important. Moreover, comparisons with other models indicate more tetrahedral potentials correlate with increasing the so-called Angell critical temperature and decreasing power of the temperature dependence.

  4. Temperature dependent terahertz properties of energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azad, Abul K.; Whitley, Von H.; Brown, Kathryn E.; Ahmed, Towfiq; Sorensen, Christian J.; Moore, David S.

    2016-04-01

    Reliable detection of energetic materials is still a formidable challenge which requires further investigation. The remote standoff detection of explosives using molecular fingerprints in the terahertz spectral range has been an evolving research area for the past two decades. Despite many efforts, identification of a particular explosive remains difficult as the spectral fingerprints often shift due to the working conditions of the sample such as temperature, crystal orientation, presence of binders, etc. In this work, we investigate the vibrational spectrum of energetic materials including RDX, PETN, AN, and 1,3-DNB diluted in a low loss PTFE host medium using terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) at cryogenic temperatures. The measured absorptions of these materials show spectral shifts of their characteristic peaks while changing their operating temperature from 300 to 7.5 K. We have developed a theoretical model based on first principles methods, which is able to predict most of the measured modes in 1, 3-DNB between 0.3 to 2.50 THz. These findings may further improve the security screening of explosives.

  5. Temperature dependence of LRE-HRE-TM thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zuoyi; Cheng, Xiaomin; Lin, Gengqi; Li, Zhen; Huang, Zhixin; Jin, Fang; Wang, Xianran; Yang, Xiaofei

    2003-04-01

    Temperature dependence of the properties of RE-TM thin films is very important for MO recording. In this paper, we studied the temperature dependence of the magnetic and magneto-optical properties of the amorphous LRE-HRE-TM single layer thin films and LRE-HRE-TM/HRE-TM couple-bilayered thin films. For LRE-HRE-TM single layer thin films, the temperature dependence of the magnetization was investigated by using the mean field theory. The experimental and theoretical results matched very well. With the LRE substitution in HRE-TM thin film, the compensation temperature Tcomp decreased and the curie temperature Tc remained unchanged. Kerr rotation angle became larger and the saturation magnetization Ms at room temperature increased. For LRE-HRE-TM/HRE-TM couple-bilayered thin films, comparisons of the temperature dependences of the coercivities and Kerr rotation angles were made between isolated sublayers and couple-bilayered thin film.

  6. Theoretical study of the voltage and concentration dependence of the anomalous mole fraction effect in single calcium channels. New insights into the characterization of multi-ion channels.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, D L; Rasmusson, R L; Strauss, H C

    1988-01-01

    Several recent independent studies on macroscopic Ca currents have demonstrated the anomalous mole fraction effect in mixtures of Ca and Ba at concentrations of 10 mM or less. Recently, Hess and Tsien (1984; Nature 309) proposed a dual binding site model, based upon Eyring rate theory, to account for this effect in L-type cardiac Ca channels. This model predicts that the anomalous mole fraction effect can be accounted for solely in terms of open single channel permeation properties; it was able to adequately reproduce the effect for macroscopic Ca currents recorded in 10 mM solutions. However, the electrochemical gradients under which single Ca channel current recordings are routinely made with the patch clamp technique vary dramatically from those used for macroscopic Ca currents. To properly assess the general validity of the Hess and Tsien model at the single Ca channel level, the effects of both large electrical potentials and elevated divalent concentrations must be understood. Computer simulations were therefore carried out using the original parameters used by Hess and Tsien under conditions designed to mimic those used in patch clamp studies. The permeation behavior generated by this model is quite complex. In particular, hyperpolarization and increased divalent concentration combine to reduce and ultimately abolish the anomalous mole fraction effect. It may therefore be very difficult to observe the anomalous mole fraction effect at the single Ca channel level; the dual-site model displays a relationship between current and mole fraction generally associated with a single-site model under the conditions frequently employed to resolve single Ca channel activity. Nonetheless, analysis of such monotonic mole fraction behavior can still be used as a test for the general validity of the dual-site model. Apparent Kms for Ca and Ba can be extracted from such monotonic behavior, and may not only be functions of membrane potential but may also depend upon the total

  7. Temperature dependence of amino acid hydrophobicities

    PubMed Central

    Wolfenden, Richard; Lewis, Charles A.; Yuan, Yang; Carter, Charles W.

    2015-01-01

    The hydrophobicities of the 20 common amino acids are reflected in their tendencies to appear in interior positions in globular proteins and in deeply buried positions of membrane proteins. To determine whether these relationships might also have been valid in the warm surroundings where life may have originated, we examined the effect of temperature on the hydrophobicities of the amino acids as measured by the equilibrium constants for transfer of their side-chains from neutral solution to cyclohexane (Kw>c). The hydrophobicities of most amino acids were found to increase with increasing temperature. Because that effect is more pronounced for the more polar amino acids, the numerical range of Kw>c values decreases with increasing temperature. There are also modest changes in the ordering of the more polar amino acids. However, those changes are such that they would have tended to minimize the otherwise disruptive effects of a changing thermal environment on the evolution of protein structure. Earlier, the genetic code was found to be organized in such a way that—with a single exception (threonine)—the side-chain dichotomy polar/nonpolar matches the nucleic acid base dichotomy purine/pyrimidine at the second position of each coding triplet at 25 °C. That dichotomy is preserved at 100 °C. The accessible surface areas of amino acid side-chains in folded proteins are moderately correlated with hydrophobicity, but when free energies of vapor-to-cyclohexane transfer (corresponding to size) are taken into consideration, a closer relationship becomes apparent. PMID:26034278

  8. Temperature dependence of particle-particle interactions in electrorheological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonon, P.; Foulc, J.-N.

    2000-04-01

    We report on the temperature dependence of particle-particle interactions in electrorheological (ER) fluids for the temperature range 20-100 °C. The attraction force between polyamide spheres immersed in silicone oil is measured as a function of temperature. The force-temperature characteristic shows a broad maximum around 40 °C, corresponding to an increase of about 30% compared to the force measured at room temperature. In view of these results we proposed that the temperature dependence of the shear stress in ER fluids is directly related to the variation of the local particle-particle attraction forces. Data are discussed in light of models which were proposed in the literature to describe particle-particle interactions. At high electric fields "conduction models" could explain the observed temperature dependence through the variations of the oil breakdown field with temperature. However, limitations of such models are also clearly evidenced by data obtained at low electric fields.

  9. Crossing regimes of temperature dependence in animal movement.

    PubMed

    Gibert, Jean P; Chelini, Marie-Claire; Rosenthal, Malcolm F; DeLong, John P

    2016-05-01

    A pressing challenge in ecology is to understand the effects of changing global temperatures on food web structure and dynamics. The stability of these complex ecological networks largely depends on how predator-prey interactions may respond to temperature changes. Because predators and prey rely on their velocities to catch food or avoid being eaten, understanding how temperatures may affect animal movement is central to this quest. Despite our efforts, we still lack a mechanistic understanding of how the effect of temperature on metabolic processes scales up to animal movement and beyond. Here, we merge a biomechanical approach, the Metabolic Theory of Ecology and empirical data to show that animal movement displays multiple regimes of temperature dependence. We also show that crossing these regimes has important consequences for population dynamics and stability, which depend on the parameters controlling predator-prey interactions. We argue that this dependence upon interaction parameters may help explain why experimental work on the temperature dependence of interaction strengths has so far yielded conflicting results. More importantly, these changes in the temperature dependence of animal movement can have consequences that go well beyond ecological interactions and affect, for example, animal communication, mating, sensory detection, and any behavioral modality dependent on the movement of limbs. Finally, by not taking into account the changes in temperature dependence reported here we might not be able to properly forecast the impact of global warming on ecological processes and propose appropriate mitigation action when needed. PMID:26854767

  10. Anomalous Dynamical Line Shapes in a Quantum Magnet at Finite Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Tennant D. A.; James A.; Lake, B.; Essler, F.H.L.; Notbohm, S.; Mikeska, H.-J.; Fielden, J.; Kogerler,, P.; Canfield, P.C.; Telling, M.T.F.

    2012-01-04

    The effect of thermal fluctuations on the dynamics of a gapped quantum magnet is studied using inelastic neutron scattering on copper nitrate, a model material for the spin-1/2, one-dimensional (1D) bond alternating Heisenberg chain. A large, highly deuterated, single-crystal sample of copper nitrate is produced using a solution growth method and measurements are made using the high-resolution backscattering spectrometer OSIRIS at the ISIS Facility. Theoretical calculations and numerical analysis are combined to interpret the physical origin of the thermal effects observed in the magnetic spectra. The primary observations are (1) a thermally induced central peak due to intraband scattering, which is similar to Villain scattering familiar from soliton systems in 1D, and (2) the one-magnon quasiparticle pole is seen to develop with temperature into an asymmetric continuum of scattering. We relate this asymmetric line broadening to a thermal strongly correlated state caused by hard-core constraints and quasiparticle interactions. These findings are a counter example to recent assertions of the universality of line broadening in 1D systems and are applicable to a broad range of quantum systems.

  11. Anomalous dynamical line shapes in a quantum magnet at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennant, D. A.; Lake, B.; James, A. J. A.; Essler, F. H. L.; Notbohm, S.; Mikeska, H.-J.; Fielden, J.; Kögerler, P.; Canfield, P. C.; Telling, M. T. F.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of thermal fluctuations on the dynamics of a gapped quantum magnet is studied using inelastic neutron scattering on copper nitrate, a model material for the spin-1/2, one-dimensional (1D) bond alternating Heisenberg chain. A large, highly deuterated, single-crystal sample of copper nitrate is produced using a solution growth method and measurements are made using the high-resolution backscattering spectrometer OSIRIS at the ISIS Facility. Theoretical calculations and numerical analysis are combined to interpret the physical origin of the thermal effects observed in the magnetic spectra. The primary observations are (1) a thermally induced central peak due to intraband scattering, which is similar to Villain scattering familiar from soliton systems in 1D, and (2) the one-magnon quasiparticle pole is seen to develop with temperature into an asymmetric continuum of scattering. We relate this asymmetric line broadening to a thermal strongly correlated state caused by hard-core constraints and quasiparticle interactions. These findings are a counter example to recent assertions of the universality of line broadening in 1D systems and are applicable to a broad range of quantum systems.

  12. Modelling temperature and concentration dependent solid/liquid interfacial energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippmann, Stephanie; Jung, In-Ho; Paliwal, Manas; Rettenmayr, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Models for the prediction of the solid/liquid interfacial energy in pure substances and binary alloys, respectively, are reviewed and extended regarding the temperature and concentration dependence of the required thermodynamic entities. A CALPHAD-type thermodynamic database is used to introduce temperature and concentration dependent melting enthalpies and entropies for multicomponent alloys in the temperature range between liquidus and solidus. Several suitable models are extended and employed to calculate the temperature and concentration dependent interfacial energy for Al-FCC with their respective liquids and compared with experimental data.

  13. Carrier transport simulation of anomalous temperature dependence in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Goto, Masanao; Takezoe, Hideo; Ishikawa, Ken

    2007-10-01

    We investigated the carrier transport phenomena in model liquid crystalline systems, which were constructed on the basis of the Gay-Berne potential and Monte Carlo calculation. The carrier transport was analyzed under the condition that the molecular arrangement in the system was fixed and thermally activated carriers were transported by hopping in the system. The carrier transport simulation was performed by Monte Carlo method using Miller-Abrahams hopping ratio. By these calculations, we reproduced the experimental results of the electronic conduction in nematic liquid crystals. PMID:17994925

  14. Carrier transport simulation of anomalous temperature dependence in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Masanao; Takezoe, Hideo; Ishikawa, Ken

    2007-10-01

    We investigated the carrier transport phenomena in model liquid crystalline systems, which were constructed on the basis of the Gay-Berne potential and Monte Carlo calculation. The carrier transport was analyzed under the condition that the molecular arrangement in the system was fixed and thermally activated carriers were transported by hopping in the system. The carrier transport simulation was performed by Monte Carlo method using Miller-Abrahams hopping ratio. By these calculations, we reproduced the experimental results of the electronic conduction in nematic liquid crystals.

  15. Temperature dependence of the excited state absorption of alexandrite

    SciTech Connect

    Shand, M.L.; Jenssen, H.P.

    1983-03-01

    The temperature dependence from 28 to 290/sup 0/C of the excited-state absorption cross section sigma /SUB 2a/ (E) in the gain wavelength region of alexandrite has been determined from the temperature dependence of the single pass gain (SPG) and of the fluorescence. sigma /SUB 2a/ (E) and the emission cross section increase with temperature at approximately the same rate.

  16. Temperature dependence of conductivity measurement for conducting polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, Leandro; Duran, Jesus; Isah, Anne; Albers, Patrick; McDougall, Michael; Wang, Weining

    2014-03-01

    Conducting polymer-based solar cells are the newest generation solar cells. While research on this area has been progressing, the efficiency is still low because certain important parameters of the solar cell are still not well understood. It is of interest to study the temperature dependence of the solar cell parameters, such as conductivity of the polymer, open circuit voltage, and reverse saturation current to gain a better understanding on the solar cells. In this work, we report our temperature dependence of conductivity measurement using our in-house temperature-varying apparatus. In this project, we designed and built a temperature varying apparatus using a thermoelectric cooler module which gives enough temperature range as we need and costs much less than a cryostat. The set-up of the apparatus will be discussed. Temperature dependence of conductivity measurements for PEDOT:PSS films with different room-temperature conductivity will be compared and discussed. NJSGC-NASA Fellowship grant

  17. Temperature and pressure dependence of CO2 extinction coefficients.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demore, W. B.; Patapoff, M.

    1972-01-01

    Results are presented of CO2 extinction coefficient measurements that were performed under conditions of temperature and pressure different from those used by previous investigators. The results show that, whereas pressure effects are generally negligible, temperature dependence is strong enough to invalidate the use of room temperature data for the Mars atmosphere.

  18. Unusual temperature dependence of elastic constants of an ambient-temperature discotic nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Venkata Sai, D; Mirri, G; Kouwer, P H J; Sahoo, R; Musevic, I; Dhara, Surajit

    2016-03-01

    We report the first experimental studies on the temperature dependence of viscoelastic properties of a room temperature discotic nematic liquid crystal. The splay elastic constant is greater than the bend elastic constant and both show unusual temperature and order parameter dependence. The rotational viscosity is remarkably larger than conventional calamitic liquid crystals. We provide a simple physical explanation based on the columnar short-range order to account for the the unusual temperature dependence of the elastic constants. PMID:26883494

  19. Temperature Dependence of the Free Excitons in GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, D. C.; Collins, T. C.

    2002-03-01

    We are presenting the temperature dependence of the photoluminescence (PL) of the free excitons and donor bound exciton ( D^circ ,X) in GaN. The excitons involved are the longitudinal, the Γ5 and the Γ6 excitons as well as D^circ ,X. The temperature dependence of the energy positions of Γ_5, Γ_6, and D^circ ,X are well mapped out using the Varshni equation in a temperature range of 0 -- 60 K. In this temperature range, the energy positions of the longitudinal excitons depart from the predictions of the Varshni equation used for the other excitons. If more than one columnar structural direction is present, then in PL, more than one longitudinal mode might be observed. The sample being investigated shows two longitudinal modes. The energy separation between the longitudinal and transverse modes has been reported by Hopfield and Thomas. One component in the separation is the polarizability, which has some temperature dependence. The longitudinal exciton then has a band gap temperature dependence, which is predicted by the Varshni equation and an additional temperature dependence due to the polarizability. We have used the Varshni equation plus a linear and quadratic temperature dependence term to map the energy positions of the longitudinal excitons.

  20. Effect of growth temperature on the electronic transport and anomalous Hall effect response in co-sputtered Co2FeSi thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Anjali; Chaudhary, Sujeet

    2015-11-01

    Co-sputtered Co2FeSi thin films are studied by varying the growth temperature (Ts) as a control parameter in terms of the appreciable change in the disorder. The effect of Ts on structural, magnetic, electrical, and magneto-transport properties was investigated. As Ts is increased from room temperature to 400 °C, an improvement in the crystallinity and atomic ordering are observed. These are found to be correlated with the associated reduction in residual resistivity ( ρ x x 0 ) from 410 to 88 μΩ cm, an increment in residual resistivity ratio (r) from 0.8 to 1.23, and an increase in saturation magnetization from 1074 to 1196 emu/cc. The spin wave stiffness constant in these films is found to increase with Ts, with a reasonably high value of 358 meVÅ2 at the optimum value of Ts of 400 °C. Further, the obtained high carrier concentration and mobility values (at 10 K) of ˜30 e-s/f.u. and ˜0.11 cm2 V-1 s-1 for the films deposited at Ts = 400 °C shows the presence of compensated Fermi surface. The transport properties are investigated qualitatively from the scaling of anomalous Hall resistivity ρx y s (T) with the longitudinal resistivity ρ x x ( T ) data, employing the extrinsic (skew- and side-jump scatterings) and intrinsic scattering contributions. The variation in the intrinsic scattering contributions observed via the variation in linear dependence of ρx y s on ρx x 2 with the change in Ts is found to be associated with the improvement in the crystallinity of these films.

  1. Temperature dependence of the emissivity of platinum in the IR.

    PubMed

    Deemyad, Shanti; Silvera, Isaac F

    2008-08-01

    The accuracy of temperature determination by fitting the spectral irradiance to a Planck curve depends on knowledge of the emissivity at all temperatures and pressures of interest within a spectral region. Here, the emissivity of platinum is measured in the near infrared as a function of temperature. In the wavelength range of study and the temperature range of 650-1100 K, we find the emissivity to be independent of temperature to within experimental error. This result should lead to improved accuracy of temperature measurement by optical pyrometry where platinum is used as a thermal emitter. PMID:19044386

  2. Temperature dependent electrical transport of disordered reduced graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muchharla, Baleeswaraiah; Narayanan, T. N.; Balakrishnan, Kaushik; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Talapatra, Saikat

    2014-06-01

    We report on the simple route for the synthesis of chemically reduced graphene oxide (rGO) using ascorbic acid (a green chemical) as a reducing agent. Temperature-dependent electrical transport properties of rGO thin films have been studied in a wide range (50 K T 400 K) of temperature. Electrical conduction in rGO thin films was displayed in two different temperature regimes. At higher temperatures, Arrhenius-like temperature dependence of resistance was observed indicating a band gap dominating transport behavior. At lower temperatures, the rGO sample showed a conduction mechanism consistent with Mott's two-dimensional variable range hopping (2D-VRH). An unsaturated negative magnetoresistance (MR) was observed up to 3 T field. A decrease in negative MR at high temperatures is attributed to the phonon scattering of charge carriers.

  3. Temperature dependence of the HNO3 UV absorption cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkholder, James B.; Talukdar, Ranajit K.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Solomon, Susan

    1993-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the HNO3 absorption cross sections between 240 and 360 K over the wavelength range 195 to 350 nm has been measured using a diode array spectrometer. Absorption cross sections were determined using both (1) absolute pressure measurements at 298 K and (2) a dual absorption cell arrangement in which the absorption spectrum at various temperatures is measured relative to the room temperature absorption spectrum. The HNO3 absorption spectrum showed a temperature dependence which is weak at short wavelengths but stronger at longer wavelengths which are important for photolysis in the lower stratosphere. The 298 K absorption cross sections were found to be larger than the values currently recommended for atmospheric modeling (DeMore et al., 1992). Our absorption cross section data are critically compared with the previous measurements of both room temperature and temperature-dependent absorption cross sections. Temperature-dependent absorption cross sections of HNO3 are recommended for use in atmospheric modeling. These temperature dependent HNO3 absorption cross sections were used in a two-dimensional dynamical-photochemical model to demonstrate the effects of the revised absorption cross sections on loss rate of HNO3 and the abundance of NO2 in the stratosphere.

  4. Anomalous is ubiquitous

    SciTech Connect

    Eliazar, Iddo; Klafter, Joseph

    2011-09-15

    Brownian motion is widely considered the quintessential model of diffusion processes-the most elemental random transport processes in Science and Engineering. Yet so, examples of diffusion processes displaying highly non-Brownian statistics-commonly termed 'Anomalous Diffusion' processes-are omnipresent both in the natural sciences and in engineered systems. The scientific interest in Anomalous Diffusion and its applications is growing exponentially in the recent years. In this Paper we review the key statistics of Anomalous Diffusion processes: sub-diffusion and super-diffusion, long-range dependence and the Joseph effect, Levy statistics and the Noah effect, and 1/f noise. We further present a theoretical model-generalizing the Einstein-Smoluchowski diffusion model-which provides a unified explanation for the prevalence of Anomalous Diffusion statistics. Our model shows that what is commonly perceived as 'anomalous' is in effect ubiquitous. - Highlights: > The article provides an overview of Anomalous Diffusion (AD) statistics. > The Einstein-Smoluchowski diffusion model is extended and generalized. > The generalized model universally generates AD statistics. > A unified 'universal macroscopic explanation' for AD statistics is established. > AD statistics are shown to be fundamentally connected to robustness.

  5. 40Ar/39Ar impact ages and time-temperature argon diffusion history of the Bunburra Rockhole anomalous basaltic achondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdan, Fred; Benedix, Gretchen; Eroglu, Ela.; Bland, Phil. A.; Bouvier, Audrey.

    2014-09-01

    The Bunburra Rockhole meteorite is a brecciated anomalous basaltic achondrite containing coarse-, medium- and fine-grained lithologies. Petrographic observations constrain the limited shock pressure to between ca. 10 GPa and 20 GPa. In this study, we carried out nine 40Ar/39Ar step-heating experiments on distinct single-grain fragments extracted from the coarse and fine lithologies. We obtained six plateau ages and three mini-plateau ages. These ages fall into two internally concordant populations with mean ages of 3640 ± 21 Ma (n = 7; P = 0.53) and 3544 ± 26 Ma (n = 2; P = 0.54), respectively. Based on these results, additional 40Ar/39Ar data of fusion crust fragments, argon diffusion modelling, and petrographic observations, we conclude that the principal components of the Bunburra Rockhole basaltic achondrite are from a melt rock formed at ∼3.64 Ga by a medium to large impact event. The data imply that this impact generated high enough energy to completely melt the basaltic target rock and reset the Ar systematics, but only partially reset the Pb-Pb age. We also conclude that a complete 40Ar∗ resetting of pyroxene and plagioclase at this time could not have been achieved at solid-state conditions. Comparison with a terrestrial analog (Lonar crater) shows that the time-temperature conditions required to melt basaltic target rocks upon impact are relatively easy to achieve. Ar data also suggest that a second medium-size impact event occurred on a neighbouring part of the same target rock at ∼3.54 Ga. Concordant low-temperature step ages of the nine aliquots suggest that, at ∼3.42 Ga, a third smaller impact excavated parts of the ∼3.64 Ga and ∼3.54 Ga melt rocks and brought the fragments together. The lack of significant impact activity after 3.5 Ga, as recorded by the Bunburra Rockhole suggests that (1) either the meteorite was ejected in a small secondary parent body where it resided untouched by large impacts, or (2) it was covered by a porous heat

  6. A percolation cluster model of the temperature dependent dielectric properties of hydrated proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suherman, Phe Man; Smith, Geoff

    2003-02-01

    This study investigates the temperature dependence of the low frequency dielectric properties (0.1 Hz-1 MHz) of hydrated globular proteins (namely, ovalbumin, lysozyme and pepsin). The study aims to reveal the mechanisms of water-protein interaction from the dielectric response of these model proteins. Two principle dielectric responses were observed for each hydrated protein, namely, an anomalous low frequency dispersion and a dielectric loss peak at higher frequency (called the varepsilon3 dispersion). The low frequency response conformed to a fractional power low of frequency, while the higher frequency response conformed to a Davidson-Cole model. The strength of both processes reached a maximum at a certain temperature within the experimental temperature range. This temperature is referred to as the percolation threshold (PT) and is thought to be associated with the percolation of protons between hydrogen-bonded water molecules. The relaxation times of the varepsilon3 dispersion conformed to Arrhenius behaviour at temperatures below the PT, from which an activation energy (DeltaH) could be calculated. This activation energy is thought to be a measure of the concentration of available charged sites through which proton transport is facilitated. The structural fractal dimension in the hydrated protein system was also calculated, and enabled the approximation of the pathway for charge percolation in the protein matrix.

  7. Temperature Dependence of Thermopower in Strongly Correlated Multiorbital Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sekino, M; Okamoto, Satoshi; Koshibae, W; Mori, Michiyasu; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2014-01-01

    Temperature dependence of thermopower in the multiorbital Hubbard model is studied by using the dynamical mean-field theory with the non-crossing approximation impurity solver. It is found that the Coulomb interaction, the Hund coupling, and the crystal filed splitting bring about nonmonotonic temperature dependence of the hermopower, including its sign reversal. The implication of our theoretical results to some materials is discussed.

  8. Identification of temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Weizhen; Yi, Fajun; Zhu, Yanwei; Meng, Songhe

    2016-07-01

    A modified Levenberg–Marquardt method (LMM) for the identification of temperature-dependent thermal conductivity is proposed; the experiment and structure of the specimen for identification are also designed. The temperature-dependent thermal conductivities of copper C10200 and brass C28000 are identified to verify the effectiveness of the proposed identification method. The comparison between identified results and the measured data of laser flash diffusivity apparatus indicates the fine consistency and potential usage of the proposed method.

  9. Temperature and size-dependent Hamaker constants for metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jiang, K; Pinchuk, P

    2016-08-26

    Theoretical values of the Hamaker constant have been calculated for metal nanoparticles using Lifshitz theory. The theory describes the Hamaker constant in terms of the permittivity of the interacting bodies. Metal nanoparticles exhibit an internal size effect that alters the dielectric permittivity of the particle when its size falls below the mean free path of the conducting electrons. This size dependence of the permittivity leads to size-dependence of the Hamaker constant for metal nanoparticles. Additionally, the electron damping and the plasma frequency used to model the permittivity of the particle exhibit temperature-dependence, which lead to temperature dependence of the Hamaker constant. In this work, both the size and temperature dependence for gold, silver, copper, and aluminum nanoparticles is demonstrated. The results of this study might be of interest for studying the colloidal stability of nanoparticles in solution. PMID:27454147

  10. Temperature and size-dependent Hamaker constants for metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, K.; Pinchuk, P.

    2016-08-01

    Theoretical values of the Hamaker constant have been calculated for metal nanoparticles using Lifshitz theory. The theory describes the Hamaker constant in terms of the permittivity of the interacting bodies. Metal nanoparticles exhibit an internal size effect that alters the dielectric permittivity of the particle when its size falls below the mean free path of the conducting electrons. This size dependence of the permittivity leads to size-dependence of the Hamaker constant for metal nanoparticles. Additionally, the electron damping and the plasma frequency used to model the permittivity of the particle exhibit temperature-dependence, which lead to temperature dependence of the Hamaker constant. In this work, both the size and temperature dependence for gold, silver, copper, and aluminum nanoparticles is demonstrated. The results of this study might be of interest for studying the colloidal stability of nanoparticles in solution.

  11. Temperature Dependence of Radiative and Nonradiative Rates from Time-Dependent Correlation Function Methods.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Baiardi, Alberto; Bloino, Julien; Barone, Vincenzo

    2016-02-01

    The temperature dependence of the rate constants in radiative and nonradiative decays from excited electronic states has been studied using a time-dependent correlation function approach in the framework of the adiabatic representation and the harmonic oscillator approximation. The present work analyzes the vibrational aspect of the processes, which gives rise to the temperature dependence, with the inclusion of mode-mixing, as well as of frequency change effects. The temperature dependence of the rate constants shows a contrasting nature, depending on whether the process has been addressed within the Franck-Condon approximation or beyond it. The calculation of the Duschinsky matrix and the shift vector between the normal modes of the two states can be done in Cartesian and/or internal coordinates, depending on the flexibility of the investigated molecule. A new computational code has been developed to calculate the rates of intersystem crossing, internal conversion, and fluorescence for selected molecules as functions of temperature. PMID:26683207

  12. The temperature dependence of electrical excitability in fish hearts.

    PubMed

    Vornanen, Matti

    2016-07-01

    Environmental temperature has pervasive effects on the rate of life processes in ectothermic animals. Animal performance is affected by temperature, but there are finite thermal limits for vital body functions, including contraction of the heart. This Review discusses the electrical excitation that initiates and controls the rate and rhythm of fish cardiac contraction and is therefore a central factor in the temperature-dependent modulation of fish cardiac function. The control of cardiac electrical excitability should be sensitive enough to respond to temperature changes but simultaneously robust enough to protect against cardiac arrhythmia; therefore, the thermal resilience and plasticity of electrical excitation are physiological qualities that may affect the ability of fishes to adjust to climate change. Acute changes in temperature alter the frequency of the heartbeat and the duration of atrial and ventricular action potentials (APs). Prolonged exposure to new thermal conditions induces compensatory changes in ion channel expression and function, which usually partially alleviate the direct effects of temperature on cardiac APs and heart rate. The most heat-sensitive molecular components contributing to the electrical excitation of the fish heart seem to be Na(+) channels, which may set the upper thermal limit for the cardiac excitability by compromising the initiation of the cardiac AP at high temperatures. In cardiac and other excitable cells, the different temperature dependencies of the outward K(+) current and inward Na(+) current may compromise electrical excitability at temperature extremes, a hypothesis termed the temperature-dependent depression of electrical excitation. PMID:27385752

  13. Temperature dependence of photovoltaic cells, modules, and systems

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, K.; Burdick, J.; Caiyem, Y.

    1996-05-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) cells and modules are often rated in terms of a set of standard reporting conditions defined by a temperature, spectral irradiance, and total irradiance. Because PV devices operates over a wide range of temperatures and irradiances, the temperature and irradiance related behavior must be known. This paper surveys the temperature dependence of crystalline and thin-film, state-of-the-art, research-size cells, modules, and systems measured by a variety of methods. The various error sources and measurement methods that contribute to cause differences in the temperature coefficient for a given cell or module measured with various methods are discussed.

  14. Temperature dependence of electronic transport property in ferroelectric polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X. L.; Wang, J. L.; Tian, B. B.; Liu, B. L.; Zou, Y. H.; Wang, X. D.; Sun, S.; Sun, J. L.; Meng, X. J.; Chu, J. H.

    2014-10-01

    The leakage current mechanism of ferroelectric copolymer of polyvinylidene fluoride with trifluoroethylene prepared by Langmuir-Blodgett was investigated in the temperature range from 100 K to 350 K. The electron as the dominant injected carrier was observed in the ferroelectric copolymer films. The transport mechanisms in copolymer strongly depend on the temperature and applied voltage. From 100 K to 200 K, Schottky emission dominates the conduction. With temperature increasing, the Frenkel-Poole emission instead of the Schottky emission to conduct the carrier transport. When the temperature gets to 260 K, the leakage current becomes independent of temperature, and the space charge limited current conduction was observed.

  15. Temperature dependent droplet impact dynamics on flat and textured surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Azar Alizadeh; Vaibhav Bahadur; Sheng Zhong; Wen Shang; Ri Li; James Ruud; Masako Yamada; Liehi Ge; Ali Dhinojwala; Manohar S Sohal

    2012-03-01

    Droplet impact dynamics determines the performance of surfaces used in many applications such as anti-icing, condensation, boiling and heat transfer. We study impact dynamics of water droplets on surfaces with chemistry/texture ranging from hydrophilic to superhydrophobic and across a temperature range spanning below freezing to near boiling conditions. Droplet retraction shows very strong temperature dependence especially for hydrophilic surfaces; it is seen that lower substrate temperatures lead to lesser retraction. Physics-based analyses show that the increased viscosity associated with lower temperatures can explain the decreased retraction. The present findings serve to guide further studies of dynamic fluid-structure interaction at various temperatures.

  16. ION AND TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF ELECTRICAL CONDUCTANCE FOR NATURAL WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four empirical equations describing the temperature dependence of electrical conductance of aqueous solutions are compared for the case of single electrolytes. The best method uses a modified Walden product where the log of the ratio between the conductances at two temperatures i...

  17. A temperature dependent SPICE macro-model for power MOSFETs

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    The power MOSFET SPICE Macro-Model has been developed suitable for use over the temperature range {minus}55 to 125 {degrees}C. The model is comprised of a single parameter set with temperature dependence accessed through the SPICE .TEMP card. SPICE parameter extraction techniques for the model and model predictive accuracy are discussed. 7 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Temperature Dependence of Viscosities of Common Carrier Gases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommers, Trent S.; Nahir, Tal M.

    2005-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental evidence for the dependence of viscosities of the real gases on temperature is described, suggesting that this dependence is greater than that predicted by the kinetic theory of gases. The experimental results were obtained using common modern instrumentation and could be reproduced by students in analytical or…

  19. Temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudyak, V. Ya.; Dubtsov, S. N.; Baklanov, A. M.

    2008-06-01

    The temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient of nanoparticles in gases has been experimentally studied. It is established that this dependence significantly differs from that predicted by various correlations, in particular, by the Cunningham-Millikan-Davies correlation that is used as an instrumental basis for virtually all methods of measurement of the diffusion coefficient in aerosols.

  20. Temperature dependence of ethanol depression in mice: dose response.

    PubMed

    Finn, D A; Syapin, P J; Bejanian, M; Jones, B L; Alkana, R L

    1994-04-01

    Manipulation of body temperature during intoxication significantly alters brain sensitivity to ethanol. The current study tested the generality of this effect within the hypnotic dose range. Drug naive, male C57BL/6J mice were injected with 3.2, 3.6, or 4.0 g/kg ethanol (20% w/v) and were exposed to 1 of 7 designated temperatures from 13 degrees to 34 degrees C to manipulate body temperature during intoxication. Rectal temperature at return of righting reflex (RORR) was significantly, positively correlated with loss of righting reflex (LORR) duration and significantly, negatively correlated with blood ethanol concentration (BEC) at RORR at all three doses. These results indicate that increasing body temperature during intoxication increased ethanol sensitivity in C57 mice at all three doses tested and demonstrate the generality of temperature dependence across hypnotic doses in these animals. Interestingly, the LORR duration was dose-dependent at each ambient temperature, but the degree of body temperature change and the BEC at RORR were not dose-dependent. Overall, these results emphasize the importance of body temperature as a variable in ethanol research. PMID:8048742

  1. Matching properties, and voltage and temperature dependence of MOS capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCreary, J. L.

    1981-12-01

    A technique for designing MOS capacitor arrays is discussed, which includes a method of calculating capacitance ratio errors and subsequent total yield. Data illustrating the sensitivity of the ratio matching to capacitor layout, structures, and technology are presented, and measured voltage coefficients of MOS capacitors as function of surface concentration are compared with the calculated coefficients. It is demonstrated that the temperature dependence of space charge capacitance, thermal expansion, and temperature dependence of the dielectric constant are the major components of the temperature coefficient of capacitance. It is also shown that to a first-order, heavily doped polysilicon accumulates and depletes similar to crystalline silicon.

  2. Anomalous reflections from the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Givishvili, G. V.; Leshchenko, L. N.

    2013-09-01

    The existence of anomalous ionospheric reflections was shown on the basis of vertical soundings at the Moskow station. They are observed at heights of 100-200 km. These anomalous reflections are not related to the main Ne( h) ionospheric profile. Morphological characteristics of such reflections are presented: the daily, seasonal, and cyclic dependences of their appearance.

  3. Anomalous grain growth in the surface region of a nanocrystalline CeO2 film under low-temperature heavy ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Edmondson, Dr. Philip; Zhang, Yanwen; Moll, Sandra; Varga, Tamas; Namavar, Fereydoon; Weber, William J

    2012-01-01

    Grain growth and phase stability of nanocrystalline ceria are investigated under ion irradiation at different temperatures. Irradiations at temperatures of 300 and 400 K result in uniform grain growth throughout the film. Anomalous grain growth is observed in thin films of nanocrystalline ceria under 3 MeV Au+ irradiation at 160 K. At this low temperature, significant grain growth is observed within 100 nm from the surface, no obvious growth is detected in the rest of the films. While the grain growth is attributed to a defect-stimulated mechanism at room temperature and above, a defect diffusion-limited mechanism is significant at low temperature with the primary defect responsible being the oxygen vacancy.

  4. Anomalous grain growth in the surface region of a nanocrystalline CeO2 film under low-temperature heavy ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Edmondson, Philip D.; Zhang, Yanwen; Moll, Sandra J.; Varga, Tamas; Namavar, Fereydoon; Weber, William J.

    2012-06-15

    Grain growth and phase stability of nanocrystalline ceria are investigated under ion irradiation at different temperatures. Irradiations at temperatures of 300 and 400 K result in uniform grain growth throughout the film. Anomalous grain growth is observed in thin films of nanocrystalline ceria under 3 MeV Au+ irradiation at 160 K. At this low temperature, significant grain growth is observed within 100 nm from the surface, no obvious growth is detected in the rest of the films. While the grain growth is attributed to a defect-stimulated mechanism at room temperature and above, a defect diffusion-limited mechanism is significant at low temperature with the primary defect responsible being the oxygen vacancy. The nanocrystalline grains remain in the cubic phase regardless of defect kinetics.

  5. TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF THERMAL NEUTRONS FROM THE MOON

    SciTech Connect

    R.C. LITTLE; W. FELDMAN; ET AL

    2000-10-01

    Planetary thermal neutron fluxes provide a sensitive proxy for mafic and feldspathic terranes, and are also necessary for translating measured gamma-ray line strengths to elemental abundances. Both functions require a model for near surface temperatures and a knowledge of the dependence of thermal neutron flux on temperature. We have explored this dependence for a representative sample of lunar soil compositions and surface temperatures using MCNP{trademark}. For all soil samples, the neutron density is found to be independent of temperature, in accord with neutron moderation theory. The thermal neutron flux, however, does vary with temperature in a way that depends on {Delta}, the ratio of macroscopic absorption to energy-loss cross sections of soil compositions. The weakest dependence is for the largest {Delta} (which corresponds to the Apollo 17 high Ti basalt in our soil selection), and the largest dependence is for the lowest {Delta} (which corresponds to ferroan anorthosite, [FAN] in our selection). For the lunar model simulated, the depth at which the thermal neutron population is most sensitive to temperature is {approx}30 g/cm{sup 2}.

  6. Extended temperature dependence of elastic constants in cubic crystals.

    PubMed

    Telichko, A V; Sorokin, B P

    2015-08-01

    To extend the theory of the temperature dependence of the elastic constants in cubic crystals beyond the second- and third-order elastic constants, the fourth-order elastic constants, as well as the non-linearity in the thermal expansion temperature dependence, have been taken into account. Theoretical results were represented as temperature functions of the effective elastic constants and compared with experimental data for a number of cubic crystals, such as alkali metal halides, and elements gold and silver. The relations obtained give a more accurate description of the experimental temperature dependences of second-order elastic constants for a number of cubic crystals, including deviations from linear behavior. A good agreement between theoretical estimates and experimental data has been observed. PMID:25819879

  7. Temperature dependence of optical properties of GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, Huade; Snyder, Paul G.; Woollam, John A.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the optical properties of GaAs was investigated using spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements, between room temperature and about 610 C in increments of 50 C, of pseudodielectric functions and related optical constants of GaAs. A quantitative analysis of the pseudodielectric function spectrum was carried out using a harmonic-oscillator approximation (HOA) to fit the measured dielectric functions. Good fits were obtained with this model, which provides a convenient means of reproducing the GaAs dielectric function at any temperature, by using the temperature-dependent oscillator parameters. The HOA analysis also provides information about band-gap variation with temperature. Using the measured optical constants at a number of fixed temperatures, an algorithm was developed for computing the dielectric function spectrum at an arbitrary temperature in the range 22-610 C.

  8. Temperature-dependent μ-Raman investigation of struvite crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prywer, Jolanta; Kasprowicz, D.; Runka, T.

    2016-04-01

    The effect of temperature on the vibrational properties of struvite crystals grown from silica gels was systematically studied by μ-Raman spectroscopy. The time-dependent Raman spectra recorded in the process of long time annealing of struvite crystal at 353 K do not indicate structural changes in the struvite crystal with the time of annealing. The temperature-dependent Raman spectra recorded in the range 298-423 K reveal a phase transition in struvite at about 368 K. Above this characteristic temperature, some of bands assigned to vibrations of the PO4 and NH4 tetrahedra and water molecules observed in the Raman spectra in low temperatures (orthorhombic phase) change their spectral parameters or disappear, which indicates a transition to a higher symmetry structure of struvite in the range of high temperatures.

  9. Analysis of the anomalous scale-dependent behavior of dispersivity using straightforward analytical equations: Flow variance vs. dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Looney, B.B.; Scott, M.T.

    1988-12-31

    Recent field and laboratory data have confirmed that apparent dispersivity is a function of the flow distance of the measurement. This scale effect is not consistent with classical advection dispersion modeling often used to describe the transport of solutes in saturated porous media. Many investigators attribute this anomalous behavior to the fact that the spreading of solute is actually the result of the heterogeneity of subsurface materials and the wide distribution of flow paths and velocities available in such systems. An analysis using straightforward analytical equations confirms this hypothesis. An analytical equation based on a flow variance approach matches available field data when a variance description of approximately 0.4 is employed. Also, current field data provide a basis for statistical selection of the variance parameter based on the level of concern related to the resulting calculated concentration. While the advection dispersion approach often yielded reasonable predictions, continued development of statistical and stochastic techniques will provide more defendable and mechanistically descriptive models.

  10. Temperature dependent Raman scattering in YCrO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Mall, A. K. Sharma, Y.; Mukherjee, S.; Garg, A.; Gupta, R.

    2014-04-24

    High quality polycrystalline YCrO{sub 3} samples were synthesized using solid-state-reaction method. The samples were subsequently characterized using X-ray diffraction and magnetometry. Further, temperature dependent Raman spectroscopy over a spectral range from 100 to 800 cm{sup −1} was used to examine the variation of phonons as a function of temperature from 90 to 300 K. In the low temperature ferroelectric phase of YCrO{sub 3}, the observed phonon spectra showed softening of some Raman modes below the magnetic ordering temperature (T{sub N} ∼ 142K), suggesting a coupling between the spin and phonon degrees of freedom.

  11. Anomalous density dependence of the activation gap of ν = 5/2 fractional quantum Hall state at extremely large Landau level mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samkharadze, Nodar; Manfra, Michael; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Ken; Csathy, Gabor

    2013-03-01

    We have conducted a study of the density dependence of ν = 5/2 fractional quantum Hall state (FQHS) in the regime of extremely low densities, down to n =4.9x10⌃10 cm⌃-2. In the density range accessed in our sample, the Landau level mixing parameter κ spans the so far unexplored range 2.52< κ<2.82. Here we observe an anomalous dependence of the activation gap of ν = 5/2 FQHS on the carrier density. We discuss the possible origins of this unexpected behavior. N.S. and G.C. were supported by the NSF grant DMR-0907172 and DMR-1207375. K. West and L. Pfeiffer acknowledge the support of the Princeton NSF-MRSEC and the Moore Foundation.

  12. Substrate-dependent temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myachina, Olga; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia

    2015-04-01

    Activity of extracellular enzymes responsible for decomposition of organics is substrate dependent. Quantity of the substrate is the main limiting factor for enzymatic or microbial heterotrophic activity in soils. Different mechanisms of enzymes response to temperature suggested for low and high substrate availability were never proved for real soil conditions. We compared the temperature responses of enzymes-catalyzed reactions in soils. Basing on Michaelis-Menten kinetics we determined the enzymes affinity to substrate (Km) and mineralization potential of heterotrophic microorganisms (Vmax) 1) for three hydrolytic enzymes: β-1,4-glucosidase, N-acetyl- β -D-glucosaminidase and phosphatase by the application of fluorogenically labeled substrates and 2) for mineralization of 14C-labeled glucose by substrate-dependent respiratory response. Here we show that the amount of available substrate is responsible for temperature sensitivity of hydrolysis of polymers in soil, whereas monomers oxidation to CO2 does not depend on substrate amount and is mainly temperature governed. We also found that substrate affinity of enzymes (which is usually decreases with the temperature) differently responded to warming for the process of depolymerisation versus monomers oxidation. We suggest the mechanism to temperature acclimation based on different temperature sensitivity of enzymes kinetics for hydrolysis of polymers and for monomers oxidation.

  13. Universal temperature-dependent normalized optoacoustic response of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Elena V.; Liopo, Anton; Oraevsky, Alexander A.; Ermilov, Sergey A.

    2015-03-01

    We found and interpreted the universal temperature-dependent optoacoustic (photoacoustic) response (ThOR) in blood; the normalized ThOR is invariant with respect to hematocrit at the hemoglobin's isosbestic point. The unique compartmentalization of hemoglobin, the primary optical absorber at 805 nm, inside red blood cells (RBCs) explains the effect. We studied the temperature dependence of Gruneisen parameter in blood and aqueous solutions of hemoglobin and for the first time experimentally observed transition through the zero optoacoustic response at temperature T0, which was proved to be consistent for various blood samples. On the other hand, the hemoglobin solutions demonstrated linear concentration function of the temperature T0. When this function was extrapolated to the average hemoglobin concentration inside erythrocytes, the temperature T0 was found equivalent to that measured in whole and diluted blood. The obtained universal curve of blood ThOR was validated in both transparent and light scattering media. The discovered universal optoacoustic temperature dependent blood response provides foundation for future development of non-invasive in vivo temperature monitoring in vascularized tissues and blood vessels.

  14. Temperature Dependent Constitutive Modeling for Magnesium Alloy Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong K.; Lee, June K.; Kim, Hyung S.; Kim, Heon Y.

    2010-06-15

    Magnesium alloys have been increasingly used in automotive and electronic industries because of their excellent strength to weight ratio and EMI shielding properties. However, magnesium alloys have low formability at room temperature due to their unique mechanical behavior (twinning and untwining), prompting for forming at an elevated temperature. In this study, a temperature dependent constitutive model for magnesium alloy (AZ31B) sheet is developed. A hardening law based on non linear kinematic hardening model is used to consider Bauschinger effect properly. Material parameters are determined from a series of uni-axial cyclic experiments (T-C-T or C-T-C) with the temperature ranging 150-250 deg. C. The influence of temperature on the constitutive equation is introduced by the material parameters assumed to be functions of temperature. Fitting process of the assumed model to measured data is presented and the results are compared.

  15. Temperature dependence of damage coefficient in electron irradiated solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faith, T. J.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of light-generated current vs cell temperature on electron-irradiated n/p silicon solar cells show the temperature coefficient of this current to increase with increasing fluence for both 10-ohm and 20-ohm cells. A relationship between minority-carrier diffusion length and light-generated current was derived by combining measurements of these two parameters: vs fluence at room temperature, and vs cell temperature in cells irradiated to a fluence of 1 x 10 to the 15th power e/sq cm. This relationship was used, together with the light-generated current data, to calculate the temperature dependence of the diffusion-length damage coefficient. The results show a strong decrease in the damage coefficient with increasing temperature in the range experienced by solar panels in synchronous earth orbit.

  16. Temperature Dependent Constitutive Modeling for Magnesium Alloy Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong K.; Lee, June K.; Kim, Hyung S.; Kim, Heon Y.

    2010-06-01

    Magnesium alloys have been increasingly used in automotive and electronic industries because of their excellent strength to weight ratio and EMI shielding properties. However, magnesium alloys have low formability at room temperature due to their unique mechanical behavior (twinning and untwining), prompting for forming at an elevated temperature. In this study, a temperature dependent constitutive model for magnesium alloy (AZ31B) sheet is developed. A hardening law based on non linear kinematic hardening model is used to consider Bauschinger effect properly. Material parameters are determined from a series of uni-axial cyclic experiments (T-C-T or C-T-C) with the temperature ranging 150-250° C. The influence of temperature on the constitutive equation is introduced by the material parameters assumed to be functions of temperature. Fitting process of the assumed model to measured data is presented and the results are compared.

  17. Temperature dependence of the Soret coefficient of ionic colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehnem, A. L.; Figueiredo Neto, A. M.; Aquino, R.; Campos, A. F. C.; Tourinho, F. A.; Depeyrot, J.

    2015-10-01

    The temperature dependence of the Soret coefficient ST(T ) in electrostatically charged magnetic colloids is investigated. Two different ferrofluids, with different particles' mean dimensions, are studied. In both cases we obtain a thermophilic behavior of the Soret effect. The temperature dependence of the Soret coefficient is described assuming that the nanoparticles migrate along the ionic thermoelectric field created by the thermal gradient. A model based on the contributions from the thermoelectrophoresis and variation of the double-layer energy, without fitting parameters, is used to describe the experimental results of the colloid with the bigger particles. To do so, independent measurements of the ζ potential, mass diffusion coefficient, and Seebeck coefficient are performed. The agreement of the theory and the experimental results is rather good. In the case of the ferrofluid with smaller particles, it is not possible to get experimentally reliable values of the ζ potential and the model described is used to evaluate this parameter and its temperature dependence.

  18. On the detection of precipitation dependence on temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yu; Luo, Ming; Leung, Yee

    2016-05-01

    Employing their newly proposed interannual difference method (IADM), Liu et al. (2009) and Shiu et al. (2012) reported a shocking increase of around 100% K-1 in heavy precipitation with warming global temperature in 1979-2007. Such increase is alarming and prompts us to probe into the IADM. In this study, both analytical derivations and numerical analyses demonstrate that IADM provides no additional information to that of the conventional linear regression, and also, it may give a false indication of dependence. For clarity and simplicity, we therefore recommend linear regression analysis over the IADM for the detection of dependence. We also find that heavy precipitation decreased during the global warming hiatus, and the precipitation dependence on temperature drops by almost 50% when the study period is extended to 1979-2014 and it may keep dropping in the near future. The risk of having heavy precipitation under warming global temperature may have been overestimated.

  19. A framework for elucidating the temperature dependence of fitness.

    PubMed

    Amarasekare, Priyanga; Savage, Van

    2012-02-01

    Climate warming is predicted to cause large-scale extinctions, particularly of ectothermic species. A striking difference between tropical and temperate ectotherms is that tropical species experience a mean habitat temperature that is closer to the temperature at which fitness is maximized (T(opt)) and an upper temperature limit for survival (T(max)) that is closer to T(opt) than do temperate species. Thus, even a small increase in environmental temperature could put tropical ectotherms at high risk of extinction, whereas temperate ectotherms have a wider temperature cushion. Although this pattern is widely observed, the mechanisms that produce it are not well understood. Here we develop a mathematical framework to partition the temperature response of fitness into its components (fecundity, mortality, and development) and test model predictions with data for insects. We find that fitness declines at high temperatures because the temperature responses of fecundity and mortality act in opposite ways: fecundity decreases with temperature when temperatures exceed the optimal range, whereas mortality continues to increase. The proximity of T(opt) to T(max) depends on how the temperature response of development mediates the interaction between fecundity and mortality. When development is highly temperature sensitive, mortality exceeds reproduction only after fecundity has started to decline with temperature, which causes fitness to decline rapidly to zero when temperatures exceed T(opt). The model correctly predicts empirically observed fitness-temperature relationships in insects from different latitudes. It also suggests explanations for the widely reported phenological shifts in many ectotherms and the latitudinal differences in fitness responses. PMID:22218308

  20. Temperature dependence of protein hydration hydrodynamics by molecular dynamics simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, E Y; Krishnan, V V

    2007-07-18

    The dynamics of water molecules near the protein surface are different from those of bulk water and influence the structure and dynamics of the protein itself. To elucidate the temperature dependence hydration dynamics of water molecules, we present results from the molecular dynamic simulation of the water molecules surrounding two proteins (Carboxypeptidase inhibitor and Ovomucoid) at seven different temperatures (T=273 to 303 K, in increments of 5 K). Translational diffusion coefficients of the surface water and bulk water molecules were estimated from 2 ns molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. Temperature dependence of the estimated bulk water diffusion closely reflects the experimental values, while hydration water diffusion is retarded significantly due to the protein. Protein surface induced scaling of translational dynamics of the hydration waters is uniform over the temperature range studied, suggesting the importance protein-water interactions.

  1. Origins of the temperature dependence of hammerhead ribozyme catalysis.

    PubMed Central

    Peracchi, A

    1999-01-01

    The difficulties in interpreting the temperature dependence of protein enzyme reactions are well recognized. Here, the hammerhead ribozyme cleavage was investigated under single-turnover conditions between 0 and 60 degrees C as a model for RNA-catalyzed reactions. Under the adopted conditions, the chemical step appears to be rate-limiting. However, the observed rate of cleavage is affected by pre-catalytic equilibria involving deprotonation of an essential group and binding of at least one low-affinity Mg2+ion. Thus, the apparent entropy and enthalpy of activation include contributions from the temperature dependence of these equilibria, precluding a simple physical interpretation of the observed activation parameters. Similar pre-catalytic equilibria likely contribute to the observed activation parameters for ribozyme reactions in general. The Arrhenius plot for the hammerhead reaction is substantially curved over the temperature range considered, which suggests the occurrence of a conformational change of the ribozyme ground state around physiological temperatures. PMID:10390528

  2. Temperature-dependent absorption cross sections for hydrogen peroxide vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicovich, J. M.; Wine, P. H.

    1988-01-01

    Relative absorption cross sections for hydrogen peroxide vapor were measured over the temperature ranges 285-381 K for lambda = 230 nm-295 nm and 300-381 K for lambda = 193 nm-350 nm. The well established 298 K cross sections at 202.6 and 228.8 nm were used as an absolute calibration. A significant temperature dependence was observed at the important tropospheric photolysis wavelengths lambda over 300 nm. Measured cross sections were extrapolated to lower temperatures, using a simple model which attributes the observed temperature dependence to enhanced absorption by molecules possessing one quantum of O-O stretch vibrational excitation. Upper tropospheric photodissociation rates calculated using the extrapolated cross sections are about 25 percent lower than those calculated using currently recommended 298 K cross sections.

  3. Temperature dependence of coherent oscillations in Josephson phase qubits.

    PubMed

    Lisenfeld, J; Lukashenko, A; Ansmann, M; Martinis, J M; Ustinov, A V

    2007-10-26

    We experimentally investigate the temperature dependence of Rabi oscillations and Ramsey fringes in superconducting phase qubits. In a wide range of temperatures, we find that both the decay time and the amplitude of these coherent oscillations remain nearly unaffected by thermal fluctuations. In the two-level limit, coherent qubit response rapidly vanishes as soon as the energy of thermal fluctuations k(B)T becomes larger than the energy level spacing variant Planck's over h omega of the qubit. In contrast, a sample of much shorter coherence times displayed semiclassical oscillations very similar to Rabi oscillation, but showing a qualitatively different temperature dependence. Our observations shed new light on the origin of decoherence in superconducting qubits. The experimental data suggest that, without degrading already achieved coherence times, phase qubits can be operated at temperatures much higher than those reported till now. PMID:17995313

  4. Ionisation of C60: is it temperature dependent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, M. Sai; Narasimhan, T. S. Lakshmi; Balasubramanian, R.; Mathews, C. K.

    1994-01-01

    In a recent paper, Drewello [T. Drewello, W. Kratschmer, M. Fieber-Erdmann and A. Ding, Int. J. Mass Spectrom. Ion Processes, 124 (1993) R1] reported a temperature dependent ionisation cross section for the formation of C2+60 in their photoionisation dynamic studies on C60 using synchrotron radiation. To check this, the ratio of ion intensities of C2+60 to that of C60 was determined as a function of temperature of C60 samples using a Knudsen effusion mass spectrometer. Our results indicate the absence of any temperature dependence of cross section for the formation of C2+60 in the temperature range of measurement (600-800 K) using electron impact ionisation.

  5. Temperature dependence of temporal resolution in an insect nervous system.

    PubMed

    Franz, A; Ronacher, B

    2002-05-01

    The vast majority of animals are poikilotherms, and thus face the problem that the temperature of their nervous systems rather smoothly follows the temperature changes imposed by their environment. Since basic properties of nerve cells, e.g., the time constants of ion channels, strongly depend on temperature, a temperature shift likely affects the processing of the temporal structure of sensory stimuli. This can be critical in acoustic communication systems in which time patterns of signals are decisive for recognition by the receiver. We investigated the temperature dependence of the responses of locust auditory receptors and interneurons by varying the temperature of the experimental animals during intracellular recordings. The resolution of fast amplitude modulations of acoustic signals was determined in a gap detection paradigm. In auditory receptors and local (second order) interneurons, temporal resolution was improved at higher temperatures. This gain could be attributed to a higher precision of spike timing. In a third-order neuron, a rise in temperature affected the interactions of inhibition and excitation in a complex manner, also resulting in a better resolution of gaps in the millisecond range. PMID:12012097

  6. Temperature dependent elasticity and damping in dehydrated sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, T. W.; Struble, W.

    2013-12-01

    Work reported previously at this conference, outlining our observation of anomalously large elastic softening and damping in dehydrated Berea sandstone at elevated temperatures, has been analysed to study shear and compressional effects separately. Modeling of the sample using COMSOL software was necessary to identify modes, as the vibration spectrum of the sample is poorly approximated by a uniform isotropic solid. The first torsional mode of our evacuated, dry, core softens at nearly twice the rate of Young's modulus modes (bending and compressional) and is also damped nearly twice as strongly as temperature increases. We consider two possible models for explaining this behavior, based on the assumption that the mechanical properties of the sandstone are dominated by the framework of quartz grains and polycrystalline cementation, neglecting initially the effects of clay and feldspar inclusions. The 20cm x 2.54cm diameter core is dry such that the pressure of water vapor in the experiment chamber is below 1e-6 Torr at 70C, suggesting that surface water beyond a small number of monolayers is negligible. Our models consider (1) enhanced sliding of grain boundaries in the cementation at elevated temperature and reduced internal water content, and (2) strain microcracking of the cementatioin at low water content due to anisotropic expansion in the quartz grains. In model (1) interfaces parallel to polyhedral grain surfaces were placed in the cement bonds and assigned frictional properties. Model (2) has not yet been implemented. The overall elasticity of a 3-D several-grain model network was determined by modeling quasistatic loading and measuring displacements. Initial results with a small number of grains/bonds suggests that only the first model provides softening and damping for all the modes, however the details of the effects of defect motioin at individual interfaces as the source for the frictional properties is still being evaluated. Nonlinear effects are

  7. Temperature dependence of VUV transmission of synthetic fused silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, St.; Lange, H.; Schoepp, H.; Witzke, H.-D.

    2006-07-01

    The temperature dependence of the VUV transmission of synthetic fused silica is of interest for commercial applications as well as for fundamental research. In this work the transmission properties of Suprasil 2 from Heraeus with an absorption edge at very low wavelengths is investigated. The absorption edge of this quartz glass shifts from 170 to 180 nm between 789 and 1129 K. The Urbach rule is discussed for the characterization of the temperature dependent transmission curves. The results are applied to the diagnostics of the Hg 185 nm line from a high pressure mercury discharge lamp.

  8. Temperature dependence of self-broadened halfwidths of CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, Carlos B.; Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1990-01-01

    The temperature dependence of self-broadened halfwidths of CO2 was studied in the temperature range 165-300 K for the band at 4978/cm. Assuming a power-law of the form gamma(T) = delta(T0)(T0/T)-exp n, the exponent has been determined for J = 6-32. An average value of n = 0.745 + or - 7 percent has been found.

  9. Models for predicting temperature dependence of material properties of aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marla, Deepak; Bhandarkar, Upendra V.; Joshi, Suhas S.

    2014-03-01

    A number of processes such as laser ablation, laser welding, electric discharge machining, etc involve high temperatures. Most of the processes involve temperatures much higher than the target melting and normal boiling point. Such large variation in target temperature causes a significant variation in its material properties. Due to the unavailability of experimental data on material properties at elevated temperatures, usually the data at lower temperatures is often erroneously extrapolated during modelling of these processes. Therefore, this paper attempts to evaluate the variation in material properties with temperature using some general and empirical theories, along with the available experimental data for aluminum. The evaluated properties of Al using the proposed models show a significant variation with temperature. Between room temperature and near-critical temperature (0.9Tc), surface reflectivity of Al varies from more than 90% to less than 50%, absorption coefficient decreases by a factor of 7, thermal conductivity decreases by a factor of 5, density decreases by a factor of 4, specific heat and latent heat of vapourization vary by a factor between 1.5 and 2. Applying these temperature-dependent material properties for modelling laser ablation suggest that optical properties have a greater influence on the process than thermophysical properties. The numerical predictions of the phase explosion threshold in laser ablation are within 5% of the experimental values.

  10. Temperature dependence of myosin-II tail fragment assembly.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Peggy M; Hostetter, Daniel R; Rice, Sarah E

    2008-01-01

    Dictyostelium myosin-II bipolar thick filament (BTF) assembly is heavily dependent on ionic strength and temperature and is reversible by the phosphorylation of just three threonines. Truncated tail fragments of Dictyostelium myosin-II are commonly used as models for BTF assembly, as they self-assemble into regular paracrystals that recapitulate the ionic strength and phosphorylation dependence of full-length Dictyostelium myosin-II BTF assembly. Here we show that Dictyostelium myosin-II tail fragment assembly is highly temperature dependent, similar to full-length Dictyostelium myosin-II. Assembly of paracrystals was far more robust at 4 degrees C than at higher temperatures. Pre-assembled paracrystals disassembled completely when shifted to 37 degrees C, indicating that assembly does not greatly improve the thermostability of these tail fragments. The melting temperatures of individual Dictyostelium myosin-II tail coiled-coils under both low and high ionic strength conditions that prohibit paracrystal assembly are extremely low, 21 degrees C and 28 degrees C, respectively. These data are consistent with reversible thermal denaturation of the coiled-coil as the most likely explanation for assembly incompetence under either very low ionic strength or high temperature conditions. Assembled paracrystals of a structurally similar fragment of nonmuscle myosin-IIA were far more thermodynamically stable than their Dictyostelium counterparts at the temperatures examined here. PMID:18784979