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Sample records for antagonistic muscular actions

  1. Calcium antagonists and their mode of action

    PubMed Central

    Nayler, Winifred G.; Dillon, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    1 The Ca2+ antagonists are a novel group of drugs useful in management of a variety of cardiac disorders. They differ from one another in terms of their chemistry, tissue specificity and selectivity. As a group, however, they share the common property of slowing Ca2+ entry through voltage-activated, ion-selective channels. Some of them exhibit other properties, including that of interfering with Na+ transport. At least one of them, diltiazem, has an intracellular action. 2 Specific high and low affinity binding sites have been identified for two of the major groups of Ca2+-antagonists, with the binding sites for verapamil and its derivatives being distinct from those which can be occupied by the dihydropyridines. The number (Bmax) and affinity (KD) of these binding sites changes under certain pathological conditions—including a reduction in ischaemia and in spontaneous hypertension, an increase in the latter, at present, only demonstrated for the dihydropyridine binding sites. 3 The sensitivity of a particular tissue to these drugs will depend upon a number of factors including the number of binding sites that are present, the contribution made by the Ca2+ entering through the voltage-activated channels to the functioning of the tissue, and properties which are peculiar to a particular type of Ca2+ antagonist, for example, whether, as in the case of verapamil, they exhibit use-dependence. PMID:3019374

  2. A new approach to assess the spasticity in hamstrings muscles using mechanomyography antagonist muscular group.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Eddy; Scheeren, Eduardo M; Nogueira-Neto, Guilherme N; Button, Vera Lúcia da S N; Nohama, Percy

    2012-01-01

    Several pathologies can cause muscle spasticity. Modified Ashworth scale (MAS) can rank spasticity, however its results depend on the physician subjective evaluation. This study aims to show a new approach to spasticity assessment by means of MMG analysis of hamstrings antagonist muscle group (quadriceps muscle). Four subjects participated in the study, divided into two groups regarding MAS (MAS0 and MAS1). MMG sensors were positioned over the muscle belly of rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL) and vastus medialis (VM) muscles. The range of movement was acquired with an electrogoniometer placed laterally to the knee. The system was based on a LabVIEW acquisition program and the MMG sensors were built with triaxial accelerometers. The subjects were submitted to stretching reflexes and the integral of the MMG (MMG(INT)) signal was calculated to analysis. The results showed that the MMG(INT) was greater to MAS1 than to MAS0 [muscle RF (p = 0.004), VL (p = 0.001) and VM (p = 0.007)]. The results showed that MMG was viable to detect a muscular tonus increase in antagonist muscular group (quadriceps femoris) of spinal cord injured volunteers. PMID:23366325

  3. Central actions of a novel and selective dopamine antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    Receptors for the neurotransmitter dopamine traditionally have been divided into two subgroups: the D/sub 1/ class, which is linked to the stimulation of adenylate cyclase-activity, and the D/sub 2/ class which is not. There is much evidence suggesting that it is the D/sub 2/ class which is not. There is much evidence suggesting that it is the D/sub 2/ dopamine receptor that mediates the physiological and behavioral actions of dopamine in the intact animal. However, the benzazepine SCH23390 is a dopamine antagonist which has potent behavioral actions while displaying apparent neurochemical selectivity for the D/sub 1/ class of dopamine receptors. The purpose of this dissertation was to (1) confirm and characterize this selectivity, and (2) test certain hypothesis related to possible modes of action of SCH233390. The inhibition of adenylate cyclase by SCH23390 occurred via an action at the dopamine receptor only. A radiolabeled analog of SCH23390 displayed the receptor binding properties of a specific high-affinity ligand, and regional receptor densities were highly correlated with dopamine levels. The subcellular distribution of (/sup 3/H)-SCH23390 binding did not correspond completely with that of dopamine-stimulated adenylate cyclase. The neurochemical potency of SCH23390 as a D/sub 1/ receptor antagonist was preserved following parental administration. A variety of dopamine agonists and antagonists displayed a high correlation between their abilities to compete for (/sup 3/H)-SCH23390 binding in vitro and to act at an adenylate cyclase-linked receptor. Finally, the relative affinities of dopamine and SCH23390 for both D/sub 1/ receptors and (/sup 3/H)-SCH23390 binding sites were comparable. It is concluded that the behavioral effects of SCH23390 are mediated by actions at D/sub 1/ dopamine receptors only, and that the physiological importance of this class of receptors should be reevaluated.

  4. Integrative role for serotonergic and glutamatergic receptor mechanisms in the action of NMDA antagonists: potential relationships to antipsychotic drug actions on NMDA antagonist responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Breese, George R; Knapp, Darin J; Moy, Sheryl S

    2002-06-01

    NMDA receptor antagonists worsen symptoms in schizophrenia and induce schizophrenic-like symptoms in normal individuals. In animals, NMDA antagonist-induced behavioral responses include increased activity, head weaving, deficits in paired pulse inhibition and social interaction, and increased forced swim immobility. Repeated exposure to NMDA antagonists in animals results in behavioral sensitization-a phenomenon accentuated in rats with dopaminergic neurons lesioned during development. In keeping with an involvement of serotonin and glutamate release in NMDA antagonist action, selected behaviors induced by NMDA antagonists are minimized by 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonists and mGLU2 receptor agonists. These observations provide promising new approaches for treating acute NMDA antagonist-induced psychosis. Further, acute atypical antipsychotic drugs also minimize NMDA antagonist actions to a greater degree than typical antipsychotics. However, because knowledge concerning acute versus chronic effectiveness of various antipsychotic drugs against NMDA antagonist neuropathology is limited, future studies to define more fully the basis of their differences in efficacy after chronic treatment could provide an understanding of their actions on neural mechanisms responsible for the core pathogenesis of schizophrenia. PMID:12204191

  5. Muscular Proprioception Contributes to the Control of Interceptive Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastin, Julien; Calvin, Sarah; Montagne, Gilles

    2006-01-01

    The authors proposed a model of the control of interceptive action over a ground plane (Chardenon, Montagne, Laurent, & Bootsma, 2004). This model is based on the cancellation of the rate of change of the angle between the current position of the target and the direction of displacement (i.e., the bearing angle). While several sources of visual…

  6. Effects of certain muscarinic antagonists on the actions of anticholinesterases on cat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Brimblecombe, R W; French, M C; Webb, S N

    1979-04-01

    1. The effects of some muscarinic antagonists, namely, N-ethyl-2-pyrrolidylmethyl-cyclopentylphenyl glycollate (PMCG), N-methyl-4-piperidyl-phenylcyclohexyl glycollate (PPCG, racemate and R and S enantiomers) and 4'-N-methyl-piperidyl-1-phenyl-cyclopentane carboxylate (G3063) on organophosphate (sarin, soman)- and carbamate (neostigmine)-induced twitch augmentation have been studied in cat soleus muscle. 2. The results of a preliminary study comparing the potency of sarin and soman in inhibiting the acetylcholinesterase activity of muscle in relation to the effect on the maximal twitch response indicated that there is not a simple relationship between degree of enzyme inhibition by these drugs and alteration of muscle function. 3. The muscarinic antagonists studied were capable of preventing or reversing sarin-, soman- or neostigmine-induced twitch augmentation. Doses sufficient to give complete protection from the effects of the anticholinesterase agents had little or no effect on the twitch response of normal muscle. 4. The protective action of these muscarinic antagonists is dose-dependent but independent of known antagonist actions at muscarinic receptors. 5. The effects of some local anaesthetics (lignocaine, prilocaine, cinchocaine, procaine) and other membrane stabilizers (quinine, ketamine, chlorpromazine, triflupromazine) were compared with those of the muscarinic antagonists in an attempt to elucidate the mode of action of these acetylcholine antagonists. The evidence is insufficient to exclude the involvement of a membrane stabilizing action. PMID:435681

  7. Physico-chemical pathways in radioprotective action of calmodulin antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshney, Rajeev; Kale, R. K.

    1996-04-01

    Ghost membranes prepared from erythrocytes of Swiss albino mice were irradiated with gamma rays at a dose rate of 0.9 Gy/s. The fluidity of membrane decreased with radiation dose and in the presence of calmodulin antagonists (CA) like chlorpromazine (CPZ), promethazine (PMZ) and trimeprazine (TMZ) it increased. Radiation induced release of Ca 2+ from membranes. This release was inhibited by CA mainly by CPZ and PMZ. Being Ca 2+ dependent, the changes in the activity of acetylcholine estrase (AchE) following irradiation was also studied. Radiation decreased the activity of AchE in dose dependent manner. Presence of CPZ and PMZ diminished the radiation induced inhibition of AchE but not in the presence of TMZ at the lower concentration tested. It is suggested that apart from scavenging of free radicals, CA perhaps exert their euxoic radioprotective effect through Ca 2+ dependent processes.

  8. Dihydromorphine-peptide hybrids with delta receptor agonistic and mu receptor antagonistic actions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.B.; Medzihradsky, F.; Woods, J.H.

    1986-03-05

    The actions of two morphine derivatives with short peptide side chains were evaluated upon the contraction of the isolated mouse vas deferens and upon displacement of /sup 3/H-etorphine from rat brain membranes. NIH-9833 (N-(6,14-endoetheno-7,8-dihydromorphine-7-alpha-carbonyl)-L-phenylalanyl-L-leucine ethyl ester HCl) was a potent agonist upon the vas deferens. Its EC50 for inhibition of the twitch was 1.2 +/- 0.1 nM. Both naltrexone (10/sup -7/ M) a relatively nonselective opioid antagonist, and ICI-174864 (10/sup -/' M) a highly selective delta receptor antagonist, blocked the actions of NIH-9833 which indicates that this drug is a delta receptor agonist. In contrast, NIH-9835 (N-(6,14-endoetheno-7,8-dihydromorphine-7-alpha-carbonyl)-L-glycyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-leucine ethyl ester HCl), which differs from NIH-9835 by the presence of a single amino acid residue, was devoid of opioid agonistic activity but was a potent antagonist of the inhibitory actions on the vas deferens of morphine and sufentanil. NIH-9833 and NIH-9835 were potent displacers of /sup 3/H-etorphine from rat cerebral membranes with EC50's of 0.58 nM and 1.7 nM, respectively. The observation that addition of a single glycyl group changes a dihydromorphine-peptide analog from a potent delta receptor agonist to an equally potent mu receptor antagonist suggests that the two receptor sites might be structurally quite similar.

  9. The mechanism of action of calcium antagonists relative to their clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Singh, B N

    1986-01-01

    As a class of therapeutic agents calcium antagonists have attracted increasing attention in recent years. Their major indications have been in the treatment of ischaemic myocardial syndromes, certain cardiac arrhythmias, hypertension, obstructive cardiomyopathies, and a number of lesser clinical disorders in which their role is less clearly defined. With the widening spectrum of therapeutic utility and an increasing plethora of newer agents under development, it is of importance to relate the overall pharmacodynamics of individual agents to their clinical effects. Calcium antagonists have a variable specificity for cardiac and peripheral activity. Based on such activity, it is useful to construct a classification of these compounds, new and old, into four categories. Type I agents, typified by verapamil and its congeners (tiapamil and gallopamil) and diltiazem, prolong AV nodal conduction and refractoriness with little effect on ventricular or atrial refractory period. These actions account for their direct antiarrhythmic properties. Type II agents include nifedipine and other dihydropyridines. In vivo, these agents are devoid of electrophysiologic effects in usual doses. They are potent peripheral vasodilators with some selectivity of action for different vascular beds; their overall haemodynamic effects are dominated by this peripheral vasodilatation and reflex augmentation of sympathetic reflexes. Type III agents include flunarizine and cinnarizine (piperazine derivatives), which, in vitro and in vivo, are potent dilators of peripheral vessels, with no corresponding calcium-blocking actions in the heart. Type IV agents are agents with a broader pharmacologic profile (perhexiline, lidoflazine and bepridil); they block calcium fluxes in the heart, in the peripheral vessels, or both. They may inhibit the fast channel in the heart and have other electrophysiologic actions. A clear understanding of the varied pharmacologic properties of the different classes of

  10. Structural insights into Resveratrol’s antagonist and partial agonist actions on estrogen receptor alpha

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Resveratrol, a naturally occurring stilbene, has been categorized as a phytoestrogen due to its ability to compete with natural estrogens for binding to estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and modulate the biological responses exerted by the receptor. Biological effects of resveratrol (RES) on estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) remain highly controversial, since both estrogenic and anti-estrogenic properties were observed. Results Here, we provide insight into the structural basis of the agonist/antagonist effects of RES on ERα ligand binding domain (LBD). Using atomistic simulation, we found that RES bound ERα monomer in antagonist conformation, where Helix 12 moves away from the ligand pocket and orients into the co-activator binding groove of LBD, is more stable than RES bound ERα in agonist conformation, where Helix 12 lays over the ligand binding pocket. Upon dimerization, the agonistic conformation of RES-ERα dimer becomes more stable compared to the corresponding monomer but still remains less stable compared to the corresponding dimer in antagonist conformation. Interestingly, while the binding pocket and the binding contacts of RES to ERα are similar to those of pure agonist diethylstilbestrol (DES), the binding energy is much less and the hydrogen bonding contacts also differ providing clues for the partial agonistic character of RES on ERα. Conclusions Our Molecular Dynamics simulation of RES-ERα structures with agonist and antagonist orientations of Helix 12 suggests RES action is more similar to Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator (SERM) opening up the importance of cellular environment and active roles of co-regulator proteins in a given system. Our study reveals that potential co-activators must compete with the Helix 12 and displace it away from the activator binding groove to enhance the agonistic activity. PMID:24160181

  11. Evaluation of growth hormone (GH) action in mice: discovery of GH receptor antagonists and clinical indications.

    PubMed

    Kopchick, John J; List, Edward O; Kelder, Bruce; Gosney, Elahu S; Berryman, Darlene E

    2014-04-01

    The discovery of a growth hormone receptor antagonist (GHA) was initially established via expression of mutated GH genes in transgenic mice. Following this discovery, development of the compound resulted in a drug termed pegvisomant, which has been approved for use in patients with acromegaly. Pegvisomant treatment in a dose dependent manner results in normalization of IGF-1 levels in most patients. Thus, it is a very efficacious and safe drug. Since the GH/IGF-1 axis has been implicated in the progression of several types of cancers, many have suggested the use of pegvisomant as an anti-cancer therapeutic. In this manuscript, we will review the use of mouse strains that possess elevated or depressed levels of GH action for unraveling many of GH actions. Additionally, we will describe experiments in which the GHA was discovered, review results of pegvisomant's preclinical and clinical trials, and provide data suggesting pegvisomant's therapeutic value in selected types of cancer. PMID:24035867

  12. Action of adenosine receptor antagonists on the cardiovascular response to defence area stimulation in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    St Lambert, J H; Dawid-Milner, M S; Silva-Carvalho, L; Spyer, K M

    1994-01-01

    1. The action of adenosine in the mediation of the cardiovascular changes associated with the defence reaction has been investigated in the rat using two A1 receptor antagonists. 2. Cumulative doses of 1,3 dipropyl-cyclopentylxanthine (DPCPX) (0.3-3 mg kg-1) and ethanol (0.03-0.25 ml) and bolus doses of DPCPX (3 mg kg-1) and 8-sulphophenyltheophylline (8-SPT) (20 mg kg-1) were given into alpha-chloralose, paralysed and artificially ventilated rats. Recordings were made of arterial blood pressure and heart rate. 3. Ethanol, the vehicle for DPCPX, failed to modify the magnitude of the defence response; however, cumulative doses of DPCPX produced a dose-dependent decrease in the HDA (hypothalamic defence area)-evoked increase in arterial blood pressure, accompanied by a similar fall in the magnitude of the evoked heart rate response. 4. The evoked rise in arterial blood pressure was reduced significantly by intravenous injection of DPCPX (3 mg kg-1) but not 8-SPT (20 mg kg-1), a purely peripherally acting adenosine antagonist. 5. These results suggest that adenosine acting at A1 receptors located in the central nervous system, is involved in the HDA-evoked pressor response. Whilst the site of action of the A1 receptors is not known, possible locations are discussed. PMID:7812606

  13. Actions of picrodendrin antagonists on dieldrin-sensitive and -resistant Drosophila GABA receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Hosie, A. M.; Ozoe, Y.; Koike, K.; Ohmoto, T.; Nikaido, T.; Sattelle, D. B.

    1996-01-01

    1. A series of terpenoid compounds, recently isolated from Picrodendron baccatum, share a picrotoxane skeleton with picrotoxinin, an antagonist of ionotropic GABA receptors. Referred to as picrodendrins, they inhibit the binding of [35S]-tert-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS) to rat GABAA receptors. Hitherto, their effects on GABA receptors have not been investigated electrophysiologically. Under two-electrode voltage-clamp, the actions of picrodendrins and related terpenoids have been assayed on homooligomeric GABA receptors formed by the expression of a Drosophila GABA receptor subunit (RDLac) in Xenopus oocytes. 2. All the terpenoids tested, dose-dependently antagonized currents induced by 30 microM (EC50) GABA. 3. Tutin and its analogues (dihydrotutin and isohyenanchin) differ in the structure of their axial C4 substituents. Of these compounds, tutin, which bears an isopropenyl group at this carbon atom, was the most potent antagonist of RDLac homo-oligomers, whereas isohyenanchin, which bears a hydroxyisopropyl group, was the least potent antagonist tested. 4. Picrodendrins differ mainly in the structure of their C9 substituents. The IC50s of picrodendrins ranged from 17 +/- 1.3 nM (picrodendrin-Q) to 1006 +/- 1.3 nM (picrodendrin-O). As such, the most potent picrodendrins (Q, A and B) were approximately equipotent with picrotoxinin as antagonists of RDLac homo-oligomers. 5. Certain picrodendrin compounds effected a use-dependent blockade of RDLac homo-oligomers. Such a biphasic block was not observed with tutin analogues. 6. Picrotoxin-resistant RDLacA3025 homo-oligomers, which have a single amino acid substitution (A302S) in the 2nd transmembrane region, were markedly less sensitive to picrodendrin-O than the wild-type, dieldrin-sensitive, homo-oligomers. 7. The relative potency of tutin analogues demonstrates that the structure-activity relationship of the C4 substituent of picrotoxane-based compounds is conserved in vertebrates and insects. However, the

  14. Neuroprotective and memory-related actions of novel alpha-7 nicotinic agents with different mixed agonist/antagonist properties.

    PubMed

    Meyer, E M; Tay, E T; Zoltewicz, J A; Meyers, C; King, M A; Papke, R L; De Fiebre, C M

    1998-03-01

    The goals of this study were to develop compounds that were selective and highly efficacious agonists at alpha-7 receptors, while varying in antagonist activity; and to test the hypothesis that these compounds had memory-related and neuroprotective actions associated with both agonist and antagonist alpha-7 receptor activities. Three compounds were identified; E,E-3-(cinnamylidene)anabaseine (3-CA), E,E-3-(2-methoxycinnamylidene) anabaseine (2-MeOCA) and E,E-3-(4-methoxycinnamylidene) anabaseine (4-MeOCA) each displaced [125I]alpha-bungarotoxin binding from rat brain membranes and activated rat alpha-7 receptors in a Xenopus oocyte expression system fully efficaciously. The potency series for binding and receptor activation was 2-MeOCA > 4-MeOCA = 3-CA and 2-MeOCA = 3-CA > 4-MeOCA, respectively. No compound significantly activated oocyte-expressed alpha-4beta-2 receptors. Although each cinnamylidene-anabaseine caused a long-term inhibition of alpha-7 receptors, as measured by ACh-application 5 min later, this inhibition ranged considerably, from less than 20% (3-CA) to 90% (2-MeOCA) at an identical concentration (10 microM). These compounds improved passive avoidance behavior in nucleus basalis lesioned rats, with 2-MeOCA most potent in this respect. In contrast, only 3-CA was neuroprotective against neurite loss during nerve growth factor deprivation in differentiated rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Choline, an efficacious alpha-7 agonist without antagonist activity, was also protective in this model. These results suggest that the neurite-protective action of alpha-7 receptor agonists may be more sensitive to potential long-term antagonist properties than acute behavioral actions are. PMID:9495863

  15. Bradykinin as a pain mediator: receptors are localized to sensory neurons, and antagonists have analgesic actions

    SciTech Connect

    Steranka, L.R.; Manning, D.C.; DeHaas, C.J.; Ferkany, J.W.; Borosky, S.A.; Connor, J.R.; Vavrek, R.J.; Stewart, J.M.; Snyder, S.H.

    1988-05-01

    Autoradiographic studies localize (/sup 3/H)bradykinin receptor binding sites to the substantia gelatinosa, dorsal root, and a subset of small cells in both the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia of the guinea pig. (/sup 3/H)Bradykinin labeling is also observed over myocardinal/coronary visceral afferent fibers. The localization of (/sup 3/H)bradykinin receptors to nociceptive pathways supports a role for bradykinin in pain mediation. Several bradkykinin antagonists block bradykinin-induced acute vascular pain in the rat. The bradykinin antagonists also relieve bradykinin- and urate-induced hyperalgesia in the rat paw. These results indicate that bradykinin is a physiologic mediator of pain and that bradykinin antagonists have analgesic activity in both acute and chronic pain models.

  16. Sepsis Strengthens Antagonistic Actions of Neostigmine on Rocuronium in a Rat Model of Cecal Ligation and Puncture

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jin; Jin, Tian; Wang, Hong; Li, Shi-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Background: The antagonistic actions of anticholinesterase drugs on non-depolarizing muscle relaxants are theoretically related to the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). However, till date the changes of AChE activity in the NMJ during sepsis have not been directly investigated. We aimed to investigate the effects of sepsis on the antagonistic actions of neostigmine on rocuronium (Roc) and the underlying changes of AChE activity in the NMJ in a rat model of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Methods: A total of 28 male adult Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to undergo a sham surgery (the sham group, n = 12) or CLP (the septic group, n = 16). After 24 h, the time-response curves of the antagonistic actions of 0.1 or 0.5 μmol/L of neostigmine on Roc (10 μmol/L)-depressed diaphragm twitch tension were measured. Meanwhile, the activity of AChE in the NMJ was detected using a modified Karnovsky and Roots method. The mRNA levels of the primary transcript and the type T transcript of AChE (AChET) in the diaphragm were determined by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results: Four of 16 rats in the septic group died within 24 h. The time-response curves of both two concentrations of neostigmine in the septic group showed significant upward shifts from those in the sham group (P < 0.001 for 0.1 μmol/L; P = 0.009 for 0.5 μmol/L). Meanwhile, the average optical density of AChE in the NMJ in the septic group was significantly lower than that in the sham group (0.517 ± 0.045 vs. 1.047 ± 0.087, P < 0.001). The AChE and AChET mRNA expression levels in the septic group were significantly lower than those in the sham group (P = 0.002 for AChE; P = 0.001 for AChET). Conclusions: Sepsis strengthened the antagonistic actions of neostigmine on Roc-depressed twitch tension of the diaphragm by inhibiting the activity of AChE in the NMJ. The reduced content of AChE might be one of the possible causes of the

  17. Quinazoline-derived alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists induce prostate cancer cell apoptosis via an alpha1-adrenoceptor-independent action.

    PubMed

    Benning, Cynthia M; Kyprianou, Natasha

    2002-01-15

    Recent evidence suggests that the quinazoline-based alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists, doxazosin and terazosin, exhibit a potent apoptotic effect against prostate tumor epithelial cells, whereas tamsulosin, a sulfonamide-based alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist, was ineffective in inducing a similar apoptotic effect against prostate cells (Cancer Res., 60: 4550-4555, 2000). In this study, to identify the precise molecular mechanism underlying this apoptosis induction, we examined whether doxazosin and terazosin (both piperazinyl quinazolines) affect prostate growth via an alpha1-adrenoceptor-independent action. Transfection-mediated overexpression of alpha1-adrenoceptor in human prostate cancer cells, DU-145 (that lack alpha1-adrenoceptor), did not alter the ability of prostate cancer cells to undergo apoptosis in response to quinazolines. Significantly enough, there was no modification of the apoptotic threshold of the androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells, LNCaP, to either quinazoline-based alpha1-agonist by androgens. Furthermore, human normal prostate epithelial cells exhibited a very low sensitivity to the apoptotic effects of doxazosin compared with that observed for the malignant prostate cells. These findings provide the first evidence that the apoptotic activity of the quinazoline-based alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists (doxazosin and terazosin) against prostate cancer cells is independent of: (a) their capacity to antagonize alpha1-adrenoceptors; and (b) the hormone sensitivity status of the cells. This may have potential therapeutic significance in the use of quinazoline-based alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists (already in clinical use for the treatment of hypertension and benign prostate hyperplasia) for the treatment of androgen-independent human prostate cancer. PMID:11809715

  18. Antagonistic action of Streptococcus salivarius and Streptococcus faecalis to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Darling, C L; Hart, G D

    1976-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius and Streptococcus faecalis were found to inhibit the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis on Löwenstein-Jensen and Middlebrook 7H11 agars, but not on the latter medium when antibacterial drugs were added. S. faecalis was found to be more inhibitory than S. salivarius to 15 strains of M. tuberculosis. S. salivarius produced little or no inhibition of growth of Runyon group III organisms but was very antagonistic to Runyon group I mycobacteria. Images PMID:824304

  19. Convulsant and anticonvulsant actions of agonists and antagonists of group III mGluRs.

    PubMed

    Ghauri, M; Chapman, A G; Meldrum, B S

    1996-06-17

    Group III metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR4, 6, 7, 8) are negatively coupled to adenylate cyclase and, when activated presynaptically, decrease the release of glutamate and GABA. We have used intracerebroventricular injections of agonists and antagonists believed to act selectively on these receptors to study the pro- or anti-convulsant effects of mGluR III activation in nonepileptic (Swiss-Webster) and epileptic (DBA/2) mice. In both mouse strains the prototypic agonists L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutanoate (LAP4) and L-serine-O-phosphate are proconvulsant. The supposed antagonists (S)-2-methyl-2-amino-4-phosphonobutanoate (MAP4) and (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (MPPG), have a predominantly proconvulsant effect. (S)-alpha-methyl-3-carboxyphenylalanine, which is a potent and selective antagonist for LAP4 in the cortex, is anticonvulsant in DBA/2 mice and decreases the convulsant effect of N-methyl-D-aspartate, 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine, LAP4 and MPPG in Swiss-Webster mice. These data suggest that reduced inhibitory transmission may be more significant than reduced synaptic release of glutamate following group III mGluR activation. PMID:8856700

  20. Enhanced attention and impulsive action following NMDA receptor GluN2B-selective antagonist pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Guy A; Silenieks, Leo B; MacMillan, Cam; Sevo, Julia; Zeeb, Fiona D; Thevarkunnel, Sandy

    2016-09-15

    NMDA GluN2B (NR2B) subtype selective antagonists are currently in clinical development for a variety of indications, including major depression. We previously reported the selective NMDA GluN2B antagonists Ro 63-1908 and traxoprodil, increase premature responding in a 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT) suggesting an effect on impulsive action. The present studies extend these investigations to a Go-NoGo and delay discounting task, and the 5-CSRTT under test conditions of both regular (5s) and short (2-5s) multiple ITI (Intertrial interval). Dizocilpine was included for comparison. Both Ro 63-1908 (0.1-1mg/kg SC) and traxoprodil (0.3-3mg/kg SC) increased premature and perseverative responses in both 5-CSRT tasks and improved attention when tested under a short ITI test condition. Ro 63-1908 but not traxoprodil increased motor impulsivity (false alarms) in a Go-NoGo task. Dizocilpine (0.01-0.06mg/kg SC) affected both measures of motor impulsivity and marginally improved attention. In a delay discounting test of impulsive choice, both dizocilpine and Ro 63-1908 decreased impulsive choice (increased choice for the larger, delayed reward), while traxoprodil showed a similar trend. Motor stimulant effects were evident following Ro 63-1908, but not traxoprodil treatment - although no signs of motor stereotypy characteristic of dizocilpine (>0.1mg/kg) were noted. The findings of both NMDA GluN2B antagonists affecting measures of impulsive action and compulsive behavior may underpin emerging evidence to suggest glutamate signaling through the NMDA GluN2B receptor plays an important role in behavioural flexibility. The profiles between Ro 63-1908 and traxoprodil were not identical, perhaps suggesting differences between members of this drug class. PMID:27180168

  1. Efficacy and putative mode of action of native and commercial antagonistic yeasts against postharvest pathogens of pear.

    PubMed

    Lutz, M Cecilia; Lopes, Christian A; Rodriguez, M Eugenia; Sosa, M Cristina; Sangorrín, Marcela P

    2013-06-17

    Putative mechanisms of action associated with the biocontrol capacity of four yeast strains (Cryptoccocus albidus NPCC 1248, Pichia membranifaciens NPCC 1250, Cryptoccocus victoriae NPCC 1263 and NPCC 1259) against Penicillium expansum and Botrytis cinerea were studied by means of in vitro and in situ assays. C. albidus(YP), a commercial yeast was also evaluated for comparative purposes. The yeast strains exhibited a variety of different mechanisms including: wound colonization, germination inhibition, biofilm formation, secretion of killer toxins, competition for nutrient and secretion of hydrolytic enzymes (protease, chitinase and glucanase). The relationship between strains (and their associated antagonist mechanisms) and in situ antagonist activity was also evaluated. Results indicate that mechanisms such as production of hydrolytic enzymes, the ability for colonization of wounds, production of killer toxin and inhibition of germination are the most important for biocontrol activity. Our study indicate that multiple modes of action may explain why P. membranifaciens NPCC 1250 and C. victoriae NPCC 1263 provided excellent control of postharvest pears disease. PMID:23680800

  2. Calcium antagonists.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Ehud; Messerli, Franz H

    2004-01-01

    Calcium antagonists were introduced for the treatment of hypertension in the 1980s. Their use was subsequently expanded to additional disorders, such as angina pectoris, paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardias, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, Raynaud phenomenon, pulmonary hypertension, diffuse esophageal spasms, and migraine. Calcium antagonists as a group are heterogeneous and include 3 main classes--phenylalkylamines, benzothiazepines, and dihydropyridines--that differ in their molecular structure, sites and modes of action, and effects on various other cardiovascular functions. Calcium antagonists lower blood pressure mainly through vasodilation and reduction of peripheral resistance. They maintain blood flow to vital organs, and are safe in patients with renal impairment. Unlike diuretics and beta-blockers, calcium antagonists do not impair glucose metabolism or lipid profile and may even attenuate the development of arteriosclerotic lesions. In long-term follow-up, patients treated with calcium antagonists had development of less overt diabetes mellitus than those who were treated with diuretics and beta-blockers. Moreover, calcium antagonists are able to reduce left ventricular mass and are effective in improving anginal pain. Recent prospective randomized studies attested to the beneficial effects of calcium antagonists in hypertensive patients. In comparison with placebo, calcium antagonist-based therapy reduced major cardiovascular events and cardiovascular death significantly in elderly hypertensive patients and in diabetic patients. In several comparative studies in hypertensive patients, treatment with calcium antagonists was equally effective as treatment with diuretics, beta-blockers, or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. From these studies, it seems that a calcium antagonist-based regimen is superior to other regimens in preventing stroke, equivalent in preventing ischemic heart disease, and inferior in preventing congestive heart failure

  3. Muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001190.htm Muscular dystrophy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Muscular dystrophy is a group of inherited disorders that cause ...

  4. Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Muscular dystrophy (MD) is a group of more than 30 inherited diseases. They all cause muscle weakness and ... ability to walk. There is no cure for muscular dystrophy. Treatments can help with the symptoms and prevent ...

  5. LY303870, a centrally active neurokinin-1 antagonist with a long duration of action.

    PubMed

    Iyengar, S; Hipskind, P A; Gehlert, D R; Schober, D; Lobb, K L; Nixon, J A; Helton, D R; Kallman, M J; Boucher, S; Couture, R; Li, D L; Simmons, R M

    1997-02-01

    The selective neurokinin (NK)-1 antagonist LY303870 has high affinity and specificity for human and guinea pig brain NK-1 receptors labeled with 125I-substance P. It has approximately 15- to 30-fold lower affinity for rat and mouse brain NK-1 receptors, consistent with previously reported species differences in the affinities of nonpeptide antagonists for NK-1 receptors. In vivo, LY303870 blocked the characteristic, caudally directed, biting and scratching response elicited by intrathecal administration of the selective NK-1 agonist Ac-[Arg6,Sar9,Met(O2)11]substance P6-11 in conscious mice. The potentiation of the tail-flick response elicited by intrathecal administration of the NK-1 agonist [Sar9,Met(O2)11]substance P in rats was also selectively blocked by LY303870. When tested in a model of persistent nociceptive activation induced by tissue injury (the formalin test), LY303870 blocked licking behavior in the late phase of the formalin test, in a dose-dependent manner. After oral administration of 10 mg/kg, the blockade of the late-phase licking behavior was evident for at least 24 hr. Ex vivo binding studies in guinea pigs showed that orally administered LY303870 potently inhibited binding to central and peripheral NK-1 receptors labeled with 125I-substance P. This inhibition was long-lasting, consistent with other in vivo activities. LY306155, the opposite enantiomer of LY303870, was less active in all of the functional assays. In rodents, LY303870 did not exhibit any neurological, motor, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal or autonomic side effects at doses of < or = 50 mg/kg p.o. Thus, LY303870 is a potent, centrally active, NK-1 antagonist in vivo, with long-lasting oral activity. PMID:9023291

  6. Action of pinaverium bromide, a calcium-antagonist, on gastrointestinal motility disorders.

    PubMed

    Christen, M O

    1990-01-01

    1. The evidence reviewed here indicates that pinaverium bromide (Dicetel) relaxes gastrointestinal (GI) structures primarily by inhibiting Ca2+ influx through potential-dependent channels of surface membranes of smooth muscle cells. 2. The in vivo selectivity of pinaverium bromide for the GI tract appears to be due mainly to its pharmacokinetic properties. Because of its low absorption (typical for quaternary ammonium compounds) and marked hepatobiliary excretion, most of the orally-administered dose of pinaverium bromide remains in the GI tract. 3. Orally-administered pinaverium bromide does not elicit adverse cardiovascular side-effects at doses that effectively relieve GI spasm, pain, transit disturbances and other symptoms related to motility disorders. 4. Pinaverium bromide is the only Ca2(+)-antagonist with known therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome and certain other functional intestinal disorders. PMID:2177709

  7. Synergistic and Antagonistic Action of Phytochrome (Phy) A and PhyB during Seedling De-Etiolation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Su, Liang; Hou, Pei; Song, Meifang; Zheng, Xu; Guo, Lin; Xiao, Yang; Yan, Lei; Li, Wanchen; Yang, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that Arabidopsis phytochrome (phy) A and phyB are crucial photoreceptors that display synergistic and antagonistic action during seedling de-etiolation in multiple light signaling pathways. However, the functional relationship between phyA and phyB is not fully understood under different kinds of light and in response to different intensities of such light. In this work, we compared hypocotyl elongation of the phyA-211 phyB-9 double mutant with the wild type, the phyA-211 and phyB-9 single mutants under different intensities of far-red (FR), red (R), blue (B) and white (W) light. We confirmed that phyA and phyB synergistically promote seedling de-etiolation in B-, B plus R-, W- and high R-light conditions. The correlation of endogenous ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5) protein levels with the trend of hypocotyl elongation of all lines indicate that both phyA and phyB promote seedling photomorphogenesis in a synergistic manner in high-irradiance white light. Gene expression analyses of RBCS members and HY5 suggest that phyB and phyA act antagonistically on seedling development under FR light. PMID:26030677

  8. Powerful anticonvulsant action of IL-1 receptor antagonist on intracerebral injection and astrocytic overexpression in mice

    PubMed Central

    Vezzani, A.; Moneta, D.; Conti, M.; Richichi, C.; Ravizza, T.; De Luigi, A.; De Simoni, M. G.; Sperk, G.; Andell-Jonsson, S.; Lundkvist, J.; Iverfeldt, K.; Bartfai, T.

    2000-01-01

    IL-1β and its endogenous receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) are rapidly induced by seizures in the rodent hippocampus. Exogenously applied IL-1β prolongs seizures in an IL-1R type I-mediated manner. This effect depends on N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor activation. We report here that intrahippocampal application of recombinant IL-1Ra or its selective endogenous overexpression in astrocytes under the control of glial acidic fibrillary protein promoter potently inhibits motor and electroencephalographic seizures induced by bicuculline methiodide in mice. Accordingly, transgenic mice show a reduced seizure-related c-fos mRNA expression in various forebrain areas compared with their wild-type littermates. Recombinant IL-1Ra was ineffective in mice deficient in IL-1R type I, having per se a delayed onset to generalized convulsions. These results demonstrate that IL-1Ra mediates potent anticonvulsant effects acting on IL-1R type I and suggest that the balance between brain IL-1β and IL-1Ra represents a crucial mechanism to control seizure generalization. PMID:11016948

  9. Antagonistic Action of Bacillus subtilis Strain SG6 on Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yueju; Selvaraj, Jonathan Nimal; Xing, Fuguo; Zhou, Lu; Wang, Yan; Song, Huimin; Tan, Xinxin; Sun, Lichao; Sangare, Lancine; Folly, Yawa Minnie Elodie; Liu, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium graminearum causes Fusarium head blight (FHB), a devastating disease that leads to extensive yield and quality loss of wheat and barley. Bacteria isolated from wheat kernels and plant anthers were screened for antagonistic activity against F. graminearum. Based on its in vitro effectiveness, strain SG6 was selected for characterization and identified as Bacillus subtilis. B. subtilis SG6 exhibited a high antifungal effect on the mycelium growth, sporulation and DON production of F. graminearum with the inhibition rate of 87.9%, 95.6% and 100%, respectively. In order to gain insight into biological control effect in situ, we applied B. subtilis SG6 at anthesis through the soft dough stage of kernel development in field test. It was revealed that B. subtilis SG6 significantly reduced disease incidence (DI), FHB index and DON (P≤0.05). Further, ultrastructural examination shows that B. subtilis SG6 strain induced stripping of F. graminearum hyphal surface by destroying the cellular structure. When hypha cell wall was damaged, the organelles and cytoplasm inside cell would exude, leading to cell death. The antifungal activity of SG6 could be associated with the coproduction of chitinase, fengycins and surfactins. PMID:24651513

  10. A model for antagonistic pleiotropic gene action for mortality and advanced age.

    PubMed

    Toupance, B; Godelle, B; Gouyon, P H; Schächter, F

    1998-06-01

    Association or linkage studies involving control and long-lived populations provide information on genes that influence longevity. However, the relationship between allele-specific differences in survival and the genetic structure of aging cohorts remains unclear. We model a heterogeneous cohort comprising several genotypes differing in age-specific mortality. In its most general form, without any specific assumption regarding the shape of mortality curves, the model permits derivation of a fundamental property underlying abrupt age-related changes in the composition of a cohort. The model is applied to sex-specific survival curves taken from period life tables, and Gompertz-Makeham mortality coefficients are calculated for the French population. Then, adjustments are performed under Gompertz-Makeham mortality functions for three genotypes composing a heterogeneous cohort, under the constraint of fitting the resultant mortality to the real French population mortality obtained from life tables. Multimodal curves and divergence after the 8th decade appear as recurrent features of the frequency trajectories. Finally, a fit to data previously obtained at the angiotensin-converting-enzyme locus is realized, explaining what had seemed to be paradoxical results-namely, that the frequency of a genotype known as a cardiovascular risk factor was increased in centenarians. Our results help explain the well-documented departure from Gompertz-Makeham mortality kinetics at older ages. The implications of our model are discussed in the context of known genetic effects on human longevity and age-related pathologies. Since antagonistic pleiotropy between early and late survival emerges as a general rule, extrapolating the effects measured for a gene in a particular age class to other ages could be misleading. PMID:9585593

  11. Mechanism of action of calcium antagonists on myocardial and smooth muscle membranes.

    PubMed

    Zakhari, S

    1986-01-01

    Although calcium channel blockers vary considerably in their chemical structure and pharmacologic profile, the widely accepted mechanism of their action is an inhibition of Ca2+ influx - via voltage-activated slow channels - into smooth and cardiac muscle. Other ways of Ca2+ entry, such as passive diffusion and Na+/Ca2+ and K+/Ca2+ exchange, are not affected by these compounds. However, various blockers exert a slightly different inhibitory action on the slow channels, which indicates that various binding sites in the cell membranes, or even in intracellular sites, may be involved. Potential sites of action of calcium channel blockers in the myocardium include: the slow calcium channels; Na+/Ca2+ channels; mitochondria; sarcoplasmic reticulum; myofilaments; and calcium efflux. However, experimental evidence has been given for only the first site, and the third and fourth sites are still controversial. In the vascular smooth muscles, calcium channel blockers could possibly block the potential-dependent or receptor-operated channels, or bind to calmodulin. Again, only the first site of action has been experimentally proven. An important feature of calcium channel blockers is their different affinities for various tissues. For instance, cinnarizine and its difluorinated derivative flunarizine are 1000 times more effective in blocking slow channels in vascular smooth muscles than those in the myocardium. Even within the same system, such as the cardiovascular system, differences in tissue specificity are encountered. Thus, while nimodipine acts preferentially on cerebral vessels, diltiazem has more affinity for the coronary vasculature. Tissue specificity is exhibited even for different myocardial structures; thus, while verapamil affects the nodal and conductive tissues in the myocardium (hence its use as an antiarrhythmic agent), nifedipine is almost devoid of such activity. Organ selectivity of calcium channel blockers is one of the attractive features of this group

  12. Selective antagonistic effects of exposure to bright light on the hypothermic action of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Overstreet, D H; Dilsaver, S C; Rezvani, A H; Janowsky, D S

    1990-01-01

    Flinders Sensitive and Resistant Lines of rats, which are differentially sensitive to the hypothermic effects of both muscarinic agonists and ethanol, were exposed to full spectrum artificial bright light for eight days, because exposure to bright light has been shown to blunt hypothermic responses to muscarinic agonists. There was a selective blunting of the hypothermic effects of ethanol, but no significant change in the intoxicating effects of ethanol, as measured by evaluation of the righting reflex. The selective effect of exposure to bright light on the hypothermic actions of ethanol suggests that bright light may be modifying the function of only a limited number of brain regions, including the hypothalamus. PMID:2085349

  13. Selective actions of calcium antagonistic drugs on the haemodynamics and regional organ blood flow in rats.

    PubMed

    McCann, E; Lundberg, C; Gerdin, B; Arfors, K E

    1986-01-01

    Six substances, all of which influence calcium utilization by smooth muscle, namely nimodipine (50 micrograms/kg), flunarizine (1 mg/kg), verapamil (0.2 mg/kg), lidoflazine (1 mg/kg), magnesium (600 mumol Mg++/kg), and manganese (180 mumol Mn++/kg), were given intravenously to rats and their effects on regional blood flows and on cardiac output were determined by the radioactive microsphere technique. All compounds caused a temporary fall in mean arterial blood pressure. Cardiac output was decreased by manganese, and minute work by nimodipine, manganese and lidoflazine. Nimodipine increased blood flow in the liver, skeletal muscle and heart and decreased that in the stomach, ileum, colon, kidney, spleen and skin; manganese increased flow in the duodenum, jejunum, liver and myocardium and decreased that in the stomach, ileum, colon, spleen and skin; flunarizine increased flow in the liver, heart and brain; and magnesium increased flow in the liver, spleen and brain. Lidoflazine and verapamil, although leading to haemodynamic alterations, had no selective effect on organ blood flow. Selective actions by calcium effector drugs can provide information on mechanisms of calcium flux in various types of vascular smooth muscle, and show that it is possible to tailor combinations of anti-calcium agents with optimal effects on a given organ. PMID:3781760

  14. Non-specific actions of the non-peptide tachykinin receptor antagonists, CP-96,345, RP 67580 and SR 48968, on neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z Y; Tung, S R; Strichartz, G R; Håkanson, R

    1994-01-01

    1. Three non-peptide tachykinin receptor antagonists, CP-96,345, RP 67580 and SR 48968, were found to inhibit the electrically-evoked, tachykinin-mediated contractile responses of the rabbit iris sphincter in a concentration-dependent fashion; the pIC50 values were 5.6 +/- 0.01, 5.4 +/- 0.07 and 4.8 +/- 0.03, respectively. 2. These antagonists also inhibited the electrically-evoked, parasympathetic response of the rabbit iris sphincter and the sympathetic response of the guinea-pig vas deferens in a concentration-dependent manner; the pIC50 values were 0.3-1.2 log units lower than those recorded for the tachykinin-mediated responses. 3. Two local anaesthetics, bupivacaine and oxybuprocaine, were also found to inhibit the tachykinin-mediated, cholinergic and sympathetic contractile responses in these tissues in a concentration-dependent manner; the concentration ranges for producing the inhibition were similar to those of the non-peptide tachykinin receptor antagonists. 4. On the sciatic nerves of frogs, the tachykinin receptor antagonists inhibited action potentials in a concentration-dependent manner; the potency of the three drugs was similar to that of bupivacaine. 5. Our results suggest that, in addition to blocking tachykinin receptors, the non-peptide tachykinin receptor antagonists, CP-96,345, RP 67580 and SR 48968, may exert non-specific inhibitory effects on neurotransmission. PMID:8012694

  15. Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Dev. Med. Child Neurol. Mar 1995;37(3):260-269. 4. Centers for ... DM1) . The International Myotonic Dystrophy Consortium (IDMC). Neurology. Mar 28 2000;54(6):1218-1221. 5. Harper ...

  16. Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... be affected. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) affects boys and girls equally, weakening muscles in the shoulders and upper ... weakness and poor muscle tone. Occurring in both girls and boys, it can have different symptoms. It varies in ...

  17. [Muscular mechanisms of lowering of physical working capacity in chronic heart failure and action of beta-adrenoblockers].

    PubMed

    Syrkin, A L; Poltavskaia, M G; Molchanova, I V; Churganova, L Iu; Chaplygin, A V

    2005-01-01

    Parameters of physical working capacity (symptom limited treadmill test with gas analysis, 6 min walk test and usual everyday activity), activity of muscular metaboreflex, efficacy of pulmonary ventilation, and heart rate variability were studied in 50 patients with postinfarction cardiosclerosis with chronic class I-III heart failure and 30 patients without heart failure. Patients with heart failure of all functional classes had lowered parameters of working capacity while metaboloreflex hyperactivation and diminished effectiveness of ventilation were found only in patients with clinical signs of chronic heart failure but not in those with symptomless left ventricular dysfunction. Therapy with metoprolol was associated with lowering of activity of metaboloreflex, augmented effectiveness of ventilation and heart rate variability, improvement of results of 6 min test and everyday activity without considerable changes of peak oxygen consumption. PMID:16234766

  18. Comparison of the β-Adrenergic Receptor Antagonists Landiolol and Esmolol: Receptor Selectivity, Partial Agonism, and Pharmacochaperoning Actions.

    PubMed

    Nasrollahi-Shirazi, Shahrooz; Sucic, Sonja; Yang, Qiong; Freissmuth, Michael; Nanoff, Christian

    2016-10-01

    Blockage of β1-adrenergic receptors is one of the most effective treatments in cardiovascular medicine. Esmolol was introduced some three decades ago as a short-acting β1-selective antagonist. Landiolol is a more recent addition. Here we compared the two compounds for their selectivity for β1-adrenergic receptors over β2-adrenergic receptors, partial agonistic activity, signaling bias, and pharmacochaperoning action by using human embryonic kidney (HEK)293 cell lines, which heterologously express each human receptor subtype. The affinity of landiolol for β1-adrenergic receptors and β2-adrenergic receptors was higher and lower than that of esmolol, respectively, resulting in an improved selectivity (216-fold versus 30-fold). The principal metabolite of landiolol (M1) was also β1-selective, but its affinity was very low. Both landiolol and esmolol caused a very modest rise in cAMP levels but a robust increase in the phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinases 1 and 2, indicating that the two drugs exerted partial agonist activity with a signaling bias. If cells were incubated for ≥24 hours in the presence of ≥1 μM esmolol, the levels of β1-adrenergic-but not of β2-adrenergic-receptors increased. This effect was contingent on export of the β1-receptor from endoplasmic reticulum and was not seen in the presence of landiolol. On the basis of these observations, we conclude that landiolol offers the advantage of: 1) improved selectivity and 2) the absence of pharmacochaperoning activity, which sensitizes cells to rebound effects upon drug discontinuation. PMID:27451411

  19. The mechanism of action of calcium antagonists on arrhythmias in early myocardial ischaemia: studies with nifedipine and DHM9.

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, M. J.; Walker, M. J.

    1988-01-01

    1. Nifedipine and DHM9 (carboxymethyl methyl 1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-4-(3-nitrophenyl)-3,5-pyridinedicarboxylate) were studied for their effects on arrhythmias resulting from regional myocardial ischaemia in conscious rats, and for their effects on left ventricular developed pressure in vitro. 2. Nifedipine possessed antiarrhythmic activity at a high dose of 10 mg kg-1 i.v., but not at 0.5 or 2 mg kg-1. Ventricular fibrillation (VF), tachycardia (VT), and ventricular premature beats (VPB) were all attenuated to a similar degree; nifedipine did not have a selectivity of action for high frequency arrhythmias. 3. Before coronary occlusion, the three doses of nifedipine reduced arterial blood pressure by a similar magnitude, indicating a similar (maximal) degree of systemic vasodilatation. The reductions in blood pressure were accompanied by reflex tachycardia. Heart rate and blood pressure did not correlate with the incidence or severity of arrhythmias. 4. DHM9 had no influence on arrhythmias, haemodynamic variables or the ECG, even at 20 mg kg-1 i.v. 5. Nifedipine concentration-dependently reduced contractility in perfused paced (5 Hz) rat ventricles in vitro. Raising the concentration of K+ in the perfusion fluid from 3 to 10 mequiv.l-1 increased the potency (-log10 EC50) of nifedipine up to four fold, and caused a significant depression in excitability. 6. DHM9 at up to 3 x 10(-5) M had no significant influence on ventricular contractility in vitro. 7. The results provided indirect evidence in support of the hypothesis that calcium antagonists inhibit ischaemia-induced arrhythmias by virtue of inhibition of the slow inward current (Isi) in the ischaemic ventricular myocardium. PMID:3207985

  20. Meaning of Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help White House Lunch Recipes The Meaning of Muscular Dystrophy KidsHealth > For Kids > The Meaning of Muscular Dystrophy ... you know someone who has MD. What Is Muscular Dystrophy? Muscular dystrophy (say: MUS-kyoo-lur DIS-troh- ...

  1. Effects of calcium channel antagonists on action potential conduction and transmitter release in the guinea-pig vas deferens.

    PubMed Central

    Beattie, D. T.; Cunnane, T. C.; Muir, T. C.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of the Ca2+ channel antagonists amlodipine, cobalt, diltiazem, nifedipine and verapamil and the local anaesthetic lignocaine were investigated on action potential conduction in and on evoked transmitter release from sympathetic nerves in the guinea-pig isolated vas deferens. Transmitter release was investigated by measurement of evoked (trains of pulses at 1 and 2 Hz, 0.1-0.5 ms supramaximal voltage) excitatory junction potentials (e.j.ps) using microelectrodes; tension was recorded simultaneously; tritium [3H] overflow from vasa preincubated (37 degrees C, 30 min) in Krebs solution containing either [3H]-noradrenaline (NA, 25 microCi ml-1, 2 X 10(-6) M NA) or [3H]-adenosine (50 microCi ml-1, 1 X 10(-6) M adenosine). Amlodipine (0.5-2 X 10(-4) M), verapamil (0.5-2 X 10(-4) M), diltiazem (1-8 X 10(-4) M), lignocaine (0.1-2 X 10(-3) M) and cobalt (2-6 X 10(-2) M) in descending order of potency, but not nifedipine (1-5 X 10(-3) M), increased the latency and inhibited, then abolished, the amplitude and number of action potentials in a concentration-dependent manner. Amlodipine (0.5-1 X 10(-4) M), verapamil (1-2 X 10(-4) M), diltiazem (1-5 X 10(-4) M) and cobalt (1 X 10(-3) M), in descending order of potency, but not nifedipine (5 X 10(-4) M), inhibited then abolished evoked e.j.ps in a concentration-dependent manner. Cobalt inhibited e.j.ps at a lower concentration than that (2-6 X 10(-2) M) required to block action potential conduction. In unstimulated tissues, the resting [3H] overflow following preincubation with [3H]-NA consisted largely of 4-hydroxy 3-methoxymandelic acid (VMA), 4-hydroxy 3-methoxy phenylglycol (MOPEG), 3,4 dihydroxyphenylglycol (DOPEG) and NA; stimulated tissues (300 pulses at 20 Hz, 0.5 ms supramaximal voltage) released mainly NA. Verapamil (0.1-1 X 10(-4) M), amlodipine (0.05-1 X 10(-4) M) and nifedipine (1-5 X 10(-4) M), but not cobalt (2 X 10(-3) M), increased, significantly, the resting overflow of 3H comprising mainly DOPEG

  2. Novel, isoform-selective, cholecystokinin A receptor antagonist inhibits colon and pancreatic cancers in preclinical models through novel mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Ponnusamy, Suriyan; Lattmann, Eric; Lattmann, Pornthip; Thiyagarajan, Thirumagal; Padinjarethalakal, Balaram N; Narayanan, Ramesh

    2016-04-01

    Colon and pancreatic cancers contribute to 90,000 deaths each year in the USA. These cancers lack targeted therapeutics due to heterogeneity of the disease and multiple causative factors. One important factor that contributes to increased colon and pancreatic cancer risk is gastrin. Gastrin mediates its actions through two G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs): cholecystokinin receptor A (CCK-A) and CCK-B/gastrin receptor. Previous studies have indicated that colon cancer predominantly expresses CCK-A and responds to CCK-A isoform antagonists. However, many CCK-A antagonists have failed in the clinic due to poor pharmacokinetic properties or lack of efficacy. In the present study, we synthesized a library of CCK-A isoform-selective antagonists and tested them in various colon and pancreatic cancer preclinical models. The lead CCK-A isoform, selective antagonist PNB-028, bound to CCK-A at 12 nM with a 60-fold selectivity towards CCK-A over CCK-B. Furthermore, it inhibited the proliferation of CCK-A-expressing colon and pancreatic cancer cells without affecting the proliferation of non-cancerous cells. PNB-028 was also extremely effective in inhibiting the growth of MAC-16 and LoVo colon cancer and MIA PaCa pancreatic cancer xenografts in immune-compromised mice. Genome‑wide microarray and kinase-array studies indicate that PNB-028 inhibited oncogenic kinases and angiogenic factors to inhibit the growth of colon cancer xenografts. Safety pharmacology and toxicology studies have indicated that PNB-028 is extremely safe and has a wide safety margin. These studies suggest that targeting CCK-A selectively renders promise to treat colon and pancreatic cancers and that PNB-028 could become the next-generation treatment option. PMID:26820391

  3. [Isolation of endophytic bacteria in potato and test of antagonistic action to bacterial ring rot of potato].

    PubMed

    Cui, Lin; Sun, Zhen; Tian, Hong Xian; Wang, Li Qin; Xu, Huei Yuen; Sun, Fu Zai; Yuan, Jun

    2002-12-01

    In this study, two hundred and forty bacterial strains were isolated from inner tissue of potato tubers collected from DaTong, TaiYuan and Inner Mongolia Autonomous regions. On the basis of antagonistic examination in vitro, fifty and five bacteria strains were characterized for antagonistic bacteria to ring rot of potato. It was 22.9 percentage of all bacteria strains. The biggest radius of suppression circle was 13 mm. Nine strains were chosen for their suppression of bacterial ring rot, blackleg and dry rot of potato. These strains were bacteriologically ideatified. Strain 118 was Pseudomonas fluorescens biovar V. Strain 110 was Bacillus pumilus. Strain 085 was Bacillus stearothermophilus. Strain 069 was Erwinia herbicola. Strain 043 was Xanthomomas fragariae. Strain 116 was Curtobacterium. Strains A-10' and T3 were Bacillus. Strain H1-6 was Pseudomonas fluorescens. PMID:15346992

  4. Effects of oxytocin-related peptides on acute morphine tolerance: opposite actions by oxytocin and its receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kovács, G L; Sarnyai, Z; Izbéki, F; Szabó, G; Telegdy, G; Barth, T; Jost, K; Brtnik, F

    1987-05-01

    The hormonally and behaviorally active nonapeptide oxytocin (OXT), its behaviorally active N-terminal octapeptide desglycinamide9-OXT and Z-prolyl-D-leucine, a synthetic analog of the C-terminal prolyl7-leucine8 sequence, inhibited the development both of a moderate and of a strong tolerance to morphine. N-alpha-Acetyl-(2-0-methyltyrosine)-OXT and (penicillamine1-2-0-methyltyrosine)- lysine8-vasopressin, both OXT receptor antagonists, facilitated the development of a moderate morphine tolerance. The i.c.v. injection of either antagonist prevented the effects of i.c.v. and s.c. OXT treatment on the development of tolerance. The effect of desglycinamide9-OXT, but not that of Z-prolyl-D-leucine was also prevented by N-alpha-acetyl-(2-0-methyltyrosine)-OXT. It is concluded that OXT and desglycinamide9-OXT, but not Z-prolyl-D-leucine, attenuate morphine tolerance by affecting putative oxytocinergic binding sites in the mouse brain. The fact that i.c.v. injection of the receptor antagonist also blocked the effect of s.c. OXT treatment argues in favor of the possibility that a minor proportion of s.c. OXT (or behaviorally active fragments thereof) may reach central nervous system target sites. PMID:3033220

  5. Muscular dystrophy - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - muscular dystrophy ... The following organizations are good resources for information on muscular dystrophy : Muscular Dystrophy Association -- www.mdausa.org National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih. ...

  6. Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Difference How to Get Involved Donate Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy (MMD) Share print email share facebook twitter google plus linkedin Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy (MMD) What is myotonic muscular dystrophy (MMD)? Myotonic ...

  7. Early Illustrations of Geste Antagoniste in Cervical and Generalized Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Broussolle, Emmanuel; Laurencin, Chloé; Bernard, Emilien; Thobois, Stéphane; Danaila, Teodor; Krack, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Geste antagoniste, or sensory trick, is a voluntary maneuver that temporarily reduces the severity of dystonic postures or movements. We present a historical review of early reports and illustrations of geste antagoniste. Results In 1894, Brissaud described this phenomenon in Paris in patients with torticollis. He noted that a violent muscular contraction could be reversed by a minor voluntary action. He considered the improvement obtained by what he called “simple mannerisms, childish behaviour or fake pathological movements” was proof of the psychogenic origin of what he named mental torticollis. This concept was supported by photographical illustrations of the patients. The term geste antagoniste was used by Brissaud’s pupils, Meige and Feindel, in their 1902 monograph on movement disorders. Other reports and illustrations of this sign were published in Europe between 1894 and 1906. Although not mentioned explicitly, geste antagoniste was also illustrated in a case report of generalized dystonia in Oppenheim’s 1911 seminal description of dystonia musculorum deformans in Berlin. Discussion Brissaud-Meige’s misinterpretation of the geste antagoniste unfortunately anchored the psychogenic origin of dystonia for decades. In New York, Herz brought dystonia back into the realm of organic neurology in 1944. Thereafter, it was given prominence by other authors, notably Fahn and Marsden in the 1970–1980s. Nowadays, neurologists routinely investigate for geste antagoniste when a dystonic syndrome is suspected, because it provides a further argument in favor of dystonia. The term alleviating maneuver was proposed in 2014 to replace sensory trick or geste antagoniste. This major sign is now part of the motor phenomenology of the 2013 Movement Disorder Society’s classification of dystonia. PMID:26417535

  8. Actions of adenosine A1 and A2 receptor antagonists on CFTR antibody-inhibited β-adrenergic mucin secretion response

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, M M C; Lloyd Mills, C; Dormer, R L; McPherson, M A

    1998-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis gene protein, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) acts as a chloride channel and is a key regulator of mucin secretion. The mechanism by which 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) corrects the defect in CFTR mediated β-adrenergic stimulation of mucin secretion has not been determined. The present study has investigated the actions of adenosine A1 and A2 receptor antagonists to determine whether ability to stimulate mucin secretion correlates with correction of CFTR antibody inhibited β-adrenergic response and whether excessive cyclic AMP rise is required.CFTR antibodies were introduced into living rat submandibular acini by hypotonic swelling. Following recovery, mucin secretion in response to isoproterenol was measured.The adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, 8 cyclopentyltheophylline (CPT) was a less potent stimulator of mucin secretion than was the A2 receptor antagonist dimethylpropargylxanthine (DMPX). A concentration of CPT close to the Ki for A1 receptor antagonism (10 nM) did not stimulate mucin secretion.DMPX, although a potent stimulator of mucin secretion, did not correct CFTR antibody inhibited mucin secretion.CPT corrected defective CFTR antibody inhibited mucin secretion at a high (1 mM) concentration, suggesting a mechanism other than adenosine receptor antagonism.DMPX potentiated the isoproterenol induced cyclic AMP rise, whereas CPT did not.Correction of the defective CFTR mucin secretion response did not correlate with ability to stimulate mucin secretion and did not require potentiation of β-adrenergic induced increases in cyclic AMP. This affords real promise for the development of a selective drug treatment for cystic fibrosis. PMID:9831904

  9. Combined cardioprotectant and antithrombotic actions of platelet P2Y12 receptor antagonists in acute coronary syndrome: just what the doctor ordered.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael V; Downey, James M

    2014-03-01

    Since the P2Y12 receptor antagonists were first introduced, they have been extensively tested in patients with acute coronary syndrome and are now standard of care. These antiplatelet drugs are very effective in reducing subsequent cardiovascular events, stent thromboses, and mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction undergoing reperfusion therapy. Although the prevailing view is that their benefit derives from their antithrombotic properties, other unrelated pleiotropic effects appear to be equally beneficial. Accumulating clinical and animal evidence indicates that, if present at the time of reperfusion, these drugs have a direct anti-infarct effect similar to that of ischemic postconditioning. Four oral antagonists have been developed in rapid succession: ticlopidine, clopidogrel, prasugrel, and ticagrelor. Each agent had a more consistent and rapid onset of action than the previous one, and this has correlated with improved clinical outcomes when given early in treatment. Unfortunately, gut absorption causes an appreciable delay in the onset of effect, especially when morphine is used, and the constant push to minimize the door-to-balloon time has made it difficult to achieve adequate platelet inhibition at the time of percutaneous coronary intervention with an oral agent. An intravenous P2Y12 antagonist such as cangrelor may optimize treatment because it produces nearly maximal inhibition of platelet aggregation within minutes. If antiplatelet agents do protect through postconditioning's mechanism, then they would render any other intervention that protects through that mechanism redundant. Indeed, animals treated with cangrelor cannot be further protected by pre- or postconditioning. However, interventions that use a different mechanism such as mild hypothermia or cariporide, a Na(+)-H(+) exchange blocker, do add to cangrelor's protection. Future research should be directed toward identifying interventions that can augment the protection from

  10. The SnRK2-APC/CTE regulatory module mediates the antagonistic action of gibberellic acid and abscisic acid pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qibing; Wu, Fuqing; Sheng, Peike; Zhang, Zhe; Zhang, Xin; Guo, Xiuping; Wang, Jiulin; Cheng, Zhijun; Wang, Jie; Wang, Haiyang; Wan, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellic acid (GA) antagonistically regulate many developmental processes and responses to biotic or abiotic stresses in higher plants. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this antagonism is still poorly understood. Here, we show that loss-of-function mutation in rice Tiller Enhancer (TE), an activator of the APC/CTE complex, causes hypersensitivity and hyposensitivity to ABA and GA, respectively. We find that TE physically interacts with ABA receptor OsPYL/RCARs and promotes their degradation by the proteasome. Genetic analysis also shows OsPYL/RCARs act downstream of TE in mediating ABA responses. Conversely, ABA inhibits APC/CTE activity by phosphorylating TE through activating the SNF1-related protein kinases (SnRK2s), which may interrupt the interaction between TE and OsPYL/RCARs and subsequently stabilize OsPYL/RCARs. In contrast, GA can reduce the level of SnRK2s and may promote APC/CTE-mediated degradation of OsPYL/RCARs. Thus, we propose that the SnRK2-APC/CTE regulatory module represents a regulatory hub underlying the antagonistic action of GA and ABA in plants. PMID:26272249

  11. Pharmacological characterization of LY233053: A structurally novel tetrazole-substituted competitive N-methyl-D-aspartic acid antagonist with a short duration of action

    SciTech Connect

    Schoepp, D.D.; Ornstein, P.L.; Leander, J.D.; Lodge, D.; Salhoff, C.R.; Zeman, S.; Zimmerman, D.M. )

    1990-12-01

    This study reports the activity of a structurally novel excitatory amino acid receptor antagonist, LY233053 (cis-(+-)-4-((2H-tetrazol-5-yl)methyl)piperidine-2-carboxylic acid), the first tetrazole-containing competitive N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) antagonist. LY233053 potently inhibited NMDA receptor binding to rat brain membranes as shown by the in vitro displacement of (3H) CGS19755 (IC50 = 107 +/- 7 nM). No appreciable affinity in (3H)alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) or (3H)kainate binding assays was observed (IC50 values greater than 10,000 nM). In vitro NMDA receptor antagonist activity was further demonstrated by selective inhibition of NMDA-induced depolarization in cortical wedges (IC50 = 4.2 +/- 0.4 microM vs. 40 microM NMDA). LY233053 was effective after in vivo systemic administration in a number of animal models. In neonatal rats, LY233053 selectively blocked NMDA-induced convulsions (ED50 = 14.5 mg/kg i.p.) with a relatively short duration of action (2-4 hr). In pigeons, LY233053 potently antagonized (ED50 = 1.3 mg/kg i.m.) the behavioral suppressant effects of 10 mg/kg of NMDA. However, a dose of 160 mg/kg, i.m., was required to produce phencyclidine-like catalepsy in pigeons. In mice, LY233053 protected against maximal electroshock-induced seizures at lower doses (ED50 = 19.9 mg/kg i.p.) than those that impaired horizontal screen performance (ED50 = 40.9 mg/kg i.p.). Cholinergic and GABAergic neuronal degenerations after striatal infusion of NMDA were prevented by single or multiple i.p. doses of LY233053. In summary, the antagonist activity of LY233053 after systemic administration demonstrates potential therapeutic value in conditions of neuronal cell loss due to NMDA receptor excitotoxicity.

  12. Carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine, but not eslicarbazepine, enhance excitatory synaptic transmission onto hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells through an antagonist action at adenosine A1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Booker, Sam A; Pires, Nuno; Cobb, Stuart; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício; Vida, Imre

    2015-06-01

    This study assessed the anticonvulsant and seizure generation effects of carbamazepine (CBZ), oxcarbazepine (OXC) and eslicarbazepine (S-Lic) in wild-type mice. Electrophysiological recordings were made to discriminate potential cellular and synaptic mechanisms underlying anti- and pro-epileptic actions. The anticonvulsant and pro-convulsant effects were evaluated in the MES, the 6-Hz and the Irwin tests. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were used to investigate the effects on fast excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission in hippocampal area CA1. The safety window for CBZ, OXC and eslicarbazepine (ED50 value against the MES test and the dose that produces grade 5 convulsions in all mice), was 6.3, 6.0 and 12.5, respectively. At high concentrations the three drugs reduced synaptic transmission. CBZ and OXC enhanced excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) at low, therapeutically-relevant concentrations. These effects were associated with no change in inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) resulting in altered balance between excitation and inhibition. S-Lic had no effect on EPSC or IPSC amplitudes over the same concentration range. The CBZ mediated enhancement of EPSCs was blocked by DPCPX, a selective antagonist, and occluded by CCPA, a selective agonist of the adenosine A1 receptor. Furthermore, reduction of endogenous adenosine by application of the enzyme adenosine deaminase also abolished the CBZ- and OXC-induced increase of EPSCs, indicating that the two drugs act as antagonists at native adenosine receptors. In conclusion, CBZ and OXC possess pro-epileptic actions at clinically-relevant concentrations through the enhancement of excitatory synaptic transmission. S-Lic by comparison has no such effect on synaptic transmission, explaining its lack of seizure exacerbation. PMID:25656478

  13. The diuretic action of 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, a selective A1 adenosine receptor antagonist.

    PubMed Central

    Knight, R. J.; Bowmer, C. J.; Yates, M. S.

    1993-01-01

    1. The diuretic effect of the selective A1 adenosine receptor antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (CPX), was investigated in anaesthetized rats. 2. CPX (0.1 mg kg-1, i.v.) produced significant increases in urine flow, and the excretion rate and fractional excretion of both sodium and chloride. By contrast, CPX administration did not result in any significant change in the excretion of potassium. 3. The diuretic effect of CPX was accompanied by a transient increase in inulin clearance although p-amino-hippurate clearance was unaffected, indicating the CPX induced a temporary elevation of glomerular filtration rate but no change in renal blood flow. 4. The fractional excretion of lithium (a marker of delivery of fluid out of the proximal tubule) was also significantly increased by CPX. However, other measures of tubular function derived from lithium clearance indicated that there were no changes in the handling of sodium or water in the distal regions of the nephron. 5. CPX did not significantly alter the relationship between either free water reabsorption or free water clearance and the distal delivery of sodium, which suggests that CPX does not affect the renal concentration/dilution mechanism. 6. The results of this study show that the diuresis and increased excretion of sodium and chloride induced by CPX (0.1 mg kg-1) in the rat, occurs with only transient elevation in glomerular filtration rate and no change in renal blood flow. The primary reason for the diuresis appears to be inhibition of sodium reabsorption in the proximal tubule.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8495243

  14. Anxiolytic-like actions of the selective 5-HT4 receptor antagonists SB 204070A and SB 207266A in rats.

    PubMed

    Kennett, G A; Bright, F; Trail, B; Blackburn, T P; Sanger, G J

    1997-01-01

    The highly selective 5-HT4 receptor antagonists, SB 204070A (0.001-0.1 mg/kg s.c., 30 min pretest) and SB 207266A (0.01, 1 and 10 mg/kg p.o., 1 hr pre-test), increased time spent in social interaction without affecting locomotor activity, in a rat 15 min social interaction test under high light, unfamiliar conditions. At 1 and 10 mg/kg s.c., SB 204070A was no longer active. These results are consistent with the profile expected of anxiolytic treatments in this procedure. In a rat 5 min elevated x-maze test, SB 204070A (0.01 and 1 mg/kg s.c., 30 min pre-test) significantly increased the percentage of time spent on the open arms. SB 204070A (0.01 mg/kg s.c.) and SB 207266A (1 mg/kg p.o., 1 hr pre-test) also increased percentage entries to the open arms. Neither compound affected locomotion at any dose tested in the procedure. The effects of both compounds in this procedure are also consistent with anxiolysis. Neither SB 204070A (0.1 or 1 mg/kg s.c., 30 min pre-test) nor SB 207266A (0.1 or 1 mg/kg p.o., 1 hr pre-test) affected either unpunished or punished responding, in a rat Geller-Seifter conflict model of anxiety. The maximal efficacy of both SB 204070A and SB 207266A in the rat social interaction test was similar to that of the benzodiazepine anxiolytic chlordiazepoxide (5 mg/kg s.c. or p.o.) used as a positive control, but was considerably less in the elevated x-maze procedure. The results suggest that 5-HT4 receptor antagonists may have modest anxiolytic-like actions in rats. PMID:9225297

  15. Biphenylacetic acid enhances the antagonistic action of fluoroquinolones on the GABA(A)-mediated responses of the isolated guinea-pig ileum.

    PubMed

    Koutsoviti-Papadopoulou, M; Nikolaidis, E; Kounenis, G

    2001-09-01

    This paper examines the effect of biphenylacetic acid on the antagonistic action of norfloxacin and enoxacin on the GABA(A)-mediated responses of the isolated guinea-pig ileum. GABA produced transient contractions followed by relaxation. The contractile effect of exogenously applied GABA was concentration-dependent with EC(50)= 9.8 x 10(-6) M. This contractile effect was not significantly modified by biphenylacetic acid, and the EC(50) value for GABA in the presence of 10(-5) M biphenylacetic acid was 1.15 x 10(-5) M. The GABA contractile effect was inhibited, dose-dependently, by either norfloxacin or enoxacin, but only at concentrations higher than 10(-5) M. The response of the ileum to GABA (at EC(50)) was reduced to 35 and 36% by pretreatment with 10(-5) M norfloxacin or enoxacin, respectively. However, in the presence of 10(-5) M biphenylacetic acid, the response of the ileum to GABA was reduced to 2.2% by pretreatment with 10(-5) M enoxacin, while it was completely abolished by pretreatment with 10(-5) M norfloxacin and the IC(50) values were 5.5 x 10(-7) and 1.5 x 10(-6) M for norfloxacin and enoxacin, respectively. These data show that biphenylacetic acid whilst having no effect at the GABA(A)-mediated contractile response of the guinea-pig ileum, enhances the antagonistic effect of both enoxacin and norfloxacin. This suggests that combined administration of fluoroquinolones and biphenylacetic acid synergistically inhibits GABA(A)-receptors at the intestinal level. PMID:11529690

  16. Flexibility and Muscular Strength.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liemohn, Wendell

    1988-01-01

    This definition of flexibility and muscular strength also explores their roles in overall physical fitness and focuses on how increased flexibility and muscular strength can help decrease or eliminate lower back pain. (CB)

  17. Mechanistic insights into mode of action of potent natural antagonists of BACE-1 for checking Alzheimer’s plaque pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Dhanjal, Jaspreet Kaur; Goyal, Sukriti; Sharma, Sudhanshu; Hamid, Rabia; Grover, Abhinav

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •Accumulation of Aβ plaques is one of the major pathology associated with Alzheimer’s disease. •Inhibition of β-Secretase or BACE-1 offers a viable prospect to check the growth of these plaques. •A large virtual dataset of natural compounds was screened against BACE-1. •Top two hits were analyzed for thermodynamic and structural stability using MD simulations. •Their detailed binding mode of actions were elucidated. -- Abstract: Alzheimer’s is a neurodegenerative disorder resulting in memory loss and decline in cognitive abilities. Accumulation of extracellular beta amyloidal plaques is one of the major pathology associated with this disease. β-Secretase or BACE-1 performs the initial and rate limiting step of amyloidic pathway in which 37–43 amino acid long peptides are generated which aggregate to form plaques. Inhibition of this enzyme offers a viable prospect to check the growth of these plaques. Numerous efforts have been made in recent years for the generation of BACE-1 inhibitors but many of them failed during the preclinical or clinical trials due to drug related or drug induced toxicity. In the present work, we have used computational methods to screen a large dataset of natural compounds to search for small molecules having BACE-1 inhibitory activity with low toxicity to normal cells. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to analyze molecular interactions between the screened compounds and the active residues of the enzyme. Herein, we report two natural compounds of inhibitory nature active against β-secretase enzyme of amyloidic pathway and are potent lead molecules against Alzheimer’s disease.

  18. Antagonistic actions of analogs related to growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) on receptors for GHRH and vasoactive intestinal peptide on rat pituitary and pineal cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Rekasi, Zoltan; Varga, Jozsef L.; Schally, Andrew V.; Halmos, Gabor; Groot, Kate; Czompoly, Tamas

    2000-01-01

    Peptide analogs of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) can potentially interact with vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptors (VPAC1-R and VPAC2-R) because of the structural similarities of these two hormones and their receptors. We synthesized four new analogs related to GHRH (JV-1–50, JV-1–51, JV-1–52, and JV-1–53) with decreased GHRH antagonistic activity and increased VIP antagonistic potency. To characterize various peptide analogs for their antagonistic activity on receptors for GHRH and VIP, we developed assay systems based on superfusion of rat pituitary and pineal cells. Receptor-binding affinities of peptides to the membranes of these cells were also evaluated by radioligand competition assays. Previously reported GHRH antagonists JV-1–36, JV-1–38, and JV-1–42 proved to be selective for GHRH receptors, because they did not influence VIP-stimulated VPAC2 receptor-dependent prolactin release from pituitary cells or VPAC1 receptor-dependent cAMP efflux from pinealocytes but strongly inhibited GHRH-stimulated growth hormone (GH) release. Analogs JV-1–50, JV-1–51, and JV-1–52 showed various degrees of VPAC1-R and VPAC2-R antagonistic potency, although also preserving a substantial GHRH antagonistic effect. Analog JV-1–53 proved to be a highly potent VPAC1 and VPAC2 receptor antagonist, devoid of inhibitory effects on GHRH-evoked GH release. The antagonistic activity of these peptide analogs on processes mediated by receptors for GHRH and VIP was consistent with the binding affinity. The analogs with antagonistic effects on different types of receptors expressed on tumor cells could be utilized for the development of new approaches to treatment of various human cancers. PMID:10655511

  19. Identification of Glycyrrhiza as the rikkunshito constituent with the highest antagonistic potential on heterologously expressed 5-HT3A receptors due to the action of flavonoids

    PubMed Central

    Herbrechter, Robin; Ziemba, Paul M.; Hoffmann, Katrin M.; Hatt, Hanns; Werner, Markus; Gisselmann, Günter

    2015-01-01

    The traditional Japanese phytomedicine rikkunshito is traditionally used for the treatment of gastrointestinal motility disorders, cachexia and nausea. These effects indicate 5-HT3 receptor antagonism, due to the involvement of these receptors in such pathophysiological processes. E.g., setrons, specific 5-HT3 receptor antagonists are the strongest antiemetics, developed so far. Therefore, the antagonistic effects of the eight rikkunshito constituents at heterologously expressed 5-HT3Areceptors were analyzed using the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. The results indicate that tinctures from Aurantii, Ginseng, Zingiberis, Atractylodis and Glycyrrhiza inhibited the 5-HT3A receptor response, whereas the tinctures of Poria cocos, Jujubae and Pinellia exhibited no effect. Surprisingly, the strongest antagonism was found for Glycyrrhiza, whereas the Zingiberis tincture, which is considered to be primarily responsible for the effect of rikkunshito, exhibited the weakest antagonism of 5-HT3A receptors. Rikkunshito contains various vanilloids, ginsenosides and flavonoids, a portion of which show an antagonistic effect on 5-HT3 receptors. A screening of the established ingredients of the active rikkunshito constituents and related substances lead to the identification of new antagonists within the class of flavonoids. The flavonoids (-)-liquiritigenin, glabridin and licochalcone A from Glycyrrhiza species were found to be the most effective inhibitors of the 5-HT-induced currents in the screening. The flavonoids (-)-liquiritigenin and hesperetin from Aurantii inhibited the receptor response in a non-competitive manner, whereas glabridin and licochalcone A exhibited a potential competitive antagonism. Furthermore, licochalcone A acts as a partial antagonist of 5-HT3A receptors. Thus, this study reveals new 5-HT3A receptor antagonists with the aid of increasing the comprehension of the complex effects of rikkunshito. PMID:26191003

  20. Becker muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... and wheelchairs may improve movement and self-care. Genetic counseling may be recommended. Daughters of a man with ... Genetic counseling may be advised if there is a family history of Becker muscular dystrophy.

  1. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of cases, the parents do not carry the gene. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy affects about 5 out of 100,000 people. ... Treatment There is no ... worse. Physical therapy may help maintain muscle strength. Other possible treatments ...

  2. Myotonic Dystrophy and Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-26

    Myotonic Dystrophy; Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy; Muscular Dystrophy; Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1; Myotonic Dystrophy Type 2; Congenital Myotonic Dystrophy; PROMM (Proximal Myotonic Myopathy); Steinert's Disease; Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy

  3. The renal action of spirorenone and other 6 beta,7 beta; 15 beta,16 beta-dimethylene-17-spirolactones, a new type of steroidal aldosterone antagonists.

    PubMed

    Casals-Stenzel, J; Buse, M; Wambach, G; Losert, W

    1984-01-01

    The aldosterone antagonistic activity in vivo and the affinity for mineralocorticoid receptors (MCR) in vitro of 3-(17 beta-hydroxy-6 beta,7 beta; 15 beta,16 beta-dimethylene-3-oxo-1, 4-androstadiene-17 alpha-yl) propionic acid gamma-lactone (spirorenone), a new aldosterone antagonist, and four of its derivatives were studied in comparison with spironolactone in rats. Spirorenone was 8.6 times as potent as spironolactone, but showed a lower affinity for the MCR than the standard. The C1/C2 saturated derivative (compound I) had 7.6 times the antialdosterone potency and 2 times the binding activity of spironolactone. The 17-spiroether derivative of spirorenone (compound II) showed a lower aldosterone antagonistic activity (1.7 the potency of spironolactone) as well as a lower affinity for the MCR (0.5 the affinity of spironolactone). The analogue with a 17 beta-hydroxyl group and a 17 alpha-hydroxypropyl side chain (compound III) possessed a very low binding capacity for MCR (1/10 of that of spironolactone) but still a 1.3 times higher antialdosterone activity than spironolactone. This result is probably due to a transformation of compound III to an active metabolite in vivo. Finally, the derivative with a reversed configuration of the 17-spirolactone ring (compound IV) had no biological activity in vivo and no affinity for the MCR. These results show that spirorenone or one of its active derivatives might lead to a new series of potent aldosterone antagonists. PMID:6329237

  4. ACTH Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Clark, Adrian John; Forfar, Rachel; Hussain, Mashal; Jerman, Jeff; McIver, Ed; Taylor, Debra; Chan, Li

    2016-01-01

    Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) acts via a highly selective receptor that is a member of the melanocortin receptor subfamily of type 1 G protein-coupled receptors. The ACTH receptor, also known as the melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R), is unusual in that it is absolutely dependent on a small accessory protein, melanocortin receptor accessory protein (MRAP) for cell surface expression and function. ACTH is the only known naturally occurring agonist for this receptor. This lack of redundancy and high degree of ligand specificity suggests that antagonism of this receptor could provide a useful therapeutic aid and a potential investigational tool. Clinical situations in which this could be useful include (1) Cushing's disease and ectopic ACTH syndrome - especially while preparing for definitive treatment of a causative tumor, or in refractory cases, or (2) congenital adrenal hyperplasia - as an adjunct to glucocorticoid replacement. A case for antagonism in other clinical situations in which there is ACTH excess can also be made. In this article, we will explore the scientific and clinical case for an ACTH antagonist, and will review the evidence for existing and recently described peptides and modified peptides in this role. PMID:27547198

  5. ACTH Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Adrian John; Forfar, Rachel; Hussain, Mashal; Jerman, Jeff; McIver, Ed; Taylor, Debra; Chan, Li

    2016-01-01

    Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) acts via a highly selective receptor that is a member of the melanocortin receptor subfamily of type 1 G protein-coupled receptors. The ACTH receptor, also known as the melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R), is unusual in that it is absolutely dependent on a small accessory protein, melanocortin receptor accessory protein (MRAP) for cell surface expression and function. ACTH is the only known naturally occurring agonist for this receptor. This lack of redundancy and high degree of ligand specificity suggests that antagonism of this receptor could provide a useful therapeutic aid and a potential investigational tool. Clinical situations in which this could be useful include (1) Cushing’s disease and ectopic ACTH syndrome – especially while preparing for definitive treatment of a causative tumor, or in refractory cases, or (2) congenital adrenal hyperplasia – as an adjunct to glucocorticoid replacement. A case for antagonism in other clinical situations in which there is ACTH excess can also be made. In this article, we will explore the scientific and clinical case for an ACTH antagonist, and will review the evidence for existing and recently described peptides and modified peptides in this role. PMID:27547198

  6. Evaluation of Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-06

    Becker Muscular Dystrophy; Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2A (Calpain-3 Deficiency); Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2B (Miyoshi Myopathy, Dysferlin Deficiency); Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2I (FKRP-deficiency)

  7. Quantitative analysis of the agonist and antagonist actions of some ATP analogues at P2X-purinoceptors in the rabbit ear artery.

    PubMed

    Leff, P; Wood, B E; O'Connor, S E; McKechnie, K

    1993-02-01

    1. The agonist and antagonist effects of a series of beta, gamma-methylene dihalo- and 2-methylthio-substituted analogues of ATP at P2x-purinoceptors have been analysed on the rabbit isolated ear artery preparation. Cumulative and sequential dosing experimental protocols were employed in the construction of agonist concentration-effect curves in order to address the possible influence of acute receptor desensitization on subsequent analyses. 2. Using the cumulative curve design the following results were obtained: D-AMP-PCBr2P, 2-methylthio-D-AMP-PCCl2P, L-AMP-PCF2P, L-AMP-PCCl2P and LAMP-PCBr2P each behaved as partial agonists. D-AMP-CPP was used as a reference full agonist and these analogues were analysed by the comparative method of Barlow et al. (1967), to provide estimates of affinity and efficacy. 2-Methylthio-L-AMP-PCBr2P was virtually silent as an agonist and was analysed as a competitive antagonist by Schild analysis. 3. Two agonists, L-AMP-PCCl2P and L-AMP-PCBr2P, were analysed by the sequential curve design, and the antagonist effects of one of the agonists, L-AMP-PCBr2P were also analysed using this protocol. The resulting estimates of affinity and efficacy, while similar to those obtained with the cumulative design, indicated that acute desensitization may affect curve definition and estimation of these quantities. 4. The following structure-activity trends emerged: D-analogues tended to have higher efficacy but lower affinity than L-analogues; efficacy varied markedly and inversely with the atomic weight of the halogen while affinity was only minimally affected; 2-methylthio- substitution also reduced efficacy with minimal effect on affinity. 5. The results of this analysis are discussed in terms of the utility of affinity and efficacy information in the classification of purinoceptors and the design of chemical probes for them. PMID:8448598

  8. Differential actions of antiparkinson agents at multiple classes of monoaminergic receptor. II. Agonist and antagonist properties at subtypes of dopamine D(2)-like receptor and alpha(1)/alpha(2)-adrenoceptor.

    PubMed

    Newman-Tancredi, Adrian; Cussac, Didier; Audinot, Valérie; Nicolas, Jean-Paul; De Ceuninck, Frédéric; Boutin, Jean-A; Millan, Mark J

    2002-11-01

    The accompanying multivariate analysis of the binding profiles of antiparkinson agents revealed contrasting patterns of affinities at diverse classes of monoaminergic receptor. Herein, we characterized efficacies at human (h)D(2SHORT(S)), hD(2LONG(L)), hD(3), and hD(4.4) receptors and at halpha(2A)-, halpha(2B)-, halpha(2C)-, and halpha(1A)-adrenoceptors (ARs). As determined by guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate ([(35)S]GTPgammaS) binding, no ligand displayed "full" efficacy relative to dopamine (100%) at all "D(2)-like" sites. However, at hD(2S) receptors quinpirole, pramipexole, ropinirole, quinerolane, pergolide, and cabergoline were as efficacious as dopamine (E(max)100%); TL99, talipexole, and apomorphine were highly efficacious (79-92%); piribedil, lisuride, bromocriptine, and terguride showed intermediate efficacy (40-55%); and roxindole displayed low efficacy (11%). For all drugs, efficacies were lower at hD(2L) receptors, with terguride and roxindole acting as antagonists. At hD(3) receptors, efficacies ranged from 33% (roxindole) to 94% (TL99), whereas, for hD(4) receptors, highest efficacies (approximately 70%) were seen for quinerolane, quinpirole, and TL99, whereas piribedil and terguride behaved as antagonists and bromocriptine was inactive. Although efficacies at hD(2S) versus hD(2L) sites were highly correlated (r = 0.79), they correlated only modestly to hD(3)/hD(4) sites (r = 0.44-0.59). In [(35)S]GTPgammaS studies of halpha(2A)-ARs, TL99 (108%), pramipexole (52%), talipexole (51%), pergolide (31%), apomorphine (16%), and quinerolane (11%) were agonists and ropinirole and roxindole were inactive, whereas piribedil and other agents were antagonists. Similar findings were obtained at halpha(2B)- and halpha(2C)-ARs. Using [(3)H]phosphatidylinositol depletion, roxindole, bromocriptine, lisuride, and terguride displayed potent antagonist properties at halpha(1A)-ARs. In conclusion, antiparkinson agents display diverse agonist and antagonist

  9. Locomotor adaptation to a soleus EMG-controlled antagonistic exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Keith E; Kinnaird, Catherine R; Ferris, Daniel P

    2013-04-01

    Locomotor adaptation in humans is not well understood. To provide insight into the neural reorganization that occurs following a significant disruption to one's learned neuromuscular map relating a given motor command to its resulting muscular action, we tied the mechanical action of a robotic exoskeleton to the electromyography (EMG) profile of the soleus muscle during walking. The powered exoskeleton produced an ankle dorsiflexion torque proportional to soleus muscle recruitment thus limiting the soleus' plantar flexion torque capability. We hypothesized that neurologically intact subjects would alter muscle activation patterns in response to the antagonistic exoskeleton by decreasing soleus recruitment. Subjects practiced walking with the exoskeleton for two 30-min sessions. The initial response to the perturbation was to "fight" the resistive exoskeleton by increasing soleus activation. By the end of training, subjects had significantly reduced soleus recruitment resulting in a gait pattern with almost no ankle push-off. In addition, there was a trend for subjects to reduce gastrocnemius recruitment in proportion to the soleus even though only the soleus EMG was used to control the exoskeleton. The results from this study demonstrate the ability of the nervous system to recalibrate locomotor output in response to substantial changes in the mechanical output of the soleus muscle and associated sensory feedback. This study provides further evidence that the human locomotor system of intact individuals is highly flexible and able to adapt to achieve effective locomotion in response to a broad range of neuromuscular perturbations. PMID:23307949

  10. How Is Muscular Dystrophy Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How is muscular dystrophy diagnosed? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content The first step in diagnosing muscular dystrophy (MD) is a visit with a health care ...

  11. Effects of opioid antagonists naloxone and naltrexone on neuropeptide Y-induced feeding and brown fat thermogenesis in the rat. Neural site of action.

    PubMed Central

    Kotz, C M; Grace, M K; Briggs, J; Levine, A S; Billington, C J

    1995-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y administered intracerebroventricularly and into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus stimulates feeding and decreases brown adipose tissue thermogenesis. Although specific neuropeptide Y antagonists are not yet available, previous studies had shown that the opioid antagonist naloxone blocked neuropeptide Y-induced feeding when both drugs were injected intracerebroventricularly. We wanted to find out if naloxone injected into specific brain sites would block neuropeptide Y effects on feeding and brown fat thermogenesis. Rats were double injected in specific brain sites with neuropeptide Y and either naloxone or naltrexone (a congener of naloxone). Food intake and brown fat measures were assessed. Naloxone or naltrexone in the paraventricular nucleus weakly decreased paraventricular nucleus neuropeptide Y-induced feeding and did not affect neuropeptide Y-induced reductions in brown fat activity. Peripheral naloxone blocked intracerebroventricular neuropeptide Y-induced feeding and brown fat alterations. Fourth ventricular naloxone decreased paraventricular nucleus neuropeptide Y-induced feeding, and naltrexone given into the nucleus of the solitary tract blocked paraventricular nucleus neuropeptide Y-induced alterations in feeding and brown fat. These data indicate that neuropeptide Y in the paraventricular nucleus may act on feeding and brown fat thermogenesis through opioidergic pathways in the nucleus of the solitary tract. PMID:7615787

  12. Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Yiu, Eppie M; Kornberg, Andrew J

    2015-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy, an X-linked disorder, has an incidence of one in 5000 boys and presents in early childhood with proximal muscle weakness. Untreated boys become wheelchair bound by the age of 12 years and die of cardiorespiratory complications in their late teens to early 20s. The use of corticosteroids, non-invasive respiratory support, and active surveillance and management of associated complications have improved ambulation, function, quality of life and life expectancy. The clinical features, investigations and management of Duchenne muscular dystrophy are reviewed, as well as the latest in some of the novel therapies. PMID:25752877

  13. Structure-activity relationships and mechanism of action of Eph-ephrin antagonists: interaction of cholanic acid with the EphA2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Tognolini, Massimiliano; Incerti, Matteo; Mohamed, Iftiin Hassan; Giorgio, Carmine; Russo, Simonetta; Bruni, Renato; Lelli, Barbara; Bracci, Luisa; Noberini, Roberta; Pasquale, Elena B.; Barocelli, Elisabetta; Vicini, Paola; Mor, Marco

    2012-01-01

    The Eph–ephrin system, including the EphA2 receptor and the ephrin-A1 ligand, plays a critical role in tumor and vascular functions during carcinogenesis. We previously identified (3α,5β)-3-hydroxycholan-24-oic acid (lithocholic acid) as an Eph-ephrin antagonist able to inhibit EphA2 receptor activation and therefore potentially useful as a novel EphA2 receptor targeting agent. Here, we explore the structure-activity relationships of a focused set of lithocholic acid derivatives, based on molecular modelling investigation and displacement binding assays. Our exploration shows that while the 3-α-hydroxyl group of lithocholic acid has a negligible role in the recognition of the EphA2 receptor, its carboxylate group is critical for disrupting the binding of ephrin-A1 to the EphA2. As a result of our investigation, we identified (5β)-cholan-24-oic acid (cholanic acid) as a novel compound that competitively inhibits EphA2-ephrin-A1 interaction with higher potency than lithocholic acid. Surface plasmon resonance analysis indicates that cholanic acid binds specifically and reversibly to the ligand-binding domain of EphA2, with a steady-state dissociation constant (KD) in the low micromolar range. Furthermore, cholanic acid blocks the phosphorylation of EphA2 and cell retraction and rounding in PC3 prostate cancer cells, two effects that depend on EphA2 activation by the ephrin-A1 ligand. These findings suggest that cholanic acid can be used as a template structure to design effective EphA2 antagonists, with potential impact in the elucidation of the role played by this receptor in pathological conditions. PMID:22529030

  14. Insights into the molecular basis of action of the AT1 antagonist losartan using a combined NMR spectroscopy and computational approach.

    PubMed

    Zervou, Maria; Cournia, Zoe; Potamitis, Constantinos; Patargias, George; Durdagi, Serdar; Grdadolnik, Simona Golic; Mavromoustakos, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    The drug:membrane interactions for the antihypertensive AT1 antagonist losartan, the prototype of the sartans class, are studied herein using an integrated approach. The pharmacophore arrangement of the drug was revealed by rotating frame nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (2D ROESY) NMR spectroscopy in three different environments, namely water, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micellar solutions mimicking conditions of biological transport fluids and membrane lipid bilayers. Drug association with micelles was monitored by diffusion ordered spectroscopy (2D DOSY) and drug:micelle intermolecular interactions were characterized by ROESY spectroscopy. The localisation of the drug in the micellar environment was investigated by introducing 5-doxyl and 16-doxyl stearic acids. The use of spin labels confirmed that losartan resides close to the micelle:water interface with the hydroxymethyl group and the tetrazole heterocyclic aromatic ring facing the polar surface with the potential to interact with SDS charged polar head groups in order to increase amphiphilic interactions. The spontaneous insertion, the diffusion pathway and the conformational features of losartan were monitored by Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations in a modeled SDS micellar aggregate environment and a long exploratory MD run (580ns) in a phospholipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer with the AT1 receptor embedded. MD simulations were in excellent agreement with experimental results and further revealed the molecular basis of losartan:membrane interactions in atomic-level detail. This applied integrated approach aims to explore the role of membranes in losartan's pathway towards the AT1 receptor. PMID:24374319

  15. Preadolescent male perceptions of action figure physiques.

    PubMed

    Baghurst, Timothy; Carlston, David; Wood, Julie; Wyatt, Frank B

    2007-12-01

    This study investigated the preference and reasoning of 176 preadolescent and adolescent males when presented with original and current action figures that had statistically different physiques. Current action figures were perceived as significantly more muscular and healthier. Participants also preferred to resemble current action figures citing muscularity and size for their preference. PMID:18023792

  16. Novel mode of action of the calcium antagonist mibefradil (Ro 40-5967): potent immunosuppression by inhibition of T-cell infiltration through allogeneic endothelium.

    PubMed Central

    Blaheta, R A; Hailer, N P; Brude, N; Wittig, B; Oppermann, E; Leckel, K; Harder, S; Scholz, M; Weber, S; Encke, A; Markus, B H

    1998-01-01

    Cyclosporin A reduces the mitotic activity of allosensitized lymphocytes, but fails to limit emigration of these cells into the donor organ. However, the modulation of both lymphocyte proliferation and infiltration are desirable characteristics of immunosuppressive therapy. The calcium-channel blocker, verapamil, has recently been shown to effectively prevent the transmigration of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells through allogeneic endothelium. Mibefradil (Ro 40-5967) represents a new generation of calcium antagonists with high potency and long-term activity. To evaluate the immunosuppressive potential of this drug, the influence of mibefradil on lymphocyte adhesion to, horizontal locomotion along, and penetration through allogeneic endothelium (HUVEC) was performed. When lymphocytes were prestimulated for 24 hr with mibefradil, adhesion and penetration were dose-dependently reduced. The adhesion ID50 values were 3.4 microM (CD4+ T cells) versus 9.2 microM (CD8+ T cells) and 2.1 microM (CD4+ T cells) versus 3.9 microM (CD8+ T cells) with regard to penetration. Mibefradil also effectively blocked horizontal locomotion. Specific down-regulation of T-cell binding to the P-selection receptor (ID50: CD4+ T cells, 0.8 microM: CD8+ T cells, 1.2 microM) and to the intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) receptor (ID50: CD4+ T cells, 1.9 microM; CD8+ T cells, 1.5 microM) by mibefradil seems to be responsible for the decreased adhesion and penetration rates. Reduction of intracellular F-actin in T lymphocytes could diminish cell locomotion. In conclusion, the potent suppressive properties of mibefradil support its use as a co-medication in cyclosporin A-based immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:9741343

  17. Protein Kinase A and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathways Antagonistically Regulate Fission Yeast fbp1 Transcription by Employing Different Modes of Action at Two Upstream Activation Sites

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Lori A.; Hoffman, Charles S.

    2000-01-01

    A significant challenge to our understanding of eukaryotic transcriptional regulation is to determine how multiple signal transduction pathways converge on a single promoter to regulate transcription in divergent fashions. To study this, we have investigated the transcriptional regulation of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe fbp1 gene that is repressed by a cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) pathway and is activated by a stress-activated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. In this study, we identified and characterized two cis-acting elements in the fbp1 promoter required for activation of fbp1 transcription. Upstream activation site 1 (UAS1), located approximately 900 bp from the transcriptional start site, resembles a cAMP response element (CRE) that is the binding site for the atf1-pcr1 heterodimeric transcriptional activator. Binding of this activator to UAS1 is positively regulated by the MAPK pathway and negatively regulated by PKA. UAS2, located approximately 250 bp from the transcriptional start site, resembles a Saccharomyces cerevisiae stress response element. UAS2 is bound by transcriptional activators and repressors regulated by both the PKA and MAPK pathways, although atf1 itself is not present in these complexes. Transcriptional regulation of fbp1 promoter constructs containing only UAS1 or UAS2 confirms that the PKA and MAPK regulation is targeted to both sites. We conclude that the PKA and MAPK signal transduction pathways regulate fbp1 transcription at UAS1 and UAS2, but that the antagonistic interactions between these pathways involve different mechanisms at each site. PMID:10938120

  18. Antagonism of the presumed presynaptic action of L-AP4 on GABAergic transmission in the ventrobasal thalamus by the novel mGluR antagonist MPPG.

    PubMed

    Salt, T E; Turner, J P

    1996-02-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) agonists CCG-I and L-AP4, acting at Group II and Group III mGluRs respectively, can reduce GABAergic synaptic inhibition on single neurones in the rat thalamus in vivo via a presumed presynaptic mechanism. The actions of L-AP4 were antagonized by (+/-)-alpha-methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (MPPG), whereas CCG-I was significantly less affected. Thus MPPG may be a useful tool for detecting physiological roles for Group III mGluRs. PMID:8734494

  19. Genetics Home Reference: tibial muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names for This Condition tardive tibial muscular dystrophy TMD Udd distal myopathy Udd-Markesbery muscular dystrophy Udd ... titin may cause more severe tibial muscular dystrophy (TMD). Neuromuscul Disord. 2008 Dec;18(12):922-8. ...

  20. Cardio-Muscular Conditioner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    In the mid-sixties, Gary Graham, a Boeing designer, developed a cardiovascular conditioner for a planned Air Force orbiting laboratory. After the project was cancelled, Graham participated in space station conditioning studies for the Skylab program. Twenty years later, he used this expertise to develop the Shuttle 2000-1, a physical therapy and athletic development conditioner, available through Contemporary Designs. The machine is used by football teams, sports clinics and medical rehabilitation centers. Cardiovascular fitness and muscular strength development are promoted through both kinetic and plyometric exercises.

  1. Congenital muscular torticollis

    PubMed Central

    Nilesh, Kumar; Mukherji, Srijon

    2013-01-01

    Congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) is a rare congenital musculoskeletal disorder characterized by unilateral shortening of the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM). It presents in newborn infants or young children with reported incidence ranging from 0.3% to 2%. Owing to effective shortening of SCM on the involved side there is ipsilateral head tilt and contralateral rotation of the face and chin. This article reports a case of CMT in a 3½-year-old male child successfully managed by surgical release of the involved SCM followed by physiotherapy. PMID:24205484

  2. Congenital muscular torticollis.

    PubMed

    Nilesh, Kumar; Mukherji, Srijon

    2013-07-01

    Congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) is a rare congenital musculoskeletal disorder characterized by unilateral shortening of the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM). It presents in newborn infants or young children with reported incidence ranging from 0.3% to 2%. Owing to effective shortening of SCM on the involved side there is ipsilateral head tilt and contralateral rotation of the face and chin. This article reports a case of CMT in a 3½-year-old male child successfully managed by surgical release of the involved SCM followed by physiotherapy. PMID:24205484

  3. ADN-1184, a monoaminergic ligand with 5-HT6/7 receptor antagonist action, exhibits activity in animal models of anxiety.

    PubMed

    Partyka, Anna; Wasik, Anna; Jastrzębska-Więsek, Magdalena; Mierzejewski, Paweł; Bieńkowski, Przemysław; Kołaczkowski, Marcin; Wesołowska, Anna

    2016-06-01

    Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) include apathy, sleep problems, irritability, wandering, elation, agitation/aggression, and mood disorders such as depression and/or anxiety. Elderly patients are usually treated with second-generation antipsychotics; however, they present not enough efficacy against all symptoms observed. Hence, there still is an unmet need for novel pharmacotherapeutic agents targeted BPSD. A novel arylsulfonamide derivative ADN-1184 has been developed that possesses a preclinical profile of activity corresponding to criteria required for treatment of both psychosis and depressive symptoms of BPSD without exacerbating cognitive impairment or inducing motor disturbances. To broaden its pharmacological efficacy toward anxiety symptoms, its anxiolytic properties have been examined in common animal preclinical models in rats and mice. ADN-1184 significantly increased the number of entries into open arms measured in the elevated plus-maze test; however, it simultaneously increased parameters of exploratory activity. In the Vogel conflict drinking test, ADN-1184 dose-dependently and significantly increased the number of shocks accepted and the number of licks. Moreover, in mice, it also had specific anxiolytic-like activity in the four-plate test, and only negligible one at a specific mid-range dose measured in the spontaneous marble burying test. The obtained findings reveal that ADN-1184 displays anxiolytic-like activity in animal models of anxiety which employed punished stimuli. In its unusual combination of some anxiolytic action with already proven antipsychotic and antidepressant properties, and lack of any disruptive impact on learning and memory processes and motor coordination, ADN-1184 displays a profile that would be desired for a novel therapeutic for BPSD. PMID:26979176

  4. Wasting Mechanisms in Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jonghyun; Tajrishi, Marjan M.; Ogura, Yuji; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy is a group of more than 30 different clinical genetic disorders that are characterized by progressive skeletal muscle wasting and degeneration. Primary deficiency of specific extracellular matrix, sarcoplasmic, cytoskeletal, or nuclear membrane protein results in several secondary changes such as sarcolemmal instability, calcium influx, fiber necrosis, oxidative stress, inflammatory response, breakdown of extracellular matrix, and eventually fibrosis which leads to loss of ambulance and cardiac and respiratory failure. A number of molecular processes have now been identified which hasten disease progression in human patients and animal models of muscular dystrophy. Accumulating evidence further suggests that aberrant activation of several signaling pathways aggravate pathological cascades in dystrophic muscle. Although replacement of defective gene with wild-type is paramount to cure, management of secondary pathological changes has enormous potential to improving the quality of life and extending lifespan of muscular dystrophy patients. In this article, we have reviewed major cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to muscle wasting in muscular dystrophy. PMID:23669245

  5. Alternative splicing and muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pistoni, Mariaelena; Ghigna, Claudia; Gabellini, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs is a major contributor to proteomic diversity and to the control of gene expression in higher eukaryotic cells. For this reasons, alternative splicing is tightly regulated in different tissues and developmental stages and its disruption can lead to a wide range of human disorders. The aim of this review is to focus on the relevance of alternative splicing for muscle function and muscle disease. We begin by giving a brief overview of alternative splicing, muscle-specific gene expression and muscular dystrophy. Next, to illustrate these concepts we focus on two muscular dystrophy, myotonic muscular dystrophy and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy, both associated to disruption of splicing regulation in muscle. PMID:20603608

  6. Myoglobin in Primary Muscular Disease: I. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: and: II. Muscular Dystrophy of Distal Type

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Herrera, A. E.; Lehmann, H.; Tomlinson, B. E.; Walton, J. N.

    1973-01-01

    Skeletal myoglobin from two cases of muscular dystrophy, one of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and one of muscular dystrophy of distal type, have been examined and no differences from normal human myoglobin were found. The opportunity has been taken to discuss the nature of minor fractions of myoglobin-like material which are found when human skeletal myoglobin is isolated. Those which have been observed in the present study have been artefacts and it was possible to demonstrate that they were due to deamidation of certain glutamine and asparagine residues. Images PMID:4590363

  7. Muscular activity and its relationship to biomechanics and human performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ariel, Gideon

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to address the issue of muscular activity, human motion, fitness, and exercise. Human activity is reviewed from the historical perspective as well as from the basics of muscular contraction, nervous system controls, mechanics, and biomechanical considerations. In addition, attention has been given to some of the principles involved in developing muscular adaptations through strength development. Brief descriptions and findings from a few studies are included. These experiments were conducted in order to investigate muscular adaptation to various exercise regimens. Different theories of strength development were studied and correlated to daily human movements. All measurement tools used represent state of the art exercise equipment and movement analysis. The information presented here is only a small attempt to understand the effects of exercise and conditioning on Earth with the objective of leading to greater knowledge concerning human responses during spaceflight. What makes life from nonliving objects is movement which is generated and controlled by biochemical substances. In mammals. the controlled activators are skeletal muscles and this muscular action is an integral process composed of mechanical, chemical, and neurological processes resulting in voluntary and involuntary motions. The scope of this discussion is limited to voluntary motion.

  8. Bed Rest Muscular Atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    2000-01-01

    A major debilitating response from prolonged bed rest (BR) is muscle atrophy, defined as a "decrease in size of a part of tissue after full development has been attained: a wasting away of tissue as from disuse, old age, injury or disease". Part of the complicated mechanism for the dizziness, increased body instability, and exaggerated gait in patients who arise immediately after BR may be a result of not only foot pain, but also of muscular atrophy and associated reduction in lower limb strength. Also, there seems to be a close association between muscle atrophy and bone atrophy. A discussion of many facets of the total BR homeostatic syndrome has been published. The old adage that use determines form which promotes function of bone (Wolff's law) also applies to those people exposed to prolonged BR (without exercise training) in whom muscle atrophy is a consistent finding. An extreme case involved a 16-year-old boy who was ordered to bed by his mother in 1932: after 50 years in bed he had "a lily-white frame with limbs as thin as the legs of a ladder-back chair". These findings emphasize the close relationship between muscle atrophy and bone atrophy. In addition to loss of muscle mass during deconditioning, there is a significant loss of muscle strength and a decrease in protein synthesis. Because the decreases in force (strength) are proportionately greater than those in fiber size or muscle cross-sectional area, other contributory factors must be involved; muscle fiber dehydration may be important.

  9. [Muscular isokinetic dynamometry].

    PubMed

    Svetlize, H D

    1991-01-01

    In the past, muscular strength has primarily been measured using isometric, isotonic or tensiometric techniques. The advent of isokinetic dynamometers has supplied an objective method of measuring peak torque throughout a full range of motion at a predetermined speed of contraction. An isokinetic contraction is a refinement of the controlled motion concept. The isokinetic contraction is dynamic, but the speed of the motion is held constant by a special device. In this way, resistance is in direct ratio to the varying force applied through the full course of a natural movement. The purpose of this study was to determine the peak torque of quadriceps (Q), and hamstrings (H), and their biomechanical angle of production, H to Q ratio and bilateral comparisons of these variables for the first time in a Southamerican population. Twenty healthy and voluntary males (age: 21.9 +/- 3.1 years, height 193.2 +/- 6.5 cm, weight: 84.2 +/- 5.2 kgs.), were tested on the Cybex II Dynamometer and Cybex Data Reduction Computer (CDRC). Quadriceps and hamstrings peak torque (pkTQ), in Newton-meters, were obtained at angular velocities of 60, 180 and 240 degrees. sec-1. Also, the angle of the range of motion at which peak torque occurred in both directions, H and Q peak torque to body weight ratios, H to Q ratio were measured. Finally, CDRC provided the bilateral comparison of the different variables expressed in percentages. All measurements were automatically corrected for the effect of gravity. The absolute maximal pkTQ of dominant (D), and non-dominant (ND), quadriceps at 60 degrees/sec was DQ 297 +/- 25 Nwm and nDQ 303 +/- 13 Nwm.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1921692

  10. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Sacconi, Sabrina; Salviati, Leonardo; Desnuelle, Claude

    2015-04-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is characterized by a typical and asymmetric pattern of muscle involvement and disease progression. Two forms of FSHD, FSHD1 and FSHD2, have been identified displaying identical clinical phenotype but different genetic and epigenetic basis. Autosomal dominant FSHD1 (95% of patients) is characterized by chromatin relaxation induced by pathogenic contraction of a macrosatellite repeat called D4Z4 located on the 4q subtelomere (FSHD1 patients harbor 1 to 10 D4Z4 repeated units). Chromatin relaxation is associated with inappropriate expression of DUX4, a retrogene, which in muscles induces apoptosis and inflammation. Consistent with this hypothesis, individuals carrying zero repeat on chromosome 4 do not develop FSHD1. Not all D4Z4 contracted alleles cause FSHD. Distal to the last D4Z4 unit, a polymorphic site with two allelic variants has been identified: 4qA and 4qB. 4qA is in cis with a functional polyadenylation consensus site. Only contractions on 4qA alleles are pathogenic because the DUX4 transcript is polyadenylated and translated into stable protein. FSHD2 is instead a digenic disease. Chromatin relaxation of the D4Z4 locus is caused by heterozygous mutations in the SMCHD1 gene encoding a protein essential for chromatin condensation. These patients also harbor at least one 4qA allele in order to express stable DUX4 transcripts. FSHD1 and FSHD2 may have an additive effect: patients harboring D4Z4 contraction and SMCHD1 mutations display a more severe clinical phenotype than with either defect alone. Knowledge of the complex genetic and epigenetic defects causing these diseases is essential in view of designing novel therapeutic strategies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis. PMID:24882751

  11. Endothelin receptors and their antagonists.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Janet J; Davenport, Anthony P

    2015-03-01

    All three members of the endothelin (ET) family of peptides, ET-1, ET-2, and ET-3, are expressed in the human kidney, with ET-1 being the predominant isoform. ET-1 and ET-2 bind to two G-protein-coupled receptors, ETA and ETB, whereas at physiological concentrations ET-3 has little affinity for the ET(A) receptor. The human kidney is unusual among the peripheral organs in expressing a high density of ET(B). The renal vascular endothelium only expresses the ET(B) subtype and ET-1 acts in an autocrine or paracrine manner to release vasodilators. Endothelial ETB in kidney, as well as liver and lungs, also has a critical role in scavenging ET-1 from the plasma. The third major function is ET-1 activation of ET(B) in in the nephron to reduce salt and water re-absorption. In contrast, ET(A) predominate on smooth muscle, causing vasoconstriction and mediating many of the pathophysiological actions of ET-1. The role of the two receptors has been delineated using highly selective ET(A) (BQ123, TAK-044) and ET(B) (BQ788) peptide antagonists. Nonpeptide antagonists, bosentan, macitentan, and ambrisentan, that are either mixed ET(A)/ET(B) antagonists or display ET(A) selectivity, have been approved for clinical use but to date are limited to pulmonary hypertension. Ambrisentan is in clinical trials in patients with type 2 diabetic nephropathy. This review summarizes ET-receptor antagonism in the human kidney, and considers the relative merits of selective versus nonselective antagonism in renal disease. PMID:25966344

  12. What Are the Treatments for Muscular Dystrophy?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources and Publications What are the treatments for muscular dystrophy? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... available to stop or reverse any form of muscular dystrophy (MD). Instead, certain therapies and medications aim to ...

  13. Blockade by ifenprodil of high voltage-activated Ca2+ channels in rat and mouse cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurones: comparison with N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist actions.

    PubMed Central

    Church, J; Fletcher, E J; Baxter, K; MacDonald, J F

    1994-01-01

    1. The block by ifenprodil of voltage-activated Ca2+ channels was investigated in intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) evoked by 50 mM K+ (high-[K+]o) in Fura-2-loaded rat hippocampal pyramidal neurones in culture and on currents carried by Ba2+ ions (IBa) through Ca2+ channels in mouse cultured hippocampal neurones under whole-cell voltage-clamp. The effects of ifenprodil on voltage-activated Ca2+ channels were compared with its antagonist actions on N-methyl-D-aspartate- (NMDA) evoked responses in the same neuronal preparations. 2. Rises in [Ca2+]i evoked by transient exposure to high-[K+]o in our preparation of rat cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurones are mediated predominantly by Ca2+ flux through nifedipine-sensitive Ca2+ channels, with smaller contributions from nifedipine-resistant, omega-conotoxin GVIA-sensitive Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ channels sensitive to crude funnel-web spider venom (Church et al., 1994). Ifenprodil (0.1-200 microM) reversibly attenuated high-[K+]o-evoked rises in [Ca2+]i with an IC50 value of 17 +/- 3 microM, compared with an IC50 value of 0.7 +/- 0.1 microM for the reduction of rises in [Ca2+]i evoked by 20 microM NMDA. Tested in the presence of nifedipine 10 microM, ifenprodil (1-50 microM) produced a concentration-dependent reduction of the dihydropyridine-resistant high-[K+]o-evoked rise in [Ca2+]i with an IC50 value of 13 +/- 4 microM. The results suggest that ifenprodil blocks Ca2+ flux through multiple subtypes of high voltage-activated Ca2+ channels. 3. Application of the polyamine, spermine (0.25-5 mM), produced a concentration-dependent reduction of rises in [Ca2+]i evoked by high-[K+]o.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7834201

  14. Trainability of muscular activity level during maximal voluntary co-contraction: comparison between bodybuilders and nonathletes.

    PubMed

    Maeo, Sumiaki; Takahashi, Takumi; Takai, Yohei; Kanehisa, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    Antagonistic muscle pairs cannot be fully activated simultaneously, even with maximal effort, under conditions of voluntary co-contraction, and their muscular activity levels are always below those during agonist contraction with maximal voluntary effort (MVE). Whether the muscular activity level during the task has trainability remains unclear. The present study examined this issue by comparing the muscular activity level during maximal voluntary co-contraction for highly experienced bodybuilders, who frequently perform voluntary co-contraction in their training programs, with that for untrained individuals (nonathletes). The electromyograms (EMGs) of biceps brachii and triceps brachii muscles during maximal voluntary co-contraction of elbow flexors and extensors were recorded in 11 male bodybuilders and 10 nonathletes, and normalized to the values obtained during the MVE of agonist contraction for each of the corresponding muscles (% EMGMVE). The involuntary coactivation level in antagonist muscle during the MVE of agonist contraction was also calculated. In both muscles, % EMGMVE values during the co-contraction task for bodybuilders were significantly higher (P<0.01) than those for nonathletes (biceps brachii: 66±14% in bodybuilders vs. 46±13% in nonathletes, triceps brachii: 74±16% vs. 57±9%). There was a significant positive correlation between a length of bodybuilding experience and muscular activity level during the co-contraction task (r = 0.653, P = 0.03). Involuntary antagonist coactivation level during MVE of agonist contraction was not different between the two groups. The current result indicates that long-term participation in voluntary co-contraction training progressively enhances muscular activity during maximal voluntary co-contraction. PMID:24260233

  15. Spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease characterized by degeneration of alpha motor neurons in the spinal cord, resulting in progressive proximal muscle weakness and paralysis. Estimated incidence is 1 in 6,000 to 1 in 10,000 live births and carrier frequency of 1/40-1/60. This disease is characterized by generalized muscle weakness and atrophy predominating in proximal limb muscles, and phenotype is classified into four grades of severity (SMA I, SMAII, SMAIII, SMA IV) based on age of onset and motor function achieved. This disease is caused by homozygous mutations of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene, and the diagnostic test demonstrates in most patients the homozygous deletion of the SMN1 gene, generally showing the absence of SMN1 exon 7. The test achieves up to 95% sensitivity and nearly 100% specificity. Differential diagnosis should be considered with other neuromuscular disorders which are not associated with increased CK manifesting as infantile hypotonia or as limb girdle weakness starting later in life. Considering the high carrier frequency, carrier testing is requested by siblings of patients or of parents of SMA children and are aimed at gaining information that may help with reproductive planning. Individuals at risk should be tested first and, in case of testing positive, the partner should be then analyzed. It is recommended that in case of a request on carrier testing on siblings of an affected SMA infant, a detailed neurological examination should be done and consideration given doing the direct test to exclude SMA. Prenatal diagnosis should be offered to couples who have previously had a child affected with SMA (recurrence risk 25%). The role of follow-up coordination has to be managed by an expert in neuromuscular disorders and in SMA who is able to plan a multidisciplinary intervention that includes pulmonary, gastroenterology/nutrition, and orthopedic care. Prognosis depends on the phenotypic

  16. Eyeball pseudo-muscular actuators for an android face

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpi, Federico; De Rossi, Danilo

    2005-05-01

    The human attention system is based on the capability of the eye of focusing and tracking. These actions are performed by the eyeball muscle system, as a consequence of visual stimuli. The F.A.C.E. (Facial Automaton for Conveying Emotions) project at our lab concerns the development of an android face endowed with dynamic expressiveness and artificial vision. Aimed at realising an artificial attention system for such an automaton, we present here a study for the development of pseudo-muscular polymer actuators for its eyeballs. The system is based on the mimicry of the muscular architecture of the human eye. In particular, linear actuators made of dielectric elastomers have been designed to replicate actions exerted by the main ocular muscles.

  17. Vasopressin receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Biff F

    2015-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) is the principal hormone involved in regulating the tonicity of body fluids. Less appreciated is the role that AVP plays in a variety of other physiologic functions including glucose metabolism, cardiovascular homeostasis, bone metabolism, and cognitive behavior. AVP receptor antagonists are now available and currently approved to treat hyponatremia. There is a great deal of interest in exploring the potential benefits that these drugs may play in blocking AVP-mediated effects in other organ systems. The purpose of this report is to provide an update on the expanding role of AVP receptor antagonists and what disease states these drugs may eventually be used for. PMID:25604388

  18. A new alcohol antagonist: Phaclofen

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, A.M. ); Harris, R.A. )

    1989-01-01

    The ability of the GABA{sub B} receptor antagonist, phaclofen to alter behavioral effects of ethanol was evaluated by loss of righting reflex (sleep time), motor incoordination (bar holding), spontaneous locomotion (open field activity) and hypothermia. Pretreatment with phaclofen significantly decreased the effects of ethanol on motor incoordination, locomotor activity and hypothermia. However, phaclofen had no effect on either pentobarbital- or diazepam-induced motor incoordination. Phaclofen slightly increased the ED{sub 50} for loss of the righting reflex but did not alter either the duration of reflex loss produced by ethanol or blood ethanol levels at awakening. Our results suggest phaclofen is rapidly inactivated resulting in difficulty in observing antagonism of long duration ethanol effects. These findings suggest that the GABA{sub B} system may play a role in mediating several important actions of ethanol.

  19. Wasting mechanisms in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jonghyun; Tajrishi, Marjan M; Ogura, Yuji; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-10-01

    Muscular dystrophy is a group of more than 30 different clinical genetic disorders that are characterized by progressive skeletal muscle wasting and degeneration. Primary deficiency of specific extracellular matrix, sarcoplasmic, cytoskeletal, or nuclear membrane protein results in several secondary changes such as sarcolemmal instability, calcium influx, fiber necrosis, oxidative stress, inflammatory response, breakdown of extracellular matrix, and eventually fibrosis which leads to loss of ambulance and cardiac and respiratory failure. A number of molecular processes have now been identified which hasten disease progression in human patients and animal models of muscular dystrophy. Accumulating evidence further suggests that aberrant activation of several signaling pathways aggravate pathological cascades in dystrophic muscle. Although replacement of defective gene with wild-type is paramount to cure, management of secondary pathological changes has enormous potential to improving the quality of life and extending lifespan of muscular dystrophy patients. In this article, we have reviewed major cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to muscle wasting in muscular dystrophy. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Molecular basis of muscle wasting. PMID:23669245

  20. Modifying muscular dystrophy through TGFβ

    PubMed Central

    Ceco, Ermelinda; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy arises from ongoing muscle degeneration and insufficient regeneration. This imbalance leads to loss of muscle with replacement by scar or fibrosis resulting in muscle weakness and, eventually, loss of muscle function. Human muscular dystrophy is characterized by a wide range of disease severity, even when the same genetic mutation is present. This variability implies that other factors, both genetic and environmental, modify the disease outcome. There has been an ongoing effort to define the genetic and molecular bases that influence muscular dystrophy onset and progression. Modifier genes for muscle disease have been identified through candidate gene approaches as well as genomewide surveys. Multiple lines of experimental evidence have now converged on the TGFβ pathway as a modifier for muscular dystrophy. TGFβ signaling is upregulated in dystrophic muscle as a result of a destabilized plasma membrane and/or altered extracellular matrix. Given the important biological role of the TGFβ pathway, and its role beyond muscle homeostasis, we review modifier genes that alter the TGFβ pathway and approaches to modulate TGFβ activity to ameliorate muscle disease. PMID:23551962

  1. Porcine models of muscular dystrophy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive, fatal, X-linked disease caused by a failure to accumulate the cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. This disease is modeled by a variety of animal models including several fish models, mice, rats, and dogs. While these models have contributed substantially t...

  2. Chronic spinal muscular atrophy of facioscapulohumeral type.

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, T; Toyokura, Y

    1976-01-01

    Chronic spinal muscular atrophy of FSH type affecting a mother and her son and daughter is reported. The relevant literature is reviewed and the relation between this conditon and Kugelberg-Welander (K-W) disease is discussed. Chronic spinal muscular atrophy of FSH type is considered to be a different entity from the eponymous K-W disease. Each type of muscular dystrophy, e.g. limb-girdle, FSH, distal, ocular, or oculopharyngeal type, has its counterpart of nuclear origin. A classification of the chronic spinal muscular atrophies is suggested following the classification of muscular dystrophy. Images PMID:957378

  3. Opioid Antagonist Impedes Exposure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merluzzi, Thomas V.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Thirty spider-phobic adults underwent exposure to 17 phobic-related, graded performance tests. Fifteen subjects were assigned to naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, and 15 were assigned to placebo. Naltrexone had a significant effect on exposure, with naltrexone subjects taking significantly longer to complete first 10 steps of exposure and with…

  4. Spiropiperidine CCR5 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Rotstein, David M; Gabriel, Stephen D; Makra, Ferenc; Filonova, Lubov; Gleason, Shelley; Brotherton-Pleiss, Christine; Setti, Lina Q; Trejo-Martin, Alejandra; Lee, Eun Kyung; Sankuratri, Surya; Ji, Changhua; Derosier, Andre; Dioszegi, Marianna; Heilek, Gabrielle; Jekle, Andreas; Berry, Pamela; Weller, Paul; Mau, Cheng-I

    2009-09-15

    A novel series of CCR5 antagonists has been identified, utilizing leads from high-throughput screening which were further modified based on insights from competitor molecules. Lead optimization was pursued by balancing opposing trends of metabolic stability and potency. Selective and potent analogs with good pharmacokinetic properties were successfully developed. PMID:19674898

  5. Intramuscular pressure and torque during isometric, concentric and eccentric muscular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Styf, J.; Ballard, R.; Aratow, M.; Crenshaw, A.; Watenpaugh, D.; Hargens, A. R.

    1995-01-01

    Intramuscular pressures, electromyography (EMG) and torque generation during isometric, concentric and eccentric maximal isokinetic muscle activity were recorded in 10 healthy volunteers. Pressure and EMG activity were continuously and simultaneously measured side by side in the tibialis anterior and soleus muscles. Ankle joint torque and position were monitored continuously by an isokinetic dynamometer during plantar flexion and dorsiflexion of the foot. The increased force generation during eccentric muscular activity, compared with other muscular activity, was not accompanied by higher intramuscular pressure. Thus, this study demonstrated that eccentric muscular activity generated higher torque values for each increment of intramuscular pressure. Intramuscular pressures during antagonistic co-activation were significantly higher in the tibilis anterior muscle (42-46% of maximal agonistic activity) compared with the soleus muscle (12-29% of maximal agonistic activity) and was largely due to active recruitment of muscle fibers. In summary, eccentric muscular activity creates higher torque values with no additional increase of the intramuscular pressure compared with concentric and isometric muscular activity.

  6. Phase 3 Study of Ataluren in Patients With Nonsense Mutation Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-02

    Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne; Muscular Dystrophies; Muscular Disorders, Atrophic; Muscular Diseases; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Neuromuscular Diseases; Nervous System Diseases; Genetic Diseases, X-Linked; Genetic Diseases, Inborn

  7. Xanthines as Adenosine Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    The natural plant alkaloids caffeine and theophylline were the first adenosine receptor (AR) antagonists described in the literature. They exhibit micromolar affinities and are non-selective. A large number of derivatives and analogs have subsequently been synthesized and evaluated as AR antagonists. Very potent antagonists have thus been developed with selectivity for each of the four AR subtypes. PMID:20859796

  8. Species‐specific action of (Pro3)GIP – a full agonist at human GIP receptors, but a partial agonist and competitive antagonist at rat and mouse GIP receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sparre‐Ulrich, A H; Hansen, L S; Svendsen, B; Christensen, M; Knop, F K; Hartmann, B; Holst, J J

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Specific, high potency receptor antagonists are valuable tools when evaluating animal and human physiology. Within the glucose‐dependent, insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) system, considerable attention has been given to the presumed GIP receptor antagonist, (Pro3)GIP, and its effect in murine studies. We conducted a pharmacological analysis of this ligand including interspecies differences between the rodent and human GIP system. Experimental Approach Transiently transfected COS‐7 cells were assessed for cAMP accumulation upon ligand stimulation and assayed in competition binding using 125I‐human GIP. Using isolated perfused pancreata both from wild type and GIP receptor‐deficient rodents, insulin‐releasing, glucagon‐releasing and somatostatin‐releasing properties in response to species‐specific GIP and (Pro3)GIP analogues were evaluated. Key Results Human (Pro3)GIP is a full agonist at human GIP receptors with similar efficacy (E max) for cAMP production as human GIP, while both rat and mouse(Pro3)GIP were partial agonists on their corresponding receptors. Rodent GIPs are more potent and efficacious at their receptors than human GIP. In perfused pancreata in the presence of 7 mM glucose, both rodent (Pro3)GIP analogues induced modest insulin, glucagon and somatostatin secretion, corresponding to the partial agonist activities observed in cAMP production. Conclusions and Implications When evaluating new compounds, it is important to consider interspecies differences both at the receptor and ligand level. Thus, in rodent models, human GIP is a comparatively weak partial agonist. Human (Pro3)GIP was not an antagonist at human GIP receptors, so there is still a need for a potent antagonist in order to elucidate the physiology of human GIP. PMID:26359804

  9. Prostanoid receptor antagonists: development strategies and therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    Jones, RL; Giembycz, MA; Woodward, DF

    2009-01-01

    Identification of the primary products of cyclo-oxygenase (COX)/prostaglandin synthase(s), which occurred between 1958 and 1976, was followed by a classification system for prostanoid receptors (DP, EP1, EP2 …) based mainly on the pharmacological actions of natural and synthetic agonists and a few antagonists. The design of potent selective antagonists was rapid for certain prostanoid receptors (EP1, TP), slow for others (FP, IP) and has yet to be achieved in certain cases (EP2). While some antagonists are structurally related to the natural agonist, most recent compounds are ‘non-prostanoid’ (often acyl-sulphonamides) and have emerged from high-throughput screening of compound libraries, made possible by the development of (functional) assays involving single recombinant prostanoid receptors. Selective antagonists have been crucial to defining the roles of PGD2 (acting on DP1 and DP2 receptors) and PGE2 (on EP1 and EP4 receptors) in various inflammatory conditions; there are clear opportunities for therapeutic intervention. The vast endeavour on TP (thromboxane) antagonists is considered in relation to their limited pharmaceutical success in the cardiovascular area. Correspondingly, the clinical utility of IP (prostacyclin) antagonists is assessed in relation to the cloud hanging over the long-term safety of selective COX-2 inhibitors. Aspirin apart, COX inhibitors broadly suppress all prostanoid pathways, while high selectivity has been a major goal in receptor antagonist development; more targeted therapy may require an intermediate position with defined antagonist selectivity profiles. This review is intended to provide overviews of each antagonist class (including prostamide antagonists), covering major development strategies and current and potential clinical usage. PMID:19624532

  10. Age-Related Differences in Muscular Strength and Muscular Endurance among Female Masters Swimmers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dummer, Gail M.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This study investigated age-related differences in muscular strength and muscular endurance among 73 female masters swimmers aged 24 to 71 years. While an age-related decline in muscular strength was apparent, the results failed to reveal a similar trend for endurance, suggesting that swimming influences endurance more than strength among women.…

  11. Validity of Field Tests of Upper Body Muscular Strength.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pate, Russell, R; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examined the validity of field tests of elementary students' upper body muscular strength and endurance. Field tests were found to be moderately valid measures of weight-relative muscular strength but not of absolute strength and muscular endurance. (SM)

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy is a condition that chiefly affects muscles used ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Muscular dystrophies are a group of genetic conditions characterized by ...

  14. Arrhythmias in the muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Rajdev, Archana; Groh, William J

    2015-06-01

    In patients with muscular dystrophies, cardiac involvement leading to cardiomyopathy and arrhythmias occurs with variable prevalence, mirroring the phenotypic variability seen among and within the various hereditary myopathies. Knowledge of the incidence of arrhythmias and predictors of sudden death in the various hereditary myopathies can help guide screening and appropriate management of these patients, thereby improving survival. The noncardiac manifestations can lead to delayed recognition of symptoms, affect the decision to implant a prophylactic device, and once a decision is made to proceed with device implant, increase peri-procedural respiratory and anesthesia-related complications. PMID:26002394

  15. Muscular Calf Injuries in Runners.

    PubMed

    Fields, Karl B; Rigby, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Calf pain is a common complaint among runners of all ages but is most frequent in masters athletes. This article focuses on injuries to the triceps surae or true 'calf muscles.' The most common calf injury is a tear of the medial gastrocnemius muscle (Tennis Leg) but other structures including the lateral gastrocnemius, plantaris and soleus also may be the cause of muscular pain. This article looks at the presentation, evaluation, and treatment of these injuries. We also highlight some examples of musculoskeletal ultrasound which is a valuable tool for rapid diagnosis of the cause and extent of injury. PMID:27618240

  16. Nutrition Considerations in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jillian; Samuels, Emily; Mullins, Lucille

    2015-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a serious degenerative muscular disease affecting males. Diagnosis usually occurs in childhood and is confirmed through genetic testing and/or muscle biopsy. Accompanying the disease are several nutrition-related concerns: growth, body composition, energy and protein requirements, constipation, swallowing difficulties, bone health, and complementary medicine. This review article addresses the nutrition aspects of DMD. PMID:25977513

  17. The Muscular Dystrophies: From Genes to Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Neil C; Bloch, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    The genetic basis of many muscular disorders, including many of the more common muscular dystrophies, is now known. Clinically, the recent genetic advances have improved diagnostic capabilities, but they have not yet provided clues about treatment or management. Thanks to better management strategies and therapeutic interventions, however, many patients with a muscular dystrophy are more active and are living longer. Physical therapists, therefore, are more likely to see a patient with a muscular dystrophy, so understanding these muscle disorders and their management is essential. Physical therapy offers the most promise in caring for the majority of patients with these conditions, because it is unlikely that advances in gene therapy will significantly alter their clinical treatment in the near future. This perspective covers some of the basic molecular biological advances together with the clinical manifestations of the muscular dystrophies and the latest approaches to their management. PMID:16305275

  18. Cannabinoid withdrawal in mice: inverse agonist vs neutral antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Sherrica; Nikas, Spyros P.; Shukla, Vidyanand G.; Vemuri, Kiran; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Järbe, Torbjörn U.C.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Previous reports shows rimonabant's inverse properties may be a limiting factor for treating cannabinoid dependence. To overcome this limitation neutral antagonists were developed, to address mechanisms by which an inverse agonist and neutral antagonist elicit withdrawal. Objective Introduces an animal model to study cannabinoid dependence by incorporating traditional methodologies and profiling novel cannabinoid ligands with distinct pharmacological properties/modes of action by evaluating their pharmacological effects on CB1-receptor (CB1R) related physiological/behavioral endpoints. Methods The cannabinergic AM2389 was acutely characterized in the tetrad (locomotor activity, analgesia, inverted screen/catalepsy bar test and temperature); with some comparisons made to Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Tolerance was measured in mice repeatedly administered AM2389. Antagonist-precipitated withdrawal was characterized in cannabinoid-adapted mice induced by either centrally acting antagonists, rimonabant and AM4113, or an antagonist with limited brain penetration, AM6545. Results In the tetrad, AM2389 was more potent and longer acting than THC, suggesting a novel approach for inducing dependence. Repeated administration of AM2389 led to tolerance by attenuating hypothermia that was induced by acute AM2389 administration. Antagonist-precipitated withdrawal signs were induced by rimonabant or AM4113, but not by AM6545. Antagonist-precipitated withdrawal was reversed by reinstating AM2389 or THC. Conclusions These findings suggest cannabinoid-precipitated withdrawal may not be ascribed to the inverse properties of rimonabant, but rather to rapid competition with the agonist at the CB1R. This withdrawal syndrome is likely centrally-mediated, since only the centrally acting CB1R antagonists elicited withdrawal, i.e., such responses were absent after the purported peripherally selective CB1R antagonist AM6545. PMID:25772338

  19. Selective orexin receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Lebold, Terry P; Bonaventure, Pascal; Shireman, Brock T

    2013-09-01

    The orexin, or hypocretin, neuropeptides (orexin-A and orexin-B) are produced on neurons in the hypothalamus which project to key areas of the brain that control sleep-wake states, modulation of food intake, panic, anxiety, emotion, reward and addictive behaviors. These neuropeptides exert their effects on a pair of G-protein coupled receptors termed the orexin-1 (OX1) and orexin-2 (OX2) receptors. Emerging biology suggests the involvement of these receptors in psychiatric disorders as they are thought to play a key role in the regulation of multiple systems. This review is intended to highlight key selective OX1 or OX2 small-molecule antagonists. PMID:23891187

  20. Calmodulin antagonists induce platelet apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhicheng; Li, Suping; Shi, Quanwei; Yan, Rong; Liu, Guanglei; Dai, Kesheng

    2010-04-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) antagonists induce apoptosis in various tumor models and inhibit tumor cell invasion and metastasis, thus some of which have been extensively used as anti-cancer agents. In platelets, CaM has been found to bind directly to the cytoplasmic domains of several platelet receptors. Incubation of platelets with CaM antagonists impairs the receptors-related platelet functions. However, it is still unknown whether CaM antagonists induce platelet apoptosis. Here we show that CaM antagonists N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide (W7), tamoxifen (TMX), and trifluoperazine (TFP) induce apoptotic events in human platelets, including depolarization of mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential, caspase-3 activation, and phosphatidylserine exposure. CaM antagonists did not incur platelet activation as detected by P-selectin surface expression and PAC-1 binding. However, ADP-, botrocetin-, and alpha-thrombin-induced platelet aggregation, platelet adhesion and spreading on von Willebrand factor surface were significantly reduced in platelets pre-treated with CaM antagonists. Furthermore, cytosolic Ca(2+) levels were obviously elevated by both W7 and TMX, and membrane-permeable Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM significantly reduced apoptotic events in platelets induced by W7. Therefore, these findings indicate that CaM antagonists induce platelet apoptosis. The elevation of the cytosolic Ca(2+) levels may be involved in the regulation of CaM antagonists-induced platelet apoptosis. PMID:20172594

  1. Arrhythmias in the Muscular Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Rajdev, Archana; Groh, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis In patients with muscular dystrophies, cardiac involvement leading to cardiomyopathy and arrhythmias occur with variable prevalence mirroring the phenotypic variability seen among and within the various hereditary myopathies. These patients are at risk for development for bradyarrhythmias and tachyarrhythmias including sudden cardiac death. Knowledge of the incidence of arrhythmias and predictors of sudden death in the various hereditary myopathies can help guide screening and appropriate management of these patients, thereby improving survival. The non-cardiac manifestations can lead to delayed recognition of symptoms (limited mobility and respiratory weakness masking cardiac manifestations), affect decision to implant prophylactic device (quantity vs. quality of life) and once a decision is made to proceed with device implant, increase peri-procedural respiratory and anesthesia-related complications. PMID:26002394

  2. Animal Models of Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Rainer; Banks, Glen B.; Hall, John K.; Muir, Lindsey A.; Ramos, Julian N.; Wicki, Jacqueline; Odom, Guy L.; Konieczny, Patryk; Seto, Jane; Chamberlain, Joel R.; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies (MDs) represent a diverse collection of inherited human disorders, which affect to varying degrees skeletal, cardiac, and sometimes smooth muscle (Emery, 20021). To date, more than 50 different genes have been implicated as causing one or more types of MD (Bansal et al., 20032). In many cases, invaluable insights into disease mechanisms, structure and function of gene products, and approaches for therapeutic interventions have benefited from the study of animal models of the different MDs (Arnett et al., 20093). The large number of genes that are associated with MD and the tremendous number of animal models that have been developed preclude a complete discussion of each in the context of this review. However, we summarize here a number of the more commonly used models together with a mixture of different types of gene and MD, which serves to give a general overview of the value of animal models of MD for research and therapeutic development. PMID:22137430

  3. Myofascial force transmission via extramuscular pathways occurs between antagonistic muscles.

    PubMed

    Huijing, Peter A; Baan, Guus C

    2008-01-01

    Most often muscles (as organs) are viewed as independent actuators. To test if this is true for antagonistic muscles, force was measured simultaneously at: (1) the proximal and distal tendons of the extensor digitorum muscle (EDL) to quantify any proximo-distal force differences, as an indicator of myofascial force transmission, (2) at the distal tendons of the whole antagonistic peroneal muscle group (PER) to test if effects of EDL length changes are present and (3) at the proximal end of the tibia to test if myofascially transmitted force is exerted there. EDL length was manipulated either at the proximal or distal tendons. This way equal EDL lengths are attained at two different positions of the muscle with respect to the tibia and antagonistic muscles. Despite its relatively small size, lengthening of the EDL changed forces exerted on the tibia and forces exerted by its antagonistic muscle group. Apart from its extramuscular myofascial connections, EDL has no connections to either the tibia or these antagonistic muscles. Proximal EDL lengthening increased distal muscular forces (active PER DeltaF approximately +1.7%), but decreased tibial forces (passive from 0.3 to 0 N; active DeltaF approximately -5%). Therefore, it is concluded that these antagonistic muscles do not act independently, because of myofascial force transmission between them. Such a decrease in tibial force indicates release of pre-strained connections. Distal EDL lengthening had opposite effects (tripling passive force exerted on tibia; active PER force DeltaF approximately -3.6%). It is concluded that the length and relative position of the EDL is a co-determinant of passive and active force exerted at tendons of nearby antagonistic muscle groups. These results necessitate a new view of the locomotor apparatus, which needs to take into account the high interdependence of muscles and muscle fibres as force generators, as well as proximo-distal force differences and serial and parallel

  4. Duchenne muscular dystrophy: current cell therapies

    PubMed Central

    Sienkiewicz, Dorota; Okurowska-Zawada, Bożena; Paszko-Patej, Grażyna; Kawnik, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a genetically determined X-linked disease and the most common, progressive pediatric muscle disorder. For decades, research has been conducted to find an effective therapy. This review presents current therapeutic methods for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, based on scientific articles in English published mainly in the period 2000 to 2014. We used the PubMed database to identify and review the most important studies. An analysis of contemporary studies of stem cell therapy and the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in muscular dystrophy was performed. PMID:26136844

  5. A trial of flunarizine in the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Dick, D J; Gardner-Medwin, D; Gates, P G; Gibson, M; Simpson, J M; Walls, T J

    1986-05-01

    Twenty-seven boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) entered a double-blind controlled trial of treatment with the calcium antagonist flunarizine. They were matched for age and disability. At monthly intervals, muscle power, functional ability, locomotor score, contractures, and forced vital capacity were measured by a team not involved in clinical care. Over a period of 1 year, flunarizine in a dose of up to 0.25 mg/kg/day had no effect on the clinical course of the disease. PMID:3520308

  6. Tannins as Gibberellin Antagonists 1

    PubMed Central

    Corcoran, Mary Ritzel; Geissman, T. A.; Phinney, Bernard O.

    1972-01-01

    Fourteen chemically defined hydrolyzable tannins and six impure mixtures of either condensed or hydrolyzable tannins were found to inhibit the gibberellin-induced growth of light-grown dwarf pea seedlings. The highest ratio of tannins to gibberellic acid tested (1000: 1 by weight) inhibited from 80 to 95% of the induced growth for all tannins tested except for two monogalloyl glucose tannins which inhibited only 50% of the induced growth. The lowest ratio tested (10: 1) inhibited the induced growth by less than 25% except for the case of terchebin where 50% inhibition was found. The inhibition of gibberellin-induced growth was found to be completely reversed by increasing the amount of gibberellin in three cases tested. Tannins alone did not inhibit endogenous growth of either dwarf or nondwarf pea seedlings. Eight compounds related to tannins, including coumarin, trans-cinnamic acid, and a number of phenolic compounds were also tested as gibberellin antagonists. Most of these compounds showed some inhibition of gibberellin-induced growth, but less than that of the tannins. At the highest ratio (1000: 1) the greatest inhibition was 55%; at the lowest ratio (10: 1) no more than 17% was observed. These compounds did not inhibit endogenous growth, and the inhibition of gibberellin-induced growth could be reversed by increasing the amount of gibberellin in two cases tested. Six chemically defined tannins were found to inhibit hypocotyl growth induced by gibberellic acid in cucumber seedlings. Growth induced by indoleacetic acid in the same test was not inhibited. The highest ratio of tannin to promotor tested gave strong inhibition of gibberellic acid-induced growth, but actually enhanced the growth induced by indoleacetic acid. This difference in action suggests a specificity between the tannins and gibberellic acid. PMID:16657953

  7. Pros and cons of vitamin K antagonists and non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Riva, Nicoletta; Ageno, Walter

    2015-03-01

    Anticoagulant treatment can be currently instituted with two different classes of drugs: the vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) and the newer, "novel" or non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant drugs (NOACs). The NOACs have several practical advantages over VKAs, such as the rapid onset/offset of action, the lower potential for food and drug interactions, and the predictable anticoagulant response. However, the VKAs currently have a broader spectrum of indications, a standardized monitoring test, and established reversal strategies. The NOACs emerged as alternative options for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism and for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Nevertheless, there remain some populations for whom the VKAs remain the most appropriate anticoagulant drug. This article discusses the advantages and disadvantages of VKAs and NOACs. PMID:25703519

  8. Effects of Attentional Focusing Strategies on Muscular Power in Older Women.

    PubMed

    Makaruk, Hubert; Porter, Jared M; Dlugolecka, Barbara; Parnicka, Urszula; Makaruk, Beata

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of different foci of attention on parameters related to maximum muscular power in older women. Using a counterbalanced within-participant design, 23 physically active young-old women (age 59-69) completed a maximum effort cycle ergometer test following three types of verbal instructions. The external instruction (EXF) was designed to focus attention on moving the pedals as fast as possible, internal instruction (INF) directed attention toward moving the legs as fast as possible, and a control condition (CON) was created in which participants were instructed to perform the task to the best of their abilities. Results indicated that the EXF and CON conditions resulted in greater muscular power compared with the INF condition. Results also indicated that directing attention internally hindered muscular power performance in older women, which is consistent with the predictions of the constrained action hypothesis. PMID:24956607

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... and walking. Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy also impairs brain development. People with this condition have a brain abnormality ... cobblestones). These changes in the structure of the brain lead to significantly delayed development of speech and motor skills and moderate to ...

  10. Reality television and the muscular male ideal.

    PubMed

    Dallesasse, Starla L; Kluck, Annette S

    2013-06-01

    Although researchers have examined the negative effects of viewing reality television (RTV) on women's body image, this research has not been extended to men. Exploring the extent to which RTV depicts men who embody the muscular ideal may enhance our understanding of the potential influence of this media genre. We explored the extent to which RTV depicted men who embodied the muscular ideal using a quantitative content analysis. Based on binomial tests, the primary male cast members of programs airing on networks popular among young adult men during the Fall 2009 broadcast season were more muscular, with lower levels of body fat, than average U.S. men. The chest-to-waist and shoulder-to-waist ratios of these cast members did not differ as a function of program type (i.e., reality drama, endurance, and romance). Young men who view RTV programs included in the present study would be exposed to an unrepresentative muscular ideal. PMID:23523084

  11. Physical Therapy and Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSHD)

    MedlinePlus

    Physical Therapy & FSHD Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy A Guide for Patients & Physical Therapists Authors: Wendy M. King, P.T., ... expertise and patient preferences. The goals of any physical therapy plan of care are to assist patients to:  ...

  12. Hotspots of damage by antagonists shape the spatial structure of plant-pollinator interactions.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, María C; Jordano, Pedro; Valido, Alfredo

    2015-08-01

    The balance between mutualistic and antagonistic plant-animal interactions and their spatial variation results in a highly dynamic mosaic of reproductive success within plant populations. Yet, the ecological drivers of this small-scale heterogeneity of interaction patterns and their outcomes remain virtually unexplored. We analyzed spatial structure in the frequency and intensity of interactions that vertebrate pollinators (birds and lizards) and invertebrate antagonists (florivores, nectar larcenists, and seed predators) had when interacting with the insular plant Isoplexis canariensis, and their effect on plant fitness. Spatially autocorrelated variation in plant reproductive success (fruit and viable seed set) emerged from the combined action of mutualists and antagonists, rather than reflecting the spatial pattern of any specific animal group. However, the influence of antagonists on plant fitness was stronger primarily due to the florivores' action on earlier reproductive stages, consuming and damaging floral structures before the arrival of pollinators. Our results indicate that the early action of antagonists creates hotspots of increased plant damage, where the effects of later acting mutualists are not translated into increased reproductive benefits. We foresee the potential for antagonists to shape the intra-population mosaics of plant fitness in situations where antagonists outnumber mutualists, when their interactions occur before those of mutualists, and when mutualists can detect and avoid damaged plants while foraging. Severely damaged plants in antagonistic hotspots might be excluded from the mating network and render a limited production of viable seeds, reducing both the growth rate of the plant population and the effective population size. PMID:26405743

  13. Muscular Oxygen Uptake Kinetics in Aged Adults.

    PubMed

    Koschate, J; Drescher, U; Baum, K; Eichberg, S; Schiffer, T; Latsch, J; Brixius, K; Hoffmann, U

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary oxygen uptake (V˙O2) kinetics and heart rate kinetics are influenced by age and fitness. Muscular V˙O2 kinetics can be estimated from heart rate and pulmonary V˙O2. In this study the applicability of a test using pseudo-random binary sequences in combination with a model to estimate muscular V˙O2 kinetics was tested. Muscular V˙O2 kinetics were expected to be faster than pulmonary V˙O2 kinetics, slowed in aged subjects and correlated with maximum V˙O2 and heart rate kinetics. 27 elderly subjects (73±3 years; 81.1±8.2 kg; 175±4.7 cm) participated. Cardiorespiratory kinetics were assessed using the maximum of cross-correlation functions, higher maxima implying faster kinetics. Muscular V˙O2 kinetics were faster than pulmonary V˙O2 kinetics (0.31±0.1 vs. 0.29±0.1 s; p=0.004). Heart rate kinetics were not correlated with muscular or pulmonary V˙O2 kinetics or maximum V˙O2. Muscular V˙O2 kinetics correlated with maximum V˙O2 (r=0.35; p=0.033). This suggests, that muscular V˙O2 kinetics are faster than estimates from pulmonary V˙O2 and related to maximum V˙O2 in aged subjects. In the future this experimental approach may help to characterize alterations in muscular V˙O2 under various conditions independent of motivation and maximal effort. PMID:27116341

  14. Anti-inflammatory actions of Chemoattractant Receptor-homologous molecule expressed on Th2 by the antagonist MK-7246 in a novel rat model of Alternaria alternata elicited pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Gil, Malgorzata A; Caniga, Michael; Woodhouse, Janice D; Eckman, Joseph; Lee, Hyun-Hee; Salmon, Michael; Naber, John; Hamilton, Valerie T; Sevilla, Raquel S; Bettano, Kimberly; Klappenbach, Joel; Moy, Lily; Correll, Craig C; Gervais, Francois G; Siliphaivanh, Phieng; Zhang, Weisheng; Zhang-Hoover, Jie; McLeod, Robbie L; Cicmil, Milenko

    2014-11-15

    Alternaria alternata is a fungal allergen linked to the development of severe asthma in humans. In view of the clinical relationship between A. alternata and asthma, we sought to investigate the allergic activity of this antigen after direct application to the lungs of Brown Norway rats. Here we demonstrate that a single intratracheal instillation of A. alternata induces dose and time dependent eosinophil influx, edema and Type 2 helper cell cytokine production in the lungs of BN rats. We established the temporal profile of eosinophilic infiltration and cytokine production, such as Interleukin-5 and Interleukin-13, following A. alternata challenge. These responses were comparable to Ovalbumin induced models of asthma and resulted in peak inflammatory responses 48h following a single challenge, eliminating the need for multiple sensitizations and challenges. The initial perivascular and peribronchiolar inflammation preceded alveolar inflammation, progressing to a more sub-acute inflammatory response with notable epithelial cell hypertrophy. To limit the effects of an A. alternata inflammatory response, MK-7246 was utilized as it is an antagonist for Chemoattractant Receptor-homologous molecule expressed in Th2 cells. In a dose-dependent manner, MK-7246 decreased eosinophil influx and Th2 cytokine production following the A. alternata challenge. Furthermore, therapeutic administration of corticosteroids resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in eosinophil influx and Th2 cytokine production. Reproducible asthma-related outcomes and amenability to pharmacological intervention by mechanisms relevant to asthma demonstrate that an A. alternata induced pulmonary inflammation in BN rats is a valuable preclinical pharmacodynamic in vivo model for evaluating the pharmacological inhibitors of allergic pulmonary inflammation. PMID:25261040

  15. Discovery of small molecule antagonists of TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Rami, Harshad K; Thompson, Mervyn; Wyman, Paul; Jerman, Jeffrey C; Egerton, Julie; Brough, Stephen; Stevens, Alexander J; Randall, Andrew D; Smart, Darren; Gunthorpe, Martin J; Davis, John B

    2004-07-16

    Small molecule antagonists of the vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1, also known as VR1) are disclosed. Ureas such as 5 (SB-452533) were used to explore the structure activity relationship with several potent analogues identified. Pharmacological studies using electrophysiological and FLIPR Ca(2+) based assays showed compound 5 was an antagonist versus capsaicin, noxious heat and acid mediated activation of TRPV1. Study of a quaternary salt of 5 supports a mode of action in which compounds from this series cause inhibition via an extracellularly accessible binding site on the TRPV1 receptor. PMID:15203132

  16. Muscular strength profile in Tunisian male national judo team

    PubMed Central

    Ghrairi, Mourad; Hammouda, Omar; Malliaropoulos, Nikos

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: it is well established that muscle strength is a determinant factor in judo. However, little data are available for African athletes. Therefore, the aim of this study was to provide reference data of the muscular strength profile (MSP) for an African team, Tunisian judo team. Methods: the study was conducted among ten international judo athletes from Tunisia. To determine their MSP, we used an isokinetic dynamometer to assess Hamstrings, Quadriceps of both knees and external, internal rotators of both shoulders. The angular velocities of the assessments were; 90, 180, 240°/s for the knees and 60, 120°/s for the shoulders. Results: MSP was determined based on two parameters; the maximum peak torque (PT) of each muscle and the ratio agonistic/antagonistic muscles (R). The knee extensors and flexors in the “supporting leg” had higher PT than in the “attacking leg”; respectively, 245N.m versus 237 (p<0.05) and 147 N.m versus 145 (p>0.05). R was normal for both legs. Furthermore, both rotators of the dominant shoulder had higher PT; 84 N.m versus 71 for the internal rotators (p<0.05) and 34,7 N.m versus 29,0 for the lateral rotators (p<0.05). Inversely, R was higher in the non-dominant side; 45% versus 35, p<0.05). Conclusion: the MSP of the selected elites Tunisian judo athletes was characterized by 3 major features; a strength of the quadriceps in the standing leg significantly higher than in the attacking leg, a normal muscular balance Hamstrings/quadriceps in both legs and a strength of the shoulder’ rotators higher in the dominant side. PMID:25332926

  17. Treatment of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy with Denosumab

    PubMed Central

    Lefkowitz, Stanley S.; Lefkowitz, Doris L.; Kethley, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is the 3rd most common form of muscular dystrophy. Effective treatments for any of the muscular dystrophies have yet to be realized. This report describes such a treatment. Case Report: A 66 year old female was diagnosed with osteoporosis. She had been diagnosed with FSHD muscular dystrophy a number of years previously by both genetic and clinical studies. Following a 2 year course with Forteo for osteoporosis, she was given an injection of Denosumab (Prolia) to maintain her bone density. By 24 hours, she exhibited increased strength and a dramatic reduction of her dystrophic symptoms e.g. she could walk unassisted in high heels. She was able to accomplish other things that had not been possible for a number of years. After approximately 5 weeks she gradually lost the newfound strength with a complete loss by about 6 weeks. A second injection of Denosumab resulted in the same effect, i.e. reversal of symptoms and increased functionality. A number of measurements and videos were taken to establish the beneficial effects of Prolia for future studies. This was repeated with a 3rd and 4th injection in order to establish the unequivocal beneficial effects on muscular dystrophy. Conclusions: Further studies will be required to establish Denosumab as a major “front line” treatment for this disease and possibly other muscular dystrophies. PMID:23569491

  18. [The heartache of muscular dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Hoogerwaard, E M; Ginjaar, H B; Wilde, A A; Leschot, N J; de Voogt, W G; de Visser, M

    2000-11-11

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy are caused by a mutation in the dystrophin gene, located on the short arm of the X chromosome. Three so called dystrophinopathy patients, a women aged 54 and two men aged 23 and 21 years, suffered from a severe dilated cardiomyopathy. Such a cardiomyopathy can develop in both carriers and patients. In addition, it is often more important for prognosis than muscle weakness. For these two reasons it is important to screen both groups for (early) cardiological abnormalities. If these are present, regular follow-up is necessary to start timely therapy. When cardiological investigations yield normal results, it is advised to screen carriers with a five-year interval. Dystrophinopathy patients should be checked every year, because the cardiomyopathy sometimes develops and deteriorates over a short period of time. Patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and with a positive family history for dilated cardiomyopathy, muscle weakness or high serum creatine kinase activity should be screened for a mutation in the dystrophin gene. PMID:11103252

  19. [Vitamin K antagonists overdose].

    PubMed

    Groszek, Barbara; Piszczek, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, anticoagulant therapy belongs to the most commonly used forms of pharmacotherapy in modern medicine. The most important representatives of anticoagulants are heparins (unfractionated heparin and low-molecular-weight heparin) and coumarin derivatives (vitamin K antagonists--VKA). Next to the many advantages of traditional oral anticoagulants may also have disadvantages. In Poland most often used two VKA: acenocoumarol and warfarin. The aim of the work is the analysis of the causes of the occurrence of bleeding disorders and symptoms of overdose VKA in patients to be hospitalized. In the years 2012 to 2014 were hospitalized 62 patients with overdose VKA (40 women and 22 men). The average age of patients was 75.3 years) and clotting disturbances and/or bleeding. At the time of the admission in all patients a significant increase in the value of the INR was stated, in 22 patients INR result was " no clot detected", on the remaining value of the INR were in the range of 7 to 13.1. On 51 patients observed different severe symptoms of bleeding (hematuria, bleeding from mucous membranes of the nose or gums ecchymoses on the extremities, bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract--as in 5 patients has led to significant anemia and transfusion of concentrated red blood cells. Up on 33 patients kidney function disorder were found--exacerbated chronic renal failure and urinary tract infection. 8 diagnosed inflammatory changes in the airways. On 13 patients, it was found a significant degree of neuropsychiatric disorders (dementia, cognitive impairment), which made impossible the understanding the sense of treatment and cooperation with the patient. In 6 patients the symptoms of overdose were probably dependent on the interaction with the congestants at the same time (change the preparation of anticoagulant, NSAIDs, antibiotics). In 2 cases, the overdose was a suicide attempt in nature. In addition to the above mentioned disorders, on two of those patients diagnosed

  20. Neurobiological actions of cysteamine

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.; Fisher, L.; Mason, R.T.; Rivier, J.; Vale, W.

    1985-06-01

    Somatostatin (SS)-related peptides act within discrete brain regions to inhibit adrenal epinephrine (E) secretion, to prevent hypothermia, and to produce hyperthermia. Depletion of brain concentrations of these SS-related peptides using cysteamine (CSH) or central administration of an SS receptor antagonist increases adrenal E secretion and impairs thermoregulation. These actions of CSH and the SS receptor antagonist are reversed by administration of SS into the central nervous system. These results support the hypothesis that endogenous brain SS-related peptides are involved in the regulation of adrenal E secretion and thermoregulation.

  1. Sexually antagonistic genes: experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Rice, W R

    1992-06-01

    When selection differs between the sexes, a mutation beneficial to one sex may be harmful to the other (sexually antagonistic). Because the sexes share a common gene pool, selection in one sex can interfere with the other's adaptive evolution. Theory predicts that sexually antagonistic mutations should accumulate in tight linkage with a new sex-determining gene, even when the harm to benefit ratio is high. Genetic markers and artificial selection were used to make a pair of autosomal genes segregate like a new pair of sex-determining genes in a Drosophila melanogaster model system. A 29-generation study provides experimental evidence that sexually antagonistic genes may be common in nature and will accumulate in response to a new sex-determining gene. PMID:1604317

  2. Clinical features of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Lindsay E.; Freeman, Brandi K.; Auh, Sungyoung; Kokkinis, Angela D.; La Pean, Alison; Chen, Cheunju; Lehky, Tanya J.; Shrader, Joseph A.; Levy, Ellen W.; Harris-Love, Michael; Di Prospero, Nicholas A.

    2009-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy is an X-linked motor neuron disease caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the androgen receptor gene. To characterize the natural history and define outcome measures for clinical trials, we assessed the clinical history, laboratory findings and muscle strength and function in 57 patients with genetically confirmed disease. We also administered self-assessment questionnaires for activities of daily living, quality of life and erectile function. We found an average delay of over 5 years from onset of weakness to diagnosis. Muscle strength and function correlated directly with serum testosterone levels and inversely with CAG repeat length, age and duration of weakness. Motor unit number estimation was decreased by about half compared to healthy controls. Sensory nerve action potentials were reduced in nearly all subjects. Quantitative muscle assessment and timed 2 min walk may be useful as meaningful indicators of disease status. The direct correlation of testosterone levels with muscle strength indicates that androgens may have a positive effect on muscle function in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy patients, in addition to the toxic effects described in animal models. PMID:19846582

  3. Pharmacodynamic properties of leukotriene receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Nicosia, S

    1999-06-01

    Leukotrienes (LTs) are among the most important mediators of asthma; cysteine-containing LTs (cysteinyl-LTs, i.e. LTC4, LTD4 and LTE4) are very potent bronchoconstrictors and participate in the inflammatory component of asthma by inducing mucus hypersecretion, plasma extravasation, mucosal oedema and eosinophil recruitment. Therefore, compounds able to inhibit either the formation or the action of LTs are potential antiasthma drugs and, at present, the cysteinyl-LT receptor antagonists (LTRAs) appear to be the most promising. The receptors for cysteinyl-LTs, termed CysLT receptors, are heterogeneous; at least two different classes have so far been recognized, named CysLT1 (blocked by the so-called classical antagonists, such as FPL 55712, ICI 198,615, ICI 204,219, SK&F 104353, MK-476 and others) and CysLT2 (insensitive to the classical antagonists, but sensitive to BAY u9773). The authors' results indicate that even more receptor subclasses might exist in human airways, which discriminate between LTC4 and LTD4, both asthma mediators. Among the many LTRAs, zafirlukast (Accolate, ICI 204,219), montelukast (Singulair, MK-476) and pranlukast (Onon, ONO-1078) are available for clinical use. All the LTRAs are able to inhibit LTD4-induced bronchoconstriction in humans, albeit with different potencies. With respect to antigen challenge, all of them inhibit the early phase of response, whereas only the most recently developed and potent ones are effective in the late phase. LTRAs are effective in asthma triggered by exercise, cold or aspirin. Furthermore, although they are not bronchodilators per se, they increase basal forced expiratory volume in one second in patients with mild-to-moderate asthma, indicating that, in these individuals, constant cysteinyl-LT release contributes to maintaining increased bronchial tone. Finally, the effect of LTRAs is additive to that of beta-agonists and is potentiated by antihistamine compounds. In conclusion, the available results clearly

  4. [Muscular Dystrophies Involving the Retinal Function].

    PubMed

    Jägle, H

    2016-03-01

    Muscular dystrophies are rare disorders, with an incidence of approx. 20 in 100 000. Some dystrophies also affect retinal or optic nerve function. In such cases, the ophthalmological findings may be critical for differential diagnosis or patient counseling. For example in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, where the alteration in retinal function seems to reflect cerebral involvement. Other important forms are mitochondrial and metabolic disorders, such as the Kearns-Sayre syndrome and the Refsum syndrome. Molecular genetic analysis has become a major tool for differential diagnosis, but may be complex and demanding. This article gives an overview of major muscular dystrophies involving retinal function and their genetic origin, in order to guide differential diagnosis. PMID:27011029

  5. Genetics Home Reference: spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... myoclonic epilepsy spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Description Spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy (SMA-PME) is a neurological condition that causes ...

  6. Other limb-girdle muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Amato, Anthony A

    2011-01-01

    The secondary α-dystroglycanopathies usually present in infancy as congenital muscular dystrophies but may manifest later in childhood or adult life (limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) 2I, LGMD2K, LGMD2M, LGMD2N, and LGMD2O). Patients with telethoninopathy (LGMD2B) may present with mainly proximal or distal lower extremity weakness, and notably the muscle biopsies may demonstrate rimmed vacuoles. LGMD2L is caused by newly described mutations in ANO5 and can sometimes present with distal weakness resembling Miyoshi myopathy. PMID:21496628

  7. Advances in gene therapy for muscular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Razak, Hayder; Malerba, Alberto; Dickson, George

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive lethal inherited muscular dystrophy caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a protein required for muscle fibre integrity. So far, many approaches have been tested from the traditional gene addition to newer advanced approaches based on manipulation of the cellular machinery either at the gene transcription, mRNA processing or translation levels. Unfortunately, despite all these efforts, no efficient treatments for DMD are currently available. In this review, we highlight the most advanced therapeutic strategies under investigation as potential DMD treatments. PMID:27594988

  8. Advances in gene therapy for muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Razak, Hayder; Malerba, Alberto; Dickson, George

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive lethal inherited muscular dystrophy caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a protein required for muscle fibre integrity. So far, many approaches have been tested from the traditional gene addition to newer advanced approaches based on manipulation of the cellular machinery either at the gene transcription, mRNA processing or translation levels. Unfortunately, despite all these efforts, no efficient treatments for DMD are currently available. In this review, we highlight the most advanced therapeutic strategies under investigation as potential DMD treatments. PMID:27594988

  9. Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a group of heterogeneous genetic diseases characterized by progressive degeneration and weakness of skeletal muscle. Since the discovery of the first muscular dystrophy gene encoding dystrophin, a large number of genes have been identified that are involved in various muscle-wasting and neuromuscular disorders. Human genetic studies complemented by animal model systems have substantially contributed to our understanding of the molecular pathomechanisms underlying muscle degeneration. Moreover, these studies have revealed distinct molecular and cellular mechanisms that link genetic mutations to diverse muscle wasting phenotypes. PMID:23671309

  10. 9 CFR 311.35 - Muscular inflammation, degeneration, or infiltration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Muscular inflammation, degeneration, or infiltration. 311.35 Section 311.35 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... PARTS § 311.35 Muscular inflammation, degeneration, or infiltration. (a) If muscular lesions are...

  11. 9 CFR 311.35 - Muscular inflammation, degeneration, or infiltration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Muscular inflammation, degeneration, or infiltration. 311.35 Section 311.35 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... PARTS § 311.35 Muscular inflammation, degeneration, or infiltration. (a) If muscular lesions are...

  12. 9 CFR 311.35 - Muscular inflammation, degeneration, or infiltration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Muscular inflammation, degeneration, or infiltration. 311.35 Section 311.35 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... PARTS § 311.35 Muscular inflammation, degeneration, or infiltration. (a) If muscular lesions are...

  13. 9 CFR 311.35 - Muscular inflammation, degeneration, or infiltration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Muscular inflammation, degeneration, or infiltration. 311.35 Section 311.35 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... PARTS § 311.35 Muscular inflammation, degeneration, or infiltration. (a) If muscular lesions are...

  14. 9 CFR 311.35 - Muscular inflammation, degeneration, or infiltration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Muscular inflammation, degeneration, or infiltration. 311.35 Section 311.35 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... PARTS § 311.35 Muscular inflammation, degeneration, or infiltration. (a) If muscular lesions are...

  15. Spinal muscular atrophy patient-derived motor neurons exhibit hyperexcitability

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huisheng; Lu, Jianfeng; Chen, Hong; Du, Zhongwei; Li, Xue-Jun; Zhang, Su-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) presents severe muscle weakness with limited motor neuron (MN) loss at an early stage, suggesting potential functional alterations in MNs that contribute to SMA symptom presentation. Using SMA induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), we found that SMA MNs displayed hyperexcitability with increased membrane input resistance, hyperpolarized threshold, and larger action potential amplitude, which was mimicked by knocking down full length survival motor neuron (SMN) in non-SMA MNs. We further discovered that SMA MNs exhibit enhanced sodium channel activities with increased current amplitude and facilitated recovery, which was corrected by restoration of SMN1 in SMA MNs. Together we propose that SMN reduction results in MN hyperexcitability and impaired neurotransmission, the latter of which exacerbate each other via a feedback loop, thus contributing to severe symptoms at an early stage of SMA. PMID:26190808

  16. Zebrafish orthologs of human muscular dystrophy genes

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, Leta S; Guyon, Jeffrey R; Vogel, Emily D; Beltre, Rosanna; Pusack, Timothy J; Zhou, Yi; Zon, Leonard I; Kunkel, Louis M

    2007-01-01

    Background Human muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders which cause decreased muscle strength and often result in premature death. There is no known cure for muscular dystrophy, nor have all causative genes been identified. Recent work in the small vertebrate zebrafish Danio rerio suggests that mutation or misregulation of zebrafish dystrophy orthologs can also cause muscular degeneration phenotypes in fish. To aid in the identification of new causative genes, this study identifies and maps zebrafish orthologs for all known human muscular dystrophy genes. Results Zebrafish sequence databases were queried for transcripts orthologous to human dystrophy-causing genes, identifying transcripts for 28 out of 29 genes of interest. In addition, the genomic locations of all 29 genes have been found, allowing rapid candidate gene discovery during genetic mapping of zebrafish dystrophy mutants. 19 genes show conservation of syntenic relationships with humans and at least two genes appear to be duplicated in zebrafish. Significant sequence coverage on one or more BAC clone(s) was also identified for 24 of the genes to provide better local sequence information and easy updating of genomic locations as the zebrafish genome assembly continues to evolve. Conclusion This resource supports zebrafish as a dystrophy model, suggesting maintenance of all known dystrophy-associated genes in the zebrafish genome. Coupled with the ability to conduct genetic screens and small molecule screens, zebrafish are thus an attractive model organism for isolating new dystrophy-causing genes/pathways and for use in high-throughput therapeutic discovery. PMID:17374169

  17. Prevalence of congenital muscular dystrophy in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Graziano, Alessandra; Bianco, Flaviana; D'Amico, Adele; Moroni, Isabella; Messina, Sonia; Bruno, Claudio; Pegoraro, Elena; Mora, Marina; Astrea, Guja; Magri, Francesca; Comi, Giacomo P.; Berardinelli, Angela; Moggio, Maurizio; Morandi, Lucia; Pini, Antonella; Petillo, Roberta; Tasca, Giorgio; Monforte, Mauro; Minetti, Carlo; Mongini, Tiziana; Ricci, Enzo; Gorni, Ksenija; Battini, Roberta; Villanova, Marcello; Politano, Luisa; Gualandi, Francesca; Ferlini, Alessandra; Muntoni, Francesco; Santorelli, Filippo Maria; Bertini, Enrico; Pane, Marika

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We provide a nationwide population study of patients with congenital muscular dystrophy in Italy. Methods: Cases were ascertained from the databases in all the tertiary referral centers for pediatric neuromuscular disorders and from all the genetic diagnostic centers in which diagnostic tests for these forms are performed. Results: The study includes 336 patients with a point prevalence of 0.563 per 100,000. Mutations were identified in 220 of the 336 (65.5%). The cohort was subdivided into diagnostic categories based on the most recent classifications on congenital muscular dystrophies. The most common forms were those with α-dystroglycan glycosylation deficiency (40.18%) followed by those with laminin α2 deficiency (24.11%) and collagen VI deficiency (20.24%). The forms of congenital muscular dystrophy related to mutations in SEPN1 and LMNA were less frequent (6.25% and 5.95%, respectively). Conclusions: Our study provides for the first time comprehensive epidemiologic information and point prevalence figures for each of the major diagnostic categories on a large cohort of congenital muscular dystrophies. The study also reflects the diagnostic progress in this field with an accurate classification of the cases according to the most recent gene discoveries. PMID:25653289

  18. Genetics Home Reference: facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Padberg GW, Lunt PW, van der Maarel SM. Best practice guidelines on genetic diagnostics of Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy: ... Reviewed : August 2014 Published : August 30, 2016 The resources on this site should not be used as a ... of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of ...

  19. Cardiomyopathy in becker muscular dystrophy: Overview.

    PubMed

    Ho, Rady; Nguyen, My-Le; Mather, Paul

    2016-06-26

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder involving mutations of the dystrophin gene. Cardiac involvement in BMD has been described and cardiomyopathy represents the number one cause of death in these patients. In this paper, the pathophysiology, clinical evaluations and management of cardiomyopathy in patients with BMD will be discussed. PMID:27354892

  20. Cardiomyopathy in becker muscular dystrophy: Overview

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Rady; Nguyen, My-Le; Mather, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder involving mutations of the dystrophin gene. Cardiac involvement in BMD has been described and cardiomyopathy represents the number one cause of death in these patients. In this paper, the pathophysiology, clinical evaluations and management of cardiomyopathy in patients with BMD will be discussed. PMID:27354892

  1. Visuospatial Attention Disturbance in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Moura, Maria Clara Drummond Soares; do Valle, Luiz Eduardo Ribeiro; Resende, Maria Bernadete Dutra; Pinto, Katia Osternack

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The cognitive deficits present in the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) are not yet well characterized. Attention, considered to be the brain mechanism responsible for the selection of sensory stimuli, could be disturbed in DMD, contributing, at least partially, to the observed global cognitive deficit. The aim of this study was to…

  2. Developing therapies for spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Wertz, Mary H; Sahin, Mustafa

    2016-02-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is an autosomal-recessive pediatric neurodegenerative disease characterized by loss of spinal motor neurons. It is caused by mutation in the gene survival of motor neuron 1 (SMN1), leading to loss of function of the full-length SMN protein. SMN has a number of functions in neurons, including RNA splicing and snRNP biogenesis in the nucleus, and RNA trafficking in neurites. The expression level of full-length SMN protein from the SMN2 locus modifies disease severity. Increasing full-length SMN protein by a small amount can lead to significant improvements in the neurological phenotype. Currently available interventions for spinal muscular atrophy patients are physical therapy and orthopedic, nutritional, and pulmonary interventions; these are palliative or supportive measures and do not address the etiology of the disease. In the past decade, there has been a push for developing therapeutics to improve motor phenotypes and increase life span of spinal muscular atrophy patients. These therapies are aimed primarily at restoration of full-length SMN protein levels, but other neuroprotective treatments have been investigated as well. Here, we discuss recent advances in basic and clinical studies toward finding safe and effective treatments of spinal muscular atrophy using gene therapy, antisense oligonucleotides, and other small molecule modulators of SMN expression. PMID:26173388

  3. Exon Snipping in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kemaladewi, Dwi U; Cohn, Ronald D

    2016-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a life-limiting neuromuscular disorder caused by mutations in the DMD gene encoding dystrophin. We discuss very recent studies that used CRISPR/Cas9 technology to 'snip out' mutated exons in DMD, restoring the reading frame of the gene. We also present cautionary aspects of translating this exciting technology into clinical practice. PMID:26856237

  4. [Muscular strength in patients with fibromyalgia. A literature review].

    PubMed

    Dombernowsky, Tilde; Dreyer, Lene; Bartels, Else Marie; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente

    2008-01-21

    Do patients with fibromyalgia (FM) have reduced muscular strength? We examined 22 articles and conclude from the results of these that FM patients have reduced muscular strength in their hands and quadriceps. The material also suggests generalised reduced muscular strength. However, the studies have several methodological shortcomings and future studies should be carefully designed with respect to patients as well as the control group and should be larger. To avoid CNS influence from e.g. fatigue and pain, muscular electro-stimulation may be used to ensure that the actual maximal muscular strength is also measured. PMID:18282450

  5. Zebrafish models for human FKRP muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Genri; Guyon, Jeffrey R; Nakamura, Yukio; Kunkel, Louis M

    2010-02-15

    Various muscular dystrophies are associated with the defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan and are known to result from mutations in genes encoding glycosyltransferases. Fukutin-related protein (FKRP) was identified as a homolog of fukutin, the defective protein in Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), that is thought to function as a glycosyltransferase. Mutations in FKRP have been linked to a variety of phenotypes including Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS), limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) 2I and congenital muscular dystrophy 1C (MDC1C). Zebrafish are a useful animal model to reveal the mechanism of these diseases caused by mutations in FKRP gene. Downregulating FKRP expression in zebrafish by two different morpholinos resulted in embryos which had developmental defects similar to those observed in human muscular dystrophies associated with mutations in FKRP. The FKRP morphants showed phenotypes involving alterations in somitic structure and muscle fiber organization, as well as defects in developing eye morphology. Additionally, they were found to have a reduction in alpha-dystroglycan glycosylation and a shortened myofiber length. Moreover, co-injection of fish or human FKRP mRNA along with the morpholino restored normal development, alpha-dystroglycan glycosylation and laminin binding activity of alpha-dystroglycan in the morphants. Co-injection of the human FKRP mRNA containing causative mutations found in human patients of WWS, MDC1C and LGMD2I could not restore their phenotypes significantly. Interestingly, these morphant fish having human FKRP mutations showed a wide phenotypic range similar to that seen in humans. PMID:19955119

  6. Zebrafish models for human FKRP muscular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Genri; Guyon, Jeffrey R.; Nakamura, Yukio; Kunkel, Louis M.

    2010-01-01

    Various muscular dystrophies are associated with the defective glycosylation of α-dystroglycan and are known to result from mutations in genes encoding glycosyltransferases. Fukutin-related protein (FKRP) was identified as a homolog of fukutin, the defective protein in Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), that is thought to function as a glycosyltransferase. Mutations in FKRP have been linked to a variety of phenotypes including Walker–Warburg syndrome (WWS), limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) 2I and congenital muscular dystrophy 1C (MDC1C). Zebrafish are a useful animal model to reveal the mechanism of these diseases caused by mutations in FKRP gene. Downregulating FKRP expression in zebrafish by two different morpholinos resulted in embryos which had developmental defects similar to those observed in human muscular dystrophies associated with mutations in FKRP. The FKRP morphants showed phenotypes involving alterations in somitic structure and muscle fiber organization, as well as defects in developing eye morphology. Additionally, they were found to have a reduction in α-dystroglycan glycosylation and a shortened myofiber length. Moreover, co-injection of fish or human FKRP mRNA along with the morpholino restored normal development, α-dystroglycan glycosylation and laminin binding activity of α-dystroglycan in the morphants. Co-injection of the human FKRP mRNA containing causative mutations found in human patients of WWS, MDC1C and LGMD2I could not restore their phenotypes significantly. Interestingly, these morphant fish having human FKRP mutations showed a wide phenotypic range similar to that seen in humans. PMID:19955119

  7. Muscular dystrophies due to glycosylation defects.

    PubMed

    Muntoni, Francesco; Torelli, Silvia; Brockington, Martin

    2008-10-01

    In the last few years, muscular dystrophies due to reduced glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (ADG) have emerged as a common group of conditions, now referred to as dystroglycanopathies. Mutations in six genes (POMT1, POMT2, POMGnT1, Fukutin, FKRP and LARGE) have so far been identified in patients with a dystroglycanopathy. Allelic mutations in each of these genes can result in a wide spectrum of clinical conditions, ranging from severe congenital onset with associated structural brain malformations (Walker Warburg syndrome; muscle-eye-brain disease; Fukuyama muscular dystrophy; congenital muscular dystrophy type 1D) to a relatively milder congenital variant with no brain involvement (congenital muscular dystrophy type 1C), and to limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) type 2 variants with onset in childhood or adult life (LGMD2I, LGMD2L, and LGMD2N). ADG is a peripheral membrane protein that undergoes multiple and complex glycosylation steps to regulate its ability to effectively interact with extracellular matrix proteins, such as laminin, agrin, and perlecan. Although the precise composition of the glycans present on ADG are not known, it has been demonstrated that the forced overexpression of LARGE, or its paralog LARGE2, is capable of increasing the glycosylation of ADG in normal cells. In addition, its overexpression is capable of restoring dystroglycan glycosylation and laminin binding properties in primary cell cultures of patients affected by different genetically defined dystroglycanopathy variants. These observations suggest that there could be a role for therapeutic strategies to overcome the glycosylation defect in these conditions via the overexpression of LARGE. PMID:19019316

  8. Serotonin 2C receptor antagonists induce fast-onset antidepressant effects.

    PubMed

    Opal, M D; Klenotich, S C; Morais, M; Bessa, J; Winkle, J; Doukas, D; Kay, L J; Sousa, N; Dulawa, S M

    2014-10-01

    Current antidepressants must be administered for several weeks to produce therapeutic effects. We show that selective serotonin 2C (5-HT2C) antagonists exert antidepressant actions with a faster-onset (5 days) than that of current antidepressants (14 days) in mice. Subchronic (5 days) treatment with 5-HT2C antagonists induced antidepressant behavioral effects in the chronic forced swim test (cFST), chronic mild stress (CMS) paradigm and olfactory bulbectomy paradigm. This treatment regimen also induced classical markers of antidepressant action: activation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and induction of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). None of these effects were induced by subchronic treatment with citalopram, a prototypical selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). Local infusion of 5-HT2C antagonists into the ventral tegmental area was sufficient to induce BDNF in the mPFC, and dopamine D1 receptor antagonist treatment blocked the antidepressant behavioral effects of 5-HT2C antagonists. 5-HT2C antagonists also activated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2) in the mPFC, effects recently linked to rapid antidepressant action. Furthermore, 5-HT2C antagonists reversed CMS-induced atrophy of mPFC pyramidal neurons. Subchronic SSRI treatment, which does not induce antidepressant behavioral effects, also activated mTOR and eEF2 and reversed CMS-induced neuronal atrophy, indicating that these effects are not sufficient for antidepressant onset. Our findings reveal that 5-HT2C antagonists are putative fast-onset antidepressants, which act through enhancement of mesocortical dopaminergic signaling. PMID:24166413

  9. Simultaneously cooperative, but serially antagonistic: a neuropsychological study of diagonistic dyspraxia in a case of Marchiafava-Bignami disease.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Kazumi; Tachibana, Kaori; Abe, Nobuhito; Manabe, Hideaki; Fuse, Takahisa; Tsukamoto, Tetsuro

    2008-01-01

    We describe a patient with Marchiafava-Bignami disease who showed, in addition to signs of callosal interruption, a peculiar form of diagonistic dyspraxia. Unlike the typical diagonistic dyspraxia, both of the patient's hands could simultaneously cooperate in a sequence of bimanual actions. More specifically, his right hand could start a commanded action with the cooperation of his left hand. However, once the action was completed, his left hand started an antagonistic action, undoing the result, with the cooperation of his right hand. Once this countermanding action was completed, the original action started again. These antagonistic actions repeated themselves alternately unless he was restrained. The patient's diagonistic dyspraxia was apparent in only some bimanual actions, and he showed no diagonistic dyspraxia when performing voluntary actions; the antagonistic actions occurred in response to oral commands or by imitation. Magnetic resonance imaging showed symmetrical demyelination with partial necrosis in the genu, body, and anterior splenium of the corpus callosum. We speculate that the bimanual coordination is possible because part of the corpus callosum is intact, whereas the antagonistic actions may be caused by conflict between the two hemispheres due to interhemispheric disinhibition elicited by the demyelinated part of the corpus callosum. PMID:18641433

  10. Caveolae and caveolin-3 in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Galbiati, F; Razani, B; Lisanti, M P

    2001-10-01

    Caveolae are vesicular invaginations of the plasma membrane, and function as 'message centers' for regulating signal transduction events. Caveolin-3, a muscle-specific caveolin-related protein, is the principal structural protein of caveolar membrane domains in skeletal muscle and in the heart. Several mutations within the coding sequence of the human caveolin-3 gene (located at 3p25) have been identified. Mutations that lead to a loss of approximately 95% of caveolin-3 protein expression are responsible for a novel autosomal dominant form of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD-1C) in humans. By contrast, upregulation of the caveolin-3 protein is associated with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Thus, tight regulation of caveolin-3 appears essential for maintaining normal muscle health and homeostasis. PMID:11597517

  11. Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy (LGMD): Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kalyan, Meenakshi; Gaikwad, Anu N.; Makadia, Ankit; Shah, Harshad

    2015-01-01

    We report a young male of autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) with positive family history presented with gradual onset proximal muscle weakness in all four limbs since eight years and thinning of shoulders, arms and thighs. Neurological examination revealed atrophy of both shoulders with wasting of both deltoids thinning of thighs and pseudo hypertrophy of both calves, hypotonia in all four limbs. Gower’s sign was positive. Winging of scapula was present. Power was 3/5 at both shoulders, 4/5 at both elbows, 5/5 at both wrists, 3/5 at both hip joints, 3/5 at both knees, 5/5 at both ankles. All deep tendon reflexes and superficial reflexes were present with plantars bilateral flexors. Electromyography (EMG) showed myopathic pattern. He had elevated creatinine phosphokinase levels and muscle biopsy findings consistent with muscular dystrophy. PMID:25738022

  12. Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy (LGMD): Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kanitkar, Shubhangi A; Kalyan, Meenakshi; Gaikwad, Anu N; Makadia, Ankit; Shah, Harshad

    2015-01-01

    We report a young male of autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) with positive family history presented with gradual onset proximal muscle weakness in all four limbs since eight years and thinning of shoulders, arms and thighs. Neurological examination revealed atrophy of both shoulders with wasting of both deltoids thinning of thighs and pseudo hypertrophy of both calves, hypotonia in all four limbs. Gower's sign was positive. Winging of scapula was present. Power was 3/5 at both shoulders, 4/5 at both elbows, 5/5 at both wrists, 3/5 at both hip joints, 3/5 at both knees, 5/5 at both ankles. All deep tendon reflexes and superficial reflexes were present with plantars bilateral flexors. Electromyography (EMG) showed myopathic pattern. He had elevated creatinine phosphokinase levels and muscle biopsy findings consistent with muscular dystrophy. PMID:25738022

  13. Neuronal involvement in muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Cisterna, Bruno A.; Cardozo, Christopher; Sáez, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    The innervation of skeletal myofibers exerts a crucial influence on the maintenance of muscle tone and normal operation. Consequently, denervated myofibers manifest atrophy, which is preceded by an increase in sarcolemma permeability. Recently, de novo expression of hemichannels (HCs) formed by connexins (Cxs) and other none selective channels, including P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs), and transient receptor potential, sub-family V, member 2 (TRPV2) channels was demonstrated in denervated fast skeletal muscles. The denervation-induced atrophy was drastically reduced in denervated muscles deficient in Cxs 43 and 45. Nonetheless, the transduction mechanism by which the nerve represses the expression of the above mentioned non-selective channels remains unknown. The paracrine action of extracellular signaling molecules including ATP, neurotrophic factors (i.e., brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)), agrin/LDL receptor-related protein 4 (Lrp4)/muscle-specific receptor kinase (MuSK) and acetylcholine (Ach) are among the possible signals for repression for connexin expression. This review discusses the possible role of relevant factors in maintaining the normal functioning of fast skeletal muscles and suppression of connexin hemichannel expression. PMID:25540609

  14. Presumed primary muscular lymphoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    Thuilliez, Céline; Watrelot-Virieux, Dorothée; Chanut, Franck; Fournel-Fleury, Corinne; Ponce, Frédérique; Marchal, Thierry

    2008-11-01

    A case of presumed primary muscular lymphoma in an 8-year-old, intact, male Newfoundland dog is reported. The dog was presented for evaluation of an infiltrating ventral cervical mass, respiratory distress, and anorexia of 1-month duration. Fine-needle aspiration of the mass revealed anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Despite chemotherapy, health status declined and the animal was euthanized a few weeks later. At necropsy, the mass infiltrated the cervical muscles and extended ventrally to the left forelimb and cranially to the tongue and laryngeal musculature. Other muscles were infiltrated by the same neoplasm (diaphragm and intercostal, abdominal, and gluteal muscles) indicating a probable multicentric origin. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of anaplastic large cell lymphoma, which showed a strong muscular tropism. Immunohistochemical staining revealed neoplastic cell reactivity for cluster of differentiation 3 (CD3) and Ki-67 antigens (70% and 90%, respectively). The neoplastic cells were negative for CD79a. The presumed histological diagnosis in this dog was primary muscular anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma. PMID:18987239

  15. Congenital muscular dystrophy: from muscle to brain.

    PubMed

    Falsaperla, Raffaele; Praticò, Andrea D; Ruggieri, Martino; Parano, Enrico; Rizzo, Renata; Corsello, Giovanni; Vitaliti, Giovanna; Pavone, Piero

    2016-01-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs) are a wide group of muscular disorders that manifest with very early onset of muscular weakness, sometime associated to severe brain involvement.The histologic pattern of muscle anomalies is typical of dystrophic lesions but quite variable depending on the different stages and on the severity of the disorder.Recent classification of CMDs have been reported most of which based on the combination of clinical, biochemical, molecular and genetic findings, but genotype/phenotype correlation are in constant progression due to more diffuse utilization of the molecular analysis.In this article, the Authors report on CMDs belonging to the group of dystroglycanopathies and in particular on the most severe forms represented by the Fukuyama CMD, Muscle-Eye-Brain disease and Walker Walburg syndrome.Clinical diagnosis of infantile hypotonia is particularly difficult considering the different etiologic factors causing the lesions, the difficulty in localizing the involved CNS area (central vs. peripheral) and the limited role of the diagnostic procedures at this early age.The diagnostic evaluation is not easy mainly in differentiating the various types of CMDs, and represents a challenge for the neonatologists and pediatricians. Suggestions are reported on the way to reach a correct diagnosis with the appropriate use of the diagnostic means. PMID:27576556

  16. Lead Optimization Studies of Cinnamic Amide EP2 Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Prostanoid receptor EP2 can play a proinflammatory role, exacerbating disease pathology in a variety of central nervous system and peripheral diseases. A highly selective EP2 antagonist could be useful as a drug to mitigate the inflammatory consequences of EP2 activation. We recently identified a cinnamic amide class of EP2 antagonists. The lead compound in this class (5d) displays anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective actions. However, this compound exhibited moderate selectivity to EP2 over the DP1 prostanoid receptor (∼10-fold) and low aqueous solubility. We now report compounds that display up to 180-fold selectivity against DP1 and up to 9-fold higher aqueous solubility than our previous lead. The newly developed compounds also display higher selectivity against EP4 and IP receptors and a comparable plasma pharmacokinetics. Thus, these compounds are useful for proof of concept studies in a variety of models where EP2 activation is playing a deleterious role. PMID:24773616

  17. Lead optimization studies of cinnamic amide EP2 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Thota; Jiang, Jianxiong; Yang, Myung-Soon; Dingledine, Ray

    2014-05-22

    Prostanoid receptor EP2 can play a proinflammatory role, exacerbating disease pathology in a variety of central nervous system and peripheral diseases. A highly selective EP2 antagonist could be useful as a drug to mitigate the inflammatory consequences of EP2 activation. We recently identified a cinnamic amide class of EP2 antagonists. The lead compound in this class (5d) displays anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective actions. However, this compound exhibited moderate selectivity to EP2 over the DP1 prostanoid receptor (∼10-fold) and low aqueous solubility. We now report compounds that display up to 180-fold selectivity against DP1 and up to 9-fold higher aqueous solubility than our previous lead. The newly developed compounds also display higher selectivity against EP4 and IP receptors and a comparable plasma pharmacokinetics. Thus, these compounds are useful for proof of concept studies in a variety of models where EP2 activation is playing a deleterious role. PMID:24773616

  18. A case of fascioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy misdiagnosed as Becker's muscular dystrophy for 20 years.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Vesper Fe Marie Llaneza; Thaisetthawatkul, Pariwat

    2012-03-01

    A 60-year-old man diagnosed clinically with Becker's muscular dystrophy 20 years ago by another physician presented with gradually progressive proximal muscle weakness since teenage years. Family history revealed a strong paternal familial inheritance pattern of similar distribution of weakness-face, forearm flexion, knee extension and foot dorsiflexion. Work-ups revealed B12 deficiency and allele 1 deletion in fascioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) DNA testing. FSHD is the third most common muscular dystrophy. Clinical diagnosis is made from the distinctive pattern of weakness, autosomal-dominant inheritance, and confirmed by genetic testing. This case strongly demonstrates the importance of a thorough and careful clinical evaluation even in a case with a long standing diagnosis. PMID:21795275

  19. Ways of increasing muscular activity by means of isometric muscular exertion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovalik, A. V.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of isometric muscular exertion on the human body was investigated by having subjects perform basic movements in a sitting position in the conventional manner with additional muscle tension at 50% maximum force and at maximum force. The pulse, arterial pressure, skin temperature, respiratory rate, minute respiratory volume and electrical activity of the muscles involved were all measured. Performance of the exercises with maximum muscular exertion for 20 sec and without movement resulted in the greatest shifts in these indices; in the conventional manner substantial changes did not occur; and with isometric muscular exertion with 50% maximum force with and without movement, optimal functional shifts resulted. The latter is recommended for use in industrial exercises for the prevention of hypodynamia. Ten exercises are suggested.

  20. Media's influence on the drive for muscularity in undergraduates.

    PubMed

    Cramblitt, Brooke; Pritchard, Mary

    2013-12-01

    Although research has found that body ideals presented by the media influence women's body dissatisfaction, less is known about media's influence on men's body satisfaction. An online survey examining media use, the drive for muscularity, and internalization of appearance and body shape ideals was given to a sample of 311 participants comprised of both men and women. Results indicated (a) the more time men and women reported watching television, the higher their reported drive for muscularity (b) total hours of viewing sports-related, image-focused, and entertainment television related to increased drive for muscularity in women (c) drive for muscularity in men related to watching image-focused television and reading men's health magazines, and (d) internalization of athletic attitudes towards appearance mediated the relationship between total television watched and drive for muscularity in both genders. Clinicians may wish to utilize these findings when treating men and women suffering from drive for muscularity and body dysmorphia. PMID:24183132

  1. Tachykinin antagonists and the airways.

    PubMed

    Joos, G F; Kips, J C; Peleman, R A; Pauwels, R A

    1995-01-01

    There is now convincing evidence for the presence of substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA) in human airway nerves. Studies on autopsy tissue, on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and on sputum suggest that SP may be present in increased amounts in the asthmatic airway. Substance P and NKA are potent bronchoconstrictors of human airways, asthmatics being more sensitive than normal persons. The major enzyme responsible for the degradation of the tachykinins, the neutral endopeptidase, is present in the airways and is involved in the breakdown of exogenously administered SP and NKA, both in normal and asthmatic persons. Other, less well documented airway effects of SP and NKA include mucus secretion, vasodilation and plasma extravasation, as well as the chemoattraction and stimulation of various cells presumed to be involved in asthmatic airway inflammation. NK2 receptors and, to a lesser extent, NK1 receptors have been shown to be involved in bronchoconstriction, whereas NK1 receptors were found to be involved in mucus secretion, microvascular leakage and vasodilatation, and in most of the effects on inflammatory cells. The first clinical trial with FK224, a peptide NK1 and NK2 receptor antagonist, and CP99994, a nonpeptide NK1 receptor antagonist, are negative. However, FK224 failed to block the bronchoconstrictor effect of NKA in asthmatics and the dose of CP99994, needed to antagonize tachykinin effects in man, remains to be determined. PMID:7543746

  2. Antagonistic neural networks underlying differentiated leadership roles.

    PubMed

    Boyatzis, Richard E; Rochford, Kylie; Jack, Anthony I

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of two distinct leadership roles, the task leader and the socio-emotional leader, has been documented in the leadership literature since the 1950s. Recent research in neuroscience suggests that the division between task-oriented and socio-emotional-oriented roles derives from a fundamental feature of our neurobiology: an antagonistic relationship between two large-scale cortical networks - the task-positive network (TPN) and the default mode network (DMN). Neural activity in TPN tends to inhibit activity in the DMN, and vice versa. The TPN is important for problem solving, focusing of attention, making decisions, and control of action. The DMN plays a central role in emotional self-awareness, social cognition, and ethical decision making. It is also strongly linked to creativity and openness to new ideas. Because activation of the TPN tends to suppress activity in the DMN, an over-emphasis on task-oriented leadership may prove deleterious to social and emotional aspects of leadership. Similarly, an overemphasis on the DMN would result in difficulty focusing attention, making decisions, and solving known problems. In this paper, we will review major streams of theory and research on leadership roles in the context of recent findings from neuroscience and psychology. We conclude by suggesting that emerging research challenges the assumption that role differentiation is both natural and necessary, in particular when openness to new ideas, people, emotions, and ethical concerns are important to success. PMID:24624074

  3. Antagonistic neural networks underlying differentiated leadership roles

    PubMed Central

    Boyatzis, Richard E.; Rochford, Kylie; Jack, Anthony I.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of two distinct leadership roles, the task leader and the socio-emotional leader, has been documented in the leadership literature since the 1950s. Recent research in neuroscience suggests that the division between task-oriented and socio-emotional-oriented roles derives from a fundamental feature of our neurobiology: an antagonistic relationship between two large-scale cortical networks – the task-positive network (TPN) and the default mode network (DMN). Neural activity in TPN tends to inhibit activity in the DMN, and vice versa. The TPN is important for problem solving, focusing of attention, making decisions, and control of action. The DMN plays a central role in emotional self-awareness, social cognition, and ethical decision making. It is also strongly linked to creativity and openness to new ideas. Because activation of the TPN tends to suppress activity in the DMN, an over-emphasis on task-oriented leadership may prove deleterious to social and emotional aspects of leadership. Similarly, an overemphasis on the DMN would result in difficulty focusing attention, making decisions, and solving known problems. In this paper, we will review major streams of theory and research on leadership roles in the context of recent findings from neuroscience and psychology. We conclude by suggesting that emerging research challenges the assumption that role differentiation is both natural and necessary, in particular when openness to new ideas, people, emotions, and ethical concerns are important to success. PMID:24624074

  4. NF-kB overexpression and decreased immunoexpression of AR in the muscular layer is related to structural damages and apoptosis in cimetidine-treated rat vas deferens

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cimetidine, histamine H2 receptors antagonist, has caused adverse effects on the male hormones and reproductive tract due to its antiandrogenic effect. In the testes, peritubular myoid cells and muscle vascular cells death has been associated to seminiferous tubules and testicular microvascularization damages, respectively. Either androgen or histamine H2 receptors have been detected in the mucosa and smooth muscular layer of vas deferens. Thus, the effect of cimetidine on this androgen and histamine-dependent muscular duct was morphologically evaluated. Methods The animals from cimetidine group (CMTG; n=5) received intraperitoneal injections of 100 mg/kg b.w. of cimetidine for 50 days; the control group (CG) received saline solution. The distal portions of vas deferens were fixed in formaldehyde and embedded in paraffin. Masson´s trichrome-stained sections were subjected to morphological and the following morphometrical analyzes: epithelial perimeter and area of the smooth muscular layer. TUNEL (Terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase mediated dUTP Nick End Labeling) method, NF-kB (nuclear factor kappa B) and AR (androgen receptors) immunohistochemical detection were also carried out. The birefringent collagen of the muscular layer was quantified in picrosirius red-stained sections under polarized light. The muscular layer was also evaluated under Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Results In CMTG, the mucosa of vas deferens was intensely folded; the epithelial cells showed numerous pyknotic nuclei and the epithelial perimeter and the area of the muscular layer decreased significantly. Numerous TUNEL-labeled nuclei were found either in the epithelial cells, mainly basal cells, or in the smooth muscle cells which also showed typical features of apoptosis under TEM. While an enhanced NF-kB immunoexpression was found in the cytoplasm of muscle cells, a weak AR immunolabeling was detected in these cells. In CMTG, no significant difference was observed

  5. Nose muscular dynamics: the tip trigonum.

    PubMed

    Figallo, E E; Acosta, J A

    2001-10-01

    In 1995, the senior author (E.E.F.) published an article in which he described the musculus digastricus septi nasi labialis. In the article presented here, work carried out by anatomists and other researchers who, over the last two centuries, studied nose muscular dynamics is described. The present study is based on Gray's Anatomy, which, in 1858, first described the nasal tip muscles, along with the other nasal muscles. Later works not only used different terminology for these muscles but also ignored some, creating tremendous confusion. The study presented here provides an update of the exact terms, location, insertions, and muscle functions of the muscles of the nose. Each nose muscle is described with regard to the two portions able to produce separate contractions. In this study, the term "dual function" is used and characterizes the nasal mimetic muscles that do not have well-defined fascia. Therefore, there is doubt about the existence of a real nasal superficial muscle aponeurotic system. The musculus myrtiformis seems to have a dual function, inserting in the canine fosse and in the periosteum of the central incisors, forming two portions-one to the septum and the other to the nostril-each of which has specific functions. This study has been based on research in physiognomy, the science of expression. With regard to the basis for nose expressions, common anatomical research is excluded because it provides a different view of the dynamics studied to date. The term trigonum musculare apicis nasi defines the interaction of the musculi compressor narium minor and dilator naris anterior, connecting with the columellar bundle of the musculus digastricus and levering the nasal spine. This muscular trigone creates circular concentric and eccentric movements of the nasal tip. PMID:11604607

  6. Exon skipping therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kole, Ryszard; Krieg, Arthur M

    2015-06-29

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused mostly by internal deletions in the gene for dystrophin, a protein essential for maintaining muscle cell membrane integrity. These deletions abrogate the reading frame and the lack of dystrophin results in progressive muscle deterioration. DMD patients experience progressive loss of ambulation, followed by a need for assisted ventilation, and eventual death in mid-twenties. By the method of exon skipping in dystrophin pre-mRNA the reading frame is restored and the internally deleted but functional dystrophin is produced. Two oligonucleotide drugs that induce desired exon skipping are currently in advanced clinical trials. PMID:25980936

  7. [Treatment progress of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD)].

    PubMed

    Smogorzewska, Elzbieta Monika; Weinberg, Kenneth I

    2004-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a common lethal disease for which no effective treatment is currently available. There exists a mouse model of the disease in which the usefulness of gene therapy was established. However, no progress towards human application was made due to the lack of a proper method for gene delivery. During the past several years, researchers acquired data which led them to believe that bone marrow stem cells are capable of generating not only blood cells, but also liver, heart, skin, muscle, and other tissue. Although the term "stem cell plasticity" became very popular, other studies have suggested that bone marrow might contain different types of stem cells that can produce non-hematopoietic cells. For example, mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) in bone marrow give rise to osteocytes, chondrocytes, adipocytes, and skeletal muscle. Recently, researchers have been able to show that transplanted bone marrow cells can contribute to muscle cells in a human patient who was diagnosed with two genetic diseases: severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The odds of this happening is estimated at one in seven million. The results of studying this patient's medical history were reported by collaborating researchers at Children's Hospital, Los Angeles and Children's Hospital, Boston in an article titled "Long-term persistence of donor nuclei in a Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patient receiving bone marrow transplantation" published in the September 2002 issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation. This patient was transplanted 15 years ago at Children's Hospital Los Angeles with paternal HLA-haploidentical T cell-depleted bone marrow. He engrafted and became a hematopoietic chimera having T and NK lymphocytes of donor origin. Studies performed on the muscle biopsy from the patient 13 years after transplantation demonstrated that the muscle showed evidence of donor derived nuclei. In addition, analysis of his bone marrow

  8. Long-acting muscarinic antagonists.

    PubMed

    Melani, Andrea S

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. Inhaled bronchodilators are the mainstay of COPD pharmacological treatment. Long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMAs) are a major class of inhaled bronchodilators. Some LAMA/device systems with different characteristics and dosing schedules are currently approved for maintenance therapy of COPD and a range of other products are being developed. They improve lung function and patient-reported outcomes and reduce acute bronchial exacerbations with good safety. LAMAs are used either alone or associated with long-acting β₂-agonists, eventually in fixed dose combinations. Long-acting β₂-agonist/LAMA combinations assure additional benefits over the individual components alone. The reader will obtain a view of the safety and efficacy of the different LAMA/device systems in COPD patients. PMID:26109098

  9. Induction of prostate apoptosis by alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists: mechanistic significance of the quinazoline component.

    PubMed

    Anglin, I E; Glassman, D T; Kyprianou, N

    2002-01-01

    alpha(1)-Adrenoceptor antagonists, have been documented to induce apoptosis and reduce prostate tumor vascularity in benign and malignant prostate cells. The quinazoline based alpha(1)-antagonists, doxazosin and terazosin but not tamsulosin (a sulphonamide derivative) suppress prostate growth without affecting cell proliferation. These quinazoline-mediated apoptotic effects occur via an alpha(1)-adrenoceptor independent mechanism potentially involving activation of the TGF-beta signal transduction pathway. This review discusses the current knowledge of the action of quinazoline-derived alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonists in the benign and malignant prostate and their potential therapeutic use in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer. Finally, a molecular pathway is proposed for their observed apoptotic function against prostate cells. Increased understanding of the action of these established and clinically accepted agents would provide a basis for the design of safe, effective therapeutic regimens in the treatment of prostatic diseases. PMID:12496995

  10. Toxicological Differences Between NMDA Receptor Antagonists and Cholinesterase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaodong; Lin, Xiaotian; Hu, Rui; Sun, Nan; Hao, Jingru; Gao, Can

    2016-08-01

    Cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs), represented by donepezil, rivastigmine, and galantamine, used to be the only approved class of drugs for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. After the approval of memantine by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonists have been recognized by authorities and broadly used in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Along with complementary mechanisms of action, NMDA antagonists and ChEIs differ not only in therapeutic effects but also in adverse reactions, which is an important consideration in clinical drug use. And the number of patients using NMDA antagonists and ChEIs concomitantly has increased, making the matter more complicated. Here we used the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System for statistical analysis , in order to compare the adverse events of memantine and ChEIs. In general, the clinical evidence confirmed the safety advantages of memantine over ChEIs, reiterating the precautions of clinical drug use and the future direction of antidementia drug development. PMID:26769920

  11. Twisted Gastrulation, a BMP Antagonist, Exacerbates Podocyte Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Sachiko; Nakamura, Jin; Asada, Misako; Takase, Masayuki; Matsusaka, Taiji; Iguchi, Taku; Yamada, Ryo; Tanaka, Mari; Higashi, Atsuko Y.; Okuda, Tomohiko; Asada, Nariaki; Fukatsu, Atsushi; Kawachi, Hiroshi; Graf, Daniel; Muso, Eri; Kita, Toru; Kimura, Takeshi; Pastan, Ira; Economides, Aris N.; Yanagita, Motoko

    2014-01-01

    Podocyte injury is the first step in the progression of glomerulosclerosis. Previous studies have demonstrated the beneficial effect of bone morphogenetic protein 7 (Bmp7) in podocyte injury and the existence of native Bmp signaling in podocytes. Local activity of Bmp7 is controlled by cell-type specific Bmp antagonists, which inhibit the binding of Bmp7 to its receptors. Here we show that the product of Twisted gastrulation (Twsg1), a Bmp antagonist, is the central negative regulator of Bmp function in podocytes and that Twsg1 null mice are resistant to podocyte injury. Twsg1 was the most abundant Bmp antagonist in murine cultured podocytes. The administration of Bmp induced podocyte differentiation through Smad signaling, whereas the simultaneous administration of Twsg1 antagonized the effect. The administration of Bmp also inhibited podocyte proliferation, whereas simultaneous administration of Twsg1 antagonized the effect. Twsg1 was expressed in the glomerular parietal cells (PECs) and distal nephron of the healthy kidney, and additionally in damaged glomerular cells in a murine model of podocyte injury. Twsg1 null mice exhibited milder hypoalbuminemia and hyperlipidemia, and milder histological changes while maintaining the expression of podocyte markers during podocyte injury model. Taken together, our results show that Twsg1 plays a critical role in the modulation of protective action of Bmp7 on podocytes, and that inhibition of Twsg1 is a promising means of development of novel treatment for podocyte injury. PMID:24586548

  12. Client Perceptions of Two Antagonist Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capone, Thomas A.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Reports results of a questionnaire administered to participants in an antagonist drug outpatient clinic and an antagonist drug work-release program to obtain awareness of acceptance of the program participants. Naltrexone patients recommended an alternative method of administering the drug and changing the money system to award deserving inmates…

  13. Analysis of the characteristics of mouthguards that affect isokinetic muscular ability and anaerobic power

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jae-Kwang; Chae, Woen-Sik

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to estimate the effects of occlusal stability to identify action mechanisms of mouthguards, known to have a modulatory effect on limb muscle function. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study included 20 male subjects to perform the isokinetic muscle tests and the Wingate anaerobic power test on both knee joints under five closed-mouth conditions: without or with 4 types of mouthguards with thickness of 2 mm based on premolar area: (1) full-coverage, (2) anterior partial-coverage, (3) right posterior partial-coverage, and (4) left posterior partial-coverage. The obtained results were subjected to One-way ANOVA with repeated measures, followed by post hoc test of the contrast method (α=.05). RESULTS There was no significant difference between the closed position with and without a full-coverage mouthguard in all variables. However, significant differences were observed between with and without a partial-coverage mouthguard in muscular endurance during extension of the left knee, muscular power and endurance during flexion of the right knee. Additionally, significant differences were found between occlusal states with full- and partial-coverage mouthguards in muscular power and endurance during extension of the left knee. CONCLUSION These findings indicate the elevation of vertical dimension by 2 mm or the inducement of occlusal stability had little effect on isokinetic muscle strength and anaerobic performance, while uneven distribution of occlusal force might have some positive effects. PMID:24353875

  14. Analgesic effectiveness of the narcotic agonist-antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Houde, Raymond W.

    1979-01-01

    1 Two fundamentally different types of narcotic-antogonists have been found to be very effective analgesics with relatively low dependence-producing potentials. 2 These two drug classes can be distinguished as being either morphine-like or nalorphine-like on the basis of their subjective and objective effects after single doses and on chronic administration, and by the character of their abstinence syndromes on abrupt withdrawal or on precipitation by other antagonists. 3 To explain differences in side effects associated with their analgesic actions, the existence of three types of receptors has been postulated: a μ receptor which is believed to be associated with euphoria and other typical morphine-like effects and a kappa (χ) and a sigma (σ) receptor which are believed to be associated with the sedative and psychotomimetic effects, respectively, of the nalorphine-like drugs. 4 The antagonist-analgesics of the morphine-type have the characteristics of being agonists of low intrinsic activity but with high affinity for the μ receptor. Representative analgesics of this type are profadol, propiram and buprenorphine. 5 The antagonist-analgesics of the nalorphine-type are drugs which are believed to have varying degrees of affinity and intrinsic activity at all three receptors, but characteristically seem to act merely as competitive antagonists with no intrinsic activity at the μ receptor. Representative analgesics of this type are pentazocine, nalbuphine and butorphanol. 6 There are considerable differences among the individual drugs of each type in terms of their analgesic and narcotic-antagonistic potencies. However, clear differences in analgesic efficacy among any of the antagonist-analgesics remain to be proved. All give evidence of being capable of relieving pain in nondependent patients in situations in which doses of morphine (or its surrogates) usually used would be effective. 7 The major advantages of the partial agonists of the morphine-type over the

  15. Dysphagia in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Assessed by Validated Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Sally K.; Garrod, Rachel; Hart, Nicholas; Miller, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Background: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) leads to progressive muscular weakness and death, most typically from respiratory complications. Dysphagia is common in DMD; however, the most appropriate swallowing assessments have not been universally agreed and the symptoms of dysphagia remain under-reported. Aims: To investigate symptoms of…

  16. Upper Body Muscular Endurance Among Children 2-5 Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabbard, Carl P.; And Others

    The upper body muscular endurance of males and females 2-5 years of age was assessed, and relationships relative to sex, age, endurance and selected anthropometric measures were investigated. None of the relationships were found to be of practical predicative value; while upper body muscular strength increased with age, no significant differences…

  17. Systemic vascular function is associated with muscular power in adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Age-associated loss of muscular strength and muscular power are critical determinants of loss of physical function and progression to disability in older adults. In this study, we examined the association of systemic vascular function and measures of muscle strength and power in older adults. Measu...

  18. Upper Girdle Imaging in Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Tasca, Giorgio; Monforte, Mauro; Iannaccone, Elisabetta; Laschena, Francesco; Ottaviani, Pierfrancesco; Leoncini, Emanuele; Boccia, Stefania; Galluzzi, Giuliana; Pelliccioni, Marco; Masciullo, Marcella; Frusciante, Roberto; Mercuri, Eugenio; Ricci, Enzo

    2014-01-01

    Background In Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), the upper girdle is early involved and often difficult to assess only relying on physical examination. Our aim was to evaluate the pattern and degree of involvement of upper girdle muscles in FSHD compared with other muscle diseases with scapular girdle impairment. Methods We propose an MRI protocol evaluating neck and upper girdle muscles. One hundred-eight consecutive symptomatic FSHD patients and 45 patients affected by muscular dystrophies and myopathies with prominent upper girdle involvement underwent this protocol. Acquired scans were retrospectively analyzed. Results The trapezius (100% of the patients) and serratus anterior (85% of the patients) were the most and earliest affected muscles in FSHD, followed by the latissimus dorsi and pectoralis major, whilst spinati and subscapularis (involved in less than 4% of the patients) were consistently spared even in late disease stages. Asymmetry and hyperintensities on short-tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequences were common features, and STIR hyperintensities could also be found in muscles not showing signs of fatty replacement. The overall involvement appears to be disease-specific in FSHD as it significantly differed from that encountered in the other myopathies. Conclusions The detailed knowledge of single muscle involvement provides useful information for correctly evaluating patients' motor function and to set a baseline for natural history studies. Upper girdle imaging can also be used as an additional tool helpful in supporting the diagnosis of FSHD in unclear situations, and may contribute with hints on the currently largely unknown molecular pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:24932477

  19. Proximal spinal muscular atrophy: current orthopedic perspective

    PubMed Central

    Haaker, Gerrit; Fujak, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a hereditary neuromuscular disease of lower motor neurons that is caused by a defective “survival motor neuron” (SMN) protein that is mainly associated with proximal progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. Although SMA involves a wide range of disease severity and a high mortality and morbidity rate, recent advances in multidisciplinary supportive care have enhanced quality of life and life expectancy. Active research for possible treatment options has become possible since the disease-causing gene defect was identified in 1995. Nevertheless, a causal therapy is not available at present, and therapeutic management of SMA remains challenging; the prolonged survival is increasing, especially orthopedic, respiratory and nutritive problems. This review focuses on orthopedic management of the disease, with discussion of key aspects that include scoliosis, muscular contractures, hip joint disorders, fractures, technical devices, and a comparative approach of conservative and surgical treatment. Also emphasized are associated complications including respiratory involvement, perioperative care and anesthesia, nutrition problems, and rehabilitation. The SMA disease course can be greatly improved with adequate therapy with established orthopedic procedures in a multidisciplinary therapeutic approach. PMID:24399883

  20. Emerging Drugs for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Vinod; Rodino-Klapac, Louise; Mendell, Jerry R.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common, severe childhood form of muscular dystrophy. Treatment is limited to glucocorticoids that have the benefit of prolonging ambulation by approximately 2 years and preventing scoliosis. Finding a more satisfactory treatment should focus on maintaining long-term efficacy with a minimal side effect profile. Areas covered Authors discuss different therapeutic strategies that have been used in pre-clinical and clinical settings. Expert opinion Multiple treatment approaches have emerged. Most attractive are molecular-based therapies that can express the missing dystrophin protein (exon skipping or mutation suppression) or a surrogate gene product (utrophin). Other approaches include increasing the strength of muscles (myostatin inhibitors), reducing muscle fibrosis, and decreasing oxidative stress. Additional targets include inhibiting NF-κB to reduce inflammation, or promoting skeletal muscle blood flow and muscle contractility using phosphodiesterase inhibitors or nitric oxide (NO) donors. The potential for each of these treatment strategies to enter clinical trials is a central theme of discussion. The review emphasizes that the goal of treatment should be to find a product at least as good as glucocorticoids with a lower side effect profile or with a significant glucocorticoid sparing effect. PMID:22632414

  1. Cardiac findings in congenital muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Ramaciotti, Claudio; Wang, Ching H; Wahbi, Karim; Rosenthal, David; Duboc, Denis; Melacini, Paola

    2010-09-01

    Cardiac involvement (CI) in congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs) has been only rarely investigated so far. By means of a systematic literature search we reviewed the literature about CI in CMD and found that CI is apparently absent in Ullrich CMD or CMD with integrin deficiency and only mild in Bethlem CMD. CI in merosin deficiency includes dilated cardiomyopathy and systolic dysfunction. CI in dystroglycanopathies seems most prevalent among all CMDs and includes dilated cardiomyopathy, systolic dysfunction, and myocardial fibrosis in Fukuyama CMD. Among the nonspecified dystroglycanopathies, CI manifests as dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (CMP) or systolic dysfunction. With CMD type 1C, as well as with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2I, up to half of the patients develop dilated cardiomyopathy. In rigid-spine syndrome, predominantly the right heart is affected secondary to thoracic deformity. In patients who carry LMNA mutations, CI may manifest as dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, or fatal ventricular arrhythmias. Overall, CI in patients with CMD varies considerably between the different CMD types from absent or mild CI to severe cardiac disease, particularly in merosin deficiency, dystroglycanopathies, and laminopathies. Patients with CMD with CI require regular cardiologic surveillance so that severe, treatable cardiac disease is not overlooked. PMID:20679303

  2. Congenital muscular dystrophy with inflammation: Diagnostic considerations

    PubMed Central

    Konkay, Kaumudi; Kannan, Meena Angamuthu; Lingappa, Lokesh; Uppin, Megha S.; Challa, Sundaram

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Muscle biopsy features of congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD) vary from usual dystrophic picture to normal or nonspecific myopathic picture or prominent fibrosis or striking inflammatory infiltrate, which may lead to diagnostic errors. A series of patients of CMD with significant inflammatory infiltrates on muscle biopsy were correlated with laminin α2 deficiency on immunohistochemistry (IHC). Material and Methods: Cryostat sections of muscle biopsies from the patients diagnosed as CMD on clinical and muscle biopsy features from 1996 to 2014 were reviewed with hematoxylin and eosin(H&E), enzyme and immunohistochemistry (IHC) with laminin α2. Muscle biopsies with inflammatory infiltrate were correlated with laminin α2 deficiency. Results: There were 65 patients of CMD, with inflammation on muscle biopsy in 16. IHC with laminin α2 was available in nine patients, of which six showed complete absence along sarcolemma (five presented with floppy infant syndrome and one with delayed motor milestones) and three showed discontinuous, and less intense staining. Conclusions: CMD show variable degrees of inflammation on muscle biopsy. A diagnosis of laminin α2 deficient CMD should be considered in patients of muscular dystrophy with inflammation, in children with hypotonia/delayed motor milestones. PMID:27570388

  3. Developments in gene therapy for muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hartigan-O'Connor, D; Chamberlain, J S

    Gene therapy for muscular dystrophy (MD) presents significant challenges, including the large amount of muscle tissue in the body, the large size of many genes defective in different muscular dystrophies, and the possibility of a host immune response against the therapeutic gene. Overcoming these challenges requires the development and delivery of suitable gene transfer vectors. Encouraging progress has been made in modifying adenovirus (Ad) vectors to reduce immune response and increase capacity. Recently developed gutted Ad vectors can deliver full-length dystrophin cDNA expression vectors to muscle tissue. Using muscle-specific promoters to drive dystrophin expression, a strong immune response has not been observed in mdx mice. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors can deliver small genes to muscle without provocation of a significant immune response, which should allow long-term expression of several MD genes. AAV vectors have also been used to deliver sarcoglycan genes to entire muscle groups. These advances and others reviewed here suggest that barriers to gene therapy for MD are surmountable. PMID:10679969

  4. Consensus statement on standard of care for congenital muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching H; Bonnemann, Carsten G; Rutkowski, Anne; Sejersen, Thomas; Bellini, Jonathan; Battista, Vanessa; Florence, Julaine M; Schara, Ulrike; Schuler, Pamela M; Wahbi, Karim; Aloysius, Annie; Bash, Robert O; Béroud, Christophe; Bertini, Enrico; Bushby, Kate; Cohn, Ronald D; Connolly, Anne M; Deconinck, Nicolas; Desguerre, Isabelle; Eagle, Michelle; Estournet-Mathiaud, Brigitte; Ferreiro, Ana; Fujak, Albert; Goemans, Nathalie; Iannaccone, Susan T; Jouinot, Patricia; Main, Marion; Melacini, Paola; Mueller-Felber, Wolfgang; Muntoni, Francesco; Nelson, Leslie L; Rahbek, Jes; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Sewry, Caroline; Storhaug, Kari; Simonds, Anita; Tseng, Brian; Vajsar, Jiri; Vianello, Andrea; Zeller, Reinhard

    2010-12-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophies are a group of rare neuromuscular disorders with a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes. Recent advances in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of congenital muscular dystrophy have enabled better diagnosis. However, medical care for patients with congenital muscular dystrophy remains very diverse. Advances in many areas of medical technology have not been adopted in clinical practice. The International Standard of Care Committee for Congenital Muscular Dystrophy was established to identify current care issues, review literature for evidence-based practice, and achieve consensus on care recommendations in 7 areas: diagnosis, neurology, pulmonology, orthopedics/rehabilitation, gastroenterology/ nutrition/speech/oral care, cardiology, and palliative care. To achieve consensus on the care recommendations, 2 separate online surveys were conducted to poll opinions from experts in the field and from congenital muscular dystrophy families. The final consensus was achieved in a 3-day workshop conducted in Brussels, Belgium, in November 2009. This consensus statement describes the care recommendations from this committee. PMID:21078917

  5. Journey into muscular dystrophies caused by abnormal glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Muntoni, Francesco

    2004-09-01

    An increasing number of genes encoding for putative or demonstrated glycosyltransferases are being associated with muscular dystrophies of variable severity, ranging from severe congenital onset and associated structural eye and brain changes, to relatively mild forms with onset into adulthood. Five of these genes (POMT1; POMGnT1; FXRP; Fukutin; LARGE) encode for proteins involved in the glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan and, indeed, abnormal glycosylation of this molecule is a common finding in all the respective conditions (Walker Warburg syndrome; Muscle-Eye-Brain disease; congenital muscular dystrophy type 1C and Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 21; Fukuyama muscular dystrophy; congenital muscular dystrophy type 1D). A 6th gene, GNE, responsible for the hereditary form of inclusion body myositis, encodes for a glycosyltransferase the substrate(s) of which is, however, still unclear. This article provides an overview of the clinical, biochemical and genetic features of this group of disorders. PMID:15605948

  6. Social dominance orientation predicts drive for muscularity among British men.

    PubMed

    Swami, Viren; Neofytou, Rudolfos-Valentino; Jablonska, Joanna; Thirlwell, Holly; Taylor, Donna; McCreary, Donald R

    2013-09-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that men's drive for muscularity would be associated with their valuation of domination, power, status, and aggression over others. A community sample of 359 men from London, UK, completed measures of drive for muscularity, social dominance orientation, right-wing authoritarianism, trait aggression, and need for power, as well as their demographic details. Bivariate correlations showed that greater drive for muscularity was significantly correlated with most of the measures and their subscales. However, in a multiple regression analysis, the only significant predictor of drive for muscularity was support for group-based dominance hierarchies (Adj. R(2)=.17). These results suggest that men's drive for muscularity is associated with a socio-political ideology that favours social dominance. PMID:23954197

  7. Pulmonary vascular reactivity: effect of PAF and PAF antagonists.

    PubMed

    Chen, C R; Voelkel, N F; Chang, S W

    1992-11-01

    We investigated the effects of two different platelet-activating factor (PAF) antagonists, SRI 63-441 and WEB 2086, on PAF-, angiotensin II-, and hypoxia-induced vasoconstrictions in isolated rat lungs perfused with a physiological salt solution. Bolus injection of PAF (0.5 micrograms) increased pulmonary arterial and microvascular pressures and caused lung edema. Both SRI 63-441, a PAF-analogue antagonist, and WEB 2086, a thienotriazolodiazepine structurally unrelated to PAF, completely blocked PAF-induced vasoconstriction and lung edema at 10(-5) M. At a lower concentration (10(-6) M), WEB 2086 was more effective than SRI 63-441. WEB 2086 also blocked the pulmonary vasodilation induced by low-dose PAF (15 ng) in blood-perfused lungs preconstricted with hypoxia. SRI 63-441 and CV 3988 (another PAF analogue antagonist), but not WEB 2086, caused acute pulmonary vasoconstriction at 10(-5) M and severe lung edema at a higher concentration (10(-4) M). PAF-induced but not SRI- or CV-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction and edema were inhibited by WEB 2086. In addition, SRI 63-441 potentiated angiotensin II- and hypoxia-induced vasoconstrictions. This effect of SRI 63-441 is not due to PAF receptor blockade because 1) addition of PAF (1.6 nM) to the perfusate likewise potentiated angiotensin II-induced vasoconstriction and 2) WEB 2086 did not cause a similar response. We conclude that both SRI 63-441 and WEB 2086 are effective inhibitors of PAF actions in the rat pulmonary circulation. However, antagonists with structures analogous to PAF (SRI 63-441 and CV 3988) can have significant pulmonary vasoactive side effects. PMID:1474049

  8. NMDA antagonist properties of the putative antiaddictive drug, ibogaine.

    PubMed

    Popik, P; Layer, R T; Fossom, L H; Benveniste, M; Geter-Douglass, B; Witkin, J M; Skolnick, P

    1995-11-01

    Both anecdotal reports in humans and preclinical studies indicate that ibogaine interrupts addiction to a variety of abused substances including alcohol, opiates, nicotine and stimulants. Based on the similarity of these therapeutic claims to recent preclinical studies demonstrating that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists attenuate addiction-related phenomena, we examined the NMDA antagonist properties of ibogaine. Pharmacologically relevant concentrations of ibogaine produce a voltage-dependent block of NMDA receptors in hippocampal cultures (Ki, 2.3 microM at -60 mV). Consistent with this observation, ibogaine competitively inhibits [3H]1-[1-(2-thienyl)-cyclohexyl]piperidine binding to rat forebrain homogenates (Ki, 1.5 microM) and blocks glutamate-induced cell death in neuronal cultures (IC50, 4.5 microM). Moreover, at doses previously reported to interfere with drug-seeking behaviors, ibogaine substitutes as a discriminative stimulus (ED50, 64.9 mg/kg) in mice trained to discriminate the prototypic voltage-dependent NMDA antagonist, dizocilpine (0.17 mg/kg), from saline. Consistent with previous reports, ibogaine reduced naloxone-precipitated jumping in morphine-dependent mice (ED50, 72 mg/kg). Although pretreatment with glycine did not affect naloxone-precipitated jumping in morphine-dependent mice, it abolished the ability of ibogaine to block naloxone-precipitated jumping. Taken together, these findings link the NMDA antagonist actions of ibogaine to a putative "antiaddictive" property of this alkaloid, its ability to reduce the expression of morphine dependence. PMID:7473163

  9. Construction, purification, and characterization of a chimeric TH1 antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Bello-Rivero, Iraldo; Torrez-Ruiz, Yeny; Blanco-Garcés, Elizabeth; Pentón-Rol, Giselle; Fernández-Batista, Osmani; Javier-González, Luís; Gerónimo-Perez, Haydee; López-Saura, Pedro

    2006-01-01

    Background TH1 immune response antagonism is a desirable approach to mitigate some autoimmune and inflammatory reactions during the course of several diseases where IL-2 and IFN-γ are two central players. Therefore, the neutralization of both cytokines could provide beneficial effects in patients suffering from autoimmune or inflammatory illnesses. Results A chimeric antagonist that can antagonize the action of TH1 immunity mediators, IFN-γ and IL-2, was designed, engineered, expressed in E. coli, purified and evaluated for its in vitro biological activities. The TH1 antagonist molecule consists of the extracellular region for the human IFNγ receptor chain 1 fused by a four-aminoacid linker peptide to human 60 N-terminal aminoacid residues of IL-2. The corresponding gene fragments were isolated by RT-PCR and cloned in the pTPV-1 vector. E. coli (W3110 strain) was transformed with this vector. The chimeric protein was expressed at high level as inclusion bodies. The protein was partially purified by pelleting and washing. It was then solubilized with strong denaturant and finally refolded by gel filtration. In vitro biological activity of chimera was demonstrated by inhibition of IFN-γ-dependent HLA-DR expression in Colo 205 cells, inhibition of IFN-γ antiproliferative effect on HEp-2 cells, and by a bidirectional effect in assays for IL-2 T-cell dependent proliferation: agonism in the absence versus inhibition in the presence of IL-2. Conclusion TH1 antagonist is a chimeric protein that inhibits the in vitro biological activities of human IFN-γ, and is a partial agonist/antagonist of human IL-2. With these attributes, the chimera has the potential to offer a new opportunity for the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. PMID:16716222

  10. New H1/H3 antagonists for treating allergic rhinitis: WO2010094643.

    PubMed

    Norman, Peter

    2011-03-01

    This application claims dual receptor specificity antihistamines, active as H(1) and H(3) antagonists, which additionally have a long duration of action that renders them suitable for once daily administration via inhalation for the treatment of allergic rhinitis. The compounds lack CNS penetration and have a high affinity for both histamine receptors. PMID:21342057

  11. Autonomic, locomotor and cardiac abnormalities in a mouse model of muscular dystrophy: targeting the renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, Rasna; Chapleau, Mark W

    2014-04-01

    New Findings What is the topic of this review? This symposium report summarizes autonomic, cardiac and skeletal muscle abnormalities in sarcoglycan-δ-deficient mice (Sgcd-/-), a mouse model of limb girdle muscular dystrophy, with emphasis on the roles of autonomic dysregulation and activation of the renin-angiotensin system at a young age. What advances does it highlight? The contributions of the autonomic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin system to the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophy are highlighted. Results demonstrate that autonomic dysregulation precedes and predicts later development of cardiac dysfunction in Sgcd-/- mice and that treatment of young Sgcd-/- mice with the angiotensin type 1 receptor antagonist losartan or with angiotensin-(1-7) abrogates the autonomic dysregulation, attenuates skeletal muscle pathology and increases spontaneous locomotor activity. Muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of genetic muscle diseases characterized by muscle weakness and atrophy. Mutations in sarcoglycans and other subunits of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex cause muscular dystrophy and dilated cardiomyopathy in animals and humans. Aberrant autonomic signalling is recognized in a variety of neuromuscular disorders. We hypothesized that activation of the renin-angiotensin system contributes to skeletal muscle and autonomic dysfunction in mice deficient in the sarcoglycan-δ (Sgcd) gene at a young age and that this early autonomic dysfunction contributes to the later development of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and increased mortality. We demonstrated that young Sgcd-/- mice exhibit histopathological features of skeletal muscle dystrophy, decreased locomotor activity and severe autonomic dysregulation, but normal LV function. Autonomic regulation continued to deteriorate in Sgcd-/- mice with age and was accompanied by LV dysfunction and dilated cardiomyopathy at older ages. Autonomic dysregulation at a young age predicted later development of

  12. Shift of the Muscular Inhibition Latency during On-Line Acquisition of Anticipatory Postural Adjustments

    PubMed Central

    Barlaam, Fanny; Vaugoyeau, Marianne; Fortin, Carole; Assaiante, Christine; Schmitz, Christina

    2016-01-01

    During action, Anticipatory Postural Adjustments (APAs) cancel the consequences of a movement on postural stabilization. Their muscular expression is characterized by early changes in the activity of the postural muscles, before the movement begins. To explore the mechanisms enabling the acquisition of APAs, a learning paradigm was designed in which the voluntary lifting of a load with one hand triggered the unloading of another load suspended below the contralateral forearm. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in the muscular expression that uncovers the progressive learning of new APAs. A trial-by-trial analysis of kinematic and electromyographic signals recorded on the right arm was conducted in twelve adults through six sessions of learning. Kinematic results reported an enhancement of the postural stabilization across learning. The main EMG pattern found during learning consisted of a flexor inhibition, where latency was shifted towards an earlier occurrence in parallel with the improvement of the postural performance. A linear regression analysis conducted between the inhibition latency and the maximal amplitude of elbow rotation showed that the earlier the inhibition onset, the better the postural stabilization. This study revealed that the progressive shift of the postural flexor inhibition latency could be considered as a reliable neurophysiological marker of the progressive learning of new APAs. Importantly, this marker could be used to track motor learning abnormalities in pathology. We relate our findings to the update of a forward predictive model of action, defined as a system that predicts beforehand the consequences of the action on posture. PMID:27192604

  13. Optimization of Spinal Muscular Atrophy subject's muscle activity during gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umat, Gazlia; Rambely, Azmin Sham

    2014-06-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is a hereditary disease related muscle nerve disorder caused by degeneration of the anterior cells of the spinal cord. SMA is divided into four types according to the degree of seriousness. SMA patients show different gait with normal people. Therefore, this study focused on the effects of SMA patient muscle actions and the difference that exists between SMA subjects and normal subjects. Therefore, the electromyography (EMG) test will be used to track the behavior of muscle during walking and optimization methods are used to get the muscle stress that is capable of doing the work while walking. Involved objective function is non-linear function of the quadratic and cubic functions. The study concludes with a comparison of the objective function using the force that sought to use the moment of previous studies and the objective function using the data obtained from EMG. The results shows that the same muscles, peroneus longus and bisepsfemoris, were used during walking activity by SMA subjects and control subjects. Muscle stress force best solution achieved from part D in simulation carried out.

  14. Molecular Gymnastics: Mechanisms of HIV-1 Resistance to CCR5 Antagonists and Impact on Virus Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Roche, Michael; Borm, Katharina; Flynn, Jacqueline K; Lewin, Sharon R; Churchill, Melissa J; Gorry, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) enters host cells through the binding of its envelope glycoproteins (Env) to the host cell receptor CD4 and then subsequent binding to a chemokine coreceptor, either CCR5 or CXCR4. CCR5 antagonists are a relatively recent class addition to the armamentarium of anti-HIV-1 drugs. These compounds act by binding to a hydrophobic pocket formed by the transmembrane helices of CCR5 and altering the conformation of the extracellular domains, such that they are no longer recognized by Env. Maraviroc is the first drug within this class to be licenced for use in HIV-1 therapy regimens. HIV resistance to CCR5 antagonists occurs either through outgrowth of pre-existing CXCR4-using viruses, or through acquisition of the ability of CCR5-using HIV-1 to use the antagonist bound form of CCR5. In the latter scenario, the mechanism underlying resistance is through complex alterations in the way that resistant Envs engage CCR5. These significant changes are unlikely to occur without consequence to the viral entry phenotype and may also open up new avenues to target CCR5 antagonist resistant viruses. This review discusses the mechanism of action of CCR5 antagonists, how HIV resistance to CCR5 antagonists occurs, and the subsequent effects on Env function. PMID:26324043

  15. Novel benzamide-based histamine h3 receptor antagonists: the identification of two candidates for clinical development.

    PubMed

    Letavic, Michael A; Aluisio, Leah; Apodaca, Richard; Bajpai, Manoj; Barbier, Ann J; Bonneville, Anne; Bonaventure, Pascal; Carruthers, Nicholas I; Dugovic, Christine; Fraser, Ian C; Kramer, Michelle L; Lord, Brian; Lovenberg, Timothy W; Li, Lilian Y; Ly, Kiev S; Mcallister, Heather; Mani, Neelakandha S; Morton, Kirsten L; Ndifor, Anthony; Nepomuceno, S Diane; Pandit, Chennagiri R; Sands, Steven B; Shah, Chandra R; Shelton, Jonathan E; Snook, Sandra S; Swanson, Devin M; Xiao, Wei

    2015-04-01

    The preclinical characterization of novel phenyl(piperazin-1-yl)methanones that are histamine H3 receptor antagonists is described. The compounds described are high affinity histamine H3 antagonists. Optimization of the physical properties of these histamine H3 antagonists led to the discovery of several promising lead compounds, and extensive preclinical profiling aided in the identification of compounds with optimal duration of action for wake promoting activity. This led to the discovery of two development candidates for Phase I and Phase II clinical trials. PMID:25893048

  16. Novel Benzamide-Based Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists: The Identification of Two Candidates for Clinical Development

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The preclinical characterization of novel phenyl(piperazin-1-yl)methanones that are histamine H3 receptor antagonists is described. The compounds described are high affinity histamine H3 antagonists. Optimization of the physical properties of these histamine H3 antagonists led to the discovery of several promising lead compounds, and extensive preclinical profiling aided in the identification of compounds with optimal duration of action for wake promoting activity. This led to the discovery of two development candidates for Phase I and Phase II clinical trials. PMID:25893048

  17. Congenital Muscular Dystrophies: A Brief Review

    PubMed Central

    Bertini, Enrico; D'Amico, Adele; Gualandi, Francesca; Petrini, Stefania

    2011-01-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous neuromuscular disorders with onset at birth or in infancy in which the muscle biopsy is compatible with a dystrophic myopathy. In the past 10 years, knowledge of neuromuscular disorders has dramatically increased, particularly with the exponential boost of disclosing the genetic background of CMDs. This review will highlight the clinical description of the most important forms of CMD, paying particular attention to the main keys for diagnostic approach. The diagnosis of CMDs requires the concurrence of expertise in multiple specialties (neurology, morphology, genetics, neuroradiology) available in a few centers worldwide that have achieved sufficient experience with the different CMD subtypes. Currently, molecular diagnosis is of paramount importance not only for phenotype-genotype correlations, genetic and prenatal counseling, and prognosis and aspects of management, but also concerning the imminent availability of clinical trials and treatments. PMID:22172424

  18. [Vitamin D: skeletal and muscular effects].

    PubMed

    Thomas, Thierry; Briot, Karine

    2013-10-01

    Insufficient serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] is a risk factor for osteoporosis. A new paradigm is emerging with the locally synthesized 1,25(OH)2D within osteoblasts and osteoclasts as the essential pathway for the effects of 25(OH)D in regulating bone remodeling via direct or indirect activation of the specific receptor VDR. Vitamin D has positive effects on fracture risk, muscular function and risk of falls; these effects are observed when serum levels of 25(OH)D are above 30 ng/ml (75 nmol/l). Vitamin D dosing interval may be relevant for reducing the risk of fracture, with evidence suggesting positive effects with short intervals of 3 months or less. It is recommended to maintain an optimal serum level of 25(OH)D when managing patients with osteoporosis or at risk of this bone disease. PMID:24054764

  19. Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy: a polyalanine myopathy.

    PubMed

    Brais, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    It has been 10 years since the identification of the first PABPN1 gene (GCN)(n)/polyalanine mutations responsible for oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). These mutations have been found in most cases of OPMD diagnosed in more than 35 countries. Sequence analyses have shown that such mutations have occurred numerous times in human history. Although PABPN1 was found early on to be a component of the classic filamentous intranuclear inclusions (INIs), mRNA and other proteins also have been found to coaggregate in the INIs. It is still unclear if the INIs play a pathologic or a protective role. The generation of numerous cell and animal models of OPMD has led to greater insight into its complex molecular pathophysiology and identified the first candidate therapeutic molecules. This paper reviews basic and clinical research on OPMD, with special emphasis on recent developments in the understanding of its pathophysiology. PMID:19080757

  20. [Statin intolerance and associated muscular dysfunctions].

    PubMed

    Boulanger-Piette, Antoine; Bergeron, Jean; Desgreniers, Joël; Côté-Levesque, Michèle; Brassard, Dominic; Joanisse, Denis R; Frenette, Jérôme

    2015-12-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. The 2012-2013 survey of Canada's public health measures revealed that dyslipidemia was present in 38% of the respondents aged between 18 and 79 years. According to the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society and the Canadian Working Group Consensus, statins remain the treatment of choice for dyslipidemia and the reduction of cardiovascular risk. However, concerns and questions persist regarding statins use and safety, potential and harmful muscular side-effects, interactions with exercise, and molecular mechanisms of myotoxicity. The goal of the present review is to provide a clear picture of the clinical situation and to investigate possible mechanisms of statin-induced myopathy. A better understanding of muscle pathology in statin users is absolutely essential to minimize their muscle symptoms and to provide a sound clinical basis for the management of cardiovascular risk. PMID:26672664

  1. Congenital muscular torticollis and positional plagiocephaly.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Alice A; Tritasavit, Sophie; Graham, John M

    2014-02-01

    On the basis of observational studies, child health practitioners in primary care settings should consider the diagnosis of congenital muscular torticollis (CMT)in infants with risk factors from birth history for intrauterine malpositioning or constraint (C). On the basis of observational studies, CMT is often associated with other conditions, including positional plagiocephaly and gross motor delays from weakened truncal muscles and/or lack of head control in early infancy (C). On the basis of observational studies, child health practitioners should counsel parents that infants should be on their stomachs frequently whenever they are awake and under direct adult supervision to develop their prone motor skills (C). On the basis of consensus, early identification of CMT(with or without positional plagiocephaly) and prompt referral to a physical therapist experienced in the treatment of CMT should be considered to avoid more costly or invasive treatments, such as cranial orthoses or surgery (D). PMID:24488831

  2. [Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy and related alpha-dystroglycanopathies].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Terumi; Nishino, Ichizo

    2008-10-01

    Alpha-dystroglycan (alpha-DG) is a glycoprotein that binds to laminin in the basal lamina and helps provide mechanical support. A group of muscular dystrophies are caused by glycosylation defects of alpha-DG and are hence collectively called alpha-dystroglycanopathy (alpha-DGP). Alpha-DGP is clinically characterized by a combination of muscular dystrophies, structural brain anomalies, and ocular involvement. So far, 6 causative genes have been identified: LARGE, POMGNT1, POMT1, POMT2, FKRP, and FKTN. Initially, alpha-DGP was classified under congenital muscular dystrophies; however, the clinical phenotype is now expanded to include a markedly wide spectrum ranging from the most severe, lethal congenital muscular dystrophy with severe brain deformity to the mildest limb girdle muscular dystrophy with minimal muscle weakness. This is exemplified by Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), which is the most prevalent alpha-DGP in Japan, and is caused by mutations in FKTN. FCMD is clinically characterized by a triad of mental retardation, brain deformities, and congenital muscular dystrophy, and a majority of FCMD patients have a homozygous 3-kb retrotransposal insertion in the 3'non-coding region. Typically, they are able to sit but never attain independent ambulation in their lives. Recently, a patient from Turkey harboring homozygous 1-bp insertion reportedly showed a severe brain deformity with hydrocephalus and died 10 days after birth. In contrast, the mildest FKTN phenotype, LGMD2L, was identified in 6 cases from 4 families in Japan. These patients harbored compound heterozygous mutation with 3-kb retrotransposal insertion in the 3'non-coding region and a novel missense mutation in the coding region. Clinically, these patients presented with minimal muscle weakness and dilated cardiomyopathy and had normal intelligence. These data clearly indicate that FKTN mutations can cause a broad spectrum of muscular dystrophies. Therefore, clinicians should always

  3. [MD-NET--muscular dystrophy network].

    PubMed

    Lochmüller, H; Straub, V

    2007-12-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MD) constitute a group of inherited disorders characterized by progressive weakness of skeletal and sometimes cardiac muscle. MD are rare disorders affecting approximately 26,000 to 40,000 people in Germany based on a pre valence of 1:2000 to 1:3000 (estimate of the Association Française contre les Myopathies, AFM) and a population of 80 million people residing in Germany. More than 30 forms of MD are recognized today caused by different genetic defects. Based on the symptoms of an individual patient the underlying genetic defect cannot be determined, since all MD have the following in common: Muscle fibers are destroyed and become replaced by fatty and fibrous tissue. Various forms of MD are caused by defects of proteins residing in the sarcolemma, the cell membrane of muscle fibers. Other forms are caused by defects of proteins that are associated to the nucleus, to the sarcomer or the cytoplasm. Moreover, there are numerous forms where the exact molecular defect is unknown to date. Even though the underlying defect is known for many MD, the pathogenic process that leads to the decay of musculature is poorly understood. At present, MD cannot be cured. MD are treated by physiotherapy, surgery and medication that may delay progression. Symptomatic therapy such as cardiac pace makers may be life-saving and improve quality of life in many patients. For optimizing research into the MD, a network, the muscular dystrophy network or MD-NET, was initiated and has been supported by the German ministry of education and research (BMBF) since 2003. PMID:18026885

  4. Porcine Models of Muscular Dystrophy1

    PubMed Central

    Selsby, Joshua T.; Ross, Jason W.; Nonneman, Dan; Hollinger, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive, fatal, X-linked disease caused by a failure to accumulate the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. This disease has been studied using a variety of animal models including fish, mice, rats, and dogs. While these models have contributed substantially to our mechanistic understanding of the disease and disease progression, limitations inherent to each model have slowed the clinical advancement of therapies, which necessitates the development of novel large-animal models. Several porcine dystrophin-deficient models have been identified, although disease severity may be so severe as to limit their potential contributions to the field. We have recently identified and completed the initial characterization of a natural porcine model of dystrophin insufficiency. Muscles from these animals display characteristic focal necrosis concomitant with decreased abundance and localization of dystrophin-glycoprotein complex components. These pigs recapitulate many of the cardinal features of muscular dystrophy, have elevated serum creatine kinase activity, and preliminarily appear to display altered locomotion. They also suffer from sudden death preceded by EKG abnormalities. Pig dystrophinopathy models could allow refinement of dosing strategies in human-sized animals in preparation for clinical trials. From an animal handling perspective, these pigs can generally be treated normally, with the understanding that acute stress can lead to sudden death. In summary, the ability to create genetically modified pig models and the serendipitous discovery of genetic disease in the swine industry has resulted in the emergence of new animal tools to facilitate the critical objective of improving the quality and length of life for boys afflicted with such a devastating disease. PMID:25991703

  5. Left-Shifted Nav Channels in Injured Bilayer: Primary Targets for Neuroprotective Nav Antagonists?

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Catherine E.; Boucher, Pierre-Alexandre; Joós, Béla

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical, ischemic, and inflammatory injuries to voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav)-rich membranes of axon initial segments and nodes of Ranvier render Nav channels dangerously leaky. By what means? The behavior of recombinant Nav1.6 (Wang et al., 2009) leads us to postulate that, in neuropathologic conditions, structural degradation of axolemmal bilayer fosters chronically left-shifted Nav channel operation, resulting in ENa rundown. This “sick excitable cell Nav-leak” would encompass left-shifted fast- and slow-mode based persistent INa (i.e., Iwindow and slow-inactivating INa). Bilayer-damage-induced electrophysiological dysfunctions of native-Nav channels, and effects on inhibitors on those channels, should, we suggest, be studied in myelinated axons, exploiting INa(V,t) hysteresis data from sawtooth ramp clamp. We hypothesize that (like dihydropyridines for Ca channels), protective lipophilic Nav antagonists would partition more avidly into disorderly bilayers than into the well-packed bilayers characteristic of undamaged, healthy plasma membrane. Whereas inhibitors using aqueous routes would access all Navs equally, differential partitioning into “sick bilayer” would co-localize lipophilic antagonists with “sick-Nav channels,” allowing for more specific targeting of impaired cells. Molecular fine-tuning of Nav antagonists to favor more avid partitioning into damaged than into intact bilayers could reduce side effects. In potentially salvageable neurons of traumatic and/or ischemic penumbras, in inflammatory neuropathies, in muscular dystrophy, in myocytes of cardiac infarct borders, Nav-leak driven excitotoxicity overwhelms cellular repair mechanisms. Precision-tuning of a lipophilic Nav antagonist for greatest efficacy in mildly damaged membranes could render it suitable for the prolonged continuous administration needed to allow for the remodeling of the excitable membranes, and thus functional recovery. PMID:22375118

  6. Benzodiazepinone Derivatives as CRTH2 Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiwen Jim; Cheng, Alan C; Tang, H Lucy; Medina, Julio C

    2011-07-14

    Multiple CRTH2 antagonists are currently evaluated in human clinical trials for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). During our lead optimization for CRTH2 antagonists, an observation of an intramolecular hydrogen bond in ortho-phenylsulfonamido benzophenone derivatives led to the design and synthesis of conformationally constrained benzodiazepinones as potent CRTH2 antagonists. The benzodiazepinones are 2 orders of magnitude more potent than the original flexible bisaryl ethers in our binding assay. Selected benzodiazepinones, such as compound 6, were also potent in the human eosinophil shape change assay. Analysis of the rigid conformations of these benzodiazepinones and ortho-phenylsulfonamido benzophenones provided an explanation for the structure-activity relationship and revealed the possible bound conformations to CRTH2, which may be useful for building a pharmacophore model of CRTH2 antagonists. PMID:24900341

  7. Plant Evolution: Evolving Antagonistic Gene Regulatory Networks.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Endymion D

    2016-06-20

    Developing a structurally complex phenotype requires a complex regulatory network. A new study shows how gene duplication provides a potential source of antagonistic interactions, an important component of gene regulatory networks. PMID:27326708

  8. Birdshot chorioretinopathy in a male patient with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Papavasileiou, Evangelia; Lobo, Ann-Marie

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of birdshot chorioretinopathy (BSCR) in a patient with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). A 40-year-old male with history of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy with significant facial diplegia and lagophthalmos presents for an evaluation of bilateral choroiditis with vasculitis and optic disc edema. Clinical examination included fundus and autofluorescence photographs, fluorescein angiography, and optical coherence tomography. To our knowledge, this patient represents the first reported case of birdshot chorioretinopathy with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy. Patients with FSHD can present with ocular findings and should be screened with dilated fundus examinations for retinal vascular changes and posterior uveitis. PMID:25861398

  9. Benign muscular dystrophy: risk calculation in families with consanguinity.

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, G; Müller, C R; Grimm, T

    1989-01-01

    This report concerns two families in which the index patients are sporadic cases of a benign form of muscular dystrophy. In both families the sisters of the patients have married a close relative. The respective risks for a child of these consanguineous marriages being affected with either X linked Becker muscular dystrophy or autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy is calculated using pedigree information, results of serum creatine kinase determinations, and also, in one family, results of DNA typing using RFLPs from the short arm of the X chromosome. PMID:2732990

  10. Tetrahydroquinoline derivatives as opioid receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cunyu; Westaway, Susan M; Speake, Jason D; Bishop, Michael J; Goetz, Aaron S; Carballo, Luz Helena; Hu, Mike; Epperly, Andrea H

    2011-01-15

    Opioid receptors play an important role in both behavioral and homeostatic functions. We herein report tetrahydroquinoline derivatives as opioid receptor antagonists. SAR studies led to the identification of the potent antagonist 2v, endowed with 1.58nM (K(i)) functional activity against the μ opioid receptor. DMPK data suggest that novel tetrahydroquinoline analogs may be advantageous in peripheral applications. PMID:21193310

  11. Efficacy of bipolar release in neglected congenital muscular torticollis patients.

    PubMed

    Seyhan, Nevra; Jasharllari, Lorenc; Keskin, Mustafa; Savacı, Nedim

    2012-06-01

    Surgical correction of the congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) is recommended for patients with unsuccessful conservative treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of surgical release of congenital muscular torticollis in neglected cases. We retrospectively evaluated the data of our patients in terms of age, sex, clinical presentation, localization of the lesion, diagnostic tests, and additional abnormalities. The age at operation ranged from 6 to 23 years. Complete muscular release as determined by pre-operative and postoperative range of motion measurements was achieved in all of the patients by bipolar release. In this study, neck motion and head tilt showed marked improvement with surgical treatment in cases with CMT who were admitted to the hospital lately. Congenital muscular torticollis patients can benefit from surgical intervention above the age of 5. Bipolar release is an adequate and complication-free method. PMID:22045346

  12. Genetics Home Reference: limb-girdle muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... most common form of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy , accounting for about 30 percent of cases. Dysferlinopathy, also ... be inherited? More about Inheriting Genetic Conditions Diagnosis & Management These resources address the diagnosis or management of ...

  13. Identification of spirooxindole and dibenzoxazepine motifs as potent mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Lotesta, Stephen D; Marcus, Andrew P; Zheng, Yajun; Leftheris, Katerina; Noto, Paul B; Meng, Shi; Kandpal, Geeta; Chen, Guozhou; Zhou, Jing; McKeever, Brian; Bukhtiyarov, Yuri; Zhao, Yi; Lala, Deepak S; Singh, Suresh B; McGeehan, Gerard M

    2016-03-15

    Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists continue to be a prevalent area of research in the pharmaceutical industry. Herein we report the discovery of various spirooxindole and dibenzoxazepine constructs as potent MR antagonists. SAR analysis of our spirooxindole hit led to highly potent compounds containing polar solubilizing groups, which interact with the helix-11 region of the MR ligand binding domain (LBD). Various dibenzoxazepine moieties were also prepared in an effort to replace a known dibenzoxepane system which interacts with the hydrophobic region of the MR LBD. In addition, an X-ray crystal structure was obtained from a highly potent compound which was shown to exhibit both partial agonist and antagonist modes of action against MR. PMID:26897089

  14. Cardiac function in muscular dystrophy associates with abdominal muscle pathology

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Brandon B.; Swaggart, Kayleigh A.; Kim, Gene; Watson, Sydeaka; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The muscular dystrophies target muscle groups differentially. In mouse models of muscular dystrophy, notably the mdx model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, the diaphragm muscle shows marked fibrosis and at an earlier age than other muscle groups, more reflective of the histopathology seen in human muscular dystrophy. Methods Using a mouse model of limb girdle muscular dystrophy, the Sgcg mouse, we compared muscle pathology across different muscle groups and heart. A cohort of nearly 200 Sgcg mice were studied using multiple measures of pathology including echocardiography, Evans blue dye uptake and hydroxyproline content in multiple muscle groups. Spearman rank correlations were determined among echocardiographic and pathological parameters. Findings The abdominal muscles were found to have more fibrosis than other muscle groups, including the diaphragm muscle. The abdominal muscles also had more Evans blue dye uptake than other muscle groups. The amount of diaphragm fibrosis was found to correlate positively with fibrosis in the left ventricle, and abdominal muscle fibrosis correlated with impaired left ventricular function. Fibrosis in the abdominal muscles negatively correlated with fibrosis in the diaphragm and right ventricles. Together these data reflect the recruitment of abdominal muscles as respiratory muscles in muscular dystrophy, a finding consistent with data from human patients. PMID:26029630

  15. Cardiac involvement in Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mavrogeni, Sophie; Markousis-Mavrogenis, George; Papavasiliou, Antigoni; Kolovou, Genovefa

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD) are X-linked muscular diseases responsible for over 80% of all muscular dystrophies. Cardiac disease is a common manifestation, not necessarily related to the degree of skeletal myopathy; it may be the predominant manifestation with or without any other evidence of muscular disease. Death is usually due to ventricular dysfunction, heart block or malignant arrhythmias. Not only DMD/BMD patients, but also female carriers may present cardiac involvement. Clinically overt heart failure in dystrophinopathies may be delayed or absent, due to relative physical inactivity. The commonest electrocardiographic findings include conduction defects, arrhythmias (supraventricular or ventricular), hypertrophy and evidence of myocardial necrosis. Echocardiography can assess a marked variability of left ventricular dysfunction, independently of age of onset or mutation groups. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has documented a pattern of epicardial fibrosis in both dystrophinopathies’ patients and carriers that can be observed even if overt muscular disease is absent. Recently, new CMR techniques, such as postcontrast myocardial T1 mapping, have been used in Duchenne muscular dystrophy to detect diffuse myocardial fibrosis. A combined approach using clinical assessment and CMR evaluation may motivate early cardioprotective treatment in both patients and asymptomatic carriers and delay the development of serious cardiac complications. PMID:26225202

  16. Extra-helical binding site of a glucagon receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Jazayeri, Ali; Doré, Andrew S; Lamb, Daniel; Krishnamurthy, Harini; Southall, Stacey M; Baig, Asma H; Bortolato, Andrea; Koglin, Markus; Robertson, Nathan J; Errey, James C; Andrews, Stephen P; Teobald, Iryna; Brown, Alastair J H; Cooke, Robert M; Weir, Malcolm; Marshall, Fiona H

    2016-05-12

    Glucagon is a 29-amino-acid peptide released from the α-cells of the islet of Langerhans, which has a key role in glucose homeostasis. Glucagon action is transduced by the class B G-protein-coupled glucagon receptor (GCGR), which is located on liver, kidney, intestinal smooth muscle, brain, adipose tissue, heart and pancreas cells, and this receptor has been considered an important drug target in the treatment of diabetes. Administration of recently identified small-molecule GCGR antagonists in patients with type 2 diabetes results in a substantial reduction of fasting and postprandial glucose concentrations. Although an X-ray structure of the transmembrane domain of the GCGR has previously been solved, the ligand (NNC0640) was not resolved. Here we report the 2.5 Å structure of human GCGR in complex with the antagonist MK-0893 (ref. 4), which is found to bind to an allosteric site outside the seven transmembrane (7TM) helical bundle in a position between TM6 and TM7 extending into the lipid bilayer. Mutagenesis of key residues identified in the X-ray structure confirms their role in the binding of MK-0893 to the receptor. The unexpected position of the binding site for MK-0893, which is structurally similar to other GCGR antagonists, suggests that glucagon activation of the receptor is prevented by restriction of the outward helical movement of TM6 required for G-protein coupling. Structural knowledge of class B receptors is limited, with only one other ligand-binding site defined--for the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRF1R)--which was located deep within the 7TM bundle. We describe a completely novel allosteric binding site for class B receptors, providing an opportunity for structure-based drug design for this receptor class and furthering our understanding of the mechanisms of activation of these receptors. PMID:27111510

  17. The Peptide Oxytocin Antagonist F-792, When Given Systemically, Does Not Act Centrally in Lactating Rats.

    PubMed

    Leng, G; Russell, J A

    2016-04-01

    Oxytocin secreted by nerve terminals in the posterior pituitary has important actions for ensuring a successful outcome of pregnancy: it stimulates uterine contractions that lead to birth and it is essential in the milk-ejection reflex, enabling milk to be expelled from the mammary glands into the mouths of suckling young. Oxytocin also has important actions in the brain: released from dendrites of neurones that innervate the posterior pituitary, oxytocin auto-excites the neurones to fire action potentials in co-ordinated bursts, causing secretion of pulses of oxytocin. Central oxytocin actions are blocked by an oxytocin antagonist given into the brain and, consequently, milk transfer stops. Systemic peptide oxytocin antagonist (atosiban) treatment is used clinically in management of pre-term labour, a major obstetric problem. Hence, it is important to know whether an oxytocin antagonist given peripherally can enter the brain and interfere with central oxytocin actions. In the present study, we tested F792, a peptide oxytocin antagonist. In urethane-anaesthetised suckled rats, we show that the mammary gland responsiveness to oxytocin is blocked by i.v. injections of 7 μg/kg of F792, and the milk-ejection reflex is blocked when F792 is given directly into the brain at a dose of 0.2 μg. To critically test whether F792 given systemically can enter the brain, we recorded the suckling- and oxytocin-induced burst-firing of individual antidromically identified oxytocin neurones in the paraventricular nucleus. Given systemically at 100 μg/kg i.v., F792 acted only peripherally, blocking the milk-ejecting actions of oxytocin, but not the burst-firing of oxytocin neurones during suckling (n = 5 neurones in five rats). Hence, this peptide oxytocin antagonist does not enter the brain from the circulation to interfere with an essential oxytocin function in the brain. Furthermore, the functions of oxytocin in the brain evidently cannot be explored with a systemic peptide

  18. New insights into the stereochemical requirements of the bradykinin B1 receptor antagonists binding.

    PubMed

    Lupala, Cecylia S; Gomez-Gutierrez, Patricia; Perez, Juan J

    2016-07-01

    Bradykinin (BK) is a nonapeptide involved in several pathophysiological conditions including among others, septic and haemorrhagic shock, anaphylaxis, arthritis, rhinitis, asthma, inflammatory bowel disease. Accordingly, BK antagonists have long been sought after for therapeutic intervention. Action of BK is mediated through two different G-protein coupled receptors known as B1 and B2. Although there are several B1 antagonists reported in literature, their pharmacological profile is not yet optimal so that new molecules need to be discovered. In the present work we have constructed an atomistic model of the B1 receptor and docked diverse available non-peptide antagonists in order to get a deeper insight into the structure-activity relationships involving binding to this receptor. The model was constructed by homology modeling using the chemokine CXC4 and bovine rhodopsin receptors as template. The model was further refined using molecular dynamics for 600ns with the protein embedded in a POPC bilayer. From the refinement process we obtained an average structure that was used for docking studies using the Glide software. Antagonists selected for the docking studies include Compound 11, Compound 12, Chroman28, SSR240612, NPV-SAA164 and PS020990. The results of the docking study underline the role of specific receptor residues in ligand binding. The results of this study permitted to define a pharmacophore that describes the stereochemical requirements of antagonist binding, and can be used for the discovery of new compounds. PMID:27469392

  19. Modeling the interactions between alpha(1)-adrenergic receptors and their antagonists.

    PubMed

    Du, Lupei; Li, Minyong

    2010-09-01

    As crucial members of the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily, alpha (1)-adrenergic receptors (alpha(1)-ARs) are recognized to intervene the actions of endogenous catecholamines such as norepinephrine and epinephrine. So far three distinct alpha(1)-AR subtypes, alpha(1A), alpha(1B) and alpha(1D), have been characterized by functional analysis, radio-ligand binding and molecular biology studies. The alpha(1)-ARs are of therapeutic interest because of their distinct and critical roles in many physiological processes, containing hypertension, benign prostatic hyperplasia, smooth muscle contraction, myocardial inotropy and chronotropy, and hepatic glucose metabolism. Accordingly, designing subtype-selective antagonists for each of the three alpha(1)-AR subtypes has been an enthusiastic region of medicinal research. Even though a large number of studies on GPCRs have been conducted, understanding of how known antagonists bind to alpha(1)-ARs still remains sketchy and has been a serious impediment to search for potent and subtype-selective alpha(1)-AR antagonists because of the lack of detailed experimental structural knowledge. This review deliberates the simulation of alpha(1)-ARs and their interactions with antagonists by using ligand-based (pharmacophore identification and QSAR modeling) and structure-based (comparative modeling and molecular docking) approaches. Combined with experimental data, these computational attempts could improve our understanding of the structural basis of antagonist binding and the molecular basis of receptor activation, thus offering a more reasonable approach in the design of drugs targeting alpha(1)-ARs. PMID:20412040

  20. Characterization of a new CCK antagonist, L364,718: In vitro and in vivo studies

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, D.S.; Liang, Jiang Ping; Owyang, Chung )

    1988-09-01

    In this study the authors examined a novel, orally effective, nonpeptidal cholecystokinin (CCK) antagonist, 3S(-)-N-(2,3-dihydro-1-methyl-2-oxo-5-phenyl-1H-1,4-benzodiazepine-3-yl)-1H-indole-2-carboxamide (L364,718) on CCK-induced amylase release. They used isolated rat pancreatic acini and incubated them with CCK-8 with or without various CCK receptor antagonists. L364,718, proglumide, and the proglumide derivative CR1409 each caused a progressive rightward shift in the CCK-8-dose-response curve without a change in maximal amylase secretion. L364,718 was 600-fold more potent than CR1409 and 2,000,000-fold more potent than proglumide in inhibiting CCK-8-induced amylase release. Inhibition of {sup 125}I-Bolton-Hunter-CCK-8 binding to acini by these receptor antagonists had a similar rank potency. L364,718 was tested against other pancreatic exocrine secretagogues and was effective against agonists that only act through the CCK receptor. To verify that L364,718 is an effective receptor antagonists against the various molecular forms of CCK released endogenously in humans, postprandial plasma CCK was extracted and bioassayed using amylase release from isolated pancreatic acini. Thus L364,718 is the most potent, selective peripheral CCK receptor antagonist reported to data, and it is capable of antagonizing the stimulatory action of exogenously as well as endogenously released CCK to evoke amylase release from pancreatic acini.

  1. Optimizing Bone Health in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Buckner, Jason L.; Bowden, Sasigarn A.; Mahan, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness, with eventual loss of ambulation and premature death. The approved therapy with corticosteroids improves muscle strength, prolongs ambulation, and maintains pulmonary function. However, the osteoporotic impact of chronic corticosteroid use further impairs the underlying reduced bone mass seen in DMD, leading to increased fragility fractures of long bones and vertebrae. These serious sequelae adversely affect quality of life and can impact survival. The current clinical issues relating to bone health and bone health screening methods in DMD are presented in this review. Diagnostic studies, including biochemical markers of bone turnover and bone mineral density by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), as well as spinal imaging using densitometric lateral spinal imaging, and treatment to optimize bone health in patients with DMD are discussed. Treatment with bisphosphonates offers a method to increase bone mass in these children; oral and intravenous bisphosphonates have been used successfully although treatment is typically reserved for children with fractures and/or bone pain with low bone mass by DXA. PMID:26124831

  2. Spinal Muscular Atrophy: Current Therapeutic Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselyov, Alex S.; Gurney, Mark E.

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by death of motor neurons in the spinal cord. SMA is caused by deletion and/or mutation of the survival motor neuron gene (SMN1) on chromosome 5q13. There are variable numbers of copies of a second, related gene named SMN2 located in the proximity to SMN1. Both genes encode the same protein (Smn). Loss of SMN1 and incorrect splicing of SMN2 affect cellular levels of Smn triggering death of motor neurons. The severity of SMA is directly related to the normal number of copies of SMN2 carried by the patient. A considerable effort has been dedicated to identifying modalities including both biological and small molecule agents that increase SMN2 promoter activity to upregulate gene transcription and produce increased quantities of full-length Smn protein. This review summarizes recent progress in the area and suggests potential target product profile for an SMA therapeutic.

  3. Prenatal prediction of spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, R J; Suthers, G K; Morrison, K E; Thomas, N H; Francis, M J; Mathew, C G; Loughlin, S; Heiberg, A; Wood, D; Dubowitz, V

    1992-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a common cause of inherited morbidity and mortality in childhood. The wide range of phenotypes in SMA, uncertainty regarding its mode of inheritance, and the suggestion of linkage heterogeneity have complicated the genetic counselling of parents of affected children. The locus responsible for autosomal recessive SMA has been mapped to 5q11.2-q13.3. The most likely order of loci is cen-D5S6-(SMA,D5S125)-(JK53CA1/2,D5S112)-D5S3 9-qter, with highly polymorphic loci being identified at JK53CA1/2 and D5S39. We describe linkage studies with another highly polymorphic locus, D5S127, that is closely linked to D5S39. This genetic map can be used as the basis for genetic counselling in families with autosomal recessive SMA. Appropriate allowance can be made for sporadic cases owing to non-inherited causes and for linkage heterogeneity or misdiagnoses. Images PMID:1348091

  4. Measuring quality of life in muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Abresch, Richard T.; Biesecker, Barbara; Conway, Kristin Caspers; Heatwole, Chad; Peay, Holly; Scal, Peter; Strober, Jonathan; Uzark, Karen; Wolff, Jodi; Margolis, Marjorie; Blackwell, Angela; Street, Natalie; Montesanti, Angela; Bolen, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives of this study were to develop a conceptual model of quality of life (QOL) in muscular dystrophies (MDs) and review existing QOL measures for use in the MD population. Methods: Our model for QOL among individuals with MD was developed based on a modified Delphi process, literature review, and input from patients and patient advocacy organizations. Scales that have been used to measure QOL among patients with MD were identified through a literature review and evaluated using the COSMIN (Consensus-Based Standards for the Selection of Health Measurement Instruments) checklist. Results: The Comprehensive Model of QOL in MD (CMQM) captures 3 broad domains of QOL (physical, psychological, and social), includes factors influencing self-reported QOL (disease-related factors, support/resources, and expectations/aspirations), and places these concepts within the context of the life course. The literature review identified 15 QOL scales (9 adult and 6 pediatric) that have been applied to patients with MD. Very few studies reported reliability data, and none included data on responsiveness of the measures to change in disease progression, a necessary psychometric property for measures included in treatment and intervention studies. No scales captured all QOL domains identified in the CMQM model. Conclusions: Additional scale development research is needed to enhance assessment of QOL for individuals with MD. Item banking and computerized adaptive assessment would be particularly beneficial by allowing the scale to be tailored to each individual, thereby minimizing respondent burden. PMID:25663223

  5. Molecular analysis of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD)

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyaya, M.; Maynard, J.; Osborn, M.

    1994-09-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness. The disease locus maps to 4q35 and is associated with a de novo DNA rearrangement, detected by a probe p13E-11 (D4F104S1) which maps proximal to the disease locus. An informative distal flanking marker for this condition is still required. Using p13E-11, we have analyzed 35 FSHD families in which the disease is apparently associated with a new mutation. Twenty three of these cases were found to have a smaller rearranged DNA fragment which was not present in either of the parents. Pulsed-field gel analysis of 5 of these families also revealed evidence of DNA deletion. During the course of this study, we identified one case with a DNA rearrangement which was also present in the unaffected mother, but at very low intensity. This finding has been confirmed by pulsed-field gel analysis, and indicates that the mother is probably a gonosomal mosaic. In order to saturate the FSHD region with new DNA markers, a laser microdissection and microcloning technique was used to construct a genomic library from the distal end of chromosome 4. Of the 72 microclones analyzed, 42 mapped into the relevant 4q35 region. 4 sequences were conserved and may be considered potential candidate genes for FSHD. The microclones mapping to 4q35 are under study to identify additional polymorphic markers for the FSHD region.

  6. Gene Therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Julian; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a relatively common inherited disorder caused by defective expression of the protein dystrophin. The most direct approach to treating this disease would be to restore dystrophin production in muscle. Recent progress has greatly increased the prospects for successful gene therapy of DMD, and here we summarize the most promising developments. Areas Covered Gene transfer using vectors derived from adeno-associated virus (AAV) has emerged as a promising method to restore dystrophin production in muscles bodywide, and represents a treatment option applicable to all DMD patients. Using information gleaned from PubMed searches of the literature, attendance at scientific conferences and results from our own lab, we provide an overview of the potential for gene therapy of DMD using AAV vectors including a summary of promising developments and issues that need to be resolved prior to large-scale therapeutic implementation. Expert Opinion Of the many approaches being pursued to treat DMD and BMD, gene therapy based on AAV-mediated delivery of microdystrophin is the most direct and promising method to treat the cause of the disorder. The major challenges to this approach are ensuring that microdystrophin can be delivered safely and efficiently without eliciting an immune response. PMID:26594599

  7. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy: consequences of chromatin relaxation

    PubMed Central

    van der Maarel, Silvère M.; Miller, Daniel G.; Tawil, Rabi; Filippova, Galina N.; Tapscott, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review In recent years we have seen remarkable progress in our understanding of the disease mechanism underlying facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of our current understanding of the disease mechanism and to discuss the observations supporting the possibility of a developmental defect in this disorder. Recent findings In the majority of cases FSHD is caused by contraction of the D4Z4 repeat array (FSHD1). This results in local chromatin relaxation and stable expression of the DUX4 retrogene in skeletal muscle, but only when a polymorphic DUX4 polyadenylation signal is present. In some cases (FSHD2), D4Z4 chromatin relaxation and stable DUX4 expression occurs in the absence of D4Z4 array contraction. DUX4 is a germline transcription factor and its expression in skeletal muscle leads to activation of early stem cell and germline programs and transcriptional activation of retroelements. Summary Recent studies have provided a plausible disease mechanism for FSHD where FSHD results from inappropriate expression of the germline transcription factor DUX4. The genes regulated by DUX4 suggest several mechanisms of muscle damage, and provide potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets that should be investigated in future studies. PMID:22892954

  8. Chronic oral administration of Ang-(1-7) improves skeletal muscle, autonomic and locomotor phenotypes in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, Rasna; Cicha, Michael Z; Sinisterra, Ruben D M; De Sousa, Frederico B; Santos, Robson A; Chapleau, Mark W

    2014-07-01

    Muscular dystrophies are a group of heterogeneous genetic disorders that cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting, dilated cardiomyopathy and early mortality. There are different types of muscular dystrophies with varying aetiologies but they all have a common hallmark of myofibre degeneration, atrophy and decreased mobility. Mutation in Sgcd (sarcoglycan-δ), a subunit of dystrophin glycoprotein complex, causes LGMD2F (limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2F). Previously, we have reported that Sgcd-deficient (Sgcd-/-) mice exhibit AngII (angiotensin II)-induced autonomic and skeletal muscle dysfunction at a young age, which contributes to onset of dilated cardiomyopathy and mortality at older ages. Two counter-regulatory RAS (renin-angiotensin system) pathways have been identified: deleterious actions of AngII acting on the AT1R (AngII type 1 receptor) compared with the protective actions of Ang-(1-7) [angiotensin-(1-7)] acting on the receptor Mas. We propose that the balance between the AngII/AT1R and Ang-(1-7)/Mas axes is disturbed in Sgcd-/- mice. Control C57BL/6J and Sgcd-/- mice were treated with Ang-(1-7) included in hydroxypropyl β-cyclodextrin (in drinking water) for 8-9 weeks beginning at 3 weeks of age. Ang-(1-7) treatment restored the AngII/AT1R compared with Ang-(1-7)/Mas balance, decreased oxidative stress and fibrosis in skeletal muscle, increased locomotor activity, and prevented autonomic dysfunction without lowering blood pressure in Sgcd-/- mice. Our results suggest that correcting the early autonomic dysregulation by administering Ang-(1-7) or enhancing its endogenous production may provide a novel therapeutic approach in muscular dystrophy. PMID:24502705

  9. A Platform Stratifying a Sequestering Agent and a Pharmacological Antagonist as a Means to Negate Botulinum Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxicity is characterized by peripheral neuromuscular blockade/flaccid paralysis that can lead to respiratory failure and ultimately death. Current therapeutic options provide relief in a pre-exposure scenario, but there are no clinically approved postexposure medical countermeasures. Here, we introduce a platform that utilizes a combination of a toxin sequestering agent and a pharmacological antagonist to ablate botulinum neurotoxicity in a well-defined mouse lethality assay. The platform was constructed to allow for ready exchange of sequestering agent and/or pharmacological antagonist for therapeutic optimization. As such, we attempted to improve upon the pharmacological antagonist, a potassium channel blocker, 3,4-diaminopyridine, through a prodrug approach; thus, a complete kinetic decomposition pathway is described. These experiments provide the first proof-of-principle that a synergistic combination strategy can be used to reduce toxin burden in the peripheral using a sequestering antibody, while restoring muscle action via a pharmacological small molecule antagonist. PMID:25000171

  10. 3D pharmacophore models for thromboxane A(2) receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jing; Liu, Yixi; Wang, Songqing

    2009-10-01

    Thromboxane A(2) (TXA(2)) is an endogenous arachidonic acid derivative closely correlated to thrombosis and other cardiovascular diseases. The action of TXA(2) can be effectively inhibited with TXA(2) receptor antagonists (TXRAs). Previous studies have attempted to describe the interactions between the TXA(2) receptor and its ligands, but their conclusions are still controversial. In this study, ligand-based computational drug design is used as a new and effective way to investigate the structure-activity relationship of TXRAs. Three-dimensional pharmacophore models of TXRAs were built with HypoGenRefine and HipHop modules in CATALYST software. The optimal HypoGenRefine model was developed on the basis of 25 TXRAs. It consists of two hydrophobic groups, one aromatic ring, one hydrogen-bond acceptor and four excluded volumes. The optimal HipHop model contains two hydrophobic groups and two hydrogen-bond acceptors. These models describe the key structure-activity relationship of TXRAs, can predict their activities, and can thus be used to design novel antagonists. PMID:19263096