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Sample records for antarctic bed rest

  1. Vitamin D: Findings from Antarctic, Bed Rest, Houston, and ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwart, Sara R.; Locke, J.; Pierson, D.; Mehta, S.; Bourbeau, Y.; Parsons, H.; Smith, S. M.

    2009-01-01

    Obtaining vitamin D is critical for space travelers because they lack ultraviolet light exposure and have an insufficient dietary supply of vitamin D. Despite the provision of 400 IU vitamin D supplements to International Space Station (ISS) early crewmembers, vitamin D status was consistently lower after flight than before flight, and in several crewmembers has decreased to levels considered clinically significant. Vitamin D has long been known to play a role in calcium metabolism, and more recently its non-calcitropic functions have been recognized. According to the results of several recent studies, functionally relevant measures indicate that the lower limit of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (a marker of vitamin D status) should be raised from the current 23 nmol/L to 80 nmol/L. The mean preflight serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH vit D) for U.S. ISS crewmembers to date is 63 +/- 16 nmol/L, and after a 4- to 6-mo space flight it typically decreases 25-30% despite supplementation (400 IU/d). The sub-optimal pre- and postflight vitamin D status is an issue that needs to be addressed, to allow NASA to better define the appropriate amount of supplemental vitamin D to serve as a countermeasure against vitamin D deficiency in astronaut crews. A series of ground-based and flight studies in multiple models have been conducted, including Antarctica in winter months when UV-B radiation levels are essentially zero, bed rest where subjects are not exposed to UV-B radiation for 60-90 days, in free-living individuals in Houston, and in International Space Station crewmembers. In these studies, we looked at dose regimen and efficacy, compliance issues, as well as toxicity. Preliminary results from these studies will be presented. Together, the data from these studies will enable us to provide space crews with evidence-based recommendations for vitamin D supplementation. The findings also have implications for other persons with limited UV light exposure, including polar workers and

  2. Bed rest and immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Aviles, Hernan; Butel, Janet S.; Shearer, William T.; Niesel, David; Pandya, Utpal; Allen, Christopher; Ochs, Hans D.; Blancher, Antoine; Abbal, Michel

    2007-02-01

    Space flight has been shown to result in altered immune responses. The current study was designed to investigate this possibility by using the bed rest model of some space flight conditions. A large number of women are included as subjects in the study. The hypothesis being tested is: 60 days head-down tilt bed rest of humans will affect the immune system and resistance to infection. Blood, urine and saliva samples will be obtained from bed rest subjects prior to, at intervals during, and after completion of 60 days of head-down tilt bed rest. Leukocyte blastogenesis, cytokine production and virus reactivation will be assessed. The ability of the subjects to respond appropriately to immunization with the neoantigen bacteriophage φX-174 will also be determined. Bed rest is being carried out at MEDES, Toulouse France, and the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX. The studies to be carried out in France will also allow assessment of the effects of muscle/bone exercise and nutritional countermeasures on the immune system in addition to the effects of bed rest.

  3. Bed rest during pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... groups, bulletin boards, and chat rooms online for moms-to-be who are also on bed rest. Expect emotional ups and downs. Share your hopes and worries with your partner. Let each other vent if needed. If sex is not allowed, look for other ways to ...

  4. Bed Rest Muscular Atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    2000-01-01

    A major debilitating response from prolonged bed rest (BR) is muscle atrophy, defined as a "decrease in size of a part of tissue after full development has been attained: a wasting away of tissue as from disuse, old age, injury or disease". Part of the complicated mechanism for the dizziness, increased body instability, and exaggerated gait in patients who arise immediately after BR may be a result of not only foot pain, but also of muscular atrophy and associated reduction in lower limb strength. Also, there seems to be a close association between muscle atrophy and bone atrophy. A discussion of many facets of the total BR homeostatic syndrome has been published. The old adage that use determines form which promotes function of bone (Wolff's law) also applies to those people exposed to prolonged BR (without exercise training) in whom muscle atrophy is a consistent finding. An extreme case involved a 16-year-old boy who was ordered to bed by his mother in 1932: after 50 years in bed he had "a lily-white frame with limbs as thin as the legs of a ladder-back chair". These findings emphasize the close relationship between muscle atrophy and bone atrophy. In addition to loss of muscle mass during deconditioning, there is a significant loss of muscle strength and a decrease in protein synthesis. Because the decreases in force (strength) are proportionately greater than those in fiber size or muscle cross-sectional area, other contributory factors must be involved; muscle fiber dehydration may be important.

  5. Flight Analogs (Bed Rest Research)

    NASA Video Gallery

    Flight Analogs / Bed Rest Research Projects provide NASA with a ground based research platform to complement space research. By mimicking the conditions of weightlessness in the human body here on ...

  6. Bed rest during pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider before you start any activity: Squeezing stress balls Pressing your hands and feet against the bed ... limit yourself from doing any of these: Cooking Light chores Walking Bathing or showering Driving Having sex ...

  7. Physiology Of Prolonged Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes physiological effects of prolonged bed rest. Rest for periods of 24 hours or longer deconditions body to some extent; healing proceeds simultaneously with deconditioning. Report provides details on shifts in fluid electrolytes and loss of lean body mass, which comprises everything in body besides fat - that is, water, muscle, and bone. Based on published research.

  8. Clinical physiology of bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    1993-01-01

    Maintenance of optimal health in humans requires the proper balance between exercise, rest, and sleep as well as time in the upright position. About one-third of a lifetime is spent sleeping; and it is no coincidence that sleeping is performed in the horizontal position, the position in which gravitational influence on the body is minimal. Although enforced bed rest is necessary for the treatment of some ailments, in some cases it has probably been used unwisely. In addition to the lower hydrostatic pressure with the normally dependent regions of the cardiovascular system, body fuid compartments during bed rest in the horizontal body position, and virtual elimination of compression on the long bones of the skeletal system during bed rest (hypogravia), there is often reduction in energy metabolism due to the relative confinement (hypodynamia) and alteration of ambulatory circadian variations in metabolism, body temperature, and many hormonal systems. If patients are also moved to unfamiliar surroundings, they probably experience some feelings of anxiety and some sociopsychological problems. Adaptive physiological responses during bed rest are normal for that environment. They are attempts by the body to reduce unnecessary energy expenditure, to optimize its function, and to enhance its survival potential. Many of the deconditioning responses begin within the first day or two of bed rest; these early responses have prompted physicians to insist upon early resumption of the upright posture and ambulation of bedridden patients.

  9. The NASA Bed Rest Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Bradley; Meck, Janice

    2005-01-01

    NASA s National Vision for Space Exploration includes human travel beyond low earth orbit and the ultimate safe return of the crews. Crucial to fulfilling the vision is the successful and timely development of countermeasures for the adverse physiological effects on human systems caused by long term exposure to the microgravity environment. Limited access to in-flight resources for the foreseeable future increases NASA s reliance on ground-based analogs to simulate these effects of microgravity. The primary analog for human based research will be head-down bed rest. By this approach NASA will be able to evaluate countermeasures in large sample sizes, perform preliminary evaluations of proposed in-flight protocols and assess the utility of individual or combined strategies before flight resources are requested. In response to this critical need, NASA has created the Bed Rest Project at the Johnson Space Center. The Project establishes the infrastructure and processes to provide a long term capability for standardized domestic bed rest studies and countermeasure development. The Bed Rest Project design takes a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, integrated approach that reduces the resource overhead of one investigator for one campaign. In addition to integrating studies operationally relevant for exploration, the Project addresses other new Vision objectives, namely: 1) interagency cooperation with the NIH allows for Clinical Research Center (CRC) facility sharing to the benefit of both agencies, 2) collaboration with our International Partners expands countermeasure development opportunities for foreign and domestic investigators as well as promotes consistency in approach and results, 3) to the greatest degree possible, the Project also advances research by clinicians and academia alike to encourage return to earth benefits. This paper will describe the Project s top level goals, organization and relationship to other Exploration Vision Projects, implementation

  10. Physiology of prolonged bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.

    1988-01-01

    Bed rest has been a normal procedure used by physicians for centuries in the treatment of injury and disease. Exposure of patients to prolonged bed rest in the horizontal position induces adaptive deconditioning responses. While deconditioning responses are appropriate for patients or test subjects in the horizontal position, they usually result in adverse physiological responses (fainting, muscular weakness) when the patient assume the upright posture. These deconditioning responses result from reduction in hydrostatic pressure within the cardiovascular system, virtual elimination of longitudinal pressure on the long bones, some decrease in total body metabolism, changes in diet, and perhaps psychological impact from the different environment. Almost every system in the body is affected. An early stimulus is the cephalic shift of fluid from the legs which increases atrial pressure and induces compensatory responses for fluid and electrolyte redistribution. Without countermeasures, deterioration in strength and muscle function occurs within 1 wk while increased calcium loss may continue for months. Research should also focus on drug and carbohydrate metabolism.

  11. International Standardization of Bed Rest Standard Measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, Ronita L.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation gives an overview of the standardization of bed rest measures. The International Countermeasures Working Group attempted to define and agree internationally on standard measurements for spaceflight based bed rest studies. The group identified the experts amongst several stakeholder agencys. It included information on exercise, muscle, neurological, psychological, bone and cardiovascular measures.

  12. Effects Of Exercise During Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.; Bernauer, Edmund M.

    1993-01-01

    Pair of reports adds to growing body of knowledge of physical deconditioning caused by prolonged bed rest and effectiveness of various exercise regimens in preserving or restoring fitness. Major objective to determine what regimens to prescribe to astronauts before flight, during prolonged weightlessness, and immediately before returning to Earth. Knowledge also benefits patients confined by illness or injury. First report discusses experiment on effects of two types of periodic, intense, short-duration exercise during bed rest. Experiment also discussed in documents "Effects Of Exercise During Prolonged Bed Rest" (ARC-12190), and "Isotonic And Isokinetic Exercise During Bed Rest" (ARC-12180). Second report reviews knowledge acquired with view toward development of protocols for exercise regimens.

  13. The Physiology of Bed Rest. Chapter 39

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortney, Suzanne M.; Schneider, Victor S.; Greenleaf, John E.

    1996-01-01

    Prolonged rest in bed has been utilized by physicians and other health-care workers to immobilize and confine patients for rehabilitation and restoration of health since time immemorial. The sitting or horizontal position is sought by the body to relieve the strain of the upright or vertical postures, for example during syncopal situations, bone fractures, muscle injuries, fatigue, and probably also to reduce energy expenditure. Most health-care personnel are aware that adaptive responses occurring during bed rest proceed concomitantly with the healing process; signs and symptoms associated with the former should be differentiated from those of the latter. Not all illnesses and infirmities benefit from prolonged bed rest. Considerations in prescribing bed rest for patients-including duration, body position, mode and duration of exercise, light-dark cycles, temperature, and humidity-have not been investigated adequately. More recently, adaptive physiological responses have been measured in normal, healthy subjects in the horizontal or slightly head-down postures during prolonged bed rest as analogs for the adaptive responses of astronauts exposed to the microgravity environment of outer and bed-rest research.

  14. Exercise countermeasures for bed-rest deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The purpose for this 30-day bed rest study was to investigate the effects of short-term, high intensity isotonic and isokinetic exercise training on maintenance of working capacity (peak oxygen uptake), muscular strength and endurance, and on orthostatic tolerance, posture and gait. Other data were collected on muscle atrophy, bone mineralization and density, endocrine analyses concerning vasoactivity and fluid-electrolyte balance, muscle intermediary metabolism, and on performance and mood of the subjects. It was concluded that: The subjects maintained a relatively stable mood, high morale, and high esprit de corps throughout the study. Performance improved in nearly all tests in almost all the subjects. Isotonic training, as opposed to isokinetic exercise training, was associated more with decreasing levels of psychological tension, concentration, and motivation; and improvement in the quality of sleep. Working capacity (peak oxygen uptake) was maintained during bed rest with isotonic exercise training; it was not maintained with isokinetic or no exercise training. In general, there was no significant decrease in strength or endurance of arm or leg muscles during bed rest, in spite of some reduction in muscle size (atrophy) of some leg muscles. There was no effect of isotonic exercise training on orthostasis, since tilt-table tolerance was reduced similarly in all three groups following bed rest. Bed rest resulted in significant decreases of postural stability and self-selected step length, stride length, and walking velocity, which were not influenced by either exercise training regimen. Most pre-bed rest responses were restored by the fourth day of recovery.

  15. Cardiac atrophy after bed rest and spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perhonen, M. A.; Franco, F.; Lane, L. D.; Buckey, J. C.; Blomqvist, C. G.; Zerwekh, J. E.; Peshock, R. M.; Weatherall, P. T.; Levine, B. D.

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac muscle adapts well to changes in loading conditions. For example, left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy may be induced physiologically (via exercise training) or pathologically (via hypertension or valvular heart disease). If hypertension is treated, LV hypertrophy regresses, suggesting a sensitivity to LV work. However, whether physical inactivity in nonathletic populations causes adaptive changes in LV mass or even frank atrophy is not clear. We exposed previously sedentary men to 6 (n = 5) and 12 (n = 3) wk of horizontal bed rest. LV and right ventricular (RV) mass and end-diastolic volume were measured using cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 2, 6, and 12 wk of bed rest; five healthy men were also studied before and after at least 6 wk of routine daily activities as controls. In addition, four astronauts were exposed to the complete elimination of hydrostatic gradients during a spaceflight of 10 days. During bed rest, LV mass decreased by 8.0 +/- 2.2% (P = 0.005) after 6 wk with an additional atrophy of 7.6 +/- 2.3% in the subjects who remained in bed for 12 wk; there was no change in LV mass for the control subjects (153.0 +/- 12.2 vs. 153.4 +/- 12.1 g, P = 0.81). Mean wall thickness decreased (4 +/- 2.5%, P = 0.01) after 6 wk of bed rest associated with the decrease in LV mass, suggesting a physiological remodeling with respect to altered load. LV end-diastolic volume decreased by 14 +/- 1.7% (P = 0.002) after 2 wk of bed rest and changed minimally thereafter. After 6 wk of bed rest, RV free wall mass decreased by 10 +/- 2.7% (P = 0.06) and RV end-diastolic volume by 16 +/- 7.9% (P = 0.06). After spaceflight, LV mass decreased by 12 +/- 6.9% (P = 0.07). In conclusion, cardiac atrophy occurs during prolonged (6 wk) horizontal bed rest and may also occur after short-term spaceflight. We suggest that cardiac atrophy is due to a physiological adaptation to reduced myocardial load and work in real or simulated microgravity and demonstrates the plasticity

  16. Effects Of Exercise During Prolonged Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, S.; Berry, P; Cohen, M.; Danelis, J.; Deroshia, C.; Greenleaf, J.; Harris, B.; Keil, L.; Bernauer, E.; Bond, M.; Ellis, S.; Lee, P.; Selzer, R.; Wade, C.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes experiment to investigate effects of isotonic and isokinetic leg exercises in counteracting effects of bed rest upon physical and mental conditions of subjects. Data taken on capacity for work, endurance and strength, tolerance to sitting up, equilibrium, posture, gait, atrophy, mineralization and density of bones, endocrine analyses concerning vasoactivity and fluid and electrolyte balances, intermediary metabolism of muscles, mood, and performance.

  17. Exercise Training During Bed Rest Attenuates Deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Hargens, Alan R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A 30-day 6 deg. head-down bed rest study was conducted to evaluate high-intensity, short-duration, alternating isotonic cycle ergometer exercise (ITE) training and high-intensity intermittent isokinetic exercise (IKE) training regiments designed to maintain peak VO2 and muscle mass, strength, and endurance at ambulatory control levels throughout prolonged bed rest. Other elements of the deconditioning (acclimation) syndrome, such as proprioception, psychological performance, hypovolemia, water balance, body composition, and orthostatic tolerance, were also measured. Compared with response during bed rest of the no exercise (NOE) control group: the ITE training regimen (a) maintained work capacity (peak VO2), (b) maintained plasma and red cell volume, (c) induced positive body water balance, (d) decreased quality of sleep and mental concentration, and (e) had no effect on the decrease in orthostatic tolerance; the IKE training regimen (a) attenuated the decrease in peak VO2 by 50%, (b) attenuated loss of red cell volume by 40%, but had no effect on loss of plasma volume, (c) induced positive body water balance, (d) had no adverse effect on quality of sleep or concentration, and (e) had no effect on the decrease in orthostatic tolerance. These findings suggest that various elements of the deconditioning syndrome can be manipulated by duration and intensity of ITE or IKE training regiments, and that several different training protocols will be required to maintain or restore physiological and psychological performance of individuals confined to prolonged bed rest.

  18. Cardiac atrophy in women following bed rest.

    PubMed

    Dorfman, Todd A; Levine, Benjamin D; Tillery, Tommy; Peshock, Ronald M; Hastings, Jeff L; Schneider, Suzanne M; Macias, Brandon R; Biolo, Gianni; Hargens, Alan R

    2007-07-01

    Both chronic microgravity exposure and long-duration bed rest induce cardiac atrophy, which leads to reduced standing stroke volume and orthostatic intolerance. However, despite the fact that women appear to be more susceptible to postspaceflight presyncope and orthostatic hypotension than male astronauts, most previous high-resolution studies of cardiac morphology following microgravity have been performed only in men. Because female athletes have less physiological hypertrophy than male athletes, we reasoned that they also might have altered physiological cardiac atrophy after bed rest. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 24 healthy young women (32.1 +/- 4 yr) to measure left ventricular (LV) and right ventricular (RV) mass, volumes, and morphology accurately before and after 60 days of 6 degrees head-down tilt (HDT) bed rest. Subjects were matched and then randomly assigned to sedentary bed rest (controls, n = 8) or two treatment groups consisting of 1) exercise training using supine treadmill running within lower body negative pressure plus resistive training (n = 8), or 2) protein (0.45 g x kg(-1) x day(-1) increase) plus branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) (7.2 g/day) supplementation (n = 8). After sedentary bed rest without nutritional supplementation, there were significant reductions in LV (96 +/- 26 to 77 +/- 25 ml; P = 0.03) and RV volumes (104 +/- 33 to 86 +/- 25 ml; P = 0.02), LV (2.2 +/- 0.2 to 2.0 +/- 0.2 g/kg; P = 0.003) and RV masses (0.8 +/- 0.1 to 0.6 +/- 0.1 g/kg; P < 0.001), and the length of the major axis of the LV (90 +/- 6 to 84 +/- 7 mm. P < 0.001), similar to what has been observed previously in men (8.0%; Perhonen MA, Franco F, Lane LD, Buckey JC, Blomqvist Zerwekh JE, Peshock RM, Weatherall PT, Levine BD. J Appl Physiol 91: 645-653, 2001). In contrast, there were no significant reductions in LV or RV volumes in the exercise-trained group, and the length of the major axis was preserved. Moreover, there were significant increases in

  19. Exercise countermeasures for bed rest deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The major objectives were to evaluate the efficiency of different modes of exercise (isotonic and isokinetic) for countering the effects of bed rest deconditioning on work capacity (peak oxygen uptake), muscular strength, orthostatic tolerance, posture, equilibrium and gait; and to collect additional data of a more fundamental nature to help understand how these deconditioning responses occur. These data will be used for writing prescriptions for exercise to be utilized by astronauts for maintaining work capacity and well-being on Freedom Station, and to determine what exercise devices should be place in the station.

  20. Exercise thermoregulation after 14 days of bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Reese, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of bed rest and exercise training during bed rest on body temperature and thermoregulatory responses at rest and during exercise are investigated. Seven male subjects underwent three two-week periods of bed rest during which isometric, isotonic, or no exercises were performed, separated by two ambulatory control periods and preceded by a two-week control period, during which they exercised regularly. Rectal and mean skin temperatures and sweating responses were determined during 70-min submaximal supine exercise during the bed rest and recovery periods. Measurements reveal a reduction in basal oral temperature during the control-recovery periods, with a relatively constant level during bed rest periods, and a significant increase in the rectal temperature elavation brought on by exercise following all three bed-rest regimes. It is concluded that the excessive increase in rectal temperature could be influenced by changes in skin heat conductance or the inhibition of sweating.

  1. Cognitive Functioning in Long Duration Head-down Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seaton, Kimberly A.; Slack, Kelley J.; Sipes, Walter A.; Bowie, Kendra

    2008-01-01

    The Space Flight Cognitive Assessment Tool for Windows (WinSCAT) is a self-administered battery of tests used on the International Space Station for evaluating cognitive functioning. Here, WinSCAT was used to assess cognitive functioning during extended head-down bed rest. Thirteen subjects who participated in 60 or 90 days of 6 deg head-down bed rest took WinSCAT during the pre-bed rest phase, the in-bed rest phase, and the post-bed rest (reconditioning) phase of study participation. After adjusting for individual baseline performance, 12 off-nominal scores were observed out of 351 total observations during bed rest and 7 of 180 during reconditioning. No evidence was found for systematic changes in off-nominal incidence as time in bed rest progressed, or during the reconditioning period. Cognitive functioning does not appear to be adversely affected by long duration head-down bed rest. Individual differences in underlying cognitive ability and motivation level are likely explanations for the current findings.

  2. Nutritional Status in Humans during Long-Duration Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.; MatthewsOliver, Susan A.; Dillon, E. Lichar; Fesperman, Vernell

    2006-01-01

    Bed rest is a valuable ground-based model for many of the physiological changes associated with space flight. A series of studies was undertaken to evaluate nutritional changes during and after 60 or 90 days of -6 head-down-tilt bed rest. A total of 11 subjects (8 M, 3 F; age 26-55 y) participated in the studies. Blood and urine were collected twice before bed rest and once per month during bed rest. Samples were analyzed in batch at the end of each study. Data were analyzed using repeated-measures ANOVA. Markers of bone resorption (such as n-telopeptide excretion, p less than 0.05) increased during bed rest, and 25-OH vitamin D status tended to decline (p=0.06). During bed rest oxidative damage markers, such as superoxide dismutase increased (p less than 0.01) and 8-(OH)-2'-deoxyguanosine tended to increase (p=0.07); whereas total antioxidant capacity decreased (p less than 0.02). Iron status indices showed patterns of increased iron stores, with decreased transferrin receptors (p less than 0.001). Biochemical markers revealed a tendency toward a loss of muscle mass, by lower excretion of creatinine and 3-methyl-histidine during bed rest. All of these changes are very similar to those observed during space flight, and further document the utility of bed rest as a model of space flight.

  3. Recovery After Prolonged Bed-Rest Deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.; Quach, David T.

    2003-01-01

    Recovery data were analyzed from normal healthy test subjects maintained in the horizontal or head-down body position in well-controlled bed rest (BR) studies in which adherence to the well-designed protocol was monitored. Because recovery data were almost always of secondary importance to the data collected during the BR period, there was little consistency in the recovery experimental designs regarding control factors (e.g., diet or exercise), duration, or timing of data collection. Thus, only about half of the BR studies that provided appropriate data were analyzed here. These recovery data were sorted into two groups: those from BR protocols of less than 37 days, and those from protocols greater than 36 days. There was great disparity in the unchanged responses at the end of BR in these two groups. Likewise with the variables that required more than 40 days for recovery; for example, some immune variables required more than 180 days. Knowledge of the recovery process after BR in healthy people should assist rehabilitation workers in differentiating "healthy" BR recovery responses from those of the infirmity of sick or injured patients; this should result in more appropriate and efficient health care.

  4. Reduction in peak oxygen uptake after prolonged bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Kozlowski, S.

    1982-01-01

    The hypothesis that the magnitude of the reduction in peak oxygen uptake (VO2) after bed rest is directly proportional to the level of pre-bed rest peak VO2 is tested. Complete pre and post-bed rest working capacity and body weight data were obtained from studies involving 24 men (19-24 years old) and 8 women (23-34 years old) who underwent bed rest for 14-20 days with no remedial treatments. Results of regression analyses of the present change in post-bed rest peak VO2 on pre-bed rest peak VO2 with 32 subjects show correlation coefficients of -0.03 (NS) for data expressed in 1/min and -0.17 for data expressed in ml/min-kg. In addition, significant correlations are found that support the hypothesis only when peak VO2 data are analyzed separately from studies that utilized the cycle ergometer, particularly with subjects in the supine position, as opposed to data obtained from treadmill peak VO2 tests. It is concluded that orthostatic factors, associated with the upright body position and relatively high levels of physical fitness from endurance training, appear to increase the variability of pre and particularly post-bed rest peak VO2 data, which would lead to rejection of the hypothesis.

  5. Long-duration bed rest as an analog to microgravity.

    PubMed

    Hargens, Alan R; Vico, Laurence

    2016-04-15

    Long-duration bed rest is widely employed to simulate the effects of microgravity on various physiological systems, especially for studies of bone, muscle, and the cardiovascular system. This microgravity analog is also extensively used to develop and test countermeasures to microgravity-altered adaptations to Earth gravity. Initial investigations of bone loss used horizontal bed rest with the view that this model represented the closest approximation to inactivity and minimization of hydrostatic effects, but all Earth-based analogs must contend with the constant force of gravity by adjustment of the G vector. Later concerns about the lack of similarity between headward fluid shifts in space and those with horizontal bed rest encouraged the use of 6 degree head-down tilt (HDT) bed rest as pioneered by Russian investigators. Headward fluid shifts in space may redistribute bone from the legs to the head. At present, HDT bed rest with normal volunteers is the most common analog for microgravity simulation and to test countermeasures for bone loss, muscle and cardiac atrophy, orthostatic intolerance, and reduced muscle strength/exercise capacity. Also, current physiologic countermeasures are focused on long-duration missions such as Mars, so in this review we emphasize HDT bed rest studies with durations of 30 days and longer. However, recent results suggest that the HDT bed rest analog is less representative as an analog for other important physiological problems of long-duration space flight such as fluid shifts, spinal dysfunction and radiation hazards. PMID:26893033

  6. Cardiovascular consequences of bed rest: effect on maximal oxygen uptake.

    PubMed

    Convertino, V A

    1997-02-01

    Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) is reduced in healthy individuals confined to bed rest, suggesting it is independent of any disease state. The magnitude of reduction in VO2max is dependent on duration of bed rest and the initial level of aerobic fitness (VO2max), but it appears to be independent of age or gender. Bed rest induces an elevated maximal heart rate which, in turn, is associated with decreased cardiac vagal tone, increased sympathetic catecholamine secretion, and greater cardiac beta-receptor sensitivity. Despite the elevation in heart rate, VO2max is reduced primarily from decreased maximal stroke volume and cardiac output. An elevated ejection fraction during exercise following bed rest suggests that the lower stroke volume is not caused by ventricular dysfunction but is primarily the result of decreased venous return associated with lower circulating blood volume, reduced central venous pressure, and higher venous compliance in the lower extremities. VO2max, stroke volume, and cardiac output are further compromised by exercise in the upright posture. The contribution of hypovolemia to reduced cardiac output during exercise following bed rest is supported by the close relationship between the relative magnitude (% delta) and time course of change in blood volume and VO2max during bed rest, and also by the fact that retention of plasma volume is associated with maintenance of VO2max after bed rest. Arteriovenous oxygen difference during maximal exercise is not altered by bed rest, suggesting that peripheral mechanisms may not contribute significantly to the decreased VO2max. However reduction in baseline and maximal muscle blood flow, red blood cell volume, and capillarization in working muscles represent peripheral mechanisms that may contribute to limited oxygen delivery and, subsequently, lowered VO2max. Thus, alterations in cardiac and vascular functions induced by prolonged confinement to bed rest contribute to diminution of maximal oxygen uptake

  7. Cardiovascular consequences of bed rest: effect on maximal oxygen uptake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.

    1997-01-01

    Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) is reduced in healthy individuals confined to bed rest, suggesting it is independent of any disease state. The magnitude of reduction in VO2max is dependent on duration of bed rest and the initial level of aerobic fitness (VO2max), but it appears to be independent of age or gender. Bed rest induces an elevated maximal heart rate which, in turn, is associated with decreased cardiac vagal tone, increased sympathetic catecholamine secretion, and greater cardiac beta-receptor sensitivity. Despite the elevation in heart rate, VO2max is reduced primarily from decreased maximal stroke volume and cardiac output. An elevated ejection fraction during exercise following bed rest suggests that the lower stroke volume is not caused by ventricular dysfunction but is primarily the result of decreased venous return associated with lower circulating blood volume, reduced central venous pressure, and higher venous compliance in the lower extremities. VO2max, stroke volume, and cardiac output are further compromised by exercise in the upright posture. The contribution of hypovolemia to reduced cardiac output during exercise following bed rest is supported by the close relationship between the relative magnitude (% delta) and time course of change in blood volume and VO2max during bed rest, and also by the fact that retention of plasma volume is associated with maintenance of VO2max after bed rest. Arteriovenous oxygen difference during maximal exercise is not altered by bed rest, suggesting that peripheral mechanisms may not contribute significantly to the decreased VO2max. However reduction in baseline and maximal muscle blood flow, red blood cell volume, and capillarization in working muscles represent peripheral mechanisms that may contribute to limited oxygen delivery and, subsequently, lowered VO2max. Thus, alterations in cardiac and vascular functions induced by prolonged confinement to bed rest contribute to diminution of maximal oxygen uptake

  8. Effect of exercise on the pseudodiabetes of bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of intensive isotonic exercise and isometric exercise (with its low metabolic rate) during bed rest on plasma insulin and glucose tolerance test was investigated. The subjects were seven healthy men, 19 to 22 years in age, 166 to 188 cm in height, and 62.40 to 103.80 kg in weight; maximal oxygen uptakes ranged from 3.36 to 4.38 liters/min. It appears that bed-rest-induced glucose intolerance is diminished with increasing energy expenditure during both bed rest and recovery.

  9. Bed rest after embryo transfer: Is it harmful?

    PubMed

    Küçük, M

    2013-04-01

    Many interventions have been proposed to increase the success of assisted reproductive techniques (ART). The most controversial is bed rest after embryo transfer (ET). Patients are frequently advised to restrict their physical activity (PA) during ART, and many fertility clinics recommend bed rest after ET for variable periods of time. It is the author's belief, however, that there is insufficient evidence to support the recommendation of bed rest after ET. In fact, accumulated data indicate that bed rest after ET or restriction of PA during ART not only fails to bring about benefits, but may actually be detrimental and associated with worse ART outcomes. As such, it is considered that the long-standing policy of bed rest after ET should be abandoned. Patients should not be encouraged to rest in bed after ET, and should maintain their routine PA during ART. If the practice is to be changed, it is important to recognize the reasons why patients tend to restrict their PA during this time period. Health professionals may play a key role in this context. PMID:23274041

  10. Attenuated sympathetic nerve responses after 24 hours of bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, Mazhar H.; Kunselman, Allen R.; Leuenberger, Urs A.; Davidson, William R Jr; Ray, Chester A.; Gray, Kristen S.; Hogeman, Cynthia S.; Sinoway, Lawrence I.

    2002-01-01

    Bed rest reduces orthostatic tolerance. Despite decades of study, the cause of this phenomenon remains unclear. In this report we examined hemodynamic and sympathetic nerve responses to graded lower body negative pressure (LBNP) before and after 24 h of bed rest. LBNP allows for baroreceptor disengagement in a graded fashion. We measured heart rate (HR), cardiac output (HR x stroke volume obtained by echo Doppler), and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during a progressive and graded LBNP paradigm. Negative pressure was increased by 10 mmHg every 3 min until presyncope or completion of -60 mmHg. After bed rest, LBNP tolerance was reduced in 11 of 13 subjects (P <.023), HR was greater (P <.002), cardiac output was unchanged, and the ability to augment MSNA at high levels of LBNP was reduced (rate of rise for 30- to 60-mmHg LBNP before bed rest 0.073 bursts x min(-1) x mmHg(-1); after bed rest 0.035 bursts x min(-1) x mmHg(-1); P < 0.016). These findings suggest that 24 h of bed rest reduces sympathetic nerve responses to LBNP.

  11. Regulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity after bed rest deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawelczyk, J. A.; Zuckerman, J. H.; Blomqvist, C. G.; Levine, B. D.

    2001-01-01

    Cardiovascular deconditioning reduces orthostatic tolerance. To determine whether changes in autonomic function might produce this effect, we developed stimulus-response curves relating limb vascular resistance, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) with seven subjects before and after 18 days of -6 degrees head-down bed rest. Both lower body negative pressure (LBNP; -15 and -30 mmHg) and rapid saline infusion (15 and 30 ml/kg body wt) were used to produce a wide variation in PCWP. Orthostatic tolerance was assessed with graded LBNP to presyncope. Bed rest reduced LBNP tolerance from 23.9 +/- 2.1 to 21.2 +/- 1.5 min, respectively (means +/- SE, P = 0.02). The MSNA-PCWP relationship was unchanged after bed rest, though at any stage of the LBNP protocol PCWP was lower, and MSNA was greater. Thus bed rest deconditioning produced hypovolemia, causing a shift in operating point on the stimulus-response curve. The relationship between limb vascular resistance and MSNA was not significantly altered after bed rest. We conclude that bed rest deconditioning does not alter reflex control of MSNA, but may produce orthostatic intolerance through a combination of hypovolemia and cardiac atrophy.

  12. Feasibility Study of a Lunar Analog Bed Rest Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, Ronita L.; Platts, Steven H.; Yarbough, Patrice; Buccello-Stout, Regina

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of using a 9.5deg head-up tilt bed rest model to simulate the effects of the 1/6 g load to the human body that exists on the lunar surface. The lunar analog bed rest model utilized a modified hospital bed. The modifications included mounting the mattress on a sled that rolled on bearings to provide freedom of movement. The weight of the sled was off-loaded using a counterweight system to insure that 1/6 body weight was applied along the long axis (z-axis) of the body. Force was verified through use of a force plate mounted at the foot of the bed. A seating assembly was added to the bed to permit periods of sitting. Subjects alternated between standing and sitting positions throughout the day. A total of 35% of the day was spent in the standing position and 65% was spent sitting. In an effort to achieve physiologic fluid shifts expected for a 1/6 G environment, subjects wore compression stockings and performed unloaded foot and ankle exercises. Eight subjects (3 females and 5 males) participated in this study. Subjects spent 13 days in the pre-bed rest phase, 6 days in bed rest and 3 days post bed rest. Subjects consumed a standardized diet throughout the study. To determine feasibility, measures of subject comfort, force and plasma volume were collected. Subject comfort was assessed using a Likert scale. Subjects were asked to assess level of comfort (0-100) for 11 body regions and provide an overall rating. Results indicated minimal to no discomfort as most subjects reported scores of zero. Force measures were performed for each standing position and were validated against subject s calculated 1/6 body weight (r(sup 2) = 0.993). The carbon monoxide rebreathing technique was used to assess plasma volume during pre-bed rest and on the last day of bed rest. Plasma volume results indicated a significant decrease (p = 0.001) from pre to post bed rest values. Subjects lost on average 8.3% (sd = 6.1%) during the

  13. Artificial gravity training reduces bed rest-induced cardiovascular deconditioning.

    PubMed

    Stenger, Michael B; Evans, Joyce M; Knapp, Charles F; Lee, Stuart M C; Phillips, Tiffany R; Perez, Sondra A; Moore, Alan D; Paloski, William H; Platts, Steven H

    2012-02-01

    We studied 15 men (8 treatment, 7 control) before and after 21 days of 6º head-down tilt to determine whether daily, 1-h exposures to 1.0 G(z) (at the heart) artificial gravity (AG) would prevent bed rest-induced cardiovascular deconditioning. Testing included echocardiographic analysis of cardiac function, plasma volume (PV), aerobic power (VO(2)pk) and cardiovascular and neuroendocrine responses to 80º head-up tilt (HUT). Data collected during HUT were ECG, stroke volume (SV), blood pressure (BP) and blood for catecholamines and vasoactive hormones. Heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), total peripheral resistance, and spectral power of BP and HR were calculated. Bed rest decreased PV, supine and HUT SV, and indices of cardiac function in both groups. Although PV was decreased in control and AG after bed rest, AG attenuated the decrease in orthostatic tolerance [pre- to post-bed rest change; control: -11.8 ± 2.0, AG: -6.0 ± 2.8 min (p = 0.012)] and VO(2)pk [pre- to post-bed rest change; control: -0.39 ± 0.11, AG: -0.17 ± 0.06 L/min (p = 0.041)]. AG prevented increases in pre-tilt levels of plasma renin activity [pre- to post-bed rest change; control: 1.53 ± 0.23, AG: -0.07 ± 0.34 ng/mL/h (p = 0.001)] and angiotensin II [pre- to post-bed rest change; control: 3.00 ± 1.04, AG: -0.63 ± 0.81 pg/mL (p = 0.009)] and increased HUT aldosterone [post-bed rest; control: 107 ± 30 pg/mL, AG: 229 ± 68 pg/mL (p = 0.045)] and norepinephrine [post-bed rest; control: 453 ± 107, AG: 732 ± 131 pg/mL (p = 0.003)]. We conclude that AG can mitigate some aspects of bed rest-induced cardiovascular deconditioning, including orthostatic intolerance and aerobic power. Mechanisms of improvement were not cardiac-mediated, but likely through improved sympathetic responsiveness to orthostatic stress. PMID:21626041

  14. Blood volume responses of men and women to bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortney, S. M.; Turner, C.; Steinmann, L.; Driscoll, T.; Alfrey, C.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews a series of studies that indicate that estrogens play an important role in blood volume regulation. The first study illustrates that the plasma volume (PV) of ambulatory women fluctuates during the menstrual cycle, increasing during periods of elevated estrogens. In the second study, it was shown that exogenous and endogenous elevations in blood estrogens attenuate the decrease in PV during bed rest. In the third study, the hypothesis was tested that women, who naturally have a higher blood estrogen content compared with men, will have a smaller loss of PV during bed rest. Ten men and ten women underwent a 13-day, 6 degrees head-down bed rest. Plasma volume and red cell mass (RCM) were measured before and after bed rest using 125I and 51Cr labeling, respectively. Before bed rest, the men and women had similar blood volume (BV) and PV (mL/kg body weight), but the women had a smaller (P < .01) RCM (22.2 +/- 0.9 versus 26.2 +/- 0.8 mL/kg, mean +/- SE). During bed rest, the decrease in RCM (mL/kg) was similar in men and women. However, the decrease in BV was greater in men (8.0 +/- 0.8 mL/kg versus 5.8 +/- 0.8 mL/kg), because of a greater reduction in PV (6.3 +/- 0.6 mL/kg versus 4.1 +/- 0.6 mL/kg). Because the decline in BV has been proposed to contribute to the cardiovascular deconditioning after bed rest, it is possible that women may experience less cardiac and circulatory strain on reambulation.

  15. Cardiovascular Adaptations to Long Duration Head Down Tilt Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platts, Steven H.; Meck, Janice V.; Martin, David S.; Freeman-Perez, Sondra A.; Riberio, Christine; Garcia, Kathleen M.; Waters, Wendy W.

    2007-01-01

    Orthostatic hypotension is a recognized risk for crewmembers returning from space. Numerous cardiovascular mechanisms have been proposed to account for this problem including vascular and cardiac dysfunction. We studied arterial and cardiac function in 6-degree head-down tilt bed rest, which is the most widely accepted ground-based analog of spaceflight. Eleven subjects are included in this study (8 men and 3 women). Data analysis was limited to the first 49 days, and compared to pre-bed rest baseline data. Using ultrasound, data was collected on arterial diameters and flows at baseline and during reactive hyperemia and following administration of nitroglycerin. Echocardiography was used to acquire information regarding systolic and diastolic function as well as ventricular mass and diameter. Plasma volumes were significantly decreased by 7 days of bed rest and stayed down through 49 days. There were no differences in reactive hyperemic response in the arm at any time point. However, the hyperemic response in the leg was significantly increased at day 49. Arterial responses to nitroglycerin did not change over the duration of bed rest (day effect) in either the arm or leg, but there was a significant difference between the arm and the leg responses. There was a marked decrease in anterior tibial intimal-medial thickness at days 21, 35 and 49. Several cardiac functional parameters including IVRT, Mitral e-wave, ejection time, velocity of circumferential shortening and myocardial performance index were significantly changed following 49 days of bed rest. These data show that some cardiovascular measures change during bed rest, while others do not. Further study is needed to determine if these measures can provide any insight into the effects of bed rest, or spaceflight, on human cardiovascular performance.

  16. Thyroid and adrenal cortical rhythmicity during bed rest.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Leach, C. S.; Winget, C. M.; Rambaut, P. C.; Mack, P. B.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of prolonged bed rest on adrenocortical and thyroid function were assessed in eight healthy males, aged 20-40 years, who were submitted to bed rest for 56 days on a 14L:10D regimen (lights-on, 9:00 AM). Four of these subjects exercised three times daily throughout the experiment. Circulating cortisol, triiodothyronine, and thyroxine, concentrations were determined in blood samples drawn at four hourly intervals for 48-hr periods before, 10, 20, 30, 42, and 54 days during, and 10 days post-bed rest. Significant fluctuations in the circulating levels of all three hormones occurred with peaks at 7:30 AM. The suggestion is advanced that thyroid rhythms may be posture dependent.

  17. Effect Of Leg Exercise On Vascular Volumes During Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Vernikos, J.; Wade, C. E.; Barnes, P. R.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes experiments on effects of no-exercise regimen and of two leg-exercise regimens on volumes of plasma, volumes of red blood cells, densities of bodies, and water balances of 19 men (32 to 42 years old) confined to minus 6 degrees-head-down bed rest for 30 days. Purpose of study to determine whether either or both exercise regimens maintain plasma volume and to relate levels of hypovolemia to body fluid balances. Results showed during bed rest, plasma volume maintained in isotomic group but not in other two groups, and no significant differences in body densities, body weights, or water balances among three groups. Concludes isotonic-exercise regimen better than isokinetic-exercise regimen for maintaining plasma volume during prolonged exposure to bed rest.

  18. Retrospective Study of Serum Sclerostin Measurements in Bed Rest Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spatz, J. M.; Fields, E. E.; Yu, E. W.; Divieti, Pajevic P.; Bouxsein, M. L.; Sibonga, M. L.; Zwart, S. R.; Smith, S. M.

    2011-01-01

    Animal models and human studies suggest that osteocytes regulate the skeleton s response to mechanical unloading at the cellular level in part by an increase in sclerostin, an inhibitor of the anabolic Wnt pathway. However, few studies have reported changes in serum sclerostin in humans exposed to reduced mechanical loading. Thus, we determined changes in serum sclerostin and bone turnover markers in healthy adult men who participated in a controlled bed rest study. Seven healthy adult men (31 +/- 3 yrs old) underwent 90-day six-degree head down tilt bed rest at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston's Institute for Translational Sciences - Clinical Research Center (ITS-CRC). Serum sclerostin, PTH, serum markers of bone turnover (bone specific alkaline phosphatase, RANKL/OPG, and osteocalcin), urinary calcium and phosphorus excretion, and 24 hour pooled urinary markers of bone resorption (NTX, DPD, PYD) were evaluated pre-bed rest (BL), bed rest day 28 (BR-28), bed rest day 60 (BR-60), and bed rest day 90 (BR-90). In addition, bone mineral density (BMD) was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at BL, BR-60, and post bed rest day 5 (BR+5). Data are reported as mean +/- standard deviation. We used repeated measures ANOVA to compare baseline values to BR-28, BR-60, and BR-90. RESULTS Consistent with prior reports, BMD declined significantly (1-2% per month) at weight-bearing skeletal sites (spine, hip, femur neck, and calcaneus). Serum sclerostin levels were elevated above BL at BR-28 (+29% +/- 20%, p = 0.003), BR-60 (+42% +/- 31%, p < 0.001), and BR-90 (22% +/- 21%, p = 0.07). Serum PTH levels were reduced at BR-28 (-17% +/- 16%, p = 0.02), BR-60 (-24% +/- 14%, p = 0.03), and returned to baseline at BR-90 (-21% +/- 21%, p = 0.14). Serum bone turnover markers did not change, however urinary bone resorption markers and calcium were significantly elevated following bed rest (p < 0.01). CONCLUSION We observed an increase of serum sclerostin

  19. Exercise thermoregulation with bed rest, confinement, and immersion deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    Altered thermoregulation following exposure to prolonged (12-14 days) of bed rest and 6 hr of head-down thermoneutral water immersion in humans, and cage confinement (8 weeks) in male, mongrel dogs resulted in occasional increased core temperature (Tcore) at rest, but consistent "excessive" increase in Tcore during submaximal exercise. This excessive increase in Tcore in nonexercising and exercising subjects was independent of the mode (isometric or isotonic) of exercise training during bed rest, and was associated with the consistent hypovolemia in men but not in women taking estrogen supplementation (1.25 mg premarin/ day) which restored plasma volume during bed rest to ambulatory control levels. Post-bed rest exercise sweating (evaporative heat loss) was unchanged or higher than control levels; however, calculated tissue heat conductance was significantly lower in men, and forearm venoconstriction was greater (venous volume was reduced) in women during exercise after bed rest. Because sweating appeared proportional to the increased level of Tcore, these findings suggest that one major factor for the excessive hyperthermia is decreased core to periphery heat conduction. Exercising dogs respond like humans with excessive increase in both rectal (Tre) and exercising muscle temperatures (Tmu) after confinement and, after eight weeks of exercise training on a treadmill following confinement, they had an attenuated rate of increase of Tre even below ambulatory control levels. Intravenous infusion of glucose also attenuated not only the rise in Tre during exercise in normal dogs, but also the excessive rise in Tre and exercising Tmu after confinement. Oral glucose also appeared to reduce the rate of increase in excessive Tre in men after immersion deconditioning. There was a greater rate of rise in Tcore in two cosmonauts during supine submaximal exercise (65% VO2 max) on the fifth recovery day after the 115-day Mir 18 mission. Thus, the excessive rise in core

  20. Dietary Support of Extended-Duration Bed Rest Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inniss, A. M.; Rice, B. L.; Smith, S. M.

    2006-01-01

    Dietary control and nutrient intake are critical aspects of any metabolic study, but this is especially true in the case of bed rest studies. We sought to define nutrient requirements, develop menus, and implement them in a series of three long-duration bed rest studies. With regard to energy intake, the goal was to maintain subject body weight to within 3% of their body weight on day 3 of bed rest (after fluid shift had occurred). For other nutrients, intakes were based on the NASA space flight nutritional requirements (with some adaptations based on the ground-based model used here). A secondary goal was to develop menus with foods similar to those expected to be approved for space flight (however, this was relaxed to attain desired nutrient intakes). This paper also describes the role of the research dietitian as part of the multi-disciplinary team and the importance of the metabolic kitchen staff. It also provides insight into some of the dietary challenges that arise during extended-duration bed rest studies. Regardless of the overall objective of the study, nutrition must be carefully planned, implemented, and monitored for results to be uncompromised.

  1. Fuel utilization during exercise after 7 days of bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrows, Linda H.; Harris, Bernard A.; Moore, Alan D.; Siconolfi, Steven F.

    1992-01-01

    Energy yield from carbohydrate, fat, and protein during physical activity is partially dependent on an individual's fitness level. Prolonged exposure to microgravity causes musculoskeletal and cardiovascular deconditioning; these adaptations may alter fuel utilization during space flight. Carbohydrate and fat metabolism during exercise were analyzed before and after 7 days of horizontal bed rest.

  2. Gradient Compression Stockings may Prevent Recovery after Bed Rest Deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, Michael B.; Lee, Stuart M.; Westby, Christian M.; Willig, Michael C.; Platts, Steven H.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Astronauts continue to wear a compression garment during and immediately after landing to prevent orthostatic intolerance (OI). We recently developed a custom-fitted, 3-piece garment that consists of thigh-high stockings with biker-style shorts that provides continuous, gradient compression: 55 mmHg at the ankle that decreases to approximately 20 mmHg at the top of the leg and 15 mmHg over the abdomen. This garment has been shown to be effective in preventing symptoms of OI during a short stand test after Space Shuttle missions, but symptoms may persist for several days after a long-duration mission in some astronauts. The purpose of this study was to confirm the effectiveness of wearing these elastic, gradient compression garments during orthostatic testing after 2 weeks of 6 degree head-down tilt bed rest as a model of spaceflight and to determine whether they would impact recovery after bed rest. Methods: Eight (5 treatment, 3 control) of 16 subjects have completed this study to-date. All subjects wore the 3-piece garment from waking until tilt testing (3 h) as a simulation of the timeline for astronauts on landing day (BR+0). Control subjects removed the garment after the tilt test. Treatment subjects wore the garment for the remainder of the day and wore lower compression thigh-high only garments on the day after bed rest (BR+1). Blood pressure, heart rate, and stroke volume responses to a 15-min 80 degree head-up tilt test were determined before 2 weeks of 6 degree head-down tilt, and on BR+0 and BR+1. Plasma volume (PV) was measured before each of these test sessions. Data are mean SE. Results: Compression garments prevented signs of OI on BR+0; all subjects in both groups completed the full 15-min test. Heart rate responses to tilt were lower on BR+0 than all other test days. Control subjects demonstrated a marginal PV decrease after bed rest, but showed typical recovery the day after bed rest (BR+0: 2.32 plus or minus 0.15 L to BR+1: 2

  3. Intensive Exercise Training During Bed Rest Attenuates Deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    1997-01-01

    Intensive exercise training during bed rest attenuates deconditioning. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 29, No. 2, pp. 207-215, 1997. A 30-d 6 deg head-down bed rest project was conducted to evaluate variable high-intensity, short-duration, isotonic cycle ergometer exercise (ITE) training and high-intensity intermittent resistive isokinetic exercise (IKE) training regimens designed to maintain peak VO2 and muscle mass, strength, and endurance at ambulatory control levels throughout prolonged bed rest. Other elements of the deconditioning (adaptive) syndrome, such as proprioception, psychological performance, hypovolemia, water balance, body composition, and orthostatic tolerance, were also measured. Major findings are summarized in this paper. Compared with response during bed rest of the no exercise (NOE) control group: the ITE training regimen (a) maintained work capacity (peak VO2), (b) maintained plasma and red cell volumes, (c) induced positive body water balance, (d) decreased quality of sleep and mental concentration, and (e) had no effect on the decrease in orthostatic tolerance; the IKE training regimen (f) attenuated the decrease in peak VO2 by 50%, (g) attenuated loss of red cell volume by 40% but had no effect on loss of plasma volume, (b) induced positive body water balance, (i) had no adverse effect on quality of sleep or concentration, and 0) had no effect on the decrease in orthostatic tolerance. These findings suggest that various elements of the deconditioning syndrome can be manipulated by duration and intensity of ITE or IKE training regimens and that several different training protocols will be required to maintain or restore physiological and psychological performance of individuals confined to prolonged bed rest.

  4. The Effects of Long Duration Bed Rest on Functional Mobility and Balance: Relationship to Resting State Motor Cortex Connectivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdeniz, B.; Koppelmans, V.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Kofman, I. S.; DeDios, Y. E.; Riascos-Castaneda, R. F.; Wood, S. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Seidler, R. D.

    2014-01-01

    NASA offers researchers from a variety of backgrounds the opportunity to study bed rest as an experimental analog for space flight. Extended exposure to a head-down tilt position during long duration bed rest can resemble many of the effects of a low-gravity environment such as reduced sensory inputs, body unloading and increased cephalic fluid distribution. The aim of our study is to a) identify changes in brain function that occur with prolonged bed rest and characterize their recovery time course; b) assess whether and how these changes impact behavioral and neurocognitive performance. Thus far, we completed data collection from six participants that include task based and resting state fMRI. The data have been acquired through the bed rest facility located at the University of Texas Medical Branch (Galveston, TX). Subjects remained in bed with their heads tilted down 6 degrees below their feet for 70 consecutive days. Behavioral measures and neuroimaging assessments were obtained at seven time points: a) 7 and 12 days before bed rest; b) 7, 30, and 65 days during bed rest; and c) 7 and 12 days after bed rest. Functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (FcMRI) analysis was performed to assess the connectivity of motor cortex in and out of bed rest. We found a decrease in motor cortex connectivity with vestibular cortex and the cerebellum from pre bed rest to in bed rest. We also used a battery of behavioral measures including the functional mobility test and computerized dynamic posturography collected before and after bed rest. We will report the preliminary results of analyses relating brain and behavior changes. Furthermore, we will also report the preliminary results of a spatial working memory task and vestibular stimulation during in and out of bed rest.

  5. Serum Sclerostin Increases in Healthy Adult Men during Bed Rest

    PubMed Central

    Fields, E. E.; Yu, E. W.; Pajevic, P. Divieti; Bouxsein, M. L.; Sibonga, J. D.; Zwart, S. R.; Smith, S. M.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Animal models and human studies suggest that osteocytes regulate the skeleton's response to mechanical unloading in part by an increase in sclerostin. However, few studies have reported changes in serum sclerostin in humans exposed to reduced mechanical loading. Objective: We determined changes in serum sclerostin and bone turnover markers in healthy adult men undergoing controlled bed rest. Design, Setting, and Participants: Seven healthy adult men (31 ± 3 yr old) underwent 90 d of 6° head down tilt bed rest at the University of Texas Medical Branch Institute for Translational Sciences-Clinical Research Center. Outcomes: Serum sclerostin, PTH, vitamin D, bone resorption and formation markers, urinary calcium and phosphorus excretion, and 24-h pooled urinary markers of bone resorption were evaluated before bed rest [baseline (BL)] and at bed rest d 28 (BR-28), d 60 (BR-60), and d 90 (BR-90). Bone mineral density was measured at BL, BR-60, and 5 d after the end of the study (BR+5). Data are reported as mean ± sd. Results: Consistent with prior reports, bone mineral density declined significantly (1–2% per month) at weight-bearing skeletal sites. Serum sclerostin was elevated above BL at BR-28 (+29 ± 20%; P = 0.003) and BR-60 (+42 ± 31%; P < 0.001), with a lesser increase at BR-90 (+22 ± 21%; P = 0.07). Serum PTH levels were reduced at BR-28 (−17 ± 16%; P = 0.02) and BR-60 (−24 ± 14%; P = 0.03) and remained lower than BL at BR-90 (−21 ± 21%; P = 0.14), but did not reach statistical significance. Serum bone turnover markers were unchanged; however, urinary bone resorption markers and calcium were significantly elevated at all time points after bed rest (P < 0.01). Conclusions: In healthy men subjected to controlled bed rest for 90 d, serum sclerostin increased, with a peak at 60, whereas serum PTH declined, and urinary calcium and bone resorption markers increased. PMID:22767636

  6. Effect Of Bed Rest On Tolerance To Acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldwater, Danielle J.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes experimental comparative study of tolerance of aerobically fit men and sedentary men to +Gz acceleration. Designed to confirm or deny previous observations that long-term aerobic training reduces tolerance to acceleration. Data accumulated in study showed decrease in tolerance to acceleration caused by deconditioning effect of bed rest more pronounced in fit men than in sedentary men. Suggests physically fit people need additional measures to reduce loss of tolerance to acceleration during microgravity exposure.

  7. Gender Differences in Bed Rest: Preliminary Analysis of Vascular Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platts, Steven H.; Stenger, Michael B.; Martin, David S.; Freeman-Perez, Sondra A.; Phillips, Tiffany; Ribeiro, L. Christine

    2008-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance is a recognized consequence of spaceflight. Numerous studies have shown that women are more susceptible to orthostatic intolerance following spaceflight as well as bed rest, the most commonly used ground-based analog for spaceflight. One of the possible mechanisms proposed to account for this is a difference in vascular responsiveness between genders. We hypothesized that women and men would have differing vascular responses to 90 days of 6-degree head down tilt bed rest. Additionally, we hypothesized that vessels in the upper and lower body would respond differently, as has been shown in the animal literature. Thirteen subjects were placed in bedrest for 90 days (8 men, 5 women) at the Flight Analogs Unit, UTMB. Direct arterial and venous measurements were made with ultrasound to evaluate changes in vascular structure and function. Arterial function was assessed, in the arm and leg, during a reactive hyperemia protocol and during sublingual nitroglycerin administration to gauge the contributions of endothelial dependent and independent dilator function respectively. Venous function was assessed in dorsal hand and foot veins during the administration of pharmaceuticals to assess constrictor and dilator function. Both gender and day effects are seen in arterial dilator function to reactive hyperemia, but none are seen with nitroglycerin. There are also differences in the wall thickness in the arm vs the leg during bed rest, which return toward pre-bed rest levels by day 90. More subjects are required, especially females as there is not sufficient power to properly analyze venous function. Day 90 data are most underpowered.

  8. Sympathetic discharge and vascular resistance after bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoemaker, J. K.; Hogeman, C. S.; Leuenberger, U. A.; Herr, M. D.; Gray, K.; Silber, D. H.; Sinoway, L. I.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of -6 degrees head-down-tilt bed rest (HDBR) for 14 days on supine sympathetic discharge and cardiovascular hemodynamics at rest was assessed. Mean arterial pressure, heart rate (n = 25), muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA; n = 16) burst frequency, and forearm blood flow (n = 14) were measured, and forearm vascular resistance (FVR) was calculated. Stroke distance, our index of stroke volume, was derived from measurements of aortic mean blood velocity (Doppler) and R-R interval (n = 7). With these data, an index of total peripheral resistance was determined. Heart rate at rest was greater in the post (71 +/- 2 beats/min)- compared with the pre-HDBR test (66 +/- 2 beats/min; P < 0.003), but mean arterial pressure was unchanged. Aortic stroke distance during post-HDBR (15.5 +/- 1.1 cm/beat) was reduced from pre-HDBR levels (20.0 +/- 1.5 cm/beat) (P < 0.03). Also, MSNA burst frequency was reduced in the post (16.7 +/- 2.8 beats/min)- compared with the pre (25.2 +/- 2.6 beats/min)-HDBR condition (P < 0.01). Bed rest did not alter forearm blood flow, FVR, or total peripheral resistance. Thus reductions in MSNA with HDBR were not associated with a decrease in FVR.

  9. Calcium kinetics during bed rest with artificial gravity and exercise countermeasures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We assessed the potential for countermeasures to lessen the loss of bone calcium during bed rest. Subjects ingested less calcium during bed rest, and with artificial gravity, they also absorbed less calcium. With exercise, they excreted less calcium. To retain bone during bed rest, calcium intake ne...

  10. Cardiovascular Adaptations to Long Duration Head-Down Tilt Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platts, Steven H.; Martin, David S.; Perez, Sondar A.; Ribeiro, Christine; Stenger, Michael B.; Summers, Richard; Meck, Janice V.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Orthostatic hypotension is a serious risk for crewmembers returning from spaceflight. Numerous cardiovascular mechanisms have been proposed to account for this problem, including vascular and cardiac dysfunction, which we studied during bed rest. METHODS: Thirteen subjects were studied before and during bed rest. Statistical analysis was limited to the first 49-60 days of bed rest, and compared to pre-bed rest data. Ultrasound data were collected on vascular and cardiac structure and function. Tilt testing was conducted for 30 minutes or until presyncopal symptoms intervened. RESULTS: Plasma volume was significantly reduced by day 7 of bed rest. Flow-mediated dilation in the leg was significantly increased at bed rest day 49. Arterial responses to nitroglycerin differed in the arm and leg, but did not change as a result of bed rest. Intimal-medial thickness markedly decreased at bed rest days 21, 35 and 49. Several cardiac functional parameters including isovolumic relaxation time, ejection time and myocardial performance index were significantly increased (indicating a decrease in cardiac function) during bed rest. There was a trend for decreased orthostatic tolerance following 60 days of bed rest. DISCUSSION: These data suggest that 6 head-down tilt bed rest alters cardiovascular structure and function in a pattern similar to short duration spaceflight. Additionally, the vascular alterations are primarily seen in the lower body, while vessels of the upper body are unaffected. KEY WORDS: spaceflight, orthostatic intolerance, hypotension, fluid-shift, plasma volume

  11. Mechanisms for decreased exercise capacity after bed rest in normal middle-aged men

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, J.; Goldwater, D.; Convertino, V.A.; McKillop, J.H.; Goris, M.L.; DeBusk, R.F.

    1983-01-15

    The mechanisms responsible for the decrease in exercise capacity after bed rest were assessed in 12 apparently healthy men aged 50 +/- 4 years who underwent equilibrium gated blood pool scintigraphy during supine and upright multistage bicycle ergometry before and after 10 days of bed rest. After bed rest, echocardiographically measured supine resting left ventricular end-diastolic volume decreased by 16% (p less than 0.05). Peak oxygen uptake during supine effort after bed rest was diminished by 6% (p . not significant (NS)), whereas peak oxygen uptake during upright effort declined by 15% (p less than 0.05). After bed rest, increases in heart rate were also greater during exercise in the upright than in the supine position (p less than 0.05). Values of left ventricular ejection fraction increased normally during both supine and upright effort after bed rest and were higher than corresponding values before bed rest (p less than 0.05). After bed rest, increased left ventricular ejection fraction and heart rate largely compensated for the reduced cardiac volume during supine effort, but these mechanisms were insufficient to maintain oxygen transport capacity at levels during upright effort before bed rest. These results indicate that orthostatically induced cardiac underfilling, not physical deconditioning or left ventricular dysfunction, is the major cause of reduced effort tolerance after 10 days of bed rest in normal middle-aged men.

  12. Implementation of the NASA AG-Bed Rest Pilot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, L. E.; Paloski, W. H.; Young, L. R.

    2007-01-01

    To examine the efficacy of artificial gravity (AG) as a countermeasure to spaceflight deconditioning, intermittent AG produced by a horizontal short-radius centrifuge (SRC) was utilized on human test subjects deconditioned by bed rest. This poster will present the subject screening, study design, logistics, and implementation of the 41 day pilot study conducted at the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX bed rest facility. An extensive screening process was employed to exclude subjects that were dissimilar to the U.S. astronaut population. Candidates underwent a modified U.S. Air Force Class III physical and tests of bone density, cardiovascular fitness, vestibular system function, psychological fitness and centrifuge tolerance. 15 subjects completed the study; 7 control and 8 AG treatment. All provided written consent to volunteer after the nature of the study and its hazards were clearly explained to them. Standard conditions were strictly regulated; Ta = 72 +/- 2 F, humidity = 70 +/- 5%, light/dark cycle 16h:8h. All fluid intake (minimum 28.5 ml/kg body weight/day) and urine output was monitored. Caloric intake was adjusted as necessary to maintain body weight. Carbohydrate, fat and protein were provided in a ratio of 55:30:15. Phosphorus intake was 1400 mg/d, sodium intake was 2 mmol/kg/d, potassium intake was 1.3 mmol/kg/d, and dietary calcium intake was 1000 mg/d. A physician examined each subject daily. During the first 11 days of the study protocol, subjects were ambulatory, but confined to the facility. Subjects participated in multiple baseline tests of bone, muscle, cardiovascular, sensory-motor, immunological, and psychological function. On the 12th day, subjects entered the bed rest phase of the study, during which they were confined to strict 6? head down tilt bed rest for 21 days. Beginning 24 hrs into this period, treatment subjects received 1 hour daily exposures to artificial gravity which was produced by spinning the subjects on a 3

  13. Simulated microgravity [bed rest] has little influence on taste, odor or trigeminal sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickers, Z. M.; Rice, B. L.; Rose, M. S.; Lane, H. W.

    2001-01-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests that astronauts' perceptions of foods in space flight may differ from their perceptions of the same foods on Earth. Fluid shifts toward the head experienced in space may alter the astronauts' sensitivity to odors and tastes, producing altered perceptions. Our objective was to determine whether head-down bed rest, which produces similar fluid shifts, would produce changes in sensitivity to taste, odor or trigeminal sensations. Six subjects were rested three times prior to bed rest, three times during bed rest and two times after bed rest to determine their threshold sensitivity to the odors isoamylbutyrate and menthone, the tastants sucrose, sodium chloride, citric acid, quinine and monosodium glutamate, and to capsaicin. Thresholds were measured using a modified staircase procedure. Self-reported congestion was also recorded at each test time. Thresholds for monosodium glutamate where slightly higher during bed rest. None of the other thresholds were altered by bed rest.

  14. Catecholaminergic effects of prolonged head-down bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, D. S.; Vernikos, J.; Holmes, C.; Convertino, V. A.

    1995-01-01

    Prolonged head-down bed rest (HDBR) provides a model for examining responses to chronic weightlessness in humans. Eight healthy volunteers underwent HDBR for 2 wk. Antecubital venous blood was sampled for plasma levels of catechols [norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine, dopamine, dihydroxyphenylalanine, dihydroxyphenylglycol, and dihydroxyphenylacetic acid] after supine rest on a control (C) day and after 4 h and 7 and 14 days of HDBR. Urine was collected after 2 h of supine rest during day C, 2 h before HDBR, and during the intervals 1-4, 4-24, 144-168 (day 7), and 312-336 h (day 14) of HDBR. All subjects had decreased plasma and blood volumes (mean 16%), atriopeptin levels (31%), and peripheral venous pressure (26%) after HDBR. NE excretion on day 14 of HDBR was decreased by 35% from that on day C, without further trends as HDBR continued, whereas plasma levels were only variably and nonsignificantly decreased. Excretion rates of dihydroxyphenylglycol and dihydroxyphenylalanine decreased slightly during HDBR; excretion rates of epinephrine, dopamine, and dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and plasma levels of catechols were unchanged. The results suggest that HDBR produces sustained inhibition of sympathoneural release, turnover, and synthesis of NE without affecting adrenomedullary secretion or renal dopamine production. Concurrent hypovolemia probably interferes with detection of sympathoinhibition by plasma levels of NE and other catechols in this setting. Sympathoinhibition, despite decreased blood volume, may help to explain orthostatic intolerance in astronauts returning from spaceflights.

  15. Atropine unmasks bed-rest effect - A spectral analysis of cardiac interbeat intervals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberger, Ary L.; Goldwater, Danielle; Bhargava, Valmik

    1986-01-01

    Heart rate spectral data obtained for 10 male subjects between 35-49 years following orthostatic tolerance testing with lower body negative pressure prebed rest and after 7-10 days of bed rest, while on placebo and after intravenous atropine are analyzed. Comparison of the spectral atropine rms for subjects prebed rest and after bed rest reveal a decrease from 63 + or - 24 ms to 40 + or - 23 ms. It is observed that heart rate interval variability for subjects after bed rest and with atropine is reduced; the heart rate at bed rest with atropine is increased from 70.4 + or - 12.4 beats/min prebed rest to 83.7 + or - 18.9 beats/min; and the exercise tolerance time for subjects in the atropine prebed-rest phase (658 + or - 352 s) is higher than the bed-rest phase (505 + or - 252 s). It is noted that bed rest impairs the cardiovascular capacity to adaptively modulate physiological responses, atropine exposes bed-rest deconditioning effects, and spectral analysis is useful for studying the effects of bed-rest deconditioning on cardiac dynamics.

  16. Energy and thermal regulation during bed rest and spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents data available from bed-rest and flight studies on the energy metabolism and thermoregulatory parameters and their changes during long-duration space missions which may influence requirements of astronauts for food and water. It is calculated, on the basis of 3100 kcal and 2.2 l water a day, with 1 h/day moderate exercise, that the requirements for a 2-yr flight would be 2,263,000 kcal and 1606 l water for each astronaut. One daily 5-h-long extravehicular sortie would require an additional 529,250 kcal and 1,095 l of water per year. Changes in the efficiency of work or metabolism would affect these nutritional requirements for long spaceflights. Factors that would increase food and water requirements are discussed.

  17. Effect of 14 days of bed rest on urine metabolite excretion and plasma enzyme levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, N.; Grunbaum, B. W.; Kodama, A. M.; Rahlmann, D. F.; Newsom, B. D.

    1974-01-01

    After 1 week of ambulatory base-line measurement, a group of 8 men 19-26 years of age remained continuously recumbent for 14 days. Studies were continued for 1 week following the prolonged recumbency. Urine excretion rates for a number of constituents were determined 2 days before bed rest, on day 14 of bed rest, and day 6 after bed rest. Blood plasma samples were also obtained at these times, and analyzed for several enzymes. On day 14 of bed rest significant increases were observed in urine excretion of total osmotically-active substances, magnesium, calcium, phosphate, creatinine, hydroxyproline, and 17-OH corticosteroids. A decrease occurred in urinary glucose excretion. Plasma levels of alkaline phosphatase and LDH-3 were depressed, while plasma GPT was elevated. Many of these changes persisted on day 6 after bed rest, and are interpreted as concomitants of the disuse atrophy of the musculoskeletal system that characterizes prolonged bed rest and weightlessness.

  18. [Kidney stone formation during space flight and long-term bed rest].

    PubMed

    Okada, Atsushi; Ichikawa, Jun; Tozawa, Keiichi

    2011-10-01

    Microgravity environment like space flight or a condition requiring long-term bed-rest increase bone resorption and decrease bone formation, inducing the rapid decrease of bone minerals to osteoporosis. Bone mineral loss increases urinary calcium excretion and the risk of urinary stone formation. To clarify the influence of the conditions on renal stone formation, a 90-day bed rest test was performed to analyze the mechanism of microgravity or bed rest-induced stone formation and prevention by bisphosphonate medication and bed-rest exercise. As the results, renal stone formation was observed in control and exercise groups and no stone was seen in the medication group. In the medication group, urinary calcium excretion and relative supersaturation of calcium oxalate were lower than in the control group throughout the bed-rest and recovery period. Bisphosphonate is useful for the prevention of renal stone formation during space flight and long-term bed-rest. PMID:21960236

  19. Immune response to 60-day head-down bed rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jinping; Guo, Aihua; Zhong, Ping; Zhang, Hongyu; Wu, Feng; Wan, Yumin; Bai, Yanqiang; Chen, Shanguang; Li, Yinghui

    Introduction: Exposure of humans to spaceflight has resulted in disregulation of the immune system. Head-down bed rest (HDBR) has been extensively used as an earth-bound analog to study physiologic effects mimicking those occurring in weightlessness during spaceflight. It is uncertain how a prolonged period of bed rest affect human immune responses. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of 60-day HDBR on immune function and EB virus reactivation in seven male volunteers. Methods: There were seven healthy male volunteers who were subjected to HDBR for 60d. Immunological parameters including leukocyte subset distribution, lymphocyte proliferation to mitogens, secreted cytokine profiles and EB virus reactivation were monitored. Results: Total WBC conunts increased significantly 10d post-HDBR as compared with pre-HDBR. At the same time, the relative percentage of neutrophils was also higher than pre-HDBR but not significant. MFI of CD11b in neutrophils was reduced obviously at thd end of HDBR. T Lymphocyte proliferations to PHA reduced at HDBR 30, HDBR 60 and 10d post-HDBR while IL-2 production decreased significantly at the same time. IFN-and IL-4 production trended to decrease at HDBR 30 and HDBR 60. The relative percentage of T lymphocyte subset, B lymphocyte and NK cells were not altered. EBV EA (early antigen) were negative and EBV VCA titers had no changes through HDBR. Conclusion: The results indicate that several immunological parameters (mainly cellular immunity) are altered significantly by prolonged HDBR, and these changes were similar to those happened in spaceflight.

  20. Orthostatic hypotension in patients, bed rest subjects, and astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathers, C. M.; Charles, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    Orthostatic hypotension after even short space flights has affected a significant number of astronauts. Given the need for astronauts to function at a high level of efficiency during and after their return from space, the application of pharmacologic and other treatments is strongly indicated. This report addresses the clinical problem of orthostatic hypotension and its treatments to ascertain whether pharmacologic or physiologic treatment may be useful in the prevention of orthostatic hypotension associated with space flight. Treatment of orthostatic hypotension in patients now includes increasing intravascular volume with high sodium intake and mineralocorticoids, or increasing vascular resistance through the use of drugs to stimulate alpha or block beta vascular receptors. Earlier treatment used oral sympathomimetic ephedrine hydrochloride alone or with "head-up" bed rest. Then long-acting adrenocortical steroid desoxycorticosterone preparations with high-salt diets were used to expand volume. Fludrocortisone was shown to prevent the orthostatic drop in blood pressure. The combination of the sympathomimetic amine hydroxyamphetamine and a monoamine oxidase inhibitor tranylcypromine has been used, as has indomethacin alone. Davies et al. used mineralocorticoids at low doses concomitantly with alpha-agonists to increase vasoconstrictor action. Schirger et al used tranylcypromine and methylphenidate with or without a Jobst elastic leotard garment or the alpha-adrenergic agonist midodrine (which stimulates both arterial and venous systems without direct central nervous system or cardiac effects). Vernikos et al established that the combination of fludrocortisone, dextroamphetamine, and atropine exhibited a beneficial effect on orthostatic hypotension induced by 7-day 6 degrees head-down bed rest (a model used to simulate the weightlessness of space flight). Thus, there are numerous drugs that, in combination with mechanical techniques, including lower body negative

  1. Sympathetic responses to Valsalva's manoeuvre following bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoemaker, J. Kevin; Hogeman, Cynthia S.; Sinoway, Lawrence I.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether 14 days of head-down tilt bed rest (HDBR) alters autonomic regulation during Valsalva's manoeuvre (VM) and if this would predict blood pressure control during a 60 degrees head-up tilt (HUT) test. To examine autonomic control of blood pressure, we measured the changes in systolic (delta SBP) and diastolic (delta DBP) blood pressure between baseline and the early straining (Phase IIE) period of VM (20 sec straining to 40 mmHg; N = 7) in conjunction with changes in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA; microneurography) burst frequency (B/min) and total activity (% delta) from baseline over the 20-sec straining period. MSNA data were successfully recorded from 6 of the 7 individuals. The averaged responses from three repeated VMs performed in the supine position were compared between the pre- and post-HDBR tests. Compared with the pre-HDBR test, a greater reduction in SBP, DBP, and MAP was observed during Phase IIE following HDBR, p < 0.05. The increase in MSNA burst frequency during straining was augmented in the post- compared with the pre-HDBR test, p < 0.0001, as was the Phase IV blood pressure overshoot, p < 0.05. Although all subjects completed the 20-min pre-HDBR tilt test without evidence of hypotension or orthostatic intolerance, the post-HDBR test was stopped early in 5 of the 7 subjects due to systolic hypotension. The responses during the VM suggest that acute autonomic adjustments to rapid blood pressure changes are preserved after bed rest. Furthermore, MSNA and blood pressure responses during VM did not predict blood pressure control during orthostasis following HDBR.

  2. Changes in markers of bone formation and resorption in a bed rest model of weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueken, S. A.; Arnaud, S. B.; Taylor, A. K.; Baylink, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    To study the mechanism of bone loss in physical unloading, we examined indices of bone formation and bone resorption in the serum and urine of eight healthy men during a 7 day -6 degrees head-down tilt bed rest. Prompt increases in markers of resorption--pyridinoline (PD), deoxypyridinoline (DPD), and hydroxyproline (Hyp)/g creatinine--during the first few days of inactivity were paralleled by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) with significant increases in all these markers by day 4 of bed rest. An index of formation, skeletal alkaline phosphatase (SALP), did not change during bed rest and showed a moderate 15% increase 1 week after reambulation. In contrast to SALP, serum osteocalcin (OC) began increasing the day preceding the increase in Hyp, remained elevated for the duration of the bed rest, and returned to pre-bed rest values within 5 days of reambulation. Similarly, DPD increased significantly at the onset of bed rest, remained elevated for the duration of bed rest, and returned to pre-bed rest levels upon reambulation. On the other hand, the other three indices of resorption, Hyp, PD, and TRAP, remained elevated for 2 weeks after reambulation. The most sensitive indices of the levels of physical activity proved to be the noncollagenous protein, OC, and the collagen crosslinker, DPD. The bed rest values of both these markers were significantly elevated compared to both the pre-bed rest values and the post-bed rest values. The sequence of changes in the circulating markers of bone metabolism indicated that increases in serum OC are the earliest responses of bone to head-down tilt bed rest.

  3. Long-term effects of antepartum bed rest on offspring.

    PubMed

    Bellieni, Carlo Valerio; Bagnoli, Franco; Perrone, Serafina; Caparelli, Ninetta; Cordelli, Duccio Maria; Melissa, Bernardino; Buonocore, Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    We studied the children of mothers who were confined to bed during pregnancy for more than 15 consecutive days (mean 3.69 months) in the years 1986-1990 (bed rest offspring; BRO). We studied 86 children: 43 BRO and 43 control children. Data were obtained by means of a 20-item questionnaire filled in by the mothers. The BRO group differed from the control group in incidence of allergies (p = 0.005), motion sickness (p = 0.03), and need to be rocked to fall asleep (p = 0.01). More BRO born at term than controls played musical instruments later in life. Two possible explanations for more allergies among the BRO group are the use of beta-stimulating drugs against premature delivery and the effects of prolonged stress on the developing immune system. Understimulation of the developing vestibular system during gestation may affect some aspects of its development and may explain the higher incidence of motion sickness and need for vigorous rocking in BRO. PMID:12907849

  4. A Comparison of Tandem Walk Performance Between Bed Rest Subjects and Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Chris; Peters, Brian; Kofman, Igor; Philips, Tiffany; Batson, Crystal; Cerisano, Jody; Fisher, Elizabeth; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Feiveson, Alan; Reschke, Millard; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Astronauts experience a microgravity environment during spaceflight, which results in a central reinterpretation of both vestibular and body axial-loading information by the sensorimotor system. Subjects in bed rest studies lie at 6deg head-down in strict bed rest to simulate the fluid shift and gravity-unloading of the microgravity environment. However, bed rest subjects still sense gravity in the vestibular organs. Therefore, bed rest isolates the axial-unloading component, thus allowing for the direct study of its effects. The Tandem Walk is a standard sensorimotor test of dynamic postural stability. In a previous abstract, we compared performance on a Tandem Walk test between bed rest control subjects, and short- and long-duration astronauts both before and after flight/bed rest using a composite index of performance, called the Tandem Walk Parameter (TWP), that takes into account speed, accuracy, and balance control. This new study extends the previous data set to include bed rest subjects who performed exercise countermeasures. The purpose of this study was to compare performance during the Tandem Walk test between bed rest subjects (with and without exercise), short-duration (Space Shuttle) crewmembers, and long-duration International Space Station (ISS) crewmembers at various time points during their recovery from bed rest or spaceflight.

  5. Effects of Fourteen-Day Bed Rest on Trunk Stabilizing Functions in Aging Adults

    PubMed Central

    Sarabon, Nejc; Rosker, Jernej

    2015-01-01

    Bed rest has been shown to have detrimental effects on structural and functional characteristics of the trunk muscles, possibly affecting trunk and spinal stability. This is especially important in populations such as aging adults with often altered trunk stabilizing functions. This study examined the effects of a fourteen-day bed rest on anticipatory postural adjustments and postural reflex responses of the abdominal wall and back muscles in sixteen adult men. Postural activation of trunk muscles was measured using voluntary quick arm movement and sudden arm loading paradigm. Measurements were conducted prior to the bed rest, immediately after, and fourteen days after the bed rest. Immediately after the bed rest, latencies of anticipatory postural adjustments showed significant shortening, especially for the obliquus internus and externus muscles. After a fourteen-day recuperation period, anticipatory postural adjustments reached a near to complete recovery. On the contrary, reactive response latencies increased from pre-bed-rest to both post-bed-rest measurement sessions. Results indicate an important effect of bed rest on stabilizing functions of the trunk muscles in elderly adults. Moreover, there proved to be a significant deterioration of postural reactive responses that outlasted the 14-day post-bed-rest rehabilitation. PMID:26601104

  6. Focal Gray Matter Plasticity as a Function of Long Duration Head-down Tilt Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppelmans, V.; DeDios, Y. E.; Wood, S. J.; Reuter-Lorenz, P. A.; Kofman, I.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Koppelmans, V.

    2014-01-01

    Long duration spaceflight (i.e., > or = 22 days) has been associated with changes in sensorimotor systems, resulting in difficulties that astronauts experience with posture control, locomotion, and manual control. The microgravity environment is an important causal factor for spaceflight induced sensorimotor changes. Whether these sensorimotor changes may be related to structural and functional brain changes is yet unknown. However, experimental studies revealed changes in the gray matter (GM) of the brain after simulated microgravity. Thus, it is possible that spaceflight may affect brain structure and thereby cognitive functioning and motor behavior. Long duration head-down tilt bed rest has been suggested as an exclusionary analog to study microgravity effects on the sensorimotor system. Bed rest mimics microgravity in body unloading and bodily fluid shifts. In consideration of the health and performance of crewmembers both in- and post-flight, we are conducting a prospective longitudinal 70-day bed rest study as an analog to investigate the effects of microgravity on the brain. VBM analysis revealed a progressive decrease from pre- to in- bed rest in GM volume in bilateral areas including the frontal medial cortex, the insular cortex and the caudate. Over the same time period, there was a progressive increase in GM volume in the cerebellum, occipital-, and parietal cortex, including the precuneus. The majority of these changes did not fully recover during the post-bed rest period. Analysis of lobular GM volumes obtained with BRAINS showed significantly increased volume from pre-bed rest to in-bed rest in GM of the parietal lobe and the third ventricle. Temporal GM volume at 70 days in bed rest was smaller than that at the first pre-bed rest measurement. Trend analysis showed significant positive linear and negative quadratic relationships between parietal GM and time, a positive linear relationship between third ventricle volume and time, and a negative linear

  7. Pressure distension in leg vessels as influenced by prolonged bed rest and a pressure habituation regimen.

    PubMed

    Eiken, Ola; Mekjavic, Igor B; Kounalakis, Stylianos N; Kölegård, Roger

    2016-06-15

    Bed rest increases pressure distension in arteries, arterioles, and veins of the leg. We hypothesized that bed-rest-induced deconditioning of leg vessels is governed by the removal of the local increments in transmural pressure induced by assuming erect posture and, therefore, can be counteracted by intermittently increasing local transmural pressure during the bed rest. Ten men underwent 5 wk of horizontal bed rest. A subatmospheric pressure (-90 mmHg) was intermittently applied to one lower leg [pressure habituation (PH) leg]. Vascular pressure distension was investigated before and after the bed rest, both in the PH and control (CN) leg by increasing local distending pressure, stepwise up to +200 mmHg. Vessel diameter and blood flow were measured in the posterior tibial artery and vessel diameter in the posterior tibial vein. In the CN leg, bed rest led to 5-fold and 2.7-fold increments (P < 0.01) in tibial artery pressure-distension and flow responses, respectively, and to a 2-fold increase in tibial vein pressure distension. In the PH leg, arterial pressure-distension and flow responses were unaffected by bed rest, whereas bed rest led to a 1.5-fold increase in venous pressure distension. It thus appears that bed-rest-induced deconditioning of leg arteries, arterioles, and veins is caused by removal of gravity-dependent local pressure loads and may be abolished or alleviated by a local pressure-habituation regimen. PMID:27079693

  8. Plasma vasopressin and renin activity in women exposed to bed rest and +G/z/ acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keil, L. C.; Ellis, S.

    1976-01-01

    To study the effect of prolonged recumbency on plasma vasopressin and renin activity, eight women were subjected to 17 days of absolute bed rest. The tolerance to +3G vertical acceleration of the subjects was tested before and after 14 days of bed rest. From day 2 and through day 17 of bed rest, plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) levels were reduced 33%. Plasma renin activity (PRA) increased 91% above ambulatory control values from days 10 through 15 of bed rest. When compared to precentrifuge values, exposure to vertical acceleration prior to bed rest provoked a 20-fold rise in mean plasma AVP but resulted in only a slight increase in PRA. After bed rest, acceleration increased plasma AVP 7-fold; however, the magnitude of this increase was less than the post +3G acceleration value obtained prior to bed rest. After bed rest, no significant rise was noted in PRA following +3G acceleration. This study demonstrates that prolonged bed rest leads to a significant rise in the PRA of female subjects, while exposure to positive vertical acceleration provokes a marked rise in plasma AVP.

  9. Effects of head-down bed rest on complex heart rate variability: Response to LBNP testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberger, Ary L.; Mietus, Joseph E.; Rigney, David R.; Wood, Margie L.; Fortney, Suzanne M.

    1994-01-01

    Head-down bed rest is used to model physiological changes during spaceflight. We postulated that bed rest would decrease the degree of complex physiological heart rate variability. We analyzed continuous heart rate data from digitized Holter recordings in eight healthy female volunteers (age 28-34 yr) who underwent a 13-day 6 deg head-down bed rest study with serial lower body negative pressure (LBNP) trials. Heart rate variability was measured on a 4-min data sets using conventional time and frequency domain measures as well as with a new measure of signal 'complexity' (approximate entropy). Data were obtained pre-bed rest (control), during bed rest (day 4 and day 9 or 11), and 2 days post-bed rest (recovery). Tolerance to LBNP was significantly reduced on both bed rest days vs. pre-bed rest. Heart rate variability was assessed at peak LBNP. Heart rate approximate entropy was significantly decreased at day 4 and day 9 or 11, returning toward normal during recovery. Heart rate standard deviation and the ratio of high- to low-power frequency did not change significantly. We conclude that short-term bed rest is associated with a decrease in the complex variability of heart rate during LBNP testing in healthy young adult women. Measurement of heart rate complexity, using a method derived from nonlinear dynamics ('chaos theory'), may provide a sensitive marker of this loss of physiological variability, complementing conventional time and frequency domain statistical measures.

  10. Gender Differences in Baroreflex Sensitivity after Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arzeno, Natalia M.; Stenger, M. B.; Ribeiro, L. C.; Lee, S. M.; Platts, S. H.

    2009-01-01

    Two potential contributing factors to post-spaceflight orthostatic intolerance are decreases in baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and sympathetic nervous system response. The purpose of this study was to examine the shape of the BRS curve and sympathetic response to a wide range of blood pressures (BP) before and during 6 head-down bed rest (BR). METHODS: Normal volunteers were tested one day before BR (20M, 1 0F) and near BR days 30 (20M, 10F), 60 (16M, 8F), and 90 (1 0M, 5F). BP was pharmacologically manipulated by 10-min infusions of phenylephrine (PE) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) at 3 increasing concentrations with a 20-min rest between PE and SNP. Electrocardiogram and continuous finger blood pressure were recorded. A blood sample was drawn at the end of each infusion to measure plasma norepinephrine levels. The spontaneous baroreflex slope (SBS), a measure of BRS, was calculated as the slope of a sequence of 3 or more beats in which the systolic BP (SBP) and following R-R interval (RR) both increased or decreased. The data included saturated responses at the upper but not the lower end of the BP range. Mean response curves were constructed using second-order mixed model analysis. Results are based on term significance in the models. RESULTS RR: RR was lower during BR than pre BR (p<0.001). Pre BR males were modeled by a linear RR response to SBP (p=0.000) while females had a quadratic response which saturated at high SBP (p=0.019). By day 30, both genders were modeled by a linear response; compared to males, females had an attenuated (lower slope) RR response to changes in SBP (p=0.031). SBS: SBS vs SBP analysis showed a lower SBS during BR (p<0.001) when compared to pre BR. Females had a higher SBS than males pre BR (p=0.006). Females exhibited saturating SBS at higher SBP (p=0.016) on day 30, while males were modeled by a linear SBS response to SBP (p=0.035). NE: Females had different NE response to diastolic BP than males pre BR (p=0.035) and on day 30 (p=0

  11. Physiological effects of acute and ordinary bed rest conditions on endurance trained volunteers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorbas, Y. G.; Ivanov, A. A.; Madvedev, S. N.; Kakurin, A. G.

    1999-12-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out a comparative study of water balance and water protein composition of the blood during exposure to acute (abrupt restriction of motor activity) and ordinary rigorous bed rest of 7 days. The studies were performed on 30 long distance runners aged 22-25 years old who had a VO 2 max of 66 ml kg -1·min -1 on the average. The volunteers were divided into three equal groups: the volunteers in the 1st group were under a normal ambulatory life conditions (control subjects), the volunteers of the 2nd group subjected to an acute bed rest (abrupt restriction of motor activity) regime (acute bed rested subjects) and the volunteers of the 3rd group were submitted to ordinary and rigorous bed rest (rigorous bed rested subjects). All volunteers were on an average of 13.8 km/day before taking part in this investigation. The 2nd and 3rd groups of volunteers were kept under a rigorous bed rest regime for 7 days. During the prebed rest period and actual bed rest period plasma volume (PV), total protein and protein fractions (albumins and globulins) and hematocrit were measured. Exposure to acute bed rest conditions induced a significant increase in hematocrit, hemoglobin concentration, protein fractions and marked decrease in (PV) and water balance which were significantly more pronounced than during exposure to ordinary rigorous bed rest. It was concluded that exposure to acute bed rest conditions induces significantly greater changes in water balance and water-protein concentration of the blood of endurance trained volunteers than exposure to ordinary rigorous bed rest conditions.

  12. Changes in mood status and neurotic levels during a 20-day bed rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizaki, Yuko; Ishizaki, Tatsuro; Fukuoka, Hideoki; Kim, Chang-Sun; Fujita, Masayo; Maegawa, Yuko; Fujioka, Hiroshi; Katsura, Taisaku; Suzuki, Yoji; Gunji, Atsuaki

    2002-04-01

    This study evaluated changes of mood status and depressive and neurotic levels in nine young male subjects during a 20-day 6° head-down tilting bed rest and examined whether exercise training modified these changes. Participants were asked to complete psychometrical inventories on before, during, and after the bed rest experiment. Depressive and neurotic levels were enhanced during bed rest period according to the Japanese version of Zung's Self-rating Depression Scale and the Japanese version of the General Health Questionnaire. Mood state "vigor" was impaired and "confusion" was increased during bed rest and recumbent control periods compared to pre-bed rest and ambulatory control periods according to the Japanese version of Profiles of Mood State, whereas the mood "tension-anxiety", "depression-dejection", "anger-hostility" and "fatigue" were relatively stable during experiment. Isometric exercise training did not modify these results. Microgravity, along with confinement to bed and isolation from familiar environments, induced impairment of mental status.

  13. Fibroblast Growth Factor-23 in Bed Rest and Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, R.; Zwart, S. R; Fields, E.; Heer, M.; Sibonga, J.; Smith, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Many nutritional factors influence bone, from the basics of calcium and vitamin D, to factors which influence bone through acid/base balance, including protein, sodium, and more. Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a recently identified factor, secreted from osteocytes, which is involved in classic (albeit complex) feedback loops controlling phosphorus homeostasis through both vitamin D and parathyroid hormone (PTH) (1, 2). As osteocytes are gravity sensing cells, it is important to determine if there are changes in FGF23 during spaceflight. In extreme cases, such as chronic kidney disease, FGF23 levels are highly elevated. FGF23 imbalances, secondary to dietary influences, may contribute to skeletal demineralization and kidney stone risk during spaceflight. Presented with an imbalanced dietary phosphorus to calcium ratio, increased secretion of FGF23 will inhibit renal phosphorus reabsorption, resulting in increased excretion and reduced circulating phosphorus. Increased intake and excretion of phosphorus is associated with increased kidney stone risk in both the terrestrial and microgravity environments. Highly processed foods and carbonated beverages are associated with higher phosphorus content. Ideally, the dietary calcium to phosphorus ratio should be at minimum 1:1. Nutritional requirements for spaceflight suggest that this ratio not be less than 0.67 (3), while the International Space Station (ISS) menu provides 1020 mg Ca and 1856 mg P, for a ratio of 0.55 (3). Subjects in NASA's bed rest studies, by design, have consumed intake ratios much closer to 1.0 (4). FGF23 also has an inhibitory influence on PTH secretion and 1(alpha)-hydroxylase, both of which are required for activating vitamin D with the conversion of 25-hydroxyvitamin D to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. Decreased 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D will result in decreased intestinal phosphorus absorption, and increased urinary phosphorus excretion (via decreased renal reabsorption). Should a decrease in 1

  14. Exercise Thermoregulation Following 13 Days of Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Stuart M. C.; Williams, W. Jon; Schneider, Suzanne M.

    2001-01-01

    This investigation examined two potential mechanisms, altered skin blood flow (SBF) and sweating rate (SR) responses, that may be responsible for an elevated core temperature during exercise after bed rest (BR) and space flight. Seven healthy men (29 +/- 5 yr, 179.6 +/- 7.1 cm, 77.2 +/- 17.0kg; mean +/- SD) underwent 13 days of 6 deg head-down BR. Pre- and post-BR, subjects completed supine submaximal cycle ergometry (20 min at 40% and 20 min at 65% of pre-BR supine VO2pk) in a thermoneutral room (23.4 +/- 0.5 C, 56 +/- 8 %RH) during, heat production (VO2 ; indirect calorimetry), intestinal temperature (T(sub in) ; ingestible pill), SBF (laser Doppler velocimetry), local SR (dew point hygrometry), and total sweat loss (TSL; Delta body weight) were measured. Pre- and post- BR plasma volume (PV) was measured using I-125 dilution. After BR, T(sub in) was elevated at rest (36.99 +/- 0.14 vs. 37.30 +/- 0.06 C; p<_0.05) and at the end of exercise (37.57 +/- 0.13 vs. 37.90 +/- 0.09 C; P less than or equal to 0.05). However, the increase in T(sub in) from rest to the end of exercise was not different after BR (0.59 +/- 0.07 vs. 0.60 +/- 0.07 C). There was no difference in VO2 pre- to post-BR during rest (0.28 +/- 0.04 vs. 0.24 +/- 0.03 1 multiplied by min(exp -1) ) or 40% VO2pk (0.95 +/- 0.08 vs. 0.96 +/- 0.05 1 multiplied by min(exp -1)), but VO2 was significantly less at the end of the 65% VO2pk stage (1.53 +/- 0.09 vs. 1.42 +/- 0.11 1 multiplies by min(exp - 1); p less than or equal to 0.05). The percent change in SBF from rest to end of exercise was less after BR (211 +/- 53 vs. 96 +/- 31%; p less than or equal to 0.05), the threshold for the onset of SBF was greater (37.17 +/- 0.18vs. 37.51 +/- 0.17 C; p less than or equal to 0.05), and the slope of the response tended to be reduced (536 +/- 184 vs. 201 +/- 46 %A PC; p=0.08). TSL was not different after BR (0.42+0.06 vs. 0.44 +/- 0.08 kg), but the T in threshold at the onset of sweating was delayed significantly (37

  15. Bone metabolism and nutritional status during 30-day head-down-tilt bed rest

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Jennifer L. L.; Zwart, Sara R.; Heer, Martina; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Ericson, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Bed rest studies provide an important tool for modeling physiological changes that occur during spaceflight. Markers of bone metabolism and nutritional status were evaluated in 12 subjects (8 men, 4 women; ages 25–49 yr) who participated in a 30-day −6° head-down-tilt diet-controlled bed rest study. Blood and urine samples were collected twice before, once a week during, and twice after bed rest. Data were analyzed using a mixed-effects linear regression with a priori contrasts comparing all days to the second week of the pre-bed rest acclimation period. During bed rest, all urinary markers of bone resorption increased ∼20% (P < 0.001), and serum parathyroid hormone decreased ∼25% (P < 0.001). Unlike longer (>60 days) bed rest studies, neither markers of oxidative damage nor iron status indexes changed over the 30 days of bed rest. Urinary oxalate excretion decreased ∼20% during bed rest (P < 0.001) and correlated inversely with urinary calcium (R = −0.18, P < 0.02). These data provide a broad overview of the biochemistry associated with short-duration bed rest studies and provide an impetus for using shorter studies to save time and costs wherever possible. For some effects related to bone biochemistry, short-duration bed rest will fulfill the scientific requirements to simulate spaceflight, but other effects (antioxidants/oxidative damage, iron status) do not manifest until subjects are in bed longer, in which case longer studies or other analogs may be needed. Regardless, maximizing research funding and opportunities will be critical to enable the next steps in space exploration. PMID:22995395

  16. Bone metabolism and nutritional status during 30-day head-down-tilt bed rest.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Jennifer L L; Zwart, Sara R; Heer, Martina; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Ericson, Karen; Smith, Scott M

    2012-11-01

    Bed rest studies provide an important tool for modeling physiological changes that occur during spaceflight. Markers of bone metabolism and nutritional status were evaluated in 12 subjects (8 men, 4 women; ages 25-49 yr) who participated in a 30-day -6° head-down-tilt diet-controlled bed rest study. Blood and urine samples were collected twice before, once a week during, and twice after bed rest. Data were analyzed using a mixed-effects linear regression with a priori contrasts comparing all days to the second week of the pre-bed rest acclimation period. During bed rest, all urinary markers of bone resorption increased ~20% (P < 0.001), and serum parathyroid hormone decreased ~25% (P < 0.001). Unlike longer (>60 days) bed rest studies, neither markers of oxidative damage nor iron status indexes changed over the 30 days of bed rest. Urinary oxalate excretion decreased ~20% during bed rest (P < 0.001) and correlated inversely with urinary calcium (R = -0.18, P < 0.02). These data provide a broad overview of the biochemistry associated with short-duration bed rest studies and provide an impetus for using shorter studies to save time and costs wherever possible. For some effects related to bone biochemistry, short-duration bed rest will fulfill the scientific requirements to simulate spaceflight, but other effects (antioxidants/oxidative damage, iron status) do not manifest until subjects are in bed longer, in which case longer studies or other analogs may be needed. Regardless, maximizing research funding and opportunities will be critical to enable the next steps in space exploration. PMID:22995395

  17. Effects of Head-Down Bed Rest on the Executive Functions and Emotional Response

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing; Zhou, Renlai; Chen, Shanguang; Tan, Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Prolonged bed rest may cause changes in the autonomic nervous system that are related to cognition and emotion. This study adopted an emotional flanker task to evaluate the effect of 45 days -6° head-down bed rest (HDBR) on executive functioning in 16 healthy young men at each of six time points: the second-to-last day before the bed rest period, the eleventh, twentieth, thirty-second and fortieth day during the bed rest period, and the eighth day after the bed rest period. In addition, self-report inventories (Beck Anxiety Inventory, BAI; Beck Depression Inventory, BDI; Positive Affect and Negative Affect Scale, PANAS) were conducted to record emotional changes, and the participants’ galvanic skin response (GSR), heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) were assessed as measures of physiological activity. The results showed that the participants’ reaction time on the flanker task increased significantly relative to their responses on the second-to-last day before the period of bed rest, their galvanic skin response weakened and their degrees of positive affect declined during the bed rest period. Our results provide some evidence for a detrimental effect of prolonged bed rest on executive functioning and positive affect. Whether this stems from a lack of aerobic physical activity and/or the effect of HDBR itself remains to be determined. PMID:23284916

  18. Effects of prolonged head-down bed rest on working memory

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing; Zhou, Renlai; Zhao, Xin; Oei, Tian Po S

    2015-01-01

    Background The weightlessness caused by prolonged bed rest results in changes in cerebral circulation and thus, brain functions, which is of interest. Methods We investigated the effects of 45-day, −6° head-down bed rest, which stimulated microgravity, on working memory in 16 healthy male participants. The 2-back task was used to test the working memory variations on the 2nd day before bed rest (R−2); on the 11th (R11), 20th (R20), 32nd (R32), and 40th (R40) days of bed rest; and on the eighth day after bed rest (R+8). The cognitive response and the physiological reactivity (such as galvanic skin response, heart rate, and heart rate variability) under the 2-back task were recorded simultaneously. Results The results showed that compared with R−2, on the R+8, the participants’ galvanic skin response increased significantly, and the high frequency of heart rate variability (HF), low frequency of heart rate variability (LF), and reaction time in the 2-back task decreased significantly. There were positive correlations between the participants’ reaction time of working memory and the LF/HF under head-down bed rest (at R11, R20, and R32). Conclusion The results suggested that the prolonged head-down bed rest may have a detrimental effect on individual physiology and working memory. Physiology indices, such as galvanic skin response and heart rate variability, were sensitive to the prolonged bed rest. PMID:25848281

  19. Depression, mood state, and back pain during microgravity simulated by bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Styf, J. R.; Hutchinson, K.; Carlsson, S. G.; Hargens, A. R.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to develop a ground-based model for spinal adaptation to microgravity and to study the effects of spinal adaptation on depression, mood state, and pain intensity. METHODS: We investigated back pain, mood state, and depression in six subjects, all of whom were exposed to microgravity, simulated by two forms of bed rest, for 3 days. One form consisted of bed rest with 6 degrees of head-down tilt and balanced traction, and the other consisted of horizontal bed rest. Subjects had a 2-week period of recovery between the studies. The effects of bed rest on pain intensity in the lower back, depression, and mood state were investigated. RESULTS: Subjects experienced significantly more intense lower back pain, lower hemisphere abdominal pain, headache, and leg pain during head-down tilt bed rest. They had higher scores on the Beck Depression Inventory (ie, were more depressed) and significantly lower scores on the activity scale of the Bond-Lader questionnaire. CONCLUSIONS: Bed rest with 6 degrees of head-down tilt may be a better experimental model than horizontal bed rest for inducing the pain and psychosomatic reactions experienced in microgravity. Head-down tilt with balanced traction may be a useful method to induce low back pain, mood changes, and altered self-rated activity level in bed rest studies.

  20. In Vivo measurement of human body composition. [during continuous bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, N.; Grunbaum, B. W.; Kodama, A. M.; Price, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    Physiological changes in human beings were studied during a 21 day bed rest regime. Results of blood analyses indicated clearly that major metabolic adjustments occurred during prolonged bed rest. However, urinary metabolic analyses showed variances attributed to specimen collection inaccuracies and the small number of test subjects.

  1. Study report on modification of the long term circulatory model for the simulation of bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, J. I.; Grounds, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    Modifications were made of the circulatory, fluid, and electrolyte control model which was based on the model of Guyton. The modifications included separate leg compartments and the addition of gravity dependency. It was found that these modifications allowed for more accurate bed rest simulation by simulating changes in the orthostatic gradient and simulating the response to the fluid shifts associated with bed rest.

  2. Bed-rest studies: Fluid and electrolyte responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    Confinement in the horizontal position for 2 to 3 weeks results in a chronic decrease in plasma volume, increased interstitial fluid volume, and unchanged or slightly increased extracellular fluid volume. Concentrations of blood electrolytes, glucose, and nitrogenous constituents remain within normal limits of variability when maintenance levels of isometric or isotonic exercise are performed for 1 hr/day. Hematocrit and plasma osmolality can be elevated significantly throughout bed rest (BR). Significant diuresis occurs on the first day, and increases in urine Na and Ca continue throughout BR, although voluntary fluid intake is unchanged. Urine Na and K are evaluated during the second week of BR in spite of stabilization of PV and extracellular volume. The initial diuresis probably arises from the extracellular fluid while subsequent urine loss above control levels must come from the intracellular fluid. Preservation of the extracellular volume takes precedance over maintenance of the intracellular fluid volume. The functioning of a natriuretic factor (hormone) to account for the continued increased loss of Na in the urine is suggested.

  3. Bed-rest studies - Fluid and electrolyte responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    Confinement in the horizontal position for 2 to 3 weeks results in a chronic decrease in plasma volume, increased interstitial fluid volume, and unchanged or slightly increased extracellular fluid volume. Concentrations of blood electrolytes, glucose, and nitrogenous constituents remain within normal limits of variability when maintenance levels of isometric or isotonic exercise are performed for 1 hr/day. Hematocrit and plasma osmolality can be elevated significantly throughout bed rest (BR). Significant diuresis occurs on the first day, and increases in urine Na and Ca continue throughout BR, although voluntary fluid intake is unchanged. Urine Na and K are evaluated during the second week of BR in spite of stabilization of PV and extracellular volume. The initial diuresis probably arises from extracellular fluid while subsequent urine loss above control levels must come from the intracellular fluid. Preservation of the extracellular volume takes precedance over maintenance of the intracellular fluid volume. The functioning of a natriuretic factor (hormone) to account for the continued increased loss of Na in the urine is suggested. Previously announced in STAR as N83-24160

  4. Effect of prolonged bed rest on lung volume in normal individuals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckett, W. S.; Vroman, N. B.; Nigro, D.; Thompson-Gorman, S.; Wilkerson, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of prolonged bed rest on the lung function was studied by measuring forced vital capacity (FVC) and total lung capacity (TLC) in normal subjects before, during, and after 11- to 12-day rest periods. It was found that both FVC and TLC increased during bed rest (compared with the ambulatory controls), while residual volume and functional residual capacity of the respiratory system did not change. It is concluded that the increase in TLC by prolonged bed rest is not dependent on alterations in plasma volume.

  5. The NASA performance assessment workstation: Cognitive performance during head-down bed rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shehab, Randa L.; Schlegel, Robert E.; Schiflett, Samuel G.; Eddy, Douglas R.

    The NASA Performance Assessment Workstation was used to assess cognitive performance changes in eight males subjected to seventeen days of 6 ° head-down bed rest. PAWS uses six performance tasks to assess directed and divided attention, spatial, mathematical, and memory skills, and tracking ability. Subjective scales assess overall fatigue and mood state. Subjects completed training trials, practice trials, bed rest trials, and recovery trials. The last eight practice trials and all bed rest trials were performed with subjects lying face-down on a gurney. In general, there was no apparent cumulative effect of bed rest. Following a short period of performance stabilization, a slight but steady trend of performance improvement was observed across all trials. For most tasks, this trend of performance improvement was enhanced during recovery. No statistically significant differences in performance were observed when comparing bed rest with the control period. Additionally, fatigue scores showed little change across all periods.

  6. Fluid and electrolyte shifts during bed rest with isometric and isotonic exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Bernauer, E. M.; Young, H. L.; Morse, J. T.; Juhos, L. T.; Van Beaumont, W.; Staley, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    It is difficult to separate the effects of reduction in hydrostatic pressure from that of reduced energy expenditure when investigating the confinement deconditioning problem. Experiments were conducted on seven healthy young men aged 19-21 yr with the purpose of separating these two factors by using isotonic physical exercise during bed rest to provide a daily energy expenditure greater than normal ambulatory levels. Fluid and electrolyte shifts were measured during three two-week bed rest periods, each of which being separated by a three-week ambulatory recovery period. During two of the three bed rest periods they performed isometric and isotonic exercises to compare their effects on fluid and electrolyte shifts during bed rest. It is shown that during bed rest, preservation of the extracellular volume takes precedence over maintenance of the plasma volume and that this mechanism is independent of the effects of isometric or isotonic exercise.

  7. Hypertrophy in the cervical muscles and thoracic discs in bed rest?

    PubMed

    Belavý, Daniel L; Miokovic, Tanja; Armbrecht, Gabriele; Felsenberg, Dieter

    2013-09-01

    The impact of prolonged bed rest on the cervical and upper thoracic spine is unknown. In the 2nd Berlin BedRest Study (BBR2-2), 24 male subjects underwent 60-day bed rest and performed either no exercise, resistive exercise, or resistive exercise with whole body vibration. Subjects were followed for 2 yr after bed rest. On axial cervical magnetic resonance images from the skull to T3, the volumes of the semispinalis capitis, splenius capitis, spinalis cervicis, longus capitis, longus colli, levator scapulae, sternocleidomastoid, middle and posterior scalenes, and anterior scalenes were measured. Disc height, anteroposterior width, and volume were measured from C2/3 to T6/7 on sagittal images. The volume of all muscles, with the exception of semispinalis capitis, increased during bed rest (P < 0.025). There were no significant differences between the groups for changes in the muscles. Increased upper and midthoracic spine disc height and volume (P < 0.001) was seen during bed rest, and disc height increases persisted at least 6 mo after bed rest. Increases in thoracic disc height were greater (P = 0.003) in the resistive vibration exercise group than in control. On radiological review, two subjects showed new injuries to the mid-lower thoracic spine. One of these subjects reported a midthoracic pain incident during maximal strength testing before bed rest and the other after countermeasure exercise on day 3 of bed rest. We conclude that bed rest is associated with increased disc size in the thoracic region and increases in muscle volume at the neck. The exercise device needs to be modified to ensure that load is distributed in a more physiological fashion. PMID:23813530

  8. Resistance exercise prevents plantar flexor deconditioning during bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamman, M. M.; Hunter, G. R.; Stevens, B. R.; Guilliams, M. E.; Greenisen, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    Because resistance exercise (REX) and unloading induce opposing neuromuscular adaptations, we tested the efficacy of REX against the effects of 14 d of bed rest unloading (BRU) on the plantar flexor muscle group. Sixteen men were randomly assigned to no exercise (NOE, N = 8) or REX (N = 8). REX performed 5 sets x 6-10 repetitions to failure of constant resistance concentric/eccentric plantar flexion every other day during BRU. One-repetition maximum (1RM) strength was tested on the training device. The angle-specific torque-velocity relationship across 5 velocities (0, 0.52, 1.05, 1.75, and 2.97 rad.s-1) and the full range-of-motion power-velocity relationship were assessed on a dynamometer. Torque-position analyses identified strength changes at shortened, neutral, and stretched muscle lengths. Concentric and eccentric contractile work were measured across ten repetitions at 1.05 rad.s-1. Maximal neural activation was measured by surface electromyography (EMG). 1RM decreased 9% in NOE and improved 11% in REX (P < 0.05). Concentric (0.52 and 1.05 rad.s-1), eccentric (0.52 and 2.97 rad.s-1), and isometric angle-specific torques decreased (P < 0.05) in NOE, averaging 18%, 17%, and 13%, respectively. Power dropped (P < 0.05) in NOE at three eccentric (21%) and two concentric (14%) velocities. REX protected angle-specific torque and average power at all velocities. Concentric and eccentric strength decreased at stretched (16%) and neutral (17%) muscle lengths (P < 0.05) in NOE while REX maintained or improved strength at all joint positions. Concentric (15%) and eccentric (11%) contractile work fell in NOE (P < 0.05) but not in REX. Maximal plantar flexor EMG did not change in either group. In summary, constant resistance concentric/eccentric REX completely prevented plantar flexor performance deconditioning induced by BRU. The reported benefits of REX should prove useful in prescribing exercise for astronauts in microgravity and for patients susceptible to functional

  9. Intensive exercise training suppresses testosterone during bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, C. E.; Stanford, K. I.; Stein, T. P.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    2005-01-01

    Spaceflight and prolonged bed rest (BR) alter plasma hormone levels inconsistently. This may be due, in part, to prescription of heavy exercise as a countermeasure for ameliorating the adverse effects of disuse. The initial project was to assess exercise programs to maintain aerobic performance and leg strength during BR. The present study evaluates the effect of BR and the performance of the prescribed exercise countermeasures on plasma steroid levels. In a 30-day BR study of male subjects, the efficacy of isotonic (ITE, n = 7) or isokinetic exercise (IKE, n = 7) training was evaluated in contrast to no exercise (n = 5). These exercise countermeasures protected aerobic performance and leg strength successfully. BR alone (no-exercise group) did not change steroidogenesis, as assessed by the plasma concentrations of cortisol, progesterone, aldosterone, and free (FT) and total testosterone (TT). In the exercise groups, both FT and TT were decreased (P < 0.05): FT during IKE from 24 +/- 1.7 to 18 +/- 2.0 pg/ml and during ITE from 21 +/- 1.5 to 18 +/- 1 pg/ml, and TT during IKE from 748 +/- 68 to 534 +/- 46 ng/dl and during ITE from 565 +/- 36 to 496 +/- 38 ng/dl. The effect of intensive exercise countermeasures on plasma testosterone was not associated with indexes of overtraining. The reduction in plasma testosterone associated with both the IKE and ITE countermeasures during BR supports our hypothesis that intensive exercise countermeasures may, in part, contribute to changes in plasma steroid concentrations during spaceflight.

  10. The Effects of Long Duration Bed Rest on Brain Functional Connectivity and Sensorimotor Functioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassady, K.; Koppelmans, V.; De Dios, Y.; Stepanyan, V.; Szecsy, D.; Gadd, N.; Wood, S.; Reuter-Lorenz, P.; Castenada, R. Riascos; Kofman, I.; Bloomberg, J.; Mulavara, A; Seidler, R.

    2016-01-01

    Long duration spaceflight has been associated with detrimental alterations in human sensorimotor functioning. Prolonged exposure to a head-down tilt (HDT) position during long duration bed rest can resemble several effects of the microgravity environment such as reduced sensory inputs, body unloading and increased cephalic fluid distribution. The question of whether microgravity affects other central nervous system functions such as brain functional connectivity and its relationship with behavior is largely unknown, but of importance to the health and performance of astronauts both during and post-flight. In the present study, we investigate the effects of prolonged exposure to HDT bed rest on resting state brain functional connectivity and its association with behavioral changes in 17 male participants. To validate that our findings were not due to confounding factors such as time or task practice, we also acquired resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) and behavioral measurements from 14 normative control participants at four time points. Bed rest participants remained in bed with their heads tilted down six degrees below their feet for 70 consecutive days. Rs-fMRI and behavioral data were obtained at seven time points averaging around: 12 and 8 days prior to bed rest; 7, 50, and 70 days during bed rest; and 8 and 12 days after bed rest. 70 days of HDT bed rest resulted in significant increases in functional connectivity during bed rest followed by a reversal of changes in the post bed rest recovery period between motor cortical and somatosensory areas of the brain. In contrast, decreases in connectivity were observed between temporoparietal regions. Furthermore, post-hoc correlation analyses revealed a significant relationship between motor-somatosensory network connectivity and standing balance performance changes; participants that exhibited the greatest increases in connectivity strength showed the least deterioration in postural

  11. Bed rest decreases mechanically induced myofiber wounding and consequent wound-mediated FGF release.

    PubMed

    Clarke, M S; Bamman, M M; Feeback, D L

    1998-08-01

    Using a terrestrial model of spaceflight (i.e., bed rest), we investigated the amount of myofiber wounding and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) release that occurs during unloading. Myofiber wounding was determined by serum levels of the creatine kinase MM (CKMM) isoform before and after bed rest. Serum levels of both acidic FGF (aFGF) and basic FGF were also determined. A second group of subjects was treated in an identical fashion except that they underwent a resistive exercise program during bed rest. Bed rest alone caused significant (P < 0.05; n = 7) reductions in post-bed-rest serum levels of both CKMM and aFGF, which were paralleled by a significant (P < 0.05; n = 7) decrease in myofiber size. In contrast, bed rest plus resistive exercise resulted in significant (P < 0.05; n = 7) increases in post-bed-rest serum levels of both CKMM and aFGF, which were paralleled by inhibition of the atrophic response. These results suggest that mechanically induced, myofiber wound-mediated FGF release may play an important role in the etiology of unloading-induced skeletal muscle atrophy. PMID:9688737

  12. Sex‐specific responses of bone metabolism and renal stone risk during bed rest

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Jennifer L. L.; Heer, Martina; Hargens, Alan R.; Macias, Brandon R.; Hudson, Edgar K.; Shackelford, Linda C.; Zwart, Sara R.; Smith, Scott M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to directly assess sex differences in bone loss, bone biochemistry, and renal stone risk in bed rest. Bed rest simulates some spaceflight effects on human physiology and can be used to address the potential existence of sex‐specific effects on bone metabolism and renal stone risk in space. We combined data from the control subjects in five head‐down‐tilt bed rest studies (combined n = 50 men, 24 women) of differing durations (14–90 days). All subjects were healthy volunteers. Mean age was 35 ± 9 years for women and 33 ± 8 years for men. The main outcome measures were bone density and biochemistry, and renal stone risk chemistry. Before bed rest began, men had higher bone mineral density and content (P < 0.001), and excreted more biomarkers of bone resorption and calcium per day than did women (P < 0.05). These differences remained during bed rest. A number of urine chemistry analytes increased (e.g., calcium) or decreased (e.g., sodium, citrate, and urine volume) significantly for men and women during bed rest. These changes may predispose men to higher stone risk. Men and women do not have substantially different responses to the skeletal unloading of bed rest. PMID:25107989

  13. Orthostatic intolerance during a 13-day bed rest does not result from increased leg compliance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melchior, Francois M.; Fortney, Suzanne M.

    1993-01-01

    Increased leg compliance (LC) has been proposed as a mechanism for orthostatic intolerance after spaceflight or bed rest. Using venous occlusion plethysmography with mercury-in-Silastic strain gauge, we evaluated LC before, during, and after a 13-day head-down bed rest in 10 men. LC was measured by the relationship between the increased calf areas at thigh cuff occlusions of 20, 30, 50, 70, and 80 mmHg. Orthostatic tolerance was evaluated by a presyncopal-limited lower body negative pressure test before and after bed rest. The 10 subjects were divided into TOL (n= 5) and INT (n=5) groups for which the orthostatic tolerance was similar and lower after bed rest, respectively. For TOL (INT) before bed rest, calf area increases were 2.2 +/- 0.5 (SE) (1.3 +/- 0.4), 3.5 +/- 0.7 (2.3 +/- 0.5), 5.0 +/- 0.9 (3.5 +/- 0.6), 5.6 +/- 0.9 (4.4 +/- 0.6), and 6.4 +/- 1.1 (4.7 +/- 0.6) sq cm for thigh occlusion pressures of 20, 30, 50, 70, and 80 mmHg, respectively. Neither for INT nor for TOL were these results significantly changed by bed rest. These results suggest that other mechanisms than increased LC have to be taken into account to explain the decreased orthostatic tolerance induced by this 13-day bed rest.

  14. Changes in body fluid compartments during a 28-day bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortney, Suzanne M.; Hyatt, Kenneth H.; Davis, John E.; Vogel, John M.

    1991-01-01

    Serial isotope measurements were used to obtain measurements of the body fluid responses of 10 22-29-year-old men during 28 d of simulated microgravity (bed rest). The subjects were maintained on a controlled metabolic diet for 7 d before the study, during 14 d of ambulatory control, 28 d of horizontal bed rest, and 14 d of ambulant recovery. Fluid compartments were measured on control days 1 and 9, bed rest days 2, 14, and 28, and recovery days 7 and 14. By day 2 of bed rest, plasma volume and extracellular volume (ECV) decreased significantly by an average 209 and 533 ml, respectively. Red cell volume and total body water (TBW) decreased more slowly, with average losses of 128 and 1316 ml, respectively, after 28 d of bed rest. Early in the bed rest, TBW loss was mostly from the ECV. Thereafter, the TBW deficit was derived from the intracellular compartment, which decreased an average of 838 ml after 28 d. These results suggest losses from all fluid compartments during bed rest, with no evidence of restoration of ECV after 1-2 weeks.

  15. Effects of acute exercise on attenuated vagal baroreflex function during bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.; Doerr, Donald F.; Guell, Antonio; Marini, J.-F.

    1992-01-01

    We measured carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses in six healthy men, 24 h before and 24 h after a bout of leg exercise during 6 deg head-down bed rest to determine if depressed vagal baroreflex function associated with exposure to microgravity environments could be reversed by a single exposure to acute intense exercise. Baroreflex responses were measured before bed rest and on day 7 of bed rest. An exercise bout consisting of dynamic and isometric actions of the quadriceps at graded speeds and resistances was performed on day 8 of bed rest and measurements of baroreflex response were repeated 24 h later. Vagally-mediated cardiac responses were provoked with ramped neck pressure-suction sequences comprising pressure elevations to +40 mm Hg, followed by serial, R-wave triggered 15 mm Hg reductions, to -65 mm Hg. Baroreceptor stimulus-cardiac response relationships were derived by plotting each R-R interval as a function of systolic pressure less the neck chamber pressure applied during the interval. Compared with pre-bed rest baseline measurements, 7 d of bed rest decreased the gain (maximum slope) of the baroreflex stimulus-response relationship by 16.8 +/- 3.4 percent (p less than 0.05). On day 9 of bed rest, 24 h after exercise, the maximum slope of the baroreflex stimulus-response relationship was increased (p less than 0.05) by 10.7 +/- 3.7 percent above pre-bed rest levels and 34.3 +/- 7.9 percent above bed rest day 7. Our data verify that vagally-mediated baroreflex function is depressed by exposure to simulated microgravity and demonstrate that this effect can be acutely reversed by exposure to a single bout of intense exercise.

  16. Branched-chain amino acid supplementation during bed rest: effect on recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.; Donaldson, M. R.; Leskiw, M. J.; Schluter, M. D.; Baggett, D. W.; Boden, G.

    2003-01-01

    Bed rest is associated with a loss of protein from the weight-bearing muscle. The objectives of this study are to determine whether increasing dietary branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) during bed rest improves the anabolic response after bed rest. The study consisted of a 1-day ambulatory period, 14 days of bed rest, and a 4-day recovery period. During bed rest, dietary intake was supplemented with either 30 mmol/day each of glycine, serine, and alanine (group 1) or with 30 mmol/day each of the three BCAAs (group 2). Whole body protein synthesis was determined with U-(15)N-labeled amino acids, muscle, and selected plasma protein synthesis with l-[(2)H(5)]phenylalanine. Total glucose production and gluconeogenesis from alanine were determined with l-[U-(13)C(3)]alanine and [6,6-(2)H(2)]glucose. During bed rest, nitrogen (N) retention was greater with BCAA feeding (56 +/- 6 vs. 26 +/- 12 mg N. kg(-1). day(-1), P < 0.05). There was no effect of BCAA supplementation on either whole body, muscle, or plasma protein synthesis or the rate of 3-MeH excretion. Muscle tissue free amino acid concentrations were increased during bed rest with BCAA (0.214 +/- 0.066 vs. 0.088 +/- 0.12 nmol/mg protein, P < 0.05). Total glucose production and gluconeogenesis from alanine were unchanged with bed rest but were significantly reduced (P < 0.05) with the BCAA group in the recovery phase. In conclusion, the improved N retention during bed rest is due, at least in part, to accretion of amino acids in the tissue free amino acid pools. The amount accreted is not enough to impact protein kinetics in the recovery phase but does improve N retention by providing additional essential amino acids in the early recovery phase.

  17. Analysis of Arterial Mechanics During Head-Down-Tilt Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Morgan B.; Martin, David S.; Westby, Christian M.; Stenger, Michael B.; Platts, Steven H.

    2014-01-01

    Carotid, brachial, and tibial arteries reacted differently to HDTBR. Previous studies have not analyzed the mechanical properties of the human brachial or anterior tibial arteries. After slight variations during bed-rest, arterial mechanical properties and IMT returned to pre-bed rest values, with the exception of tibial stiffness and PSE, which continued to be reduced post-bed rest while the DC remained elevated. The tibial artery remodeling was probably due to decreased pressure and volume. Resulting implications for longer duration spaceflight are unclear. Arterial health may be affected by microgravity, as shown by increased thoracic aorta stiffness in other ground based simulations (Aubert).

  18. Baroreflex Sensitivity Decreases During 90-Day Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M. B.; Arzeno, N. M.; Platts, S. H.

    2008-01-01

    Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) decreases during spaceflight and simulated spaceflight (head down bed rest [BR]). However, previous studies have only examined BRS in response to a limited blood pressure (BP) range or to a single sudden change in BP. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine BRS during 90 days of 6deg head-down tilt BR over a broad range of BP perturbations. METHODS: Nineteen normal volunteers (12M, 7F) were tested one day before BR, and then near BR days 30, 60 and 90. BP was pharmacologically altered by continuous infusions of phenylephrine (PE) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Electrocardiogram and continuous BP were collected during 10 min of normal saline (NS), followed by increasing concentrations of PE (10 min each of 0.4, 0.8 and 1.6 micro-g/kg/min). After a 20 min break, NS was infused again for 10 min, followed by increasing concentrations of SNP (10 min each of 0.4, 0.8, 1.2 micro-g/kg/min). Baroreceptor sensitivity was measured as the slope of a sequence of 3 or more beats in which the systolic BP and following R-R interval (RR) both increased or decreased. Spectral heart rate variability (HRV) and mean RR were analyzed using data from only the NS infusions. Two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance was performed to examine the effects of BR and gender. RESULTS: RR decreased (p<0.001) from pre- BR across BR days. High frequency in normalized units, a measure of parasympathetic activity, decreased with BR (p=0.027) and was lower (p=0.046) in men (0.39+/-0.02, mean+/-SEM) than women (0.48+/-0.02). The spontaneous baroreflex slope, our measure of BRS, increased with PE and decreased with SNP across BR (p<0.001). The percentage decrease in BRS from pre- to post-BR appeared to be larger in women (43.6+/-7.0%) than in men (31.3+/-3.9%, p=0.06). CONCLUSION: Parasympathetic activity and baroreflex sensitivity decrease during 90 days of BR, and BRS tends to diminish more in women than in men.

  19. Long Duration Head-Down Tilt Bed Rest Studies: Safety Considerations Regarding Vision Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, Ronita L.; Zanello, S. B.; Yarbough, P. O.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Taibbi, G.; Vizzeri, G.

    2012-01-01

    Visual symptoms reported in astronauts returning from long duration missions in low Earth orbit, including hyperopic shift, choroidal folds, globe flattening and papilledema, are thought to be related to fluid shifts within the body due to microgravity exposure. Because of this possible relation to fluid shifts, safety considerations have been raised regarding the ocular health of head-down tilt (HDT) bed rest subjects. HDT is a widely used ground ]based analog that simulates physiological changes of spaceflight, including fluid shifts. Thus, vision monitoring has been performed in bed rest subjects in order to evaluate the safety of HDT with respect to vision health. Here we report ocular outcomes in 9 healthy subjects (age range: 27-48 years; Male/Female ratio: 8/1) completing bed rest Campaign 11, an integrated, multidisciplinary 70-day 6 degrees HDT bed rest study. Vision examinations were performed on a weekly basis, and consisted of office-based (2 pre- and 2 post-bed rest) and in-bed testing. The experimental design was a repeated measures design, with measurements for both eyes taken for each subject at each planned time point. Findings for the following tests were all reported as normal in each testing session for every subject: modified Amsler grid, red dot test, confrontational visual fields, color vision and fundus photography. Overall, no statistically significant differences were observed for any of the measures, except for both near and far visual acuity, which increased during the course of the study. This difference is not considered clinically relevant as may result from the effect of learning. Intraocular pressure results suggest a small increase at the beginning of the bed rest phase (p=0.059) and lesser increase at post-bed rest with respect to baseline (p=0.046). These preliminary results provide the basis for further analyses that will include correlations between intraocular pressure change pre- and post-bed rest, and optical coherence

  20. The Influence of Roughness and Pyrethroid Formulations on Bed Bug (Cimex lectularius L.) Resting Preferences.

    PubMed

    Hottel, Benjamin A; Pereira, Roberto M; Koehler, Philip G

    2015-01-01

    Two-choice tests were conducted to examine the effect of surface roughness on the resting preference of bed bugs, Cimex lectularius L., on copper, basswood, and acrylic materials. The influence of pyrethroid formulation applications on resting preferences was also evaluated. Bed bugs were given the choice of resting between two sanded halves of each material tested. One half was sanded with a P60 grit sandpaper and the other with a less rough P600 grit sandpaper. A significantly higher proportion of bed bugs chose to rest on the rougher P60 grit sanded half of all materials tested. Pyrethroid applications were made to either the P60 grit half or both halves of acrylic arenas and resting preferences were again assessed. Behavioral responses of bed bugs to pyrethroid formulation applications varied depending on the bed bug strain used and the formulation applied. Bed bugs would still rest on the P60 grit half when Suspend SC formulation (0.06% deltamethrin) was applied; however, an avoidance response was observed from a bed bug strain susceptible to D-Force aerosol formulations (0.06% deltamethrin). The avoidance behavior is likely attributed to one, more than one, or even an interaction of multiple spray constituents and not the active ingredient. PMID:26463196

  1. Comparison of Ocular Outcomes in Two 14-Day Bed Rest Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, R. L.; Zanello, S. B.; Yarbough, P. O.; Taibbi, G.; Vizzeri, G.

    2011-01-01

    Reports of astronauts visual changes raised concern about ocular health during long-duration spaceflight. Some of these findings included hyperopic shifts, choroidal folds, optic disc edema, retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickening, and cotton wool spots. While the etiology remains unknown, hypotheses speculate that hypertension in the brain caused by cephalad fluid shifts during spaceflight is a possible mechanism for these ocular changes. Head-down tilt (HDT) bed rest is a spaceflight analog that induces cephalad fluid shifts. In addition, previous studies of the HDT position demonstrated body fluid shifts associated with changes in intraocular pressure (IOP). For these reasons, vision monitoring of HDT bed rest subjects was implemented for NASA bed rest studies. Subjects selected for these studies were healthy adults (14 males and 5 females). Average age was 37.5 plus or minus 9.1 years, weight was 77.4 plus or minus 11.3 Kg, and height was 173.4 plus or minus 7.2 14 cm. Controlled conditions followed for all NASA bed rest studies were implemented. These conditions included factors such as eating a standardized diet, maintaining a strict sleep wake cycle, and remaining in bed for 24 hours each day. In one study, subjects maintained a horizontal (0 degree) position while in bed and were exercised six days per week with an integrated resistance and aerobic training (iRAT) program. In the other study, subjects were placed at 6 degrees HDT while in bed and did not engage in exercise. All subjects underwent pre- and post bed rest vision testing. While the battery of vision tests for each study was not identical, measures common to both studies will be presented. These measures included IOP and measures that provided an indication of optic disc swelling as derived from optical coherence tomography (OCT) testing: average retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness (millimeters), disc area (square millimeters), rim area (square millimters), and average cup to disc (C

  2. Effects of exercise on fluid exchange and body composition in man during 14-day bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Bernauer, E. M.; Juhos, L. T.; Young, H. L.; Morse, J. T.; Staley, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    A description is presented of an investigation in which body composition, fluid intake, and fluid and electrolyte losses were measured in seven normal, healthy men during three 2-wk bed-rest periods, separated by two 3-wk recovery periods. During bed rest the subjects remained in the horizontal position continuously. During the dietary control periods, body mass decreased significantly with all three regimens, including no exercise, isometric exercise, and isotonic excercise. During bed rest, body mass was essentially unchanged with no exercise, but decreased significantly with isotonic and isometric exercise. With one exception, there were no statistically significant changes in body density, lean body mass, or body fat content by the end of each of the three bed-rest periods.

  3. Plasma lactic dehydrogenase activities in men during bed rest with exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Juhos, L. T.; Young, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    Peak oxygen uptake and the activity of lactic dehydrogenase (LDH-T) and its five isoenzymes were measured by spectrophotometer in seven men before, during, and after bed rest and exercise training. Exercise training consisted of isometric leg exercises of 250 kcal/hr for a period of one hour per day. It is found that LDH-T was reduced by 0.05 percent in all three regimens by day 10 of bed rest, and that the decrease occurred at different rates. The earliest reduction in LDH-T activity in the no-exercise regimen was associated with a decrease in peak oxygen uptake of 12.3 percent. It is concluded that isometric (aerobic) muscular strength training appear to maintain skeletal muscle integrity better during bed rest than isotonic exercise training. Reduced hydrostatic pressure during bed rest, however, ultimately counteracts the effects of both moderate isometric and isotonic exercise training, and may result in decreased LDH-T activity.

  4. NASA'S Standard Measures During Bed Rest: Adaptations in the Cardiovascular System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Stuart M. C.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Martin, David S.; Cromwell, Roni L.; Platts, Steven H.; Stenger, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Bed rest is a well-accepted analog of space flight that has been used extensively to investigate physiological adaptations in a larger number of subjects in a shorter amount of time than can be studied with space flight and without the confounding effects associated with normal mission operations. However, comparison across studies of different bed rest durations, between sexes, and between various countermeasure protocols have been hampered by dissimilarities in bed rest conditions, measurement protocols, and testing schedules. To address these concerns, NASA instituted standard bed rest conditions and standard measures for all physiological disciplines participating in studies conducted at the Flight Analogs Research Unit (FARU) at the University of Texas-Medical Branch. Investigators for individual studies employed their own targeted study protocols to address specific hypothesis-driven questions, but standard measures tests were conducted within these studies on a non-interference basis to maximize data availability while reducing the need to implement multiple bed rest studies to understand the effects of a specific countermeasure. When possible, bed rest standard measures protocols were similar to tests nominally used for medically-required measures or research protocols conducted before and after Space Shuttle and International Space Station missions. Specifically, bed rest standard measures for the cardiovascular system implemented before, during, and after bed rest at the FARU included plasma volume (carbon monoxide rebreathing), cardiac mass and function (2D, 3D and Doppler echocardiography), and orthostatic tolerance testing (15- or 30-minutes of 80 degree head-up tilt). Results to-date indicate that when countermeasures are not employed, plasma volume decreases and the incidence of presyncope during head-up tilt is more frequent even after short-duration bed rest while reductions in cardiac function and mass are progressive as bed rest duration

  5. Serum sclerostin and DKK1 in relation to exercise against bone loss in experimental bed rest.

    PubMed

    Belavý, Daniel L; Baecker, Natalie; Armbrecht, Gabriele; Beller, Gisela; Buehlmeier, Judith; Frings-Meuthen, Petra; Rittweger, Jörn; Roth, Heinz J; Heer, Martina; Felsenberg, Dieter

    2016-05-01

    The impact of effective exercise against bone loss during experimental bed rest appears to be associated with increases in bone formation rather than reductions of bone resorption. Sclerostin and dickkopf-1 are important inhibitors of osteoblast activity. We hypothesized that exercise in bed rest would prevent increases in sclerostin and dickkopf-1. Twenty-four male subjects performed resistive vibration exercise (RVE; n = 7), resistive exercise only (RE; n = 8), or no exercise (control n = 9) during 60 days of bed rest (2nd Berlin BedRest Study). We measured serum levels of BAP, CTX-I, iPTH, calcium, sclerostin, and dickkopf-1 at 16 time-points during and up to 1 year after bed rest. In inactive control, after an initial increase in both BAP and CTX-I, sclerostin increased. BAP then returned to baseline levels, and CTX-I continued to increase. In RVE and RE, BAP increased more than control in bed rest (p ≤ 0.029). Increases of CTX-I in RE and RVE did not differ significantly to inactive control. RE may have attenuated increases in sclerostin and dickkopf-1, but this was not statistically significant. In RVE there was no evidence for any impact on sclerostin and dickkopf-1 changes. Long-term recovery of bone was also measured and 6-24 months after bed rest, and proximal femur bone mineral content was still greater in RVE than control (p = 0.01). The results, while showing that exercise against bone loss in experimental bed rest results in greater bone formation, could not provide evidence that exercise impeded the rise in serum sclerostin and dickkopf-1 levels. PMID:26056021

  6. Effects of head-down-tilt bed rest on cerebral hemodynamics during orthostatic stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, R.; Zuckerman, J. H.; Pawelczyk, J. A.; Levine, B. D.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Our aim was to determine whether the adaptation to simulated microgravity (microG) impairs regulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) during orthostatic stress and contributes to orthostatic intolerance. Twelve healthy subjects (aged 24 +/- 5 yr) underwent 2 wk of -6 degrees head-down-tilt (HDT) bed rest to simulate hemodynamic changes that occur when humans are exposed to microG. CBF velocity in the middle cerebral artery (transcranial Doppler), blood pressure, cardiac output (acetylene rebreathing), and forearm blood flow were measured at each level of a ramped protocol of lower body negative pressure (LBNP; -15, -30, and -40 mmHg x 5 min, -50 mmHg x 3 min, then -10 mmHg every 3 min to presyncope) before and after bed rest. Orthostatic tolerance was assessed by using the cumulative stress index (CSI; mmHg x minutes) for the LBNP protocol. After bed rest, each individual's orthostatic tolerance was reduced, with the group CSI decreased by 24% associated with greater decreases in cardiac output and greater increases in systemic vascular resistance at each level of LBNP. Before bed rest, mean CBF velocity decreased by 14, 10, and 45% at -40 mmHg, -50 mmHg, and maximal LBNP, respectively. After bed rest, mean velocity decreased by 16% at -30 mmHg and by 21, 35, and 39% at -40 mmHg, -50 mmHg, and maximal LBNP, respectively. Compared with pre-bed rest, post-bed-rest mean velocity was less by 11, 10, and 21% at -30, -40, and -50 mmHg, respectively. However, there was no significant difference at maximal LBNP. We conclude that cerebral autoregulation during orthostatic stress is impaired by adaptation to simulated microG as evidenced by an earlier and greater fall in CBF velocity during LBNP. We speculate that impairment of cerebral autoregulation may contribute to the reduced orthostatic tolerance after bed rest.

  7. Exercise Effects on the Course of Gray Matter Changes Over 70 Days of Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppelmans, V.; Ploutz-Snyder, L.; DeDios, Y. E.; Wood, S. J.; Reuter-Lorenz, P. A.; Kofman, I.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Seidler, R. D.

    2014-01-01

    Long duration spaceflight affects posture control, locomotion, and manual control. The microgravity environment is an important causal factor for spaceflight induced sensorimotor changes through direct effects on peripheral changes that result from reduced vestibular stimulation and body unloading. Effects of microgravity on sensorimotor function have been investigated on earth using bed rest studies. Long duration bed rest serves as a space-flight analogue because it mimics microgravity in body unloading and bodily fluid shifts. It has been hypothesized that the cephalad fluid shift that has been observed in microgravity could potentially affect central nervous system function and structure, and thereby indirectly affect sensorimotor or cognitive functioning. Preliminary results of one of our ongoing studies indeed showed that 70 days of long duration head down-tilt bed rest results in focal changes in gray matter volume from pre-bed rest to various time points during bed rest. These gray matter changes that could reflect fluid shifts as well as neuroplasticity were related to decrements in motor skills such as maintenance of equilibrium. In consideration of the health and performance of crewmembers both inand post-flight we are currently conducting a study that investigates the potential preventive effects of exercise on gray matter and motor performance changes that we observed over the course of bed rest. Numerous studies have shown beneficial effects of aerobic exercise on brain structure and cognitive performance in healthy and demented subjects over a large age range. We therefore hypothesized that an exercise intervention in bed rest could potentially mitigate or prevent the effects of bed rest on the central nervous system. Here we present preliminary outcomes of our study.

  8. Role of skin blood flow and sweating rate in exercise thermoregulation after bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Stuart M C.; Williams, W. Jon; Schneider, Suzanne M.

    2002-01-01

    Two potential mechanisms, reduced skin blood flow (SBF) and sweating rate (SR), may be responsible for elevated intestinal temperature (T(in)) during exercise after bed rest and spaceflight. Seven men underwent 13 days of 6 degrees head-down bed rest. Pre- and post-bed rest, subjects completed supine submaximal cycle ergometry (20 min at 40% and 20 min at 65% of pre-bed rest supine peak exercise capacity) in a thermoneutral room. After bed rest, T(in) was elevated at rest (+0.31 +/- 0.12 degrees C) and at the end of exercise (+0.33 +/- 0.07 degrees C). Percent increase in SBF during exercise was less after bed rest (211 +/- 53 vs. 96 +/- 31%; P < or = 0.05), SBF/T(in) threshold was greater (37.09 +/- 0.16 vs. 37.33 +/- 0.13 degrees C; P < or = 0.05), and slope of SBF/T(in) tended to be reduced (536 +/- 184 vs. 201 +/- 46%/ degrees C; P = 0.08). SR/T(in) threshold was delayed (37.06 +/- 0.11 vs. 37.34 +/- 0.06 degrees C; P < or = 0.05), but the slope of SR/T(in) (3.45 +/- 1.22 vs. 2.58 +/- 0.71 mg x min-1 x cm-2 x degrees C-1) and total sweat loss (0.42 +/- 0.06 vs. 0.44 +/- 0.08 kg) were not changed. The higher resting and exercise T(in) and delayed onset of SBF and SR suggest a centrally mediated elevation in the thermoregulatory set point during bed rest exposure.

  9. Supine lower body negative pressure exercise during bed rest maintains upright exercise capacity.

    PubMed

    Watenpaugh, D E; Ballard, R E; Schneider, S M; Lee, S M; Ertl, A C; William, J M; Boda, W L; Hutchinson, K J; Hargens, A R

    2000-07-01

    Bed rest and spaceflight reduce exercise fitness. Supine lower body negative pressure (LBNP) treadmill exercise provides integrated cardiovascular and musculoskeletal stimulation similar to that imposed by upright exercise in Earth gravity. We hypothesized that 40 min of supine exercise per day in a LBNP chamber at 1.0-1.2 body wt (58 +/- 2 mmHg LBNP) maintains aerobic fitness and sprint speed during 15 days of 6 degrees head-down bed rest (simulated microgravity). Seven male subjects underwent two such bed-rest studies in random order: one as a control study (no exercise) and one with daily supine LBNP treadmill exercise. After controlled bed-rest, time to exhaustion during an upright treadmill exercise test decreased 10%, peak oxygen consumption during the test decreased 14%, and sprint speed decreased 16% (all P < 0.05). Supine LBNP exercise during bed rest maintained all the above variables at pre-bed-rest levels. Our findings support further evaluation of LBNP exercise as a countermeasure against long-term microgravity-induced deconditioning. PMID:10904055

  10. Bed Rest Promotes Reductions in Walking Speed, Functional Parameters, and Aerobic Fitness in Older, Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hays, Nicholas P.; Williams, Rick H.; Wolfe, Robert R.; Evans, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Context. The exact relationship between the bed rest-induced loss of skeletal muscle and reductions in muscle strength and physical performance in the older individuals is still unclear. Objective. We examined the effect of 10 days of bed rest on changes in regional body composition, muscle strength, and functional status, and the relationship between these variables in older individuals. Design, Participants, and Intervention. Regional body composition was measured using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. We also determined changes in leg strength and several indices of functional status, including walking speed. Results. Body weight, body mass index, and total and lower extremity lean mass decreased with bed rest. There were also significant reductions in knee extension one repetition maximum, isometric knee extension, knee extension 60° concentric, stair ascent time, stair ascent power, stair descent time, VO2 max, floor transfer test, 5-minute walk time, and chair stand. The overall change in total and lower extremity lean mass was also directly related to bed rest-induced reductions in one repetition maximum knee extension. Conclusions. Bed rest promoted overall declines in muscle mass, muscle strength, and physical function in older individuals. The changes in lean tissue were closely correlated with the bed rest-induced decline of muscle strength. PMID:25122628

  11. Evaluation of a Reverse Gradient Garment for prevention of bed-rest deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandler, H.; Dolkas, D.; Newsom, B.; Webb, P.; Annis, J.; Pace, N.; Grunbaum, B. W.

    1983-01-01

    A Reverse Gradient Garment (RGG) was used to intermittently induce venous pooling in the extremities of a magnitude similar to that seen in going from a lying to standing position during the course of a 15-d period of horizontal bed rest. Venous pooling failed to improve bed-rest-induced losses in +2.5 Gz and +3.0 Gz centrifugation tolerance or to prevent increased heart-rate responses to lower-body negative pressure (LBNP). Four subjects served as controls, four were treated. Tests during the 7-d recovery period showed fluid/electrolyte and body composition values to have returned to pre-bed-rest levels with continued depression of acceleration tolerance times (56% decreased at +2.5 Gz and 74% decreased at +3.0 Gz compared to pre-bed-rest levels) and exaggerated blood insulin response on glucose tolerance testing (blood insulin for treated group increased 95% at 1 h before bed rest and 465% during recovery). This study demonstrates that the physiologic changes after bed rest persist for significant periods of time. Acceleration tolerance time proved to be a sensitive test for the deconditioning process.

  12. Upright exercise or supine lower body negative pressure exercise maintains exercise responses after bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. M.; Bennett, B. S.; Hargens, A. R.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Ballard, R. E.; Murthy, G.; Ford, S. R.; Fortney, S. M.

    1997-01-01

    Adaptation to bed rest or space flight is accompanied by an impaired ability to exercise in an upright position. We hypothesized that a daily, 30-min bout of intense, interval exercise in upright posture or supine against lower body negative pressure (LBNP) would maintain upright exercise heart rate and respiratory responses after bed rest. Twenty-four men (31 +/- 3 yr) underwent 5 d of 6 degree head-down tilt: eight performed no exercise (CON), eight performed upright treadmill exercise (UPex), and eight performed supine treadmill exercise against LBNP at -51.3 +/- 0.4 mm Hg (LBNPex). Submaximal treadmill exercise responses (56, 74, and 85% of VO2peak) were measured pre- and post-bed rest. In CON, submaximal heart rate, respiratory exchange ratio, and ventilation were significantly greater (P < or = 0.05) after bed rest. In UPex and LBNPex, submaximal exercise responses were similar pre- and post-bed rest. Our results indicate that a daily 30-min bout of intense, interval upright exercise training or supine exercise training against LBNP is sufficient to maintain upright exercise responses after 5 d of bed rest. These results may have important implications for the development of exercise countermeasures during space flight.

  13. Cardiorespiratory responses to exercise after bed rest in men and women

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Bernauer, E. M.; Stremel, R. W.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare cardiorespiratory responses of men and women to submaximal and maximal workloads before and after bed rest (BR). Fifteen male college students (19-23 yr) and eight female nurses (23-34 yr) underwent 14 d and 17 d, respectively, of bed rest. The maximal work capacity test was performed in the supine position on a bicycle ergometer just before and immediately after bed rest. Compared with pre-BR values, after bed rest the maximal ventilatory volume was essentially unchanged in the men (+1.8%) and women (+2.3%), but maximal heart rate was elevated from 185 to 193 b/min (+4.3%) in the men and from 181 to 187 b/min (3.3%) in the women. Mean corpuscular volume was unchanged in both groups pre- and post-bed rest. It is concluded that the proportional deterioration in maximal VO2 following prolonged bed rest was essentially the same in young men and women.

  14. Comparison of Ocular Outcomes in Two 14-Day Bed Rest Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, Ronita L.; Zanello, S. B.; Yarbough, P. O.; Tabbi, G.; Vizzeri, G.

    2012-01-01

    Reports of astronauts' visual changes have raised concern about ocular health during long-duration spaceflight. Some of these findings include globe flattening with hyperopic shifts, choroidal folds, optic disc edema, retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickening, and cotton wool spots. While the etiology remains unknown, it is hypothesized that, in predisposed individuals, hypertension in the brain may follow cephalad fluid shifts during spaceflight. This possible mechanism of ocular changes may also apply to analogous cases of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) or pseudotumor cerebri on Earth patients. Head-down t ilt (HDT) bed rest is a spaceflight analog that induces cephalad fluid shifts. Previous studies of the HDT position demonstrated body fluid shifts associated with changes in intraocular pressure (IOP) but the conditions of bed rest varied among experiments, making it difficult to compare data and draw conclusions. For these reasons, vision evaluation of bed rest subjects was implemented for NASA bed rest studies since 2010, in an attempt to monitor vision health in subjects subjected to bed rest. Vision monitoring is thus currently performed in all NASA-conducted bed rest campaigns

  15. The Effects of Long Duration Bed Rest as a Spaceflight Analogue on Resting State Sensorimotor Network Functional Connectivity and Neurocognitive Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassady, K.; Koppelmans, V.; Yuan, P.; Cooke, K.; De Dios, Y.; Stepanyan, V.; Szecsy, D.; Gadd, N.; Wood, S.; Reuter-Lorenz, P.; Castenada, R. Riascos; Kofman, I.; Bloomberg, J.; Mulavara, A.; Seidler, R.

    2015-01-01

    Long duration spaceflight has been associated with detrimental alterations in human sensorimotor systems and neurocognitive performance. Prolonged exposure to a head-down tilt position during long duration bed rest can resemble several effects of the microgravity environment such as reduced sensory inputs, body unloading and increased cephalic fluid distribution. The question of whether microgravity affects other central nervous system functions such as brain functional connectivity and its relationship with neurocognitive performance is largely unknown, but of potential importance to the health and performance of astronauts both during and post-flight. The aims of the present study are 1) to identify changes in sensorimotor resting state functional connectivity that occur with extended bed rest exposure, and to characterize their recovery time course; 2) to evaluate how these neural changes correlate with neurocognitive performance. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) data were collected from 17 male participants. The data were acquired through the NASA bed rest facility, located at the University of Texas Medical Branch (Galveston, TX). Participants remained in bed with their heads tilted down six degrees below their feet for 70 consecutive days. RsfMRI data were obtained at seven time points: 7 and 12 days before bed rest; 7, 50, and 65 days during bed rest; and 7 and 12 days after bed rest. Functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) analysis was performed to measure the connectivity of sensorimotor networks in the brain before, during, and post-bed rest. We found a decrease in left putamen connectivity with the pre- and post-central gyri from pre bed rest to the last day in bed rest. In addition, vestibular cortex connectivity with the posterior cingulate cortex decreased from pre to post bed rest. Furthermore, connectivity between cerebellar right superior posterior fissure and other cerebellar regions decreased from

  16. Effects of Bed Rest on Conduction Velocity of the Triceps Surae Stretch Reflex and Postural Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.; Wood, S. J.; Cerisano, J. M.; Kofman, I. S.; Fisher, E. A.; Esteves, J. T.; Taylor, L. C.; DeDios, Y. E.; Harm, D. L.

    2011-01-01

    Despite rigorous exercise and nutritional management during space missions, astronauts returning from microgravity exhibit neuromuscular deficits and a significant loss in muscle mass in the postural muscles of the lower leg. Similar changes in the postural muscles occur in subjects participating in long-duration bed rest studies. These adaptive muscle changes manifest as a reduction in reflex conduction velocity during head-down bed rest. Because the stretch reflex encompasses both the peripheral (muscle spindle and nerve axon) and central (spinal synapse) components involved in adaptation to calf muscle unloading, it may be used to provide feedback on the general condition of neuromuscular function, and might be used to evaluate the effectiveness of countermeasures aimed at preserving muscle mass and function during periods of unloading. Stretch reflexes were measured on 18 control subjects who spent 60 to 90 days in continuous 6 deg head-down bed rest. Using a motorized system capable of rotating the foot around the ankle joint (dorsiflexion) through an angle of 10 degrees at a peak velocity of about 250 deg/sec, a stretch reflex was recorded from the subject's left triceps surae muscle group. Using surface electromyography, about 300 reflex responses were obtained and ensemble-averaged on 3 separate days before bed rest, 3 to 4 times in bed, and 3 times after bed rest. The averaged responses for each test day were examined for reflex latency and conduction velocity (CV) across gender. Computerized posturography was also conducted on these same subjects before and after bed rest as part of the standard measures. Peak-to-peak sway was measured during Sensory Organization Tests (SOTs) to evaluate changes in the ability to effectively use or suppress visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive information for postural control. Although no gender differences were found, a significant increase in reflex latency and a significant decrease in CV were observed during the bed

  17. Joint US/USSR study: Comparison of effects of horizontal and head-down bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandler, Harold; Grigoriev, Anatoli I.

    1990-01-01

    An account is given of the results of the first joint U.S./U.S.S.R. bed rest study. The study was accomplished in two parts: A soviet part (May to June 1979) and an American part (July to August 1979). Both studies were conducted under identical conditions and provided a basis for comparison of physiologic reactions and standardizing procedures and methods. Each experiment consisted of three periods: 14 days of pre-bed rest control, 7 days of bed rest, and a 10 to 14 day recovery period. Ten males participated in each study, with five subjects experiencing horizontal bed rest and five subjects a -6 deg head-down body position. Biochemical and hormonal measurements were made of blood and urine, with particular attention to electrolyte metabolism and kidney function; cardio-pulmonary changes at rest and exercise; influence of Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP); and incremental exercise using a bicyle ergometer while supine and sitting. Expected moderate changes were noted to occur for various physiologic parameters. Clinical evidence pointed to the fact that head-down bed rest when compared to horizontal conditions more closely matched the conditions seen after manned spaceflight. For the most part, statistically significant differences between the two body positions were not observed.

  18. Induced venous pooling and cardiorespiratory responses to exercise after bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Sandler, H.; Webb, P.; Annis, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    Venous pooling induced by a specially constructed garment is investigated as a possible means for reversing the reduction in maximal oxygen uptake regularly observed following bed rest. Experiments involved a 15-day period of bed rest during which four healthy male subjects, while remaining recumbent in bed, received daily 210-min venous pooling treatments from a reverse gradient garment supplying counterpressure to the torso. Results of exercise testing indicate that while maximal oxygen uptake endurance time and plasma volume were reduced and maximal heart rate increased after bed rest in the control group, those parameters remained essentially unchanged for the group undergoing venous pooling treatment. Results demonstrate the importance of fluid shifts and venous pooling within the cardiovascular system in addition to physical activity to the maintenance of cardiovascular conditioning.

  19. The effect of supplemental oral phosphate on the bone mineral changes during prolonged bed rest

    PubMed Central

    Hulley, Stephen B.; Vogel, John M.; Donaldson, Charles L.; Bayers, Jon H.; Friedman, Ronald J.; Rosen, Sheldon N.

    1971-01-01

    Five healthy young men were studied during 24-30 wk of continuous bed rest. During the first 12 wk of bed rest, untreated subjects increased calcium excretion in the urine by 109 mg/day and in the feces by 147 mg/day. The rate of total body calcium loss was 0.5-0.7% per month. Losses of central calcaneus mineral, assessed by gamma ray transmission scanning, occurred at a tenfold higher rate, whereas the mineral content of the radius did not change. Changes in phosphorus balance resembled the calcium pattern, and increased excretion of nitrogen and hydroxyproline also occurred during bed rest. Upon reambulation, the subjects' calcium balance became positive in 1 month and recovery of their calcaneus mineral was complete within 10-20 wk. Treatment with potassium phosphate supplements (1327 mg P/day) entirely prevented the hypercalciuria of bed rest, but fecal calcium tended to increase. During the first 12 wk, calcium balance was slightly less negative (mean - 193 mg/day) than during bed rest without added phosphate (mean - 267 mg/day). This effect was not seen during the second 12 wk of bed rest. The patterns of magnesium excretion were similar to those of calcium. Fecal and urinary phosphorus excretions were doubled, and phosphorus balance became positive (+ 113 mg/day). Mineral loss from the central calcaneus was similar to that of untreated subjects. It is concluded that this form of phosphate supplementation reduces urinary calcium excretion but does not prevent bone loss during bed rest. PMID:5129304

  20. Long-Duration Space Flight and Bed Rest Effects on Testosterone and Other Steroids

    PubMed Central

    Heer, Martina; Wang, Zuwei; Huntoon, Carolyn L.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Limited data suggest that testosterone is decreased during space flight, which could contribute to bone and muscle loss. Objective: The main objective was to assess testosterone and hormone status in long- and short-duration space flight and bed rest environments and to determine relationships with other physiological systems, including bone and muscle. Design: Blood and urine samples were collected before, during, and after long-duration space flight. Samples were also collected before and after 12- to 14-d missions and from participants in 30- to 90-d bed rest studies. Setting: Space flight studies were conducted on the International Space Station and before and after Space Shuttle missions. Bed rest studies were conducted in a clinical research center setting. Data from Skylab missions are also presented. Participants: All of the participants were male, and they included 15 long-duration and nine short-duration mission crew members and 30 bed rest subjects. Main Outcome Measures: Serum total, free, and bioavailable testosterone were measured along with serum and urinary cortisol, serum dehydroepiandrosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, and SHBG. Results: Total, free, and bioavailable testosterone was not changed during long-duration space flight but were decreased (P < 0.01) on landing day after these flights and after short-duration space flight. There were no changes in other hormones measured. Testosterone concentrations dropped before and soon after bed rest, but bed rest itself had no effect on testosterone. Conclusions: There was no evidence for decrements in testosterone during long-duration space flight or bed rest. PMID:22049169

  1. Effects of artificial gravity during bed rest on bone metabolism in humans

    PubMed Central

    Smith, S. M.; Zwart, S. R.; Heer, M. A.; Baecker, N.; Evans, H. J.; Feiveson, A. H.; Shackelford, L. C.; LeBlanc, A. D.

    2009-01-01

    We report results from a study designed to explore the utility of artificial gravity (AG) as a countermeasure to bone loss induced by microgravity simulation. After baseline testing, 15 male subjects underwent 21 days of 6° head-down bed rest to simulate the deconditioning associated with spaceflight. Eight of the subjects underwent 1 h of centrifugation (AG; 1 Gz at the heart, 2.5 Gz at the feet) each day for 21 days, whereas seven of the subjects served as untreated controls (Con). Blood and urine were collected before, during, and after bed rest for bone marker determinations. Bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content (BMC) were determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and peripheral quantitative computerized tomography before and after bed rest. Urinary excretion of bone resorption markers increased during bed rest, but the AG and Con groups did not differ significantly. The same was true for serum C-telopeptide. During bed rest, bone alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and total ALP tended to be lower in the AG group (P = 0.08, P = 0.09). Neither BMC nor BMD changed significantly from the pre-bed rest period in AG or Con groups, and the two groups were not significantly different. However, when AG and Con data were combined, there was a significant (P < 0.05) effect of time for whole body total BMC and total hip and trochanter BMD. These data failed to demonstrate efficacy of this AG prescription to prevent the changes in bone metabolism observed during 3 wk of bed rest. PMID:19074572

  2. Effects of 21 days of bed rest, with or without artificial gravity, on nutritional status of humans

    PubMed Central

    Zwart, S. R.; Crawford, G. E.; Gillman, P. L.; Kala, G.; Rodgers, A. S.; Rogers, A.; Inniss, A. M.; Rice, B. L.; Ericson, K.; Coburn, S.; Bourbeau, Y.; Hudson, E.; Mathew, G.; DeKerlegand, D. E.; Sams, C. F.; Heer, M. A.; Paloski, W. H.; Smith, S. M.

    2009-01-01

    Spaceflight and bed rest models of microgravity have profound effects on physiological systems, including the cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, and immune systems. These effects can be exacerbated by suboptimal nutrient status, and therefore it is critical to monitor nutritional status when evaluating countermeasures to mitigate negative effects of spaceflight. As part of a larger study to investigate the usefulness of artificial gravity as a countermeasure for musculoskeletal and cardiovascular deficits during bed rest, we tested the hypothesis that artificial gravity would have an effect on some aspects of nutritional status. Dietary intake was recorded daily before, during, and after 21 days of bed rest with artificial gravity (n = 8) or bed rest alone (n = 7). We examined body composition, hematology, general blood chemistry, markers of oxidative damage, and blood levels of selected vitamins and minerals before, during, and after the bed rest period. Several indicators of vitamin status changed in response to diet changes: serum α- and γ-tocopherol and urinary 4-pyridoxic acid decreased (P < 0.001) and plasma β-carotene increased (P < 0.001) in both groups during bed rest compared with before bed rest. A decrease in hematocrit (P < 0.001) after bed rest was accompanied by a decrease in transferrin (P < 0.001), but transferrin receptors were not changed. These data provide evidence that artificial gravity itself does not negatively affect nutritional status during bed rest. Likewise, artificial gravity has no protective effect on nutritional status during bed rest. PMID:19074571

  3. Body Unloading Associated with Space Flight and Bed-rest Impacts Functional Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Ballard, K. L.; Batson, C. D.; Buxton, R. E.; Feiveson, A. H.; Kofman, I. S.; Lee, S. M. C.; Miller, C. A.; Mulavara, A. P.; Peters, B. T.; Phillips, T.; Platts, S. H.; Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.; Reschke, M. F.; Ryder, J. W.; Stenger, M. B.; Taylor, L. C.; Wood, S. J.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the Functional Task Test study is to determine the effects of space flight on functional tests that are representative of high priority exploration mission tasks and to identify the key underlying physiological factors that contribute to decrements in performance. Ultimately this information will be used to assess performance risks and inform the design of countermeasures for exploration class missions. We are currently conducting studies on both ISS crewmembers and on subjects experiencing 70 days of 6 degrees head-down bed-rest as an analog for space flight. Bed-rest provides the opportunity for us to investigate the role of prolonged axial body unloading in isolation from the other physiological effects produced by exposure to the microgravity environment of space flight. This allows us to parse out the contribution of the body unloading component on functional performance. In this on-going study both ISS crewmembers and bed-rest subjects were tested using an interdisciplinary protocol that evaluated functional performance and related physiological changes before and after 6 months in space and 70 days of 6? head-down bed-rest, respectively. Functional tests included ladder climbing, hatch opening, jump down, manual manipulation of objects and tool use, seat egress and obstacle avoidance, recovery from a fall, and object translation tasks. Crewmembers were tested three times before flight, and on 1, 6 and 30 days after landing. Bed-rest subjects were tested three times before bed-rest and immediately after getting up from bed-rest as well as 1, 6 and 12 days after reambulation. A comparison of bed-rest and space flight data showed a significant concordance in performance changes across all functional tests. Tasks requiring a greater demand for dynamic control of postural equilibrium (i.e. fall recovery, seat egress/obstacle avoidance during walking, object translation, jump down) showed the greatest decrement in performance. Functional tests with

  4. Vestibular and Somatosensory Covergence in Postural Equilibrium Control: Insights from Spaceflight and Bed Rest Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulavara, A. P.; Batson, C. D.; Buxton, R. E.; Feiveson, A. H.; Kofman, I. S.; Lee, S. M. C.; Miller, C. A.; Peters, B. T.; Phillips, T.; Platts, S. H.; Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.; Reschke, M. F.; Ryder, J. W.; Stenger, M. B.; Taylor, L. C.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the Functional Task Test study is to determine the effects of space flight on functional tests that are representative of high priority exploration mission tasks and to identify the key underlying physiological factors that contribute to decrements in performance. We are currently conducting studies on both International Space Station (ISS) astronauts experiencing up to 6 months of microgravity and subjects experiencing 70 days of 6??head-down bed-rest as an analog for space flight. Bed-rest provides the opportunity for us to investigate the role of prolonged axial body unloading in isolation from the other physiological effects produced by exposure to the microgravity environment of space flight. This allows us to parse out the contribution of the body unloading somatosensory component on functional performance. Both ISS crewmembers and bed-rest subjects were tested using a protocol that evaluated functional performance along with tests of postural and locomotor control before and after space flight and bed-rest, respectively. Functional tests included ladder climbing, hatch opening, jump down, manual manipulation of objects and tool use, seat egress and obstacle avoidance, recovery from a fall, and object translation tasks. Astronauts were tested three times before flight, and on 1, 6, and 30 days after landing. Bed-rest subjects were tested three times before bed-rest and immediately after getting up from bed-rest as well as 1, 6, and 12 days after re-ambulation. A comparison of bed-rest and space flight data showed a significant concordance in performance changes across all functional tests. Tasks requiring a greater demand for dynamic control of postural equilibrium (i.e. fall recovery, seat egress/obstacle avoidance during walking, object translation, jump down) showed the greatest decrement in performance. Functional tests with reduced requirements for postural stability showed less reduction in performance. Results indicate that body unloading

  5. Systematic reviews of bed rest and advice to stay active for acute low back pain.

    PubMed Central

    Waddell, G; Feder, G; Lewis, M

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the United Kingdom (UK), 9% of adults consult their doctor annually with back pain. The treatment recommendations are based on orthopaedic teaching, but the current management is causing increasing dissatisfaction. Many general practitioners (GPs) are confused about what constitutes effective advice. AIM: To review all randomized controlled trials of bed rest and of medical advice to stay active for acute back pain. METHOD: A systematic review based on a search of MEDLINE and EMBASE from 1966 to April 1996 with complete citation tracking for randomized controlled trials of bed rest or medical advice to stay active and continue ordinary daily activities. The inclusion criteria were: primary care setting, patients with low back pain of up to 3 months duration, and patient-centred outcomes (rate of recovery from the acute attack, relief of pain, restoration of function, satisfaction with treatment, days off work and return to work, development of chronic pain and disability, recurrent attacks, and further health care use). RESULTS: Ten trials of bed rest and eight trials of advice to stay active were identified. Consistent findings showed that bed rest is not an effective treatment for acute low back pain but may delay recovery. Advice to stay active and to continue ordinary activities results in a faster return to work, less chronic disability, and fewer recurrent problems. CONCLUSION: A simple but fundamental change from the traditional prescription of bed rest to positive advice about staying active could improve clinical outcomes and reduce the personal and social impact of back pain. PMID:9474831

  6. Attenuation of the protein wasting associated with bed rest by branched-chain amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.; Schluter, M. D.; Leskiw, M. J.; Boden, G.

    1999-01-01

    Bed rest is generally accepted as being an appropriate ground-based model for human spaceflight. The objectives of this study were to test the hypothesis that increasing the amount of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) in the diet could attenuate the protein loss associated with bed rest. Nineteen healthy subjects were randomized into two groups according to diet. During the 6 d of bed rest, the diets were supplemented with either 30 mmol/d each of three non-essential amino acids, glycine, serine, and alanine (control group), or with 30 mmol/d each of the BCAAs, leucine, isoleucine, and valine (BCAA group). Nutrition was supplied as a commercially available defined formula diet at a rate of 1.3 x REE. Nitrogen (N) balance and urinary 3-MeH excretion were determined for the 6 d. In our results, the urine-based estimate of N balance was 22.2 +/- 14.4 (n = 9) mg N.kg-1.d-1 and 60.5 +/- 10.1 mg (n = 8) N.kg-1.d-1 for the control and BCAA-supplemented groups, respectively (P < 0.05). Urinary 3-MeH excretion was unchanged in both groups with bed rest. We conclude that BCAA supplementation attenuates the N loss during short-term bed rest.

  7. Zinc, copper, and nitrogen balances during bed rest and fluoride supplementation in healthy adult males

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krebs, J. M.; Schneider, V. S.; LeBlanc, A. D.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of bed rest and fluoride supplementation on zinc, copper, and nitrogen balances and Zn and Cu serum levels were measured in 15 healthy males. Subjects aged 19-54 y remained on a metabolic research ward for 10 wk. During weeks 1-5, subjects were ambulatory. During wks 6-10 they remained in continuous bed rest. During weeks 3-10 nine subjects received 10 or 20 mg F/d as sodium fluoride. Daily urine and weekly fecal composites were made and biweekly fasting blood samples were taken. Dietary intakes were 1.40 +/- 0.17 mg Cu/d (22.0 +/- 2.7 mumol Cu/d), 10.82 +/- 0.49 mg Zn/d (165.6 +/- 7.6 mumol Zn/d), and 14.27 +/- 0.23 g N/d (1019 +/- 16 mmol N/d). Bed rest increased urinary Zn and N excretions and fecal Zn excretions and decreased Zn balance (p less than 0.05) whereas Cu balance was unchanged. During bed rest, F supplementation increased Zn and N balances compared with untreated control subjects (p less than 0.05). These results are compatible with bone and muscle atrophy during bed rest and increased bone formation with F supplementation.

  8. Changes in intervertebral disc cross-sectional area with bed rest and space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeBlanc, A. D.; Evans, H. J.; Schneider, V. S.; Wendt, R. E. 3rd; Hedrick, T. D.

    1994-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN. We measured the cross-sectional area of the intervertebral discs of normal volunteers after an overnight rest; before, during, and after 5 or 17 weeks of bed rest; and before and after 8 days of weightlessness. OBJECTIVES. This study sought to determine the degree of expansion of the lumbar discs resulting from bed rest and space flight. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA. Weightlessness and bed rest, an analog for weightlessness, reduce the mechanical loading on the musculoskeletal system. When unloaded, intervertebral discs will expand, increasing the nutritional diffusion distance and altering the mechanical properties of the spine. METHODS. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure the cross-sectional area and transverse relaxation time (T2) of the intervertebral discs. RESULTS. Overnight or longer bed rest causes expansion of the disc area, which reaches an equilibrium value of about 22% (range 10-40%) above baseline within 4 days. Increases in disc area were associated with modest increases in disc T2. During bed rest, disc height increased approximately 1 mm, about one-half of previous estimates based on body height measurements. After 5 weeks of bed rest, disc area returned to baseline within a few days of ambulation, whereas after 17 weeks, disc area remained above baseline 6 weeks after reambulation. After 8 days of weightlessness, T2, disc area, and lumbar length were not significantly different from baseline values 24 hours after landing. CONCLUSIONS. Significant adaptive changes in the intervertebral discs can be expected during weightlessness. These changes, which are rapidly reversible after short-duration flights, may be an important factor during and after long-duration missions.

  9. Bed rest suppresses bioassayable growth hormone release in response to muscle activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCall, G. E.; Goulet, C.; Grindeland, R. E.; Hodgson, J. A.; Bigbee, A. J.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1997-01-01

    Hormonal responses to muscle activity were studied in eight men before (-13 or -12 and -8 or -7 days), during (2 or 3, 8 or 9, and 13 or 14 days) and after (+2 or +3 and +10 or +11 days) 17 days of bed rest. Muscle activity consisted of a series of unilateral isometric plantar flexions, including 4 maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs), 48 contractions at 30% MVC, and 12 contractions at 80% MVC, all performed at a 4:1-s work-to-rest ratio. Blood was collected before and immediately after muscle activity to measure plasma growth hormone by radioimmunoassay (IGH) and by bioassay (BGH) of tibia epiphyseal cartilage growth in hypophysectomized rats. Plasma IGH was unchanged by muscle activity before, during, or after bed rest. Before bed rest, muscle activity increased (P < 0.05) BGH by 66% at -13 or -12 days (2,146 +/- 192 to 3,565 +/- 197 microg/l) and by 92% at -8 or -7 days (2,162 +/- 159 to 4,161 +/- 204 microg/l). After 2 or 3 days of bed rest, there was no response of BGH to the muscle activity, a pattern that persisted through 8 or 9 days of bed rest. However, after 13 or 14 days of bed rest, plasma concentration of BGH was significantly lower after than before muscle activity (2,594 +/- 211 to 2,085 +/- 109 microg/l). After completion of bed rest, muscle activity increased BGH by 31% at 2 or 3 days (1,807 +/- 117 to 2,379 +/- 473 microg/l; P < 0.05), and by 10 or 11 days the BGH response was similar to that before bed rest (1,881 +/- 75 to 4,160 +/- 315 microg/l; P < 0.05). These data demonstrate that the ambulatory state of an individual can have a major impact on the release of BGH, but not IGH, in response to a single bout of muscle activity.

  10. Regional changes in muscle mass following 17 weeks of bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, Adrian D.; Schneider, Victor S.; Evans, Harlan J.; Pientok, Colette; Rowe, Roger; Spector, Elisabeth

    1992-01-01

    This work reports on the muscle loss and recovery after 17 wk of continuous bed rest and 8 wk of reambulation in eight normal male volunteers. Muscle changes were assessed by urinary levels of 3-methylhistidine (3-MeH), nitrogen balance, dual-photon absorptiometry (DPA), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and isokinetic muscle performance. The total body lean tissue loss during bed rest calculated from nitrogen balance was 3.9 +/- 2.1 kg. Although the total loss is minimal, DPA scans showed that nearly all of the lean tissue loss occurred in the lower limbs. Similarly, MRI muscle volume measurements showed greater percent loss in the limbs relative to the back muscles. MRI, DPA, and nitrogen balance suggest that muscle atrophy continued throughout bed rest with rapid recovery after reambulaton. Isokinetic muscle strength decreased significantly in the thigh and calf with no loss in the arms and with rapid recovery during reambulation.

  11. VO2 kinetics of constant-load exercise following bed-rest-induced deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Goldwater, D. J.; Sandler, H.

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the oxygen uptake kinetics during exercise and recovery may be changed by alterations in work intensity, prior exercise, muscle group involvement, ambient conditions, posture, disease state, and level of physical conditioning. However, the effects of detraining on oxygen uptake kinetics have not been determined. The present investigation has the objective to determine the effects of deconditioning following seven days of continuous head-down bed rest on changes in steady-state oxygen uptake, O2 deficit, and recovery oxygen uptake during the performance of constant-load exercise. The obtained results may provide support for previous proposals that submaximal oxygen uptake was significantly reduced following bed rest. The major finding was that bed-rest deconditioning resulted in a reduction of total O2 transport/utilization capacity during the transient phase of upright but not supine exercise.

  12. Physiological responses to prolonged bed rest and fluid immersion in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    For many centuries, physicians have used prolonged rest in bed and immersion in water in the treatment of ailments and disease. Both treatments have positive remedial effects. However, adverse physiological responses become evident when patients return to their normal daily activities. The present investigation is concerned with an analysis of the physiological changes during bed rest and the effects produced by water immersion. It is found that abrupt changes in body position related to bed rest cause acute changes in fluid compartment volumes. Attention is given to fluid shifts and body composition, renal function and diuresis, calcium and phosphorus metabolism, and orthostatic tolerance. In a discussion of water immersion, fluid shifts are considered along with cardiovascular-respiratory responses, renal function, and natriuretic and diuretic factors.

  13. Executive function on the 16-day of bed rest in young healthy men

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizaki, Yuko; Fukuoka, Hideoki; Tanaka, Hidetaka; Ishizaki, Tatsuro; Fujii, Yuri; Hattori-Uchida, Yuko; Nakamura, Minako; Ohkawa, Kaoru; Kobayashi, Hodaka; Taniuchi, Shoichiro; Kaneko, Kazunari

    2009-05-01

    Microgravity due to prolonged bed rest may cause changes in cerebral circulation, which is related to brain function. We evaluate the effect of simulated microgravity due to a 6° head-down tilt bed rest experiment on executive function among 12 healthy young men. Four kinds of psychoneurological tests—the table tapping test, the trail making test, the pointing test and losing at rock-paper-scissors—were performed on the baseline and on day 16 of the experiment. There was no significant difference in the results between the baseline and day 16 on all tests, which indicated that executive function was not impaired by the 16-day 6° head-down tilting bed rest. However, we cannot conclude that microgravity did not affect executive function because of the possible contribution of the following factors: (1) the timing of tests, (2) the learning effect, or (3) changes in psychophysiology that were too small to affect higher brain function.

  14. Effect of antiorthostatic bed rest on hepatic blood flow in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, L.; Cintron, N. M.; Vanderploeg, J. M.; Chen, Y.; Habis, J.

    1988-01-01

    Physiological changes that occur during exposure to weightlessness may induce alterations in blood flow to the liver. Estimation of hepatic blood flow (HBF) using ground-based weightlessness simulation models may provide insight into functional changes of the liver in crewmembers during flight. In the present study, HBF, indirectly estimated by indocyanine gree (ICG) clearance, is compared in 10 subjects during the normal ambulatory condition and antiorthostatic (-6 deg) bed rest. Plasma clearance of ICG was determined following intravenous administration of a 0.5-mg/kg dose of ICG to each subject on two separate occasions: once after being seated for 1 h, and once after 24 h of head-down bed rest. After 24 h of head-down bed rest, hepatic blood flow did not change significantly from the respective control value.

  15. Nighttime restfulness during daytime dance therapy: an exploratory study using bed sensors.

    PubMed

    Krampe, Jean; Miller, Steven J; Echebiri, Chinonye; Rantz, Marilyn J; Skubic, Marjorie

    2014-03-01

    Dance-based therapy has the potential to slow the progression of functional limitations in older adults. The purpose of this study was to explore the feasibility of measuring the impact of dance-based therapy on the nighttime restfulness patterns of older adults in an aging-in-place facility using passive bed sensors. A secondary data analysis of the continuous 2-month nighttime bed sensor data was reviewed for measurable change during a dance study. A measurable variation in nighttime restfulness level was detected between the dancers and nondancers, and no high or very high restlessness was detected during this period for the dance-based therapy group. Although these exploratory variations are modest, the findings suggest that bed sensors can be used to measure nighttime restfulness following a therapeutic dance intervention. More research is needed in this emerging area. PMID:24005243

  16. Pharmacologic counter measures minimizing post-space flight orthostatic intolerance. [bed rest, drug disposition, and physiological function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, D. C.; Kates, R.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of bed rest on drug disposition and physiological function was investigated as part of a project to determine the cardiovascular effects of space flight. One group of subjects was given doses of lidocane, penicillin-G, and ICG during a control period and following seven days of bed rest. Cardiac function was evaluated by echo-cardiography. Renal function was evaluated in a second group before and after several days of bed rest. Inulin, para-aminohippurate, and dextran clearances were studied. In the first group, the post-bed rest parameters were not statistically different from the pre-bed rest valves. In the second study, renal function did not change significantly after seven days of bed rest. Plans for future research are reviewed.

  17. The Metabolic Cost of a High Intensity Exercise Program During Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackney, Kyle; Everett, Meghan; Guined, Jamie; Cunningham, Daid

    2012-01-01

    Background: Given that disuse-related skeletal muscle atrophy may be exacerbated by an imbalance between energy intake and output, the amount of energy required to complete exercise countermeasures is an important consideration in the well being of subject health during bed rest and spaceflight. Objective: To evaluate the energy cost of a high intensity exercise program performed during short duration bed rest. Methods: 9 subjects (8 male and 1 female; 34.5 +/- 8.2 years) underwent 14 days of bed rest and exercise countermeasures. Exercise energy expenditure and excess post exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) were collected once in each of 5 different exercise protocols (30 second, 2 minute and 4 minute intervals, continuous aerobic and a variety of resistance exercises) during bed rest. Body mass, basal metabolic rate (BMR), upper and lower leg muscle, subcutaneous, and intramuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) volumes were assessed before and at the end of bed rest. Results: There were no significant differences in body mass (pre: 75.1 +/- 10.5 kg; post: 75.2 +/- 10.1 kg), BMR (pre: 1649 +/- 216 kcal; post: 1657 +/- 177 kcal), muscle subcutaneous, or IMAT volumes (Table 2) after 14 days of bed rest and exercise. Body mass was maintained with an average daily intake of 2710 +/- 262 kcal (36.2 +/- 2.1 kcal/kg/day), while average daily energy expenditure was 2579 +/-311 kcal (34.5 +/- 3.6 kcal/kg/day). Exercise energy expenditure was significantly greater as a result of continuous aerobic exercise than all other exercise protocols.

  18. Fluid and salt supplementation effect on body hydration and electrolyte homeostasis during bed rest and ambulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorbas, Yan G.; Kakurin, Vassily J.; Kuznetsov, Nikolai A.; Yarullin, Vladimir L.

    2002-06-01

    Bed rest (BR) induces significant urinary and blood electrolyte changes, but little is known about the effect of fluid and salt supplements (FSS) on catabolism, hydration and electrolytes. The aim was to measure the effect of FSS on catabolism, body hydration and electrolytes during BR. Studies were done during 7 days of a pre-bed rest period and during 30 days of a rigorous bed rest period. Thirty male athletes aged, 24.6±7.6 years were chosen as subjects. They were divided into three groups: unsupplemented ambulatory control subjects (UACS), unsupplemented bed rested subjects (UBRS) and supplemented bed rested subjects (SBRS). The UBRS and SBRS groups were kept under a rigorous bed rest regime for 30 days. The SBRS daily took 30 ml water per kg body weight and 0.1 sodium chloride per kg body weight. Plasma sodium (Na), potassium (K), calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) levels, urinary Na, K, Ca and Mg excretion, plasma osmolality, plasma protein level, whole blood hemoglobin (Hb) and hematocrit (Hct) level increased significantly ( p≤0.05), while plasma volume (PV), body weight, body fat, peak oxygen uptake, food and fluid intake decreased significantly ( p≤0.05) in the UBRS group when compared with the SBRS and UACS groups. In contrast, plasma and urinary electrolytes, osmolality, protein level, whole blood Hct and Hb level decreased significantly ( p≤0.05), while PV, fluid intake, body weight and peak oxygen uptake increased significantly ( p≤0.05) in the SBRS group when compared with the UBRS group. The measured parameters did not change significantly in the UACS group when compared with their baseline control values. The data indicate that FSS stabilizes electrolytes and body hydration during BR, while BR alone induces significant changes in electrolytes and body hydration. We conclude that FSS may be used to prevent catabolism and normalize body hydration status and electrolyte values during BR.

  19. Effects of 60-day bed rest with and without exercise on cellular and humoral immunological parameters.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Paula; Belavý, Daniel L; Huscher, Dörte; Lang, Annemarie; Hahne, Martin; Kuhlmey, Anne-Kathrin; Maschmeyer, Patrick; Armbrecht, Gabriele; Fitzner, Rudolf; Perschel, Frank H; Gaber, Timo; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger; Straub, Rainer H; Felsenberg, Dieter; Buttgereit, Frank

    2015-07-01

    Exercise at regular intervals is assumed to have a positive effect on immune functions. Conversely, after spaceflight and under simulated weightlessness (e.g., bed rest), immune functions can be suppressed. We aimed to assess the effects of simulated weightlessness (Second Berlin BedRest Study; BBR2-2) on immunological parameters and to investigate the effect of exercise (resistive exercise with and without vibration) on these changes. Twenty-four physically and mentally healthy male volunteers (20-45 years) performed resistive vibration exercise (n=7), resistance exercise without vibration (n=8) or no exercise (n=9) within 60 days of bed rest. Blood samples were taken 2 days before bed rest, on days 19 and 60 of bed rest. Composition of immune cells was analyzed by flow cytometry. Cytokines and neuroendocrine parameters were analyzed by Luminex technology and ELISA/RIA in plasma. General changes over time were identified by paired t-test, and exercise-dependent effects by pairwise repeated measurements (analysis of variance (ANOVA)). With all subjects pooled, the number of granulocytes, natural killer T cells, hematopoietic stem cells and CD45RA and CD25 co-expressing T cells increased and the number of monocytes decreased significantly during the study; the concentration of eotaxin decreased significantly. Different impacts of exercise were seen for lymphocytes, B cells, especially the IgD(+) subpopulation of B cells and the concentrations of IP-10, RANTES and DHEA-S. We conclude that prolonged bed rest significantly impacts immune cell populations and cytokine concentrations. Exercise was able to specifically influence different immunological parameters. In summary, our data fit the hypothesis of immunoprotection by exercise and may point toward even superior effects by resistive vibration exercise. PMID:25382740

  20. Effects of 60-day bed rest with and without exercise on cellular and humoral immunological parameters

    PubMed Central

    Hoff, Paula; Belavý, Daniel L; Huscher, Dörte; Lang, Annemarie; Hahne, Martin; Kuhlmey, Anne-Kathrin; Maschmeyer, Patrick; Armbrecht, Gabriele; Fitzner, Rudolf; Perschel, Frank H; Gaber, Timo; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger; Straub, Rainer H; Felsenberg, Dieter; Buttgereit, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Exercise at regular intervals is assumed to have a positive effect on immune functions. Conversely, after spaceflight and under simulated weightlessness (e.g., bed rest), immune functions can be suppressed. We aimed to assess the effects of simulated weightlessness (Second Berlin BedRest Study; BBR2-2) on immunological parameters and to investigate the effect of exercise (resistive exercise with and without vibration) on these changes. Twenty-four physically and mentally healthy male volunteers (20–45 years) performed resistive vibration exercise (n=7), resistance exercise without vibration (n=8) or no exercise (n=9) within 60 days of bed rest. Blood samples were taken 2 days before bed rest, on days 19 and 60 of bed rest. Composition of immune cells was analyzed by flow cytometry. Cytokines and neuroendocrine parameters were analyzed by Luminex technology and ELISA/RIA in plasma. General changes over time were identified by paired t-test, and exercise-dependent effects by pairwise repeated measurements (analysis of variance (ANOVA)). With all subjects pooled, the number of granulocytes, natural killer T cells, hematopoietic stem cells and CD45RA and CD25 co-expressing T cells increased and the number of monocytes decreased significantly during the study; the concentration of eotaxin decreased significantly. Different impacts of exercise were seen for lymphocytes, B cells, especially the IgD+ subpopulation of B cells and the concentrations of IP-10, RANTES and DHEA-S. We conclude that prolonged bed rest significantly impacts immune cell populations and cytokine concentrations. Exercise was able to specifically influence different immunological parameters. In summary, our data fit the hypothesis of immunoprotection by exercise and may point toward even superior effects by resistive vibration exercise. PMID:25382740

  1. An overview of the issues: physiological effects of bed rest and restricted physical activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Bloomfield, S. A.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    Reduction of exercise capacity with confinement to bed rest is well recognized. Underlying physiological mechanisms include dramatic reductions in maximal stroke volume, cardiac output, and oxygen uptake. However, bed rest by itself does not appear to contribute to cardiac dysfunction. Increased muscle fatigue is associated with reduced muscle blood flow, red cell volume, capillarization and oxidative enzymes. Loss of muscle mass and bone density may be reflected by reduced muscle strength and higher risk for injury to bones and joints. The resultant deconditioning caused by bed rest can be independent of the primary disease and physically debilitating in patients who attempt to reambulate to normal active living and working. A challenge to clinicians and health care specialists has been the identification of appropriate and effective methods to restore physical capacity of patients during or after restricted physical activity associated with prolonged bed rest. The examination of physiological responses to bed rest deconditioning and exercise training in healthy subjects has provided significant information to develop effective rehabilitation treatments. The successful application of acute exercise to enhance orthostatic stability, daily endurance exercise to maintain aerobic capacity, or specific resistance exercises to maintain musculoskeletal integrity rather than the use of surgical, pharmacological, and other medical treatments for clinical conditions has been enhanced by investigation and understanding of underlying mechanisms that distinguish physical deconditioning from the disease. This symposium presents an overview of cardiovascular and musculoskeletal deconditioning associated with reduced physical work capacity following prolonged bed rest and exercise training regimens that have proven successful in ameliorating or reversing these adverse effects.

  2. Future Antarctic Bed Topography and Its Implications for Ice Sheet Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adhikari, Surendra; Ivins, Erik R.; Larour, Eric Y.; Seroussi, Helene L.; Morlighem, Mathieu; Nowicki, S.

    2014-01-01

    The Antarctic bedrock is evolving as the solid Earth responds to the past and ongoing evolution of the ice sheet. A recently improved ice loading history suggests that the Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS) has generally been losing its mass since the Last Glacial Maximum. In a sustained warming climate, the AIS is predicted to retreat at a greater pace, primarily via melting beneath the ice shelves.We employ the glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) capability of the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM) to combine these past and future ice loadings and provide the new solid Earth computations for the AIS.We find that past loading is relatively less important than future loading for the evolution of the future bed topography. Our computations predict that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) may uplift by a few meters and a few tens of meters at years AD 2100 and 2500, respectively, and that the East Antarctic Ice Sheet is likely to remain unchanged or subside minimally except around the Amery Ice Shelf. The Amundsen Sea Sector in particular is predicted to rise at the greatest rate; one hundred years of ice evolution in this region, for example, predicts that the coastline of Pine Island Bay will approach roughly 45mmyr-1 in viscoelastic vertical motion. Of particular importance, we systematically demonstrate that the effect of a pervasive and large GIA uplift in the WAIS is generally associated with the flattening of reverse bed slope, reduction of local sea depth, and thus the extension of grounding line (GL) towards the continental shelf. Using the 3-D higher-order ice flow capability of ISSM, such a migration of GL is shown to inhibit the ice flow. This negative feedback between the ice sheet and the solid Earth may promote stability in marine portions of the ice sheet in the future.

  3. Behavioral and Psychological Issues in Long Duration Head-down Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seaton, Kimberly A.; Bowie, Kendra; Sipes, Walter A.

    2008-01-01

    Behavioral health services, similar to those offered to the U.S. astronauts who complete six-month missions on board the International Space Station, were provided to 13 long-duration head-down bed rest participants. Issues in psychological screening, selection, and support are discussed as they relate to other isolated and confined environments. Psychological services offered to participants are described, and challenges in subject selection and retention are discussed. Psychological support and training provided to both subjects and study personnel have successfully improved the well-being of study participants. Behavioral health services are indispensable to long-duration head-down tilt bed rest studies.

  4. Improvements and validation of the erythropoiesis control model for bed rest simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, J. I.

    1977-01-01

    The most significant improvement in the model is the explicit formulation of separate elements representing erythropoietin production and red cell production. Other modifications include bone marrow time-delays, capability to shift oxyhemoglobin affinity and an algorithm for entering experimental data as time-varying driving functions. An area of model development is suggested by applying the model to simulating onset, diagnosis and treatment of a hematologic disorder. Recommendations for further improvements in the model and suggestions for experimental application are also discussed. A detailed analysis of the hematologic response to bed rest including simulation of the recent Baylor Medical College bed rest studies is also presented.

  5. The metabolic and hemodynamic effects of prolonged bed rest in normal subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chobanian, A. V.; Lille, R. D.; Tercyak, A.; Blevins, P.

    1974-01-01

    Investigation in six normal subjects of the effects of chronic bed rest on the interrelationships between cardiovascular hemodynamics, catecholamine metabolism, vascular reactivity, renin and aldosterone activity, and electrolyte and fluid balance. Negative sodium and potassium balances and reductions in plasma volume were observed in all subjects, but plasma renin activity and aldosterone secretory rate showed no significant change. Other findings included the observation that major decreases in sodium balance and plasma volume occurred in the early bed rest period and did not correlate closely with the degree of orthostatic intolerance.

  6. Disproportional changes in hematocrit, plasma volume, and proteins during exercise and bed rest.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Beaumont, W.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Juhos, L.

    1972-01-01

    The interrelationships between the changes in plasma volume, hematocrit, and plasma proteins during muscular exercise and bed rest were investigated. Proportionally, the changes in hematocrit are always smaller than the changes in plasma volume. For this reason changes in the concentration of blood constituents can only be quantitated on the basis of plasma volume changes. During short periods of intensive exercise, there was a small loss of plasma proteins. With prolonged submaximal exercise there was a net gain in plasma protein, which contributes to stabilization of the vascular volume. Prolonged bed rest induced hypoproteinemia; this loss of plasma protein probably plays an important role in recumbency hypovolemia.

  7. Body water compartments during bed rest: Evaluation of analytical methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, H. L.; Juhos, L.; Castle, B. L.; Yusken, J.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    Nine healthy young men were studied to determine the reproducibility and interchangeability of the use of radio-iodinated human serum albumin and Evans Blue dye for estimating plasma volume, sodium bromide for extracellular fluid volume, and deuterium oxide for total body water volume. All subjects were tested in a semibasal condition and allowed to rest for at least 30 min. after arriving at the laboratory. The results indicate that there was uniform distribution of I131 and Evans Blue dye 10 min. after injection and of NaBr and D2O 3 hours after oral ingestion; the buildup of residual tracer did not interfere appreciably with the measurement of either or Evans Blue spaces when they are administered at equal intervals, and the buildup of background tracer after ingestion of NaBr and D2O once per week for three consecutive weeks did not affect the accuracy of the measurement. It was found that I131 and Evans Blue may be used interchangeably for estimating plasma volume; for estimating bromide and D2O spaces, one 3-hour equilibrium blood sample gives results similar to the extrapolation of multiple samples.

  8. Sex differences in blood pressure control during 6° head-down tilt bed rest

    PubMed Central

    Arzeno, Natalia M.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Platts, Steven H.

    2013-01-01

    Spaceflight-induced orthostatic intolerance has been studied for decades. Although ∼22% of the astronaut corps are women, most mechanistic studies use mostly male subjects, despite known sex differences in autonomic control and postflight orthostatic intolerance. We studied adrenergic, baroreflex, and autonomic indexes during continuous infusions of vasoactive drugs in men and women during a 60-day head-down bed rest. Volunteers were tested before bed rest (20 men and 10 women) and around day 30 (20 men and 10 women) and day 60 (16 men and 8 women) of bed rest. Three increasing doses of phenylephrine (PE) and sodium nitroprusside were infused for 10 min after an infusion of normal saline. A 20-min rest period separated the phenylephrine and sodium nitroprusside infusions. Autonomic activity was approximated by spectral indexes of heart rate and blood pressure variability, and baroreflex sensitivity was measured by the spontaneous baroreflex slope. Parasympathetic modulation and baroreflex sensitivity decreased with bed rest, with women experiencing a larger decrease in baroreflex sensitivity by day 30 than men. The sympathetic activation of men and parasympathetic responsiveness of women in blood pressure control during physiological stress were preserved throughout bed rest. During PE infusions, women experienced saturation of the R-R interval at high frequency, whereas men did not, revealing a sex difference in the parabolic relationship between high-frequency R-R interval, a measurement of respiratory sinus arrhythmia, and R-R interval. These sex differences in blood pressure control during simulated microgravity reveal the need to study sex differences in long-duration spaceflight to ensure the health and safety of the entire astronaut corps. PMID:23396455

  9. Effects of rehydration on +Gz tolerance after 14-days' bed rest.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Van Beaumont, W.; Bernauer, E. M.; Haines, R. F.; Sandler, H.; Staley, R. W.; Young, H. L.; Yusken, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    Investigation of the magnitude of reduction in human tolerance to centrifugation following 2 weeks of bed rest with moderate daily exercise. The degree of hypovolemia associated with these exposures is assessed, and the possibility to improve or to return to control levels the tolerance to acceleration forces acting in the head-to-foot direction through rehydration prior to acceleration is explored.

  10. Countermeasures and Functional Testing in Head-Down Tilt Bed Rest (CFT 70)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, Ronita L.

    2013-01-01

    This 70-day bed rest campaign was comprised of 6 integrated studies and conducted at the NASA Flight Analogs Research Unit (FARU). The FARU is located at the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas and is a satellite unit of the Institute for Translational Sciences - Clinical Research Center. This presentation will describe the FARU, discuss the utility of the bed rest platform for use in these studies, and introduce the studies that participated in the CFT 70 bed rest campaign. Information in this presentation will serve as the background for subsequent talks from each individual study. Individual study presentations will discuss preliminary results from completed subjects. Studies included in CFT70 were: ? Physiological Factors Contributing to Post Flight Changes in Functional Performance. J. Bloomberg, NASA ? Integrated Resistance and Aerobic Training Study. L. Ploutz-Snyder, USRA ? Testosterone Supplementation as a Countermeasure Against Musculoskeletal losses during Space Exploration. R. Urban, University of Texas Medical Branch ? Effects of Retronasal Smelling, Variety and Choice on Appetite & Satiety. J. Hunter, Cornell University ? AD ASTRA: Automated Detection of Attitudes and States through Transaction Recordings Analysis. C. Miller, Smart Information Flow Technologies, LLC ? Bed Rest as a Spaceflight Analog to Study Neuro-cognitive Changes: Extent, Longevity, and Neural Bases. R. Seidler, University of Michigan

  11. Prevention of disuse osteoporosis: Effect of sodium fluoride during five weeks of bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Victor S.

    1987-01-01

    An attempt was made to modify factors which promote disuse osteoporosis and thereby prevent it from occurring. Since fluoride is currently used to enhance bone formation in the treatment of low turnover osteoporosis, it was hypothesized that if the fluoride ion was available over a long period of time that it would slow the demonstrated loss of calcium by inhibiting bone resorption and enhancing bone formation. This study was used to determine whether oral medication with sodium F will modify or prevent 5 weeks of bed rest induced disuse osteoporosis, to determine the longitudinal effects of 5 weeks of bed rest on PTH, CT and calcitriol, to measure muscle volume changes and metabolic activity by magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy during prolonged bed rest, to measure changes in peak muscle strength and fatigability, and to measure bone turnover in bone biopsies. Subjects were studied during 1 week of equilibration, 4 weeks of control ambulation, 5 weeks of bed rest, and 1 week of reambulation.

  12. Physiological responses to prolonged bed rest in humans: A compendium of research, 1981-1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luu, Phuong B.; Ortiz, Vanessa; Barnes, Paul R.; Greenleaf, John E.

    1990-01-01

    Clinical observations and results form more basic studies that help to elucidate the physiological mechanisms of the adaptation of humans to prolonged bed rest. If the authors' abstract or summary was appropriate, it was included. In some cases a more detailed synopsis was provided under the subheadings of purpose, methods, results, and conclusions.

  13. Zinc and copper balances in healthy adult males during and after 17 wk of bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krebs, J. M.; Schneider, V. S.; LeBlanc, A. D.; Kuo, M. C.; Spector, E.; Lane, H. W.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of long-term bed rest on zinc and copper balances were measured in seven healthy men. Volunteers aged 22-54 y (mean +/- SD, 34 +/- 12 y), 168-185 cm in height (173 +/- 5 cm), and 64-86 kg in weight (74 +/- 9 kg) remained on a metabolic ward for 29 wk. Subjects were ambulatory during weeks 1-5, remained in continuous bed rest for weeks 6-22, and were reambulated during weeks 23-29. Copper and zinc were measured in weekly urine and fecal composites. Dietary intakes provided (mean +/- SD) 19.2 +/- 1.2 mumol Cu (1.22 +/- 0.08 mg), 211 +/- 11 mumol Zn (13.81 +/- 0.72 mg), 25.2 +/- 1.2 mmol Ca (1011 +/- 46 mg), 1086 +/- 46 mmol N (15.21 +/- 0.65 g), and 48.1 +/- 1.4 mmol K (1489 +/- 44 mg)/d. Bed rest increased fecal zinc excretion and decreased zinc balance, whereas copper balance was unchanged. Reambulation decreased fecal zinc excretion and increased both zinc and copper balances. These results suggest that during long-term bed rest or space flight, individuals will lose total body zinc and will retain more zinc and copper when they reambulate.

  14. Biochemical and hormonal changes in endurance trained volunteers during and after exposure to bed rest and chronic hyperhydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorbas, Y. G.; Naexu, K. A.; Yaroshenko, Y. N.

    2000-04-01

    The objective of this investigation was to assess the effect of a daily intake of fluid and salt supplementation on biochemical and hormonal changes in endurance trained volunteers aged 19-24 yrs during 30-day bed rest and during 15 days of post bed rest period. The studies were performed on 30 long distance runners aged 19-24 yrs who had a peak oxygen uptake of 66 ml/kg/min and had taken 14.5 km/day on average prior to their participation in the study. The volunteers were divided into three groups: the volunteers in the first group were under normal ambulatory conditions (control subjects); the second group subjected to bed rest alone unsupplemented (bed rested volunteers); the third group was submitted to bed rest and consumed daily 30 ml water/kg bodyweight and 0.1 g of sodium chloride (NaCl)/kg body weight (supplemented bed rested volunteers). The second and third groups of volunteers were kept under a rigorous bed rest regime for 30 days. During the pre bed rest period of 15 days, during the bed rest period of 30 days and during the post bed rest period of 15 days cyclic adenosine monophosphate, cyclic guanosine monophosphate, prostaglandins of pressor, prostaglandins depressor groups, renin activity in plasma and aldosterone in plasma and in urine were determined. We found that in bed rested volunteers without fluid and salt supplementation intake plasma renin activity and aldosterone in plasma and urine continued to increase during the bed rest period as plasma volume decreased. Moreover, in this group, cyclic nucleotides measured as an indicator of adrenosympathetic system activity increased and prostaglandins as local vasoactive substances decreased during the bed rest period. These variables returned toward the baselines in the post bed rest period as plasma volume deficit was restituted. On the other hand, the hormonal levels in the other two groups remained rather constant during the experimental period. We concluded that daily intake of fluid and salt

  15. Short-term bed rest increases TLR4 and IL-6 expression in skeletal muscle of older adults.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Micah J; Timmerman, Kyle L; Markofski, Melissa M; Walker, Dillon K; Dickinson, Jared M; Jamaluddin, Mohammad; Brasier, Allan R; Rasmussen, Blake B; Volpi, Elena

    2013-08-01

    Bed rest induces significant loss of leg lean mass in older adults. Systemic and tissue inflammation also accelerates skeletal muscle loss, but it is unknown whether inflammation is associated to inactivity-induced muscle atrophy in healthy older adults. We determined if short-term bed rest increases toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling and pro-inflammatory markers in older adult skeletal muscle biopsy samples. Six healthy, older adults underwent seven consecutive days of bed rest. Muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) were taken after an overnight fast before and at the end of bed rest. Serum cytokine expression was measured before and during bed rest. TLR4 signaling and cytokine mRNAs associated with pro- and anti-inflammation and anabolism were measured in muscle biopsy samples using Western blot analysis and qPCR. Participants lost ∼4% leg lean mass with bed rest. We found that after bed rest, muscle levels of TLR4 protein expression and interleukin-6 (IL-6), nuclear factor-κB1, interleukin-10, and 15 mRNA expression were increased after bed rest (P < 0.05). Additionally, the cytokines interferon-γ, and macrophage inflammatory protein-1β, were elevated in serum samples following bed rest (P < 0.05). We conclude that short-term bed rest in older adults modestly increased some pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in muscle samples while systemic changes in pro-inflammatory cytokines were mostly absent. Upregulation of TLR4 protein content suggests that bed rest in older adults increases the capacity to mount an exaggerated, and perhaps unnecessary, inflammatory response in the presence of specific TLR4 ligands, e.g., during acute illness. PMID:23761639

  16. Short-term bed rest increases TLR4 and IL-6 expression in skeletal muscle of older adults

    PubMed Central

    Timmerman, Kyle L.; Markofski, Melissa M.; Walker, Dillon K.; Dickinson, Jared M.; Jamaluddin, Mohammad; Brasier, Allan R.; Rasmussen, Blake B.; Volpi, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Bed rest induces significant loss of leg lean mass in older adults. Systemic and tissue inflammation also accelerates skeletal muscle loss, but it is unknown whether inflammation is associated to inactivity-induced muscle atrophy in healthy older adults. We determined if short-term bed rest increases toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling and pro-inflammatory markers in older adult skeletal muscle biopsy samples. Six healthy, older adults underwent seven consecutive days of bed rest. Muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) were taken after an overnight fast before and at the end of bed rest. Serum cytokine expression was measured before and during bed rest. TLR4 signaling and cytokine mRNAs associated with pro- and anti-inflammation and anabolism were measured in muscle biopsy samples using Western blot analysis and qPCR. Participants lost ∼4% leg lean mass with bed rest. We found that after bed rest, muscle levels of TLR4 protein expression and interleukin-6 (IL-6), nuclear factor-κB1, interleukin-10, and 15 mRNA expression were increased after bed rest (P < 0.05). Additionally, the cytokines interferon-γ, and macrophage inflammatory protein-1β, were elevated in serum samples following bed rest (P < 0.05). We conclude that short-term bed rest in older adults modestly increased some pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in muscle samples while systemic changes in pro-inflammatory cytokines were mostly absent. Upregulation of TLR4 protein content suggests that bed rest in older adults increases the capacity to mount an exaggerated, and perhaps unnecessary, inflammatory response in the presence of specific TLR4 ligands, e.g., during acute illness. PMID:23761639

  17. Biochemical and hemodynamic changes in normal subjects during acute and rigorous bed rest and ambulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorbas, Yan G.; Kakurin, Vassily J.; Afonin, Victor B.; Yarullin, Vladimir L.

    2002-06-01

    Rigorous bed rest (RBR) induces significant biochemical and circulatory changes. However, little is known about acute rigorous bed rest (ARBR). Measuring biochemical and circulatory variables during ARBR and RBR the aim of this study was to establish the significance of ARBR effect. Studies were done during 3 days of a pre-bed rest (BR) period and during 7 days of ARBR and RBR period. Thirty normal male individuals aged, 24.1±6.3 years were chosen as subjects. They were divided equally into three groups: 10 subjects placed under active control conditions served as unrestricted ambulatory control subjects (UACS), 10 subjects submitted to an acute rigorous bed rest served as acute rigorous bed rested subjects (ARBRS) and 10 subjects submitted to a rigorous bed rest served as rigorous bed rested subjects (RBRS). The UACS were maintained under an average running distance of 9.7 km day -1. For the ARBR effect simulation, ARBRS were submitted abruptly to BR for 7 days. They did not have any prior knowledge of the exact date and time when they would be asked to confine to RBR. For the RBR effect simulation, RBRS were subjected to BR for 7 days on a predetermined date and time known to them right away from the start of the study. Plasma renin activity (PRA), plasma cortisol (PC), plasma aldosterone (PA), plasma and urinary sodium (Na) and potassium (K) levels, heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), and arterial blood pressure (ABP) increased significantly, and urinary aldosterone (UA), stroke volume (SV) and plasma volume (PV) decreased significantly ( p<0.05) in ARBRS and RBRS as compared with their pre-BR values and the values in UACS. Electrolyte, hormonal and hemodynamic responses were significantly ( p<0.05) greater and occurred significantly faster ( p<0.05) during ARBR than RBR. Parameters change insignificantly ( p>0.05) in UACS compared with pre-BR control values. It was concluded that, the more abruptly muscular activity is restricted in experimental subjects

  18. Bed topography under Antarctic outlet glaciers revealed by mass conservation and radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morlighem, M.; Rignot, E. J.; Mouginot, J.; Seroussi, H. L.

    2015-12-01

    Bed topography, together with ice thickness, is an essential characteristic of glaciers and ice sheets for many glaciological applications. Despite significant technical advances, it remains challenging to measure ice thickness remotely, especially in deep troughs occupied by outlet glaciers. The method of mass conservation, that combines radar-derived ice thickness data with high-resolution InSAR-derived ice velocity vectors, provides an effective method for generating a high-resolution bed from sparse radar sounding profiles, and has been successfully applied along the coast of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Applying the same technique to the coast of the Antarctic Ice Sheet presents a number of challenges. The coverage of ice thickness data collected in Antarctica, for example, is much less comprehensive compared to Greenland, especially in the wake of NASA's Operation IceBridge (OIB) Mission in 2010-2015. Here, we combine radar sounder data collected by various centers (OIB/Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets, the British Antarctic Survey and University of Texas) acquired between 1998 and 2011, with high-resolution ice motion data from interferometric SAR (ALOS PALSAR, RADARSAT-2 and Envisat ASAR) to reconstruct bed topography beneath major Antarctic outlet glaciers at an unprecedented level of detail. The results reveal some important features not known previously at that level of detail and shed light on the vulnerability of these glaciers in a warming climate. We find for example that Recovery glacier is deeper than in previous mappings and has long grooves parallel to the flow direction. Denman Glacier, East Antarctica, flow along a deep, narrow trough more than 2,000 m below sea level that extends more than 100 km inland. We find ridges and bumps in the vicinity of the grounding line of Thwaites Glacier, in the Amundsen Sea sector, that are consistent with the pattern of grounding line retreat. We have also a new mapping of the trough upstream of David

  19. Effect of acute hypercapnia during 10-day hypoxic bed rest on posterior eye structures.

    PubMed

    Jaki Mekjavic, Polona; Lenassi, Eva; Eiken, Ola; Mekjavic, Igor B

    2016-05-15

    To gain insights into microgravity-induced ophthalmic changes (microgravity ocular syndrome), and as part of a project investigating effects of future planetary habitats, we investigated the effect of acute hypercapnia following 10-day bed rest and hypoxia on posterior eye structures. Female subjects (N = 7) completed three 10-day experimental interventions: 1) normoxic bed rest [NBR; partial pressure of inspired O2 (PiO2 ) = 132.9 ± 0.3 Torr]; 2) hypoxic ambulatory confinement (HAMB; PiO2 = 90.4 ± 0.3 Torr); and 3) hypoxic bed rest (HBR; n = 12; PiO2 = 90.4 ± 0.3 Torr). Before and on the last day of each intervention, optical coherence tomography (OCT) of the optic disk was performed, and the thicknesses of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL), retina, and choroid were measured. OCT examinations were conducted with the subjects breathing the prevailing normocapnic breathing mixture (either normoxic or hypoxic) and then following a 10-min period of breathing the same gas mixture, but with the addition of 1% CO2 Choroidal thickness was greater during both bed-rest conditions (NBR and HBR) compared with the ambulatory (HAMB) condition (ANOVA, P < 0.001). Increases in RNFL thickness compared with baseline were observed in the hypoxic trials (HBR, P < 0.001; and HAMB, P = 0.021), but not the normoxic trial (NBR). A further increase in RNFL thickness (P = 0.019) was observed after the 10-min hypercapnic trial in the NBR condition only. The fact that choroidal thickness was not affected by Po2 or Pco2, but increased by bed rest, suggests a hydrostatic rather than a vasoactive effect. The increments in RNFL thickness were most likely associated with local hypoxia and hypercapnia-induced dilatation of the retinal blood vessels. PMID:27013607

  20. Artificial Gravity as a Multi-System Countermeasure to Bed Rest Deconditioning: Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, L. E.; Paloski, William H.; Young, L. R.

    2006-01-01

    Artificial gravity paradigms may offer effective, efficient, multi-system protection from the untoward effects of adaptation to the microgravity of space or the hypogravity of planetary surfaces. Intermittent artificial gravity (AG) produced by a horizontal short-radius centrifuge (SRC) has recently been utilized on human test subjects deconditioned by bed rest. This presentation will review preliminary results of a 41 day study conducted at the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX bed rest facility. During the first eleven days of the protocol, subjects were ambulatory, but confined to the facility. They began a carefully controlled diet, and participated in multiple baseline tests of bone, muscle, cardiovascular, sensory-motor, immunological, and psychological function. On the twelfth day, subjects entered the bed rest phase of the study, during which they were confined to strict 6deg head down tilt bed rest for 21 days. Beginning 24 hrs into this period, treatment subjects received one hour daily exposures to artificial gravity which was produced by spinning the subjects on a 3.0 m radius SRC. They were oriented radially in the supine position so that the centrifugal force was aligned with their long body axis, and while spinning, they "stood" on a force plate, supporting the centrifugal loading (2.5 g at the feet, 1.0 g at the heart). The subject station allowed free translation over approximately 10 cm to ensure full loading of the lower extremities and to allow for anti-orthostatic muscle contractions. Control subjects were positioned on the centrifuge but did not spin. Following the bed rest phase, subjects were allowed to ambulate again, but remained within the facility for an additional 9 days and participated in multiple follow-up tests of physiological function.

  1. Plasma volume and biochemical changes in athletes during bed rest chronic hyperhydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorbas, Yan G.; Yarullin, Vladimir L.; Denogradov, Sergei D.; Afonin, Victor B.

    Daily fluid and salt supplements (FSS) may be used to reduce plasma biochemical changes during bed rest (BR). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a daily intake of FSS on plasma volume (PV) and biochemical changes during BR. Studies were done during a pre BR period of 15 days and during a BR period of 30 days. Thirty male athletes aged 22-26 years were chosen as subjects. They were divided into three groups: unsupplemented ambulatory control subjects (UACS), unsupplemented bed rested subjects (UBRS) and supplemented bed rested subjects (SBRS). The UBRS and SBRS were kept under a rigorous bed rest regime for 30 days. The SBRS took 26 ml water/kg body weight and 0.1 g sodium chloride/kg body weight daily. PV, protein, albumin, sodium (Na), Chloride (Cl), potassium (K), osmolality, creatinine, glucose, and whole blood haematocrit (Hct) and haemoglobin (Hb) concentrations were measured. PV increased significantly ( P≤0.01) while plasma protein, albumin, Na, Cl, K, glucose, creatinine, osmolality, and whole blood Hb and Hct concentration decreased significantly ( P≤0.01) in the SBRS group when compared with the UBRS group. By contrast, PV decreased significantly ( P≤0.01), while plasma protein, albumin, Na, Cl, K, glucose, creatinine, osmolality and whole blood Hct and Hb concentration increased significantly ( P≤0.01) in the UBRS group when compared with the SBRS and UACS groups. The measured parameters did not change significantly in the UACS group when compared with the baseline control values. It was concluded that a daily intake of FSS may be used to attenuate PV losses and biochemical changes in endurance trained athletes during bed rest.

  2. The influence on individual working memory during 15 days -6° head-down bed rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xin; Wang, YiXue; Zhou, RenLai; Wang, LinJie; Tan, Cheng

    2011-12-01

    The research evaluated the changes of verbal and spatial working memory with females during 15 days -6° head-down bed rest. We used 2-back task to evaluate the working memory ability on four time points: the fifth day before the rest, the fifth day and the tenth day in the rest and the fifth day after the rest, as well as record the participants' depression and anxiety feelings using Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) simultaneously. The results demonstrated that the trends of verbal and spatial working memory performance were consistent with that of the control group during the rest. Moreover, in the -6° head-down bed rest conditions, the participants have performed no damage on the working memory ability, and any clinically salient anxiety and depression. The research considered that, compared to the real space environment, individuals' undamaged cognitive functions probably have something to do with the failure of evoking clinical anxiety and depression in the stimulated weightless environment.

  3. Immune Response and Function: Exercise Conditioning Versus Bed-Rest and Spaceflight Deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Jackson, C. G. R.; Lawless, D.

    1994-01-01

    Immune responses measured at rest immediately or some hours after exercise training (some with and some without increase in maximal oxygen uptake) gave variable and sometimes conflicting results; therefore, no general conclusions can be drawn. On the other hand, most immune responses were either unchanged (immunoglobulin, T cells, CD4+, and natural killer activity) or decreased (blood properdin, neutrophil phagocytic activity, salivary lysozymes, brain immunoglobulin A and G, and liver B lymphocytes and phytohemagglutinin activity) during prolonged bed rest. Some data suggested that exercise training during bed rest may partially ameliorate the decreased functioning of the immune system. Exercise and change in body position, especially during prolonged bed rest with plasma fluid shifts and diuresis, may induce a change in plasma protein concentration and content, which can influence drug metabolism as well as immune function. Leukocytosis, accompanied by lymphopenia and a depressed lymphocyte response, occurs in astronauts on return to Earth from spaceflight; recovery may depend on time of exposure to microgravity. It is clear that the effect of drugs and exercise used as countermeasures for microgravity deconditioning should be evaluated for their effect on an astronaut's immune system to assure optimal health and performance on long-duration space missions.

  4. Prospective Evaluation of the Optimal Duration of Bed Rest After Vascular Interventions Using a 3-French Introducer Sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Aramaki, Takeshi Moriguchi, Michihisa Bekku, Emima; Endo, Masahiro Asakura, Koiku; Boku, Narikazu; Yoshimura, Kenichi

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo assess optimal bed-rest duration after vascular intervention by way of the common femoral artery using 3F introducer sheaths.Materials and MethodsEligibility criteria for this single-center, prospective study included clinically necessary angiography, no coagulopathy or anticoagulant therapy, no hypersensitivity to contrast medium, age >20 years, and written, informed consent. Enrolled patients were assigned to one of three groups (105/group) with the duration of bed rest deceased sequentially. A sheath was inserted by way of the common femoral artery using the Seldinger technique. The first group (level 1) received 3 h of bed rest after the vascular intervention. If no bleeding or hematomas developed, the next group (level 2) received 2.5 h of bed rest. If still no bleeding or hematomas developed, the final group (level 3) received 2 h of bed rest. If any patient had bleeding or hematomas after bed rest, the study was terminated, and the bed rest of the preceding level was considered the optimal duration.ResultsA total of 105 patients were enrolled at level 1 between November 2010 and September 2011. Eight patients were excluded from analysis because cessation of bed rest was delayed. None of the remaining subjects experienced postoperative bleeding; therefore, patient enrollment at level 2 began in September 2011. However, puncture site bleeding occurred in the 52nd patient immediately after cessation of bed rest, necessitating study termination.ConclusionTo prevent bleeding, at least 3 h of postoperative bed rest is recommended for patients undergoing angiography using 3F sheaths.

  5. Gender Differences in Isokinetic Strength after 60 and 90 d Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, K. L.; Ploutz-Snyder, R. J.; Cromwell, R. L.; Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.

    2010-01-01

    Recent reports suggest that changes in muscle strength following disuse may differ between males and females. PURPOSE: To examine potential gender differences in strength changes following 60 and 90 d of experimental bed rest. METHODS: Isokinetic extensor and flexor strength of the knee (60deg and 180deg/s, concentric only), ankle (30deg/s, concentric and eccentric), and trunk (60deg/s, concentric only) were measured following 60 d (males: n=4, 34.5+/-9.6 y; females: n=4, 35.5+/-8.2 y) and 90 d (males: n=10, 31.4+/-4.8 y; females: n=5, 37.6+/-9.9 y) of 6-degree head-down-tilt bed rest (BR; N=23). Subjects were fed a controlled diet (55%/15%/ 30%, CHO/PRO/FAT) that maintained body weight within 3% of the weight recorded on Day 3 of bed rest. After a familiarization session, testing was conducted 6 d before BR and 2 d after BR completion. Peak torque and total work were calculated for the tests performed. To allow us to combine data from both 60- and 90-d subjects, we used a mixed-model statistical analysis in which time and gender were fixed effects and bed rest duration was a random effect. Log-transformations of strength measures were utilized when necessary in order to meet statistical assumptions. RESULTS: Main effects were seen for both time and gender (p<0.05), showing decreased strength in response to bed rest for both males and females, and males stronger than females for most strength measures. Only one interaction effect was observed: females exhibited a greater loss of trunk extensor peak torque at 60 d versus pre-BR, relative to males (p=0.004). CONCLUSION: Sixty and 90 d of BR induced significant losses in isokinetic muscle strength of the locomotor and postural muscles of the knee, ankle, and trunk. Although males were stronger than females for most of the strength measures that we examined, only changes in trunk extensor peak torque were greater for females than males at day 60 of bed rest

  6. Bone Loss in Space: Shuttle/MIR Experience and Bed Rest Countermeasure Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shackelford, L. C.; LeBlanc, A.; Feiveson, A.; Oganov, V.

    1999-01-01

    Loss of bone mineral during space flight was documented in the 1970's Skylab missions. The USSR space program made similar observations in the 1980's. The Institute of Biomedical Problems in Moscow and NASA JSC in 1989 began to collect pre- and post-flight bone mineral density (BMD) using Hologic QDR 1000 DEXA scanners transferred from JSC to Moscow and Star City. DEXA whole body, hip, and lumbar spine scans were performed prior to and during the first week after return from 4- to 6-month missions (plus one 8-month mission and one 14- month mission) on the Mir space station. These data documented the extent and regional nature of bone loss during long duration space flight. Of the 18 cosmonauts participating in this study between 1990 and 1995, seven flew two missions. BMD scans prior to the second flight compared to the first mission preflight scans indicated that recovery was possibly delayed or incomplete. Because of these findings, NASA and IBMP initiated the study "Bone Mineral Loss and Recovery After Shuttle/Mir Flights" in 1995 to evaluate bone recovery during a 3-year post-flight period. All of the 14 participants thus far evaluated lost bone in at least one region of the spine and lower extremities during flight. Of the 14, only one to date has exhibited full return to baseline BNM values in all regions. The current study will continue until the last participant has reached full bone recovery in all regions, has reached a plateau, or until three years after the flight (2001 for the last mission of the program). Bone mineral density losses in space and difficulty in returning to baseline indicate a need for countermeasure development. In late 1996 NASA JSC and Baylor College of Medicine were approved to conduct two countermeasure studies during 17 weeks of bed rest. In 1997 the studies were begun in the bed rest facility established by NASA, Baylor College of Medicine, and The Methodist Hospital in Houston. To date, three bed rest controls, five resistive

  7. Exercise Effects on the Brain and Sensorimotor Function in Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppelmans, V.; Cassady, K.; De Dios, Y. E.; Szecsy, D.; Gadd, N.; Wood, S. J.; Reuter-Lorenz, R. A.; Kofman, I.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Ploutz-Snyder, L.; Seidler, R. D.

    2016-01-01

    Long duration spaceflight microgravity results in cephalad fluid shifts and deficits in posture control and locomotion. Effects of microgravity on sensorimotor function have been investigated on Earth using head down tilt bed rest (HDBR). HDBR serves as a spaceflight analogue because it mimics microgravity in body unloading and bodily fluid shifts. Preliminary results from our prior 70 days HDBR studies showed that HDBR is associated with focal gray matter (GM) changes and gait and balance deficits, as well as changes in brain functional connectivity. In consideration of the health and performance of crewmembers we investigated whether exercise reduces the effects of HDBR on GM, functional connectivity, and motor performance. Numerous studies have shown beneficial effects of exercise on brain health. We therefore hypothesized that an exercise intervention during HDBR could potentially mitigate the effects of HDBR on the central nervous system. Eighteen subjects were assessed before (12 and 7 days), during (7, 30, and 70 days) and after (8 and 12 days) 70 days of 6-degrees HDBR at the NASA HDBR facility in UTMB, Galveston, TX, US. Each subject was randomly assigned to a control group or one of two exercise groups. Exercise consisted of daily supine exercise which started 20 days before the start of HDBR. The exercise subjects participated either in regular aerobic and resistance exercise (e.g. squat, heel raise, leg press, cycling and treadmill running), or aerobic and resistance exercise using a flywheel apparatus (rowing). Aerobic and resistance exercise intensity in both groups was similar, which is why we collapsed the two exercise groups for the current experiment. During each time point T1-weighted MRI scans and resting state functional connectivity scans were obtained using a 3T Siemens scanner. Focal changes over time in GM density were assessed using voxel based morphometry (VBM8) under SPM. Changes in resting state functional connectivity was assessed

  8. Head-down bed rest impairs vagal baroreflex responses and provokes orthostatic hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.; Doerr, Donald F.; Eckberg, Dwain L.; Fritsch, Janice M.; Vernikos-Danellis, Joan

    1990-01-01

    The hypothesis that baroreflex malfunction contributes to orthostatic hypotension in microgravity was tested by studying vagally mediated carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflexes in healthy human subjects before, during, and after 30 days of 6-deg head-down bed rest. The baroreflex response relationships were provoked with ramped neck pressure-suction sequences comprising pressure elevations to 40 mm Hg followed by serial R-wave-triggered 15-mm Hg reductions to -65 mm0 Hg; each R-R interval was plotted as a function of systolic pressure minus the neck chamber pressure applied during the interval. It is shown that head-down bed rest led to an impairment of vagal baroreflex function and that it was associated with an impairment of hemodynamic adjustments to standing, indicating that baroreflex impairment may contribute to orthostatic hypotension observed in spacecrews after a flight.

  9. Analog Exercise Hardware to Implement a High Intensity Exercise Program During Bed Rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loerch, Linda; Newby, Nate; Sinka, Joe; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate novel countermeasure protocols in a spaceflight analog setting before validation on the International Space Station, NASA’s Human Research Program is sponsoring a multi-investigator bed rest campaign that uses a combination of commercial and custom-made exercise training hardware to conduct daily resistance and aerobic exercise protocols. These devices include the stand alone zero-gravity locomotion simulator, horizontal squat device, Lode commercial supine cycle ergometer, Cybex commercial prone leg curl machine, and Quantum Fitness commercial horizontal leg press. This paper will describe these pieces of hardware that are used to support current bed rest studies at NASA’s Flight Analog Research Unit in Galveston, Texas, USA.

  10. Work capacity during 30 days of bed rest with isotonic and isokinetic exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Bernauer, E. M.; Ertl, A. C.; Trowbridge, T. S.; Wade, C. E.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented from a study to determine whether or not short-term variable intensity isotonic and intermittent high-intensity isokinetic short-duration leg exercise is effective for the maintenance of peak O2 (VO2) uptake and muscular strength and endurance, respectively, during 30 days of -6 deg head-down bed rest deconditioning. The results show no significant changes in leg peak torque, leg mean total work, arm total peak torque, or arm mean total work for members of the isotonic, isokinetic, and controls groups. Changes are observed, however, in peak VO2 levels. The results suggest that near-peak variabile intensity, isotonic leg excercise maintains peak VO2 during 30 days of bed rest, while peak intermittent, isokinetic leg excercise protocol does not.

  11. Centrifugation protocol for the NASA Artificial Gravity-Bed Rest Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Arya, Maneesh; Paloski, William H; Young, Laurence R

    2007-07-01

    We have implemented a 41-day ground-based study to investigate the effects of daily artificial gravity loading on bed rest deconditioned human subjects. Each subject underwent 21 days of 6 degree head-down bed rest. Treatment subjects received 60 min daily doses of inertial mechanical loading (2.5 G at the feet decreasing to 1 G at the heart) produced by a short radius centrifuge. During rotation, the subject's cardiovascular responses were monitored via ECG, blood pressure and pulse oximetry, and subjective assessment of motion sickness and overall health were periodically requested. The subject's weight distribution at the feet was measured using a force plate, and lower leg muscle activity was monitored via surface electromyography. Control subjects were instrumented but did not receive any centrifugation. This paper provides details on the centrifuge protocol development and efficacy. PMID:18372684

  12. Effects of long-duration bed rest on structural compartments of m. soleus in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belozerova, I.; Shenkman, B.; Mazin, M.; Leblanc, A.; LeBlanc, A. D. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), histomorphometry and electron microscopy of muscle demonstrate that long-term exposure to actual or simulated weightlessness (including head down bed rest) leads to decreased volume of antigravity muscles in mammals. In muscles interbundle space is occupied by the connective tissue. Rat studies show that hindlimb unloading induces muscle fiber atrophy along with increase in muscle non-fiber connective tissue compartment. Beside that, usually 20% of the muscle fiber volume is comprised by non-contractile (non-myofibrillar) compartment. The aim of the present study was to compare changes in muscle volume, and in muscle fiber size with alterations in myofibrillar apparatus, and in connective tissue compartment in human m. soleus under conditions of 120 day long head down bed rest (HDBR).

  13. Physiology of Fluid and Electrolyte Responses During Inactivity: Water Immersion and Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    1984-01-01

    This manuscript emphasizes the physiology of fluid-electrolyte-hormonal responses during the prolonged inactivity of bed rest and water immersion. An understanding of the total mechanism of adaptation (deconditioning) should provide more insight into the conditioning process. Findings that need to be confirmed during bed rest and immersion are: (1) the volume and tissues of origin of fluid shifted to the thorax and head; (2) interstitial fluid pressure changes in muscle and subcutaneous tissue, particularly during immersion; and (3) the composition of the incoming presumably interstitial fluid that contributes to the early hypervolemia. Better resolution of the time course and source of the diuretic fluid is needed. Important data will be forthcoming when hypotheses are tested involving the probable action of the emerging diuretic and natriuretic hormones, between themselves and among vasopressin and aldosterone, on diuresis and blood pressure control.

  14. Physiological Effects of Aquatic Exercise in Pregnant Women on Bed Rest.

    PubMed

    Sechrist, Dawndra M; Tiongco, Cynthia Gorter; Whisner, Sandra M; Geddie, Matthew D

    2015-01-01

    This pilot study examined the effectiveness of an Aquatic Exercise Program (AEP) provided by an occupational therapist for pregnant women on hospitalized bed rest. Researchers conducted a retrospective analysis of medical records of hospitalized pregnant women comparing those who attended an AEP (n = 19) to a control group who received no AEP (n = 12). Statistical tests were used to assess evidence of differences in length of gestation as well as blood pressure and amniotic fluid index (AFI) at discharge. Women who received an AEP had increased AFI and length of gestation compared to the control group. This study supports the use of an AEP as an intervention for pregnant women on prescribed bed rest. Further research is recommended to validate these findings with a larger sample. PMID:25924026

  15. Cardiorespiratory deconditioning with static and dynamic leg exercise during bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stremel, R. W.; Convertino, V. A.; Bernauer, E. M.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented for an experimental study designed to compare the effects of heavy static and dynamic exercise training during 14 days of bed rest on the cardiorespiratory responses to submaximal and maximal exercise performed by seven healthy men aged 19-22 yr. The parameters measured were submaximal and maximal oxygen uptake, minute ventilation, heart rate, and plasma volume. The results indicate that exercise alone during bed rest reduces but does not eliminate the reduction in maximal oxygen uptake. An additional positive hydrostatic effect is therefore necessary to restore maximal oxygen uptake to ambulatory control levels. The greater protective effect of static exercise on maximal oxygen uptake is probably due to a greater hydrostatic component from the isometric muscular contraction. Neither the static nor the dynamic exercise training regimes are found to minimize the changes in all the variables studied, thereby suggesting a combination of static and dynamic exercises.

  16. Calcium kinetics during bed rest with artificial gravity and exercise countermeasures

    PubMed Central

    Smith, S. M.; Castaneda-Sceppa, C.; O’Brien, K. O.; Abrams, S. A.; Gillman, P.; Brooks, N. E.; Cloutier, G. J.; Heer, M.; Zwart, S. R.; Wastney, M. E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary We assessed the potential for countermeasures to lessen the loss of bone calcium during bed rest. Subjects ingested less calcium during bed rest, and with artificial gravity, they also absorbed less calcium. With exercise, they excreted less calcium. To retain bone during bed rest, calcium intake needs to be maintained. Introduction This study aims to assess the potential for artificial gravity (AG) and exercise (EX) to mitigate loss of bone calcium during space flight. Methods We performed two studies: (1) a 21-day bed rest (BR) study with subjects receiving 1 h/day AG (n=8) or no AG (n=7) and (2) a 28-day BR study with 1 h/day resistance EX (n=10) or no EX (n=3). In both studies, stable isotopes of Ca were administered orally and intravenously, at baseline and after 10 days of BR, and blood, urine, and feces were sampled for up to 14 days post dosing. Tracers were measured using thermal ionization mass spectrometry. Data were analyzed by compartmental modeling. Results Less Ca was absorbed during BR, resulting in lower Ca balance in BR+AG (−6.04±3.38 mmol/day, P=0.023). However, Ca balance did not change with BR+EX, even though absorbed Ca decreased and urinary Ca excretion increased, because endogenous excretion decreased, and there was a trend for increased bone deposition (P=0.06). Urinary N-telopeptide excretion increased in controls during BR, but not in the EX group. Markers of bone formation were not different between treatment groups for either study. Ca intake decreased during BR (by 5.4 mmol/day in the AG study and 2.8 mmol/day in the EX study), resulting in lower absorbed Ca. Conclusions During BR (or space flight), Ca intake needs to be maintained or even increased with countermeasures such as exercise, to enable maintenance of bone Ca. PMID:24861908

  17. Bed Rest is an Analog to Study the Physiological Changes of Spaceflight and to Evaluate Countermeasures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfannenstiel, P.; Ottenbacher, M.; Inniss, A.; Ware, D.; Anderson, K.; Stranges, S.; Keith, K.; Cromwell, R.; Neigut. J.; Powell, D.

    2012-01-01

    The UTMB/NASA Flight Analog Research Unit is an inpatient unit with a bionutrition kitchen and unique testing areas for studying subjects subjected to 6 degree head-down complete bed rest for prolonged periods as an analog for zero gravity. Bed rest allows study of physiological changes and performance of functional tasks representative of critical interplanetary mission operations and measures of the efficacy of countermeasures designed to protect against the resulting deleterious effects. METHODS/STUDY POPULATION: Subjects are healthy adults 24-55 years old; 60 75 in tall; body mass index 18.5-30; and bone mineral density normal by DXA scan. Over 100 subjects have been studied in 7 campaigns since 2004. The iRAT countermeasure combines high intensity interval aerobic exercises on alternating days with continuous aerobic exercise. Resistance exercise is performed 3 days per week. Subjects are tested on an integrated suite of functional and interdisciplinary physiological tests before and after 70 days of total bed rest. RESULTS/ANTICIPATED RESULTS: It is anticipated that post-bed rest functional performance will be predicted by a weighted combination of sensorimotor, cardiovascular and muscle physiological factors. Control subjects who do not participate in the exercise countermeasure will have significantly greater decreases in these parameters. DISCUSSION/SIGNIFICANCE OF IMPACT: Astronauts experience alterations in multiple physiological systems due to exposure to the microgravity, leading to disruption in the ability to perform functional tasks after reintroduction to a gravitational environment. Current flight exercise countermeasures are not fully protective of cardiovascular, muscle and bone health. There is a need to refine and optimize countermeasures to mitigate health risks associated with long-term space missions.

  18. Complications of immobilization and bed rest. Part 1: Musculoskeletal and cardiovascular complications.

    PubMed Central

    Dittmer, D. K.; Teasell, R.

    1993-01-01

    Prolonged bed rest and immobilization inevitably lead to complications. Such complications are much easier to prevent than to treat. Musculoskeletal complications include loss of muscle strength and endurance, contractures and soft tissue changes, disuse osteoporosis, and degenerative joint disease. Cardiovascular complications include an increased heart rate, decreased cardiac reserve, orthostatic hypotension, and venous thromboembolism. Images Figures 1-2 Figures 3-4 PMID:8324411

  19. Prolonged bed rest decreases skeletal muscle and whole body protein synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrando, A. A.; Lane, H. W.; Stuart, C. A.; Davis-Street, J.; Wolfe, R. R.

    1996-01-01

    We sought to determine the extent to which the loss of lean body mass and nitrogen during inactivity was due to alterations in skeletal muscle protein metabolism. Six male subjects were studied during 7 days of diet stabilization and after 14 days of stimulated microgravity (-6 degrees bed rest). Nitrogen balance became more negative (P < 0.03) during the 2nd wk of bed rest. Leg and whole body lean mass decreased after bed rest (P < 0.05). Serum cortisol, insulin, insulin-like growth factor I, and testosterone values did not change. Arteriovenous model calculations based on the infusion of L-[ring-13C6]-phenylalanine in five subjects revealed a 50% decrease in muscle protein synthesis (PS; P < 0.03). Fractional PS by tracer incorporation into muscle protein also decreased by 46% (P < 0.05). The decrease in PS was related to a corresponding decrease in the sum of intracellular amino acid appearance from protein breakdown and inward transport. Whole body protein synthesis determined by [15N]alanine ingestion on six subjects also revealed a 14% decrease (P < 0.01). Neither model-derived nor whole body values for protein breakdown change significantly. These results indicate that the loss of body protein with inactivity is predominantly due to a decrease in muscle PS and that this decrease is reflected in both whole body and skeletal muscle measures.

  20. Focal Gray Matter Plasticity as a Function of Long Duration Head-down Tilt Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppelmans, Vincent; Erdeniz, Burak; DeDios, Yiri; Wood, Scott; Reuter-Lorenz, Patricia; Kofman, Igor; Bloomberg, Jacob; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Seidler, Rachael

    2014-01-01

    Long duration spaceflight (i.e., 22 days or longer) has been associated with changes in sensorimotor systems, resulting in difficulties that astronauts experience with posture control, locomotion, and manual control. The microgravity environment is an important causal factor for spaceflight induced sensorimotor changes. Whether these sensorimotor changes may be related to structural and functional brain changes is yet unknown. However, increased intracranial pressure that by itself has been related to microgravity-induced bodily fluid shifts: [1] has been associated with white matter microstructural damage, [2] Thus, it is possible that spaceflight may affect brain structure and thereby cognitive functioning. Long duration head-down tilt bed rest has been suggested as an exclusionary analog to study microgravity effects on the sensorimotor system, [3] Bed rest mimics microgravity in body unloading and bodily fluid shifts. In consideration of the health and performance of crewmembers both in- and post-flight, we are conducting a prospective longitudinal 70-day bed rest study as an analog to investigate the effects of microgravity on brain structure, and [4] Here we present results of the first eight subjects.

  1. Collagen cross-link excretion during space flight and bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. M.; Nillen, J. L.; Leblanc, A.; Lipton, A.; Demers, L. M.; Lane, H. W.; Leach, C. S.; LeBlanc, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Extended exposure to weightlessness results in bone loss. However, little information exists as to the precise nature or time course of this bone loss. Bone resorption results in the release of collagen breakdown products, including N-telopeptide and the pyridinium (PYD) cross-links, pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline. Urinary pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline are known to increase during bed rest. We assessed excretion of PYD cross-links and N-telopeptide before, during, and after long (28-day, 59-day, and 84-day) Skylab missions, as well as during short (14-day) and long (119-day) bed-rest studies. During space flight, the urinary cross-link excretion level was twice those observed before flight. Urinary excretion levels of the collagen breakdown products were also 40-50% higher, during short and long bed rest, than before. These results clearly show that the changes in bone metabolism associated with space flight involve increased resorption. The rate of response (i.e. within days to weeks) suggests that alterations in bone metabolism are an early effect of weightlessness. These studies are important for a better understanding of bone metabolism in space crews and in those who are bedridden.

  2. Pyridoxic acid excretion during low vitamin B-6 intake, total fasting, and bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coburn, S. P.; Thampy, K. G.; Lane, H. W.; Conn, P. S.; Ziegler, P. J.; Costill, D. L.; Mahuren, J. D.; Fink, W. J.; Pearson, D. R.; Schaltenbrand, W. E.

    1995-01-01

    Vitamin B-6 metabolism in 10 volunteers during 21 d of total fasting was compared with results from 10 men consuming a diet low only in vitamin B-6 (1.76 mumol/d) and with men consuming a normal diet during bed rest. At the end of the fast mean plasma concentrations of vitamin B-6 metabolites and urinary excretion of 4-pyridoxic acid tended to be higher in the fasting subjects than in the low-vitamin B-6 group. The fasting subjects lost approximately 10% of their total vitamin B-6 pool and approximately 13% of their body weight. The low-vitamin B-6 group lost only approximately 4% of their vitamin B-6 pool. Compared with baseline, urinary excretion of pyridoxic acid was significantly increased during 17 wk of bed rest. There was no increase in pyridoxic acid excretion during a second 15-d bed rest study. These data suggest the possibility of complex interactions between diet and muscle metabolism that may influence indexes that are frequently used to assess vitamin B-6 status.

  3. Electrical impedance measurements in the arm and the leg during a thirty day bed rest study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardus, David; Jaweed, Mazher; McTaggart, Wesley

    1995-01-01

    The need to detect, follow, and understand the effects of gravity on body fluid distribution is a constant stimulus to the quest for new techniques in this area of research. One of these techniques is electrical bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS). Although not new, this is a technique whose applications to biomedical research are fairly recent. What is new is the development of instrumentation that has made practical the use of impedance spectroscopy in the biomedical setting, particularly in studies involving human subjects. The purpose of this paper is to report impedance spectroscopy observations made on a subject who was submitted to bed rest for a period of thirty days. These observations were made as part of a study on muscle atrophy during a thirty day head down bed rest. Since bed rest studies are very costly in human and financial terms, and technically difficult to realize, we felt that even though the present study deals only with a single case it was worthy of reporting because it illustrates kinds of questions impedance spectroscopy may help to answer in microgravity research.

  4. Comparison of Structural and Functional Ocular Outcomes Between 14- and 70 Day Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, R. L.; Taibbi, G.; Zanello, S. B.; Yarbough, P. O.; Ploutz-Snyder, R. J.; Vizzeri, G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To compare structural and functional ocular outcomes in healthy human subjects undergoing 14- and/or 70-day head-down-tilt bed rest (HDTBR). We hypothesized the amount of HDTBR-induced ocular changes be affected by the HDTBR duration. Methods: The studies were conducted at the NASA Flight Analogs Research Unit, The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Galveston, TX. Participants were selected using NASA standard screening procedures. Standardized NASA screening procedures and bed rest conditions (e.g., strict sleep-wake cycle, standardized diet, continuous video monitoring) were implemented in both studies. Participants maintained a 6deg HDTBR position for 14 and/or 70 consecutive days and did not engage in exercise. Weekly ophthalmological examinations were conducted in the sitting (pre/post-bed rest only) and HDT positions. Ocular outcomes of interest included: near best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA); spherical equivalent, as determined by cycloplegic autorefraction; Goldmann applanation tonometry and iCare (Icare Finland Oy, Espoo, Finland) intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement; color vision; red dot test; modified Amsler grid test; confrontational visual field; stereoscopic color fundus photography; Spectralis OCT (Heidelberg Engineering, GmbH, Heidelberg, Germany) retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT), peripapillary and macular retinal thicknesses. Mixed-effects linear models were used to compare pre- and post-HDTBR observations between 14- and 70-day HDTBR for our continuously scaled outcomes.

  5. Contributions of MSNA and stroke volume to orthostatic intolerance following bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoemaker, J. K.; Hogeman, C. S.; Sinoway, L. I.

    1999-01-01

    We examined whether the altered orthostatic tolerance following 14 days of head-down tilt bed rest (HDBR) was related to inadequate sympathetic outflow or to excessive reductions in cardiac output during a 10- to 15-min head-up tilt (HUT) test. Heart rate, blood pressure (BP, Finapres), muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA, microneurography), and stroke volume blood velocity (SVV, Doppler ultrasound) were assessed during supine 30 degrees (5 min) and 60 degrees (5-10 min) HUT positions in 15 individuals who successfully completed the pre-HDBR test without evidence of orthostatic intolerance. Subjects were classified as being orthostatically tolerant (OT, n = 9) or intolerant (OI, n = 6) following the post-HDBR test. MSNA, BP, and SVV during supine and HUT postures were not altered in the OT group. Hypotension during 60 degrees HUT in the post-bed rest test for the OI group (P < 0.05) was associated with a blunted increase in MSNA (P < 0.05). SVV was reduced following HDBR in the OI group (main effect of HDBR, P < 0.02). The data support the hypothesis that bed rest-induced orthostatic intolerance is related to an inadequate increase in sympathetic discharge that cannot compensate for a greater postural reduction in stroke volume.

  6. Markers of bone resorption and calcium metabolism are related to dietary intake patterns in male and female bed rest subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, S. R.; Hargens, A. r.

    2006-01-01

    Dietary potassium and protein intakes predict net endogenous acid production in humans. Intracellular buffers, including exchangeable bone mineral, play a crucial role in balancing chronic acid-base perturbations in the body; subsequently, chronic acid loads can potentially contribute to bone loss. Bone is lost during space flight, and a dietary countermeasure would be desirable for many reasons. We studied the ability of diet protein and potassium to predict levels of bone resorption markers in males and females. Identical twin pairs (8 M, 7 F) were assigned to 2 groups: bed rest (sedentary, SED) or bed rest with supine treadmill exercise in a lower body negative pressure chamber (EX). Diet was controlled for 3 d before and 30 d of bed rest (BR). Urinary Ca, N-telopeptide (NTX), and pyridinium crosslinks (PYD) were measured before and on days 5, 12, 19, and 26 of BR. Data were analyzed by Pearson correlation (P<0.05). The ratio of dietary animal protein/potassium intake was not correlated with NTX before BR for males or females, but they were positively correlated in both groups of males during bed rest. Dietary animal protein/potassium and urine Ca were correlated before and during bed rest for the males, and only during bed rest for the females. Conversely, the ratio of dietary vegetable protein/potassium intake was negatively correlated with urinary calcium during bed rest for the females, but there was no relationship between vegetable protein/potassium intake and bone markers for the males. These data suggest that the ratio of animal protein/potassium intake may affect bone, particularly in bed rest subjects. These data show that the type of protein and gender may be additional factors that modulate the effect of diet on bone metabolism during bed rest. Altering this ratio may help prevent bone loss on Earth and during space flight.

  7. The deleterious effects of bed rest on human skeletal muscle fibers are exacerbated by hypercortisolemia and ameliorated by dietary supplementation.

    PubMed

    Fitts, R H; Romatowski, J G; Peters, J R; Paddon-Jones, D; Wolfe, R R; Ferrando, A A

    2007-07-01

    Prolonged inactivity associated with bed rest in a clinical setting or spaceflight is frequently associated with hypercortisolemia and inadequate caloric intake. Here, we determined the effect of 28 days of bed rest (BR); bed rest plus hypercortisolemia (BRHC); and bed rest plus essential amino acid (AA) and carbohydrate (CHO) supplement (BRAA) on the size and function of single slow- and fast-twitch muscle fibers. Supplementing meals, the BRAA group consumed 16.5 g essential amino acids and 30 g sucrose at 1100, 1600, and 2100 h, and the BRHC subjects received 5 daily doses of 10-15 mg of oral hydrocortisone sodium succinate throughout bed rest. Bed rest induced atrophy and loss of force (mN) and power (muN.FL.s(-1)) in single fibers was exacerbated by hypercortisolemia where soleus peak force declined by 23% in the type I fiber from a prevalue of 0.78 +/- 0.02 to 0.60 +/- 0.02 mN post bed rest (compared to a 7% decline with bed rest alone) and 27% in the type II fiber (1.10 +/- 0.08 vs. 0.81 +/- 0.05 mN). In the BRHC group, peak power dropped by 19, 15, and 11% in the soleus type I, and vastus lateralis (VL) type I and II fibers, respectively. The AA/CHO supplement protected against the bed rest-induced loss of peak force in the type I soleus and peak power in the VL type II fibers. These results provide evidence that an AA/CHO supplement might serve as a successful countermeasure to help preserve muscle function during periods of relative inactivity. PMID:17409123

  8. The interplay of central and peripheral factors in limiting maximal O2 consumption in man after prolonged bed rest.

    PubMed Central

    Ferretti, G; Antonutto, G; Denis, C; Hoppeler, H; Minetti, A E; Narici, M V; Desplanches, D

    1997-01-01

    1. The effects of bed rest on the cardiovascular and muscular parameters which affect maximal O2 consumption (VO2,max) were studied. The fractional limitation of VO2,max imposed by these parameters after bed rest was analysed. 2. The VO2,max, by standard procedure, and the maximal cardiac output (Qmax), by the pulse contour method, were measured during graded cyclo-ergometric exercise on seven subjects before and after a 42-day head-down tilt bed rest. Blood haemoglobin concentration ([Hb]) and arterialized blood gas analysis were determined at the highest work load. 3. Muscle fibre types, oxidative enzyme activities, and capillary and mitochondrial densities were measured on biopsy samples from the vastus lateralis muscle before and at the end of bed rest. The measure of muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) by NMR imaging at the level of biopsy site allowed computation of muscle oxidative capacity and capillary length. 4. The VO2,max was reduced after bed rest (-16.6%). The concomitant decreases in Qmax (-30.8%), essentially due to a change in stroke volume, and in [Hb] led to a huge decrease in O2 delivery (-39.7%). 5. Fibre type distribution was unaffected by bed rest. The decrease in fibre area corresponded to the significant reduction in muscle CSA (-17%). The volume density of mitochondria was reduced after bed rest (-16.6%), as were the oxidative enzyme activities (-11%). The total mitochondrial volume was reduced by 28.5%. Capillary density was unchanged. Total capillary length was 22.2% lower after bed rest, due to muscle atrophy. 6. The interaction between these muscular and cardiovascular changes led to a smaller reduction in VO2,max than in cardiovascular O2 transport. Yet the latter appears to play the greatest role in limiting VO2,max after bed rest (> 70% of overall limitation), the remaining fraction being shared between peripheral O2 diffusion and utilization. PMID:9218227

  9. Neuro-Motor Responses to Daily Centrifugation in Bed-Rested Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, Millard F.; Somers, Jeffery T.; Krnavek, Jody; Fisher, Elizibeth; Ford, George; Paloski, William H.

    2007-01-01

    It is well known from numerous space flight studies that exposure to micro-g produces both morphological and neural adaptations in the major postural muscles. However, the characteristics and mechanism of these changes, particularly when it may involve the central nervous system are not defined. Furthermore, it is not known what role unloading of the muscular system may have on central changes in sensorimotor function or if centrifugation along the +Gz direction (long body axis) can mitigate both the peripheral changes in muscle function and modification of the central changes in sensorimotor adaptation to the near weightless environment of space flight. The purpose of this specific effort was, therefore, to investigate the efficacy of artificial gravity (AG) as a method for maintaining sensorimotor function in micro-g. Eight male subjects were exposed to daily 1 hr centrifugation during a 21 day 6 degree head-down bed rest study. Seven controls were placed on the centrifuge without rotation. The radius and angular velocity of the centrifuge were adjusted such that each subject experienced a centripetal acceleration of 2.5g at the feet, and approximately 1.0g at the heart. Both the tendon (MSR) and functional stretch reflexes (FSR) were collected using an 80 lb. ft. servomotor controlled via position feedback to provide a dorsiflexion step input to elicit the MSR, and the same step input with a built in 3 sec hold to evoke the FSR. EMG data were obtained from the triceps surae. Supplementary torque, velocity and position data were collected with the EMG responses. All data were digitized and sampled at 4 kHz. Only the MSR data has been analyzed at this time, and preliminary results suggest that those subjects exposed to active centrifugation (treatment group) show only minor changes in MSR peak latency times, either as a function of time spent in bed rest or exposure to centrifugation, while the control subjects show delays in the MSR peak latencies that are

  10. Stretch Reflex as a Simple Measure to Evaluate the Efficacy of Potential Flight Countermeasures Using the Bed Rest Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cerisano, J. M.; Reschke, M. F.; Kofman, I. S.; Fisher, E. A.; Harm, D. L.

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Spaceflight is acknowledged to have significant effects on the major postural muscles. However, it has been difficult to separate the effects of ascending somatosensory changes caused by the unloading of these muscles during flight from changes in sensorimotor function caused by a descending vestibulo-cerebellar response to microgravity. It is hypothesized that bed rest is an adequate model to investigate postural muscle unloading given that spaceflight and bed rest may produce similar results in both nerve axon and muscle tissue. METHODS: To investigate this hypothesis, stretch reflexes were measured on 18 subjects who spent 60 to 90 days in continuous 6 head-down bed rest. Using a motorized system capable of rotating the foot around the ankle joint (dorsiflexion) through an angle of 10 deg at a peak velocity of approximately 250 deg/sec, a stretch reflex was recorded from the subject's left triceps surae muscle group. Using surface electromyography, about 300 reflex responses were obtained and ensemble-averaged on 3 separate days before bed rest, 3 to 4 times in bed, and 3 times after bed rest. The averaged responses for each test day were examined for reflex latency and conduction velocity (CV) across gender and compared with spaceflight data. RESULTS: Although no gender differences were found, bed rest induced changes in reflex latency and CV similar to the ones observed during spaceflight. Also, a relationship between CV and loss of muscle strength in the lower leg was observed for most bed rest subjects. CONCLUSION: Even though bed rest (limb unloading) alone may not mimic all of the synaptic and muscle tissue loss that is observed as a result of spaceflight, it can serve as a working analog of flight for the evaluation of potential countermeasures that may be beneficial in mitigating unwanted changes in the major postural muscles that are observed post flight.

  11. Left ventricular remodeling during and after 60 days of sedentary head-down bed rest.

    PubMed

    Westby, Christian M; Martin, David S; Lee, Stuart M C; Stenger, Michael B; Platts, Steven H

    2016-04-15

    Short periods of weightlessness are associated with reduced stroke volume and left ventricular (LV) mass that appear rapidly and are thought to be largely dependent on plasma volume. The magnitude of these cardiac adaptations are even greater after prolonged periods of simulated weightlessness, but the time course during and the recovery from bed rest has not been previously described. We collected serial measures of plasma volume (PV, carbon monoxide rebreathing) and LV structure and function [tissue Doppler imaging, three-dimensional (3-D) and 2-D echocardiography] before, during, and up to 2 wk after 60 days of 6° head down tilt bed rest (HDTBR) in seven healthy subjects (four men, three women). By 60 days of HDTBR, PV was markedly reduced (2.7 ± 0.3 vs. 2.3 ± 0.3 liters,P< 0.001). Resting measures of LV volume and mass were ∼15% (P< 0.001) and ∼14% lower (P< 0.001), respectively, compared with pre-HDTBR values. After 3 days of reambulation, both PV and LV volumes were not different than pre-HDTBR values. However, LV mass did not recover with normalization of PV and remained 12 ± 4% lower than pre-bed rest values (P< 0.001). As previously reported, decreased PV and LV volume precede and likely contribute to cardiac atrophy during prolonged LV unloading. Although PV and LV volume recover rapidly after HDTBR, there is no concomitant normalization of LV mass. These results demonstrate that reduced LV mass in response to prolonged simulated weightlessness is not a simple effect of tissue dehydration, but rather true LV muscle atrophy that persists well into recovery. PMID:26494448

  12. Effect of prolonged LBNP and saline ingestion on plasma volume and orthostatic responses during bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortney, Suzanne M.; Dussack, Larry; Rehbein, Tracy; Wood, Margie; Steinmann, Laura

    1991-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance remains a significant problem following space flight despite frequent use of the saline fluid-loading countermeasure and volitional use of an anti-gravity suite during reentry and landing. The purpose of this project is to examine the plasma volume (PV), endocrine, and orthostatic responses of bedrested subjects following 2-hr and 4-hr treatments of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) and saline ingestion. Ten healthy men were randomly assigned into 2 groups. Group A underwent a 4-hr LBNP/saline treatment on best rest day 5 and the 2-hr treatment on day 11. Group B underwent the 2-hr treatment on day 6 and the 4-hr treatment on day 10. Blood volume was determined before and after bed rest using radiolabelling. Changes in PV between measurements were calculated from changes in hematocrit and estimated red cell volume. Urinary excretion of anti-diuretic hormone (ADH) and aldosterone (ALD) were measured each day during the study. Orthostatic responses were measured using a ramp LBNP protocol before bed rest, before each treatment, and 24 hours after each treatment. Both 2-hr and 4-hr treatments resulted in a restoration of PV to pre-bed rest levels which persisted at least 24 hours. This increase in PV was associated with significant increases in urinary excretion of ADH and ALD. Twenty-four hours after the 4-hr treatment, the heart rate and pulse pressure response to LBNP were significantly lower and stroke volumes during LBNP were increased. Twenty-four hours after the 2-hr treatment, there was no evidence of improvement in orthostatic responses. These results suggest that a countermeasure which simply restores PV during space flight may not be sufficient for restoring orthostatic responses.

  13. Use of lower body negative pressure to counter symptoms of orthostatic intolerance in patients, bed rest subjects, and astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathers, C. M.; Charles, J. B.

    1993-01-01

    This report briefly discusses some aspects of autonomic cardiovascular dysfunction as related to changes in orthostatic function in patients, bed rest subjects, and astronauts. This relationship is described in normal individuals to provide the basis for discussion of parameters that may be altered in patients, bed rest subjects, and astronauts. The relationships between disease states, age, periods of weightlessness during space flight, and autonomic dysfunction, and their contribution to changes in orthostatic tolerance are presented. The physiologic effects of lower body negative pressure are illustrated by presenting data obtained in bed rest subjects and in astronauts. Finally, the usefulness of lower body negative pressure to counter symptoms of orthostatic intolerance in patients, bed rest subjects, and astronauts is discussed.

  14. Symposium Conclusion: Women's cardiovascular health after bed rest or space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughson, Richard L.; Arbeille, Phillipe; Shoemaker, Kevin; Edgell, Heather

    The Canadian Space Agency has recently funded research on two long-duration missions to study cardiovascular deconditioning associated with bed rest or space flight. The first, Women's International Space simulation for Exploration (WISE-2005) examined the responses during a 60-day head down bed rest (HDBR) of 24 women with or without a countermeasure that consisted of supine treadmill running within a lower body negative pressure (LBNP) device followed by 10-minutes resting LBNP and on different days high intensity resistance exercise on a flywheel device. The second study, Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular Control on return from the International Space Station (CCISS) is currently underway with two male astronauts tested and the first woman anticipated later this year. Women have been previously identified as being more susceptible to orthostatic intolerance than men after both bed rest and space flight studies. Thus, in the WISE-2005 study we examined responses of the cardiovascular system after HDBR in women and compared these to previously published data from men. We found that after HDBR women have a greater increase in heart rate with infusion of the drug isoproterenol and this was consistent with observations in men. However, during drug infusion the women had a reduction in leg vascular resistance while men had an increase. The exercise countermeasure group had preserved heart rate and leg vascular resistance responses to drug infusion. The ability to vasoconstrict the legs and splanchnic region is critical to maintenance of upright posture after HDBR and space flight. In the WISE-2005 study, subjects who were able to constrict the legs and/or splanchnic region after HDBR were much less likely to have a marked drop in blood pressure before the end of 10-minutes upright tilt, and subjects who performed the countermeasure were more likely to be in this group of tilt test finishers. These data provide new insight into mechanisms that might be responsible for

  15. Cardiac atrophy after bed-rest deconditioning: a nonneural mechanism for orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, B. D.; Zuckerman, J. H.; Pawelczyk, J. A.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The cardiovascular adaptation to bed rest leads to orthostatic intolerance, characterized by an excessive fall in stroke volume (SV) in the upright position. We hypothesized that this large fall in SV is due to a change in cardiac mechanics. METHODS AND RESULTS: We measured pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP), SV, left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV), and left ventricular mass (by echocardiography) at rest, during lower-body negative pressure, and after saline infusion before and after 2 weeks of bed rest with -6 degrees head-down tilt (n=12 subjects aged 24+/-5 years). Pressure (P)-volume (V) curves were modeled exponentially by P=ae(kV)+b and logarithmically by P=-Sln[(Vm-V)/(Vm-V0)], where V0 indicates volume at P=0, and the constants k and S were used as indices of normalized chamber stiffness. Dynamic stiffness (dP/dV) was calculated at baseline LVEDV. The slope of the line relating SV to PCWP during lower-body negative pressure characterized the steepness of the Starling curve. We also measured plasma volume (with Evans blue dye) and maximal orthostatic tolerance. Bed rest led to a reduction in plasma volume (17%), baseline PCWP (18%), SV (12%), LVEDV (16%), V0 (33%), and orthostatic tolerance (24%) (all P<.05). The slope of the SV/PCWP curve increased from 4.6+/-0.4 to 8.8+/-0.9 mL/mm Hg (P<.01) owing to a parallel leftward shift in the P-V curve. Normalized chamber stiffness was unchanged, but dP/dV was reduced by 50% at baseline LVEDV, and cardiac mass tended to be reduced by 5% (P<.10). CONCLUSIONS: Two weeks of head-down-tilt bed rest leads to a smaller, less distensible left ventricle but a shift to a more compliant portion of the P-V curve. This results in a steeper Starling relationship, which contributes to orthostatic intolerance by causing an excessive reduction in SV during orthostasis.

  16. Physiological responses to prolonged bed rest and fluid immersion in man: A compendium of research (1974 - 1980)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Silverstein, L.; Bliss, J.; Langenheim, V.; Rosson, H.; Chao, C.

    1982-01-01

    Water immersion and prolonged bed rest reproduce nearly all the physiological responses observed in astronauts in the weightless state. Related to actual weightlessness, given responses tend to occur sooner in immersion and later in bed rest. Much research was conducted on humans using these two techniques, especially by Russian scientists. Abstracts and annotations of reports that appeared in the literature from January 1974 through December 1980 are compiled and discussed.

  17. Deterioration of left ventricular chamber performance after bed rest : "cardiovascular deconditioning" or hypovolemia?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perhonen, M. A.; Zuckerman, J. H.; Levine, B. D.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Orthostatic intolerance after bed rest is characterized by hypovolemia and an excessive reduction in stroke volume (SV) in the upright position. We studied whether the reduction in SV is due to a specific adaptation of the heart to head-down tilt bed rest (HDTBR) or acute hypovolemia alone. METHODS AND RESULTS: We constructed left ventricular (LV) pressure-volume curves from pulmonary capillary wedge pressure and LV end-diastolic volume and Starling curves from pulmonary capillary wedge pressure and SV during lower body negative pressure and saline loading in 7 men (25+/-2 years) before and after 2 weeks of -6 degrees HDTBR and after the acute administration of intravenous furosemide. Both HDTBR and hypovolemia led to a similar reduction in plasma volume. However, baseline LV end-diastolic volume decreased by 20+/-4% after HDTBR and by 7+/-2% after hypovolemia (interaction P<0.001). Moreover, SV was reduced more and the Starling curve was steeper during orthostatic stress after HDTBR than after hypovolemia. The pressure-volume curve showed a leftward shift and the equilibrium volume of the left ventricle was decreased after HDTBR; however, after hypovolemia alone, the curve was identical, with no change in equilibrium volume. Lower body negative pressure tolerance was reduced after both conditions; it decreased by 27+/-7% (P<0.05) after HDTBR and by 18+/-8% (P<0.05) after hypovolemia. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic HDTBR leads to ventricular remodeling, which is not seen with equivalent degrees of acute hypovolemia. This remodeling leads to a greater decrease in SV during orthostatic stress after bed rest than hypovolemia alone, potentially contributing to orthostatic intolerance.

  18. Bone mineral loss and recovery after 17 weeks of bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, A. D.; Schneider, V. S.; Evans, H. J.; Engelbretson, D. A.; Krebs, J. M.; LaBlanc, A. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the rate and extent of bone loss and recovery from long-term disuse and in particular from disuse after exposure to weightlessness. For this purpose, bed rest is used to simulate the reduced stress and strain on the skeleton. This study reports on the bone loss and recovery after 17 weeks of continuous bed rest and 6 months of reambulation in six normal male volunteers. Bone regions measured were the lumbar spine, hip, tibia, forearm, calcaneus, total body, and segmental regions from the total-body scan. The total body, lumbar spine, femoral neck, trochanter, tibia, and calcaneus demonstrated significant loss, p less than 0.05. Expressed as the percentage change from baseline, these were 1.4, 3.9, 3.6, 4.6, 2.2, and 10.4, respectively. Although several areas showed positive slopes during reambulation, only the calcaneus was significant (p less than 0.05), with nearly 100% recovery. Segmental analysis of the total-body scans showed significant loss (p less than 0.05) in the lumbar spine, total spine, pelvis, trunk, and legs. During reambulation, the majority of the regions demonstrated positive slopes, although only the pelvis and trunk were significant (p less than 0.05). Potential redistribution of bone mineral was observed: during bed rest the bone mineral increased in the skull of all subjects. The change in total BMD and calcium from calcium balance were significantly (p less than 0.05) correlated, R = 0.88.

  19. Multi-System Effects of Daily Artificial Gravity Exposures in Humans Deconditioned by Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloski, William H.

    2007-01-01

    We have begun to explore the utility of intermittent artificial gravity (AG) as a multi-system countermeasure to the untoward health and performance effects of adaptation to decreased gravity during prolonged space flight. The first study in this exploration was jointly designed by an international, multi-disciplinary team of scientists interested in standardizing an approach so that comparable data could be obtained from follow-on studies performed in multiple international locations. Fifteen rigorously screened male volunteers participated in the study after providing written informed consent. All were subjected to 21 days of 6deg head-down-tilt (HDT) bed rest. Eight were treated with daily 1hr AG exposures (2.5g at the feet decreasing to 1.0g at the heart) aboard a short radius (3m) centrifuge, while the other seven served as controls. Multiple observations were made of dependent measures in the bone, muscle, cardiovascular, sensory-motor, immune, and behavioral systems during a 10 day acclimatization period prior to HDT bed rest and again during an 8 day recovery period after the bed rest period. Comparisons between the treatment and control subjects demonstrated salutary effects of the AG exposure on aspects of the muscle and cardiovascular systems, with no untoward effects on the vestibular system, the immune system, or cognitive function. Bone deconditioning was similar between the treatment and control groups, suggesting that the loading provided by this specific AG paradigm was insufficient to protect that system from deconditioning. Future work will be devoted to varying the loading duty cycle and/or coupling the AG loading with exercise to provide maximum physiological protection across all systems. Testing will also be extended to female subjects. The results of this study suggest that intermittent AG could be an effective multi-system countermeasure.

  20. Psychoneuroendocrine alterations during 5 days of head-down tilt bed rest and artificial gravity interventions.

    PubMed

    Choukèr, A; Feuerecker, B; Matzel, S; Kaufmann, I; Strewe, C; Hoerl, M; Schelling, G; Feuerecker, M

    2013-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate psychological stress and endocrine responses during 5 days of head-down tilt bed rest (HDTBR) with or without the impact of artificial gravity (AG). Participants were assigned to one of three bed-rest-protocols either with (i) no centrifugation, (ii) continuous 30 min (AG1) or (iii) discontinuous 6 × 5 min (AG2) centrifugation periods at 1G in the center of mass periods. Centrifugations were performed daily in one session. Questionnaires for assessing psychological stress and the corresponding biological sample collection were performed before, during and after HDTBR or centrifugation. Overall, questionnaires showed no significant changes of anxiety or emotional stress during HDTBR. In the AG1-group, salivary cortisol levels were significantly higher after centrifugation irrespective of the progress of the HDTBR and day of intervention. The AG2-group showed higher cortisol concentrations after centrifugation only on the first days of head-down tilt but no more on day 5 of HDTBR. During bed rest, urine epinephrine excretion increased in all groups, but showed the highest day concentrations in the AG1-group, which were also significantly higher when compared with AG2. These results indicate that 5 days of HDT alone is not a major stressor and accordingly resulted only in moderate changes of neuroendocrine responses over time. However, daily centrifugation for a continuous duration of 30 min induced a significant neuroendocrine response, which was not subject to a habituation as compared with daily but intermittent centrifugation for 6 × 5 min. Discontinuous centrifugation is better tolerated and associated with lower adrenocortical stress responses during HDTBR. PMID:23579361

  1. Artificial Gravity as a Multi-System Countermeasure to Bed Rest Deconditioning: Pilot Study Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloski, William H.; Young, L. R.

    2007-01-01

    Efficient, effective, multi-system countermeasures will likely be required to protect the health, safety, and performance of crews aboard planned exploration-class space flight missions to Mars and beyond. To that end, NASA, DLR, and IMBP initiated a multi-center international project to begin systematically exploring the utility of artificial gravity (AG) as a multi-system countermeasure in ground based venues using test subjects deconditioned by bed rest. The goal of this project is to explore the efficacy of short-radius, intermittent AG as a countermeasure to bone, muscle, cardiovascular, and sensory-motor adaptations to hypogravity. This session reports the results from a pilot study commissioned to validate a standardized protocol to be used by all centers involved in the project. Subject selection criteria, medical monitoring requirements, medical care procedures, experiment control procedures, and standardized dependent measures were established jointly. Testing was performed on 15 rigorously screened male volunteers subjected to 21 days of 6deg HDT bed rest. (All provided written consent to volunteer after the nature of the study and its hazards were clearly explained to them.) Eight were treated with daily 1hr AG exposures (2.5g at the feet decreasing to 1.0g at the heart) aboard a short radius (3m) centrifuge, while the other seven served as controls. Multiple tests of multiple dependent measures were made in each of the primary physiological systems of interest during a 10 day acclimatization period prior to HDT bed rest and again during an 8 day recovery period after the bed rest period was complete. Analyses of these data (presented in other papers in this session) suggest the AG prescription had salutary effects on aspects of the bone, muscle, and cardiovascular systems, with no untoward effects on the vestibular system, the immune system, or cognitive function. Furthermore, treatment subjects were able to tolerate 153/160 centrifuge sessions over

  2. Zinc and Copper Balances During 3 Weeks of Bed Rest, With or Without Artificial Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heacox, Hayley

    2016-01-01

    During my internship with the Johnson Space Center's Nutritional Biochemistry Laboratory, I led on a project evaluating the effects of bed rest on copper and zinc metabolism to better understand the role of these nutrients in human adaptation to (simulated) space flight. Furthermore, the effects of artificial gravity, a multisystem countermeasure, were explored. In this project, I studied mineral balance is defined as the body's net loss or gain of a nutrient over time, and thus losses (in urine or feces) are subtracted from dietary intake. In my project, it was hypothesized that artificial gravity may have more of an effect on muscle versus bone, and this may be evident through effects observed with copper and zinc. In this study, dietary intake and fecal excretion of zinc and copper were previously determined. I was responsible for determining urinary zinc and copper content. This required preparation of all urine samples in a 1:10 dilution fashion with a diluent comprised of 1%Nitric Acid (grade), 2% ETOH, and 0.005% Triton X-100 in 18mOhm water along with a 1:1 Gallium Germanium internal standard. The diluted samples were then analyzed via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Concentrations were determined by comparing unknown sample analyses to calibration curves, which were prepared daily. Upon completing cumulative copper and zinc balance determinations, I found that AG-treated subjects had more positive copper balance than control subjects during best, which suggests that AG-treated subjects tended to retain more copper. The opposite was observed for zinc; although positive, AG-treated subjects had a lower zinc balance than control subjects during bed rest. This suggests less preservation of this mineral. Previously, cumulative calcium balance was determined for this study. It was found that calcium balance decreased in both control and AG-treated subjects during bed rest. The zinc and copper balances found in this study reveal positive

  3. Analysis of Arterial Mechanics During Head-down Tilt Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, Morgan; Martin, David S.; Westby, Christian M.; Stenger, Michael B.; Platts, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Arterial health may be affected by microgravity or ground based analogs of spaceflight, as shown by an increase in thoracic aorta stiffness1. Head-down tilt bed rest (HDTBR) is often used as a ground-based simulation of spaceflight because it induces physiological changes similar to those that occur in space2, 3. This abstract details an analysis of arterial stiffness (a subclinical measure of atherosclerosis), the distensibility coefficient (DC), and the pressure-strain elastic modulus (PSE) of the arterial walls during HDTBR. This project may help determine how spaceflight differentially affects arterial function in the upper vs. lower body.

  4. WISE-2005: Integrative Cardiovascular Responses with LBNP during 60-Day Bed Rest in Women

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughson, R. L.; Kerbeci, P.; Arbeille, Ph.; Mattar, L.; Shoemaker, J. K.

    2005-01-01

    During 2005, 24 women will take part in the Women International Space-simulation for Exploration (WISE). In this paper we report on the first phase that studied 4 Exercise (EX+LBNP), 4 nutrition (NUT), and 4 no countermeasure control (CON) subjects. The EX+LBNP group completed regular exercise on a treadmill inside LBNP, flywheel resistive exercise and static periods of LBNP, and had recovery days. The NUT group received daily protein supplements. Integrative cardiovascular responses were obtained and here we report data for heart rate during LBNP, blood volume and angiotensin 11. LBNP was applied at 0, -10, -20 and -30 mmHg for 2-minutes for each stage. Blood was sampled prebed rest and on HDT-60. After 60-days head down bed rest, HR in the CON group increased by 6.1+/-2.8 bpm at rest and by 20.7+/-5.0 bpm at -30 mmHg LBNP. The EX+LBNP group had increases of 3.6+/-5.6 and 11.6+/-5.4 bpm, while the NUT group HR increased 2.6+/-3.1 and 9.4+/-3.6 bpm. The EX+LBNP group had almost no change in blood volume or plasma angiotensin II from pre-bed rest to HDT60, while both the CON and NUT groups had larger increases in plasma volume and almost double concentrations of angiotensin II. These data show a positive effect in the EX+LBNP group on the heart rate response as well as an unexpected possible benefit in the NUT group. Further studies are required to confirm possible cardiovascular benefits of the protein supplement.

  5. Use of bed rest and head-down tilt to simulate spaceflight-induce immune system changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, D. A.; Schaffar, L.; Taylor, G. R.; Loftin, K. C.; Schneider, V. S.; Koebel, A.; Abbal, M.; Sonnenfeld, G.; Lewis, D. E.; Reuben, J. R.; Ferebee, R.

    1996-01-01

    Bed rest, both with and without head-down tilt, has been extensively used as an earth-bound analog to study physiologic effects mimicking those occurring in weightlessness during spaceflight. We have been able to show in six subjects that 4 weeks of head-down tilt bed rest induces a significant decrease in interleukin-2 secretion by PHA-stimulated T lymphocytes. Another study, lasting 113 days, with two subjects showed a decreased interleukin-2 receptor expression in PHA-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells but a decreased interleukin-2 production in one subject only. Under the same conditions, interleukin-1 production was largely increased in both subjects. Several other immune parameters were also analyzed. Increased interleukin-1 production could contribute to bone mineral loss encountered during bed rest and decreased interleukin-2 secretion could play a role in the appearance of infectious diseases often observed during bed red.

  6. Fluid and electrolyte shifts in women during +Gz acceleration after 15 days' bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Stinnett, H. O.; Davis, G. L.; Kollias, J.; Bernauer, E. M.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on twelve women aged 23-34 yr - a bed rest (BR) group of eight subjects and an ambulatory (AMB) group of four subjects - to determine the effect of bed rest on shifts in plasma volume, electrolytes, and erythrocyte volume during +Gz acceleration on a centrifuge. The BR group underwent the +Gz acceleration during a two-week ambulatory control period, after 15 days of a 17-day BR period, and on the third day of ambulatory recovery. The AMB group underwent the same experimental procedures, but continued their normal daily routine during the BR period without additional prescribed physical exercise. Major conclusions are that (1) the higher the mean control tolerance, the greater the tolerance decline after BR; (2) relative confinement and reduced activity contribute as much to reduction in tolerance as does the horizontal body position during BR; (3) BR deconditioning has no effect on the erythrocyte volume during +3.0 Gz; and (4) about one-half the loss in tolerance after BR can be attributed to plasma volume and electrolyte shifts.

  7. Disproportionate loss of thin filaments in human soleus muscle after 17-day bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, D. A.; Bain, J. L.; Thompson, J. L.; Fitts, R. H.; Widrick, J. J.; Trappe, S. W.; Trappe, T. A.; Costill, D. L.

    1998-01-01

    Previously we reported that, after 17-day bed rest unloading of 8 humans, soleus slow fibers atrophied and exhibited increased velocity of shortening without fast myosin expression. The present ultrastructural study examined fibers from the same muscle biopsies to determine whether decreased myofilament packing density accounted for the observed speeding. Quantitation was by computer-assisted morphometry of electron micrographs. Filament densities were normalized for sarcomere length, because density depends directly on length. Thick filament density was unchanged by bed rest. Thin filaments/microm2 decreased 16-23%. Glycogen filled the I band sites vacated by filaments. The percentage decrease in thin filaments (Y) correlated significantly (P < 0.05) with the percentage increase in velocity (X), (Y = 0.1X + 20%, R2 = 0.62). An interpretation is that fewer filaments increases thick to thin filament spacing and causes earlier cross-bridge detachment and faster cycling. Increased velocity helps maintain power (force x velocity) as atrophy lowers force. Atrophic muscles may be prone to sarcomere reloading damage because force/microm2 was near normal, and force per thin filament increased an estimated 30%.

  8. Tensiomygraphic Measurement of Atrophy Related Processes During Bed Rest and Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simunic, B. ostjan; Degens, Hans; Rittweger, Jorn; Narici, Marcco; Pisot, Venceslav; Mekjavic, Igor B.; Pisot, Rado

    2013-02-01

    Tensiomyographic (TMG) parameters were recently proposed for a non-invasive estimation of MHC distribution in human vastus lateralis muscle. However, TMG potential is even higher, offers additional insight into the skeletal muscle physiology, especially in the field of atrophy and hypertrophy. The purpose of this study is in developing time dynamics of TMG-measured contraction time (Tc) and maximal response amplitude (Dm), together with muscle belly thickness, measure thoroughly during 35-day bed rest and followed in 30-day recovery (N = 10 males; age 24.3 ± 2.6 years). Measurements were performed in two postural muscles (vastus medialis and lateralis) and one non-postural muscle (biceps femoris). During bed rest period we found different dynamics of muscle thickness decrease and Dm increase. Tc was unchanged in postural muscles, but in non-postural muscle increased significantly and stayed as such even at the end of recovery. We could conclude that TMG related parameters are more sensitive in measuring muscle atrophic and hypertrophic processes than biomedical imaging technique. However, a mechanism that regulates Dm still needs to be identified.

  9. Effects of Daily Centrifugation on Segmental Fluid Distribution in Bed-rested Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diedrich, Andre; Moore, S. T.; Stenger, M.; Arya, T. M.; Newby, N.; Tucker, J. M.; Milstead, L.; Acock, K.; Knapp, C.; Jevans, J.; Paloski, W.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of daily centrifugation on segmental fluid distribution have been studied during 21 days of 6 degree head down bedrest. One group (N=7) underwent no countermeasure while the other (N=8) received a daily, one hour, dose (2.5 gz at the foot, decreasing to 1.0 gz at the heart) of artificial gravity (AG) training on the Johnson Space Center short radius centrifuge. Fluid shifts of thoracic(VTO), abdominal (VAB), thigh (VTH), and calf (VCA) regions were measured by the tetrapolar segmental body impedance technique. Untrained subjects reduced their total volume from 18.9 plus or minus 0.5L to 17.9 plus or minus 0.9L (MN plus or minus SE, P less than 0.05) while trained subjects maintained their total volume. In untrained, control, subjects after bed rest, there was a trend toward reduced volume in all segments, with significant reductions in thigh and calf (fig, P less than 0.05). Trained subjects maintained volume in all segments. Our data indicate that artificial gravity treatment counteracts bed rest-induced hypovolemia.

  10. Surveillance of Ocular Parameters and Visual Function in Bed Rest Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, Ronita L.

    2011-01-01

    Recent visual changes in astronauts have raised concern about ocular health during long duration spaceflight. Seven cases have been documented in astronauts who spent 6 months aboard the International Space Station. These astronauts were male ranging in age from 45 to 55 years old. All astronauts exhibited pre- to post flight refractive changes. Decreased intraocular pressure (IOP) post flight was observed in 3 cases. Fundoscopic exams revealed post flight findings of choroidal folds in 4 cases, optic disc edema in 5 cases and the presence of cotton wool spots in 3 cases. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) confirmed findings of choroidal folds and disc edema, and also documented retinal nerve fiber layer thickening (5 cases). Findings from MRI examinations showed posterior globe flattening (5 cases), optic nerve sheath distention (6 cases) and torturous optic nerves (2 cases). Of the 7 cases, intracranial pressure was measured on 4 astronauts. These 4 showed elevated ICP post-flight that remained elevated for as long as 19 months in one case. While the etiology remains unknown, hypotheses speculate that venous insufficiency or hypertension in the brain caused by cephalad fluid shifts during spaceflight are possible mechanisms for ocular changes seen in astronauts. Head-down tilt bed rest is a spaceflight analog that induces cephalad fluid shifts. This study is designed to provide ocular monitoring of bed rest subjects and determine whether clinically relevant changes are found. Ocular Changes

  11. Study of bone mineral metabolism. [during body immobilization, bed rest, and space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    The use of Sr-85 as an indicator of the skeletal location and relative amount of bone demineralization which occurs during immobilization of the body or body parts, bed-rest or space flight was studied. The bone mineral replacement which occurs after immobilization was measured rather than the bone loss which occurs during immobilization. In a study with two adult beagle dogs, the Sr-85 uptake in a leg which had been immobilized for two months was 400 percent higher than the uptake in the legs in regular use. This increased uptake probably resulted from only a few percent loss in bone mineral and indicates that losses less than one percent can be easily detected and located. The sensitivity, simplicity, and low radiation dose associated with the use of this method indicates that it should receive consideration for use on humans in bed-rest and space flight studies. Methods for measuring changes in total body nitrogen and in assisting the Johnson Space Center in calibrating a whole body counter for total body potassium measurements were also investigated.

  12. Changes in prevalence of subjective fatigue during 14-day 6° head-down bed rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayanagi, Kaname; Natsuno, Toyoki; Shiozawa, Tomoki; Yamaguchi, Nobuhisa; Watanabe, Yoriko; Suzuki, Satomi; Iwase, Satoshi; Mano, Tadaaki; Yajima, Kazuyoshi

    2009-06-01

    The present study examines the prevalence of subjective fatigue in young healthy males during 14 days of 6° head-down bed rest (HDBR) by using a multidimensional questionnaire. Forty-one subjects completed the Subjective Fatigue Scale questionnaire to assess the fatigue-related complaints and symptoms. The questionnaire is composed of three sections, with 10 items each. The sections measured drowsiness and dullness (Section 1), difficulty in concentration (Section 2), and the projection of physical disintegration (Section 3). The subjects answered simple questions between 1400 and 1700 on 6 measurement days before and during the HDBR period. The prevalence rate of low back pain was markedly high (80.5%) on the second day and more than 50% in the first half of the HDBR period, and any complaints related to either a lack of sleep or a deterioration in the quality of sleep continued until the end of the HDBR period. Our findings may be useful in developing preventive strategies against physical and mental fatigue associated with prolonged HDBR, horizontal bed rest, and microgravity environments.

  13. Head-down-tilt bed rest alters forearm vasodilator and vasoconstrictor responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoemaker, J. K.; Hogeman, C. S.; Silber, D. H.; Gray, K.; Herr, M.; Sinoway, L. I.

    1998-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that head-down-tilt bed rest (HDBR) for 14 days alters vascular reactivity to vasodilatory and vasoconstrictor stimuli, the reactive hyperemic forearm blood flow (RHBF, measured by venous occlusion plethysmography) and mean arterial pressure (MAP, measured by Finapres) responses after 10 min of circulatory arrest were measured in a control trial (n = 20) and when sympathetic discharge was increased by a cold pressor test (RHBF + cold pressor test; n = 10). Vascular conductance (VC) was calculated (VC = RHBF/MAP). In the control trial, peak RHBF at 5 s after circulatory arrest (34.1 +/- 2.5 vs. 48.9 +/- 4.3 ml . 100 ml-1 . min-1) and VC (0.34 +/- 0.02 vs. 0.53 +/- 0.05 ml . 100 ml-1 . min-1 . mmHg-1) were reduced in the post- compared with the pre-HDBR tests (P < 0. 05). Total excess RHBF over 3 min was diminished in the post- compared with the pre-HDBR trial (84.8 vs. 117 ml/100 ml, P < 0.002). The ability of the cold pressor test to lower forearm blood flow was less in the post- than in the pre-HDBR test (P < 0.05), despite similar increases in MAP. These data suggest that regulation of vascular dilation and the interaction between dilatory and constrictor influences were altered with bed rest.

  14. Identification of vascular responses to exercise and orthostatic stress in bed rest-induced cardiovascular deconditioning.

    PubMed

    Aletti, Federico; Ferrario, Manuela; Tam, Enrico; Cautero, Michela; Cerutti, Sergio; Capelli, Carlo; Baselli, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of bed rest-induced cardiovascular deconditioning were investigated by means of a previously developed multivariate model for the assessment of arterial control of circulation. The vascular response to exercise and tilt, before and after a 14-day head down tilt bed rest, was identified and disentangled from the main mechanisms due to global, neural control of circulation. Results of the decomposition of diastolic pressure and pulse pressure beat-by-beat series and the relevant spectral analysis suggested that the autoregulation-related response is not affected by prolonged exposition to microgravity. As to the complex regulation of arterial blood pressure, a maintained responsiveness to sympathetic stimuli was found, even in presence of indications of the cardiovascular deconditioning, such as tachycardia, reset of baroreflex, cardiopulmonary unloading. These preliminary results emphasized the necessity for more complex analyses of the main alterations and compensatory mechanisms elicited by microgravity-induced-cardiovascular deconditioning, in order to develop more effective long term strategies to prevent it. PMID:19963898

  15. Postural responses of head and foot cutaneous microvascular flow and their sensitivity to bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aratow, Michael; Hargens, Alan R.; Meyer, J.-UWE; Arnaud, Sara B.

    1991-01-01

    To explore the mechanism for facial puffiness, headache, and nasal congestion associated with microgravity and cephalad fluid shifts, the postural responses of the cutaneous microcirculation (CMC) in the forehead and dorsum of the foot of eight healthy men were studied by changing body position on a tilt table and measuring blood flows with a laser Doppler flowmeter. Increasing arterial pressure in the feet by moving from a -6-deg head-down tilt to a 60-deg head-up posture decreased foot CMC by 46.5 + or - 12.0 percent. Raising arterial pressure in the head increased forehead CMC by 25.5 + or - 0.7 percent (p less than 0.05). To investigate the possibility that these opposite responses could be modified by simulated microgravity, tilt test were repeated after 7 d of -6-deg head-down-tilt bed rest. The responses were not significantly different from those recorded before bed rest. Therefore, CMC in the feet is well regulated to prevent edema when shifting to an upright position, whereas there is less regulation in the head CMC.

  16. Five days of head-down-tilt bed rest induces noninflammatory shedding of L-selectin.

    PubMed

    Feuerecker, M; Feuerecker, B; Matzel, S; Long, M; Strewe, C; Kaufmann, I; Hoerl, M; Schelling, G; Rehm, M; Choukèr, A

    2013-07-15

    Head-down-tilt bed rest (HDTBR) is a popular model, simulating alterations of gravitation during space missions. The aim of this study was to obtain a better insight into the complexly orchestrated regulations of HDTBR-induced immunological responses, hypothesizing that artificial gravity can mitigate these HDTBR-related physiological effects. This crossover-designed 5 days of HDTBR study included three protocols with no, or daily 30 min of centrifugation or 6 × 5 min of centrifugation. Twelve healthy, male participants donated blood pre-HDTBR, post-HDTBR, and twice during HDTBR. Cellular immune changes were assessed either by enumerative and immune cell phenotyping assays or by functional testing of responses to either recall antigens or receptor-dependent activation by chemotactic agents N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and with TNF-α. The expression of the adhesion molecule L-selectin (CD62L) on the surface of granulocytes and its shedding into plasma samples were measured. In parallel, other humoral factor, such as interleukin-6 and interleukin-8, parameters of endothelial damage (glycocalyx) were determined. Hematocrit and hemoglobin were significantly increased during HDTBR. Although immune functional tests did not indicate a change in the immune performance, the expression of CD62L on resting granulocytes was significantly shed by 50% during HDTBR. Although the latter is normally associated to an activation of inflammatory innate immune responses and during interaction of granulocytes with the endothelium, CD62L shedding was, however, not related either to a systemic inflammatory alteration or to shedding of the endothelial glycocalyx during bed rest. This suggests a noninflammatory or "mechanical" shedding related to fluid shifts during head-down intervention and not to an acute inflammatory process. PMID:23681910

  17. Lower body negative pressure treadmill exercise as a countermeasure for bed rest-induced bone loss in female identical twins

    PubMed Central

    Zwart, Sara R.; Hargens, Alan R.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Macias, Brandon R.; Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Tse, Kevin; Smith, Scott M.

    2007-01-01

    Supine weight-bearing exercise within lower body negative pressure (LBNP) alleviates some of the skeletal deconditioning induced by simulated weightlessness in men. We examined the potential beneficial effect in women. Because dietary acid load affected the degree of bone resorption in men during bed rest, we also investigated this variable in women. Subjects were 7 pairs of female identical twins assigned at random to 2 groups, sedentary bed rest (control) or bed rest with supine treadmill exercise within LBNP. Dietary intake was controlled and monitored. Urinary calcium and markers of bone resorption were measured before bed rest (BR) and on BR days 5/6, 12/13, 19/20, and 26/27. Bone mineral content was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry before and after bed rest. Data were analyzed by repeated measures two-way analysis of variance. Pearson correlation coefficients were used to define the relationships between diet and markers of bone metabolism, and to estimate heritability of markers. During bed rest, all markers of bone resorption and urinary calcium and phosphorus increased (P < 0.001); parathyroid hormone (P = 0.06), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (P = 0.06), and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (P = 0.09) tended to decrease. LBNP exercise tended to mitigate bone density loss. The ratio of dietary animal protein to potassium was positively correlated with urinary calcium excretion for all weeks of bed rest in the control group, but only during weeks 1 and 3 for the exercise group. Pre-bed rest data suggested that many markers of bone metabolism have strong genetic determinants. Treadmill exercise within LBNP had less of a protective effect on bone resorption during bed rest in women than previously-published results had shown for its effect in men, but the same trends were observed for both sexes. Dietary acid load of these female subjects was significantly correlated with calcium excretion but not with other bone resorption markers. PMID:17070743

  18. FemHab: The effects of bed rest and hypoxia on oxidative stress in healthy women.

    PubMed

    Debevec, Tadej; Pialoux, Vincent; Ehrström, Sabine; Ribon, Alexandra; Eiken, Ola; Mekjavic, Igor B; Millet, Grégoire P

    2016-04-15

    Independently, both inactivity and hypoxia augment oxidative stress. This study, part of the FemHab project, investigated the combined effects of bed rest-induced unloading and hypoxic exposure on oxidative stress and antioxidant status. Healthy, eumenorrheic women were randomly assigned to the following three 10-day experimental interventions: normoxic bed rest (NBR;n= 11; PiO2 = 133 mmHg), normobaric hypoxic bed rest (HBR;n= 12; PiO2 = 90 mmHg), and ambulatory hypoxic confinement (HAMB;n= 8: PiO2 = 90 mmHg). Plasma samples, obtained before (Pre), during (D2, D6), immediately after (Post) and 24 h after (Post+1) each intervention, were analyzed for oxidative stress markers [advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP), malondialdehyde (MDA), and nitrotyrosine], antioxidant status [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and uric acid (UA)], NO metabolism end-products (NOx), and nitrites. Compared with baseline, AOPP increased in NBR and HBR on D2 (+14%; +12%;P< 0.05), D6 (+19%; +15%;P< 0.05), and Post (+22%; +21%;P< 0.05), respectively. MDA increased at Post+1 in NBR (+116%;P< 0.01) and D2 in HBR (+114%;P< 0.01) and HAMB (+95%;P< 0.05). Nitrotyrosine decreased (-45%;P< 0.05) and nitrites increased (+46%;P< 0.05) at Post+1 in HAMB only. Whereas SOD was higher at D6 (+82%) and Post+1 (+67%) in HAMB only, the catalase activity increased on D6 (128%) and Post (146%) in HBR and HAMB, respectively (P< 0.05). GPX was only reduced on D6 (-20%;P< 0.01) and Post (-18%;P< 0.05) in HBR. No differences were observed in FRAP and NOx. UA was higher at Post in HBR compared with HAMB (P< 0.05). These data indicate that exposure to combined inactivity and hypoxia impairs prooxidant/antioxidant balance in healthy women. Moreover, habitual activity levels, as opposed to inactivity, seem to blunt hypoxia-related oxidative stress via antioxidant system upregulation. PMID:26796757

  19. Physiological responses of women to simulated weightlessness: A review of the first female bed-rest study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandler, H.; Winter, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    Subjects were exposed to centrifugation, to lower body negative pressure (LBNP), and to exericse stress both before and after bed rest. Areas studied were centrifugation tolerance, fluid electrolyte changes and hematology, tolerance to LBNP, physical working capacity, biochemistries, blood fibrinolytic activity, female metabolic and hormonal responses, circadian alterations, and gynecology. Results were compared with the responses observed in similarly bed-rested male subjects. The bed-rested females showed deconditioning responses similar to those of the males, although with some differences. Results indicate that women are capable of coping with exposure to weightlessness and, moreover, that they may be more sensitive subjects for evaluating countermeasures to weightlessness and developing criteria for assessing applicants for shuttle voyages.

  20. Effects of 45-day -6° head-down bed rest on the time-based prospective memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, SiYi; Zhou, RenLai; Xiu, LiChao; Chen, ShanGuang; Chen, XiaoPing; Tan, Cheng

    2013-03-01

    The research explored the effects of 45-day -6° head-down bed rest (HDBR) simulation of microgravity on the time-based prospective memory (PM) with 16 males. The time-based prospective memory task was performed on the 2nd day before HDBR, on the 11th, 20th, 32nd, and 40th days during HDBR, and on the 8th day after HDBR, and subjects' anxiety and depression feelings were recorded simultaneously using Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The results demonstrated that it showed decreased accuracy of PM responses and frequency of clock checks during and after bed rest; long term bed rest did not induce significant emotional changes. The deficit of prospective memory performance induced by long term HDBR may result from a lack of aerobic physical activity or changes in the prefrontal cortex, but it remains to be determined.

  1. Hormonal changes during 17 days of head-down bed-rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Custaud, Marc-Antoine; Arnaud, Sara B.; Monk, Timothy H.; Claustrat, Bruno; Gharib, Claude; Gauquelin-Koch, Guillemette

    2003-01-01

    We investigated in six men the impact of 17 days of head-down bed rest (HDBR) on the daily rhythms of the hormones involved in hydroelectrolytic regulation. This HDBR study was designed to mimic a real space flight. Urine samples were collected at each voiding before, during and after HDBR. Urinary excretion of Growth Hormone (GH), Cortisol, 6 Sulfatoxymelatonin, Normetadrenaline (NMN) and Metadrenaline (NM) was determined. A decrease in urinary cortisol excretion during the night of HDBR was noted. For GH, a rhythm was found before and during HDBR. The rhythm of melatonin, evaluated with the urine excretion of 6 Sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6S), the main hepatic metabolite, persisted throughout the experiment without any modification to the level of phase. A decrease during the night was noted for normetadrenaline urinary derivates, but only during the HDBR.

  2. Twins Bed Rest Project: LBNP/Exercise Minimizes Changes in Lean Leg Mass, Strength and Endurance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amorim, Fabiano T.; Schneider, Suzanne M.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Boda, Wanda L.; Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Hargens, Alan R.

    2006-01-01

    Decreases in muscle strength and endurance frequently are observed in non-weightbearing conditions such as bed rest (BR), spaceflight or limb immobilization. Purpose: Ow purpose was to determine if supine treadmill exercise against simulated gravity, by application of lower body negative pressure (LBNP), prevents loss of lean leg mass, strength and endurance during 30 d of 6deg head-down bed rest (BR). Methods: Fifteen pairs of monozygous twins (8 male, 7 female pairs; 26+/-4 yrs; 170+/-12 cm; 62.6+/-11.3 kg; mean+/-SD) were subjects in the present study. One sibling of each pair of twins was randomly assigned to either an exercise (EX) or non-exercise (CON) group. The EX twin walked/jogged on a vertical treadmill within LBNP chamber 6 d/wk using a 40-min interval exercise protocol at 40-80% of pre-BR VO(sub 2peak). LBNP was adjusted individually for each subject such that footward force was between 1.0 and 1.2 times body weight (-53+/-5 mmHg LBNP). The CON twin performed no exercise during BR. Subjects performed isokinetic knee (60 and 120deg/s) and ankle (60deg/s) testing to assess strength and endurance (End) before and after BR. They also had their lean leg mass (L(sub mass)) evaluated by DEXA before and after BR. Results: Changes in peak torque (T(sub pk)) were smaller for flexion (flex) than for extension (ext) after BR and did not differ between groups. The CON group had larger decreases (P<0.05) in L(sub mass), knee and ankle ext T(sub pk), and knee ext End.

  3. Age-related differences in plasma BDNF levels after prolonged bed rest.

    PubMed

    Soavi, Cecilia; Marušič, Uroš; Sanz, Juana Maria; Morieri, Mario Luca; Dalla Nora, Edoardo; Šimunič, Bostjan; Pišot, Rado; Zuliani, Giovanni; Passaro, Angelina

    2016-05-15

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the family of neurotrophins and has been implicated in brain resistance to insults. Murine studies have demonstrated increased hippocampal concentration after acute immobilization and decreased concentration after chronic immobilization. In humans, chronic stress and sedentary lifestyle result in decreased plasma BDNF levels, but there no data exist regarding acute immobilization. The aim of our study was to evaluate age-related responses [comparing 7 younger subjects (age 23 ± 3 yr) and 8 older subjects (age 60 ± 4 yr)] of plasma BDNF before (baseline data collection, BDC) and after 14 days (BR14) of horizontal bed rest (BR). At BDC, BDNF levels were not different between the two groups (P = 0.101), although at BR14, BDNF levels were higher in older subjects (62.02 ± 18.31) than in younger subjects (34.36 ± 15.24 pg/ml) (P = 0.002). A general linear model for repeated measures showed a significant effect of BR on BDNF (P = 0.002). The BDC BDNF levels correlated with fat-free mass in both populations (ALL) (R = 0.628, P = 0.012), (older, R = 0.753, P = 0.031; younger, R = 0.772, P = 0.042), and with total cholesterol in ALL (R = 0.647, P = 0.009) and older study subjects (R = 0.805, P = 0.016). At BR14, BDNF correlated with total cholesterol (R = 0.579, P = 0.024) and age (R = 0.647, P = 0.009) in ALL. With an increase in age, the brain could become naturally less resistant to acute stressors, including the detrimental effects of prolonged bed rest, and thus the increase in BDNF in the older study group might reflect a protective overshooting of the brain to counteract the negative effects in such conditions. PMID:26940658

  4. Daily Supine LBNP Treadmill Exercise Maintains Upright Exercise Capacity During 14 Days of Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ertl, Andy C.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Hargens, Alan R.; Fortney, S. M.; Lee, S. M. C.; Ballard, R. E.; William, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    Exposure to microgravity or bed rest reduces upright exercise capacity. Exercise modes, durations, and intensities which will effectively and efficiently counteract such deconditioning are presently unresolved. We that daily supine treadmill interval training with lower body negative pressure (LBNP) would prevent reduction in upright exercise capacity during 14 days of 6 deg. head-down bed rest (BR). Eight healthy male subjects underwent two 14 day BR protocols separated by 3 months. In a crossover design, subjects either remained at strict BR or performed 40 min of daily exercise consisting of supine walking and running at intensities varying from 40-80% of pre-BR upright peak oxygen uptake (VO2). LBNP during supine exercise was used to provide 1.0 to 1.2 times body weight of footward force. An incremental upright treadmill test to measure submaximal and peak exercise responses was given pre- and post-BR. In the non-exercise condition, peak VO2 and time to exhaustion were reduced 16 +/- 4% and 10 +/- 1% (p less than 0.05), respectively, from pre-BR. With LBNP exercise these variables were not significantly different (NS) from pre-BR. During submaximal treadmill speeds after BR, heart rate was higher (11 +/- 11 bpm, p less than 0.05) and respiratory exchange ratio was elevated (p less than 0.05) in the no exercise condition. Both were maintained at pre-BR levels in the LBNP exercise condition (NS from pre-BR). Since this supine treadmill interval training with addition of LBNP maintained upright exercise responses and capacity during BR, this countermeasure may also be effective during space flight.

  5. Improved Antarctic Sub-ice Bed Topography from Ice Surface Morphology and Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fretwell, P.; Rivera, A.; Scambos, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    The subglacial topography of Antarctica is critical input data for ice sheet models and for understanding the geological, geomorphic and glacial history of the continent. Recent compilations of direct measurements using radar and gravity, published as Bedmap (version 2 is current), have improved the coverage, resolution and visualization of the sub-ice-sheet bedrock, but many regions remain poorly mapped. Here we present a new technique that uses continent-wide ice sheet surface morphology from satellite imagery data (a series of MODIS mosaics), surface topography, and surface ice flow velocity to estimate the elevation of the Antarctic bed. The analysis is based upon an inversion of the driving stress equation with corrections for temperature and plasticity. We test a number of versions of the input data sets at various resolutions to find data and scaling that best replicate well-mapped areas of Bedmap2, or match Radio Echo Sounding data not incorporated in Bedmap. Results comparing Bedmap2 cells over East Antarctica to a modelled output based upon the MOA mosaic and ice velocity, show a 0.81 r2 correlation with a standard deviation of 898m. The technique works best in areas of moderate flow and thin to moderate ice thickness. In such areas, especially where present RES data is lacking or sparse, the model provides hitherto unrevealed detail. These data could be used to supplement existing Bedmap models, improve geomorphological knowledge of the continent, target areas for detailed field survey, and inform field survey design. The Recovery Glacier region, highlighted below, is an example of such an area.

  6. Effects of three day bed-rest on circulatory, metabolic and hormonal responses to oral glucose load in endurance trained athletes and untrained subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smorawinski, J.; Kubala, P.; Kaciuba-Uociako, H.; Nazar, K.; Titow-Stupnicka, E.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1996-01-01

    Endurance trained long distance runners and untrained individuals underwent three days of bed rest and oral glucose loading. Before and after bed rest, individuals were given glucose tolerance tests, and their heart rates, blood pressure, blood glucose levels, insulin levels, and catecholamine interactions were measured. Results indicated that glucose tolerance is more affected by bed rest-induced deconditioning in untrained individuals than in trained individuals.

  7. Mechanical Vibrations Reduce the Intervertebral Disc Swelling and Muscle Atrophy from Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holguin, Nilsson; Muir, Jesse; Evans, Harlan J.; Qin, Yi-Xian; Rubin, Clinton; Wagshul, Mark; Judex, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Loss of functional weight bearing, such as experienced during space flight or bed rest (BR), distorts intervertebral disc (IVD) and muscle morphology. IVDs are avascular structures consisting of cells that may derive their nutrition and waste removal from the load induced fluid flow into and out of the disc. A diurnal cycle is produced by forces related to weight bearing and muscular activity, and comprised of a supine and erect posture over a 24 hr period. A diurnal cycle will include a disc volume change of approx. 10-13%. However, in space there are little or no diurnal changes because of the microgravity, which removes the gravitational load and compressive forces to the back muscles. The BR model and the etiology of the disc swelling and muscle atrophy could provide insight into those subjects confined to bed for chronic disease/injury and aging. We hypothesize that extremely low-magnitude, high frequency mechanical vibrations will abate the disc degeneration and muscle loss associated with long-term BR.

  8. Changes in plasma volume during bed rest - Effects of menstrual cycle and estrogen administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortney, S. M.; Beckett, W. S.; Carpenter, A. J.; Davis, J.; Drew, H.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of increased blood estrogen concentration, caused either during normal menstrual cycles or by exogenous administration of premarin, on the bed-rest (BR) induced decrease in plasma volume (PV) was investigated. In women who underwent duplicate 11-day BR without estrogen supplementation, the PV was found to decrease significantly, during the first 5 days of BR, to a lower level at which it remained for the rest of the BR period. In women who began BR in the periovulatory stage of the menstrual cycle, the loss of PV was delayed, while women who began BR during other stages of the cycle exhibited the usual trend of the PV decrease during the BR. In women who underwent a single 12-day BR period while taking premarin (1.25 mg/day), PV was found to decrease during the first 4-5 days of BR, but then returned toward the pre-BR level during the remainder of the BR, indicating that estrogens have a role in stabilizing body fluid volume.

  9. Ventromedial prefrontal cortex damage alters resting blood flow to the bed nucleus of stria terminalis

    PubMed Central

    Motzkin, Julian C.; Philippi, Carissa L.; Oler, Jonathan A.; Kalin, Ned H.; Baskaya, Mustafa K.; Koenigs, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) plays a key role in modulating emotional responses, yet the precise neural mechanisms underlying this function remain unclear. vmPFC interacts with a number of subcortical structures involved in affective processing, including the amygdala, hypothalamus, periaqueductal gray, ventral striatum, and bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BNST). While a previous study of non-human primates shows that vmPFC lesions reduce BNST activity and anxious behavior, no such causal evidence exists in humans. In this study, we used a novel application of MRI in neurosurgical patients with focal, bilateral vmPFC damage to determine whether vmPFC is indeed critical for modulating BNST function in humans. Relative to neurologically healthy subjects, who exhibited robust rest-state functional connectivity between vmPFC and BNST, the vmPFC lesion patients had significantly lower resting-state perfusion of the right BNST. No such perfusion differences were observed for the amygdala, striatum, hypothalamus, or periaqueductal gray. This study thus provides unique data on the relationship between vmPFC and BNST, suggesting that vmPFC serves to promote BNST activity in humans. This finding is relevant for neural circuitry models of mood and anxiety disorders. PMID:25569763

  10. Changes in the Diurnal Rhythms during a 45-Day Head-Down Bed Rest

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiaodi; Zhang, Lin; Wan, Yufeng; Yu, Xinyang; Guo, Yiming; Chen, Xiaoping; Tan, Cheng; Huang, Tianle; Shen, Hanjie; Chen, Xianyun; Li, Hongying; Lv, Ke; Sun, Fei; Chen, Shanguang; Guo, Jinhu

    2012-01-01

    In spaceflight human circadian rhythms and sleep patterns are likely subject to change, which consequently disturbs human physiology, cognitive abilities and performance efficiency. However, the influence of microgravity on sleep and circadian clock as well as the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Placing volunteers in a prone position, whereby their heads rest at an angle of −6° below horizontal, mimics the microgravity environment in orbital flight. Such positioning is termed head-down bed rest (HDBR). In this work, we analysed the influence of a 45-day HDBR on physiological diurnal rhythms. We examined urinary electrolyte and hormone excretion, and the results show a dramatic elevation of cortisol levels during HDBR and recovery. Increased diuresis, melatonin and testosterone were observed at certain periods during HDBR. In addition, we investigated the changes in urination and defecation frequencies and found that the rhythmicity of urinary frequency during lights-off during and after HDBR was higher than control. The grouped defecation frequency data exhibits rhythmicity before and during HDBR but not after HDBR. Together, these data demonstrate that HDBR can alter a number of physiological processes associated with diurnal rhythms. PMID:23110150

  11. Changes in the diurnal rhythms during a 45-day head-down bed rest.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaodi; Zhang, Lin; Wan, Yufeng; Yu, Xinyang; Guo, Yiming; Chen, Xiaoping; Tan, Cheng; Huang, Tianle; Shen, Hanjie; Chen, Xianyun; Li, Hongying; Lv, Ke; Sun, Fei; Chen, Shanguang; Guo, Jinhu

    2012-01-01

    In spaceflight human circadian rhythms and sleep patterns are likely subject to change, which consequently disturbs human physiology, cognitive abilities and performance efficiency. However, the influence of microgravity on sleep and circadian clock as well as the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Placing volunteers in a prone position, whereby their heads rest at an angle of -6° below horizontal, mimics the microgravity environment in orbital flight. Such positioning is termed head-down bed rest (HDBR). In this work, we analysed the influence of a 45-day HDBR on physiological diurnal rhythms. We examined urinary electrolyte and hormone excretion, and the results show a dramatic elevation of cortisol levels during HDBR and recovery. Increased diuresis, melatonin and testosterone were observed at certain periods during HDBR. In addition, we investigated the changes in urination and defecation frequencies and found that the rhythmicity of urinary frequency during lights-off during and after HDBR was higher than control. The grouped defecation frequency data exhibits rhythmicity before and during HDBR but not after HDBR. Together, these data demonstrate that HDBR can alter a number of physiological processes associated with diurnal rhythms. PMID:23110150

  12. Association Between Cardiovascular and Intraocular Pressure Changes in a 14-day 6 deg Head Down Tilt (HDT) Bed Rest Study: Possible Implications in Retinal Anatomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, R. L.; Zanello, S. B.; Yarbough, P. O.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Taibbi, G.; Brewer, J. L.; Vizzeri, G.

    2013-01-01

    Mean IOP significantly increased while at 6deg HDT and returned towards pre-bed rest values upon leaving bed rest. While mean IOP increased during bed rest, it remained within the normal limits for subject safety. A diuretic shift and cardiovascular deconditioning occurs during in-bed rest, as expected. There was no demonstrable correlation between the largest change in IOP (pre/post) and cardiovascular measure changes (pre/post). Additional mixed effects linear regression modeling may reveal some subclinical physiological changes that might assist in describing the VIIP syndrome pathophysiology.

  13. Behavioral, Brain Imaging and Genomic Measures to Predict Functional Outcomes Post - Bed Rest and Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulavara, A. P.; DeDios, Y. E.; Gadd, N. E.; Caldwell, E. E.; Batson, C. D.; Goel, R.; Seidler, R. D.; Oddsson, L.; Zanello, S.; Clarke, T.; Peters, B.; Cohen, H. S.; Reschke, M.; Wood, S.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor disturbances during their initial exposure to microgravity and during the re-adaptation phase following a return to an Earth-gravitational environment. These alterations may disrupt crewmembers' ability to perform mission critical functional tasks requiring ambulation, manual control and gaze stability. Interestingly, astronauts who return from spaceflight show substantial differences in their abilities to readapt to a gravitational environment. The ability to predict the manner and degree to which individual astronauts would be affected would improve the effectiveness of countermeasure training programs designed to enhance sensorimotor adaptability. For such an approach to succeed, we must develop predictive measures of sensorimotor adaptability that will allow us to foresee, before actual spaceflight, which crewmembers are likely to experience the greatest challenges to their adaptive capacities. The goals of this project are to identify and characterize this set of predictive measures. Our approach includes: 1) behavioral tests to assess sensory bias and adaptability quantified using both strategic and plastic-adaptive responses; 2) imaging to determine individual brain morphological and functional features, using structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diffusion tensor imaging, resting state functional connectivity MRI, and sensorimotor adaptation task-related functional brain activation; and 3) assessment of genotypic markers of genetic polymorphisms in the catechol-O-methyl transferase, dopamine receptor D2, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor genes and genetic polymorphisms of alpha2-adrenergic receptors that play a role in the neural pathways underlying sensorimotor adaptation. We anticipate that these predictive measures will be significantly correlated with individual differences in sensorimotor adaptability after long-duration spaceflight and exposure to an analog bed rest environment. We will be conducting a

  14. Supine Lower Body Negative Pressure Exercise Maintains Upright Exercise Capacity in Male Twins during 30 Days of Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Stuart M. C.; Schneider, Suzanne M.; Boda, Wanda L.; Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Macias, Brandon R.; Meyer, R. Scott; Hargens, Alan R.

    2006-01-01

    Exercise capacity is reduced following both short and long duration exposures to microgravity. We have shown previously that supine lower body negative pressure with exercise (LBNP(sub ex) maintains upright exercise capacity in men after 5d and 15d bed rest, as a simulation of microgravity. We hypothesized that LBNP(sub ex) would protect upright exercise capacity (VO2pk) and sprint performance in eight sets of identical male twins during a 30-d bed rest. Twins within each set were randomly assigned to either a control group (CON) who performed no exercise or to an exercise group (EX) who performed a 40-min interval (40-80% pre-BR VO2pk) LBNP(sub ex) (55+/-4 mmHg) exercise protocol, plus 5 min of resting LBNP, 6 d/wk. LBNP produced footward force equivalent to 1.0- 1.2 times body weight. Pre- and post-bed rest, subjects completed an upright graded exercise test to volitional fatigue and sprint test of 30.5 m. After bed rest, VO2pk was maintained in the EX subjects (-3+/-3%), but was significantly decreased in the CON subjects (-24+/-4%). Sprint time also was increased in the CON subjects (24+/-8%), but maintained in the EX group (8+/-2%). The performance of a supine, interval exercise protocol with LBNP maintains upright exercise capacity and sprint performance during 30 d of bed rest. This exercise countermeasure protocol may help prevent microgravity-induced deconditioning during long duration space flight.

  15. Effects of daily mild supine exercise on physical performance after 20 days bed rest in young persons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Kashihara, H.; Takenaka, K.; Kawakubo, K.; Makita, Y.; Goto, S.; Ikawa, S.; Gunji, A.

    To investgate the effects of daily mild supine exercise on physical performance capacity identified as maximal oxygen uptake rate (VO 2max) after 20 days bed-rest, 3 male students performed a supine pedaling at 40 % intensity of VO 2max for one hour every day, while 6 male and 5 female students were control. Before and after the bed-rest, muscle mass and strength of exercising leg and cardio-vascular responses during -40 mmHg lower body negative pressure (LBNP) and moderate upright cycling exercise were measured. Despite the exercise programme VO 2max was similarly decreased to the control subjects after the bed-rest. The delta VO 2max was correlated to delta % left ventricular fractional shortening during LBNP, and also % delta VO 2max to % delta stroke volume of the moderate exercise (both p<0.05). The exercise programme should be too weak to maintain cardiovascular functions and thus to present the decrease in VO 2max against pro-longed bed-rest as well as weightlessness stress.

  16. The effects of bed rest on crew performance during simulated shuttle reentry. Volume 1: Study overview and physiological results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, A.; Vykukal, H. C.

    1974-01-01

    A centrifuge study was carried out to measure physiological stress and control task performance during simulated space shuttle orbiter reentry. Jet pilots were tested with, and without, anti-g-suit protection. The pilots were exposed to simulated space shuttle reentry acceleration profiles before, and after, ten days of complete bed rest, which produced physiological deconditioning similar to that resulting from prolonged exposure to orbital zero g. Pilot performance in selected control tasks was determined during simulated reentry, and before and after each simulation. Physiological stress during reentry was determined by monitoring heart rate, blood pressure, and respiration rate. Study results indicate: (1) heart rate increased during the simulated reentry when no g protection was given, and remained at or below pre-bed rest values when g-suits were used; (2) pilots preferred the use of g-suits to muscular contraction for control of vision tunneling and grayout during reentry; (3) prolonged bed rest did not alter blood pressure or respiration rate during reentry, but the peak reentry acceleration level did; and (4) pilot performance was not affected by prolonged bed rest or simulated reentry.

  17. Vibration mechanosignals superimposed to resistive exercise result in baseline skeletal muscle transcriptome profiles following chronic disuse in bed rest

    PubMed Central

    Salanova, Michele; Gambara, Guido; Moriggi, Manuela; Vasso, Michele; Ungethuem, Ute; Belavý, Daniel L.; Felsenberg, Dieter; Cerretelli, Paolo; Gelfi, Cecilia; Blottner, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Disuse-induced muscle atrophy is a major concern in aging, in neuromuscular diseases, post-traumatic injury and in microgravity life sciences affecting health and fitness also of crew members in spaceflight. By using a laboratory analogue to body unloading we perform for the first time global gene expression profiling joined to specific proteomic analysis to map molecular adaptations in disused (60 days of bed rest) human soleus muscle (CTR) and in response to a resistive exercise (RE) countermeasure protocol without and with superimposed vibration mechanosignals (RVE). Adopting Affymetrix GeneChip technology we identified 235 differently transcribed genes in the CTR group (end- vs. pre-bed rest). RE comprised 206 differentially expressed genes, whereas only 51 changed gene transcripts were found in RVE. Most gene transcription and proteomic changes were linked to various key metabolic pathways (glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, lipid metabolism) and to functional contractile structures. Gene expression profiling in bed rest identified a novel set of genes explicitly responsive to vibration mechanosignals in human soleus. This new finding highlights the efficacy of RVE protocol in reducing key signs of disuse maladaptation and atrophy, and to maintain a close-to-normal skeletal muscle quality outcome following chronic disuse in bed rest. PMID:26596638

  18. Effect of heat acclimation on sitting orthostatic tolerance in the heat after 48 and 96 hour bed rest in men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Matter, M., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate sitting orthostatic tolerance and determine potentially adverse signs and symptoms that would incapacitate subjects in a hot environment (Gemini reentry cabin temperature profile) after 48 hr and 96 hr of horizontal bed rest (BR), which simulated microgravity deconditioning. Six college men (23-29 yr) were allocated into two groups: heat acclimated (three subjects: No. 1- control, No. 2- 48 hr BR, and No. 3- 96 hr BR) and nonheat acclimated (three subjects: No. 4- control, No. 5- 48 hr BR, and No. 6- 96 hr BR). After BR they sat in an ambient temperature of 57 C (135 F) for 30 min which then was decreased to 49 C (120 F) for up to 480 min. Tolerance time in the heat with seated orthostatic stress was 480 min (subject No. 1) and 180 min (subject No. 4) in the two ambulatory men, but was reduced to 22-150 min in the four bed-rested men irrespective of their heat acclimation status. Although heat acclimation appeared to enhance tolerance and attenuate accompanying physiological responses, as well as ameliorate the frequency and intensity of adverse signs and symptoms at termination of exposure, tolerance was reduced in the bed-rest deconditioned subjects regardless of their acclimation level. Thus, these few collective findings do not indicate an unequivocal positive effect of acute heat acclimation on sitting orthostatic tolerance in acute bed-rest deconditioned subjects.

  19. Bone Resorption Increases as Early as the Second Day in Head- Down Bed Rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heer, M.; Kamps, N.; Mika, C.; Boese, A.; Gerzer, R.

    Long-term bed rest and space mission studies have shown that immobilization as well as microgravity induce increased bone resorption while bone formation tends to decrease. In order to analyze the kinetics of short-term changes in bone turnover we studied in a randomized, strictly controlled crossover design the effects of 6 days 6° head-down tilt bed rest (HDT) in 8 male healthy subjects (mean body weight (BW): 70.1 +/- 1.88 kg; mean age: 25.5 +/- 1.04 years) in our metabolic ward. Two days before arriving in the metabolic ward the subjects started with a diet consisting of an energy content of 10 MJ/d, 2000 mg Calcium/d, 400 i.U. Vitamin D, 200 mEq Na+ and 50 ml water/kg BW/d. The diet was continued in the metabolic ward. The metabolic ward period (11days) was divided into 3 parts: 4 ambulatory days, 6 days either HDT or control and 1 recovery day. Continuous urine collection started on the first day in the metabolic ward to analyze calcium excretion and bone resorption markers, namely C-telopeptide (CTX) and N-telopeptide (NTX). On the 2nd ambulatory day in the metabolic ward and on the 5th day in HDT or control blood was drawn to analyze serum calcium, parathyroid hormone, and bone formation markers (bone Alkaline Phosphatase (bAP), Procollagen-I-Propeptide (P-I-CP). Both study phases were identical with respect to environmental conditions, study protocol and diet. Urinary calcium excretion was as early as the first day in immobilization increased (p<0.01). CTX- and NTX-excretion stayed unchanged the first 24 hours in HDT compared to the control. But, already on the 2nd day of immobilization both bone resorption markers significantly increased. NTX-excretion was increased by 28.7 +/- 14.0% (p<0.05), while CTX-excretion rose by 17.8 +/- 8.3% (p<0.01). Both, the CTX- excretion as well as the calcium excretion keep the significantly higher level during the HDT period, and even continued through the first day of recovery. However, NTX excretion, descended from day

  20. Effect of head-down-tilt bed rest and hypovolemia on dynamic regulation of heart rate and blood pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwasaki, K. I.; Zhang, R.; Zuckerman, J. H.; Pawelczyk, J. A.; Levine, B. D.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Adaptation to head-down-tilt bed rest leads to an apparent abnormality of baroreflex regulation of cardiac period. We hypothesized that this "deconditioning response" could primarily be a result of hypovolemia, rather than a unique adaptation of the autonomic nervous system to bed rest. To test this hypothesis, nine healthy subjects underwent 2 wk of -6 degrees head-down bed rest. One year later, five of these same subjects underwent acute hypovolemia with furosemide to produce the same reductions in plasma volume observed after bed rest. We took advantage of power spectral and transfer function analysis to examine the dynamic relationship between blood pressure (BP) and R-R interval. We found that 1) there were no significant differences between these two interventions with respect to changes in numerous cardiovascular indices, including cardiac filling pressures, arterial pressure, cardiac output, or stroke volume; 2) normalized high-frequency (0.15-0.25 Hz) power of R-R interval variability decreased significantly after both conditions, consistent with similar degrees of vagal withdrawal; 3) transfer function gain (BP to R-R interval), used as an index of arterial-cardiac baroreflex sensitivity, decreased significantly to a similar extent after both conditions in the high-frequency range; the gain also decreased similarly when expressed as BP to heart rate x stroke volume, which provides an index of the ability of the baroreflex to alter BP by modifying systemic flow; and 4) however, the low-frequency (0.05-0.15 Hz) power of systolic BP variability decreased after bed rest (-22%) compared with an increase (+155%) after acute hypovolemia, suggesting a differential response for the regulation of vascular resistance (interaction, P < 0.05). The similarity of changes in the reflex control of the circulation under both conditions is consistent with the hypothesis that reductions in plasma volume may be largely responsible for the observed changes in cardiac

  1. Effects of 30-, 60-, and 90-Day Bed Rest on Postural Control in Men and Women

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esteves, Julie; Taylor, Laura C.; Vanya, Robert D.; Dean, S. Lance; Wood, Scott J.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Head-down-tilt bed rest (HDT) has been used as a safe gr ound-based analog to mimic and develop countermeasures for the physiological effects of spaceflight, including decrements in postural stability. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize the effects of 30-, 60-, and 90-day bed rest on postural control in men and women. METHODS Twenty-nine subjects (18M,11F) underwent 13 days of ambula tory acclimatization and were placed in 6? HDT for 30 (n=12), 60 (n=8), or 90 (n=9) days, followed by 14 days of ambulatory recovery. Computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) was used to assess changes in sensory and motor components of postural control, and recovery after HDT. Sensory Organization Tests (SOTs) objectively evaluate one?s ability to effectively use or suppress visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive information for postural control. Stability during the SOTs was assessed using peak-to-peak sway and convergence toward stability limits to derive an equilibrium score. Motor Control Tests (MCTs) evaluate one?s ability to recover from unexpected support surface perturbations, with performance determined by center-of-pressure path length. Whole-body kinematic data were collected to determine body-sway strategy used to maintain stability during each condition. Baselines were determined pre-HDT. Recovery was tracked post-HDT on days 0, 1, 2, and 4. RESULTS Immediately after HDT, subjects showed decreased performance on most SOTs, primarily on sway-referenced support conditions, typically returning to baseline levels within 4 days. MCT performance was not significantly affected. There were no significant gender or duration differences in performance. Kinematic data revealed a tendency to use ankle strategy to maintain an upright stance during most SOT conditions. Interestingly, six subjects (2M,4F) experienced orthostatic intolerance and were unable to complete day 0 testing. CONCLUSION HDT mimics some un loading mechanisms of spaceflight and

  2. Effects of Artificial Gravity and Bed Rest on Spatial Orientation and Balance Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloski, William H.; Moore, S. T.; Feiveson, A. H.; Taylor, L. C.

    2007-01-01

    While the vestibular system should be well-adapted to bed rest (a condition it experiences approximately 8/24 hrs each day), questions remain regarding the degree to which repeated exposures to the unusual gravito-inertial force environment of a short-radius centrifuge might affect central processing of vestibular information used in spatial orientation and balance control. Should these functions be impaired by intermittent AG, its feasibility as a counter-measure would be diminished. We, therefore, examined the effects of AG on spatial orientation and balance control in 15 male volunteers before and after 21 days of 6 HDT bed rest (BR). Eight of the subjects were treated with daily 1hr AG exposures (2.5g at the feet; 1.0g at the heart) aboard a short radius (3m) centrifuge, while the other seven served as controls (C). Spatial orientation was assessed by measures of ocular counter-rolling (OCR; rotation of the eye about the line of sight, an otolith-mediated reflex) and subjective visual vertical (SVV; perception of the spatial upright). Both OCR and SVV measurements were made with the subject upright, lying on their left sides, and lying on their right sides. OCR was measured from binocular eye orientation recordings made while the subjects fixated for 10s on a point target directly in front of the face at a distance of 1 m. SVV was assessed by asking subjects (in the dark) to adjust to upright (using a handheld controller) the orientation of a luminous bar randomly perturbed (15) to either side of the vertical meridian. Balance control performance was assessed using a computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) protocol similar to that currently required for all returning crew members. During each session, the subjects completed a combination of trials of sensory organization test (SOT) 2 (eyes closed, fixed platform) and SOT 5 (eyes closed, sway-referenced platform) with and without static and dynamic pitch plane head movements (plus or minus 20 deg., dynamic

  3. Medical Monitoring during Short Radius Centrifugation in Bed-rested Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinertson, Randal; Nelson, Victor; Aunon, Serena; Schlegel, Todd; Paloski, William

    2007-01-01

    The artificial gravity pilot project was designed to investigate the efficacy of daily exposure to a Gz acceleration gradient for counteracting the physiologic decrements induced by prolonged bed rest. A short radius centrifuge was used to produce a Gz gradient such that 1 g was applied at the level of the subject s heart and 2.5 g at the feet. For inclusion in the study, subjects were required to complete a 75-minute screening spin on the centrifuge. During the study, each active treatment subject was scheduled for a 60-minute spin each day for 20 consecutive days. During centrifugation, subjects were continuously monitored by a physician for signs and symptoms of pre-syncope, motion sickness, arrhythmias, joint/muscle pain and any other unanticipated problems. The physician was also present to provide emergency care in the case of a medical emergency. Cameras mounted on the centrifuge were used to provide a means of observing the subject s face and torso. Audio communication was continuously maintained. Other monitoring tools included two-lead EKG tracings, pulse oximetry, intermittent sphygmomanometer readings, lights in the peripheral visual field, and continuous blood pressure readout from a tonometry device. Thirty screening runs were attempted using twenty-seven subjects. Seven of these runs were terminated early for symptoms of pre-syncope, motion sickness, or GI distress. A total of eight subjects completed the active treatment arm of the study. Of the 160 centrifuge runs that were scheduled for these eight treatment subjects, 152 were completed, seven were terminated early, and one was not attempted. Of the seven early terminations, four were related to symptoms of pre-syncope, one to leg pain, one to GI discomfort, and one to equipment failure. Three terminations for adverse symptoms occurred on the first treatment day. Three terminations occurred on day nineteen of treatment and within 24 hours after scheduled soleus and quadriceps muscle biopsies. We

  4. The Artificial Gravity Bed Rest Pilot Project: Effects on Knee Extensor and Plantar Flexor Muscle Groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caiozzo, V. J.; Haddad, F.; Lee, S.; Baker, M.; Baldwin, K. M.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this project was to examine the effects of artificial gravity (2.5 g) on skeletal muscle strength and key anabolic/catabolic markers known to regulate muscle mass. Two groups of subjects were selected for study: 1) a 21 day-bed rest (BR) control (C) group (N=7); and 2) an AG group (N=8), which was exposed to 21 days of bed-rest plus daily 1 hr exposures to AG (2.5 g). This particular experiment was part of an integrated AG Pilot Project sponsored by NASA/Johnson Space Center. The in vivo torque-velocity relationships of the knee extensors and plantar flexors of the ankle were determined pre and post treatment. Also, pre- and post treatment biopsy samples were obtained from both the vastus lateralis and soleus muscles and were used, in part, for a series of analyses on gene expression (mRNA abundance) of key factors implicated in the anabolic versus catabolic state of the muscle. Post/Pre toque-velocity determinations revealed greater decrements in knee extensor performance in the C versus AG group (P less than 0.04). The plantar flexor muscle group of the AG subjects actually demonstrated a net gain in torque-velocity relationship; whereas, in the C group the overall post/pre responses declined (AG vs C; P less than 0.001). Measurements of muscle fiber cross-sectional area (for both muscles) demonstrated a loss of approx. 20% in the C group while no losses were evident in the AG group. RT-PCR analyses of muscle biopsy specimens demonstrated that markers of growth and cytoskeletal integrity (IGF-1, IGF-1 BP4, mechano growth factor, total RNA, and pro-collagen 3a) were higher in the AG group, whereas catabolic markers (myostatin and atrogen) were elevated in the C group. Importantly, these patterns were seen in both muscles. Based on these observations we conclude that paradigms of AG have the potential to maintain the functional, biochemical, and structural homeostasis of skeletal muscle in the face of chronic unloading states. These findings also

  5. Effect of leg exercise training on vascular volumes during 30 days of 6 deg head-down bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Vernikos, J.; Wade, C. E.; Barnes, P. R.

    1992-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of leg exercise training on vascular volumes during 30 d of 6-deg head-down bed rest, plasma and red cell volumes, body density, and water balance were measured in 19 men confined to bed rest (BR). One group had no exercise training (NOE), another near-maximal variable-intensity isotonic exercise (ITE) for 60 min/d, and the third near-maximal intermittent isokinetic exercise (IKE) for 60 min/d. Mean energy costs for the NOE, IKE, and ITE regimens were determined. Body densities within groups and mean urine volumes between groups were unchanged during BR. Changes in red cell volume followed changes in plasma volume. There was close coupling between resting plasma volume and plasma protein and osmotic content. It is argued that the ITE training protocol is better than the IKE protocol for maintaining plasma volume during prolonged exposure to BR.

  6. Ocular Outcomes Evaluation in a 14-Day Head-Down Bed Rest Study

    PubMed Central

    Taibbi, Giovanni; Cromwell, Ronita L.; Zanello, Susana B.; Yarbough, Patrice O.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert J.; Godley, Bernard F.; Vizzeri, Gianmarco

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We evaluated ocular outcomes in a 14-day head-down tilt (HDT) bed rest (BR) study designed to simulate the effects of microgravity on the human body. Methods Healthy subjects were selected using NASA standard screening procedures. Standardized NASA BR conditions were implemented (e.g., strict sleep-wake cycle, standardized diet, 24-hour-a-day BR, continuous video monitoring). Subjects maintained a 6° HDT position for 14 consecutive days. Weekly ophthalmological examinations were performed in the sitting (pre/post-BR) and HDT (in-bed phase) positions. Equivalency tests with optimal-alpha techniques evaluated pre/post-BR differences in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), spherical equivalent, intraocular pressure (IOP), Spectral-domain OCT retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT), optic disc and macular parameters. Results 16 subjects (12 men and 4 women) were enrolled. Nearly all ocular outcomes were within our predefined clinically relevant thresholds following HDTBR, except near BCVA (pre/post-BR mean difference: −0.06 logMAR), spherical equivalent (−0.30 D), Tonopen XL IOP (+3.03 mmHg) and Spectralis OCT average (+1.14 μm), temporal-inferior (+1.58 μm) and nasal-inferior RNFLT (+3.48 μm). Modified Amsler grid, red dot test, confrontational visual field and color vision were within normal limits throughout. No changes were detected on stereoscopic color fundus photography. Discussion A few functional and structural changes were detected after 14-day HDTBR, notably an improved BCVA possibly due to learning effect and RNFL thickening without signs of optic disc edema. In general, 6° HDTBR determined a small non-progressive IOP elevation, which returned to baseline levels post-BR. Further studies with different BR duration and/or tilt angle are warranted to investigate microgravity-induced ophthalmological changes. PMID:25245897

  7. Alendronate and Resistive Exercise Countermeasures Against Bed Rest-Induced Bone Loss: Biochemical Markers of Bone and Calcium Metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.; Nillen, Jeannie L.; Davis-Street, Janis E.; DeKerlegand, Diane E.; LeBlanc, Adrian; Shackelford, Linda C.

    2001-01-01

    Weightlessness-induced bone loss must be counteracted to ensure crew health during extendedduration space missions. Studies were conducted to assess two bone loss countermeasures in a ground-based model: horizontal bed rest. Following a 3-wk ambulatory adaptation period, male and female subjects (aged 21-56 y) completed a 17-wk bed rest protocol. Subjects were assigned to one of three treatments: alendronate (ALEN; 10 mg/d, n=6), resistive exercise (RE; 1.5 h/d, 6 d/wk, n=8), or control (CN; no countermeasure, n=8). Dietary intake was adjusted to maintain body weight. Endocrine and biochemical indices were measured in blood and urine using standard laboratory methods. All data reported are expressed as percent change from individual pre-bedrest data. Serum calcium changed little during bed rest, and tended to decrease (4-8%) in ALEN subjects. In RE subjects, bone alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin were increased >65 and >30%, respectively, during bed rest, while these were unchanged or decreased in ALEN and CN subjects. Urinary calcium was increased 50% in CN subjects, but was unchanged or decreased in both ALEN and RE groups. Urinary n-telopeptide excretion was increased 40-50% in CN and RE subjects, but decreased 20% in ALEN subjects. Pyridinium crosslink and deoxypyridinoline excretion were increased 20-50% during bed rest. These data suggest that RE countermeasures are effective at increasing markers of bone formation in an analog of weightlessness, while ALEN reduces markers of bone resorption. Counteracting the bone loss of space flight may require both pharmacologic and exercise countermeasures.

  8. Focal Gray Matter Plasticity as a Function of Long Duration Head Down Tilted Bed Rest: Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppelmans, V.; Erdeniz, B.; DeDios, Y. E.; Wood, S. J.; Reuter-Lorenz, P. A.; Kofman, I.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Seidler, R. D.

    2014-01-01

    Long duration spaceflight (i.e., 22 days or longer) has been associated with changes in sensorimotor systems, resulting in difficulties that astronauts experience with posture control, locomotion, and manual control. The microgravity environment is an important causal factor for spaceflight induced sensorimotor changes. Whether these sensorimotor changes are solely related to peripheral changes from reduced vestibular stimulation, body unloading, body fluid shifts or that they may be related to structural and functional brain changes is yet unknown. However, a recent study reported associations between microgravity and flattening of the posterior eye globe and protrusion of the optic nerve [1] possibly as the result of increased intracranial pressure due to microgravity induced bodily fluid shifts [3]. Moreover, elevated intracranial pressure has been related to white matter microstructural damage [2]. Thus, it is possible that spaceflight may affect brain structure and thereby cognitive functioning. Long duration head down tilt bed rest has been suggested as an exclusionary analog to study microgravity effects on the sensorimotor system [4]. Bed rest mimics microgravity in body unloading and bodily fluid shifts. In consideration of the health and performance of crewmembers both in- and post-flight, we are conducting a prospective longitudinal 70-day bed rest study as an analog to investigate the effects of microgravity on brain structure [5]. Here we present results of the first six subjects. Six subjects were assessed at 12 and 7 days before-, at 7, 30, and 70 days in-, and at 8 and 12 days post 70 days of bed rest at the NASA bed rest facility in UTMB, Galveston, TX, USA. At each time point structural MRI scans (i.e., high resolution T1-weighted imaging and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI)) were obtained using a 3T Siemens scanner. Focal changes over time in gray matter density were assessed using the voxel based morphometry 8 (VBM8) toolbox under SPM

  9. Comparison of a space shuttle flight (STS-78) and bed rest on human muscle function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trappe, S. W.; Trappe, T. A.; Lee, G. A.; Widrick, J. J.; Costill, D. L.; Fitts, R. H.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess muscle fiber size, composition, and in vivo contractile characteristics of the calf muscle of four male crew members during a 17-day spaceflight (SF; Life and Microgravity Sciences Spacelab Shuttle Transport System-78 mission) and eight men during a 17-day bed rest (BR). The protocols and timelines of these two investigations were identical, therefore allowing for direct comparisons between SF and the BR. The subjects' age, height, and weight were 43 +/- 2 yr, 183 +/- 4 cm, and 86 +/- 3 kg for SF and 43 +/- 2 yr, 182 +/- 3 cm, and 82 +/- 4 kg for BR, respectively. Calf muscle strength was examined before SF and BR; on days 2, 8, and 12 during SF and BR; and on days 2 and 8 of recovery. Muscle biopsies were obtained before and within 3 h after SF (gastrocnemius and soleus) and BR (soleus) before reloading. Maximal isometric calf strength and the force-velocity characteristics were unchanged with SF or BR. Additionally, neither SF nor BR had any effect on fiber composition or fiber size of the calf muscles studied. In summary, no changes in calf muscle strength and morphology were observed after the 17-day SF and BR. Because muscle strength is lost during unloading, both during spaceflight and on the ground, these data suggest that the testing sequence employed during the SF and BR may have served as a resistance training countermeasure to attenuate whole muscle strength loss.

  10. Insulin and glucose responses during bed rest with isotonic and isometric exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolkas, C. B.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of daily intensive isotonic (68% maximum oxygen uptake) and isometric (21% maximum extension force) leg exercise on plasma insulin and glucose responses to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) during 14-day bed-rest (BR) periods were investigated in seven young healthy men. The OGTT was given during ambulatory control and on day 10 of the no-exercise, isotonic, and isometric exercise BR periods during the 15-wk study. The subjects were placed on a controlled diet starting 10 days before each BR period. During BR, basal plasma glucose concentration remained unchanged with no exercise, but increased (P less 0.05) to 87-89 mg/100 ml with both exercise regimens on day 2, and then fell slightly below control levels on day 13. The fall in glucose content during BR was independent of the exercise regimen and was an adjustment for the loss of plasma volume. The intensity of the responses of insulin and glucose to the OGTT was inversely proportional to the total daily energy expenditure during BR. It was estimated that at least 1020 kcal/day must be provided by supplemental exercise to restore the hyperinsulinemia to control levels.

  11. Effect of intermittent standing and walking on physiological changes induced by head-down bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos, J.; Ludwig, D. A.; Ertl, A. C.; Wade, C. E.; Keil, L.; OHara, D.

    1994-01-01

    Continuous exposure to gravity may not be necessary to prevent compromised physiological function resulting from exposure to microgravity. However, minimum gravity (G) exposure requirements, effectiveness of passive Gz versus activity in a G field, and optimal G stimulus amplitude, duration, and frequency are unknown. To partially address these questions, a 4-day, 6 degree head-down bed rest (HDBR) study (one ambulatory control day, 4 full HDBR days, one recovery day) was conducted. Nine males, 30-50 yr, were subjected to four different +1 Gz (head-foot) exposure protocols (periodic standing or controlled walking for 2 or 4 h/day in 15 min doses), plus a continuous HDBR (0 Gz) control. Standing 4 h completely prevented and standing 2 h partially prevented post-HDBR orthostatic intolerance. Both walking conditions (2 h and 4 h) attenuated the decrease in peak VO2 and prevented the increased urinary Ca2+ excretion associated with HDBR. Both 4 h conditions (standing and walking) attenuated plasma volume loss during HDBR. It was concluded that various physiological systems benefit differentially from passive +1 Gz or activity in +1 Gz and the duration (2 h vs. 4 h) of the stimulus may be an important moderating factor.

  12. Low Magnitude Mechanical Signals Reduce Risk-Factors for Fracture during 90-Day Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muir, J. W.; Xia, Y.; Holquin, N.; Judex, S.; Qin, Y.; Evans, H.; Lang, T.; Rubin, C.

    2007-01-01

    Long duration spaceflight leads to multiple deleterious changes to the musculoskeletal system, where loss of bone density, an order of magnitude more severe than that which follows the menopause, combined with increased instability, conspire to elevate the risk of bone fracture due to falls on return to gravitational fields. Here, a ground-based analog for spaceflight is used to evaluate the efficacy of a low-magnitude mechanical intervention, VIBE (Vibrational Inhibition of Bone Erosion), as a potential countermeasure to preserve musculoskeletal integrity in the face of disuse. Twenty-six subjects consented to ninety days of six-degree head-down tilt bed-rest. 18 completed the 90d protocol, 8 of which received daily 10-minute exposure to 30 Hz, 0.3g VIBE, applied in the supine position using a vest elastically coupled to the vibrating platform. The shoulder harness induced a load of 60% of the subjects body weight. At baseline and 90d, Qualitative Ultrasound Scans (QUS) of the calcaneus and CT-scans of the hip and spine were performed to measure changes in bone density. Postural control (PC) was assessed through center of pressure (COP) recordings while subjects stood on a force platform for 4 minutes of quiet stance with eyes closed, and again with eyes opened. As compared to control bedrest subjects,

  13. Effects of age and inactivity due to prolonged bed rest on atrophy of trunk muscles.

    PubMed

    Ikezoe, Tome; Mori, Natsuko; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of age and inactivity due to being chronically bedridden on atrophy of trunk muscles. The subjects comprised 33 young women (young group) and 41 elderly women who resided in nursing homes or chronic care institutions. The elderly subjects were divided into two groups: independent elderly group who were able to perform activities of daily living involving walking independently (n = 28) and dependent elderly group who were chronically bedridden (n = 13). The thickness of the following six trunk muscles was measured by B-mode ultrasound: the rectus abdominis, external oblique, internal oblique, transversus abdominis, thoracic erector spinae (longissimus) and lumbar multifidus muscles. All muscles except for the transversus abdominis and lumbar multifidus muscles were significantly thinner in the independent elderly group compared with those in the young group. The thicknesses of all muscles in the dependent elderly group was significantly smaller than that in the young group, whereas there were no differences between the dependent elderly and independent elderly groups in the muscle thicknesses of the rectus abdominis and internal oblique muscles. In conclusion, our results suggest that: (1) age-related atrophy compared with young women was less in the deep antigravity trunk muscles than the superficial muscles in the independent elderly women; (2) atrophy associated with chronic bed rest was more marked in the antigravity muscles, such as the back and transversus abdominis. PMID:21472438

  14. Body fluid alterations during head-down bed rest in men at moderate altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeppky, J. A.; Roach, R. C.; Selland, M. A.; Scotto, P.; Luft, F. C.; Luft, U. C.

    1993-01-01

    To determine the effects of hypoxia on fluid balance responses to simulated zero-gravity, measurements were made in six subjects before and during -5 deg continuous head-down bed rest (HDBR) over 8 d at 10,678 ft. The same subjects were studied again at this altitude without HDBR as a control (CON) using a cross-over design. During this time, they maintained normal upright day-time activities, sleeping in the horizontal position at night. Fluid balance changes during HDBR in hypoxia were more pronounced than similar measurements previously reported from HDBR studies at sea level. Plasma volume loss was slightly greater and the diuresis and natriuresis were doubled in magnitude as compared to previous studies in normoxia and sustained for 4 d during hypoxia. These changes were associated with an immediate but transient rise in plasma atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) to day 4 of 140 percent in HDBR and 41 percent in CON (p less than 0.005), followed by a decline towards baseline. Differences were less striking between HDBR and CON for plasma antidiuretic hormone and aldosterone, which were transiently reduced by HDBR. Plasma catecholamines showed a similar pattern to ANP in both HDBR and CON, suggesting that elevated ANP and catecholamines together accounted for the enhanced fluid shifts with HDBR during hypoxia.

  15. Temporal Changes in Left Ventricular Mechanics: Impact of Bed Rest and Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, J. M.; Downs, M.; Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.

    2014-01-01

    The use of more sensitive and specific echocardiographic techniques such as speckle tracking imaging may address the current limitations of conventional cardiac imaging techniques to provide insight into the extent and time course of cardiac deconditioning following spaceflight or headdown tilt bed rest (HDTBR). METHODS Speckle tracking assessment of longitudinal, radial, and circumferential strain and twist was used to evaluate the impact of 70 days of HDTBR (n=7) and HDTBR + exercise (n=11) on temporal changes in LV mechanics. Echocardiograms were performed pre (BR-2), during (BR31, 70), and following (BR+4hr) HDTBR. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to evaluate the effect of HDTBR on cardiac variables in control and exercise subjects. RESULTS After sedentary HDTBR, longitudinal (-19.0 +/- 1.8% vs. -14.9 +/- 2.4%) and radial (15.0 +/- 1.9% vs. 11.3 +/- 2.2%) strain and twist (18.0 +/- 4.0deg vs. 17.0 +/- 3.6deg) were significantly impaired. In contrast, exercise preserved LV mechanics, and there were non-significant improvements from BR-2 to BR70 in longitudinal strain (-18.7 +/- 1.5% vs. -20.4 +/- 2.7%), radial strain (13.2 +/- 2.4% vs. 14.2 +/- 1.6%), and twist (16.3 +/- 3.6deg vs. 18.6 +/- 5.9deg). CONCLUSIONS Using speckle tracking echocardiography provides important new insights into temporal changes in LV mechanics during disuse and exercise training.

  16. Lower-body negative-pressure exercise and bed-rest-mediated orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Suzanne M.; Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Lee, Stuart M C.; Ertl, Andrew C.; Williams, W. Jon; Ballard, Richard E.; Hargens, Alan R.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: Supine, moderate exercise is ineffective in maintaining orthostatic tolerance after bed rest (BR). Our purpose was to test the hypothesis that adding an orthostatic stress during exercise would maintain orthostatic function after BR. METHODS: Seven healthy men completed duplicate 15-d 6 degrees head-down tilt BR using a crossover design. During one BR, subjects did not exercise (CON). During another BR, subjects exercised for 40 min.d(-1) on a supine treadmill against 50-60 mm Hg LBNP (EX). Exercise training consisted of an interval exercise protocol of 2- to 3-min intervals alternating between 41 and 65% (.)VO(2max). Before and after BR, an LBNP tolerance test was performed in which the LBNP chamber was decompressed in 10-mm Hg stages every 3 min until presyncope. RESULTS: LBNP tolerance, as assessed by the cumulative stress index (CSI) decreased after BR in both the CON (830 +/- 144, pre-BR vs 524 +/- 56 mm Hg.min, post-BR) and the EX (949 +/- 118 pre-BR vs 560 +/- 44 mm Hg.min, post-BR) conditions. However, subtolerance (0 to -50 mm Hg LBNP) heart rates were lower and systolic blood pressures were better maintained after BR in the EX condition compared with CON. CONCLUSION: Moderate exercise performed against LBNP simulating an upright 1-g environment failed to protect orthostatic tolerance after 15 d of BR.

  17. Long Duration Head Down Tilt Bed Rest Effects on Neurocognitive Performance: Extent, Longevity and Neural Bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidler, R. D.; Mulavara, A. P.; Koppelmans, V.; Cassady, K.; Yuan, P.; Kofman, I. S.; De Dios, Y. E.; Szecsy, D. L.; Riascos-Castaneda, R F.; Wood, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    We are conducting ongoing experiments in which we are performing structural and functional magnetic resonance brain imaging to identify the relationships between changes in neurocognitive function and neural structural alterations following a six month International Space Station mission and following 70 days exposure to a spaceflight analog, head down tilt bedrest. Our central hypothesis is that measures of brain structure, function, and network integrity will change from pre to post intervention (spaceflight, bedrest). Moreover, we predict that these changes will correlate with indices of cognitive, sensory, and motor function in a neuroanatomically selective fashion. Our interdisciplinary approach utilizes cutting edge neuroimaging techniques and a broad ranging battery of sensory, motor, and cognitive assessments that will be conducted preflight, during flight, and post flight to investigate potential neuroplastic and maladaptive brain changes in crewmembers following long-duration spaceflight. Success in this endeavor would 1) result in identification of the underlying neural mechanisms and operational risks of spaceflight-induced changes in behavior, and 2) identify whether a return to normative behavioral function following re-adaptation to Earth's gravitational environment is associated with a restitution of brain structure and function or instead is supported by substitution with compensatory brain processes. In this presentation I will provide an overview of changes in behavior, brain structure, and brain function that we are observing in our bed rest participants in comparison to normative control subjects.

  18. Effects of prolonged head-down bed rest on physiological responses to moderate hypoxia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeppky, J. A.; Roach, R. C.; Selland, M. A.; Scotto, P.; Greene, E. R.; Luft, U. C.

    1993-01-01

    To determine the effects of hypoxia on physiological responses to simulated zero-gravity cardiopulmonary and fluid balance measurements were made in 6 subjects before and during 5-degree head-down bed rest (HDBR) over 8 d at 10,678 ft and a second time at this altitude as controls (CON). The V-dot(O2)(max) increased by 9 percent after CON, but fell 3 percent after HDBR. This reduction in work capacity during HDBR could be accounted for by inactivity. The heart rate response to a head-up tilt was greatly enhanced following HDBR, while mean blood pressure was lower. No significant negative impact of HDBR was noted on the ability to acclimatize to hypoxia in terms of pulmonary mechanics, gas exchange, circulatory or mental function measurements. No evidence of pulmonary interstitial edema or congestion was noted during HDBR at the lower PIO2 and blood rheology properties were not negatively altered. Symptoms of altitude illness were more prevalent, but not marked, during HDBR and arterial blood gases and oxygenation were not seriously effected by simulated microgravity. Declines in base excess with altitude were similar in both conditions. The study demonstrated a minimal effect of HDBR on the ability to adjust to this level of hypoxia.

  19. Early processing variations in selective attention to the color and direction of moving stimuli during 30 days head-down bed rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin-Jie; He, Si-Yang; Niu, Dong-Bin; Guo, Jian-Ping; Xu, Yun-Long; Wang, De-Sheng; Cao, Yi; Zhao, Qi; Tan, Cheng; Li, Zhi-Li; Tang, Guo-Hua; Li, Yin-Hui; Bai, Yan-Qiang

    2013-11-01

    Dynamic variations in early selective attention to the color and direction of moving stimuli were explored during a 30 days period of head-down bed rest. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded at F5, F6, P5, P6 scalp locations in seven male subjects who attended to pairs of bicolored light emitting diodes that flashed sequentially to produce a perception of movement. Subjects were required to attend selectively to a critical feature of the moving target, e.g., color or direction. The tasks included: a no response task, a color selective response task, a moving direction selective response task, and a combined color-direction selective response task. Subjects were asked to perform these four tasks on: the 3rd day before bed rest; the 3rd, 15th and 30th day during the bed rest; and the 5th day after bed rest. Subjects responded quickly to the color than moving direction and combined color-direction response. And they had a longer reaction time during bed rest on the 15th and 30th day during bed rest after a relatively quicker response on the 3rd day. Using brain event-related potentials technique, we found that in the color selective response task, the mean amplitudes of P1 and N1 for target ERPs decreased in the 3rd day during bed rest and 5th day after bed rest in comparison with pre-bed rest, 15th day and 30th day during bed rest. In the combined color-direction selective response task, the P1 latencies for target ERPs on the 3rd and 30th day during bed rest were longer than on the 15th day during bed rest. As 3rd day during bed rest was in the acute adaptation period and 30th day during bed rest was in the relatively adaptation stage of head-down bed rest, the results help to clarify the effects of bed rest on different task loads and patterns of attention. It was suggested that subjects expended more time to give correct decision in the head-down tilt bed rest state. A difficulty in the recruitment of brain resources was found in feature selection task

  20. WISE 2005-2006: 60-days of Head-Down Bed Rest Increases the Incidence of Menstrual Cycle Disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Charles

    Objective: It has been suggested that acute bed rest of short duration (11 days) disrupts the menstrual cycle of healthy subjects. Furthermore, use of countermeasures such as heavy exercise or dietary manipulations may adversely effect the menstrual cycle. We hypothesized that bed rest of 60 days and the use of countermeasures would increase the incidence of disruption of the menstrual cycle (MC). Methods: Twenty-four healthy subjects with a mean age of 32±0.8 yr, body mass of 59±0.8 kg and MC lengths of 25-32 days were enrolled. Three months prior to the study subjects did not use hormonal birth control methods. Subjects were assigned to one of three groups (n=8 per group): control, exercise countermeasures, and dietary countermeasures. MC lengthening was defined as an increase in duration of 10 or more days. Analysis was performed accounting for the effects of bedrest as well as treatment group. Results: Effects of countermeasures were not significant in the present analysis. After the conclusion of the study, subjects were classified as either normal (N; n=16) or oligomenorrhea (O; n=8) as determined by MC length during the pre-bed rest (PB) and bed rest (BR) periods. During the control period prior to bed rest one subject (4%) had an increase MC length. During the control period the average MC length was 31±0.8 days with a leutinizing hormone (LH) surge 12±0.8 days prior to menses. The duration of menses was 4±0.4 days. During BR there was an increase to 33% (p¡0.05) in the number of subjects having MC lengthening. In these subjects the mean length was increased from 31±0.9 to 62±8.2 days (p¡0.05). There was no change in the period from the LH surge prior to the next menses, 11±0.8 days, or duration of menses, 4±0.2 days. Plasma LH, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), prolacin (PRL), progesterone (PRG), estradiol (E2), dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S), aldosterone (Aldo), testosterone (T) and cortisol (C) were measured during PB, BR, early

  1. PlanHab: hypoxia exaggerates the bed-rest-induced reduction in peak oxygen uptake during upright cycle ergometry.

    PubMed

    Keramidas, Michail E; Kölegård, Roger; Mekjavic, Igor B; Eiken, Ola

    2016-08-01

    The study examined the effects of hypoxia and horizontal bed rest, separately and in combination, on peak oxygen uptake (V̇o2 peak) during upright cycle ergometry. Ten male lowlanders underwent three 21-day confinement periods in a counterbalanced order: 1) normoxic bed rest [NBR; partial pressure of inspired O2 (PiO2 ) = 133.1 ± 0.3 mmHg]; 2) hypoxic bed rest (HBR; PiO2 = 90.0 ± 0.4 mmHg), and 3) hypoxic ambulation (HAMB; PiO2 = 90.0 ± 0.4 mmHg). Before and after each confinement, subjects performed two incremental-load trials to exhaustion, while inspiring either room air (AIR), or a hypoxic gas (HYPO; PiO2 = 90.0 ± 0.4 mmHg). Changes in regional oxygenation of the vastus lateralis muscle and the frontal cerebral cortex were monitored with near-infrared spectroscopy. Cardiac output (CO) was recorded using a bioimpedance method. The AIR V̇o2 peak was decreased by both HBR (∼13.5%; P ≤ 0.001) and NBR (∼8.6%; P ≤ 0.001), with greater drop after HBR (P = 0.01). The HYPO V̇o2 peak was also reduced by HBR (-9.7%; P ≤ 0.001) and NBR (-6.1%; P ≤ 0.001). Peak CO was lower after both bed-rest interventions, and especially after HBR (HBR: ∼13%, NBR: ∼7%; P ≤ 0.05). Exercise-induced alterations in muscle and cerebral oxygenation were blunted in a similar manner after both bed-rest confinements. No changes were observed in HAMB. Hence, the bed-rest-induced decrease in V̇o2 peak was exaggerated by hypoxia, most likely due to a reduction in convective O2 transport, as indicated by the lower peak values of CO. PMID:27342877

  2. Ocular Outcomes Comparison Between 14- and 70-day Head-down Tilt Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, R.L.; Taibbi, G.; Zanello, S.B.; Yarbough, P.O.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.J.; Vizzen, G.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Ophthalmological changes, including optic disc edema with optic nerve sheath distension, posterior globe flattening with hyperopic shift, choroidal folds and cotton wool spots have been detected in some astronauts involved in long-duration spaceflights. (sup 1) It is hypothesized that elevated intracranial pressure resulting from microgravity-induced cephalad fluid shifts may be responsible for most of these findings. Head-down tilt bed rest (HTDBR) is a ground-based microgravity analog which also produces cephalad fluid shifts. It is conceivable that prolonged HDTBR exposure may induce ocular changes similar to those experienced in microgravity. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to compare structural and functional ocular outcomes between 14- and 70-day HDTBR in healthy human subjects. It is hypothesized that 70-d HDTBR induced ocular changes of greater magnitude as compared to 14-d HDTBR. METHODS: Two HDTBR studies were conducted at the NASA Flight Analogs Research Unit, located at The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, TX. Identical NASA standard screening procedures and BR conditions (e.g., strict sleep-wake cycle, standardized diet, continuous video monitoring) were implemented in both studies. Participants spent 14 and/or 70 consecutive days in a 6deg HDT position and did not engage in exercise. Subjects received weekly ocular examinations before, during, and after HDTBR. Ocular testing included: distance and near best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), cycloplegic refraction, intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement, color vision, red dot test, modified Amsler grid test, confrontational visual field, color fundus photography and Spectral-domain OCT scans of the macula and the optic disc. Pre/post HDTBR differences between the two studies will be evaluated for BCVA, spherical equivalent, IOP, retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness and macular OCT parameters. RESULTS: 16 (12 males and 4 females) and 6 (5 males and 1

  3. Increased Brain Activation for Dual Tasking with 70-Days Head-Down Bed Rest.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Peng; Koppelmans, Vincent; Reuter-Lorenz, Patricia A; De Dios, Yiri E; Gadd, Nichole E; Wood, Scott J; Riascos, Roy; Kofman, Igor S; Bloomberg, Jacob J; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P; Seidler, Rachael D

    2016-01-01

    Head-down tilt bed rest (HDBR) has been used as a spaceflight analog to simulate the effects of microgravity exposure on human physiology, sensorimotor function, and cognition on Earth. Previous studies have reported that concurrent performance of motor and cognitive tasks can be impaired during space missions. Understanding the consequences of HDBR for neural control of dual tasking may possibly provide insight into neural efficiency during spaceflight. In the current study, we evaluated how dual task performance and the underlying brain activation changed as a function of HDBR. Eighteen healthy men participated in this study. They remained continuously in the 6° head-down tilt position for 70 days. Functional MRI for bimanual finger tapping was acquired during both single task and dual task conditions, and repeated at 7 time points pre-, during- and post-HDBR. Another 12 healthy males participated as controls who did not undergo HDBR. A widely distributed network involving the frontal, parietal, cingulate, temporal, and occipital cortices exhibited increased activation for dual tasking and increased activation differences between dual and single task conditions during HDBR relative to pre- or post-HDBR. This HDBR-related brain activation increase for dual tasking implies that more neurocognitive control is needed for dual task execution during HDBR compared to pre- and post-HDBR. We observed a positive correlation between pre-to-post HDBR changes in dual-task cost of reaction time and pre-to-post HDBR change in dual-task cost of brain activation in several cerebral and cerebellar regions. These findings could be predictive of changes in dual task processing during spaceflight. PMID:27601982

  4. Effect of dietary sodium on fluid/electrolyte regulation during bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, W. Jon; Schneider, Suzanne M.; Gretebeck, Randall J.; Lane, Helen W.; Stuart, Charles A.; Whitson, Peggy A.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A negative fluid balance during bed rest (BR) is accompanied by decreased plasma volume (PV) which contributes to cardiovascular deconditioning. HYPOTHESIS: We hypothesized that increasing dietary sodium while controlling fluid intake would increase plasma osmolality (POSM), stimulate fluid conserving hormones, and reduce fluid/electrolyte (F/E) losses during BR; conversely, decreasing dietary sodium would decrease POSM, suppress fluid conserving hormones, and increase F/E losses. METHODS: We controlled fluid intake (30 ml x kg(-1) x d(-1)) in 17 men who consumed either a 4.0 +/- 0.06 g x d(-1) (174 mmol x d(-1)) (CONT; n = 6), 1.0 +/- 0.02 g x d(-1) (43 mmol x d(-1)) (LS; n = 6), or 10.0 +/- 0.04 g x d(-1) (430 mmol x d(-1)) (HS; n = 5) sodium diet before, during, and after 21 d of 6 degrees head-down BR. PV, total body water, urine volume and osmolality, POSM, and F/E controlling hormone concentrations were measured. RESULTS: In HS subjects, plasma renin activity (-92%), plasma/urinary aldosterone (-59%; -64%), and PV (-15.0%; 6.0 ml x kg(-1); p < 0.05) decreased while plasma atrial natriuretic peptide (+34%) and urine antidiuretic hormone (+24%) increased during BR (p < 0.05) compared with CONT. In LS, plasma renin activity (+166%), plasma aldosterone (+167%), plasma antidiuretic hormone (+19%), and urinary aldosterone (+335%) increased with no change in PV compared with CONT (p < 0.05). Total body water did not change in any of the subjects. CONCLUSIONS: Contrary to our hypothesis, increasing dietary sodium while controlling fluid intake during BR resulted in a greater loss of PV compared with the CONT subjects. Reducing dietary sodium while controlling fluid intake did not alter the PV response during BR compared with CONT subjects.

  5. Impact of resistance exercise during bed rest on skeletal muscle sarcopenia and myosin isoform distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamman, M. M.; Clarke, M. S.; Feeback, D. L.; Talmadge, R. J.; Stevens, B. R.; Lieberman, S. A.; Greenisen, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    Because resistance exercise (REx) and bed-rest unloading (BRU) are associated with opposing adaptations, our purpose was to test the efficacy of REx against the effects of 14 days of BRU on the knee-extensor muscle group. Sixteen healthy men were randomly assigned to no exercise (NoEx; n = 8) or REx (n = 8). REx performed five sets of leg press exercise with 80-85% of one repetition maximum (1 RM) every other day during BRU. Muscle samples were removed from the vastus lateralis muscle by percutaneous needle biopsy. Myofiber distribution was determined immunohistochemically with three monoclonal antibodies against myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms (I, IIa, IIx). MHC distribution was further assessed by quantitative gel electrophoresis. Dynamic 1-RM leg press and unilateral maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) were determined. Maximal neural activation (root mean squared electromyogram) and rate of torque development (RTD) were measured during MVC. Reductions (P < 0.05) in type I (15%) and type II (17%) myofiber cross-sectional areas were found in NoEx but not in REx. Electrophoresis revealed no changes in MHC isoform distribution. The percentage of type IIx myofibers decreased (P < 0.05) in REx from 9 to 2% and did not change in NoEx. 1 RM was reduced (P < 0.05) by 9% in NoEx but was unchanged in REx. MVC fell by 15 and 13% in NoEx and REx, respectively. The agonist-to-antagonist root mean squared electromyogram ratio decreased (P < 0.05) 19% in REx. RTD slowed (P < 0.05) by 54% in NoEx only. Results indicate that REx prevented BRU-induced myofiber atrophy and also maintained training-specific strength. Unlike spaceflight, BRU did not induce shifts in myosin phenotype. The reported benefits of REx may prove useful in prescribing exercise for astronauts in microgravity.

  6. Muscle Adaptations Following Short-Duration Bed Rest with Integrated Resistance, Interval, and Aerobic Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackney, Kyle J.; Scott, Jessica M.; Buxton, Roxanne; Redd-Goetchius, Elizabeth; Crowell, J. Brent; Everett, Meghan E.; Wickwire, Jason; Ryder, Jeffrey W.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L.

    2011-01-01

    Unloading of the musculoskeletal system during space flight results in deconditioning that may impair mission-related task performance in astronauts. Exercise countermeasures have been frequently tested during bed rest (BR) and limb suspension; however, high-intensity, short-duration exercise prescriptions have not been fully explored. PURPOSE: To determine if a high intensity resistance, interval, and aerobic exercise program could protect against muscle atrophy and dysfunction when performed during short duration BR. METHODS: Nine subjects (1 female, 8 male) performed a combination of supine exercises during 2 weeks of horizontal BR. Resistance exercise (3 d / wk) consisted of squat, leg press, hamstring curl, and heel raise exercises (3 sets, 12 repetitions). Aerobic (6 d / wk) sessions alternated continuous (75% VO2 peak) and interval exercise (30 s, 2 min, and 4 min) and were completed on a supine cycle ergometer and vertical treadmill, respectively. Muscle volumes of the upper leg were calculated pre, mid, and post-BR using magnetic resonance imaging. Maximal isometric force (MIF), rate of force development (RFD), and peak power of the lower body extensors were measured twice before BR (averaged to represent pre) and once post BR. ANOVA with repeated measures and a priori planned contrasts were used to test for differences. RESULTS: There were no changes to quadriceps, hamstring, and adductor muscle volumes at mid and post BR time points compared to pre BR (Table 1). Peak power increased significantly from 1614 +/- 372 W to 1739 +/- 359 W post BR (+7.7%, p = 0.035). Neither MIF (pre: 1676 +/- 320 N vs. post: 1711 +/- 250 N, +2.1%, p = 0.333) nor RFD (pre: 7534 +/- 1265 N/ms vs. post: 6951 +/- 1241 N/ms, -7.7%, p = 0.136) were significantly impaired post BR.

  7. Increased Brain Activation for Dual Tasking with 70-Days Head-Down Bed Rest

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Peng; Koppelmans, Vincent; Reuter-Lorenz, Patricia A.; De Dios, Yiri E.; Gadd, Nichole E.; Wood, Scott J.; Riascos, Roy; Kofman, Igor S.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Seidler, Rachael D.

    2016-01-01

    Head-down tilt bed rest (HDBR) has been used as a spaceflight analog to simulate the effects of microgravity exposure on human physiology, sensorimotor function, and cognition on Earth. Previous studies have reported that concurrent performance of motor and cognitive tasks can be impaired during space missions. Understanding the consequences of HDBR for neural control of dual tasking may possibly provide insight into neural efficiency during spaceflight. In the current study, we evaluated how dual task performance and the underlying brain activation changed as a function of HDBR. Eighteen healthy men participated in this study. They remained continuously in the 6° head-down tilt position for 70 days. Functional MRI for bimanual finger tapping was acquired during both single task and dual task conditions, and repeated at 7 time points pre-, during- and post-HDBR. Another 12 healthy males participated as controls who did not undergo HDBR. A widely distributed network involving the frontal, parietal, cingulate, temporal, and occipital cortices exhibited increased activation for dual tasking and increased activation differences between dual and single task conditions during HDBR relative to pre- or post-HDBR. This HDBR-related brain activation increase for dual tasking implies that more neurocognitive control is needed for dual task execution during HDBR compared to pre- and post-HDBR. We observed a positive correlation between pre-to-post HDBR changes in dual-task cost of reaction time and pre-to-post HDBR change in dual-task cost of brain activation in several cerebral and cerebellar regions. These findings could be predictive of changes in dual task processing during spaceflight. PMID:27601982

  8. Attenuated thermoregulatory sweating and cutaneous vasodilation after 14-day bed rest in humans.

    PubMed

    Michikami, Daisaku; Kamiya, Atsunori; Fu, Qi; Iwase, Satoshi; Mano, Tadaaki; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the effect of head-down bed rest (HDBR) for 14 days on thermoregulatory sweating and cutaneous vasodilation in humans. Fluid intake was ad libitum during HDBR. We induced whole body heating by increasing skin temperature for 1 h with a water-perfused blanket through which hot water (42 degrees C) was circulated. The experimental room was air-conditioned (27 degrees C, 30-40% relative humidity). We measured skin blood flow (chest and forearm), skin temperatures (chest, upper arm, forearm, thigh, and calf), and tympanic temperature. We also measured sweat rate by the ventilated capsule method in which the skin area for measurement was drained by dry air conditioned at 27 degrees C under similar skin temperatures in both trials. We calculated cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) from the ratio of skin blood flow to mean blood pressure. From tympanic temperature-sweat rate and -CVC relationships, we assessed the threshold temperature and sensitivity as the slope response of variables to a given change in tympanic temperature. HDBR increased the threshold temperature for sweating by 0.31 degrees C at the chest and 0.32 degrees C at the forearm, whereas it reduced sensitivity by 40% at the chest and 31% at the forearm. HDBR increased the threshold temperature for cutaneous vasodilation, whereas it decreased sensitivity. HDBR reduced plasma volume by 11%, whereas it did not change plasma osmolarity. The increase in the threshold temperature for sweating correlated with that for cutaneous vasodilation. In conclusion, HDBR attenuated thermoregulatory sweating and cutaneous vasodilation by increasing the threshold temperature and decreasing sensitivity. HDBR increased the threshold temperature for sweating and cutaneous vasodilation by similar magnitudes, whereas it decreased their sensitivity by different magnitudes. PMID:12949026

  9. Clinical effects of thigh cuffs during a 7-day 6° head-down bed rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavy-Le Traon, Anne; Maillet, Alain; Vasseur Clausen, Pascale; Custaud, Marc-Antoine; Alferova, Irina; Gharib, Claude; Fortrat, Jacques-Olivier

    2001-08-01

    Thigh cuffs are used by Russian cosmonauts to limit the fluid shift induced by space flight. A ground simulation using the head-down bed rest (HDBR) model was performed to assess the effects of thigh cuffs on clinical tolerance and orthostatic adaptation. 8 male healthy volunteers (32.4±1.9 years) participated twice in a 7-day HDBR — one time with thigh cuffs (worm daily from 9 am to 7 pm) (TC) and one time without (WTC). Orthostatic tolerance was assessed by a 10 minute stand test and by a LBNP test (5 min at -15, -30, -45 mmHg) before (BDC-1) and at the end of the HDBR period (R+1). Plasma volume was measured before and at the end of HDBR by the Evans blue dye dilution technique. Thigh cuffs limits headache due to fluid shift, as well as the loss in plasma volume (TC: -5.85±0.95%; WTC: -9.09±0.82%, p<0.05). The mean duration of the stand test (R+1) did not differ in the two group (TC 7.1±1.3 min; WTC 7.0±1.0 min). The increase in HR and decrease in diastolic blood pressure were slightly but significantly larger without thigh cuffs. Duration of the LBNP tests did not differ with thigh cuffs. Thigh cuffs limit the symptoms due to fluid shift and the loss in plasma volume. They partly reduced the increase in HR during orthostatic stress but had no effect on duration of orthostatic stress tests.

  10. Using a Micro-Uav for Ultra-High Resolution Multi-Sensor Observations of Antarctic Moss Beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucieer, A.; Robinson, S.; Turner, D.; Harwin, S.; Kelcey, J.

    2012-07-01

    This study is the first to use an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) for mapping moss beds in Antarctica. Mosses can be used as indicators for the regional effects of climate change. Mapping and monitoring their extent and health is therefore important. UAV aerial photography provides ultra-high resolution spatial data for this purpose. We developed a technique to extract an extremely dense 3D point cloud from overlapping UAV aerial photography based on structure from motion (SfM) algorithms. The combination of SfM and patch-based multi-view stereo image vision algorithms resulted in a 2 cm resolution digital terrain model (DTM). This detailed topographic information combined with vegetation indices derived from a 6-band multispectral sensor enabled the assessment of moss bed health. This novel UAV system has allowed us to map different environmental characteristics of the moss beds at ultra-high resolution providing us with a better understanding of these fragile Antarctic ecosystems. The paper provides details on the different UAV instruments and the image processing framework resulting in DEMs, vegetation indices, and terrain derivatives.

  11. Effects of 14 days of head-down tilt bed rest on cutaneous vasoconstrictor responses in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Thad E.; Shibasaki, Manabu; Cui, Jian; Levine, Benjamin D.; Crandall, Craig G.

    2003-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that head-down tilt bed rest (HDBR) reduces adrenergic and nonadrenergic cutaneous vasoconstrictor responsiveness. Additionally, an exercise countermeasure group was included to identify whether exercise during bed rest might counteract any vasoconstrictor deficits that arose during HDBR. Twenty-two subjects underwent 14 days of strict 6 degrees HDBR. Eight of these 22 subjects did not exercise during HDBR, while 14 of these subjects exercised on a supine cycle ergometer for 90 min a day at 75% of pre-bed rest heart rate maximum. To assess alpha-adrenergic vasoconstrictor responsiveness, intradermal microdialysis was used to locally administer norepinephrine (NE), while forearm skin blood flow (SkBF; laser-Doppler flowmetry) was monitored over microdialysis membranes. Nonlinear regression modeling was used to identify the effective drug concentration that caused 50% of the cutaneous vasoconstrictor response (EC(50)) and minimum values from the SkBF-NE dose-response curves. In addition, the effects of HDBR on nonadrenergic cutaneous vasoconstriction were assessed via the venoarteriolar response of the forearm and leg. HDBR did not alter EC(50) or the magnitude of cutaneous vasoconstriction to exogenous NE administration regardless of whether the subjects exercised during HDBR. Moreover, HDBR did not alter the forearm venoarteriolar response in either the control or exercise groups during HDBR. However, HDBR significantly reduced the magnitude of cutaneous vasoconstriction due to the venoarteriolar response in the leg, and this response was similarly reduced in the exercise group. These data suggest that HDBR does not alter cutaneous vasoconstrictor responses to exogenous NE administration, whereas cutaneous vasoconstriction of the leg due to the venoarteriolar response is reduced after HDBR. It remains unclear whether attenuated venoarteriolar responses in the lower limbs contribute to reduced orthostatic tolerance after bed rest and

  12. Energy absorption, lean body mass, and total body fat changes during 5 weeks of continuous bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krebs, Jean M.; Evans, Harlan; Kuo, Mike C.; Schneider, Victor S.; Leblanc, Adrian D.

    1990-01-01

    The nature of the body composition changes due to inactivity was examined together with the question of whether these changes are secondary to changes in energy absorption. Volunteers were 15 healthy males who lived on a metabolic research ward under close staff supervision for 11 weeks. Subjects were ambulatory during the first six weeks and remained in continuous bed rest for the last five weeks of the study. Six male volunteers (age 24-61 years) were selected for body composition measurements. Nine different male volunteers (age 21-50 years) were selected for energy absorption measurements. The volunteers were fed weighed conventional foods on a constant 7-d rotation menu. The average daily caloric content was 2,592 kcal. Comparing the five weeks of continuous bed rest with the previous six weeks of ambulation, it was observed that there was no change in energy absorption or total body weight during bed rest, but a significant decrease in lean body mass and a significant increase in total body fat (p less than 0.05).

  13. Effects of an artificial gravity countermeasure on orthostatic tolerance, blood volumes and aerobic power after short-term bed rest (BR-AG1).

    PubMed

    Linnarsson, Dag; Hughson, Richard L; Fraser, Katelyn S; Clément, Gilles; Karlsson, Lars L; Mulder, Edwin; Paloski, William H; Rittweger, Jörn; Wuyts, Floris L; Zange, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to artificial gravity (AG) in a short-arm centrifuge has potential benefits for maintaining human performance during long-term space missions. Eleven subjects were investigated during three campaigns of 5 days head-down bed rest: 1) bed rest without countermeasures (control), 2) bed rest and 30 min of AG (AG1) daily, and 3) bed rest and six periods of 5 min AG (AG2) daily. During centrifugation, the supine subjects were exposed to AG in the head-to-feet direction with 1 G at the center of mass. Subjects participated in the three campaigns in random order. The cardiovascular effects of bed rest and countermeasures were determined from changes in tolerance to a head-up tilt test with superimposed lower body negative pressure (HUT), from changes in plasma volume (PV) and from changes in maximum aerobic power (V̇o2 peak) during upright work on a cycle ergometer. Complete data sets were obtained in eight subjects. After bed rest, HUT tolerance times were 36, 64, and 78% of pre-bed rest baseline during control, AG1 and AG2, respectively, with a significant difference between AG2 and control. PV and V̇o2 peak decreased to 85 and 95% of pre-bed rest baseline, respectively, with no differences between the treatments. It was concluded that the AG2 countermeasure should be further investigated during future long-term bed rest studies, especially as it was better tolerated than AG1. The superior effect of AG2 on orthostatic tolerance could not be related to concomitant changes in PV or aerobic power. PMID:25342708

  14. Age-related differences in lean mass, protein synthesis and skeletal muscle markers of proteolysis after bed rest and exercise rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Ruth E; Brunker, Lucille B; Agergaard, Jakob; Barrows, Katherine M; Briggs, Robert A; Kwon, Oh Sung; Young, Laura M; Hopkins, Paul N; Volpi, Elena; Marcus, Robin L; LaStayo, Paul C; Drummond, Micah J

    2015-09-15

    Bed rest-induced muscle loss and impaired muscle recovery may contribute to age-related sarcopenia. It is unknown if there are age-related differences in muscle mass and muscle anabolic and catabolic responses to bed rest. A secondary objective was to determine if rehabilitation could reverse bed rest responses. Nine older and fourteen young adults participated in a 5-day bed rest challenge (BED REST). This was followed by 8 weeks of high intensity resistance exercise (REHAB). Leg lean mass (via dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry; DXA) and strength were determined. Muscle biopsies were collected during a constant stable isotope infusion in the postabsorptive state and after essential amino acid (EAA) ingestion on three occasions: before (PRE), after bed rest and after rehabilitation. Samples were assessed for protein synthesis, mTORC1 signalling, REDD1/2 expression and molecular markers related to muscle proteolysis (MURF1, MAFBX, AMPKα, LC3II/I, Beclin1). We found that leg lean mass and strength decreased in older but not younger adults after bedrest (P < 0.05) and was restored after rehabilitation. EAA-induced mTORC1 signalling and protein synthesis increased before bed rest in both age groups (P < 0.05). Although both groups had blunted mTORC1 signalling, increased REDD2 and MURF1 mRNA after bedrest, only older adults had reduced EAA-induced protein synthesis rates and increased MAFBX mRNA, p-AMPKα and the LC3II/I ratio (P < 0.05). We conclude that older adults are more susceptible than young persons to muscle loss after short-term bed rest. This may be partially explained by a combined suppression of protein synthesis and a marginal increase in proteolytic markers. Finally, rehabilitation restored bed rest-induced deficits in lean mass and strength in older adults. PMID:26173027

  15. Mean 24-hours sympathetic nervous system activity decreases during head-down tilted bed rest but not during microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Nj; Heer, M.; Ivanova, K.; Norsk, P.

    Sympathetic nervous system activity is closely related to gravitational stress in ground based experiments. Thus a high activity is present in the standing-up position and a very low activity is observed during acute head-out water immersion. Adjustments in sympathetic activity are necessary to maintain a constant blood pressure during variations in venous return. Head-down tilted bed rest is applied as a model to simulate changes observed during microgravity. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that mean 24-hours sympathetic activity was low and similar during space flight and in ground based observation obtained during long-term head-down tilted bed rest. Forearm venous plasma noradrenaline was measured by a radioenzymatic technique as an index of muscle sympathetic activity and thrombocyte noradrenaline and adrenaline were measured as indices of mean 24-hours sympathoadrenal activity. Previous results have indicated that thrombocyte noradrenaline level has a half-time of 2 days. Thus to reflect sympathetic activity during a specific experiment the study period must last for at least 6 days and a sample must be obtained within 12 hours after the experiment has ended. Ten normal healthy subjects were studied before and during a 14 days head-down tilted bed rest as well as during an ambulatory study period of a similar length. The whole experiment was repeated while the subjects were on a low calorie diet. Thrombocyte noradrenaline levels were studied in 4 cosmonauts before and within 12 hours after landing after more than 7 days in flight. Thrombocyte noradrenaline decreased markedly during the head-down tilted bed rest (p<0.001), whereas there were no significant changes in the ambulatory study. Plasma noradrenaline decreased in the adaptation period but not during the intervention. During microgravity thrombocyte noradrenaline increased in four cosmonauts and the percentage changes were significantly different in cosmonauts and in subjects

  16. Individual Variability in Aerobic Fitness Adaptations to 70-d of Bed Rest and Exercise Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downs, Meghan; Buxton, Roxanne; Goetchius, Elizabeth; DeWitt, John; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Change in maximal aerobic capacity (VO2pk) in response to exercise training and disuse is highly variable among individuals. Factors that could contribute to the observed variability (lean mass, daily activity, diet, sleep, stress) are not routinely controlled in studies. The NASA bed rest (BR) studies use a highly controlled hospital based model as an analog of spaceflight. In this study, diet, hydration, physical activity and light/dark cycles were precisely controlled and provided the opportunity to investigate individual variability. PURPOSE. Evaluate the contribution of exercise intensity and lean mass on change in VO2pk during 70-d of BR or BR + exercise. METHODS. Subjects completed 70-d of BR alone (CON, N=9) or BR + exercise (EX, N=17). The exercise prescription included 6 d/wk of aerobic exercise at 70 - 100% of max and 3 d/wk of lower body resistance exercise. Subjects were monitored 24 hr/d. VO2pk and lean mass (iDXA) were measured pre and post BR. ANOVA was used to evaluate changes in VO2pk pre to post BR. Subjects were retrospectively divided into high and low responders based on change in VO2pk (CON > 20% loss, n=5; EX >10% loss, n=4, or 5% gain, n=4) to further understand individual variability. RESULTS. VO2pk decreased from pre to post BR in CON (P<0.05) and was maintained in EX; however, significant individual variability was observed (CON: -22%, range: -39% to -.5%; EX: -1.8%, range: -16% to 12.6%). The overlap in ranges between groups included 3 CON who experienced smaller reduction in VO2pk (<16%) than the worst responding EX subjects. Individual variability was maintained when VO2pk was normalized to lean mass (range, CON: -33.7% to -5.7%; EX: -15.8% to 11%), and the overlap included 5 CON with smaller reductions in VO2pk than the worst responding EX subjects. High responders to disuse also lost the most lean mass; however, this relationship was not maintained in EX (i.e. the largest gains/losses in lean mass were observed in both high and low

  17. NIRS-Derived Tissue Oxygen Saturation and Hydrogen Ion Concentration Following Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. M. C.; Everett, M. E.; Crowell, J. B.; Westby, C. M.; Soller, B. R.

    2010-01-01

    Long-term bed rest (BR), a model of spaceflight, results in a decrease in aerobic capacity and altered submaximal exercise responses. The strongest BR-induced effects on exercise appear to be centrally-mediated, but longer BR durations may result in peripheral adaptations (e.g., decreased mitochondrial and capillary density) which are likely to influence exercise responses. PURPOSE: To measure tissue oxygen saturation (SO2) and hydrogen ion concentration ([H+]) in the vastus lateralis (VL) using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during cycle ergometry before and after . 30 d of BR. METHODS: Eight subjects performed a graded exercise test on a cycle ergometer to volitional fatigue 7 d before (pre-BR) and at the end or 1 day after BR (post-BR). NIRS spectra were collected from a sensor adhered to the skin overlying the VL. Oxygen consumption (VO2) was measured by open circuit spirometry. Blood volume (BV) was measured before and after BR using the carbon monoxide rebreathing technique. Changes in pre- and post-BR SO2 and [H+] data were compared using mixed model analyses. BV and peak exercise data were compared using paired t-tests. RESULTS: BV (pre-BR: 4.3+/-0.3, post-BR: 3.7+/-0.2 L, mean+/-SE, p=.01) and peak VO2 (pre-BR: 1.98+/-0.24, post-BR: 1.48 +/-0.21 L/min, p<.01) were reduced after BR. As expected, SO2 decreased with exercise before and after BR. However, SO2 was lower post compared with pre-BR throughout exercise, including at peak exercise (pre-BR: 50+/-3, post-BR: 43+/-4%, p=.01). After BR, [H+] was higher at the start of exercise and did not increase at the same rate as pre-BR. Peak [H+] was not different from pre to post-BR (pre-BR: 36+/-2; post-BR: 38+/-2 nmol/L). CONCLUSIONS: Lower SO2 during exercise suggests that oxygen extraction in the VL is higher after BR, perhaps due to lower circulating blood volume. The higher [H+] after BR suggests a greater reliance upon glycolysis during submaximal exercise, although [H+] at peak exercise was unchanged

  18. Functional impairment of skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism during knee extension exercise after bed rest

    PubMed Central

    Salvadego, Desy; Lazzer, Stefano; Marzorati, Mauro; Porcelli, Simone; Rejc, Enrico; Šimunič, Bostjan; Pišot, Rado; di Prampero, Pietro Enrico

    2011-01-01

    A functional evaluation of skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism during dynamic knee extension (KE) incremental exercises was carried out following a 35-day bed rest (BR) (Valdoltra 2008 BR campaign). Nine young male volunteers (age: 23.5 ± 2.2 yr; mean ± SD) were evaluated. Pulmonary gas exchange, heart rate and cardiac output (by impedance cardiography), skeletal muscle (vastus lateralis) fractional O2 extraction, and brain (frontal cortex) oxygenation (by near-infrared spectroscopy) were determined during incremental KE. Values at exhaustion were considered “peak”. Peak heart rate (147 ± 18 beats/min before vs. 146 ± 17 beats/min after BR) and peak cardiac output (17.8 ± 3.3 l/min before vs. 16.1 ± 1.8 l/min after BR) were unaffected by BR. As expected, brain oxygenation did not decrease during KE. Peak O2 uptake was lower after vs. before BR, both when expressed as liters per minute (0.99 ± 0.17 vs. 1.26 ± 0.27) and when normalized per unit of quadriceps muscle mass (46.5 ± 6.4 vs. 56.9 ± 11.0 ml·min−1·100 g−1). Skeletal muscle peak fractional O2 extraction, expressed as a percentage of the maximal values obtained during a transient limb ischemia, was lower after (46.3 ± 12.1%) vs. before BR (66.5 ± 11.2%). After elimination, by the adopted exercise protocol, of constraints related to cardiovascular O2 delivery, a decrease in peak O2 uptake and muscle peak capacity of fractional O2 extraction was found after 35 days of BR. These findings suggest a substantial impairment of oxidative function at the muscle level, “downstream” with respect to bulk blood flow to the exercising muscles, that is possibly at the level of blood flow distribution/O2 utilization inside the muscle, peripheral O2 diffusion, and intracellular oxidative metabolism. PMID:21921243

  19. Cardiovascular and Body Fluid Adjustments During Bed Rest and Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.; Tomko, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Although a few scientific bed rest (BR) studies were conducted soon after World War II, advent of the space program provided impetus for utilizing prolonged (days-months) BR, which employed the horizontal or 6 degree head-down tilt (HDT) body positions, to simulate responses of healthy people to microgravity. Shorter (hours) HDT protocols were used to study initial mechanisms of the acclimation-deconditioning (reduction of physical fitness) syndromes. Of the major physiological factors modified during BR, reduced force on bones, ligaments, and muscles, and greatly reduced hydrostatic pressure within the cardiovascular system, the latter: which involves shifts of blood from the lower extremities into the upper body, increase in central venous pressure, and diuresis, appears to be the initial stimulus for acclimation. Increase in central venous pressure occurs in subjects during weightless parabolic flight, but not in astronauts early during orbital flight. But significant reduction in total body water (hypohydration) and plasma volume (hypovolemia) occurs in subjects during both BR and microgravity. Response of interstitial fluid volume is not as clear, It has been reported to increase during BR, and it may have increased in Skylab II and IV astronauts. Reduction of total body water, and greater proportional reduction of extracellular volume, indicates increased cellular volume which may contribute to inflight cephalic edema. Cerebral pressure abates after a few days of HDT, but not during flight. accompanied by normal (eugravity) blood constituent concentrations suggesting some degree of acclimation had occurred. But during reentry, with moderately increased +Gz (head-to-foot) acceleration and gravitational force, the microgravity "euhydration" becomes functional progressive dehydration contributing to the general reentry syndrome (GRS) which, upon landing the Shuttle, can and often results in gastrointestinal distress, disorientation, vertigo, fatigue, and

  20. Analog Exercise Hardware to Implement a High Intensity Exercise Program During Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loerch, Linda; Newby, Nate; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Background: In order to evaluate novel countermeasure protocols in a space flight analog prior to validation on the International Space Station (ISS), NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) is sponsoring a multi-investigator bedrest campaign that utilizes a combination of commercial and custom-made exercise training hardware to conduct daily resistive and aerobic exercise protocols. This paper will describe these pieces of hardware and how they are used to support current bedrest studies at NASA's Flight Analog Research Unit in Galveston, TX. Discussion: To implement candidate exercise countermeasure studies during extended bed rest studies the following analog hardware are being utilized: Stand alone Zero-Gravity Locomotion Simulator (sZLS) -- a custom built device by NASA, the sZLS allows bedrest subjects to remain supine as they run on a vertically-oriented treadmill (0-15 miles/hour). The treadmill includes a pneumatic subject loading device to provide variable body loading (0-100%) and a harness to keep the subject in contact with the motorized treadmill to provide a ground reaction force at their feet that is quantified by a Kistler Force Plate. Supine Cycle Ergometer -- a commercially available supine cycle ergometer (Lode, Groningen, Netherlands) is used for all cycle ergometer sessions. The ergometer has adjustable shoulder supports and handgrips to help stabilize the subject during exercise. Horizontal Squat Device (HSD) -- a custom built device by Quantum Fitness Corp (Stafford, TX), the HSD allows for squat exercises to be performed while lying in a supine position. The HSD can provide 0 to 600 pounds of force in selectable 5 lb increments, and allows hip translation in both the vertical and horizontal planes. Prone Leg Curl -- a commercially available prone leg curl machine (Cybex International Inc., Medway, MA) is used to complete leg curl exercises. Horizontal Leg Press -- a commercially available horizontal leg press (Quantum Fitness Corporation) is

  1. Arterial Structure and Function in Women and Men Following Long Duration Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Stuart M. C.; Stenger, Michael B.; Martin, David S.; Platts, Steven H.

    2008-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance is a well-recognized consequence of space flight and bed rest (BR), with a greater incidence reported in women. We hypothesized that leg, but not arm, arterial structure and function would be altered following prolonged BR, as a model of space flight, and that women would be more susceptible to BR-induced deconditioning than men. METHODS: Ten volunteers (5 males, 5 females) completed 90 d of 6 head-down BR. Subjects participated in tests of brachial (BA) and anterior tibial (AT) artery endothelium-dependent (flow mediated dilation [FMD] following 5-7 min of arterial occlusion) and endothelium-independent (0.4 mg sublingual nitroglycerin [SN]) vasodilation before BR (PRE) and on days 7 (BR7), 21 (BR21), and 90 (BR90) of BR. Vessel diameter and intimal medial thickness (IMT) were measured by ultrasound. IMT, baseline diameter, and percent change in diameter from baseline during FMD and SN tests were compared across BR and between genders using repeated measures two-way ANOVA with Bonferroni post-hoc tests in which PRE and women were control conditions. RESULTS: Baseline vessel diameter was lower in women than in men in both the BA (p=0.005) and AT (p=0.01) across all days. Baseline AT diameter decreased during BR (p=0.01) and tended to be more profound in women (interaction, p=0.06). AT diameter was reduced in women at BR21 and BR90 (p<0.01) but not in men. In contrast, there was no BR effect on baseline BA diameter. IMT also decreased in the AT (p<0.001) but not in the BA during BR; AT IMT was reduced by BR21 (p<0.05). As a group, there was no effect of BR on AT FMD, BA FMD, and AT SN-dilation, although BA SN-dilation was significantly reduced on BR21 (p=0.01). Across all BR days, women exhibited higher AT FMD (p=0.03), BA FMD (p=0.02), and BA SN-dilation (p=0.01) and tended to demonstrate greater AT SN-dilation (p=0.11). CONCLUSIONS: These preliminary results suggest that arterial remodeling occurs during BR in the leg (decreased diameter

  2. Ocular Outcomes Comparison Between 14- and 70-Day Head-Down-Tilt Bed Rest

    PubMed Central

    Taibbi, Giovanni; Cromwell, Ronita L.; Zanello, Susana B.; Yarbough, Patrice O.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert J.; Godley, Bernard F.; Vizzeri, Gianmarco

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare ocular outcomes in healthy subjects undergoing 14- and/or 70-day head-down-tilt (HDT) bed rest (BR). Methods Participants were selected by using NASA standard screening procedures. Standardized NASA BR conditions were implemented. Subjects maintained a 6° HDT position for 14 and/or 70 consecutive days. Weekly ophthalmologic examinations were performed in the sitting (pre/post-BR only) and HDT positions. Mixed-effects linear models compared pre- and post-HDT BR observations between 14- and 70-day HDT BR in best-corrected visual acuity, spherical equivalent, intraocular pressure (IOP), Spectralis OCT retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, peripapillary and macular retinal thicknesses. Results Sixteen and six subjects completed the 14- and 70-day HDT BR studies, respectively. The magnitude of HDT BR–induced changes was not significantly different between the two studies for all outcomes, except the superior (mean pre/post difference of 14- vs. 70-day HDT BR: +4.69 μm versus +11.50 μm), nasal (+4.63 μm versus +11.46 μm), and inferior (+4.34 μm versus +10.08 μm) peripapillary retinal thickness. A +1.42 mm Hg and a +1.79 mm Hg iCare IOP increase from baseline occurred during 14- and 70-day HDT BR, respectively. Modified Amsler grid, red dot test, confrontational visual field, color vision, and stereoscopic fundus photography were unremarkable. Conclusions Seventy-day HDT BR induced greater peripapillary retinal thickening than 14-day HDT BR, suggesting that time may affect the amount of optic disc swelling. Spectralis OCT detected retinal nerve fiber layer thickening post BR, without clinical signs of optic disc edema. A small IOP increase during BR subsided post HDT BR. Such changes may have resulted from BR-induced cephalad fluids shift. The HDT BR duration may be critical for replicating microgravity-related ophthalmologic changes observed in astronauts on ≥6-month spaceflights. PMID:26868753

  3. High Intensity Exercise Countermeasures does not Prevent Orthostatic Intolerance Following Prolonged Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platts, Steven H.; Stenger, Michael B.; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L.; Lee, Stuart M. C.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 20% of Space Shuttle astronauts became presyncopal during operational stand and 80deg head-up tilt tests, and the prevalence of orthostatic intolerance increases after longer missions. Greater than 60% of the US astronauts participating in Mir and early International Space Station missions experienced presyncope during post-flight tilt tests, perhaps related to limitations of the exercise hardware that prevented high intensity exercise training until later ISS missions. The objective of this study was to determine whether an intense resistive and aerobic exercise countermeasure program designed to prevent cardiovascular and musculoskeletal deconditioning during 70 d of bed rest (BR), a space flight analog, would protect against post-BR orthostatic intolerance. METHODS Twenty-six subjects were randomly assigned to one of three groups: non-exercise controls (n=11) or one of two exercise groups (ExA, n=8; ExB, n=7). Both ExA and ExB groups performed the same resistive and aerobic exercise countermeasures during BR, but one exercise group received testosterone supplementation while the other received a placebo during BR in a double-blinded fashion. On 3 d/wk, subjects performed lower body resistive exercise and 30 min of continuous aerobic exercise (=75% max heart rate). On the other 3 d/wk, subjects performed only highintensity, interval-style aerobic exercise. Orthostatic intolerance was assessed using a 15-min 80? head-up tilt test performed 2 d (BR-2) before and on the last day of BR (BR70). Plasma volume was measured using carbon monoxide rebreathing on BR-3 and before rising on the first recovery day (BR+0). The code for the exercise groups has not been broken, and results are reported here without group identification. RESULTS Only one subject became presyncopal during tilt testing on BR-2, but 7 of 11 (63%) controls, 3 of 8 (38%) ExA, and 4 of 7 (57%) ExB subjects were presyncopal on BR70. Survival analysis of post-BR tilt tests revealed no

  4. Effects of encouraged water drinking on thermoregulatory responses after 20 days of head-down bed rest in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Maki; Kanikowska, Dominika; Iwase, Satoshi; Shimizu, Yuuki; Inukai, Yoko; Nishimura, Naoki; Sugenoya, Junichi

    2009-09-01

    We tested the hypothesis that encouraged water drinking according to urine output for 20 days could ameliorate impaired thermoregulatory function under microgravity conditions. Twelve healthy men, aged 24 ± 1.5 years (mean ± SE), underwent -6° head-down bed rest (HDBR) for 20 days. During bed rest, subjects were encouraged to drink the same amount of water as the 24-h urine output volume of the previous day. A heat exposure test consisting of water immersion up to the knees at 42°C for 45 min after a 10 min rest (baseline) in the sitting position was performed 2 days before the 20-day HDBR (PRE), and 2 days after the 20-day HDBR (POST). Core temperature (tympanic), skin temperature, skin blood flow and sweat rate were recorded continuously. We found that the -6° HDBR did not increase the threshold temperature for onset of sweating under the encouraged water drinking regime. We conclude that encouraged water drinking could prevent impaired thermoregulatory responses after HDBR.

  5. Integrated Resistance and Aerobic Training Maintains Cardiovascular and Skeletal Muscle Fitness During 14 Days of Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz-Snyder, Lori; Goetchius, Elizabeth; Crowell, Brent; Hackney, Kyle; Wickwire, Jason; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Snyder, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Background: Known incompatibilities exist between resistance and aerobic training. Of particular importance are findings that concurrent resistance and aerobic training reduces the effectiveness of the resistance training and limits skeletal muscle adaptations (example: Dudley & Djamil, 1985). Numerous unloading studies have documented the effectiveness of resistance training alone for the maintenance of skeletal muscle size and strength. However the practical applications of those studies are limited because long ]duration crew members perform both aerobic and resistance exercise throughout missions/spaceflight. To date, such integrated training on the International Space Station (ISS) has not been fully effective in the maintenance of skeletal muscle function. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of high intensity concurrent resistance and aerobic training for the maintenance of cardiovascular fitness and skeletal muscle strength, power and endurance over 14 days of strict bed rest. Methods: 9 subjects (8 male and 1 female; 34.5 +/- 8.2 years) underwent 14 days of bed rest with concurrent training. Resistance and aerobic training were integrated as shown in table 1. Days that included 2 exercise sessions had a 4-8 hour rest between exercise bouts. The resistance training consisted of 3 sets of 12 repetitions of squat, heel raise, leg press and hamstring curl exercise. Aerobic exercise consisted of periodized interval training that included 30 sec, 2 min and 4 min intervals alternating by day with continuous aerobic exercise.

  6. Bed rest impairs skeletal muscle amino acid transporter expression, mTORC1 signaling, and protein synthesis in response to essential amino acids in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Jared M.; Fry, Christopher S.; Walker, Dillon K.; Gundermann, David M.; Reidy, Paul T.; Timmerman, Kyle L.; Markofski, Melissa M.; Paddon-Jones, Douglas; Rasmussen, Blake B.; Volpi, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy during bed rest is attributed, at least in part, to slower basal muscle protein synthesis (MPS). Essential amino acids (EAA) stimulate mammalian target of rapamycin (mTORC1) signaling, amino acid transporter expression, and MPS and are necessary for muscle mass maintenance, but there are no data on the effect of inactivity on this anabolic mechanism. We hypothesized that bed rest decreases muscle mass in older adults by blunting the EAA stimulation of MPS through reduced mTORC1 signaling and amino acid transporter expression in older adults. Six healthy older adults (67 ± 2 yr) participated in a 7-day bed rest study. We used stable isotope tracers, Western blotting, and real-time qPCR to determine the effect of bed rest on MPS, muscle mTORC1 signaling, and amino acid transporter expression and content in the postabsorptive state and after acute EAA ingestion. Bed rest decreased leg lean mass by ∼4% (P < 0.05) and increased postabsorptive mTOR protein (P < 0.05) levels while postabsorptive MPS was unchanged (P > 0.05). Before bed rest acute EAA ingestion increased MPS, mTOR (Ser2448), S6 kinase 1 (Thr389, Thr421/Ser424), and ribosomal protein S6 (Ser240/244) phosphorylation, activating transcription factor 4, L-type amino acid transporter 1 and sodium-coupled amino acid transporter 2 protein content (P < 0.05). However, bed rest blunted the EAA-induced increase in MPS, mTORC1 signaling, and amino acid transporter protein content. We conclude that bed rest in older adults significantly attenuated the EAA-induced increase in MPS with a mechanism involving reduced mTORC1 signaling and amino acid transporter protein content. Together, our data suggest that a blunted EAA stimulation of MPS may contribute to muscle loss with inactivity in older persons. PMID:22338078

  7. Effect of three day bed-rest on circulatory and hormonal responses to active orthostatic test in endurance trained athletes and untrained subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubala, P.; Smorawinski, J.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.; Nazar, K.; Bicz, B.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1996-01-01

    Circulatory and hormonal parameters were measured in endurance-trained athletes and control subjects during orthostatic tolerance tests conducted prior to and after three days of bed rest. Heart rate and blood pressure changes due to bed rest appeared to be the same in both groups. Hormonal changes, however, were different between the two groups, with the athletes having decreased sympathoadrenal activity and increased plasma renin activity. Untrained subjects had changes in cortisol secretion only.

  8. Effects of long-term head-down-tilt bed rest and different training regimes on the coagulation system of healthy men

    PubMed Central

    Haider, Thomas; Gunga, Hanns-Christian; Matteucci-Gothe, Raffaella; Sottara, Elke; Griesmacher, Andrea; Belavý, Daniel L; Felsenberg, Dieter; Werner, Andreas; Schobersberger, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Immobility plus preexisting chronic disease or acute trauma can activate the coagulation system, thus increasing the risk for thromboembolic events. The effects of long-term bed-rest immobility and microgravity on the coagulation system of healthy persons (e.g., during crewed Mars missions) have not yet been studied. The main objective of the second Berlin BedRest Study (BBR2-2) “Coagulation Part” was to investigate adaptations of the hemostatic system during long-term bed rest (60 days) under simulated microgravity (6° head-down-tilt [6°HDT]) and after mobilization in three different volunteer groups (randomly assigned to CTR= inactive control group; RE= resistive exercise only group; and RVE= resistive exercise with whole-body vibration group). In 24 males (aged 21–45 years), before, during, and after long-term bed rest, key parameters of coagulation were measured from venous blood samples: D-dimer (DD), thrombin–antithrombin III complex (TAT), and prothrombin fragment F1 + 2 (PT-F1 + 2). Additionally, modified rotational thrombelastometry (ROTEM®) analysis was performed. Times of exploratory analyses were as follows: baseline data collection 2 days before bed rest (BDC-2); eight different days of 6°HDT bed rest (HDT1–HDT60), and two different days after reambulation (R + 3 and R + 6). We found significant changes in DD, TAT, and PT-F1 + 2 over the total time course, but no consistent effect of physical interventions (RE, RVE) on these parameters. Notably, no parameter reached levels indicative of intravascular thrombin formation. All ROTEM® parameters remained within the normal range and no pathological traces were found. Sixty days of 6°HDT bed rest are not associated with pronounced activation of the coagulation system indicative of intravascular thrombus formation in healthy volunteers independent of the training type during the bed rest. PMID:24400137

  9. Influence of prolonged bed-rest on spectral and temporal electromyographic motor control characteristics of the superficial lumbo-pelvic musculature.

    PubMed

    Belavý, Daniel L; Ng, Joseph K-F; Wilson, Stephen J; Armbrecht, Gabriele; Stegeman, Dick F; Rittweger, Jörn; Felsenberg, Dieter; Richardson, Carolyn A

    2010-02-01

    Little is known about the motor control of the lumbo-pelvic musculature in microgravity and its simulation (bed-rest). Analysis of spectral and temporal electromyographic variables can provide information on motor control relevant for normal function. This study examined the effect of 56-days of bed-rest with 1-year follow-up in 10 male subjects on the median frequency and the activation timing in surface electromyographic recordings from five superficial lumbo-pelvic muscles during a repetitive knee movement task. Trunk fat mass (from whole body-composition measurements) and movement accuracy as possible explanatory factors were included. Increased median frequency was observed in the lumbar erector spinae starting late in bed-rest, but this was not seen in its synergist, the thoracic erector spinae (p<.0001). These changes persisted up to 1-year after bed-rest and were independent of changes in body-composition or movement accuracy. Analysis suggested decreases of median frequency (p<.0001) in the abdominal and gluteal muscles to result from increased (p<.01) trunk fat levels during and after bed-rest. No changes in lumbo-pelvic muscle activation timing were seen. The results suggest that bed-rest particularly affects the shorter lumbar erector spinae and that the temporal sequencing of superficial lumbo-pelvic muscle activation is relatively robust. PMID:19395271

  10. High dietary sodium chloride causes further protein loss during head-down tilt bed rest (HDBR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buehlmeier, Judith; Frings-Meuthen, Petra; Baecker, Natalie; Stehle, Peter; Heer, Martina

    Human spaceflight is associated with a loss of body protein most likely caused by muscle degradation. Additionally astronauts tend towards a high dietary intake of sodium chloride (NaCl), which has recently been shown to induce low grade metabolic acidosis (Frings-Meuthen et al. JBMR, Epub 2007). In several patterns, e.g. chronical renal failure, metabolic acidosis is associated with protein catabolism. We therefore hypothesized that high dietary intake of NaCl enforces protein losses in HDBR, a model for physiological changes in microgravity (µG). Eight healthy male subjects (mean age 26.25 ± 3.5; mean body weight: 78.5 ± 4.1 kg) participated in a 14-day bed rest study in the metabolic ward of the DLR - Institute of Aerospace Medicine, Cologne, Germany. The study was carried out in a cross over design, consisting of two phases, each lasting 22 days (5 days adaptation, 14 days 6° HDBR and 3 days recovery). Both study phases were identical with respect to environmental conditions and study protocol. Subjects received an individually tailored, weight-maintaining diet containing 1.3 g protein/kg/day. The diet was identical in both study phases with the exception of NaClintake: Every subject received a low NaCl diet (0.7 mmol/kg/day) in one phase and a high NaCl diet (7.7 mmol/kg/day) in another one. Blood gas for analysis of acid-base balance was implemented at days 4 and 5 of adaptation, days 2, 5, 7, 10, 12, 14 of HDBR and days 2, 3 of recovery. Continuous urine collection started on the first day in the metabolic ward to analyze nitrogen excretion. Nitrogen balance was calculated from the difference between protein intake and urinary nitrogen excretion, determined by use of chemiluminescence (Grimble et al. JPEN, 1988). Plasma pH did not change significantly (p=0.285), but plasma bicarbonate and base excess decreased (p=0.0175; p=0.0093) with high NaCl intake in HDBR compared to the low NaCl diet. Nitrogen balance in HDBR was negative, as expected in

  11. Elevated serum soluble CD200 and CD200R as surrogate markers of bone loss under bed rest conditions.

    PubMed

    Kos, O; Hughson, R L; Hart, D A; Clément, G; Frings-Meuthen, P; Linnarsson, D; Paloski, W H; Rittweger, J; Wuyts, F; Zange, J; Gorczynski, R M

    2014-03-01

    CD200 is a transmembrane protein that belongs to the immunoglobulin family of proteins and is ubiquitously expressed on a variety of cell types. Upon interaction with its receptors (CD200Rs) expressed on myeloid-derived cells and T lymphocytes, an immunoregulatory signal is delivered to receptor-expressing cells. Previous studies have implicated a role for CD200:CD200R in the regulation of the expression of mRNA markers of osteoclastogenesis/osteoblastogenesis, following interaction of CD200 (on osteoblast precursors) with CD200R1 (on osteoclast precursors). Signaling of CD200R1 is hypothesized to attenuate osteoclastogenesis. We have investigated whether levels of soluble forms of CD200 and/or CD200R1 (sCD200, sCD200R1) are altered in volunteers undergoing 6° head down tilt bed rest to mimic conditions of microgravity known to be associated with preferential osteoclastogenesis and whether countermeasures, reported to be beneficial in attenuation of bone loss under microgravity conditions, would lead to altered sCD200 and sCD200R1 levels. Our data suggest that, as predicted, sCD200 levels fall under bed rest conditions while sCD200R1 levels rise. In subjects undergoing 30-minute per day continuous centrifugation protocols, as a countermeasure to attenuate changes which may lead to bone loss, these alterations in sCD200 and sCD200R1 levels seen under conditions of bed rest were abolished or attenuated. Our results suggest that measurement of sCD200 and/or sCD200R1 may prove a useful and rapid means of monitoring subjects at risk of bone loss and/or accessing the efficacy of treatment regimes designed to counter bone loss. PMID:24333170

  12. Effect of high sodium intake during 14 days of bed-rest on acid-base balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frings, P.; Baecker, N.; Heer, M.

    Lowering mechanical load like in microgravity is the dominant stimulus leading to bone loss However high dietary sodium intake is also considered as a risk factor for osteoporosis and thereby might exacerbate the microgravity induced bone loss In a metabolic balance non bed-rest study we have recently shown that a very high sodium intake leads to an increased bone resorption most likely because of a mild metabolic acidosis Frings et al FASEB J 19 5 A1345 2005 To test if mild metabolic acidosis also occurs during immobilization we examined the effect of increased dietary sodium on bone metabolism and acid-base balance in eight healthy male test subjects mean age 26 25 pm 3 49 years body weight 77 98 pm 4 34 kg in our metabolic ward during a 14-day head-down tilt HDT bed-rest study The study was designed as a randomized crossover study with two study periods Each period was divided into three parts 4 ambulatory days with 200 mmol sodium intake 14 days of bed-rest with either 550 mmol or 50 mmol sodium intake and 3 recovery days with 200 mmol sodium intake The sodium intake was altered by variations in dietary sodium chloride content Blood pH P CO2 and P O2 were analyzed in fasting morning fingertip blood samples several times during the entire study Bicarbonate HCO 3 - and base excess BE were calculated according to the Henderson-Hasselbach equation Preliminary results in the acid-base balance from the first study period 4 subjects with 550 mmol and 4 subjects with 50 mmol sodium intake strongly

  13. WISE 2005: Aerobic and resistive countermeasures prevent paraspinal muscle deconditioning during 60-day bed rest in women.

    PubMed

    Holt, Jacquelyn A; Macias, Brandon R; Schneider, Suzanne M; Watenpaugh, Donald E; Lee, Stuart M C; Chang, Douglas G; Hargens, Alan R

    2016-05-15

    Microgravity-induced lumbar paraspinal muscle deconditioning may contribute to back pain commonly experienced by astronauts and may increase the risk of postflight injury. We hypothesized that a combined resistive and aerobic exercise countermeasure protocol that included spinal loading would mitigate lumbar paraspinal muscle deconditioning during 60 days of bed rest in women. Sixteen women underwent 60-day, 6° head-down-tilt bed rest (BR) and were randomized into control and exercise groups. During bed rest the control group performed no exercise. The exercise group performed supine treadmill exercise within lower body negative pressure (LBNP) for 3-4 days/wk and flywheel resistive exercise for 2-3 days/wk. Paraspinal muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) was measured using a lumbar spine MRI sequence before and after BR. In addition, isokinetic spinal flexion and extension strengths were measured before and after BR. Data are presented as means ± SD. Total lumbar paraspinal muscle CSA decreased significantly more in controls (10.9 ± 3.4%) than in exercisers (4.3 ± 3.4%; P < 0.05). The erector spinae was the primary contributor (76%) to total lumbar paraspinal muscle loss. Moreover, exercise attenuated isokinetic spinal extension loss (-4.3 ± 4.5%), compared with controls (-16.6 ± 11.2%; P < 0.05). In conclusion, LBNP treadmill and flywheel resistive exercises during simulated microgravity mitigate decrements in lumbar paraspinal muscle structure and spine function. Therefore spaceflight exercise countermeasures that attempt to reproduce spinal loads experienced on Earth may mitigate spinal deconditioning during long-duration space travel. PMID:26893030

  14. Effects of space flight and -6 degrees bed rest on the neuroendocrine response to metabolic stress in physically fit subjects.

    PubMed

    Ksinantová, Lucia; Koska, Juraj; Martinkovic, Miroslav; Vigas, Milan; Macho, Ladislav; Kvetnansky, Richard

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of plasma epinephrine (EPI) and norepinephrine (NE) responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia (ITT) 3 weeks before the space flight (SF), on the fifth day of SF, on days 2 and 16 after landing in the first Slovak astronaut, and before and on the fifth day of prolonged bed rest (BR) in 15 military aircraft pilots, aged 33.5 +/- 1.4 years, body mass index (BMI) 26.5 +/- 0.7 kg/m(2), maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2max)) 55.2 +/- 2.4 mL/kg/min, who volunteered for the study. ITT was induced by i.v. administrations of 0.1 IU/kg body weight insulin (Actrapid HM) in a bolus. Insulin administration led to a comparable hypoglycemia in preflight, actual flight conditions, and before and after bed rest. ITT led to a pronounced increase in EPI levels and moderate increase in NE in preflight studies. However, an evidently reduced plasma elevation of EPI was found after insulin administration during SF and during BR. Thus, during the real microgravity in SF and simulated microgravity in BR, ITT activates the adrenomedullary system to less extent that at conditions of the Earth's gravitation. Post-flight changes in EPI and NE did not differ from those of preflight values, since SF was relatively short (8 days) and the readaptation to Earth's gravitation was fast. It seems that an increased blood flow in brain might be responsible for the reduced EPI response to insulin. Responses to ITT in physically fit subjects indicate the stimulus specificity of the deconditioning effect of 5 days of bed rest on the stress response. PMID:15240415

  15. The Effect of Bed Rest on Bone Turnover in Young Women Hospitalized for Anorexia Nervosa: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    DiVasta, Amy D.; Feldman, Henry A.; Quach, Ashley E.; Balestrino, Maria; Gordon, Catherine M.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Malnourished adolescents with anorexia nervosa (AN) requiring medical hospitalization are at high risk for skeletal insults. Even short-term bed rest may further disrupt normal patterns of bone turnover. Objective: The objective of the study was to determine the effect of relative immobilization on bone turnover in adolescents hospitalized for AN. Design: This was a short-term observational study. Setting: The study was conducted at a tertiary care pediatric hospital. Study Participants: Twenty-eight adolescents with AN, aged 13–21 yr with a mean body mass index of 15.9 ± 1.8 kg/m2, were enrolled prospectively on admission. Intervention: As per standard care, all subjects were placed on bed rest and graded nutritional therapy. Main Outcome Measure: Markers of bone formation (bone specific alkaline phosphatase), turnover (osteocalcin), and bone resorption (urinary N-telopeptides NTx) were measured. Results: During the 5 d of hospitalization, serum osteocalcin increased by 0.24 ± 0.1 ng/ml · d (P = 0.02). Urine N-telopeptides reached a nadir on d 3, declining −6.9 ± 2.8 nm bone collagen equivalent per millimole creatinine (P = 0.01) but returned to baseline by d 5 (P > 0.05). Bone-specific alkaline phosphatase exhibited a decline that was strongly age dependent, being highly significant for younger subjects only [age 14 yr: −0.42 ± 0.11 (P = 0.0002); age 18 yr: −0.03 ± 0.08 (P = 0.68)]. Age had no effect on other outcome measures. Conclusion: Limitation of physical activity during hospitalization for patients with AN is associated with suppressed bone formation and resorption and an imbalance of bone turnover. Future interventional studies involving mechanical stimulation and/or weight-bearing activity are needed to determine whether medical protocols prescribing strict bed rest are appropriate. PMID:19223524

  16. Six-Degree Head-Down Tilt Bed Rest: Forty Years of Development as a Physiological Analog for Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeffrey D.; Cromwell, Ronita L.; Kundrot, Craig E.; Charles, John B.

    2011-01-01

    Early on, bed rest was recognized as a method for inducing many of the physiological changes experienced by spaceflight. Head-down tilt (HDT) bed rest was first introduced as an analog for spaceflight by a Soviet team led by Genin and Kakurin. Their study was performed in 1970 (at -4 degrees) and lasted for 30 days; results were reported in the Russian Journal of Space Biology (Kosmicheskaya Biol. 1972; 6(4): 26-28 & 45-109). The goal was to test physiological countermeasures for cosmonauts who would soon begin month-long missions to the Salyut space station. HDT was chosen to produce a similar sensation of blood flow to the head reported by Soyuz cosmonauts. Over the next decade, other tilt angles were studied and comparisons with spaceflight were made, showing that HDT greater than 4 degrees was superior to horizontal bed rest for modeling acute physiological changes observed in space; but, at higher angles, subjects experienced greater discomfort without clearly improving the physiological comparison to spaceflight. A joint study performed by US and Soviet investigators, in 1979, set the goal of standardization of baseline conditions and chose 6-degrees HDT. This effectively established 6-degree HDT bed rest as the internationally-preferred analog for weightlessness and, since 1990, nearly all further studies have been conducted at 6-degrees HDT. A thorough literature review (1970-2010) revealed 534 primary scientific journal articles which reported results from using HDT as a physiological analog for spaceflight. These studies have ranged from as little as 10 minutes to the longest duration of 370 days. Long-term studies lasting four weeks or more have resulted in over 170 primary research articles. Today, the 6-degree HDT model provides a consistent, thoroughly-tested, ground-based analog for spaceflight and allows the proper scientific controls for rigorous testing of physiological countermeasures; however, all models have their strengths and limits. The 6

  17. Performance and mood-state parameters during 30-day 6 deg head-down bed rest with exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deroshia, Charles W.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    A study aimed at determining if the performance and mood impairments occur in bed-rested subjects, and if different exercise-training regimens modify or prevent them is presented. Eighteen healthy men were divided into three groups performing no exercise, isotonic exercise, and isokinetic exercise. Few deleterious changes occurred in performance and mood of the three groups which did not exceed baseline ambulatory levels. It is concluded that mood and performance did not deteriorate in response to prolonged bedrest and were not altered by exercise training.

  18. Performance and mood-state parameters during 30-day 6 degrees head-down bed rest with exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeRoshia, C. W.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    The study was designed to determine if performance and mood impairments occur in bed-rested subjects, and if different exercise-training regimens modify or prevent them. Eighteen normal, healthy men were divided on the basis of age, peak oxygen uptake, and maximal isometric knee extension strength into three similar groups: no exercise (NOE), isotonic exercise (ITE), and isokinetic exercise (IKE). A 15-min battery of 10 performance tests and 8 mood and 2 sleep scales were administered daily during ambulatory control, 30 d of absolute bed rest (BR), and 4 d of ambulatory recovery. Performance test proficiency increased (p < 0.05) for all three groups during BR in 7 of 10 tests and there were no consistent significant differences between the three groups. However, during BR, the ITE group was distinguished from the other groups by a decline (p < 0.05) in the activation mood dimension and in two of its constituent scales (motivation and concentration), and by improvement (p < 0.05) in the trouble-falling-asleep and psychological-tension scales. Since few deleterious changes in performance and mood occurred in the three groups and did not exceed baseline ambulatory levels, we conclude that mood and performance did not deteriorate in response to prolonged BR and were not altered by exercise training. However, the decline in activation mood scales in the ITE group may reflect overtraining or excess total workload in this group.

  19. Effect of head-down bed rest on the neuroendocrine response to orthostatic stress in physically fit men.

    PubMed

    Koska, J; Ksinantová, L; Kvetnanský, R; Marko, M; Hamar, D; Vigas, M; Hatala, R

    2003-01-01

    The role of neuroendocrine responsiveness in the development of orthostatic intolerance after bed rest was studied in physically fit subjects. Head-down bed-rest (HDBR, -6 degrees, 4 days) was performed in 15 men after 6 weeks of aerobic training. The standing test was performed before, after training and on day 4 of the HDBR. Orthostatic intolerance was observed in one subject before and after training. The blood pressure response after training was enhanced (mean BP increments 18+/-2 vs. 13+/- 2 mm Hg, p<0.05, means +/- S.E.M.), although noradrenaline response was diminished (1.38+/-0.18 vs. 2.76+/-0.25 mol.l(-1), p<0.01). Orthostatic intolerance after HDBR was observed in 10 subjects, the BP response was blunted, and noradrenaline as well as plasma renin activity (PRA) responses were augmented (NA 3.10+/-0.33 mol.l(-1), p<0.001; PRA 2.98+/-1.12 vs. 0.85+/-0.15 ng.ml(-1), p<0.05). Plasma noradrenaline, adrenaline and aldosterone responses in orthostatic intolerant subjects were similar to the tolerant group. We conclude that six weeks of training attenuated the sympathetic response to standing and had no effect on the orthostatic tolerance. In orthostatic intolerance the BP response induced by subsequent HDBR was absent despite an enhanced sympathetic response. PMID:12790765

  20. Effects of endurance training on endocrine response to physical exercise after 5 days of bed rest in healthy male subjects.

    PubMed

    Koska, Juraj; Ksinantová, Lucia; Kvetnanský, Richard; Hamar, Dusan; Martinkovic, Miroslav; Vigas, Milan

    2004-06-01

    The study was designed to evaluate how a bout of endurance training (ET) influences the endocrine response after head-down bed rest (HDBR). Eleven healthy males completed the study, which consisted of a 6-wk ET followed by 5 days of -6 degrees head-down HDBR. Treadmill exercise at 80% of pretraining maximal aerobic capacity (VO(2max)) was performed before and after ET as well as after HDBR. ET increased VO(2max) by 13%. The response of norepinephrine was attenuated after ET and exaggerated after HDBR (P < 0.001). The differences in epinephrine responses were not statistically significant. The responses of cortisol and plasma renin activity (PRA) were unchanged after ET and were enhanced after HDBR (P < 0.001). The response of growth hormone after HDBR was reduced (P < 0.05). Only the change in cortisol response was associated with the increment of VO(2max) after ET (r = 0.68, P < 0.01). Endurance training failed to completely prevent changes in endocrine responses seen after HDBR. Improvement of physical fitness was associated with an enhancement of the cortisol response to exercise following the period of bed rest. PMID:15240416

  1. Limited effect of fly-wheel and spinal mobilization exercise countermeasures on lumbar spine deconditioning during 90 d bed-rest in the Toulouse LTBR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belavý, Daniel L.; Ohshima, Hiroshi; Bareille, Marie-Pierre; Rittweger, Jörn; Felsenberg, Dieter

    2011-09-01

    We examined the effect of high-load fly-wheel (targeting the lower-limb musculature and concurrent loading of the spine via shoulder restraints) and spinal movement countermeasures against lumbar spine muscle atrophy, disc and spinal morphology changes and trunk isokinetic torque loss during prolonged bed-rest. Twenty-four male subjects underwent 90 d head-down tilt bed-rest and performed either fly-wheel (FW) exercises every three days, spinal movement exercises in lying five times daily (SpMob), or no exercise (Ctrl). There was no significant impact of countermeasures on losses of isokinetic trunk flexion/extension ( p≥0.65). Muscle volume change by day-89 of bed-rest in the psoas, iliacus, lumbar erector spinae, lumbar multifidus and quadratus lumborum, as measured via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), was statistically similar in all three groups ( p≥0.33). No significant effect on MRI-measures of lumbar intervertebral disc volume, spinal length and lordosis ( p≥0.09) were seen either, but there was some impact ( p≤0.048) on axial plane disc dimensions (greater reduction than in Ctrl) and disc height (greater increases than in Ctrl). MRI-data from subjects measured 13 and 90-days after bed-rest showed partial recovery of the spinal extensor musculature by day-13 after bed-rest with this process complete by day-90. Some changes in lumbar spine and disc morphology parameters were still persistent 90-days after bed-rest. The present results indicate that the countermeasures tested were not optimal to maintain integrity of the spine and trunk musculature during bed rest.

  2. Trabecular and cortical bone density and architecture in women after 60 days of bed rest using high-resolution pQCT: WISE 2005.

    PubMed

    Armbrecht, Gabriele; Belavý, Daniel Ludovic; Backström, Magdalena; Beller, Gisela; Alexandre, Christian; Rizzoli, Rene; Felsenberg, Dieter

    2011-10-01

    Prolonged bed rest is used to simulate the effects of spaceflight and causes disuse-related loss of bone. While bone density changes during bed rest have been described, there are no data on changes in bone microstructure. Twenty-four healthy women aged 25 to 40 years participated in 60 days of strict 6-degree head-down tilt bed rest (WISE 2005). Subjects were assigned to either a control group (CON, n = 8), which performed no countermeasures; an exercise group (EXE, n = 8), which undertook a combination of resistive and endurance training; or a nutrition group (NUT, n = 8), which received a high-protein diet. Density and structural parameters of the distal tibia and radius were measured at baseline, during, and up to 1 year after bed rest by high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT). Bed rest was associated with reductions in all distal tibial density parameters (p < 0.001), whereas only distal radius trabecular density decreased. Trabecular separation increased at both the distal tibia and distal radius (p < 0.001), but these effects were first significant after bed rest. Reduction in trabecular number was similar in magnitude at the distal radius (p = 0.021) and distal tibia (p < 0.001). Cortical thickness decreased at the distal tibia only (p < 0.001). There were no significant effects on bone structure or density of the countermeasures (p ≥ 0.057). As measured with HR-pQCT, it is concluded that deterioration in bone microstructure and density occur in women during and after prolonged bed rest. The exercise and nutrition countermeasures were ineffective in preventing these changes. PMID:21812030

  3. Assessment of Immune Status, Latent Viral Reactivation and Stress during Long Duration Bed Rest as an Analog for Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian E.; Stowe, Raymond P.; Mehta, Satish K.; Yetman, Deborah L.; Leaf, Melanie J.; Pierson, Duane L.; Sams, Clarence F.

    2007-01-01

    As logistical access for in-flight space research becomes more limited, the use of ground based spaceflight analogs for life science studies will increase. These studies are particularly important as NASA progresses towards the Lunar and eventually Mars missions outlined in the 2005 Vision for Space Exploration. Countermeasures must be developed to mitigate the clinical risks associated with exploration class space missions. In an effort to coordinate studies across multiple disciplines, NASA has selected 90-day bed rest as the analog of choice, and initiated the Flight Analogs Project to implement research studies with or without the evaluation of countermeasures. Although bed rest is not the analog of choice to evaluate spaceflight-associated immune dysfunction, a standard Immune Assessment was developed for subjects participating in the 90-day bed best studies. The Immune Assessment consists of: leukocyte subset distribution, T cell functional responses, intracellular cytokine production profiles, latent viral reactivation, virus specific T cell levels, virus specific T cell function, stress hormone levels and a behavioral assessment using stress questionnaires. The purpose of the assessment during the initial studies (without countermeasure) is to establish control data against which future studies (with countermeasure) will be evaluated. It is believed that some of the countermeasures planned to be evaluated in future studies, such as exercise, pharmacologic intervention or nutritional supplementation, have the ability to impact immune function. Therefore immunity will likely be monitored during those studies. The data generated during the first three control studies showed that the subjects in general did not display altered peripheral leukocyte subsets, constitutive immune activation, significant latent viral reactivation (EBV, VZV) or altered T cell function. Interestingly, for some subjects the level of constitutively activated T cells (CD8+/CD69+) and

  4. Physiological Observations and Omics to Develop Personalized Sensormotor Adaptability Countermeasures Using Bed Rest and Space Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulavara, A. P.; Seidler, R. D.; Feiveson, A.; Oddsson, L.; Zanello, S.; Oman, C. M.; Ploutz-Snyder, L.; Peters, B.; Cohen, H. S.; Reschke, M.; Wood, S.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor disturbances during the initial exposure to microgravity and during the re-adapation phase following a return to an earth-gravitational environment. These alterations may disrupt the ability to perform mission critical functional tasks requiring ambulation, manual control and gaze stability. Interestingly, astronauts who return from space flight show substantial differences in their abilities to readapt to a gravitational environment. The ability to predict the manner and degree to which individual astronauts would be affected would improve the effectiveness of countermeasure training programs designed to enhance sensorimotor adaptability. For such an approach to succeed, we must develop predictive measures of sensorimotor adaptability that will allow us to foresee, before actual space flight, which crewmembers are likely to experience the greatest challenges to their adaptive capacities. The goals of this project are to identify and characterize this set of predictive measures that include: 1) behavioral tests to assess sensory bias and adaptability quantified using both strategic and plastic-adaptive responses; 2) imaging to determine individual brain morphological and functional features using structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diffusion tensor imaging, resting state functional connectivity MRI, and sensorimotor adaptation task-related functional brain activation; 3) genotype markers for genetic polymorphisms in Catechol-O-Methyl Transferase, Dopamine Receptor D2, Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and genetic polymorphism of alpha2-adrenergic receptor that play a role in the neural pathways underlying sensorimotor adaptation. We anticipate these predictive measures will be significantly correlated with individual differences in sensorimotor adaptability after long-duration space flight and an analog bed rest environment. We will be conducting a retrospective study leveraging data already collected from relevant

  5. The implementation of game in a 20-day head-down tilting bed rest experiment upon mood status and neurotic levels of rest subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizaki, Yuko; Fukuoka, Hideoki; Ishizaki, Tatsuro; Tanaka, Hidetaka; Ishitobi, Hiromi

    2004-12-01

    This study evaluated the effect of the implementation of game on mental health among participants in a bed rest (BR) experiment. Subjects were 12 healthy males aged 20-26, who participated in a 20-day 6-degrees head-down tilting BR experiment. The participants were asked to complete psychometrical questionnaires before, during, and after the experiment. We entrusted the participants to manage their leisure time and they intended a game in which all of them could take part over the experiment period. The general conversation and light-hearted mood among the subjects continued during the experimental period. Longitudinal data analysis showed that levels of neurosis and mood status did not deteriorate during the experiment, while our previous experiments, which were performed under the same protocol as this study except for the implementation of the game showed a distinct deterioration in psychosocial status. We consider that the implementation of game autonomously contributes to the positive effects on the mental health among the participants.

  6. Decreasing ventromedial prefrontal cortex deactivation in risky decision making after simulated microgravity: effects of −6° head-down tilt bed rest

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Li-Lin; Zhou, Yuan; Liang, Zhu-Yuan; Rao, Henyi; Zheng, Rui; Sun, Yan; Tan, Cheng; Xiao, Yi; Tian, Zhi-Qiang; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Wang, Chun-Hui; Bai, Yan-Qiang; Chen, Shan-Guang; Li, Shu

    2014-01-01

    Space is characterized by risk and uncertainty. As humans play an important role in long-duration space missions, the ability to make risky decisions effectively is important for astronauts who spend extended time periods in space. The present study used the Balloon Analog Risk Task to conduct both behavioral and fMRI experiments to evaluate the effects of simulated microgravity on individuals' risk-taking behavior and the neural basis of the effect. The results showed that participants' risk-taking behavior was not affected by bed rest. However, we found that the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) showed less deactivation after bed rest and that the VMPFC activation in the active choice condition showed no significant difference between the win outcome and the loss outcome after bed rest, although its activation was significantly greater in the win outcome than in the loss outcome before bed rest. These results suggested that the participants showed a decreased level of value calculation after the bed rest. Our findings can contribute to a better understanding of the effect of microgravity on individual higher-level cognitive functioning. PMID:24904338

  7. Computerized spatial navigation training during 14 days of bed rest in healthy older adult men: Effect on gait performance.

    PubMed

    Marusic, Uros; Kavcic, Voyko; Giordani, Bruno; Gerževič, Mitja; Meeusen, Romain; Pišot, Rado

    2015-06-01

    Prolonged physical inactivity or bed rest (BR) due to illness or other factors can result in significant declines in physical health and even cognitive functions. Based on random selection, 7 healthy older adult men received computerized spatial navigation training, while 8 served as active controls during 14-day BR. Greater post-BR declines were seen in normal and complex (dual-task) walking for the control as compared to intervention group, suggesting that computerized spatial navigation training can successfully moderate detrimental BR effects. Findings underline the generalization of cognitive-based intervention to the motor domain and potentially support their use to supplement BR interventions (e.g., exercise and nutrition). PMID:25938245

  8. Effects of 17 days of head-down bed rest on hydro-electrolytic regulation in men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millet, C.; Custaud, M. A.; Allevard, A. M.; Zaouali-Ajina, M.; Monk, T. H.; Arnaud, S. B.; Gharib, C.; Gauquelin-Koch, G.

    2001-01-01

    Prolonged periods of head-down bed rest (HDBR) are commonly used to mimic the effects of microgravity. HDBR has been shown to produce, as in space, a cephalad redistribution of circulating blood volume with an increase in central blood volume which induces the early adaptations in blood volume regulating hormones. Changes in atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), arginine vasopressin (AVP), renin activity and aldosterone have been observed. Many reports describe these endocrine adaptations but few investigations of rhythms are in the literature. We proposed to evaluate the circadian rhythms of the hormones and electrolytes involved in the hydro-electrolytic regulation during a HDBR study which was designed to simulate a 17-day spaceflight (Life and Microgravity Spacelab experiment, LMS, NASA).

  9. Analysis by NASA's VESGEN Software of Retinal Blood Vessels Before and After 70-Day Bed Rest: A Retrospective Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raghunandan, Sneha; Vyas, Ruchi J.; Vizzeri, Gianmarco; Taibbi, Giovanni; Zanello, Susana B.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Significant risks for visual impairment associated with increased intracranial pressure (VIIP) are incurred by microgravity spaceflight, especially long-duration missions. Impairments include decreased near visual acuity, posterior globe flattening, choroidal folds, optic disc edema and cotton wool spots. We hypothesize that microgravity-induced fluid shifts result in pathological changes within the retinal blood vessels that precede development of visual and other ocular impairments. Potential contributions of retinal vascular remodeling to VIIP etiology are therefore being investigated by NASAs innovative VESsel GENeration Analysis (VESGEN) software for two studies: (1) head-down tilt in human subjects before and after 70 days of bed rest, and (2) U.S. crew members before and after ISS missions. VESGEN analysis in previous research supported by the US National Institutes of Health identified surprising new opportunities to regenerate retinal vessels during early-stage, potentially reversible progression of the visually impairing and blinding disease, diabetic retinopathy.

  10. Effects of 1-week head-down tilt bed rest on bone formation and the calcium endocrine system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Whalen, Robert T.; Fung, Paul; Sherrard, Donald J.; Maloney, Norma

    1992-01-01

    The -6-deg head-down tilt (HDT) is employed in the study of 8 subjects to determine early responses in human bone and calcium endocrines during spaceflight. The average rates of bone formation in the iliac crest are determined by means of a single-dose labeling schedule and are found to decrease in 6 of the subjects. The decrease varies directly with walking miles, and increased excretion of urinary Ca and Na are observed preceding increased levels of ionized serum calcium on a bed-rest day late in the week. Reduced phosphorous excretions are also followed by increased serum phosphorous on day six, and reductions are noted in parathyroid hormone and vitamin D by the end of the experiment. The data demonstrate the responsiveness of the skeletal system to biomechanical stimuli such as the HDT.

  11. Exercise Thermoregulation After 6 hours of Chair Rest, 6 deg Head-Down Bed-Rest, and Water Immersion Deconditioning in Men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Hutchinson, T.; Shaffer-Bailey, M.; Looft-Wilson, R.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose was to investigate the mechanism for the excessive exercise hyperthermia following deconditioning (reduction of physical fitness). Rectal (T(sub re)) and mean skin (T(bar)(sub sk)) temperatures and thermoregulatory responses were measured in six men [mean (SD) age, 32 (6) years; mass, 78.26 (5.80) kg; surface area, 1.95 (0.11) sq m; maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max), 48 (6) ml/min/kg; whilst supine in air at dry bulb temperature 23.2 (0.6)C, relative humidity 31.1 (11.1)% and air speed 5.6 (0.1) m/min] during 70 min of leg cycle exercise [51 (4)% VO2max] in ambulatory control (AC), or following 6 h of chair rest (CR), 6deg head-down bed rest (BR), and 20deg (W120) and 80deg (W180) foot-down water immersion [water temperature, 35.0 (0.1) C]. Compared with the AC exercise (Delta)T(sub re) [mean (SD) 0.77 (0.13)C], (Delta)T(sub re), after CR was 0.83 (0.08)C (NS), after BR 0.92 (0.13)C (*P <0.05), after W180 0.96 (0.13)C*, and after W120 1.03 (0.09)C*. All T(sub sk) responded similarly to exercise: they decreased (NS) by 0.5-0.7 C in minutes 4-8 and equilibrated at +0.1 to +0.5 C at 60-70. Skin heat conductance was not different among the five conditions (range = 147-159 kJ/sq/C. Results from an intercorrelation matrix suggested that total body sweat rate was more closely related to T(sub re) at 70 min (T(sub re70)) than limb sweat rate or blood flow. Only 36% of the variability in T(sub re70) could be accounted for by total sweating, and less than 10% from total body dehydration. It would appear that multiple factors are involved which may include change in sensitivity of thermo- and osmoreceptors.

  12. Exercise thermoregulation after 6 h of chair rest, 6 degrees head-down bed-rest, and water immersion deconditioning in men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Hutchinson, T.; Shaffer-Bailey, M.; Looft-Wilson, R.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose was to investigate the mechanism for the excessive exercise hyperthermia following deconditioning (reduction of physical fitness). Rectal (Tre) and mean skin (Tsk) temperatures and thermoregulatory responses were measured in six men [mean (SD) age, 32 (6) years; mass, 78.26 (5.80) kg; surface area, 1.95 (0.11) m2; maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max), 48 (6) ml.min-1.kg-1; whilst supine in air at dry bulb temperature 23.2 (0.6) degree C, relative humidity 31.1 (11.1)% and air speed 5.6 (0.1) m.min-1] during 70 min of leg cycle exercise [51 (4)% VO2max] in ambulatory control (AC), or following 6 h of chair rest (CR), 6 degree head-down bed rest (BR), and 20 degree (WI20) and 80 degree (WI80) foot-down water immersion [water temperature, 35.0 (0.1) degree C]. Compared with the AC exercise delta Tre [mean (SD) 0.77 (0.13) degree C (*P < 0.05), after WI80 0.96 (0.13) degree C*, and after WI20 1.03 (0.09) degree C*. All Tsk responded similarly to exercise: they decreased (NS) by 0.5-0.7 degree C in minutes 4-8 and equilibrated at +0.1 to +0.5 degree C at 60-70. Skin heat conductance was not different among the five conditions (range = 147-159 kJ.m-2.h-1.degree C-1). Results from an intercorrelation matrix suggested that total body sweat rate was more closely related to Tre at 70 min (Tre70) than limb sweat rate or blood flow. Only 36% of the variability in Tre70 could be accounted for by total sweating, and less than 10% from total body dehydration. It would appear that multiple factors are involved which may include change in sensitivity of thermo- and osmoreceptors.

  13. Using an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) to capture micro-topography of Antarctic moss beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucieer, Arko; Turner, Darren; King, Diana H.; Robinson, Sharon A.

    2014-04-01

    Mosses, the dominant flora of East Antarctica, show evidence of drying in recent decades, likely due to the regional effects of climate change. Given the relatively small area that such moss beds occupy, new tools are needed to map and monitor these fragile ecosystems in sufficient detail. In this study, we collected low altitude aerial photography with a small multi-rotor Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). Structure from Motion (SfM) computer vision techniques were applied to derive ultra-high resolution 3D models from multi-view aerial photography. A 2 cm digital surface model (DSM) and 1 cm orthophoto mosaic were derived from the 3D model and aerial photographs, respectively. The geometric accuracy of the orthophoto and DSM was 4 cm. A weighted contributing upstream area was derived with the D-infinity algorithm, based on the DSM and a snow cover map derived from the orthophoto. The contributing upstream area was used as a proxy for water availability from snowmelt, one of the key environmental drivers of moss health. A Monte Carlo simulation with 300 realisations was implemented to model the impact of error in the DSM on runoff direction. Significant correlations were found between these simulated water availability values and field measurements of moss health and water content. In the future ultra-high spatial resolution DSMs acquired with a UAV could thus be used to determine the impact of changing snow cover on the health and spatial distribution of polar vegetation non-destructively.

  14. The effect of rowing ergometry and resistive exercise on skeletal muscle structure and function during bed rest.

    PubMed

    Krainski, Felix; Hastings, Jeffrey L; Heinicke, Katja; Romain, Nadine; Pacini, Eric L; Snell, Peter G; Wyrick, Phil; Palmer, M Dean; Haller, Ronald G; Levine, Benjamin D

    2014-06-15

    Exposure to microgravity causes functional and structural impairment of skeletal muscle. Current exercise regimens are time-consuming and insufficiently effective; an integrated countermeasure is needed that addresses musculoskeletal along with cardiovascular health. High-intensity, short-duration rowing ergometry and supplemental resistive strength exercise may achieve these goals. Twenty-seven healthy volunteers completed 5 wk of head-down-tilt bed rest (HDBR): 18 were randomized to exercise, 9 remained sedentary. Exercise consisted of rowing ergometry 6 days/wk, including interval training, and supplemental strength training 2 days/wk. Measurements before and after HDBR and following reambulation included assessment of strength, skeletal muscle volume (MRI), and muscle metabolism (magnetic resonance spectroscopy); quadriceps muscle biopsies were obtained to assess muscle fiber types, capillarization, and oxidative capacity. Sedentary bed rest (BR) led to decreased muscle volume (quadriceps: -9 ± 4%, P < 0.001; plantar flexors: -19 ± 6%, P < 0.001). Exercise (ExBR) reduced atrophy in the quadriceps (-5 ± 4%, interaction P = 0.018) and calf muscle, although to a lesser degree (-14 ± 6%, interaction P = 0.076). Knee extensor and plantar flexor strength was impaired by BR (-14 ± 15%, P = 0.014 and -22 ± 7%, P = 0.001) but preserved by ExBR (-4 ± 13%, P = 0.238 and +13 ± 28%, P = 0.011). Metabolic capacity, as assessed by maximal O2 consumption, (31)P-MRS, and oxidative chain enzyme activity, was impaired in BR but stable or improved in ExBR. Reambulation reversed the negative impact of BR. High-intensity, short-duration rowing and supplemental strength training effectively preserved skeletal muscle function and structure while partially preventing atrophy in key antigravity muscles. Due to its integrated cardiovascular benefits, rowing ergometry could be a primary component of exercise prescriptions for astronauts or patients suffering from severe

  15. Exercise as potential countermeasure for the effects of 70 days of bed rest on cognitive and sensorimotor performance

    PubMed Central

    Koppelmans, Vincent; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Yuan, Peng; Cassady, Kaitlin E.; Cooke, Katherine A.; Wood, Scott J.; Reuter-Lorenz, Patricia A.; De Dios, Yiri E.; Stepanyan, Vahagn; Szecsy, Darcy L.; Gadd, Nichole E.; Kofman, Igor; Scott, Jessica M.; Downs, Meghan E.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori; Seidler, Rachael D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Spaceflight has been associated with changes in gait and balance; it is unclear whether it affects cognition. Head down tilt bed rest (HDBR) is a microgravity analog that mimics cephalad fluid shifts and body unloading. In consideration of astronaut’s health and mission success, we investigated the effects of HDBR on cognition and sensorimotor function. Furthermore, we investigated if exercise mitigates any cognitive and sensorimotor sequelae of spaceflight. Method: We conducted a 70-day six-degree HDBR study in 10 male subjects who were randomly assigned to a HDBR supine exercise or a HDBR control group. Cognitive measures (i.e., processing speed, manual dexterity, psychomotor speed, visual dependency, and 2D and 3D mental rotation) and sensorimotor performance (functional mobility (FMT) and balance performance) were collected at 12 and 8 days pre-HDBR, at 7, 50, and 70 days in HDBR, and at 8 and 12 days post-HDBR. Exercise comprised resistance training, and continuous and high-intensity interval aerobic exercise. We also repeatedly assessed an outside-of-bed rest control group to examine metric stability. Results: Small practice effects were observed in the control group for some tasks; these were taken into account when analyzing effects of HDBR. No significant effects of HDBR on cognition were observed, although visual dependency during HDBR remained stable in HDBR controls whereas it decreased in HDBR exercise subjects. Furthermore, HDBR was associated with loss of FMT and standing balance performance, which were almost fully recovered 12 days post-HDBR. Aerobic and resistance exercise partially mitigated the effects of HDBR on FMT and accelerated the recovery time course post-HDBR. Discussion: HDBR did not significantly affect cognitive performance but did adversely affect FMT and standing balance performance. Exercise had some protective effects on the deterioration and recovery of FMT. PMID:26388746

  16. Gender differences in endocrine responses to posture and 7 days of 6 deg head down bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos, J.; Dallman, M. F.; Keil, L. C.; Ohara, D.; Convertino, V. A.

    1993-01-01

    Endocrine regulation of fluids and electrolytes during seven days of 6 deg head down bed rest (HDBR) was compared in male (n = 8) and, for the first time, female (n = 8) volunteers. The subjects' responses to quiet standing for 2 hr before and after HDBR were also tested. In both sexes, diuresis and natriuresis were evident during the first 2-3 days of HDBR, resulting in a marked increase in the urinary Na/K ratio and significant Na retention on reambulation. After the first day of HDBR, plasma renin activity (PRA) was increased relative to aldosterone, plasma volume was decreased, and the renal response to aldosterone appeared to be appropriate. Circulating levels of arginine vasopressin (AVP), cortisol, and ACTH were unchanged during HDBR. Plasma testosterone decreased slightly on day 2 of HDBR in males. The ratio of AM ACTH to cortisol was lower in females than in males because ACTH was lower in females. Urinary cortisol increased and remained elevated throughout the HDBR in males only. There were no gender differences in the responses to 7 day HDBR, except those in the pituitary-adrenal system; those differences appeared unrelated to the postural change. The provocative cardiovascular test of quiet standing before and after bed rest revealed both sex differences and effects of HDBR. There were significant sex differences in cardiovascular responses to standing, before and after HDBR. Females had greater PRA and aldosterone responses to standing before bedrest and larger aldosterone responses to standing after HDBR than males. Cardiovascular responses to standing before and after bedrest differed markedly: arterial pressure and heart rates increased with standing before HDBR, by contrast, arterial pressure decreased, with greater increases in heart rates after HDBR. In both sexes, all hormonal responses to standing were greater after HDBR. The results show clearly that similar responses to standing as well as to HDBR occur in both sexes, but that females exhibit

  17. Interpersonal relationships in isolation and confinement: Long-term bed rest in head-down tilt position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karine, Weiss; Gabriel, Moser

    The long-term bed-rest was organized by ESA and CNES, in order to simulate the physiological effects of weightlessness: eight volunteers had to stay 42 days in bed, in a head down tilt position (-6 °). There were two subjects in a room, they could not be alone and it was difficult for them to have their own personal space and intimacy. In these circumstances, as in outer space, interpersonal relationships were of prime importance. This situation enabled us, through systematic observation, to analyze the evolution of the relational behavior in dyads, and to quote some social indicators of adaptation. Results show significant withdrawal, and the time spent alone was marked by the emergence, during the experiment, of specific preferential activities. Behavioral contagion was observed in each dyad (people engaged in the same activities at the same time), except in the one case of abandon. Moreover, the highest rates of inactivity and withdrawal were noted in this case. Verbal indicators were useful to comment these results and showed that, for all the dyads, one of the two subjects always played a regulating role by expressing a very positive perception of the situation. These results emphasize the importance of psycho-sociological factors in isolation and confinement. Thus, it appears that different modalities of interpersonal relationships, and not only verbal interactions, play a significant role in adaptation to stress situations.

  18. WISE-2005: effect of aerobic and resistive exercises on orthostatic tolerance during 60 days bed rest in women

    PubMed Central

    Guinet, Patrick; Schneider, Suzanne M.; Macias, Brandon R.; Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Hughson, Richard L.; Le Traon, Anne Pavy; Bansard, Jean-Yves; Hargens, Alan R.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular deconditioning after long duration spaceflight is especially challenging in women who have a lower orthostatic tolerance (OT) compared with men. We hypothesized that an exercise prescription, combining supine aerobic treadmill exercise in a Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP) chamber followed by 10 min of resting LBNP, 3 to 4 times a week, and flywheel resistive training every third day would maintain orthostatic tolerance (OT) in women during a 60-day head-down-tilt bed rest (HDBR). Sixteen women were assigned to two groups (exercise, control). Pre and post HDBR OT was assessed with a tilt/LBNP test until presyncope. OT time (mean ± SE) decreased from 17.5±1.0 min to 9.1±1.5 min (−50±6%) in control group (p<0.001) and from 19.3 ±1.3 min to 13.0 ± 1.9 min (−35±7%) in exercise group (p<0.001), with no significant difference in OT time between the two groups after HDBR (p=0.13). Nevertheless compared with controls post HDBR, exercisers had a lower heart rate (mean±SE) during supine rest (71±3 versus 85±4, p<0.01), a slower increase in heart rate and a slower decrease in stroke volume over the course of tilt/LBNP test (p<0.05). Blood volume (mean±SE) decreased in controls (−9±2%, p<0.01) but was maintained in exercisers (−4±3%, p=0.17). Our results suggest that the combined exercise countermeasure fails to protect OT but improves cardiovascular response to subtolerance levels of orthostatic stress. PMID:19247686

  19. Effect of leg exercise training on vascular volumes during 30 days of 6 degrees head-down bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Vernikos, J.; Wade, C. E.; Barnes, P. R.

    1992-01-01

    Plasma and red cell volumes, body density, and water balance were measured in 19 men (32-42 yr) confined to bed rest (BR). One group (n = 5) had no exercise training (NOE), another near-maximal variable-intensity isotonic exercise for 60 min/day (ITE; n = 7), and the third near-maximal intermittent isokinetic exercise for 60 min/day (IKE; n = 7). Caloric intake was 2,678-2,840 kcal/day; mean body weight (n = 19) decreased by 0.58 +/- 0.35 (SE) kg during BR due to a negative fluid balance (diuresis) on day 1. Mean energy costs for the NOE, and IKE, and ITE regimens were 83 (3.6 +/- 0.2 ml O2.min-1.kg-1), 214 (8.9 +/- 0.5 ml.min-1.kg-1), and 446 kcal/h (18.8 +/- 1.6 ml.min-1.kg-1), respectively. Body densities within groups and mean urine volumes (1,752-1,846 ml/day) between groups were unchanged during BR. Resting changes in plasma volume (ml/kg) after BR were -1.5 +/- 2.3% (NS) in ITE, -14.7 +/- 2.8% (P less than 0.05) in NOE, and -16.8 +/- 2.9% (P less than 0.05) in IKE, and mean water balances during BR were +295, -106, and +169 ml/24 h, respectively. Changes in red cell volume followed changes in plasma volume. The significant chronic decreases in plasma volume in the IKE and NOE groups and its maintenance in the ITE group could not be accounted for by water balance or by responses of the plasma osmotic, protein, vasopressin, or aldosterone concentrations or plasma renin activity. There was close coupling between resting plasma volume and plasma protein and osmotic content.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  20. Association Between Cardiovascular and Intraocular Pressure Changes in a 14-Day 6 deg Head Down Tilt (HDT) Bed Rest Study: Possible Implications in Retinal Anatomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, Ronita; Zanello, Susana; Yarbough, Patrice; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Taibbi, Giovanni; Vizzeri, Gianmarco

    2013-01-01

    Visual symptoms and intracranial pressure increase reported in astronauts returning from long duration missions in low Earth-orbit are thought to be related to fluid shifts within the body due to microgravity exposure. Because of this possible relation to fluid shifts, studies conducted in head-down tilt (HDT) bed rest are being monitored for potential changes in ocular health. These measures will also serve to determine whether HDT is a suitable ground-based analog to model subclinical cardiovascular and ocular changes that could shed light on the etiology of the VIIP syndrome observed in spaceflight. Sixteen healthy normotensive (12M, 4F, age range 29-54 years), non-smoker and normal weight subjects, volunteered to participate in a 14 day 6 deg head HDT study conducted at the NASA Flight Analogs Research Unit (FARU). This facility provides standard bed rest conditions (diet, wake/sleep time, time allowed in sunlight) during the time that the subjects stay at the FARU. Cardiovascular parameters were obtained in supine posture at BR-5, BR+0, and BR+3 and ocular monitoring was performed weekly. Intraocular pressure (IOP) increased from pre-bed rest BR-3) to the third day into bed rest (BR+3). Values reached a plateau towards the end of the bed rest phase (BR10) and decreased within the first three days of recovery (BR+2) returning to levels comparable to baseline at BR-3. As expected, most cardiovascular parameters were affected by 14 days of HDT bed rest. Plasma volume decreased as a result of bed rest but recovered to baseline levels by BR+3. Indications of cardiovascular deconditioning included increase in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate, and a decrease in stroke volume and cardiac output between BR-5 and BR+3. Due to the experimental design of this study, we were not able to test the hypothesis that fluid shifts might be involved in the IOP increase during the bed rest phase, since cardiovascular measures were not available for those

  1. Effects of normobaric hypoxic bed rest on the thermal comfort zone.

    PubMed

    Ciuha, Ursa; Eiken, Ola; Mekjavic, Igor B

    2015-01-01

    Future Lunar and Mars habitats will maintain a hypobaric hypoxic environment to minimise the risk of decompression sickness during the preparation for extra-vehicular activity. This study was part of a larger study investigating the separate and combined effects of inactivity associated with reduced gravity and hypoxia, on the cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, neurohumoural, and thermoregulatory systems. Eleven healthy normothermic young male subjects participated in three trials conducted on separate occasions: (1) Normobaric hypoxic ambulatory confinement, (2) Normobaric hypoxic bedrest and (3) Normobaric normoxic bedrest. Normobaric hypoxia was achieved by reduction of the oxygen fraction in the air (FiO2 = 0.141 ± 0.004) within the facility, while the effects of reduced gravity were simulated by confining the subjects to a horizontal position in bed, with all daily routines performed in this position for 21 days. The present study investigated the effect of the interventions on behavioural temperature regulation. The characteristics of the thermal comfort zone (TCZ) were assessed by a water-perfused suit, with the subjects instructed to regulate the sinusoidally varying temperature of the suit within a range considered as thermally comfortable. Measurements were performed 5 days prior to the intervention (D-5), and on days 10 (D10) and 20 (D20) of the intervention. no statistically significant differences were found in any of the characteristics of the TCZ between the interventions (HAMB, HBR and NBR), or between different measurement days (D-5, D10, D20) within each intervention. rectal temperature remained stable, whereas skin temperature (Tsk) increased during all interventions throughout the one hour trial. no difference in Tsk between D-5, D10 and D20, and between HAMB, HBR and NBR were revealed. subjects perceived the regulated temperature as thermally comfortable, and neutral or warm. we conclude that regulation of thermal comfort is not compromised by

  2. Pharmacokinetics of Intranasal Scopolamine Gel Formulation During Antiorthostatic Bed Rest, a Microgravity Analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Rajendra P.; Daniels, Vernie R.; Crady, Camille J.; Derendorf, H.; Putcha, L.

    2011-01-01

    Statement of Purpose, Innovation or Hypothesis: Space Motion sickness (SMS) is a long-standing problem for astronauts on both short and long duration space flights. Scopolamine (SCOP) is frequently used for the treatment of motion sickness (MS), and is available as transdermal patch and tablet dosage forms. These formulations of SCOP are ineffective for the treatment of SMS. Intranasal dosage forms are noninvasive with rapid absorption and enhanced bioavailability, thus allowing precise and reduced dosing in addition to offering rescue and treatment options. An intranasal gel dosage formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed and pharmacokinetics (PK) and bioavailability were determined in clinical trials with human subjects under IND guidelines.Description of Methods and Materials: The present clinical trial compares PK and bioavailability of INSCOP in 12 normal, healthy subjects (6 male/ 6 female) during ambulation (AMB) and antiorthostaticbed rest (ABR) used as a ground-based microgravity analog. Subjects received 0.2 mg and 0.4 mg doses of INSCOP during AMB and ABR in a 4-way crossover design.Data and Results: Results indicated no difference between AMB and ABR in PK parameters after 0.2 mg dose, Clearance (Cls) decreased with a concomitant increase in maximum concentration and area under concentration-versus-time curve (AUC) during ABR after the 0.4 mg dose.Interpretation, Conclusion or Significance: The difference in AUC and Cls at the higher (0.4 mg) but not the lower dose (0.2 mg) during ABR suggests that ABR may affect metabolism and/or clearance of INSCOP at higher doses . These results indicate that dosing adjustment may be required for treatment of SMS with INSCOP in space.

  3. Using Natural Stable Calcium Isotopes to Rapidly Assess Changes in Bone Mineral Balance Using a Bed Rest Model to Induce Bone Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, J. L. L.; Skulan, J. L.; Gordon, G. E.; Smith, Scott M.; Romaniello, S. J.; Anbar, A. D.

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic bone diseases like osteoporosis result from the disruption of normal bone mineral balance (BMB) resulting in bone loss. During spaceflight astronauts lose substantial bone. Bed rest provides an analog to simulate some of the effects of spaceflight; including bone and calcium loss and provides the opportunity to evaluate new methods to monitor BMB in healthy individuals undergoing environmentally induced-bone loss. Previous research showed that natural variations in the Ca isotope ratio occur because bone formation depletes soft tissue of light Ca isotopes while bone resorption releases that isotopically light Ca back into soft tissue (Skulan et al, 2007). Using a bed rest model, we demonstrate that the Ca isotope ratio of urine shifts in a direction consistent with bone loss after just 7 days of bed rest, long before detectable changes in bone mineral density (BMD) occur. The Ca isotope variations tracks changes observed in urinary N-teleopeptide, a bone resorption biomarker. Bone specific alkaline phosphatase, a bone formation biomarker, is unchanged. The established relationship between Ca isotopes and BMB can be used to quantitatively translate the changes in the Ca isotope ratio to changes in BMD using a simple mathematical model. This model predicts that subjects lost 0.25 0.07% ( SD) of their bone mass from day 7 to day 30 of bed rest. Given the rapid signal observed using Ca isotope measurements and the potential to quantitatively assess bone loss; this technique is well suited to study the short-term dynamics of bone metabolism.

  4. Resistance training and timed essential amino acids protect against the loss of muscle mass and strength during 28 days of bed rest and energy deficit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Space flight and bed rest (BR) result in losses of muscle mass and strength. Resistance training (RT) and amino acid (AA) supplementation are potential countermeasures to minimize these losses. However, it is unknown if timing of supplementation with exercise can optimize benefits, particularly with...

  5. Low-magnitude whole body vibration with resistive exercise as a countermeasure against cardiovascular deconditioning after 60 days of head-down bed rest.

    PubMed

    Coupé, Mickael; Yuan, Ming; Demiot, Claire; Bai, Yanqiang Q; Jiang, Shizhong Z; Li, Yongzhi Z; Arbeille, Philippe; Gauquelin-Koch, Guillemette; Levrard, Thibaud; Custaud, Marc-Antoine; Li, Yinghui H

    2011-12-01

    Whole body vibration with resistive exercise is a promising countermeasure against some weightlessness-induced dysfunctions. Our objective was to study whether the combination of low-magnitude whole body vibration with a resistive exercise can prevent the cardiovascular deconditioning induced by a nonstrict 60-day head-down bed rest (Earth Star International Bed Rest Experiment Project). Fourteen healthy men participated in this study. We recorded electrocardiograms and blood pressure waves by means of a noninvasive beat-by-beat measurement system (Cardiospace, integrated by Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales and Astronaut Center of China) during an orthostatic test (20 min of 75-degree head-up tilt test) before and immediately after bed rest. We estimated heart rate, blood pressure, cardiac output, stroke volume, total peripheral resistance, baroreflex sensitivity, and heart rate variability. Low-magnitude whole body vibration with resistive exercise prevented an increase of the sympathetic index (reflecting the sympathovagal balance of cardiac autonomic control) and limited the decrease of the spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity induced by 60 days of head-down bed rest. However, this countermeasure had very little effect on cardiac hemodynamics and did not improve the orthostatic tolerance. This combined countermeasure did not efficiently prevent orthostatic intolerance but prevents changes in the autonomic nervous system associated with cardiovascular deconditioning. The underlying mechanisms remain hypothetical but might involve cutaneous and muscular mechanoreceptors. PMID:21900640

  6. Blood volume regulating hormones response during two space related simulation protocols: Four-week confinement and head-down bed-rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maillet, A.; Gauquelin, G.; Gunga, H. C.; Fortrat, J. O.; Kirsch, K.; Guell, A.; Bizollon, Ch. A.; Gharib, C.

    1995-04-01

    The volume of regulating hormones (renin, aldosterone, arginine vasopressin and atrial natriuretic factor), electrolytes and creatinine concentrations, and blood pressure were measured in two different four-week experimental protocols: respectively -6 ° head-down bed-rest (5 subjects) and confinement (6 subjects). We observed a significant increase ( P < 0.01 at D2 vs D-5) of systolic blood pressure during confinement and a different level of response for some hormones, especially for arginine vasopressin (300% increase during confinement instead of 50% during bed-rest). The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system was enhanced during confinement and head-down bed-rest. In both conditions, we obtained a similar pattern of response for blood volume regulating hormones. During confinement, two main factors were inactivity and stress activation of the sympathetic nervous system. In the bed-rest study the response is principally due to the fluid shift and blood volume adaptation but it is not possible to exclude the role of inactivity and stress.

  7. PlanHab: Hypoxia counteracts the erythropoietin suppression, but seems to exaggerate the plasma volume reduction induced by 3 weeks of bed rest.

    PubMed

    Keramidas, Michail E; Mekjavic, Igor B; Kölegård, Roger; Choukèr, Alexander; Strewe, Claudia; Eiken, Ola

    2016-04-01

    The study examined the distinct and synergistic effects of hypoxia and bed rest on the erythropoietin (EPO) concentration and relative changes in plasma volume (PV). Eleven healthy male lowlanders underwent three 21-day confinement periods, in a counterbalanced order: (1) normoxic bed rest (NBR; PIO2: 133.1 ± 0.3 mmHg); (2) hypoxic bed rest (HBR; PIO2: 90.0 ± 0.4 mmHg, ambient simulated altitude of ~4000 m); and (3) hypoxic ambulation (HAMB; PIO2: 90.0 ± 0.4 mmHg). Blood samples were collected before, during (days 2, 5, 14, and 21) and 2 days after each confinement to determineEPOconcentration. Qualitative differences inPVchanges were also estimated by changes in hematocrit and hemoglobin concentration along with concomitant changes in plasma renin concentration.NBRcaused an initial reduction inEPOby ~39% (P = 0.04). By contrast,HBRenhancedEPO(P = 0.001), but the increase was less than that induced byHAMB(P < 0.01). All three confinements caused a significant reduction inPV(P < 0.05), with a substantially greater drop inHBRthan in the other conditions (P < 0.001). Thus, present results suggest that hypoxia prevents theEPOsuppression, whereas it seems to exaggerate thePVreduction induced by bed rest. PMID:27081163

  8. The effects of twelve weeks of bed rest on bone histology, biochemical markers of bone turnover, and calcium homeostasis in eleven normal subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zerwekh, J. E.; Ruml, L. A.; Gottschalk, F.; Pak, C. Y.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the effects of 12 weeks of skeletal unloading on parameters of calcium homeostasis, calcitropic hormones, bone histology, and biochemical markers of bone turnover in 11 normal subjects (9 men, 2 women; 34 +/- 11 years of age). Following an ambulatory control evaluation, all subjects underwent 12 weeks of bed rest. An additional metabolic evaluation was performed after 12 days of reambulation. Bone mineral density declined at the spine (-2.9%, p = 0.092) and at the hip (-3.8%, p = 0.002 for the trochanter). Bed rest prompted a rapid, sustained, significant increase in urinary calcium and phosphorus as well as a significant increase in serum calcium. Urinary calcium increased from a pre-bed rest value of 5.3 mmol/day to values as high as 73 mmol/day during bed rest. Immunoreactive parathyroid hormone and serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D declined significantly during bed rest, although the mean values remained within normal limits. Significant changes in bone histology included a suppression of osteoblastic surface for cancellous bone (3.1 +/- 1.3% to 1.9 +/- 1.5%, p = 0.0142) and increased bone resorption for both cancellous and cortical bone. Cortical eroded surface increased from 3.5 +/- 1.1% to 7.3 +/- 4.0% (p = 0.018) as did active osteoclastic surface (0.2 +/- 0.3% to 0.7 +/- 0.7%, p = 0.021). Cancellous eroded surface increased from 2.1 +/- 1.1% to 4.7 +/- 2.2% (p = 0.002), while mean active osteoclastic surface doubled (0.2 +/- 0.2% to 0.4 +/- 0.3%, p = 0.020). Serum biochemical markers of bone formation (osteocalcin, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, and type I procollagen extension peptide) did not change significantly during bed rest. Urinary biochemical markers of bone resorption (hydroxyproline, deoxypyridinoline, and N-telopeptide of type I collagen) as well as a serum marker of bone resorption (type I collagen carboxytelopeptide) all demonstrated significant increases during bed rest which declined toward normal

  9. Evaluation of Treadmill Exercise in a Lower Body Negative Pressure Chamber as a Countermeasure for Weightlessness-Induced Bone Loss: a Bed Rest Study with Identical Twins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.; Davis-Street, Janis E.; Fesperman, J. Vernell; Calkins, D. S.; Bawa, Maneesh; Macias, Brandon R.; Meyer, R. Scott; Hargens, Alan R.

    2003-01-01

    Counteracting bone loss is required for future space exploration. We evaluated the ability of treadmill exercise in a LBNP chamber to counteract bone loss in a 30-day bed rest study. Eight pairs of identical twins were randomly assigned to sedentary control or exercise groups. Exercise within LBNP decreased the bone resorption caused by bed rest and may provide a countermeasure for spaceflight. INTRODUCTION: Bone loss is one of the greatest physiological challenges for extended-duration space missions. The ability of exercise to counteract weightlessness-induced bone loss has been studied extensively, but to date, it has proven ineffective. We evaluated the effectiveness of a combination of two countermeasures-treadmill exercise while inside a lower body negative pressure (LBNP) chamber-on bone loss during a 30-day bed rest study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eight pairs of identical twins were randomized into sedentary (SED) or exercise/LBNP (EX/LBNP) groups. Blood and urine samples were collected before, several times during, and after the 30-day bed rest period. These samples were analyzed for markers of bone and calcium metabolism. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to determine statistical significance. Because identical twins were used, both time and group were treated as repeated variables. RESULTS: Markers of bone resorption were increased during bed rest in samples from sedentary subjects, including the collagen cross-links and serum and urinary calcium concentrations. For N-telopeptide and deoxypyridinoline, there were significant (p < 0.05) interactions between group (SED versus EX/LBNP) and phase of the study (sample collection point). Pyridinium cross-links were increased above pre-bed rest levels in both groups, but the EX/LBNP group had a smaller increase than the SED group. Markers of bone formation were unchanged by bed rest in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: These data show that this weight-bearing exercise combined with LBNP ameliorates some of the negative

  10. Using RFID and accelerometer-embedded tracers to measure probabilities of bed load transport, step lengths, and rest times in a mountain stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olinde, Lindsay; Johnson, Joel P. L.

    2015-09-01

    We present new measurements of bed load tracer transport in a mountain stream over several snowmelt seasons. Cumulative displacements were measured using passive tracers, which consisted of gravel and cobbles embedded with radio frequency identification tags. The timing of bed load motion during 11 transporting events was quantified with active tracers, i.e., accelerometer-embedded cobbles. Probabilities of cobble transport increased with discharge above a threshold, and exhibited slight to moderate hysteresis during snowmelt hydrographs. Dividing cumulative displacements by the number of movements recorded by each active tracer constrained average step lengths. Average step lengths increased with discharge, and distributions of average step lengths and cumulative displacements were thin tailed. Distributions of rest times followed heavy-tailed power law scaling. Rest time scaling varied somewhat with discharge and with the degree to which tracers were incorporated into the streambed. The combination of thin-tailed displacement distributions and heavy-tailed rest time distributions predict superdiffusive dispersion.

  11. Effects of 3-day bed rest on physiological responses to graded exercise in athletes and sedentary men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smorawinski, J.; Nazar, K.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.; Kaminska, E.; Cybulski, G.; Kodrzycka, A.; Bicz, B.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    2001-01-01

    To test the hypotheses that short-term bed-rest (BR) deconditioning influences metabolic, cardiorespiratory, and neurohormonal responses to exercise and that these effects depend on the subjects' training status, 12 sedentary men and 10 endurance- and 10 strength-trained athletes were submitted to 3-day BR. Before and after BR they performed incremental exercise test until volitional exhaustion. Respiratory gas exchange and heart rate (HR) were recorded continuously, and stroke volume (SV) was measured at submaximal loads. Blood was taken for lactate concentration ([LA]), epinephrine concentration ([Epi]), norepinephrine concentration ([NE]), plasma renin activity (PRA), human growth hormone concentration ([hGH]), testosterone, and cortisol determination. Reduction of peak oxygen uptake (VO(2 peak)) after BR was greater in the endurance athletes than in the remaining groups (17 vs. 10%). Decrements in VO(2 peak) correlated positively with the initial values (r = 0.73, P < 0.001). Resting and exercise respiratory exchange ratios were increased in athletes. Cardiac output was unchanged by BR in all groups, but exercise HR was increased and SV diminished in the sedentary subjects. The submaximal [LA] and [LA] thresholds were decreased in the endurance athletes from 71 to 60% VO(2 peak) (P < 0.001); they also had an earlier increase in [NE], an attenuated increase in [hGH], and accentuated PRA and cortisol elevations during exercise. These effects were insignificant in the remaining subjects. In conclusion, reduction of exercise performance and modifications in neurohormonal response to exercise after BR depend on the previous level and mode of physical training, being the most pronounced in the endurance athletes.

  12. On the combined effects of normobaric hypoxia and bed rest upon bone and mineral metabolism: Results from the PlanHab study.

    PubMed

    Rittweger, Jörn; Debevec, Tadej; Frings-Meuthen, Petra; Lau, Patrick; Mittag, Uwe; Ganse, Bergita; Ferstl, Philip G; Simpson, Elizabeth J; Macdonald, Ian A; Eiken, Ola; Mekjavic, Igor B

    2016-10-01

    Bone losses are common as a consequence of unloading and also in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although hypoxia has been implicated as an important factor to drive bone loss, its interaction with unloading remains unresolved. The objective therefore was to assess whether human bone loss caused by unloading could be aggravated by chronic hypoxia. In a cross-over designed study, 14 healthy young men underwent 21-day interventions of bed rest in normoxia (NBR), bed rest in hypoxia (HBR), and hypoxic ambulatory confinement (HAmb). Hypoxic conditions were equivalent to 4000m altitude. Bone metabolism (NTX, P1NP, sclerostin, DKK1) and phospho-calcic homeostasis (calcium and phosphate serum levels and urinary excretion, PTH) were assessed from regular blood samples and 24-hour urine collections, and tibia and femur bone mineral content was assessed by peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). Urinary NTX excretion increased (P<0.001) to a similar extent in NBR and HBR (P=0.69) and P1NP serum levels decreased (P=0.0035) with likewise no difference between NBR and HBR (P=0.88). Serum total calcium was increased during bed rest by 0.059 (day D05, SE 0.05mM) to 0.091mM (day D21, P<0.001), with no additional effect by hypoxia during bed rest (P=0.199). HAmb led, at least temporally, to increased total serum calcium, to reduced serum phosphate, and to reduced phosphate and calcium excretion. In conclusion, hypoxia did not aggravate bed rest-induced bone resorption, but led to changes in phospho-calcic homeostasis likely caused by hyperventilation. Whether hyperventilation could have mitigated the effects of hypoxia in this study remains to be established. PMID:27443510

  13. Influence of head-down bed rest on the circadian rhythms of hormones and electrolytes involved in hydroelectrolytic regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millet, C.; Custaud, M. A.; Allevard, A. M.; Zaouali-Ajina, M.; Monk, T. H.; Arnaud, S. B.; Claustrat, B.; Gharib, C.; Gauquelin-Koch, G.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated in six men the impact of a 17-day head-down bed rest (HDBR) on the circadian rhythms of the hormones and electrolytes involved in hydroelectrolytic regulation. This HDBR study was designed to mimic an actual spaceflight. Urine samples were collected at each voiding before, during and after HDBR. Urinary excretion of aldosterone, arginine vasopressin (AVP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), cortisol, electrolytes (Na+ and K+) and creatinine were determined. HDBR resulted in a significant reduction of body mass (P < 0.01) and of caloric intake [mean (SEM) 2,778 (37) kcal.24 h(-1) to 2,450 (36) kcal.24 h(-1), where 1 kcal.h(-1) = 1.163 J.s(-1); P< 0.01]. There was a significant increase in diastolic blood pressure [71.8 (0.7) mmHg vs 75.6 (0.91) mmHg], with no significant changes in either systolic blood pressure or heart rate. The nocturnal hormonal decrease of aldosterone was clearly evident only before and after HDBR, but the day/night difference did not appear during HDBR. The rhythm of K+ excretion was unchanged during HDBR, whereas for Na+ excretion, a large decrease was shown during the night as compared to the day. The circadian rhythm of cortisol persisted. These data suggest that exposure to a 17-day HDBR could induce an exaggeration of the amplitude of the Na+ rhythm and abolition of the aldosterone rhythm.

  14. Lower Extremity Muscle Thickness During 30-Day 6 degrees Head-Down Bed Rest with Isotonic and Isokinetic Exercise Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, S.; Kirby, L. C.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    Muscle thickness was measured in 19 Bed-Rested (BR) men (32-42 year) subjected to IsoTonic (ITE, cycle orgometer) and IsoKi- netic (IKE, torque orgometer) lower extremity exercise training, and NO Exercise (NOE) training. Thickness was measured with ultrasonography in anterior thigh-Rectus Femoris (RF) and Vastus Intermadius (VI), and combined posterior log-soleus, flexor ballucis longus, and tibialis posterior (S + FHL +TP) - muscles. Compared with ambulatory control values, thickness of the (S + FHL + TP) decreased by 90%-12% (p less than 0.05) In all three test groups. The (RF) thickness was unchanged in the two exercise groups, but decreased by 10% (p less than 0.05) in the NOE. The (VI) thickness was unchanged In the ITE group, but decreased by 12%-l6% (p less than 0.05) in the IKE and NOE groups. Thus, intensive, alternating, isotonic cycle ergometer exercise training is as effective as intensive, intermittent, isokinetic exercise training for maintaining thicknesses of rectus femoris and vastus lntermedius anterior thigh muscles, but not posterior log muscles, during prolonged BR deconditioning.

  15. Electromyography-based analysis of human upper limbs during 45-day head-down bed-rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Anshuang; Wang, Chunhui; Qi, Hongzhi; Li, Fan; Wang, Zheng; He, Feng; Zhou, Peng; Chen, Shanguang; Ming, Dong

    2016-03-01

    Muscle deconditioning occurs in response to simulated or actual microgravity. In spaceflight, astronauts become monkey-like for mainly using their upper limbs to control the operating system and to complete corresponding tasks. The changes of upper limbs' athletic ability will directly affect astronauts' working performance. This study investigated the variation trend of surface electromyography (sEMG) during prolonged simulated microgravity. Eight healthy males participating in this study performed strict 45-day head-down bed-rest (HDBR). On the 5th day of pre-HDBR, and the 15th, the 30th and the 45th days of HDBR, the subjects performed maximum pushing task and maximum pulling task, and sEMG was collected from upper limbs synchronously. Each subject's maximum volunteer contractions of both the tasks during these days were compared, showing no significant change. However, changes were detected by sEMG-based analysis. It was found that integrated EMG, root mean square, mean frequency, fuzzy entropy of deltoid, and fuzzy entropy of triceps brachii changed significantly when comparing pre-HDBR with HDBR. The variation trend showed a recovery tendency after significant decline, which is inconsistent with the monotonic variation of lower limbs that was proved by previous research. These findings suggest that EMG changes in upper limbs during prolonged simulated microgravity, but has different variation trend from lower limbs.

  16. No effect of artificial gravity on lung function with exercise training during head-down bed rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Longxiang; Guo, Yinghua; Wang, Yajuan; Wang, Delong; Liu, Changting

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the effectiveness of microgravity simulated by head-down bed rest (HDBR) and artificial gravity (AG) with exercise on lung function. Twenty-four volunteers were randomly divided into control and exercise countermeasure (CM) groups for 96 h of 6° HDBR. Comparisons of pulse rate, pulse oxygen saturation (SpO2) and lung function were made between these two groups at 0, 24, 48, 72, 96 h. Compared with the sitting position, inspiratory capacity and respiratory reserve volume were significantly higher than before HDBR (0° position) (P < 0.05). Vital capacity, expiratory reserve volume, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, forced inspiratory vital capacity, forced inspiratory volume in 1 s, forced expiratory flow at 25, 50, and 75%, maximal mid-expiratory flow and peak expiratory flow were all significantly lower than those before HDBR (P < 0.05). Neither control nor CM groups showed significant differences in pulse rate, SpO2, pulmonary volume and pulmonary ventilation function over the HDBR observation time. Postural changes can lead to variation in lung volume and ventilation function, but a HDBR model induced no changes in pulmonary function and therefore should not be used to study AG countermeasures.

  17. Effect of artificial gravity with exercise training on lung function during head-down bed rest in humans.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yinghua; Guo, Na; Liu, Changting; Wang, Delong; Wang, Junfeng; Sun, Xiqing; Fan, Shangchun; Wang, Changyong; Yang, Changbin; Zhang, Yu; Lu, Dongyuan; Yao, Yongjie

    2013-01-01

    There is evidence to suggest that microgravity/weightlessness can induce changes in lung physiology/function. We hypothesized that microgravity, induced by head-down bed rest (HDBR), would induce changes in lung function and that exercise training with artificial gravity (AG) would prevent these changes from occurring. Twelve participants were randomly assigned to a control or AG exercise countermeasure (CM) group (n = 6 per group) and 96 h of 6° HDBR. Participants in the CM group were exposed to AG (alternating 2 min intervals of +1·0 and +2·0 G) for 30 min, twice daily, during which time ergometric exercise (40 W intensity) was performed. Pulse rate, oxygen saturation (SO(2) ) and lung function were measured and compared between groups. The CM and control groups were similar in mean age, height and weight. There were no significant within or between group differences over time in pulse rate, SO(2) , vital capacity, inspiratory capacity, tidal volume, expiratory reserve volume, inspiratory reserve volume, minute ventilation, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, peak expiratory flow, maximal expiratory flow in 25%, 50% and 75% vital capacity, forced inspiratory vital capacity, forced inspiratory volume in 1 s and maximal voluntary ventilation. Microgravity induced by 96 h of HDBR does not appear to affect lung function in humans. Further, AG with exercise training does not change lung function during 96 h of HDBR in humans. PMID:23216762

  18. Orthostatic Intolerance Is Independent of the Degree of Autonomic Cardiovascular Adaptation after 60 Days of Head-Down Bed Rest.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiexin; Li, Yongzhi; Verheyden, Bart; Chen, Zhanghuang; Wang, Jingyu; Li, Yinghui; Aubert, André E; Yuan, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Spaceflight and head-down bed rest (HDBR) can induce the orthostatic intolerance (OI); the mechanisms remain to be clarified. The aim of this study was to determine whether or not OI after HDBR relates to the degree of autonomic cardiovascular adaptation. Fourteen volunteers were enrolled for 60 days of HDBR. A head-up tilt test (HUTT) was performed before and after HDBR. Our data revealed that, in all nonfainters, there was a progressive increase in heart rate over the course of HDBR, which remained higher until 12 days of recovery. The mean arterial pressure gradually increased until day 56 of HDBR and returned to baseline after 12 days of recovery. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia and baroreflex sensitivity decreased during HDBR and remained suppressed until 12 days of recovery. Low-frequency power of systolic arterial pressure increased during HDBR and remained elevated during recovery. Three subjects fainted during the HUTT after HDBR, in which systemic vascular resistance did not increase and remained lower until syncope. None of the circulatory patterns significantly differed between the fainters and the nonfainters at any time point. In conclusion, our data indicate that the impaired orthostatic tolerance after HDBR could not be distinguished by estimation of normal hemodynamic and/or neurocardiac data. PMID:26425559

  19. Unilateral lower limb suspension does not mimic bed rest or spaceflight effects on human muscle fiber function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widrick, J. J.; Trappe, S. W.; Romatowski, J. G.; Riley, D. A.; Costill, D. L.; Fitts, R. H.

    2002-01-01

    We used Ca2+-activated skinned muscle fibers to test the hypothesis that unilateral lower leg suspension (ULLS) alters cross-bridge mechanisms of muscle contraction. Soleus and gastrocnemius biopsies were obtained from eight subjects before ULLS, immediately after 12 days of ULLS (post-0 h), and after 6 h of reambulation (post-6 h). Post-0 h soleus fibers expressing type I myosin heavy chain (MHC) showed significant reductions in diameter, absolute and specific peak Ca2+-activated force, unloaded shortening velocity, and absolute and normalized peak power. Fibers obtained from the gastrocnemius were less affected by ULLS, particularly fibers expressing fast MHC isoforms. Post-6 h soleus fibers produced less absolute and specific peak force than did post-0 h fibers, suggesting that reambulation after ULLS induced cell damage. Like bed rest and spaceflight, ULLS primarily affects soleus over gastrocnemius fibers. However, in contrast to these other models, slow soleus fibers obtained after ULLS showed a decrease in unloaded shortening velocity and a greater reduction in specific force.

  20. Orthostatic Intolerance Is Independent of the Degree of Autonomic Cardiovascular Adaptation after 60 Days of Head-Down Bed Rest

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiexin; Li, Yongzhi; Verheyden, Bart; Chen, Zhanghuang; Wang, Jingyu; Li, Yinghui; Aubert, André E.; Yuan, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Spaceflight and head-down bed rest (HDBR) can induce the orthostatic intolerance (OI); the mechanisms remain to be clarified. The aim of this study was to determine whether or not OI after HDBR relates to the degree of autonomic cardiovascular adaptation. Fourteen volunteers were enrolled for 60 days of HDBR. A head-up tilt test (HUTT) was performed before and after HDBR. Our data revealed that, in all nonfainters, there was a progressive increase in heart rate over the course of HDBR, which remained higher until 12 days of recovery. The mean arterial pressure gradually increased until day 56 of HDBR and returned to baseline after 12 days of recovery. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia and baroreflex sensitivity decreased during HDBR and remained suppressed until 12 days of recovery. Low-frequency power of systolic arterial pressure increased during HDBR and remained elevated during recovery. Three subjects fainted during the HUTT after HDBR, in which systemic vascular resistance did not increase and remained lower until syncope. None of the circulatory patterns significantly differed between the fainters and the nonfainters at any time point. In conclusion, our data indicate that the impaired orthostatic tolerance after HDBR could not be distinguished by estimation of normal hemodynamic and/or neurocardiac data. PMID:26425559

  1. Isokinetic strength and endurance during 30-day 6 degrees head-down bed rest with isotonic and isokinetic exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Bernauer, E. M.; Ertl, A. C.; Bulbulian, R.; Bond, M.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine if an intensive, intermittent, isokinetic, lower extremity exercise training program would attenuate or eliminate the decrease of muscular strength and endurance during prolonged bed rest (BR). The 19 male subjects (36 +/- 1 yr, 178 +/- 2 cm, 76.5 +/- 1.7 kg) were allocated into a no exercise (NOE) training group (N = 5), an isotonic (lower extremity cycle ergometer) exercise (ITE) training group (N = 7), and an isokinetic (isokinetic knee flexion-extension) exercise (IKE) training group (N = 7). Peak knee (flexion and extension) and shoulder (abduction-adduction) functions were measured weekly in all groups with one 5-repetition set. After BR, average knee extension total work decreased by 16% with NOE, increased by 27% with IKE, and was unchanged with ITE. Average knee flexion total work and peak torque (strength) responses were unchanged in all groups. Force production increased by 20% with IKE and was unchanged with NOE and ITE. Shoulder total work was unchanged in all groups, while gross average peak torque increased by 27% with ITE and by 22% with IKE, and was unchanged with NOE. Thus, while ITE training can maintain some isokinetic functions during BR, maximal intermittent IKE training can increase other functions above pre-BR control levels.

  2. Isokinetic Strength and Endurance During 30-day 6 deg Head-Down Bed Rest with Isotonic and Isokinetic Exercise Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Bernauer, E. M.; Ertl, A. C.; Bond, M.; Bulbulian, R.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine if an intensive, intermittent, isokinetic, lower extremity exercise training program would attenuate or eliminate the decrease of muscular strength and endurance during prolonged bed rest (BR). The 19 male subjects (36 +/- 1 yr, 178 +/- 2 cm, 76.5 +/- 1.7 kg) were allocated into a no exercise (NOE) training group (N = 5), an isotonic (lower extremity cycle orgometer) exercise (ITE) training group (N = 7), and an isokinetic (isokinetic knee flexion-extension) exercise (IKE) training group (N = 7). Peak knee (flexion and extension) and shoulder (abduction-adduction) functions were measured weekly in all groups with one 5-repetition set. After BR, average knee extension total work decreased by 16% with NOE, increased by 27% with IKE, and was unchanged with ITE. Average knee flexion total work and peak torque (strength) responses were unchanged in all groups. Force production increased by 20% with IKE and was unchanged with NOE and ITE. Shoulder total work was unchanged in all groups, while gross average peak torque increased by 27% with ITE and by 22% with IKE, and was unchanged with NOE. Thus, while ITE training can maintain some isokinetic functions during BR, maximal intermittent IKE training can increase other functions above pre-BR control levels.

  3. Submaximal exercise VO2 and Qc during 30-day 6 degrees head-down bed rest with isotonic and isokinetic exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Ertl, A. C.; Bernauer, E. M.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Maintaining intermediary metabolism is necessary for the health and well-being of astronauts on long-duration spaceflights. While peak oxygen uptake (VO2) is consistently decreased during prolonged bed rest, submaximal VO2 is either unchanged or decreased. METHODS: Submaximal exercise metabolism (61 +/- 3% peak VO2) was measured during ambulation (AMB day-2) and on bed rest days 4, 11, and 25 in 19 healthy men (32-42 yr) allocated into no exercise (NOE, N = 5) control, and isotonic exercise (ITE, N = 7) and isokinetic exercise (IKE, N = 7) training groups. Exercise training was conducted supine for two 30-min periods per day for 6 d per week: ITE training was intermittent at 60-90% peak VO2; IKE training was 10 sets of 5 repetitions of peak knee flexion-extension force at a velocity of 100 degrees s-1. Cardiac output was measured with the indirect Fick CO2 method, and plasma volume with Evans blue dye dilution. RESULTS: Supine submaximal exercise VO2 decreased significantly (*p < 0.05) by 10.3%* with ITE and by 7.3%* with IKE; similar to the submaximal cardiac output decrease of 14.5%* (ITE) and 20.3%* (IKE), but different from change in peak VO2 (+1.4% with ITE and -10.2%* with IKE) and decrease in plasma volume of -3.7% (ITE) and -18.0%* (IKE). Reduction of submaximal VO2 during bed rest correlated 0.79 (p < 0.01) with submaximal Qc, but was not related to change in peak VO2 or plasma volume. CONCLUSION: Reduction in submaximal oxygen uptake during prolonged bed rest is related to decrease in exercise but not resting cardiac output; perturbations in active skeletal muscle metabolism may be involved.

  4. Surviving Bed Rest

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... to think about catching up on correspondence or reading your favorite author's latest novel. Try these time ...

  5. Coring to the West Antarctic ice sheet bed with a new Deep Ice Sheet Coring (DISC) drill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, C. R.; Taylor, K. C.; Shturmakov, A. J.; Mason, W. P.; Emmel, G. R.; Lebar, D. A.

    2005-05-01

    As a contribution to IPY 2007-2008, the U.S. ice core research community, supported by the National Science Foundation, plans to core through the West Antarctic ice sheet (WAIS) at the ice-flow divide between the Ross Sea and Amundsen Sea drainage systems. The aim is to develop a unique series of interrelated climatic, ice-dynamic, and biologic records focused on understanding interactions among global earth systems. There will be approximately 15 separate but synergistic projects to analyze the ice and interpret the records. The most significant expected outcome of the WAIS Divide program will be climate records for the last ~40,000 years with an annually resolved chronology (through layer counting), comparable to the records from central Greenland. The data will also extend, at lower temporal resolution, to approximately 100,000 BP. These records will permit comparison of environmental conditions between the northern and southern hemispheres, and study of greenhouse gas concentrations in the paleoatmosphere, with unprecedented detail. To accomplish the coring, an innovative new Deep Ice Sheet Coring (DISC) drill is being built at the University of Wisconsin. The modular design of the bore-hole assembly (sonde) provides high flexibility for producing a 122 mm diameter ice core to depths of 4,000 m with maximum core lengths of 4 m. The DISC drill has a rotating outer barrel that can be used with or without an inner barrel designed to improve core recovery in brittle ice. Separate and independent motors for the drill and pump allow cutter speeds from 0 to 150 rpm and pump rates from 0 to 140 gpm. The high pumping rate should alleviate problems drilling in warm ice near the bed; it also helps make tripping speeds several times faster than with the old US drill. Other innovations include vibration and acoustic sensors for monitoring the drilling process, a segmented core barrel to avoid the formerly persistent problem of bent core barrels, and a high-speed data

  6. Treadmill exercise within lower body negative pressure protects leg lean tissue mass and extensor strength and endurance during bed rest.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Suzanne M; Lee, Stuart M C; Feiveson, Alan H; Watenpaugh, Donald E; Macias, Brandon R; Hargens, Alan R

    2016-08-01

    Leg muscle mass and strength are decreased during reduced activity and non-weight-bearing conditions such as bed rest (BR) and spaceflight. Supine treadmill exercise within lower body negative pressure (LBNPEX) provides full-body weight loading during BR and may prevent muscle deconditioning. We hypothesized that a 40-min interval exercise protocol performed against LBNPEX 6 days week(-1) would attenuate losses in leg lean mass (LLM), strength, and endurance during 6° head-down tilt BR, with similar benefits for men and women. Fifteen pairs of healthy monozygous twins (8 male and 7 female pairs) completed 30 days of BR with one sibling of each twin pair assigned randomly as the non-exercise control (CON) and the other twin as the exercise subject (EX). Before and after BR, LLM and isokinetic leg strength and endurance were measured. Mean knee and ankle extensor and flexor strength and endurance and LLM decreased from pre- to post-BR in the male CON subjects (P < 0.01), but knee extensor strength and endurance, ankle extensor strength, and LLM were maintained in the male EX subjects. In contrast, no pre- to post-BR changes were significant in the female subjects, either CON or EX, likely due to their lower pre-BR values. Importantly, the LBNPEX countermeasure prevents or attenuates declines in LLM as well as extensor leg strength and endurance. Individuals who are stronger, have higher levels of muscular endurance, and/or have greater LLM are likely to experience greater losses during BR than those who are less fit. PMID:27495299

  7. Knee-joint proprioception during 30-day 6 degrees head-down bed rest with isotonic and isokinetic exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernauer, E. M.; Walby, W. F.; Ertl, A. C.; Dempster, P. T.; Bond, M.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    To determine if daily isotonic exercise or isokinetic exercise training coupled with daily leg proprioceptive training, would influence leg proprioceptive tracking responses during bed rest (BR), 19 men (36 +/- SD 4 years, 178 +/- 7 cm, 76.8 +/- 7.8 kg) were allocated into a no-exercise (NOE) training control group (n = 5), and isotonic exercise (ITE, n = 7) and isokinetic exercise (IKE, n = 7) training groups. Exercise training was conducted during BR for two 30-min periods.d-1, 5 d.week-1. Only the IKE group performed proprioceptive training using a new isokinetic procedure with each lower extremity for 2.5 min before and after the daily exercise training sessions; proprioceptive testing occurred weekly for all groups. There were no significant differences in proprioceptive tracking scores, expressed as a percentage of the perfect score of 100, in the pre-BR ambulatory control period between the three groups. Knee extension and flexion tracking responses were unchanged with NOE during BR, but were significantly greater (*p < 0.05) at the end of BR in both exercise groups when compared with NOE responses (extension: NOE 80.7 +/- 0.7%, ITE 82.9* +/- 0.6%, IKE 86.5* +/- 0.7%; flexion: NOE 77.6 +/- 1.5%, ITE 80.0 +/- 0.8% (NS), IKE 83.6* +/- 0.8%). Although proprioceptive tracking was unchanged during BR with NOE, both isotonic exercise training (without additional proprioceptive training) and especially isokinetic exercise training when combined with daily proprioceptive training, significantly improved knee proprioceptive tracking responses after 30 d of BR.

  8. Knee-Joint Proprioception During 30-Day 6 deg Head-Down Bed Rest with Isotonic and Isokinetic Exercise Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernauer, E. M.; Walby, W. F.; Ertl, A. C.; Dempster, P. T.; Bond, M.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    To determine if daily isotonic exercise or isokinetic exercise training coupled with daily log proprioceptive training, would influence log proprioceptive tracking responses during Bed Rest (BR), 19 men (36 +/- SD 4 years, 178 +/- 7 cm, 76.8 +/- 7.8 kg) were allocated into a NO-Exercise (NOE) training control group (n = 5), and IsoTanic Exercise (ITE, n = 7) and IsoKinetic Exercise (IKE, n = 7) training groups. Exercise training was conducted during BR for two 30-min period / d, 5 d /week. Only the IKE group performed proprioceptive training using a now isokinetic procedure with each lower extremity for 2.5 min before and after the daily exercise training sessions; proprioceptive testing occurred weekly for all groups. There were no significant differences in proprioceptive tracking scores, expressed as a percentage of the perfect score of 100, in the pro-BR ambulatory control period between the three groups. Knee extension and flexion tracking responses were unchanged with NOE during BR, but were significantly greater (*p less than 0.05) at the end of BR in both exercise groups when compared with NOE responses (extension: NOE 80.7 +/- 0.7%, ITE 82.9 +/- 0.6%, IKE 86.5* +/- 0.7%; flexion: NOE 77.6 +/- 1.50, ITE 80.0 +/- 0.8% (NS), IKE 83.6* +/- 0.8%). Although proprioceptive tracking was unchanged during BR with NOE, both lsotonic exercise training (without additional propriaceptive training) and especially isokinetic exercise training when combined with daily proprioceptive training, significantly improved knee proprioceptive tracking responses after 30 d of BR.

  9. Effects of 30-Day Head-Down Bed Rest on Ocular Structures and Visual Function in a Healthy Subject

    PubMed Central

    Taibbi, Giovanni; Kaplowitz, Kevin; Cromwell, Ronita L.; Godley, Bernard F.; Zanello, Susana B.; Vizzeri, Gianmarco

    2013-01-01

    Introduction We report ocular changes occurring in a healthy human subject enrolled in a bed rest (BR) study designed to replicate the effects of a low-gravity environment. Case report A 25-year-old Caucasian male spent 30 consecutive days in a 6° head-down-tilt position at the NASA Flight Analogs Research Unit. Comprehensive ophthalmologic exams, optic disc stereo-photography, Standard Automated Perimetry (SAP) and optic disc Spectralis OCT scans were performed at baseline, immediately post-BR (BR+0) and 6 months post-BR. Main outcome measures: changes in best-corrected visual acuity, intraocular pressure (IOP), cycloplegic refraction, SAP and Spectralis OCT measures. At BR+0 IOP was 11 and 10 mmHg in the right (OD) and left eye (OS), respectively (a bilateral 4 mmHg decrease compared to baseline); SAP documented a possible bilateral symmetrical inferior scotoma; Spectralis OCT showed an average 19.4 μm (+5.2%) increase in peripapillary retinal thickness, and an average 0.03 mm3 (+5.0%) increase in peripapillary retinal volume bilaterally. However, there were no clinically detectable signs of optic disc edema. 6 months post-BR, IOP was 13 and 14 mmHg in OD and OS, respectively, and the scotoma had resolved. Spectralis OCT measurements matched the ones recorded at baseline. Discussion In this subject, a reduction in IOP associated with subtle structural and functional changes compared to baseline were documented after prolonged head-down BR. These changes may be related to cephalad fluid shifts in response to tilt. Further studies should clarify whether decreased translaminar pressure (i.e., the difference between IOP and intracranial pressure) may be responsible for these findings. PMID:23447853

  10. Leg muscle volume during 30-day 6-degree head-down bed rest with isotonic and isokinetic exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Lee, P. L.; Ellis, S.; Selzer, R. H.; Ortendahl, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to compare the effect of two modes of lower-extremity exercise training on the mass (volume) of posterior leg group (PLG) muscles (soleus, flexor hallucis longus, tibialis posterior, lateral and medial gastrocnemius, and flexor digitorum longus) on 19 men (ages 32-42 years) subjected to intense dynamic-isotonic (ITE, cycle ergometer, number of subjects (N) = 7), isokinetic (IKE, torque egrometer, N = 7), and no exercise (NOE, N = 5) training for 60 min/day during head-down bed rest (HDBR). Total volume of the PLG muscles decreased (p less than 0.05) similarly: ITE = 4.3 +/- SE 1.6%, IKE = 7.7 +/- 1.6%, and NOE = 6.3 +/- 0.8%; combined volume (N = 19) loss was 6.1 +/- 0.9%. Ranges of volume changes were 2.6% to -9.0% (ITE), -2.1% to -14.9% (IKE), and -3.4% to -8/1% (NOE). Correlation coefficients (r) of muscle volume versus thickness measured with ultrasonography were: ITE r + 0.79 (p less than 0.05), IKE r = 0.27 (not significant (NS)), and NOE r = 0.63 (NS). Leg-muscle volume and thickness were highly correlated (r = 0.79) when plasma volume was maintained during HDBR with ITE. Thus, neither intensive lower extremity ITE nor IKE training influence the normal non-exercised posterior leg muscle atrophy during HDBR. The relationship of muscle volume and thickness may depend on the mode of exercise training associated with the maintenance of plasma volume.

  11. The Effects of Long Duration Head Down Tilt Bed Rest on Neurocognitive Performance: The Effects of Exercise Interventions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidler, R. D.; Mulavara, A. P.; Koppelmans, V.; Erdeniz. B.; Kofman, I. S.; DeDios, Y. E.; Szecsy, D. L.; Riascos-Castaneda, R. F.; Wood, S. J.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    We are conducting ongoing experiments in which we are performing structural and functional magnetic resonance brain imaging to identify the relationships between changes in neurocognitive function and neural structural alterations following a six month International Space Station mission and following 70 days exposure to a spaceflight analog, head down tilt bedrest. Our central hypothesis is that measures of brain structure, function, and network integrity will change from pre to post intervention (spaceflight, bedrest). Moreover, we predict that these changes will correlate with indices of cognitive, sensory, and motor function in a neuroanatomically selective fashion. Our interdisciplinary approach utilizes cutting edge neuroimaging techniques and a broad ranging battery of sensory, motor, and cognitive assessments that will be conducted pre flight, during flight, and post flight to investigate potential neuroplastic and maladaptive brain changes in crewmembers following long-duration spaceflight. Success in this endeavor would 1) result in identification of the underlying neural mechanisms and operational risks of spaceflight-induced changes in behavior, and 2) identify whether a return to normative behavioral function following re-adaptation to Earth's gravitational environment is associated with a restitution of brain structure and function or instead is supported by substitution with compensatory brain processes. Our ongoing bed rest participants are also engaging in exercise studies directed by Dr. Lori Ploutz Snyder. In this presentation, I will briefly highlight the existing literature linking exercise and fitness to brain and behavioral functions. I will also overview the metrics from my study that could be investigated in relation to the exercise and control subgroups.

  12. Effects of leg strength and bicycle ergometry exercise on cardiovascular deconditioning after 30-day head-down bed rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bin; Liu, Yusheng; Sun, Hongyi; Zhao, Dongming; Wang, Yue; Wu, Ping; Ni, Chengzhi

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine if the intermittent leg muscular strength exercise and bicycle ergometry exercise could attenuate cardiovascular deconditioning induced by prolonged -6° head-down bed rest (HDBR). Fifteen male subjects were randomly allocated into group A ( n=5, 30 days HDBR without exercise), group B ( n=5, 30 days HDBR with leg muscular strength exercise) and group C ( n=5, 30 days HDBR with bicycle ergometry exercise). The orthostatic tolerance (OT) was determined by +75°/20 min head-up tilt (HUT) test and the submaximal exercise capacity was determined by bicycle ergometry before and after HDBR. The results were as follows: (1) Compared with that before HDBR, OT time decreased dramatically by 57.6% ( p<0.001) after HDBR in group A, while it decreased by 36.4% ( p=0.084) in group B and by 34.7% ( p=0.062) in group C. (2) Compared with that before HDBR, the submaximal exercise time decreased significantly by 17.7% ( p<0.05) and 21.1% ( p<0.05) in groups A and B, respectively, after HDBR. However, it had no change (+1.3%, p>0.77) in group C. (3) compared with that before HDBR, the changes of heart rate (HR) and blood pressure were slightly improved in group B and C, while deteriorated in group A during orthostatic test and exercise test after HDBR. The results indicate that leg muscular strength exercise and bicycle ergometry exercise could partially attenuate the cardiovascular deconditioning induced by 30 d HDBR, and the latter exercise training could fully provide the protection for the loss of exercise capacity.

  13. Gender differences in endocrine responses to posture and 7 days of -6 degrees head-down bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos, J.; Dallman, M. F.; Keil, L. C.; O'Hara, D.; Convertino, V. A.

    1993-01-01

    Endocrine regulation of fluids and electrolytes during 7 days of -6 degrees head-down bed rest (HDBR) was compared in male (n = 8) and, for the first time, female (n = 8) volunteers. The subjects' responses to quiet standing for 2 h before and after HDBR were also tested. In both sexes, diuresis and natriuresis were evident during the first 2-3 days of HDBR, resulting in a marked increase in the urinary Na(+)-to-K+ ratio and significant Na+ retention on re-ambulation. After the 1st day of HDBR, plasma renin activity (PRA) was increased relative to aldosterone (Aldo), plasma volume was decreased, and the renal response to Aldo appeared to be appropriate. Circulating levels of arginine vasopressin, cortisol, and ACTH were unchanged during HDBR. Plasma testosterone decreased slightly on day 2 of HDBR in males. The ratio of early morning ACTH to cortisol was lower in females than in males because ACTH was lower in females. Urinary cortisol increased and remained elevated throughout the HDBR in males only. There were no gender differences in the responses to 7 days of HDBR, except those in the pituitary-adrenal system; those differences appeared unrelated to the postural change. The provocative cardiovascular test of quiet standing before and after HDBR revealed both sex differences and effects of HDBR. There were significant sex differences in cardiovascular responses to standing before and after HDBR. Females had greater PRA and Aldo responses to standing before HDBR and larger Aldo responses to standing after HDBR than males.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  14. A combination of whey protein and potassium bicarbonate supplements during head-down-tilt bed rest: Presentation of a multidisciplinary randomized controlled trial (MEP study)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buehlmeier, Judith; Mulder, Edwin; Noppe, Alexandra; Frings-Meuthen, Petra; Angerer, Oliver; Rudwill, Floriane; Biolo, Gianni; Smith, Scott M.; Blanc, Stéphane; Heer, Martina

    2014-02-01

    Inactivity, as it appears during space flight and in bed rest, induces reduction of lean body and bone mass, glucose intolerance, and weakening of the cardiovascular system. Increased protein intake, whey protein in particular, has been proposed to counteract some of these effects, but has also been associated with negative effects on bone, likely caused by a correspondingly high ratio of acid to alkali precursors in the diet.

  15. Fourteen days of bed rest induces a decline in satellite cell content and robust atrophy of skeletal muscle fibers in middle-aged adults.

    PubMed

    Arentson-Lantz, Emily J; English, Kirk L; Paddon-Jones, Douglas; Fry, Christopher S

    2016-04-15

    Bed rest, a ground-based spaceflight analog, induces robust atrophy of skeletal muscle, an effect that is exacerbated with increasing age. We examined the effect of 14 days of bed rest on skeletal muscle satellite cell content and fiber type atrophy in middle-aged adults, an understudied age demographic with few overt signs of muscle aging that is representative of astronauts who perform long-duration spaceflight. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis of healthy middle-aged adults [n= 7 (4 male, 3 female); age: 51 ± 1 yr] before (Pre-BR) and after (Post-BR) 14 days of bed rest. Immunohistochemical analyses were used to quantify myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoform expression, cross-sectional area (CSA), satellite cell and myonuclear content, and capillary density. Peak oxygen consumption, knee extensor strength, and body composition were also measured Pre-BR and Post-BR. Post-BR MyHC type 2a fiber percentage was reduced, and mean CSA decreased in all fiber types (-24 ± 5%;P< 0.05). Satellite cell content was also reduced Post-BR (-39 ± 9%;P< 0.05), and the change in satellite cell content was significantly correlated with the change in mean fiber CSA (r(2)= 0.60;P< 0.05). A decline in capillary density was observed Post-BR (-23 ± 6%;P< 0.05), and Post-BR capillary content was significantly associated with Post-BR peak aerobic capacity (r(2)= 0.59;P< 0.05). A subtle decline in myonuclear content occurred during bed rest (-5 ± 1%;P< 0.05). The rapid maladaptation of skeletal muscle to 14 days of mechanical unloading in middle-aged adults emphasizes the need for robust countermeasures to preserve muscle function in astronauts. PMID:26796754

  16. Effect of Head-Down Bed Rest and Artificial Gravity Countermeasure on Cardiac Autonomic and Advanced Electrocardiographic Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, T. T.; Platts, S.; Stenger, M.; Ribeiro, C.; Natapoff, A.; Howarth, M.; Evans, J.

    2007-01-01

    To study the effects of 21 days of head-down bed rest (HDBR), with versus without an artificial gravity (AG) countermeasure, on cardiac autonomic and advanced electrocardiographic function. Fourteen healthy men participated in the study: seven experienced 21 days of HDBR alone ("HDBR controls") and seven the same degree and duration of HDBR but with approximately 1hr daily short-arm centrifugation as an AG countermeasure ("AG-treated"). Five minute supine high-fidelity 12-lead ECGs were obtained in all subjects: 1) 4 days before HDBR; 2) on the last day of HDBR; and 3) 7 days after HDBR. Besides conventional 12-lead ECG intervals and voltages, all of the following advanced ECG parameters were studied: 1) both stochastic (time and frequency domain) and deterministic heart rate variability (HRV); 2) beat-to-beat QT interval variability (QTV); 3) T-wave morphology, including signal-averaged T-wave residua (TWR) and principal component analysis ratios; 4) other SAECG-related parameters including high frequency QRS ECG and late potentials; and 5) several advanced ECG estimates of left ventricular (LV) mass. The most important results by repeated measures ANOVA were that: 1) Heart rates, Bazett-corrected QTc intervals, TWR, LF/HF power and the alpha 1 of HRV were significantly increased in both groups (i.e., by HDBR), but with no relevant HDBR*group differences; 2) All purely "vagally-mediated" parameters of HRV (e.g., RMSSD, HF power, Poincare SD1, etc.), PR intervals, and also several parameters of LV mass (Cornell and Sokolow-Lyon voltages, spatial ventricular activation times, ventricular gradients) were all significantly decreased in both groups (i.e., by HDBR), but again with no relevant HDBR*group differences); 3) All "generalized" or "vagal plus sympathetic" parameters of stochastic HRV (i.e., SDNN, total power, LF power) were significantly more decreased in the AG-treated group than in the HDBR-only group (i.e., here there was a relevant HDBR*group difference

  17. High Intensity Resistive and Rowing Exercise Countermeasures Do Not Prevent Orthostatic Intolerance Following 70 Days of Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Stuart M. C.; Stenger, Michael B.; Laurie, Steven S.; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L.; Platts, Steven H.

    2015-01-01

    More than 60% of US astronauts participating in Mir and early International Space Station missions (greater than 5 months) were unable to complete a 10-min 80 deg head-up tilt test on landing day. This high incidence of post-spaceflight orthostatic intolerance may be related to limitations of the inflight exercise hardware that prevented high intensity training. PURPOSE: This study sought to determine if a countermeasure program that included intense lower-body resistive and rowing exercises designed to prevent cardiovascular and musculoskeletal deconditioning during 70 days of 6 deg head-down tilt bed rest (BR), a spaceflight analog, also would protect against post- BR orthostatic intolerance. METHODS: Sixteen males participated in this study and performed no exercise (Control, n=10) or performed an intense supine exercise protocol with resistive and aerobic components (Exercise, n=6). On 3 days/week, exercise subjects performed lower body resistive exercise and a 30-min continuous bout of rowing (greater than or equal to 75% max heart rate). On 3 other days/week, subjects performed only high-intensity, interval-style rowing. Orthostatic intolerance was assessed using a 15-min 80 deg head-up tilt test performed 2 days (BR-2) before and on the last day of BR (BR70). Plasma volume was measured using a carbon monoxide rebreathing technique on BR-3 and before rising on the first recovery day (BR+0). RESULTS: Following 70 days of BR, tilt tolerance time decreased significantly in both the Control (BR-2: 15.0 +/- 0.0, BR70: 9.9 +/- 4.6 min, mean +/- SD) and Exercise (BR-2: 12.2 +/- 4.7, BR70: 4.9 +/- 1.9 min) subjects, but the decreased tilt tolerance time was not different between groups (Control: -34 +/- 31, Exercise: -56 +/- 16%). Plasma volume also decreased (Control: -0.56 +/- 0.40, Exercise: -0.48 +/- 0.33 L) from pre to post-BR, with no differences between groups (Control: -18 +/- 11%, Exerciser: -15 +/-1 0%). CONCLUSIONS: These findings confirm previous reports

  18. Effect of 17 days of bed rest on peak isometric force and unloaded shortening velocity of human soleus fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widrick, J. J.; Romatowski, J. G.; Bain, J. L.; Trappe, S. W.; Trappe, T. A.; Thompson, J. L.; Costill, D. L.; Riley, D. A.; Fitts, R. H.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of prolonged bed rest (BR) on the peak isometric force (P0) and unloaded shortening velocity (V0) of single Ca(2+)-activated muscle fibers. Soleus muscle biopsies were obtained from eight adult males before and after 17 days of 6 degrees head-down BR. Chemically permeabilized single fiber segments were mounted between a force transducer and position motor, activated with saturating levels of Ca2+, and subjected to slack length steps. V0 was determined by plotting the time for force redevelopment vs. the slack step distance. Gel electrophoresis revealed that 96% of the pre- and 87% of the post-BR fibers studied expressed only the slow type I myosin heavy chain isoform. Fibers with diameter > 100 microns made up only 14% of this post-BR type I population compared with 33% of the pre-BR type I population. Consequently, the post-BR type I fibers (n = 147) were, on average, 5% smaller in diameter than the pre-BR type I fibers (n = 218) and produced 13% less absolute P0. BR had no overall effect on P0 per fiber cross-sectional area (P0/CSA), even though half of the subjects displayed a decline of 9-12% in P0/CSA after BR. Type I fiber V0 increased by an average of 34% with BR. Although the ratio of myosin light chain 3 to myosin light chain 2 also rose with BR, there was no correlation between this ratio and V0 for either the pre- or post-BR fibers. In separate fibers obtained from the original biopsies, quantitative electron microscopy revealed a 20-24% decrease in thin filament density, with no change in thick filament density. These results raise the possibility that alterations in the geometric relationships between thin and thick filaments may be at least partially responsible for the elevated V0 of the post-BR type I fibers.

  19. WISE-2005: LBNP/Treadmill and Resistive Exercise Countermeasures Maintain Aerobic Capacity during a 60-d Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Suzanne M.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Macias, Brandon R.; Hargens, Alan R.

    2006-01-01

    We have previously documented that supine treadmill exercise within lower body negative pressure (LBNPex) performed 6 sessions (raised dot) wk(sup -1) during 15- and 30-day bed rests (BR) maintained upright aerobic capacity (VO2pk). In the present study, ure are evaluating whether aerobic capacity is maintained during a 60-d BR when the LBNPex frequency is reduced to 2-4 sessions (raised dot) wk(sup -1) and resistance exercise (REX) is added 2-3 sessions (raised dot) wk(sup -1). Eight healthy women (32 plus or minus 4 yrs; 56.4 plus or minus 3.6 kg; 164 plus or minus 8 cm; mean plus or minus SD) performed maximal-exertion, graded treadmill tests before and 3 days after a 60-d, 6 deg. head-down tilt BR. (Earliest day the medical monitors would permit a maximal exercise test post-BR). During BR, four subjects performed no exercise (CON), while four other subjects (EX) performed LBNPex and REX on separate days. The LBNPex countermeasure employed an intermittent (40-80% pre-BR VO2pk), 40-min protocol against an LBNP pressure (-49 plus or minus 3 mmHg) applied to provide a footward force equivalent to 1.0-1.2 body weight. REX consisted of maximal concentric and eccentric supine leg press and heel raise exercises using a gravity-independent flywheel ergometer. Comparisons were performed using paired (within-group) or non-paired (between-group) t-tests. Three days post-BR, VO2pk of the CON group was reduced significantly from pre-BR (Pre:37.2 plus or minus 1.2, Post: 29.4 plus or minus 2 ml (raised dot) kg(sup -1) (raised dot) min(sup -1), P less than 0.05), while the VO2pk of the EX group was not significantly reduced (Pre: 39.6 plus or minus 1.9, Post: 38.0 plus or minus 0.6 ml (raised dot) kg(sup -1) (raised dot) min(sup -1)). Peak heart rate, ventilation, rating of perceived exertion, and respiratory exchange ratio were not significantly different between the two groups pre- and post-BR. These preliminary results suggest that the combined LBNPex and REX

  20. Prevention of bone mineral changes induced by bed rest: Modification by static compression simulating weight bearing, combined supplementation of oral calcium and phosphate, calcitonin injections, oscillating compression, the oral diophosphonatedisodium etidronate, and lower body negative pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, V. S.; Hulley, S. B.; Donaldson, C. L.; Vogel, J. M.; Rosen, S. N.; Hantman, D. A.; Lockwood, D. R.; Seid, D.; Hyatt, K. H.; Jacobson, L. B.

    1974-01-01

    The phenomenon of calcium loss during bed rest was found to be analogous to the loss of bone material which occurs in the hypogravic environment of space flight. Ways of preventing this occurrence are investigated. A group of healthy adult males underwent 24-30 weeks of continuous bed rest. Some of them were given an exercise program designed to resemble normal ambulatory activity; another subgroup was fed supplemental potassium phosphate. The results from a 12-week period of treatment were compared with those untreated bed rest periods. The potassium phosphate supplements prevented the hypercalciuria of bed rest, but fecal calcium tended to increase. The exercise program did not diminish the negative calcium balance. Neither treatment affected the heavy loss of mineral from the calcaneus. Several additional studies are developed to examine the problem further.

  1. An evaluation of the effects of bed rest, sleep deprivation and discontinuance of training on the physical fitness of highly trained young men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olree, H. D.; Corbin, B.; Dugger, G.; Smith, C.

    1973-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to determine what physiological effects result when highly trained subjects are confined to bed, deprived of sleep, or allowed to discontinue training. Results indicated: (1) There was a moderate increase in strength variables due to the training in this experiment but the stress which the subjects received caused a negligible change in strength variables. (2) The training program resulted in highly significant changes in specific bicycle ergometer variables indicating good increases in cardiopulmonary fitness. Five days of bed rest or fifty hours of sleep deprivation caused comparable drastic decreases in cardiopulmonary fitness. Post stress the subjects reverted to a normal daily schedule and after two weeks they had recovered about half of what they lost. (3) Cardiac output remains relatively constant at a constant work load, but stroke volume increases with conditioning and decreases with deconditioning due to stress.

  2. LGM-extent of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet offshore from the Hobbs Coast, based on paleo-ice stream bed observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klages, J.; Kuhn, G.; Hillenbrand, C.; Graham, A. G.; Smith, J.; Larter, R. D.; Gohl, K.

    2012-12-01

    Paleo-ice stream beds that are exposed today on the West Antarctic continental shelf provide unique archives of conditions at the base of the past ice sheet, that are difficult to assess beneath its modern, extant counterpart. During the last decade, several of these paleo-ice stream beds have been studied in detail to reconstruct the extent of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), the patterns of ice drainage, and the timing of grounding-line retreat during the last deglaciation. However, despite significant advances, such information still remains poorly constrained in numerous drainage sectors of the WAIS. In particular, the maximum extent of ice at the LGM remains ambiguous for key drainage basins of the ice sheet. Whether the WAIS extended to the shelf break around the continent, or advanced only partially across its sea bed, is a crucial piece of information required for reconstructing and modeling patterns of ice-sheet change from past to present. Here we present marine geological and geophysical data that we collected on R/V "Polarstern" expedition ANT-XXVI/3 in early 2010 to investigate the extent, flow, and retreat of the WAIS, from an especially poorly studied part of the West Antarctic shelf, offshore from the Hobbs Coast in the western Amundsen Sea. Here, a landward deepening paleo-ice stream trough is incised into the shelf. The seafloor within the western-central part of the trough is characterized by a large trough-wide grounding zone wedge, ~70 m thick and ~17 km long, which overlies a high of seaward dipping sedimentary strata. The back-slope of the GZW is characterized by highly elongate streamlined bedforms suggesting fast paleo-ice flow towards NW. The crest of the wedge has been cross-cutted by iceberg keels. In contrast, the outer shelf seafloor offshore the GZW is predominantly smooth and featureless, although there is some evidence locally for iceberg scouring. A radiocarbon age from calcareous microfossils

  3. Submaximal Exercise VO2 and Q During 30-Day 6 degree Head-Down Bed Rest with Isotonic and Isokinetic Exercise Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Bernauer, E. M.; Erti, A. C.

    1995-01-01

    Submaximal exercise (61+3% peak VO2) metabolism was measured before (AC day-2) and on bed rest day 4, 11, and 25 in 19 healthy men (32-42 yr) allocated into no exercise (NOE, N=5) control, and isotonic exercise (ITE, N=7)and isokinetic exercise (IKE, N=7) training groups. Training was conducting supine for two 30-min periods/d for 6 d/wk: ITE was 60-90% peak VO2: IKE was peak knee flexion-extension at 100 deg/s. Supine submaximal exercise 102 decreased significantly (*p<0.05) by 10.3%, with ITE and by 7.3%* with IKE; similar to the submaximal cardiac output (Q) change of -14.5%* (ITE) and -203%* (IKE), but different from change in peak VO2 (+1.4% with ITE and - 10.2%, with IKE) and plasma volume of -3.7% (ITE) and - 18.0% * (IKE). Thus, reduction of submaximal V02 during prolonged bed rest appears to respond to submaximal Q but is not related to change in peak VO2 or plasma volume.

  4. Effects of resistance exercise combined with essential amino acid supplementation and energy deficit on markers of skeletal muscle atrophy and regeneration during bed rest and active recovery

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Naomi E.; Cadena, Samuel M.; Vannier, Edouard; Cloutier, Gregory; Carambula, Silvia; Myburgh, Kathryn H.; Roubenoff, Ronenn; Castaneda-Sceppa, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Space flight and bed rest (BR) lead to muscle atrophy. This study assessed the effect of essential amino acid supplementation (EAA) and resistance training with decreased energy intake on molecular changes in skeletal muscle after 28d BR and 14d recovery. METHODS Thirty-one men (31–55yr) subjected to an 8±6% energy deficit were randomized to receive EAA without resistance training (AA, n=7), EAA 3 h after (RT, n=12), or 5 min before (AART, n=12) resistance training. RESULTS During BR, myostatin transcript levels increased 2-fold in the AA group. During recovery, IGF1 mRNA increased in all groups while Pax7, MyoD, myogenin and MRF4 transcripts increased in AA only (all p<0.05). MAFbx transcripts decreased 2-fold with AA and RT. Satellite cells did not change during BR or recovery. DISCUSSION This suggests that EAA alone is the least protective countermeasure to muscle loss, and several molecular mechanisms are proposed by which exercise attenuates muscle atrophy during bed rest with energy deficit. PMID:20928906

  5. Collagen content in the vastus lateralis and the soleus muscle following a 90-day bed rest period with or without resistance exercises

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Rasmus Oestergaard; Schjerling, Peter; Tesch, Per; Stål, Per; Langberg, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Summary Introduction spaceflight seems associated with deterioration of the function of the skeletal muscles. Since muscle collagen is critical for muscle function, an improved understanding of the content of the muscle collagen during long-term inactivity seems important. Bed-rest with in-bed resistance training serves as a proxy for the conditions in space. Therefore, ground-based studies may improve the understanding of the consequences of long-term inactivity. Purpose the purpose is to compare the change in collagen protein in the vastus lateralis (VL) and the soleus (SOL) muscle amongst persons exposed to a 90-day bed rest with or without resistance exercise. Methods an explorative analysis was completed based on data from a randomized, controlled trial. The intervention group (BRE, SOL n=4, VL n=8) performed supine-based squat exercises, whereas the controls (BE, SOL n=6, VL n=12) remained inactive during follow-up. Muscle biopsies from vastus lateralis and soleus were taken at baseline (pre) and after 90-days’ follow-up (post). Muscle collagen (μg collagen/mg protein) was quantified. Two-way repeated measurements ANOVA was used to compare the interaction between the intervention (BRE/BR) and time (pre/post) for each muscle. Results the collagen content of VL was similar between pre and post in the BRE group (−3.8 μg collagen/mg protein [95% CI: −22.0; 14.4], p=0.68) while it rose amongst individuals in the BR group (14.9 μg collagen/mg protein [95% CI: −0.01; 29.7], p=0.05). The difference of 18.66 [95% CI: −6.5; 43.9] between BRE and BR across time was, however, not significant (p=0.14). No significant reduction in SOL muscle collagen content was observed from pre to post in the BR group (−9.3 μg collagen/mg protein [95% CI: −24.9; 6.4], p=0.25) or in the BRE group (−6.5 μg collagen/mg protein [95% CI: −25.6; 12.6], p=0.50). There was no difference in the effect of BR versus BRE over time (mean difference −2.78 μg collagen

  6. Reducing bed rest time from five to three hours does not increase complications after cardiac catheterization: the THREE CATH Trial 1

    PubMed Central

    Matte, Roselene; Hilário, Thamires de Souza; Reich, Rejane; Aliti, Graziella Badin; Rabelo-Silva, Eneida Rejane

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to compare the incidence of vascular complications in patients undergoing transfemoral cardiac catheterization with a 6F introducer sheath followed by 3-hour versus 5-hour rest. Methods: randomized clinical trial. Subjects in the intervention group (IG) ambulated 3 hours after sheath removal, versus 5 hours in the control group (CG). All patients remained in the catheterization laboratory for 5 hours and were assessed hourly, and were contacted 24, 48, and 72 h after hospital discharge. Results: the sample comprised 367 patients in the IG and 363 in the GC. During cath lab stay, hematoma was the most common complication in both groups, occurring in 12 (3%) IG and 13 (4%) CG subjects (P=0.87). Bleeding occurred in 4 (1%) IG and 6 (2%) CG subjects (P=0.51), and vasovagal reaction in 5 (1.4%) IG and 4 (1.1%) CG subjects (P=0.75). At 24-h, 48-h, and 72-h bruising was the most commonly reported complication in both groups. None of the comparisons revealed any significant between-group differences. Conclusion: the results of this trial show that reducing bed rest time to 3 hours after elective cardiac catheterization is safe and does not increase complications as compared with a 5-hour rest. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT-01740856 PMID:27463113

  7. Gender-related Changes in Dorsal Hand and Foot Vein Function Following 60 Days of Head Down Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westby, Christian M.; Phillips, Tiffany; Stenger, Michael B.; Platts, Steven H.

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that female astronauts are more likely to experience post-flight orthostatic hypotension and presyncope compared to male astronauts. It has been suggested that the disproportionally higher incidence of presyncope (83% of female vs. 20% male crewmembers) may be due to sex-related differences in vascular function between the upper and lower limbs. However, much of this evidence is specific to changes in resistance vessels. Given that more than 70% of the circulating blood volume resides in compliance vessels, it is conceivable that even small changes in venous function may contribute to post-flight orthostatic hypotension. In spite of this, little is currently known regarding the influence of microgravity exposure on venous function between males and females. PURPOSE: To determine the influence of 60 days of HDBR on dorsal foot and hand vein function between healthy males (M) and females (F). METHODS: Using 2-D ultrasound, dorsal hand and foot vein diameter responses to intravenous infusions phenylephrine (PE), acetylcholine (ACh), and nitroglycerine (NTG) were determined in 26 adults; 10 females (age:37 +/- 2 yr ) and 16 males (age:34 +/- 2 yr ). Changes in venous function were calculated as the difference between diameter at baseline and following each venoactive drug. Differences in venous function between limb and sexes across HDBR were determined using mixed-effects linear regression. RESULTS: In response to 60 days of HDBR, the change in venousconstrictor response to PE in the dorsal hand veins was not significantly different between M and F. Interestingly, the change in constrictor response in the dorsal foot veins (compared to pre HDBR) was approximately 30% greater in the F, whereas the constrictor response was approximately 45% less in the M (p=0.026). HDBR had no influence on the change in dilator response to ACh, or NTG between M and F and between vascular beds. CONCLUSION: These results demonstrate that 60 days of HDBR contributes to sex

  8. Effects of Resistive Vibration Exercise Combined with Whey Protein and KHCO3 on Bone Tturnover Markers in Head-down Tilt Bed Rest (MTBR-MNX Study)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, Sonja; Baecker, Natalie; Buehlmeier, Judith; Fischer, Annelie; Smith, Scott M.; Heer, Martina

    2014-01-01

    High protein intake further increases bone resorption markers in head-down tilt bed rest (HDBR), most likely induced by low-grade metabolic acidosis. Adding an alkaline salt to a diet with high protein content prevents this additional rise of bone resorption markers in HDBR. In addition, high protein intake, specifically whey protein, increases muscle protein synthesis and improves glucose tolerance, which both are affected by HDBR. Resistive vibration exercise (RVE) training counteracts the inactivity-induced bone resorption during HDBR. To test the hypothesis that WP plus alkaline salt (KHCO3) together with RVE during HDBR will improve bone turnover markers, we conducted a randomized, three-campaign crossover design study with 12 healthy, moderately fit male subjects (age 34+/-8 y, body mass [BM] 70 +/- 8 kg). All study campaigns consisted of a 7-d ambulatory period, 21days of -6 deg. head-down tilt bed rest (HDBR), and a 6-d recovery period. Diet was standardized and identical across phases. In the control (CON) campaign, subjects received no supplement or RVE. In the intervention campaigns, subjects received either RVE alone or combined with WP and KHCO3 (NEX). WP was applied in 3 doses per day of 0.6 g WP/kg BM together with 6 doses of 15 mmol KHCO3 per day. Eleven subjects completed the RVE and CON campaign, 8 subjects completed all three campaigns. On day 21 of HDBR excretion of the bone resorption marker C-telopeptide (CTX) was 80+/-28% (p<0.001) higher than baseline, serum calcium concentrations increased by 12 +/- 29% (p<0.001) and serum osteocalcin concentrations decreased by 6+/-12% (p=0.001). Urinary CTX excretion was 11+/- 25% (p=0.02) lower on day 21 of HDBR in the RVE- and tended to decrease by 3+/- 22% (p=0.06) in the NEX campaign compared to CON. Urinary calcium excretion was higher on day 21 in HDBR in the RVE and NEX (24+/- 43% p=0.01; 25+/- 37% p=0.03) compared to the CON campaign. We conclude that combination of RVE with WP/KHCO3 was not

  9. Effects of Three-Day Bed Rest on Physiological Responses to Graded Exercise in Endurance Athletes, Body Builders and Sedentary Men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smorawinski, J.; Nazar, K.; Kaciuza-Uscilko, H.; Kaminska, E.; Cybulski, G.; Kodrzycka, A.; Bice, B.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Sun, Sid (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    To test the hypotheses that short-term bed rest (BR) deconditioning influences metabolic, cardiorespiratory and neurohormonal responses to exercise and that these effects depend on the subjects' training status 12 sedentary men, and 10 endurance- and 10 strength-trained athletes were submitted to three-day BR. Before and after BR they performed incremental exercise test until volitional exhaustion. Respiratory gas exchange and HR were recorded continuously and stroke volume (SV) was measured at submaximal loads. Blood was taken for lactate [LA], adrenaline [A], noradrenaline, [NA], renting activity (PRA), growth hormone [hGH], testosterone and cortisol determination. Reduction of peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) after BR was greater in the endurance athletes (than in the remaining groups (17 % vs. 100%). Decrements in VO2peak correlated positively with the initial values (r = 0.73, p less than 0.001). Resting and exercise respiratory exchange ratios were increased in athletes. Cardiac output was unchanged by BR in all groups, but exercise HR was increased and SV diminished in the sedentary subjects. The submaximal [LA] and [LA] thresholds were decreased the in endurance athletes from 71 to 60 %VO2 peak (p less than 0.001); they also had an earlier increase in [NA], and an attenuated increase in [hGH), and accentuated PRA and cortisol elevations during exercise. These effects were insignificant in the remaining subjects. In conclusion: reduction of exercise performance and modifications in neurohormonal response to exercise after BR depend on the previous level and mode of physical training, being the most pronounced in the endurance athletes.

  10. Effects of Three-Day Bed Rest on Physiological Responses to Graded Exercise in Endurance Athletes, Body Builders and Sedentary Men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smorawinski, J.; Nazar, K.; Kaciuza-Uscilko; Kaminska, E.; Kodrzycka, A.; Bicz, B.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    2001-01-01

    To test the hypotheses that short-term bed rest (BR) deconditioning influences metabolic, cardiorespiratory and neurohormonal responses to exercise and that these effects depend on the subjects' training status, 12 sedentary men, and 10 endurance- and 10 strength-trained athletes were submitted to three-day BR. Before and after BR they performed incremental exercise tests until volitional exhaustion. Respiratory gas exchange and HR were recorded continuously and stroke volume (SV) was measured at submaximal loads. Blood was taken for lactate [LA], adrenaline [A], noradrenaline [NA], renin activity (PRA), growth hormone [hGH], testosterone and cortisol determination. Reduction of peak oxygen uptake (V02peak) after BR was greater in the endurance athletes than in the remaining groups (17 % vs. 10%). Decrements in VO2peak correlated positively with the initial values (r = 0.73, p is less than 0.001). Resting and exercise respiratory exchange ratios were increased in athletes. Cardiac output was unchanged by BR in all groups, but exercise HR was increased and SV diminished in the sedentary subjects. The submaximal [LA] and [LA] thresholds were decreased the in endurance athletes from 71 to 60% V02 peak (p is less than0.001), they also had an earlier increase in [NA], an attenuated increase in [hGH], and accentuated PRA and cortisol elevations during exercise. These effects were insignificant in the remaining subjects. In conclusion: reduction of exercise performance and modifications in neurohormonal response to exercise after BR depend on the previous level and mode of physical training, being the most pronounced in the endurance athletes.

  11. Unique Aeromagnetic-radar Ice-sounding Survey over the West Antarctic Ice Sheet Allows Three Dimensional Definition of Sources of Magnetic Anomalies Caused by Subglacial Volcanic Sources at the Bed of the Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, J. C.; Casertz; Soar Teams

    2011-12-01

    The West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) flows through the volcanically active West Antarctic Rift System (WARS). The aeromagnetic method has proven the most useful geophysical tool for studying subglacial volcanic rocks beneath the WAIS since early surveys in the 1950s. The Central West Antarctica (CWA) aerogeophysical survey covering ~354,000 km2 (about the area of Nevada and California combined) over the WAIS, consisting of a 5-km line-spaced, orthogonal set of aeromagnetic, radar ice-sounding and aerogravity measurements, is a unique Antarctic data set. This 1990-97 survey (CASERTZ and SOAR), still provides invaluable information on subglacial volcanic rocks, particularly when combined with widely spaced older aeromagnetic flight lines over a much greater area. These combined survey data indicate numerous high-amplitude (100->1000 nT), 5-50 km width, shallow-source, magnetic anomalies over a very extensive area (>1.2 x 106 km2) mostly resulting from subglacial volcanic eruptions. I interpreted the anomalies sampled in the CWA survey as defining ~1000 "volcanic centers" requiring high remanent normal magnetizations in the present field direction. About 400 of these anomaly sources (conservatively selected) are correlated with bed topography. The tops of >80% of these anomaly sources have <200 m relief at the bed of the WAIS. They appear modified by moving ice, requiring a younger age than the WAIS (~25 Ma). The 5 km by 5 km orthogonal flight line survey obviated aliasing of the magnetic and radar ice sounding data, because it is approximately equivalent to the flight elevation above the ice (1 km) surface plus the ice thickness (2-3 km); it reveals the magnetic anomalies and the tops of volcanic sources at its bed in three dimensions. Models (2 1/2 D) fit to a number of the magnetic anomalies, whose sources are at the bed of the ice sheet are constrained by topography measured by the radar ice sounding. Volcanoes in the WARS are <34 Ma, but at least four are active

  12. Effect of computerized cognitive training with virtual spatial navigation task during bed rest immobilization and recovery on vascular function: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Nandu; Kavcic, Voyko; Marusic, Uros; Simunic, Bostjan; Rössler, Andreas; Hinghofer-Szalkay, Helmut; Pisot, Rado

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of bed rest (BR) immobilization, with and without computerized cognitive training with virtual spatial navigation task (CCT), on vascular endothelium on older subjects. The effects of 14-day BR immobilization in healthy older males (n=16) of ages 53–65 years on endothelial function were studied using EndoPAT®, a noninvasive and user-independent method. From the group of 16 older men, 8 randomly received CCT during the BR, using virtual navigation tasks in a virtual environment with joystick device. In all the cases, EndoPAT assessments were done at pre- and post-BR immobilization as well as following 28 days of ambulatory recovery. The EndoPAT index increased from 1.53±0.09 (mean ± standard error of the mean) at baseline to 1.61±0.16 following immobilization (P=0.62) in the group with CCT. The EndoPAT index decreased from 2.06±0.13 (mean ± standard error of the mean) at baseline to 1.70±0.09 at the last day of BR study, day 14 (BR14) (P=0.09) in the control group. Additionally, there were no statistically significant differences between BR14 and at 28 days of follow-up (rehabilitation program) (R28). Our results show a trend of immobilization in older persons affecting the vasoconstrictory endothelial response. As the control subjects had a greater increase in EndoPAT index after R28 (+0.018) compared to subjects who had cognitive training (+0.11) (calculated from the first day of BR study), it is possible that cognitive training during BR does not improve endothelial function but rather contributes to slowing down the impairment of endothelial function. Finally, our results also show that EndoPAT may be a useful noninvasive tool to assess the vascular reactivity. PMID:25709419

  13. Greater loss in muscle mass and function but smaller metabolic alterations in older compared with younger men following 2 wk of bed rest and recovery.

    PubMed

    Pišot, Rado; Marusic, Uros; Biolo, Gianni; Mazzucco, Sara; Lazzer, Stefano; Grassi, Bruno; Reggiani, Carlo; Toniolo, Luana; di Prampero, Pietro Enrico; Passaro, Angelina; Narici, Marco; Mohammed, Shahid; Rittweger, Joern; Gasparini, Mladen; Gabrijelčič Blenkuš, Mojca; Šimunič, Boštjan

    2016-04-15

    This investigation aimed to compare the response of young and older adult men to bed rest (BR) and subsequent rehabilitation (R). Sixteen older (OM, age 55-65 yr) and seven young (YM, age 18-30 yr) men were exposed to a 14-day period of BR followed by 14 days of R. Quadriceps muscle volume (QVOL), force (QF), and explosive power (QP) of leg extensors; single-fiber isometric force (Fo); peak aerobic power (V̇o2peak); gait stride length; and three metabolic parameters, Matsuda index of insulin sensitivity, postprandial lipid curve, and homocysteine plasma level, were measured before and after BR and after R. Following BR, QVOL was smaller in OM (-8.3%) than in YM (-5.7%,P= 0.031); QF (-13.2%,P= 0.001), QP (-12.3%,P= 0.001), and gait stride length (-9.9%,P= 0.002) were smaller only in OM. Fo was significantly smaller in both YM (-32.0%) and OM (-16.4%) without significant differences between groups. V̇o2peakdecreased more in OM (-15.3%) than in YM (-7.6%,P< 0.001). Instead, the Matsuda index fell to a greater extent in YM than in OM (-46.0% vs. -19.8%, respectively,P= 0.003), whereas increases in postprandial lipid curve (+47.2%,P= 0.013) and homocysteine concentration (+26.3%,P= 0.027) were observed only in YM. Importantly, after R, the recovery of several parameters, among them QVOL, QP, and V̇o2peak, was not complete in OM, whereas Fo did not recover in either age group. The results show that the effect of inactivity on muscle mass and function is greater in OM, whereas metabolic alterations are greater in YM. Furthermore, these findings show that the recovery of preinactivity conditions is slower in OM. PMID:26823343

  14. Resistance training and timed essential amino acids protect against the loss of muscle mass and strength during 28 days of bed rest and energy deficit

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Naomi; Cloutier, Gregory J.; Cadena, Samuel M.; Layne, Jennifer E.; Nelsen, Carol A.; Freed, Alicia M.; Roubenoff, Ronenn; Castaneda-Sceppa, Carmen

    2008-01-01

    Spaceflight and bed rest (BR) result in losses of muscle mass and strength. Resistance training (RT) and amino acid (AA) supplementation are potential countermeasures to minimize these losses. However, it is unknown if timing of supplementation with exercise can optimize benefits, particularly with energy deficit. We examined the effect of these countermeasures on body composition, strength, and insulin levels in 31 men (ages 31–55 yr) during BR (28 days) followed by active recovery (14 days). Subjects were randomly assigned to essential AA supplementation (AA group, n = 7); RT with AA given 3 h after training (RT group, n = 12); or RT with AA given 5 min before training (AART group, n = 12). Energy intake was reduced by 8 ± 6%. Midthigh muscle area declined with BR for the AA > RT > AART groups: −11%, −3%, −4% (P = 0.05). Similarly, greatest losses in lower body muscle strength were seen in the AA group (−22%). These were attenuated in the exercising groups [RT (−8%) and AART (−6%; P < 0.05)]. Fat mass and midthigh intramuscular fat increased after BR in the AA group (+3% and +14%, respectively), and decreased in the RT (−5% and −4%) and AART groups (−1 and −5%; P = 0.05). Muscle mass and strength returned toward baseline after recovery, but the AA group showed the lowest regains. Combined resistance training with AA supplementation pre- or postexercise attenuated the losses in muscle mass and strength by approximately two-thirds compared with AA supplement alone during BR and energy deficit. These data support the efficacy of combined AA and RT as a countermeasure against muscle wasting due to low gravity. PMID:18483167

  15. Cardiovascular responses to lower body negative pressure before and after 4 h of head-down bed rest and seated control in men and women.

    PubMed

    Edgell, H; Grinberg, A; Gagné, N; Beavers, K R; Hughson, R L

    2012-11-01

    Cardiovascular deconditioning after a 4-h head-down bed rest (HDBR) might be a consequence of the time of day relative to pre-HDBR testing, or simply 4 h of confinement and inactivity rather than the posture change. Ten men and 11 women were studied during lower body negative pressure (LBNP) before and after 4-h HDBR and 4-h seated posture (SEAT) as a control for time of day and physical inactivity effects to test the hypotheses that cardiovascular deconditioning was a consequence of the HDBR posture, and that women would have a greater deconditioning response. Following HDBR, men and women had lower blood volume, higher heart rate with a greater increase during LBNP, a greater decrease of stroke volume during LBNP, lower central venous pressure, smaller inferior vena cava diameter, higher portal vein resistance index with a greater increase during LBNP, but lower forearm vascular resistance, lower norepinephrine, and lower renin. Women had lower vasopressin and men had higher vasopressin after HDBR, and women had lower pelvic impedance and men higher pelvic impedance. Following SEAT, brachial vascular resistance was reduced, thoracic impedance was elevated, the reduction of central venous pressure during LBNP was changed, women had higher angiotensin II whereas men had lower levels, and pelvic impedance increased in women and decreased in men. Cardiovascular deconditioning was greater after 4-h HDBR than after SEAT. Women and men had similar responses for most cardiovascular variables in the present study that tested the responses to LBNP after short-duration HDBR compared with a control condition. PMID:22984250

  16. Mapping by VESGEN of Blood Vessels in the Retinas of ISS Crew Members and Bed Rest Subjects for Increased Understanding of VIIP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons-Wingerter, P. A.; Vizzeri, G.; Tabbi, G.; Zanello, S. B.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.

    2014-01-01

    Research by NASA has established that significant risks for visual impairment in association with increased intracranial pressure (VIIP) are incurred by microgravity spaceflight, especially long-duration missions. Impairments include decreased near visual acuity, posterior globe flattening, choroidal folds, optic disc edema, and cotton wool spots. Much remains to be learned about the etiology of VIIP before effective countermeasures can be developed. Contributions of retinal vascular remodeling to the etiology of VIIP have not yet been investigated, primarily due to the current lack of ophthalmic tools for precisely measuring progressive pathophysiological remodeling of the retinal microvasculature. Although ophthalmic science and clinical practice are now highly sophisticated at detecting indirect, secondary signs of vascular remodeling such as cotton wool spots that arise during the progression of retinal vascular diseases, methods for quantifying direct, primary vascular changes are not yet established. To help develop insightful analysis of retinal vascular remodeling for aerospace medicine, we will map and quantify by our innovative VESsel GENeration Analysis (VESGEN) software the remodeling status of retinal blood vessels in crew members before and after ISS missions, and in healthy human subjects before and after head-down tilt bed rest. For this proof-of-concept study, we hypothesize that pathophysiological remodeling of retinal blood vessels occurs in coordination with microgravity-induced fluid shifts prior to development of visual impairments. VESGEN analysis in previous research supported by the US National Institutes of Health identified surprising new opportunities to regenerate retinal vessels during early-stage progression of the visually impairing, potentially blinding disease, diabetic retinopathy.

  17. Mapping Antarctic grounding lines from Cryosat-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wouters, B.; Bamber, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    The grounding zone (GZ) of the Antarctic ice sheet is a critical boundary for assessing the mass of ice leaving the continent and the stability (or lack thereof) of the inland, grounded ice sheet. It marks the transition between ice that can contribute to sea level and that which already has. Ice shelf basal melt rates are a maximum close the GZ and can have an important influence on inland flow. Changes in the position of the GZ for an ice stream resting on a bed with a retrograde slope (deepening inland) can provide an early warning of an instability in flow or state transition. Several methods exists to monitor the GZ, however, to date, there has been no method for routinely and regularly monitoring the GZ, nor any method that can be applied unambiguously across its entirety around Antarctica. The CryoSat-2 mission provides year-round coverage of the ice sheets, at a high spatial resolution. On the Antarctic ice shelves, the 369 day repeat period of the observations leads to aliasing of tidal motion induced by ocean tides, resulting in distinct patterns in the CryoSat-2 elevation measurements. Here, we focus on the Filchner-Ronne ice shelf to demonstrate the potential of the Cryosat-2 observations to map the GZ, and compare our results with existing GZ estimates.

  18. PlanHab: the combined and separate effects of 16 days of bed rest and normobaric hypoxic confinement on circulating lipids and indices of insulin sensitivity in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Elizabeth J; Debevec, Tadej; Eiken, Ola; Mekjavic, Igor; Macdonald, Ian A

    2016-04-15

    PlanHab is a planetary habitat simulation study. The atmosphere within future space habitats is anticipated to have reduced Po2, but information is scarce as to how physiological systems may respond to combined exposure to moderate hypoxia and reduced gravity. This study investigated, using a randomized-crossover design, how insulin sensitivity, glucose tolerance, and circulating lipids were affected by 16 days of horizontal bed rest in normobaric normoxia [NBR: FiO2 = 0.209; PiO2 = 133.1 (0.3) mmHg], horizontal bed rest in normobaric hypoxia [HBR: FiO2 = 0.141 (0.004); PiO2 = 90.0 (0.4) mmHg], and confinement in normobaric hypoxia combined with daily moderate intensity exercise (HAMB). A mixed-meal tolerance test, with arterialized-venous blood sampling, was performed in 11 healthy, nonobese men (25-45 yr) before (V1) and on the morning ofday 17of each intervention (V2). Postprandial glucose and c-peptide response were increased at V2 of both bed rest interventions (P< 0.05 in each case), with c-peptide:insulin ratio higher at V2 in HAMB and HBR, both in the fed and fasted state (P< 0.005 in each case). Fasting total cholesterol was reduced at V2 in HAMB [-0.47 (0.36) mmol/l;P< 0.005] and HBR [-0.55 (0.41) mmol/l;P< 0.005]. Fasting HDL was lower at V2 in all interventions, with the reduction observed in HBR [-0.30 (0.21) mmol/l] greater than that measured in HAMB [-0.13 (0.14) mmol/l;P< 0.005] and NBR [-0.17 (0.15) mmol/l;P< 0.05]. Hypoxia did not alter the adverse effects of bed rest on insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance but appeared to increase insulin clearance. The negative effect of bed rest on HDL was compounded in hypoxia, which may have implications for long-term health of those living in future space habitats. PMID:26769956

  19. Plasma volume and water/sodium balance differences due to sex and menstrual phase after 4 hours of head-down bed rest (HDBR).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgell, Heather; Grinberg, Anna; Beavers, Keith; Gagne, Nathalie; Totosy de Zepetnek, Julia; Greaves, Danielle; Hughson, Richard L.

    In both sexes, orthostatic responses are impaired by spaceflight or head-down bed-rest (HDBR), with a greater impact in women. Decreased plasma volume (PV) could contribute to reductions in cardiac output and blood pressure upon an orthostatic challenge. We hypothesized that a greater decrease in PV in women might lead to poorer orthostatic responses. We further hypothesized that the responses in women would differ throughout the menstrual cycle. We studied the responses of men (n=6) and women (n= 6) to 4-hr HDBR and 4-hr seated control (SEAT). Furthermore, we studied women in both the follicular (Day 8-11) and luteal (Day 18-24) phases of menstruation in a repeated measures design. After 4-hr HDBR, PV decreased in men (-175.1 ± 56.8 mL; vs. SEAT: P=0.076) and in the follicular phase, but did not change in the luteal phase (Luteal: -55.0 ± 54.6 mL; Follicular: -226.4 ± 88.2 mL (Interaction effect: P=0.01)). After 4-hr HDBR, only men appear to exhibit increased urine volume (Men, difference from SEAT: +298.3 ± 105.5 mL; Luteal, difference from SEAT: +59.4 ± 34.3 mL; Follicular, difference from SEAT: +43.7 ± 190.0 mL; P=0.16). No changes in urinary sodium after 4-hr HDBR were observed in any group (Men, difference from SEAT: -16.5 ± 13.5 µmol; Luteal, difference from SEAT: -8.0 ± 8.8 µmol; Follicular, difference from SEAT: +28.2 ± 29.5 µmol; P=0.264). No changes in urinary osmolarity were observed after 4-hr HDBR in any group (Men, difference from SEAT: -38.8 ± 126.2 mmol/kg; Luteal, difference from SEAT: -85.1 ± 66.9 mmol/kg; Follicular, difference from SEAT: -99.1 ± 98.5 mmol/kg; P=0.906). The changes in plasma volume do not appear to be a result of urinary water and sodium loss. Perhaps actions of atrial natriuretic peptide, urodilatin, the RAAS pathway, and/or capillary filtration are involved. From these observed changes in plasma volume, we surmise that women in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle may exhibit lower cardiac output and thus

  20. Artificial gravity with ergometric exercise preserves the cardiac, but not cerebrovascular, functions during 4 days of head-down bed rest.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chang-Bin; Wang, Yong-Chun; Gao, Yuan; Geng, Jie; Wu, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Yu; Shi, Fei; Sun, Xi-Qing

    2011-12-01

    Cardiovascular and musculoskeletal deconditioning occurring in long-term spaceflight requires new strategies to counteract these adverse effects. We previously reported that a short-arm centrifuge produced artificial gravity (AG), together with ergometer, has an approving effect on promoting cardiovascular function. The current study sought to investigate whether the cardiac and cerebrovascular functions were maintained and improved using a strategy of AG combined with exercise training on cardiovascular function during 4-day head-down bed rest (HDBR). Twelve healthy male subjects were assigned to a control group (CONT, n=6) and an AG combined with ergometric exercise training group (CM, n=6). Simultaneously, cardiac pumping and systolic functions, cerebral blood flow were measured before, during, and after HDBR. The results showed that AG combined with ergometric exercise caused an increase trend of number of tolerance, however, there was no significant difference between the two groups. After 4-day HDBR in the CONT group, heart rate increased significantly (59±6 vs 66±7 beats/min), while stroke volume (98±12 vs 68±13 mL) and cardiac output (6±1 vs 4±1 L/min) decreased significantly (p<0.05). All subjects had similar drops on cerebral vascular function. Volume regulating hormone aldosterone increased in both groups (by 119.9% in CONT group and 112.8% in the CM group), but only in the CONT group there were a significant changes (p<0.05). Angiotensin II was significantly increased by 140.5% after 4-day HDBR in the CONT group (p<0.05), while no significant changes were observed in the CM group. These results indicated that artificial gravity with ergometric exercise successfully eliminated changes induced by simulated weightlessness in heart rate, volume regulating hormones, and cardiac pumping function and partially maintained cardiac systolic function. Hence, a daily 1h alternating +1.0 and +2.0 Gz with 40 W exercise training appear to be an effective

  1. Influence of Exercise on the Metabolic Profile Caused by 28 days of Bed Rest with Energy Deficit and Amino Acid Supplementation in Healthy Men

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Naomi E.; Cadena, Samuel M.; Cloutier, Gregory; Vega-López, Sonia; Roubenoff, Ronenn; Castaneda-Sceppa, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Objective Muscle loss and metabolic changes occur with disuse [i.e. bed rest (BR)]. We hypothesized that BR would lead to a metabolically unhealthy profile defined by: increased circulating tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, decreased circulating insulin-like-growth-factor (IGF)-1, decreased HDL-cholesterol, and decreased muscle density (MD; measured by mid-thigh computerized tomography). Methods We investigated the metabolic profile after 28 days of BR with 8±6% energy deficit in male individuals (30-55 years) randomized to resistance exercise with amino acid supplementation (RT, n=24) or amino acid supplementation alone (EAA, n=7). Upper and lower body exercises were performed in the horizontal position. Blood samples were taken at baseline, after 28 days of BR and 14 days of recovery. Results We found a shift toward a metabolically unfavourable profile after BR [compared to baseline (BLN)] in both groups as shown by decreased HDL-cholesterol levels (EAA: BLN: 39±4 vs. BR: 32±2 mg/dL, RT: BLN: 39±1 vs. BR: 32±1 mg/dL; p<0.001) and Low MD (EAA: BLN: 27±4 vs. BR: 22±3 cm2, RT: BLN: 28±2 vs. BR: 23±2 cm2; p<0.001). A healthier metabolic profile was maintained with exercise, including NormalMD (EAA: BLN: 124±6 vs. BR: 110±5 cm2, RT: BLN: 132±3 vs. BR: 131±4 cm2; p<0.001, time-by-group); although, exercise did not completely alleviate the unfavourable metabolic changes seen with BR. Interestingly, both groups had increased plasma IGF-1 levels (EAA: BLN:168±22 vs. BR 213±20 ng/mL, RT: BLN:180±10 vs. BR: 219±13 ng/mL; p<0.001) and neither group showed TNFα changes (p>0.05). Conclusions We conclude that RT can be incorporated to potentially offset the metabolic complications of BR. PMID:25317071

  2. Effect of 3-Day Bed Rest on the Basal Sympathetic Activity and Responsiveness of this System to Physiological Stimuli In Athletes and Sedentary Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smorawinski, Jerzy; Adrian, Jacek; Kaciuba-Uscilko, Hanna; Nazar, Krystyna; Greenleaf, John E.; Dalton, P. Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The aims of this study were: (1) to examine the effect of three days of bed rest (BR) on basal plasma epinephrine [E] and norepinephrine [NE] and the catecholamine responses to various physiological stimuli, and (2) to find out whether previous physical activity modifies effects of BR. In the first series, 29 young men (11 sedentary students, 8 endurance and 10 strength trained athletes) were submitted to oral glucose tolerance test in supine position and to active orthostatic test before and after 3 days of BR. Plasma [E] and [NE] were measured after overnight fast (basal condition), at 60, 120 and 180 min after glucose ingestion (70 a), and at the 8th min of unsupported standing. In the second series, other 22 subjects (12 sedentary students, 10 endurance and 10 strength trained athletes) were submitted to 2 min cold pressor test (CPT) and exercise. Plasma E and NE were determined in the supine position after overnight fast and at 60th and 120th s of hand cooling. Then, after breakfast followed by 2-3 hour sitting, the subjects performed cycle ergometer exercise with workload increasing until volitional exhaustion. Plasma [E] and [NE] were determined at the end of each load. Plasma catecholamines were determined made radioenzymatically. After BR, basal plasma [NE] was decreased in endurance and strength athletes (p<0.01) but not in sedentary subjects. In neither group BR affected the basal [E]. Responses of both catecholamines to glucose load were diminished after BR in all three groups (p<0.05) but the effect was most pronounced in the endurance athletes. All subjects tolerated well 8-min standing although their heart rate response was increased after BR. Plasma catecholamine responses standing were not significantly affected by BR in either group but the plasma [NE] and [E] during standing were lowered after BR in endurance athletes (p<0.01). BR did not affect blood pressure and catecholamine responses to CPT. The pre- and post-exercise plasma catecholamines

  3. [Contraction properties and musculo-tendinous stiffness of the human triceps surae muscle and their change as a result of a long-term bed-rest].

    PubMed

    Koriak, Iu A

    2012-01-01

    The effect of a 120-day 5 degree head-down tilt (HDT) bed rest on the mechanical properties and electromechanical delay (EMD) of the human triceps surae (TS) muscle was studied in four (mean age 31.5+/-1.7 yr) healthy young women subjects. The TS mechanical properties were evaluated based on the following indicators: maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), maximal strength (Po; frequency 150 Hz), peak twitch force (Poc), time-to-peak tension (TPT), half-relaxation time (1/2 RT) and tension development time to reach 25, 50, 75 and 90% of maximal tension. Force deficit (Pd) were estimated. In response to a light signal,the subject was supposed to make a voluntary foot flexion, with the instruction "to exert the fastest and greatest tension". EMD measurements were recorded from each subject during voluntary contraction. Surface electrodes sensed electromyographic (EMG) activity in the soleus muscle. A separate timer was used to determine total reaction time (TRT). Premotor time (PMT) was taken to be the time interval from the delivery of the signal to change in EMG. EMD was the time interval between the change in EMG and movement i.e. the time interval between EMG and the onset of muscle tension. After HDT Poe, MVC and Po decreased by 24.4, 36.1 and 11.5%, respectively, while Pd increased by 38.8%. TPT increased by 13.6%, while 1/2RT decreased by 19.2%. The rate of increase of voluntary contractions calculated according to a relative scale significantly increased, while the rate of development of electrically evoked contraction did not show any significant differences. The voluntary contraction EMD increased by 27.4%; PMT by 8.7%, and TRT by 13.6%. Thus, the mechanical changes suggest that weightlessness changes not only the peripheral processes associated with contractions but also the central and neural command. EMD is a simple and quick method for evaluation of muscle stiffness changes. Moreover, EMD can serve as an indicator of the functional condition of the

  4. Antarctic Entomology.

    PubMed

    Chown, Steven L; Convey, Peter

    2016-03-11

    The Antarctic region comprises the continent, the Maritime Antarctic, the sub-Antarctic islands, and the southern cold temperate islands. Continental Antarctica is devoid of insects, but elsewhere diversity varies from 2 to more than 200 species, of which flies and beetles constitute the majority. Much is known about the drivers of this diversity at local and regional scales; current climate and glacial history play important roles. Investigations of responses to low temperatures, dry conditions, and varying salinity have spanned the ecological to the genomic, revealing new insights into how insects respond to stressful conditions. Biological invasions are common across much of the region and are expected to increase as climates become warmer. The drivers of invasion are reasonably well understood, although less is known about the impacts of invasion. Antarctic entomology has advanced considerably over the past 50 years, but key areas, such as interspecific interactions, remain underexplored. PMID:26982437

  5. Antarctic meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, W. A.; Rancitelli, L. A.

    1982-04-01

    An abundance of meteorites has been discovered on two sites in the Antarctic which may assist in the study of the origins of meteorites and the history of the solar system. Characteristics particular to those meteorites discovered in this region are explained. These specimens, being well preserved due to the climate, have implications in the study of the cosmic ray flux through time, the meteoroid complex in space, and cosmic ray exposure ages. Implications for the study of the Antarctic, particularly the ice flow, are also discussed. Further discoveries of meteorites in this region are anticipated.

  6. Dynamic thinning of glaciers on the Southern Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wouters, B.; Martin-Español, A.; Helm, V.; Flament, T.; van Wessem, J. M.; Ligtenberg, S. R. M.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Bamber, J. L.

    2015-05-01

    Growing evidence has demonstrated the importance of ice shelf buttressing on the inland grounded ice, especially if it is resting on bedrock below sea level. Much of the Southern Antarctic Peninsula satisfies this condition and also possesses a bed slope that deepens inland. Such ice sheet geometry is potentially unstable. We use satellite altimetry and gravity observations to show that a major portion of the region has, since 2009, destabilized. Ice mass loss of the marine-terminating glaciers has rapidly accelerated from close to balance in the 2000s to a sustained rate of -56 ± 8 gigatons per year, constituting a major fraction of Antarctica’s contribution to rising sea level. The widespread, simultaneous nature of the acceleration, in the absence of a persistent atmospheric forcing, points to an oceanic driving mechanism.

  7. The safety band of Antarctic ice shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fürst, Johannes Jakob; Durand, Gaël; Gillet-Chaulet, Fabien; Tavard, Laure; Rankl, Melanie; Braun, Matthias; Gagliardini, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    The floating ice shelves along the seaboard of the Antarctic ice sheet restrain the outflow of upstream grounded ice. Removal of these ice shelves, as shown by past ice-shelf recession and break-up, accelerates the outflow, which adds to sea-level rise. A key question in predicting future outflow is to quantify the extent of calving that might precondition other dynamic consequences and lead to loss of ice-shelf restraint. Here we delineate frontal areas that we label as `passive shelf ice’ and that can be removed without major dynamic implications, with contrasting results across the continent. The ice shelves in the Amundsen and Bellingshausen seas have limited or almost no `passive’ portion, which implies that further retreat of current ice-shelf fronts will yield important dynamic consequences. This region is particularly vulnerable as ice shelves have been thinning at high rates for two decades and as upstream grounded ice rests on a backward sloping bed, a precondition to marine ice-sheet instability. In contrast to these ice shelves, Larsen C Ice Shelf, in the Weddell Sea, exhibits a large `passive’ frontal area, suggesting that the imminent calving of a vast tabular iceberg will be unlikely to instantly produce much dynamic change.

  8. Antarctic science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summerhayes, Colin

    Once upon a time, dinosaurs roamed Antarctica and swam in its seas. Since then, life evolved as the climate cooled into the ice ages. Life will no doubt continue to evolve there as the globe now warms. But nowadays, humans are having a profound and direct effect on life in Antarctica, the sub-Antarctic islands, and the surrounding Southern Ocean, which are being invaded by a wide range of alien species including microbes, algae, fungi, bryophytes, land plants, invertebrates, fish, birds, and mammals.

  9. Antarctic Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Andrew; Cockell, Charles S.; Convey, Peter; Detrich III, H. William; Fraser, Keiron P. P.; Johnston, Ian A.; Methe, Barbara A.; Murray, Alison E.; Peck, Lloyd S.; Römisch, Karin; Rogers, Alex D.

    2004-01-01

    With the development of genomic science and its battery of technologies, polar biology stands on the threshold of a revolution, one that will enable the investigation of important questions of unprecedented scope and with extraordinary depth and precision. The exotic organisms of polar ecosystems are ideal candidates for genomic analysis. Through such analyses, it will be possible to learn not only the novel features that enable polar organisms to survive, and indeed thrive, in their extreme environments, but also fundamental biological principles that are common to most, if not all, organisms. This article aims to review recent developments in Antarctic genomics and to demonstrate the global context of such studies. PMID:18629155

  10. Antarctic micrometeorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurat, G.; Koeberl, C.; Presper, T.; Brandstaetter, F.; Maurette, Michel

    1994-01-01

    Micrometeoroids in the size range 50-500 micron dominate the flux onto the Earth. Contrary to theoretical predictions, many of them survive atmospheric entry almost unchanged. Such micrometeorites can be collected from the Antarctic ice sheet where they account for a surprisingly large proportion of the total dust content of the ice. Early studies of this important class of extraterrestrial material have revealed that some Antarctic micrometeorites are similar to CM chondrites in chemical bulk composition and mineral composition, and a few seem to resemble CI chondrites. However, none of the micrometeorites investigated so far match CM or CI chondrites exactly, nor is there a match between average bulk micrometeorite composition and that of any other chondrite class. Also, the micrometeorite mineral chemistry is different from that of carbonaceous chondrites. Several elements are depleted in micrometeorites as compared to carbonaceous chondrites and some are enriched. The question arises whether these differences are pristine or if some of them are of secondary origin. On the basis of our data we will attempt to answer these questions, some of which have been addressed by us before.

  11. Effects of 5 days of head-down bed rest, with and without short-arm centrifugation as countermeasure, on cardiac function in males (BR-AG1 study).

    PubMed

    Caiani, E G; Massabuau, P; Weinert, L; Vaïda, P; Lang, R M

    2014-09-15

    This study examined cardiac remodeling and functional changes induced by 5 days of head-down (-6°) bed rest (HDBR) and the effectiveness of short-arm centrifugation (SAC) in preventing them in males. Twelve healthy men (mean age: 33 ± 7) were enrolled in a crossover design study (BR-AG1, European Space Agency), including one sedentary (CTRL) and two daily SAC countermeasures (SAC1, 30 min continuously; SAC2, 30 min intermittently) groups. Measurements included plasma and blood volume and left ventricular (LV) and atrial (LA) dimensions by transthoracic echocardiography (2- and 3-dimensional) and Doppler inflows. Results showed that 5 days of HDBR had a major impact on both the geometry and cardiac function in males. LV mass and volume decreased by 16 and 14%, respectively; LA volume was reduced by 36%; Doppler flow and tissue Doppler velocities were reduced during early filling by 18 and 12%, respectively; and aortic flow velocity time integral was decreased by 18% with a 3% shortening of LV ejection time. These modifications were presumably due to decreased physiological loading and dehydration, resulting in reduced plasma and blood volume. All these changes were fully reversed 3 days after termination of HDBR. Moreover, SAC was not able to counteract these changes, either when applied continuously or intermittently. PMID:25080927

  12. Antarctic contribution to global sea level in a high CO2 world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golledge, Nicholas R.; Levy, Richard H.; Naish, Timothy R.; McKay, Robert M.; Gasson, Edward G. W.; Kowalewski, Douglas E.; Fogwill, Christopher J.

    2016-04-01

    In 2014 atmospheric CO2 levels exceeded 400 ppm for the first time since the early Pliocene (3.5-5 Ma). Although the rise in global mean surface temperatures that will accompany continued increases in CO2 is hard to predict, proxy evidence from the early Pliocene suggest that these CO2 concentrations, together with higher-than-present summer insolation, were associated with circum-Antarctic seas 2-4° C warmer than present and air temperatures 6-10° C warmer. Large sectors of the present-day Antarctic ice sheet rest on bedrock below sea level, and as such these areas are more sensitive to environmental forcings than ice grounded above sea level because the geometry of their submarine beds allows for runaway retreat in response to relatively small initial perturbations (Thomas & Bentley, 1978; Mengel & Levermann, 2014). Here we present an ice-sheet model ensemble that explores the consequences of a range of air and ocean warming scenarios representative of a higher-than-present CO2 world. Using circum-Antarctic palaeoenvironmental proxy data to constrain the range of likely conditions adjacent to the continent we calculate probability densities of likely sea-level equivalent ice-sheet volume changes relative to present, together with their associated uncertainties, for a range of timeframes. We find that multi-metre sea-level contributions are likely within centuries, increasing to over ten metres within subsequent millennia. Our results are consistent with empirically-based sea-level reconstructions for the Pliocene, and in addition offer new insights into basin-specific responses within the Antarctic continent.

  13. Glacier mass loss. Dynamic thinning of glaciers on the Southern Antarctic Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Wouters, B; Martin-Español, A; Helm, V; Flament, T; van Wessem, J M; Ligtenberg, S R M; van den Broeke, M R; Bamber, J L

    2015-05-22

    Growing evidence has demonstrated the importance of ice shelf buttressing on the inland grounded ice, especially if it is resting on bedrock below sea level. Much of the Southern Antarctic Peninsula satisfies this condition and also possesses a bed slope that deepens inland. Such ice sheet geometry is potentially unstable. We use satellite altimetry and gravity observations to show that a major portion of the region has, since 2009, destabilized. Ice mass loss of the marine-terminating glaciers has rapidly accelerated from close to balance in the 2000s to a sustained rate of -56 ± 8 gigatons per year, constituting a major fraction of Antarctica's contribution to rising sea level. The widespread, simultaneous nature of the acceleration, in the absence of a persistent atmospheric forcing, points to an oceanic driving mechanism. PMID:25999505

  14. Isotonic And Isokinetic Exercise During Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Wade, C. E.; Bernauer, E. M.; Trowbridge, T. S.; Ertl, A. C.

    1993-01-01

    Brief, intense activity prevents deterioration of peak oxygen uptake, a measure of work capacity. Study intended to explore effectiveness of exercise in maintaining fitness during long missions in microgravity so crewmembers able to keep up arduous work of building and expanding Space Station. Showed that intermittent, intense exercise of short duration more effective than similar exercise at lower intensity for longer times measured in previous studies. Intense short-term exercise seems to maintain volumes of plasma and red blood cells at normal levels.

  15. Bed Rest and Orthostatic-Hypotensive Intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Suzanne M.

    2000-01-01

    Orthostatic tolerance may be defined as the ability of humans to maintain cerebral perfusion and consciousness upon movement from a supine or sitting position to the upright posture; for example, subjects can stand suddenly or be tilted to the head-up body position. Similar but not identical physiological responses can be induced by positive G(sub Z) (head to foot) acceleration or exposure to lower body negative pressure (LBNP). The objective is to suddenly shift blood to the lower body to determine how effectively cardiovascular and neural-hormonal compensatory responses react to maintain blood pressure. In the most precise method for measuring tolerance, individuals would be stressed until they faint (syncope). However, the potential consequences and discomforts of such a test usually prohibit such a procedure so that few investigators actually induce syncope. In a more common approach, subjects are exposed to a given level of stress, for example, head-up tilt for 15 min, and any increases in heart rate or decreases in blood pressure are interpreted as indicators of progress toward syncope. Presumably, the greater the perturbation of heart rate and blood pressure, the closer to "tolerance," i.e., point of unconsciousness. Another more appropriate approach is to induce a progressively increasing hypotensive stress until pre-determined physiological responses or pre-syncopal symptoms appear. The physiological criteria may include a sudden drop in systolic blood pressure (greater than 25 mm/min), a sudden drop in heart rate (greater than 15 beats/min), or a systolic blood pressure less than 70 mmHg. The most common pre-syncopal symptoms include lightheadedness, stomach awareness or distress, feelings of warmth, tingly skin, and light to profuse sweating. Usually a combination of physiological responses and symptoms occurs such that, on different days, the tolerance time to the same orthostatic protocol is reproducible for a given individual. The assumption is that by taking subjects to near fainting, one can determine their tolerance. This latter pre-syncopal approach is better for estimating orthostatic or hypotensive tolerance than the former measurement of heart rate and blood pressure responses to a given stress. There is considerable variability in individual responses to orthostasis. For example, some subjects are "heart-rate responders" and have a pronounced cardiovascular response similar to that when performing moderately hard aerobic exercise, whereas others may experience pre-syncopal symptoms with very little increase in heart rate. Some individuals have a slow, gradual fall in blood pressure to orthostasis, and others have little change in blood pressure until a sudden precipitous fall in pressure occurs just prior to fainting. With both tilt and LBNP tests there is a low correlation between heart-rate or blood-pressure responses to a sub-tolerance stress as a measure of pre-syncopal limited orthostatic-hypotensive tolerance.

  16. The Antarctic Ice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radok, Uwe

    1985-01-01

    The International Antarctic Glaciological Project has collected information on the East Antarctic ice sheet since 1969. Analysis of ice cores revealed climatic history, and radar soundings helped map bedrock of the continent. Computer models of the ice sheet and its changes over time will aid in predicting the future. (DH)

  17. The Antarctic Ozone Hole.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolarski, Richard S.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (1987) and the findings of the British Antarctic Survey (1985). Proposes two theories for the appearance of the hole in the ozone layer over Antarctica which appears each spring; air pollution and natural atmospheric shifts. Illustrates the mechanics of both. Supports worldwide chlorofluorocarbon…

  18. Antarctic Meteorology and Climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J. C.; Turner, J.

    1997-07-01

    This book is a comprehensive survey of the climatology and meteorology of Antarctica. The first section of the book reviews the methods by which we can observe the Antarctic atmosphere and presents a synthesis of climatological measurements. In the second section, the authors consider the processes that maintain the observed climate, from large-scale atmospheric circulation to small-scale processes. The final section reviews our current knowledge of the variability of Antarctic climate and the possible effects of "greenhouse" warming. The authors stress links among the Antarctic atmosphere, other elements of the Antarctic climate system (oceans, sea ice and ice sheets), and the global climate system. This volume will be of greatest interest to meteorologists and climatologists with a specialized interest in Antarctica, but it will also appeal to researchers in Antarctic glaciology, oceanography and biology. Graduates and undergraduates studying physical geography, and the earth, atmospheric and environmental sciences will find much useful background material in the book.

  19. Tectonic, Climatic, and Cryospheric Evolution of the Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-06-01

    For millennia, Antarctica has been a frozen continent, a land of ice and snow where complex life persists rather than thrives. But Antarctica has not always been this way. Millions of years ago the southern continent was teeming with life. Changing oceans and a plummeting atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration drove a dramatic evolution of the Antarctic continent. To provide a record of these ancient climatic shifts, the 2005-2006 SHALDRIL drilling program collected sediment cores from the bed of the iceberg-filled seas off the Antarctic Peninsula. In the AGU book Tectonic, Climatic, and Cryospheric Evolution of the Antarctic Peninsula, editors John B. Anderson and Julia S. Wellner draw on the findings garnered from SHALDRIL to explore the changing Antarctic Peninsula. In this interview, Eos talks to John B. Anderson.

  20. The Antarctic Submillimetre Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minier, V.; Olmi, L.; Durand, G.; Daddi, E.; Israel, F.; Kramer, C.; Lagage, P.-O.; de Petris, M.; Sabbatini, L.; Spinoglio, L.; Schneider, N.; Tothill, N.; Tremblin, P.; Valenziano, L.; Veyssière, C.

    This report aims to provide a summary of the status of our Antarctic Submillimetre Telescope (AST) project up to date. It is a very new project for Antarctic astronomy. Necessary prerequisites for a future deployment of a large size telescope infrastructure have been tested in years 2007 and 2008. The knowledge of the transmission, frost formation and temperature gradient were fundamental parameters before starting a feasibility study. The telescope specifications and requirements are currently discussed with the industrial partnership.

  1. Cardiovascular control in Antarctic fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egginton, Stuart; Campbell, Hamish; Davison, William

    2006-04-01

    The capacity for synthesis and plasma levels of stress hormones in species with a range of activity patterns suggest that depressed catecholamine synthesis is typical of notothenioid fishes regardless of life style, although they are able to release extensive stores under conditions of extreme trauma. Cortisol does not appear to be an important primary stress hormone in these species. In general, vascular reactivity shows a modest α and β adrenergic tonus, but with greater potency for cholinergic and serotonergic vasoconstrictor agonists, although a dominance of vasodilatation over vasoconstriction is observed in one species. Vasomotor control mechanisms appear to be primarily a consequence of evolutionary lineage rather than low environmental temperature, but the pattern may be modified according to functional demand. These and other data confirm the cardiovascular system is dominated by cholinergic control: the heart apparently lacks adrenergic innervation, but receives inhibitory parasympathetic input that regulates heart rate (HR) by setting a resting vagal tonus. Oxygen consumption (MO 2) determined at rest and varied via specific dynamic action, in intact fish and fish that had undergone bilateral sectioning of the vagus nerve, show that HR is a good predictor of MO 2, and that the major influence on HR is the degree of vagal tone—these fish work by removing the brake rather than applying the accelerator. However, whether these traits actually represent adaptation to the Antarctic environment or merely represent ancestral characteristics and their relative phylogenetic position is at present unclear.

  2. Sugars in Antarctic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbaro, Elena; Kirchgeorg, Torben; Zangrando, Roberta; Vecchiato, Marco; Piazza, Rossano; Barbante, Carlo; Gambaro, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    The processes and transformations occurring in the Antarctic aerosol during atmospheric transport were described using selected sugars as source tracers. Monosaccharides (arabinose, fructose, galactose, glucose, mannose, ribose, xylose), disaccharides (sucrose, lactose, maltose, lactulose), alcohol-sugars (erythritol, mannitol, ribitol, sorbitol, xylitol, maltitol, galactitol) and anhydrosugars (levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan) were measured in the Antarctic aerosol collected during four different sampling campaigns. For quantification, a sensitive high-pressure anion exchange chromatography was coupled with a single quadrupole mass spectrometer. The method was validated, showing good accuracy and low method quantification limits. This study describes the first determination of sugars in the Antarctic aerosol. The total mean concentration of sugars in the aerosol collected at the "Mario Zucchelli" coastal station was 140 pg m-3; as for the aerosol collected over the Antarctic plateau during two consecutive sampling campaigns, the concentration amounted to 440 and 438 pg m-3. The study of particle-size distribution allowed us to identify the natural emission from spores or from sea-spray as the main sources of sugars in the coastal area. The enrichment of sugars in the fine fraction of the aerosol collected on the Antarctic plateau is due to the degradation of particles during long-range atmospheric transport. The composition of sugars in the coarse fraction was also investigated in the aerosol collected during the oceanographic cruise.

  3. REST based mobile applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambow, Mark; Preuss, Thomas; Berdux, Jörg; Conrad, Marc

    2008-02-01

    Simplicity is the major advantage of REST based webservices. Whereas SOAP is widespread in complex, security sensitive business-to-business aplications, REST is widely used for mashups and end-user centric applicatons. In that context we give an overview of REST and compare it to SOAP. Furthermore we apply the GeoDrawing application as an example for REST based mobile applications and emphasize on pros and cons for the use of REST in mobile application scenarios.

  4. Rebound of Antarctic ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salby, Murry; Titova, Evgenia; Deschamps, Lilia

    2011-05-01

    Restrictions on CFCs have led to a gradual decline of Equivalent Effective Stratospheric Chlorine (EESC). A rebound of Antarctic ozone, however, has remained elusive, masked by large interannual changes that dominate its current evolution. A positive response of ozone is not expected to emerge for at least 1-2 decades, possibly not for half a century. We show that interannual changes of the Antarctic ozone hole are accounted for almost perfectly by changes in dynamical forcing of the stratosphere. The close relationship enables dynamically-induced changes of ozone to be removed, unmasking the climate signal associated with CFCs. The component independent of dynamically-induced changes exhibits a clear upward trend over the last decade - the first signature of a rebound in Antarctic ozone. It enables ozone to be tracked relative to CFCs and other changes of climate.

  5. Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, D.W.H.

    1987-01-01

    The Maritime and Continental Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems are considered in the context of environmental impacts - habitat destruction, alien introductions, and pollution. Four types of pollution are considered: nutrients, radionuclides, inert materials, and noxious chemicals. Their ability to recover from perturbation is discussed in the light of present scientific knowledge, and the methods used to control impacts are reviewed. It is concluded that techniques of waste disposal are still inadequate, adequate training in environmental and conservation principles for Antarctic personnel in many countries is lacking, and scientific investigations may be a much more serious threat than tourism to the integrity of these ecosystems. Some priorities crucial to future management are suggested.

  6. Bed bugs.

    PubMed

    Foulke, Galen T; Anderson, Bryan E

    2014-09-01

    The term bed bug is applied to 2 species of genus Cimex: lectularius describes the common or temperate bed bug, and hemipterus its tropical cousin. Cimex lectularius is aptly named; its genus and species derive from the Latin words for bug and bed, respectively. Though the tiny pest is receiving increased public attention and scrutiny, the bed bug is hardly a new problem. PMID:25577850

  7. Diagnosing Antarctic Fog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzara, M. A.

    2010-07-01

    Fog affects aviation and other logistical operations in the Antarctic; nevertheless limited studies have been conducted to understand fog behavior in this part of the world. A study has been conducted in the Ross Island region of Antarctica, the location of McMurdo Station and Scott Base - the main stations of the United States and New Zealand Antarctic programs, respectively. Using tools such as multi-channel satellites observations and supported by in situ radiosonde and ground-based automatic weather station observations, combined with back trajectory and mesoscale numerical models, discover that austral summer fog events are "advective" in temperament. The diagnosis finds a primary source region from the southeast over the Ross Ice Shelf (over 72% of the cases studied) while a minority of cases point toward a secondary fog source region to the north along the Scott Coast of the Ross Sea with influences from the East Antarctic Plateau. Part of this examination confirms existing anecdotes from forecasters and weather observers, while refuting others about fog and its behavior in this environment. This effort marks the beginning of our understanding of Antarctic fog behavior.

  8. Differences between Antarctic and non-Antarctic meteorites: An assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Koeberl, C. ); Cassidy, W.A. )

    1991-01-01

    The discovery of a statistically significant number of meteorites in Antarctica over the past 20 years has posed many questions. One of the most intriguing suggestions that came up during the study of the Antarctic samples was that there might be a difference between the parent populations of Antarctic and non-Antarctic samples was that there might be a difference between the parent populations of Antarctic and non-Antarctic meteorites. This interpretation was put forward after the detection of a significant difference in the abundances of volatile and mobile trace elements in H, L, and C chondrites and achondrites. Other major differences include the occurrence of previously rare or unknown meteorites, different meteorite-type frequencies, petrographic characteristics, oxygen isotopic compositions, and smaller average masses. Not all differences between the Antarctic and non-Antarctic meteorite populations can be explained by weathering, pairing, or different collection procedures. Variable trace element abundances and distinct differences in the thermal history and thermoluminescence characteristics have to be interpreted as being pre-terrestrial in origin. Such differences imply the existence of meteoroid streams, whose existence poses problems in the framework of our current knowledge of celestial mechanics. In this paper we summarize the contributions in this series and provide a review of the current state of the question for the reality and cause of differences between Antarctic and non-Antarctic meteorites.

  9. Viruses in Antarctic lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kepner, R. L. Jr; Wharton, R. A. Jr; Suttle, C. A.; Wharton RA, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Water samples collected from four perennially ice-covered Antarctic lakes during the austral summer of 1996-1997 contained high densities of extracellular viruses. Many of these viruses were found to be morphologically similar to double-stranded DNA viruses that are known to infect algae and protozoa. These constitute the first observations of viruses in perennially ice-covered polar lakes. The abundance of planktonic viruses and data suggesting substantial production potential (relative to bacteria] secondary and photosynthetic primary production) indicate that viral lysis may be a major factor in the regulation of microbial populations in these extreme environments. Furthermore, we suggest that Antarctic lakes may be a reservoir of previously undescribed viruses that possess novel biological and biochemical characteristics.

  10. Antarctic Meteorite Newsletter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, Marilyn

    2000-01-01

    This newsletter contains something for everyone! It lists classifications of about 440 meteorites mostly from the 1997 and 1998 ANSMET (Antarctic Search for Meteorites) seasons. It also gives descriptions of about 45 meteorites of special petrologic type. These include 1 iron, 17 chondrites (7 CC, 1 EC, 9 OC) and 27 achondrites (25 HED, UR). Most notable are an acapoloite (GRA98028) and an olivine diogenite (GRA98108).

  11. Antarctic Photochemistry: Uncertainty Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Richard W.; McConnell, Joseph R.

    1999-01-01

    Understanding the photochemistry of the Antarctic region is important for several reasons. Analysis of ice cores provides historical information on several species such as hydrogen peroxide and sulfur-bearing compounds. The former can potentially provide information on the history of oxidants in the troposphere and the latter may shed light on DMS-climate relationships. Extracting such information requires that we be able to model the photochemistry of the Antarctic troposphere and relate atmospheric concentrations to deposition rates and sequestration in the polar ice. This paper deals with one aspect of the uncertainty inherent in photochemical models of the high latitude troposphere: that arising from imprecision in the kinetic data used in the calculations. Such uncertainties in Antarctic models tend to be larger than those in models of mid to low latitude clean air. One reason is the lower temperatures which result in increased imprecision in kinetic data, assumed to be best characterized at 298K. Another is the inclusion of a DMS oxidation scheme in the present model. Many of the rates in this scheme are less precisely known than are rates in the standard chemistry used in many stratospheric and tropospheric models.

  12. Thermoluminescence and Antarctic meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sears, D. W. G.; Hasan, F. A.

    1986-01-01

    The level of natural thermoluminescence (TL) in meteorites is the result of competition between build-up, due to exposure to cosmic radiation, and thermal decay. Antarctic meteorites tend to have lower natural TL than non-Antarctic meteorites because of their generally larger terrestrial ages. However, since a few observed falls have low TL due to a recent heating event, such as passage within approximately 0.7 astronomical units of the Sun, this could also be the case for some Antarctic meteorites. Dose rate variations due to shielding, heating during atmospheric passage, and anomalous fading also cause natural TL variations, but the effects are either relatively small, occur infrequently, or can be experimentally circumvented. The TL sensitivity of meteorites reflects the abundance and nature of the feldspar. Thus intense shock, which destroys feldspar, causes the TL sensitivity to decrease by 1 to 2 orders of magnitude, while metamorphism, which generates feldspar through the devitrification of glass, causes TL sensitivity to increase by a factor of approximately 10000. The TL-metamorphism relationship is particularly strong for the lowest levels of metamorphism. The order-disorder transformation in feldspar also affect the TL emission characteristics and thus TL provides a means of paleothermometry.

  13. Rapid Thinning of an East Antarctic Outlet Glacier During Stable Holocene Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R. S.; Mackintosh, A. N.; Norton, K. P.; Golledge, N. R.; Fogwill, C. J.; Kubik, P.

    2014-12-01

    Ice-sheets that are grounded on overdeepened beds below sea-level are potentially vulnerable to collapse. Many outlets of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet that occupy reverse bed slopes are currently in negative mass balance. New ice-penetrating radar data reveal that large overdeepened basins and reverse bed slopes exist under parts of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet, raising concern for its future behaviour. Retreat of the Antarctic ice sheet from the Last Glacial Maximum to its present configuration provides an opportunity to assess ice-sheet response to climate forcing and ice-dynamic feedbacks. Here we report 44 new surface-exposure ages from an East Antarctic outlet glacier that thinned dramatically during the early/mid-Holocene at a rate comparable to modern rates of thinning at Pine Island Glacier. Rapid thinning was coeval with retreat of the grounding-line through an overdeepening on the inner continental-shelf, and the disintegration of a buttressing ice-shelf. We demonstrate that a similar magnitude and timing of ice-dynamic thinning also occurred on the West Antarctic and Peninsula ice-sheets, at a time of relative climatic and oceanic stability after grounding-lines had retreated to the inner continental-shelf. These results imply that significant ice-sheet thinning in the early/mid Holocene arose from topographic feedbacks rather than from significant environmental forcing.

  14. International Workshop on Antarctic Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annexstad, J. O.; Schultz, L.; Waenke, H.

    1986-01-01

    Topics addressed include: meteorite concentration mechanisms; meteorites and the Antarctic ice sheet; iron meteorites; iodine overabundance in meteorites; entrainment, transport, and concentration of meteorites in polar ice sheets; weathering of stony meteorites; cosmic ray records; radiocarbon dating; element distribution and noble gas isotopic abundances in lunar meteorites; thermoanalytical characterization; trace elements; thermoluminescence; parent sources; and meteorite ablation and fusion spherules in Antarctic ice.

  15. Geoethical Approach to Antarctic Subglacial Lakes Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talalay, Pavel; Markov, Alexey; Sysoev, Mikhail

    2014-05-01

    Antarctic ice sheet above subglacial lake. All equipment is got into working trim, the bottom hot-point is powered, and the sonde starts to melt down to the ice sheet bed. The personnel leave the site, and all further operations are going on in semi-automatic mode. The melted water does not recover from the hole and refreezes behind the sonde. Electric line for power supply and communication with down-hole sensors is released from the coil installed inside the sonde. Since the sonde enters into the subglacial lake, it samples the water and examines subglacial conditions. After sampling, the motor connected with coil is switched on, and the top hot-point is put into action. The sonde begins to recover itself to the surface by spooling the cable and melting overlying ice with the help of the upper hot-point. Since 8-9 months from starting, the sonde reaches the surface and waits the personnel for servicing and moving to the next site. The big advantage of the proposed technology is that subglacial lake would be measured and sampled while subglacial water is reliably isolated from surface environment.

  16. Longitudinal surface structures (flowstripes) on Antarctic glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasser, N. F.; Gudmundsson, G. H.

    2012-03-01

    Longitudinal surface structures ("flowstripes") are common on many glaciers but their origin and significance are poorly understood. In this paper we present observations of the development of these longitudinal structures from four different Antarctic glacier systems; the Lambert Glacier/Amery Ice Shelf area, the Taylor and Ferrar Glaciers in the Ross Sea sector, Crane and Jorum Glaciers (ice-shelf tributary glaciers) on the Antarctic Peninsula, and the onset zone of a tributary to the Recovery Glacier Ice Stream in the Filchner Ice Shelf area. Mapping from optical satellite images demonstrates that longitudinal surface structures develop in two main situations: (1) as relatively wide flow stripes within glacier flow units and (2) as relatively narrow flow stripes where there is convergent flow around nunataks or at glacier confluence zones. Our observations indicate that the confluence features are narrower, sharper, and more clearly defined features. They are characterised by linear troughs or depressions on the ice surface and are much more common than the former type. Longitudinal surface structures within glacier flow units have previously been explained as the surface expression of localised bed perturbations but a universal explanation for those forming at glacier confluences is lacking. Here we propose that these features are formed at zones of ice acceleration and extensional flow at glacier confluences. We provide a schematic model for the development of longitudinal surface structures based on extensional flow that can explain their ridge and trough morphology as well as their down-ice persistence.

  17. CHAMP Magnetic Anomalies of the Antarctic Crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyung Rae; Gaya-Pique, Luis R.; vonFrese, Ralph R. B.; Taylor, Patrick T.; Kim, Jeong Woo

    2003-01-01

    Regional magnetic signals of the crust are strongly masked by the core field and its secular variations components and hence difficult to isolate in the satellite measurements. In particular, the un-modeled effects of the strong auroral external fields and the complicated- behavior of the core field near the geomagnetic poles conspire to greatly reduce the crustal magnetic signal-to-noise ratio in the polar regions relative to the rest of the Earth. We can, however, use spectral correlation theory to filter the static lithospheric and core field components from the dynamic external field effects. To help isolate regional lithospheric from core field components, the correlations between CHAMP magnetic anomalies and the pseudo magnetic effects inferred from gravity-derived crustal thickness variations can also be exploited.. Employing these procedures, we processed the CHAMP magnetic observations for an improved magnetic anomaly map of the Antarctic crust. Relative to the much higher altitude Orsted and noisier Magsat observations, the CHAMP magnetic anomalies at 400 km altitude reveal new details on the effects of intracrustal magnetic features and crustal thickness variations of the Antarctic.

  18. Biodiversity and biogeography of Antarctic and sub-Antarctic mollusca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linse, Katrin; Griffiths, Huw J.; Barnes, David K. A.; Clarke, Andrew

    2006-04-01

    For many decades molluscan data have been critical to the establishment of the concept of a global-scale increase in species richness from the poles to the equator. Low polar diversity is key to this latitudinal cline in diversity. Here we investigate richness patterns in the two largest classes of molluscs at both local and regional scales throughout the Southern Ocean. We show that biodiversity is very patchy in the Southern Ocean (at the 1000-km scale) and test the validity of historical biogeographic sub-regions and provinces. We used multivariate analysis of biodiversity patterns at species, genus and family levels to define richness hotspots within the Southern Ocean and transition areas. This process identified the following distinct sub-regions in the Southern Ocean: Antarctic Peninsula, Weddell Sea, East Antarctic—Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctic—Enderby Land, East Antarctic—Wilkes Land, Ross Sea, and the independent Scotia arc and sub Antarctic islands. Patterns of endemism were very different between the bivalves and gastropods. On the basis of distributional ranges and radiation centres of evolutionarily successful families and genera we define three biogeographic provinces in the Southern Ocean: (1) the continental high Antarctic province excluding the Antarctic Peninsula, (2) the Scotia Sea province including the Antarctic Peninsula, and (3) the sub Antarctic province comprising the islands in the vicinity of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current.

  19. Gazetteer of the Antarctic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Board on Geographic Names; Defense Mapping Agency; U.S. Geological Survey; National Science Foundation

    1989-01-01

    This gazetteer lists antarctic names approved by the United States Board on Geographic Names and by the Secretary of the Interior. The Board is the interagency body created by law to standardize and promulgate geographic names for official purposes. As the official standard for names in Antarctica, the gazetteer assures accuracy and uniformity for the specialist and the general user alike. Unlike the last (1981) edition, now out of print, the book contains neither historical notes nor textual descriptions of features. The gazetteer contains names of features in Antarctica and the area extending northward to the Antarctic Convergence that have been approved by the Board as recently as mid-1989. It supersedes previous Board gazetteers for the area. For each geographic feature, the book contains the name, cross references if any, and latitude and longitude. Coverage corresponds to that of maps at the scale of 1:250,000 or larger for islands, coastal Antarctica, and mountains and ranges of the continent. Much of the interior of Antarctica, an ice plateau, has been mapped at a smaller scale and is nearly devoid of features and toponyms. All of the names are for natural features; scientific stations are not listed. For the names of submarine features, reference should be made to the Gazetteer of Undersea Features, U.S. Board on Geographic Names (1981).

  20. Revisiting Antarctic Ozone Depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grooß, Jens-Uwe; Tritscher, Ines; Müller, Rolf

    2015-04-01

    Antarctic ozone depletion is known for almost three decades and it has been well settled that it is caused by chlorine catalysed ozone depletion inside the polar vortex. However, there are still some details, which need to be clarified. In particular, there is a current debate on the relative importance of liquid aerosol and crystalline NAT and ice particles for chlorine activation. Particles have a threefold impact on polar chlorine chemistry, temporary removal of HNO3 from the gas-phase (uptake), permanent removal of HNO3 from the atmosphere (denitrification), and chlorine activation through heterogeneous reactions. We have performed simulations with the Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS) employing a recently developed algorithm for saturation-dependent NAT nucleation for the Antarctic winters 2011 and 2012. The simulation results are compared with different satellite observations. With the help of these simulations, we investigate the role of the different processes responsible for chlorine activation and ozone depletion. Especially the sensitivity with respect to the particle type has been investigated. If temperatures are artificially forced to only allow cold binary liquid aerosol, the simulation still shows significant chlorine activation and ozone depletion. The results of the 3-D Chemical Transport Model CLaMS simulations differ from purely Lagrangian longtime trajectory box model simulations which indicates the importance of mixing processes.

  1. Subglacial processes of an Antarctic palaeo-ice stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinardy, Benedict; Murray, Tavi; Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter; Hiemstra, John; Larter, Rob

    2010-05-01

    Break-up of ice shelves along the eastern coast of the Antarctic Peninsula in the last 10-20 years has given access to the seafloor and underlying sediments. To interpret varying bed conditions below ice grounded on the shelf NE of the Antarctic Peninsula during the last glacial period and during subsequent ice sheet retreat, multibeam bathymetric data, sub-bottom profiler (TOPAS/3.5 kHz) data and sediment cores were analysed. Highly attenuated bedforms at the surface of an acoustically transparent layer (ATL) were observed in several cross-shelf troughs indicating that the Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet was drained by ice streams flowing towards the shelf break. Micromorphological analysis of a soft and stiff diamict recovered in sediment cores from the troughs shows closely associated poly-deformational structures indicating a subglacial origin (tills). The ATL is most widespread and thickest on the outer shelf and is formed by saturated, low shear strength sedimentary units including sub-ice shelf diamictons and the soft till recovered in the cores from the troughs. A prominent reflector at the base of the ATL indicates the surface of a stiff till. Increased porewater pressure and saturation of the surface of the stiff till led to its mobilisation and deformation into a soft till layer facilitating rapid ice flow. Near to the crystalline to sedimentary substrate boundary on the inner shelf, localised areas of the sea floor without an ATL may indicate parts of the palaeo-ice sheet bed where stiff till was either not mobilized or mobilized only in a thin soft till layer (<0.4 m), and basal sliding occurred. The high spatial variability of basal processes between and within troughs is also indicated by patches of deforming sediment along with more stable areas of the bed, similar to the bed mosaic model of conditions observed under contemporary ice streams.

  2. RADARSAT: The Antarctic Mapping Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jezek, Kenneth C.; Lindstrom, E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The first Antarctic Imaging Campaign (AIC) occurred during the period September 9, 1997 through October 20, 1997. The AIC utilized the unique attributes of the Canadian RADARSAT-1 to acquire the first, high-resolution, synthetic aperture imagery covering the entire Antarctic Continent. Although the primary goal of the mission was the acquisition of image data, the nearly flawless execution of the mission enabled additional collections of exact repeat orbit data. These data, covering an extensive portion of the interior Antarctic, potentially are suitable for interferometric analysis of topography and surface velocity. This document summarizes the Project through completion with delivery of products to the NASA DAACs.

  3. Psychological factors in the antarctic.

    PubMed

    Rothblum, E D

    1990-05-01

    For the people who live and work in the Antarctic, isolation and extreme physical conditions cause considerable stress. This article reviews psychological research on Antarctic residents, focusing on factors related to the isolation (effective personnel selection, positive adjustment, conflict, and reintegration into the home environment) and factors related to the physical environment (the extreme cold, high altitude, increased radiation, sensory deprivation, and seasonal changes in activity level). Finally, Antarctic research has been applied to the study of future space travel and space station habitation. PMID:2189993

  4. Antarctic stratospheric ice crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, J. ); Toon, O.B.; Pueschel, R.F.; Snetsinger, K.G. ) Verma, S. )

    1989-11-30

    Ice crystals were replicated over the Palmer Peninsula at approximately 72{degree}S on six occasions during the 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. The sampling altitude was between 12.5 and 18.5 km (45-65 thousand ft pressure altitude) with the temperature between 190 and 201 K. The atmosphere was subsaturated with respect to ice in all cases. The collected crystals were predominantly solid and hollow columns. The largest crystals were sampled at lower altitudes where the potential temperature was below 400 K. While the crystals were larger than anticipated, their low concentration results in a total surface area that is less than one tenth of the total aerosol surface area. The large ice crystals may play an important role in the observed stratospheric dehydration processes through sedimentation. Evidence of scavenging of submicron particles further suggests that the ice crystals may be effective in the removal of stratospheric chemicals.

  5. Antarctic Meteorite Location Map Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutt, John (Editor); Fessler, Brian (Editor); Cassidy, William (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Antarctica has been a prolific source of meteorites since meteorite concentrations were discovered in 1969. The Antarctic Search For Meteorites (ANSMET) project has been active over much of the Trans-Antarctic Mountain Range. The first ANSMET expedition (a joint U.S.-Japanese effort) discovered what turned out to be a significant concentration of meteorites at the Allan Hills in Victoria Land. Later reconnaissance in this region resulted in the discovery of meteorite concentrations on icefields to the west of the Allan Hills, at Reckling Moraine, and Elephant Moraine. Antarctic meteorite location maps (reduced versions) of the Allan Hills main, near western, middle western, and far western icefields and the Elephant Moraine icefield are presented. Other Antarctic meteorite location maps for the specimens found by the ANSMET project are being prepared.

  6. Antarctic Crabs: Invasion or Endurance?

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Huw J.; Whittle, Rowan J.; Roberts, Stephen J.; Belchier, Mark; Linse, Katrin

    2013-01-01

    Recent scientific interest following the “discovery” of lithodid crabs around Antarctica has centred on a hypothesis that these crabs might be poised to invade the Antarctic shelf if the recent warming trend continues, potentially decimating its native fauna. This “invasion hypothesis” suggests that decapod crabs were driven out of Antarctica 40–15 million years ago and are only now returning as “warm” enough habitats become available. The hypothesis is based on a geographically and spatially poor fossil record of a different group of crabs (Brachyura), and examination of relatively few Recent lithodid samples from the Antarctic slope. In this paper, we examine the existing lithodid fossil record and present the distribution and biogeographic patterns derived from over 16,000 records of Recent Southern Hemisphere crabs and lobsters. Globally, the lithodid fossil record consists of only two known specimens, neither of which comes from the Antarctic. Recent records show that 22 species of crabs and lobsters have been reported from the Southern Ocean, with 12 species found south of 60°S. All are restricted to waters warmer than 0°C, with their Antarctic distribution limited to the areas of seafloor dominated by Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW). Currently, CDW extends further and shallower onto the West Antarctic shelf than the known distribution ranges of most lithodid species examined. Geological evidence suggests that West Antarctic shelf could have been available for colonisation during the last 9,000 years. Distribution patterns, species richness, and levels of endemism all suggest that, rather than becoming extinct and recently re-invading from outside Antarctica, the lithodid crabs have likely persisted, and even radiated, on or near to Antarctic slope. We conclude there is no evidence for a modern-day “crab invasion”. We recommend a repeated targeted lithodid sampling program along the West Antarctic shelf to fully test the validity of the

  7. The Antarctic Master Directory -- a resource for Antarctic Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharfen, G.; Bauer, R.

    2002-12-01

    Under the auspices of the Antarctic Treaty, a group of nations conducting Antarctic scientific research have created the Antarctic Master Directory (AMD), a resource for Antarctic scientists. The AMD is a Web-based, searchable directory containing data descriptions (metadata in the form of DIF entries) of Antarctic scientific data, and is a node of the International Directory Network/Global Change Master Directory (IDN/GCMD). The data descriptions in the AMD, essentially a data catalog of Antarctic scientific data, include information about what data were collected, where they were collected, when they were collected, who the scientists are, who the point of contact is, and information about the format of the data and what documentation and bibliographic information exists. As part of the AMD effort, the National Science Foundation Office of Polar Programs (OPP) funds the National Snow and Ice Data Center to operate the U.S. Antarctic Data Coordination Center (USADCC), the US focal point for the AMD. The USADCC assists PIs as they meet the requirements of the OPP "Guidelines and Award Conditions for Scientific Data", which identify the conditions for awards and responsibilities of PIs regarding the archival of data, and submission of metadata, resulting from their NSF OPP grants. The USADCC offers access to free, easy-to-use online tools that PIs can use to create the data descriptions that the NSF policy data requires. We provide advice to PIs on how to meet the data policy requirements, and can answer specific questions on related issues. Scientists can access data set descriptions submitted to the AMD, by thousands of scientists around the world, from the USADCC web pages.

  8. Antarctic moss stress assessment based on chlorophyll content and leaf density retrieved from imaging spectroscopy data.

    PubMed

    Malenovský, Zbyněk; Turnbull, Johanna D; Lucieer, Arko; Robinson, Sharon A

    2015-10-01

    The health of several East Antarctic moss-beds is declining as liquid water availability is reduced due to recent environmental changes. Consequently, a noninvasive and spatially explicit method is needed to assess the vigour of mosses spread throughout rocky Antarctic landscapes. Here, we explore the possibility of using near-distance imaging spectroscopy for spatial assessment of moss-bed health. Turf chlorophyll a and b, water content and leaf density were selected as quantitative stress indicators. Reflectance of three dominant Antarctic mosses Bryum pseudotriquetrum, Ceratodon purpureus and Schistidium antarctici was measured during a drought-stress and recovery laboratory experiment and also with an imaging spectrometer outdoors on water-deficient (stressed) and well-watered (unstressed) moss test sites. The stress-indicating moss traits were derived from visible and near infrared turf reflectance using a nonlinear support vector regression. Laboratory estimates of chlorophyll content and leaf density were achieved with the lowest systematic/unsystematic root mean square errors of 38.0/235.2 nmol g(-1) DW and 0.8/1.6 leaves mm(-1) , respectively. Subsequent combination of these indicators retrieved from field hyperspectral images produced small-scale maps indicating relative moss vigour. Once applied and validated on remotely sensed airborne spectral images, this methodology could provide quantitative maps suitable for long-term monitoring of Antarctic moss-bed health. PMID:26083501

  9. Antarctic Miocene Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashworth, A. C.; Lewis, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    Fossils from Antarctic Miocene terrestrial deposits, coupled with stratigraphic, geochemical and paleontological data from marine boreholes, provide new insights into the climatic history of the continent. During the Miocene, ice caps coalesced to form ice sheets and vegetated surfaces gave way to barren expanses. The cryospheric changes especially have global climatic implications. The fossil data consists of diatoms, pollen and spores, and macroscopic remains of plants, ostracods, insects, molluscs and a fish. Plant fossils include wood and leaves of Nothofagus (southern beech), seeds of several vascular plants, including Ranunculus (buttercup), Hippuris (mare's-tail) and Myriophyllum (watermilfoil), megaspores of Isoetes (quillwort), and moss species. The insect chitin consists of larval head capsules of Chironomidae (midges) and exoskeletal parts of Coleoptera (beetles). The molluscs include freshwater gastropods and bivalves. The majority of these taxa are likely descendants of taxa that had survived on the continent from the Paleogene or earlier. Even though early Miocene glaciations may have been large, the climate was never cold enough to cause the extinction of the biota, which probably survived in coastal refugia. Early Miocene (c. 20 Ma) macrofossils from the McMurdo Dry Valleys (77°S) support palynological interpretations from the Cape Roberts and ANDRILL marine records that the upland vegetation was a shrub tundra. Mean summer temperature (MST) in the uplands was c. 6°C and possibly higher at the coast. The climate was wet, supporting mires and lakes. By the mid-Miocene, even though the climate continued to be wet. MST was c. 4°C which was too cold to support Nothofagus and most vascular plant species. Stratigraphic evidence indicates that the time between the Early and Mid-Miocene was a time of repeated ice advances and retreats of small glaciers originating from ice caps. At c. 14 Ma there appears to have been a modal shift in climate to

  10. Bed Rest and Immobilization: Risk Factors for Bone Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pub. No. 16–7887 NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ~ National Resource Center 2 AMS Circle Bethesda, MD ... another language, contact the NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ~ National Resource Center at NIHBoneInfo@mail.nih.gov . ...

  11. Cortisol, insulin and leptin during space flight and bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.; Schluter, M. D.; Leskiw, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    Most ground based models for studying muscle atrophy and bone loss show reasonable fidelity to the space flight situation. However there are some differences. Investigation of the reasons for these differences can provide useful information about humans during space flight and aid in the refinement of ground based models. This report discusses three such differences, the relationships between: (i) cortisol and the protein loss, (ii) cortisol and ACTH and (iii) leptin, insulin and food intake.

  12. Changes in Body Inertia During Bed Rest Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, Beth A.

    1999-01-01

    Development of effective exercise countermeasures is crucial for long duration human space flight. To analyze the mechanical effects of a particular exercise on the musculoskeletal system, the inertial properties of segments of the body must be quantified. Since bone mineral density loss is related to the lack of mechanical stress and strain on the skeletal system, physical analysis can be very useful for countermeasure evaluation.

  13. Complications of immobilization and bed rest. Part 2: Other complications.

    PubMed Central

    Teasell, R.; Dittmer, D. K.

    1993-01-01

    Prolonged immobilization affects almost every organ system. Respiratory complications include decreased ventilation, atelectasis, and pneumonia. Decreased basal metabolic rate, increased diuresis, natriuresis, and nitrogen and calcium depletion affect metabolism. Genitourinary problems include renal stones and more frequent urinary tract infections. Glucose intolerance, anorexia, constipation, and pressure sores might develop. Central nervous system changes could affect balance and coordination and lead to increasing dependence on caregivers. Images Figure 1 PMID:8324412

  14. Recent bed rest results and countermeasure development at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Bedrest studies of normal subjects provide opportunities to understand physiologic responses to supine posture and inactivity. Furthermore, head-down tilt has been a valuable procedure to investigate adaptation to microgravity and development of countermeasures to maintain the health and well-being of humans during space-flight. Recent bedrest experiments at NASA have ranged in duration from a few hours to 17 weeks. Acute studies of 6 degrees head-down tilt indicate that elevation of capillary blood pressure from 28 to 34 mm Hg and increased capillary perfusion in tissues of the head cause facial and intracranial edema. Intracranial pressure increases from 2 to 17 mm Hg going from upright posture to 6 degrees head-down tilt. Microvessels of the head have a low capacity to constrict and diminish local perfusion. Elevation of blood and tissue fluid pressures/flow in the head may also explain the higher headward bone density associated with long-term head-down tilt. These mechanistic studies of head-down tilt, along with a better understanding of the relative stresses involved with upright posture and lower body negative pressure, have facilitated development of suitable physiologic countermeasures to maintain astronaut health during microgravity. Presently no exercise hardware is available to provide a blood pressure gradient from head to feet in space. However, recent studies in our laboratory suggest that treadmill exercise using a graded lower-body compression suit and 100 mmHg lower body negative pressure provides equivalent or greater physiologic stress than similar upright exercise on Earth. Therefore, exercise within a lower body negative pressure chamber may provide a cost-effective and simple countermeasure to maintain the cardiovascular and neuro-musculoskeletal systems of astronauts during long-duration flight.

  15. Environmental contamination in Antarctic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Bargagli, R

    2008-08-01

    Although the remote continent of Antarctica is perceived as the symbol of the last great wilderness, the human presence in the Southern Ocean and the continent began in the early 1900s for hunting, fishing and exploration, and many invasive plant and animal species have been deliberately introduced in several sub-Antarctic islands. Over the last 50 years, the development of research and tourism have locally affected terrestrial and marine coastal ecosystems through fuel combustion (for transportation and energy production), accidental oil spills, waste incineration and sewage. Although natural "barriers" such as oceanic and atmospheric circulation protect Antarctica from lower latitude water and air masses, available data on concentrations of metals, pesticides and other persistent pollutants in air, snow, mosses, lichens and marine organisms show that most persistent contaminants in the Antarctic environment are transported from other continents in the Southern Hemisphere. At present, levels of most contaminants in Antarctic organisms are lower than those in related species from other remote regions, except for the natural accumulation of Cd and Hg in several marine organisms and especially in albatrosses and petrels. The concentrations of organic pollutants in the eggs of an opportunistic top predator such as the south polar skua are close to those that may cause adverse health effects. Population growth and industrial development in several countries of the Southern Hemisphere are changing the global pattern of persistent anthropogenic contaminants and new classes of chemicals have already been detected in the Antarctic environment. Although the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty provides strict guidelines for the protection of the Antarctic environment and establishes obligations for all human activity in the continent and the Southern Ocean, global warming, population growth and industrial development in countries of the Southern

  16. Antarctic Meteorite Classification and Petrographic Database Enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, N. S.; Satterwhite, C. E.; Righter, K.

    2012-03-01

    Describes the Antarctic Meteorite Classification Database and the latest enhancements made to the data acquisition process used to provide updated meteorite data concurrent with the publication of the Antarctic Meteorite Newsletter twice a year.

  17. Bed Bugs FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tropical Diseases Laboratory Diagnostic Assistance [DPDx] Parasites Home Bed Bugs FAQs Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... are bed bugs treated and prevented? What are bed bugs? Bed bugs ( Cimex lectularius ) are small, flat, parasitic ...

  18. Antarctic Peninsula and Weddell Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Numerous icebergs are breaking out of the sea ice in the Southern Ocean surrounding the Antarctic Peninsula. This true-color MODIS image from November 13, 2001, shows several icebergs drifting out of the Weddell Sea. The Antarctic Peninsula (left) reaches out into the Drake Passage, which separates the southern tip of South America from Antarctica. Warmer temperatures have cleared a tiny patch of bare ground at the Peninsula's tip. The predominant ocean current in the area is the Antarctic Circumpolar Current ('circum' meaning 'around'), which is also the 'West Wind Drift.' The current is the largest permanent current in the world, and water is moved eastward by westerly winds. Icebergs leaving the Weddell Sea are likely to be moved north and east by the current. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  19. Multidecadal warming of Antarctic waters.

    PubMed

    Schmidtko, Sunke; Heywood, Karen J; Thompson, Andrew F; Aoki, Shigeru

    2014-12-01

    Decadal trends in the properties of seawater adjacent to Antarctica are poorly known, and the mechanisms responsible for such changes are uncertain. Antarctic ice sheet mass loss is largely driven by ice shelf basal melt, which is influenced by ocean-ice interactions and has been correlated with Antarctic Continental Shelf Bottom Water (ASBW) temperature. We document the spatial distribution of long-term large-scale trends in temperature, salinity, and core depth over the Antarctic continental shelf and slope. Warming at the seabed in the Bellingshausen and Amundsen seas is linked to increased heat content and to a shoaling of the mid-depth temperature maximum over the continental slope, allowing warmer, saltier water greater access to the shelf in recent years. Regions of ASBW warming are those exhibiting increased ice shelf melt. PMID:25477461

  20. Antarctic analogs for Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, A. E.; Andersen, D. T.; McKay, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    Enceladus is a new world for Astrobiology. The Cassini discovery of the icy plume emanating from the South Polar region indicates an active world, where detection of water, organics, sodium, and nano-particle silica in the plume strongly suggests that the source is a subsurface salty ocean reservoir. Recent gravity data from Cassini confirms the presence of a regional sea extending north to 50°S. An ocean habitat under a thick ice cover is perhaps a recurring theme in the Outer Solar System, but what makes Enceladus unique is that the plume jetting out into space is carrying samples of this ocean. Therefore, through the study of Enceladus' plumes we can gain new insights not only of a possible habitable world in the Solar Systems, but also about the formation and evolution of other icy-satellites. Cassini has been able to fly through this plume - effectively sampling the ocean. It is time to plan for future missions that do more detailed analyses, possibly return samples back to Earth and search for evidence of life. To help prepare for such missions, the need for earth-based analog environments is essential for logistical, methodological (life detection) and theoretical development. We have undertaken studies of two terrestrial environments that are close analogs to Enceladus' ocean: Lake Vida and Lake Untersee - two ice-sealed Antarctic lakes that represent physical, chemical and possibly biological analogs for Enceladus. By studying the diverse biology and physical and chemical constraints to life in these two unique lakes we will begin to understand the potential habitability of Enceladus and other icy moons, including possible sources of nutrients and energy, which together with liquid water are the key ingredients for life. Analog research such as this will also enable us to develop and test new strategies to search for evidence of life on Enceladus.

  1. Antarctic Ozone Hole, 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Each spring the ozone layer over Antarctica nearly disappears, forming a 'hole' over the entire continent. The hole is created by the interaction of some man-made chemicals-freon, for example-with Antarctica's unique weather patterns and extremely cold temperatures. Ozone in the stratosphere absorbs ultraviolet radiation from the sun, thereby protecting living things. Since the ozone hole was discovered many of the chemicals that destroy ozone have been banned, but they will remain in the atmosphere for decades. In 2000, the ozone hole grew quicker than usual and exceptionally large. By the first week in September the hole was the largest ever-11.4 million square miles. The top image shows the average total column ozone values over Antarctica for September 2000. (Total column ozone is the amount of ozone from the ground to the top of the atmosphere. A relatively typical measurement of 300 Dobson Units is equivalent to a layer of ozone 0.12 inches thick on the Earth's surface. Levels below 220 Dobson Units are considered to be significant ozone depletion.) The record-breaking hole is likely the result of lower than average ozone levels during the Antarctic fall and winter, and exceptionally cold temperatures. In October, however (bottom image), the hole shrank dramatically, much more quickly than usual. By the end of October, the hole was only one-third of it's previous size. In a typical year, the ozone hole does not collapse until the end of November. NASA scientists were surprised by this early shrinking and speculate it is related to the region's weather. Global ozone levels are measured by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS). For more information about ozone, read the Earth Observatory's ozone fact sheet, view global ozone data and see these ozone images. Images by Greg Shirah, NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio.

  2. Latest Word on Retreat of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bindschadler, R.

    2000-01-01

    The West Antarctic ice sheet during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is estimated to have been three times its present volume and to have extended close to the edge of the continental shelf Holocene retreat of this ice sheet in the Ross Sea began between 11,000 and 12,000 years ago. This history implies an average contribution of this ice sheet to sea level of 0.9 mm/a. Evidence of dateable past grounding line positions in the Ross sector are broadly consistent with a linear retreat model. However, inferred rates of retreat for some of these grounding line positions are