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Sample records for antenna array synthesis

  1. Synthesis of Volumetric Ring Antenna Array for Terrestrial Coverage Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Reyna, Alberto; Panduro, Marco A.; Del Rio Bocio, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a synthesis of a volumetric ring antenna array for a terrestrial coverage pattern. This synthesis regards the spacing among the rings on the planes X-Y, the positions of the rings on the plane X-Z, and uniform and concentric excitations. The optimization is carried out by implementing the particle swarm optimization. The synthesis is compared with previous designs by resulting with proper performance of this geometry to provide an accurate coverage to be applied in satellite applications with a maximum reduction of the antenna hardware as well as the side lobe level reduction. PMID:24701150

  2. Feasibility study of a synthesis procedure for array feeds to improve radiation performance of large distorted reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutzman, W. L.; Takamizawa, K.; Werntz, P.; Lapean, J.; Barts, R.; Shen, B.

    1992-01-01

    Virginia Tech has several articles which support the NASA Langley effort in the area of large aperture radiometric antenna systems. This semi-annual report reports on the following activities: a feasibility study of a synthesis procedure for array feeds to improve radiation performance of large distorted reflector antennas and the design of array feeds for large reflector antennas.

  3. A method for synthesis of small arrays of printed dipole antennas backed by a ground plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovic, Branko D.

    1987-11-01

    A method is proposed for synthesis of antenna arrays consisting of narrow strip-dipole antennas printed on a thin dielectric substrate. Approximately antiresonant dipoles (i.e., dipoles about one wavelength long) are considered, because by moderate variation of their width and length their impedance can be varied in a wide range. A method for analysis of such arrays is described first, in which the printed strip dipoles are replaced by approximately equivalent circular-cylindrical dipoles with coaxial magnetic coating, using recently proposed generalization of equivalent radius of thin cylindrical antennas. An interactive optimization procedure is next applied for synthesis, which enables arrays to be obtained having array radiation pattern and, particularly, dipole impedances close to the desired.

  4. Feasibility study of a synthesis procedure for array feeds to improve radiation performance of large distorted reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutzman, W. L.; Takamizawa, K.; Werntz, P.; Lapean, J.; Barts, R.

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: General Reflector Antenna Systems Program version 7(GRASP7); Multiple Reflector Analysis Program for Cylindrical Antennas (MRAPCA); Tri-Reflector 2D Synthesis Code (TRTDS); a geometrical optics and a physical optics synthesis techniques; beam scanning reflector, the type 2 and 6 reflectors, spherical reflector, and multiple reflector imaging systems; and radiometric array design.

  5. Design and synthesis of flexible switching 1 × 2 antenna array on Kapton substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georges Rabobason, Yvon; Rigas, Grigorios; Swaisaenyakorn, Srijittar; Mirkhaydarov, Bobur; Ravelo, Blaise; Shkunov, Maxim; Young, Paul; Benjelloun, Nabil

    2016-06-01

    Flexible front- and back-end RF/analogue system antennas were recently emerged. However, little flexible antenna system design is available so far, in planar hybrid technology with surface mounted components. This paper describes the design feasibility of flexible switching 1 × 2 antenna array system. It acts as a switching antenna implemented in hexapole configuration. The system is comprised of a key element RF switch terminated by two identical patch antennas associated to half-wave elementary transmission lines (TLs). A detailed theory illustrating the global S-parameter model determination in function of the given RF-switch return and insertion losses is established. In difference to the conventional microwave circuit theory, the proposed equivalent S-parameter model is originally built with the non-standard optimized antenna load. Thus, the synthesis method of the terminal antenna input impedance and the output access line characteristic impedance is formulated in function of the specified return and optimal transmission losses. The design method and theoretical approach feasibility is verified with the demonstrator of flexible switching 1 × 2 antenna array printed on Kapton substrate. The circuit prototype is implemented in hybrid planar technology integrating patch antenna operating at about 6 GHz and a packaged GaAs RF switch associated to the RF/DC signal decoupling accessory mounted surface components. Simulations of the designed circuit transmission and isolation losses from 5.5 GHz to 7 GHz were carried out by using the commercial RF switch S-parameter touchstone model provided by the manufacturer. The simulated and measured return losses are compared and discussed. Then, the measured radiation patterns confirm the proposed switched antenna concept feasibility.

  6. Feasibility study of a synthesis procedure for array feeds to improve radiation performance of large distorted reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutzman, W. L.; Takamizawa, K.; Werntz, P.; Lapean, J.; Barts, R.; Shen, B.

    1991-01-01

    Virginia Tech is involved in a number of activities with NASA Langley related to large aperture radiometric antenna systems. These efforts are summarized and the focus of this report is on the feasibility study of a synthesis procedure for array feeds to improve radiation performance of large distorted reflector antennas; however, some results for all activities are reported.

  7. Phased array antenna control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doland, G. D. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Several new and useful improvements in steering and control of phased array antennas having a small number of elements, typically on the order of 5 to 17 elements are provided. Among the improvements are increasing the number of beam steering positions, reducing the possibility of phase transients in signals received or transmitted with the antennas, and increasing control and testing capacity with respect to the antennas.

  8. Coaxial phased array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, H., Jr.

    1980-08-01

    A coaxial antenna array for communicating circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation is disclosed. A pair of open ended antenna cavities is coaxially constructed and operates by excitation of linear radiation elements arranged within each of the cavities. A pair of crossed dipole radiation devices is centered within the inner cavity and operated by means of a phase shifting network circuit to transmit as well as receive circularly polarized radiation. Four monopole radiation devices are symmetrically arranged to operate in the outer cavity in phase quadrature by means of the phase shifting network circuit to both transmit and receive circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation. Combined operation of the two antenna cavities with a 180 deg phase differential between the fields related to the two antenna cavities provides a broad beam, relatively wide frequency bandwidth communication capability. Particular embodiments disclosed feature a generally square cavity array as well as a circular cavity array.

  9. Coaxial phased array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, H., Jr. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A coaxial antenna array for communicating circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation is disclosed. A pair of open ended antenna cavities is coaxially constructed and operates by excitation of linear radiation elements arranged within each of the cavities. A pair of crossed dipole radiation devices is centered within the inner cavity and operated by means of a phase shifting network circuit to transmit as well as receive circularly polarized radiation. Four monopole radiation devices are symmetrically arranged to operate in the outer cavity in phase quadrature by means of the phase shifting network circuit to both transmit and receive circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation. Combined operation of the two antenna cavities with a 180 deg phase differential between the fields related to the two antenna cavities provides a broad beam, relatively wide frequency bandwidth communication capability. Particular embodiments disclosed feature a generally square cavity array as well as a circular cavity array.

  10. Imaging antenna arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, D. B.; Muha, M. S.

    1982-01-01

    Many millimeter and far-infrared imaging systems are limited in sensitivity and speed because they depend on a single scanned element. Because of recent advances in planar detectors such as Schottky diodes, superconducting tunnel junctions, and microbolometers, an attractive approach to this problem is a planar antenna array with integrated detectors. A planar line antenna array and optical system for imaging has been developed. The significant advances are a 'reverse-microscope' optical configuration and a modified bow-tie antenna design. In the 'reverse-microscope' configuration, a lens is attached to the bottom of the substrate containing the antennas. Imaging is done through the substrate. This configuration eliminates the troublesome effects of substrate surface waves. The substrate lens has only a single refracting surface, making possible a virtually aplanatic system, with little spherical aberration or coma. The array is characterized by an optical transfer function that is easily measured. An array with 19 dB crosstalk levels between adjacent antennas has been tested and it was found that the array captured 50 percent of the available power. This imaging system was diffraction limited.

  11. Contoured-beam synthesis for array-fed reflector antennas by field correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, T. S.

    1982-12-01

    A method is described for calculating the feed excitations of an array-fed reflector antenna for the production of a desired contoured beam. It is based on field correlation at the nearest reflector between the surface currents from selected stations in the field of view and the field radiated by the array. Mode coupling in the array is included in the formulation. The feed excitation is derived by satisfying constraints on the envelope of the copolar and crosspolar correlation functions through a minimax optimization. Some preliminary results are presented for a simple contoured beam, which is realized using an open Cassegrain antenna and a 19-element circular-waveguide feed cluster.

  12. Antenna array research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, C.

    1973-01-01

    Antenna array research on electromagnetic field problems in inhomogeneous media is presented along with characteristics of the Eaton lens. Comparisons are given of the radiation pattern and directivity of small Luneburg lens with a homogeneous lens. References and figure captions on radiation patterns are included.

  13. Electronic switching spherical array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockton, R.

    1978-01-01

    This work was conducted to demonstrate the performance levels attainable with an ESSA (Electronic Switching Spherical Array) antenna by designing and testing an engineering model. The antenna was designed to satisfy general spacecraft environmental requirements and built to provide electronically commandable beam pointing capability throughout a hemisphere. Constant gain and beam shape throughout large volumetric coverage regions are the principle characteristics. The model is intended to be a prototype of a standard communications and data handling antenna for user scientific spacecraft with the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). Some additional testing was conducted to determine the feasibility of an integrated TDRSS and GPS (Global Positioning System) antenna system.

  14. JPL Large Advanced Antenna Station Array Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    In accordance with study requirements, two antennas are described: a 30 meter standard antenna and a 34 meter modified antenna, along with a candidate array configuration for each. Modified antenna trade analyses are summarized, risks analyzed, costs presented, and a final antenna array configuration recommendation made.

  15. View north of the antenna array, note the communications antenna ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View north of the antenna array, note the communications antenna in the middleground - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Christmas Valley Radar Site Transmit Sector Four Antenna Array, On unnamed road west of Lost Forest Road, Christmas Valley, Lake County, OR

  16. Multibeam Phased Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popovic, Zoya; Romisch, Stefania; Rondineau, Sebastien

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a new architecture for Ka-band multi-beam arrays was developed and demonstrated experimentally. The goal of the investigation was to demonstrate a new architecture that has the potential of reducing the cost as compared to standard expensive phased array technology. The goals of this specific part of the project, as stated in the yearly statement of work in the original proposal are: 1. Investigate bounds on performance of multi-beam lens arrays in terms of beamwidths, volume (size), isolation between beams, number of simultaneous beams, etc. 2. Design a small-scale array to demonstrate the principle. The array will be designed for operation around 3OGHz (Ka-band), with two 10-degree beamwidth beams. 3. Investigate most appropriate way to accomplish fine-tuning of the beam pointing within 5 degrees around the main beam pointing angle.

  17. Interleaved array antenna technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    This is the third phase of a program to establish an antenna concept for shuttle and free flying spacecraft earth resources experiments using Synthetic Aperture Radar. The feasibility of a plated graphite epoxy waveguide for a space antenna was evaluated. A quantity of flat panels and waveguides were developed, procured, and tested for electrical and mechanical properties. In addition, processes for the assembly of a unique waveguide array were investigated. Finally, trades between various configurations that would allow elevation (range) electronic scanning and that would minimize feed complexity for various RF bandwidths were made.

  18. Recent advances in antenna synthesis.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutzman, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    A technique for the synthesis of planar aperture antennas has been developed. It applies equally well to continuous or array type apertures. Patterns with shaped main beams and complex sidelobe structures can be synthesized. The method involves applying corrections iteratively and converging toward the desired pattern. The iteration process terminates when the synthesized pattern approximates the desired pattern to within a specified tolerance. A computer program has been written to perform all calculations. The source distribution which is required to produce the synthesized pattern is provided as output. The method is such that patterns requiring complex source distributions will not be synthesized (such as superdirective patterns).

  19. Feasibility study of a synthesis procedure for array feeds to improve radiation performance of large distorted reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutzman, W. L.; Smith, W. T.

    1990-01-01

    Surface errors on parabolic reflector antennas degrade the overall performance of the antenna. Space antenna structures are difficult to build, deploy and control. They must maintain a nearly perfect parabolic shape in a harsh environment and must be lightweight. Electromagnetic compensation for surface errors in large space reflector antennas can be used to supplement mechanical compensation. Electromagnetic compensation for surface errors in large space reflector antennas has been the topic of several research studies. Most of these studies try to correct the focal plane fields of the reflector near the focal point and, hence, compensate for the distortions over the whole radiation pattern. An alternative approach to electromagnetic compensation is presented. The proposed technique uses pattern synthesis to compensate for the surface errors. The pattern synthesis approach uses a localized algorithm in which pattern corrections are directed specifically towards portions of the pattern requiring improvement. The pattern synthesis technique does not require knowledge of the reflector surface. It uses radiation pattern data to perform the compensation.

  20. Feasibility study of a synthesis procedure for array feeds to improve radiation performance of large distorted reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutzman, W. L.; Takamizawa, K.; Werntz, P.; Lapean, J.; Barts, R.; Shen, B.; Dunn, D.

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: (1) performance analysis of the Gregorian tri-reflector; (2) design and performance of the type 6 reflector antenna; (3) a new spherical main reflector system design; (4) optimization of reflector configurations using physical optics; (5) radiometric array design; and (7) beam efficiency studies.

  1. A phased array tracking antenna for vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohmori, Shingo; Mano, Kazukiko; Tanaka, Kenji; Matsunaga, Makoto; Tsuchiya, Makio

    1990-01-01

    An antenna system including antenna elements and a satellite tracking method is considered a key technology in implementing land mobile satellite communications. In the early stage of land mobile satellite communications, a mechanical tracking antenna system is considered the best candidate for vehicles, however, a phased array antenna will replace it in the near future, because it has many attractive advantages such as a low and compact profile, high speed tracking, and potential low cost. Communications Research Laboratory is now developing a new phased array antenna system for land vehicles based on research experiences of the airborne phased array antenna, which was developed and evaluated in satellite communication experiments using the ETS-V satellite. The basic characteristics of the phased array antenna for land vehicles are described.

  2. New carbon nanotube antenna array simulation and fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zareie, Hosein; Davoudzadeh, Nima; Koohsorkhi, Javad; Mohajerzadeh, Shamsoddin; Rouhi, Nima

    2009-03-01

    A novel THz antenna structure, made of carbon nanotube arrays is suggested. Using CST MICROWAVE STUDIO (CST MWS), the capabilities of carbon nanotube terahertz (THz) antenna arrays have been simulated and this CNT antenna array has been fabricated.

  3. Resonance spectra of diabolo optical antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hong; Simpkins, Blake; Caldwell, Joshua D.; Guo, Junpeng

    2015-10-01

    A complete set of diabolo optical antenna arrays with different waist widths and periods was fabricated on a sapphire substrate by using a standard e-beam lithography and lift-off process. Fabricated diabolo optical antenna arrays were characterized by measuring the transmittance and reflectance with a microscope-coupled FTIR spectrometer. It was found experimentally that reducing the waist width significantly shifts the resonance to longer wavelength and narrowing the waist of the antennas is more effective than increasing the period of the array for tuning the resonance wavelength. Also it is found that the magnetic field enhancement near the antenna waist is correlated to the shift of the resonance wavelength.

  4. Resonance spectra of diabolo optical antenna arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Hong; Guo, Junpeng; Simpkins, Blake; Caldwell, Joshua D.

    2015-10-15

    A complete set of diabolo optical antenna arrays with different waist widths and periods was fabricated on a sapphire substrate by using a standard e-beam lithography and lift-off process. Fabricated diabolo optical antenna arrays were characterized by measuring the transmittance and reflectance with a microscope-coupled FTIR spectrometer. It was found experimentally that reducing the waist width significantly shifts the resonance to longer wavelength and narrowing the waist of the antennas is more effective than increasing the period of the array for tuning the resonance wavelength. Also it is found that the magnetic field enhancement near the antenna waist is correlated to the shift of the resonance wavelength.

  5. A printed circuit cylindrical array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Ashok K.; Powell, Walter E.

    1986-11-01

    The design and performance of a Ku-band cylindrical antenna are described. The antenna is designed to provide a 360-deg azimuth coverage with 20-dB sidelobes and an operating bandwidth of 1 GHz (16.0-17.0 GHz). The antenna consists of 16 facets of 2 x 4 dipole arrays. The 360-deg coverage is obtained with a switch matrix network. The antenna elements and the feeding switch matrix network are printed on a single printed circuit board.

  6. Design of microstrip disk antenna arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, M. C.; Parks, F. G.

    1978-01-01

    The radio frequency characteristics and design parameters for microstrip disk antenna elements and planar arrays are presented. Two C-band model arrays (an 8 element linear and an 8 by 8 planar) were designed, fabricated, and tested to demonstrate the technique of using microstrip elements for array applications. These arrays were designed with a cosine amplitude distribution.

  7. Wideband Microstrip Antenna-Feeding Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, John

    1990-01-01

    Special impedance-matching probes help reduce feed complexity. Lightweight array of microstrip antenna elements designed to transmit and illuminate reflector antenna with circularly polarized radiation at 1,545 to 1,550 MHz and to receive circularly polarized radiation at 1,646 to 1,660 MHz. Microstrip array is cluster of 7 subarrays containing total of 28 microstrip patches. Produces cicularly polarized beam with suitable edge taper to illuminate reflector antenna. Teardrop-shaped feed probe provides gradual change of field from coaxial transmission line into microstrip substrate. Intended to be part of larger overlapping-cluster array generating multiple contiguous beams.

  8. Adaptive antenna arrays for weak interfering signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, I. J.

    1985-01-01

    The interference protection provided by adaptive antenna arrays to an Earth station or satellite receive antenna system is studied. The case where the interference is caused by the transmission from adjacent satellites or Earth stations whose signals inadverently enter the receiving system and interfere with the communication link is considered. Thus, the interfering signals are very weak. To increase the interference suppression, one can either decrease the thermal noise in the feedback loops or increase the gain of the auxiliary antennas in the interfering signal direction. Both methods are examined. It is shown that one may have to reduce the noise correlation to impractically low values and if directive auxiliary antennas are used, the auxiliary antenna size may have to be too large. One can, however, combine the two methods to achieve the specified interference suppression with reasonable requirements of noise decorrelation and auxiliary antenna size. Effects of the errors in the steering vector on the adaptive array performance are studied.

  9. Control of phased-array antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoilenko, V. I.; Shishov, Iu. A.

    Principles and algorithms for the control of phased arrays are described. Particular consideration is given to algorithms for the control of phase distribution, adaptive arrays, beam-steerable arrays, the design of phase shifters, the compensation of beam-pointing errors, and the calibration of high-gain antenna pointing.

  10. Juno Microwave Radiometer Patch Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, N.; Chen, J.; Focardi, P.; Hodges, R.; Hughes, R.; Jakoboski, J.; Venkatesan, J.; Zawadzki, M.

    2009-01-01

    Juno is a mission in the NASA New Frontiers Program with the goal of significantly improving our understanding of the formation and structure of Jupiter. This paper discusses the modeling and measurement of the two patch array antennas. An overview of the antenna architecture, design and development at JPL is provided, along with estimates of performance and the results of measurements.

  11. Antenna-array, phase quadrature tracking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cubley, H. D.

    1970-01-01

    Phase relationship between input signals appearing on widely-spaced parallel connected antenna elements in array is automatically adjusted in phase quadrature tracking system. Compact and lightweight design permit use in wide variety of airborne communications networks.

  12. General view looking northnorthwest at antenna array. Troposhperic scatter communications ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view looking north-northwest at antenna array. Troposhperic scatter communications antennas are seen at far left, transmitter building is in center, antenna array at right - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Moscow Radar Site Transmit Sector One Antenna Array, At the end of Steam Road, Moscow, Somerset County, ME

  13. Antenna arraying performance for deep space telecommunications systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stelzried, C. T.; Berman, A. L.; Noreen, G. K.

    1983-01-01

    Antenna arraying is a crucial Deep Space Network technique in maximizing the science return of planetary and comet encounters. The equations which describe the total figure of merit for a multiple system of arrayed antennas are developed. An example is given for three Canberra DSN antennas and the Parkes 64-m antenna to be arrayed for the Voyager 2 Uranus flyby.

  14. Antenna arraying performance for deep space telecommunications systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzried, C. T.; Berman, A. L.; Noreen, G. K.

    1983-02-01

    Antenna arraying is a crucial Deep Space Network technique in maximizing the science return of planetary and comet encounters. The equations which describe the total figure of merit for a multiple system of arrayed antennas are developed. An example is given for three Canberra DSN antennas and the Parkes 64-m antenna to be arrayed for the Voyager 2 Uranus flyby.

  15. Far-infrared imaging antenna arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neikirk, D. P.; Rutledge, D. B.; Muha, M. S.; Park, H.; Yu, C.-X.

    1982-01-01

    A far-infrared monolithic imaging antenna array with diffraction-limited resolution has been demonstrated. The optical system is similar to an oil-immersion microscope, except that the position of the object and the image are interchanged. The array is a series of evaporated silver bow-tie antennas of 75 nm thick, spaced at 310 microns, on a fused-quartz substrate; the bow angle of 60 deg gives an impedance of 150 ohm to match to bismuth microbolometers. The measured responsivity of the array elements is 1-2 V/W at the relatively low bias of 1 mA. Previous measurements have shown that the bolometers are 1/f noise limited up to 100 kHz and that they have a frequency response of 5 MHz. The antenna array should be adequate for far-infrared plasma interferometer measurements.

  16. Planar microstrip YAGI antenna array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, John (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A directional microstrip antenna includes a driven patch surrounded by an isolated reflector and one or more coplanar directors, all separated from a ground plane on the order of 0.1 wavelength or less to provide end fire beam directivity without requiring power dividers or phase shifters. The antenna may be driven at a feed point a distance from the center of the driven patch in accordance with conventional microstrip antenna design practices for H-plane coupled or horizontally polarized signals. The feed point for E-plane coupled or vertically polarized signals is at a greater distance from the center than the first distance. This feed point is also used for one of the feed signals for circularly polarized signals. The phase shift between signals applied to feed points for circularly polarized signals must be greater than the conventionally required 90 degrees and depends upon the antenna configuration.

  17. The development of inflatable array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J.

    2001-01-01

    Inflatable array antennas are being developed to significantly reduce the mass, the launch vehicle's stowage volume, and the cost of future spacecraft systems. Three inflatable array antennas, recently developed for spacecraft applications, are a 3.3 m x 1.0 m L-band synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) array, a 1.0 m-diameter X-band telecom reflectarray, and a 3 m-diameter Ka-band telecom reflectarray. All three antennas are similar in construction, and each consists of an inflatable tubular frame that supports and tensions a multi-layer thin-membrane RF radiating surface with printed microstrip patches. The L-band SAR array achieved a bandwidth of 80 MHz, an aperture efficiency of 74%, and a total mass of 15 kg. The X-band reflectarray achieved an aperture efficiency of 37%, good radiation patterns, and a total mass of 1.2 kg (excluding the inflation system). The 3 m Ka-band reflectarray achieved a surface flatness of 0.1 mm RMS, good radiation patterns, and a total mass of 12.8 kg (excluding the inflation system). These antennas demonstrated that inflatable arrays are feasible across the microwave and millimeter-wave spectrums. Further developments of these antennas are deemed necessary, in particular, in the area of qualifying the inflatable structures for space-environment usage.

  18. Magnetic antenna excitation of whistler modes. II. Antenna arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2014-12-15

    The excitation of whistler modes from magnetic loop antennas has been investigated experimentally. The field topology of the excited wave driven by a single loop antenna has been measured for different loop orientations with respect to the uniform background field. The fields from two or more antennas at different locations are then created by superposition of the single-loop data. It is shown that an antenna array can produce nearly plane waves which cannot be achieved with single antennas. By applying a phase shift along the array, oblique wave propagation is obtained. This allows a meaningful comparison with plane wave theory. The Gendrin mode and oblique cyclotron resonance are demonstrated. Wave helicity and polarization in space and time are demonstrated and distinguished from the magnetic helicity of the wave field. The superposition of two oblique plane whistler modes produces in a “whistler waveguide” mode whose polarization and helicity properties are explained. The results show that single point measurements cannot properly establish the wave character of wave packets. The laboratory observations are relevant for excitation and detection of whistler modes in space plasmas.

  19. Breadboard Signal Processor for Arraying DSN Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jongeling, Andre; Sigman, Elliott; Chandra, Kumar; Trinh, Joseph; Soriano, Melissa; Navarro, Robert; Rogstad, Stephen; Goodhart, Charles; Proctor, Robert; Jourdan, Michael; Rayhrer, Benno

    2008-01-01

    A recently developed breadboard version of an advanced signal processor for arraying many antennas in NASA s Deep Space Network (DSN) can accept inputs in a 500-MHz-wide frequency band from six antennas. The next breadboard version is expected to accept inputs from 16 antennas, and a following developed version is expected to be designed according to an architecture that will be scalable to accept inputs from as many as 400 antennas. These and similar signal processors could also be used for combining multiple wide-band signals in non-DSN applications, including very-long-baseline interferometry and telecommunications. This signal processor performs functions of a wide-band FX correlator and a beam-forming signal combiner. [The term "FX" signifies that the digital samples of two given signals are fast Fourier transformed (F), then the fast Fourier transforms of the two signals are multiplied (X) prior to accumulation.] In this processor, the signals from the various antennas are broken up into channels in the frequency domain (see figure). In each frequency channel, the data from each antenna are correlated against the data from each other antenna; this is done for all antenna baselines (that is, for all antenna pairs). The results of the correlations are used to obtain calibration data to align the antenna signals in both phase and delay. Data from the various antenna frequency channels are also combined and calibration corrections are applied. The frequency-domain data thus combined are then synthesized back to the time domain for passing on to a telemetry receiver

  20. An LTCC 94 GHz Antenna Array

    SciTech Connect

    Aguirre, J; Pao, H; Lin, H; Garland, P; O'Neill, D; Horton, K

    2007-12-21

    An antenna array is designed in low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) Ferro A6M{trademark} for a mm-wave application. The antenna is designed to operate at 94 GHz with a few percent bandwidth. A key manufacturing technology is the use of 3 mil diameter vias on a 6 mil pitch to construct the laminated waveguides that form the beamforming network and radiating elements. Measurements for loss in the laminated waveguide are presented. The slot-fed cavity-radiating element is designed to account for extremely tight mutual coupling between elements. The array incorporates a slot-fed multi-layer beamforming network.

  1. Deployable Wide-Aperture Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W.; Dobbins, Justin A.; Lin, Greg Y.; Chu, Andrew; Scully, Robert C.

    2005-01-01

    Inexpensive, lightweight array antennas on flexible substrates are under development to satisfy a need for large-aperture antennas that can be stored compactly during transport and deployed to full size in the field. Conceived for use aboard spacecraft, antennas of this type also have potential terrestrial uses . most likely, as means to extend the ranges of cellular telephones in rural settings. Several simple deployment mechanisms are envisioned. One example is shown in the figure, where the deployment mechanism, a springlike material contained in a sleeve around the perimeter of a flexible membrane, is based on a common automobile window shade. The array can be formed of antenna elements that are printed on small sections of semi-flexible laminates, or preferably, elements that are constructed of conducting fabric. Likewise, a distribution network connecting the elements can be created from conventional technologies such as lightweight, flexible coaxial cable and a surface mount power divider, or preferably, from elements formed from conductive fabrics. Conventional technologies may be stitched onto a supporting flexible membrane or contained within pockets that are stitched onto a flexible membrane. Components created from conductive fabrics may be attached by stitching conductive strips to a nonconductive membrane, embroidering conductive threads into a nonconductive membrane, or weaving predetermined patterns directly into the membrane. The deployable antenna may comprise multiple types of antenna elements. For example, thin profile antenna elements above a ground plane, both attached to the supporting flexible membrane, can be used to create a unidirectional boresight radiation pattern. Or, antenna elements without a ground plane, such as bow-tie dipoles, can be attached to the membrane to create a bidirectional array such as that shown in the figure. For either type of antenna element, the dual configuration, i.e., elements formed of slots in a conductive

  2. Feasibility study of a synthesis procedure for array feeds to improve radiation performance of large distorted reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutzman, Warren L.; Takamizawa, K.; Werntz, P.; Lapean, J.; Shen, B.

    1993-01-01

    Virginia Tech has several activities which support the NASA Langley effort in the area of large aperture radiometric antenna systems. This semi-annual report discusses the major areas of research and progress made.

  3. Oblique view to the northwest of the Antenna Array ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view to the northwest of the Antenna Array - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Christmas Valley Radar Site Transmit Sector Six Antenna Array, On unnamed road west of Lost Forest Road, Christmas Valley, Lake County, OR

  4. General view of Antenna Array and building complex, looking southwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of Antenna Array and building complex, looking southwest - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Tulelake Radar Site Receive Sector Six Antenna Array, Unnamed Road West of Double Head Road, Tulelake, Siskiyou County, CA

  5. Detail view to the east of the Antenna Array ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view to the east of the Antenna Array - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Christmas Valley Radar Site Transmit Sector Six Antenna Array, On unnamed road west of Lost Forest Road, Christmas Valley, Lake County, OR

  6. General view to the south of the antenna array ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view to the south of the antenna array - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Christmas Valley Radar Site Transmit Sector Five Antenna Array, On unnamed road west of Lost Forest Road, Christmas Valley, Lake County, OR

  7. General view to the northwest of the antenna array ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view to the northwest of the antenna array - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Christmas Valley Radar Site Transmit Sector Five Antenna Array, On unnamed road west of Lost Forest Road, Christmas Valley, Lake County, OR

  8. General view of Antenna Array and building complex, looking northeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of Antenna Array and building complex, looking northeast - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Tulelake Radar Site Receive Sector Six Antenna Array, Unnamed Road West of Double Head Road, Tulelake, Siskiyou County, CA

  9. Detail view looking eastnortheast at elements of antenna array ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view looking east-northeast at elements of antenna array - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Moscow Radar Site Transmit Sector One Antenna Array, At the end of Steam Road, Moscow, Somerset County, ME

  10. Multiband Photonic Phased-Array Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Suning

    2015-01-01

    A multiband phased-array antenna (PAA) can reduce the number of antennas on shipboard platforms while offering significantly improved performance. Crystal Research, Inc., has developed a multiband photonic antenna that is based on a high-speed, optical, true-time-delay beamformer. It is capable of simultaneously steering multiple independent radio frequency (RF) beams in less than 1,000 nanoseconds. This high steering speed is 3 orders of magnitude faster than any existing optical beamformer. Unlike other approaches, this technology uses a single controlling device per operation band, eliminating the need for massive optical switches, laser diodes, and fiber Bragg gratings. More importantly, only one beamformer is needed for all antenna elements.

  11. Biologically-inspired, electrically small antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoumi, Amir Reza

    First, the motivation behind adding a passive external coupling network after antenna arrays is discussed, the concept of biomimetic antenna arrays (BMAAs) introduced and some of the previous work done in this area have been reviewed. Next, a BMAA which achieves an angular resolution of roughly 15 times its regular counterpart is introduced and fully characterized. The introduced BMAA employs transformers which considerably degrade its performance, namely its output power. To cicumvent this shortcoming a new architecture of a BMAA that does not employ transformers and therefore yields a higher output power for the same angular resolution has been subsequently presented. Moreover, a detailed noise analysis of this BMAA is carried out and the output noise of the new architecture is compared with the output noise of the original design. The modified twoelement BMAA architecture is then extended to multiple elements. A novel nonlinear optimization process is introduced that maximizes the total power captured by the BMAA for a given angular resolution and the concept illustrated for a three-element antenna array. Next an optimum two-element BMAA which achieves the maximum possible angular resolution while obtaining the same output power level of a regular antenna array with the same elements and spacing is introduced. A novel two-element superdirective array based on this optimum BMAA has been also discussed. The passive BMAAs discussed in this thesis have a relatively narrow bandwidth. To extend the bandwidth of BMAAs, non- Foster networks have been employed in their external coupling networks and it has been demonstrated that they can increase their bandwidth by a factor of roughly 33. Finally, the BMAA concept has been extended to nano-antenna arrays and a concept for designing sub-wavelength angle-sensing detectors at optical wavelengths has been introduced.

  12. Phased Antenna Array for Global Navigation Satellite System Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turbiner, Dmitry (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods for phased array antennas are described. Supports for phased array antennas can be constructed by 3D printing. The array elements and combiner network can be constructed by conducting wire. Different parameters of the antenna, like the gain and directivity, can be controlled by selection of the appropriate design, and by electrical steering. Phased array antennas may be used for radio occultation measurements.

  13. Feasibility study of a synthesis procedure for array feeds to improve radiation performance of large distorted reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutzman, W. L.; Takamizawa, K.; Lapean, J.

    1993-01-01

    There were several tangible products that resulted from the reflector antenna research program. The initial technical effort was to develop techniques to compensate for distortions over the surface of the main reflector of a large reflector antenna system. An in-depth investigation of this problem resulted in a new technique for the electronic correction of surface errors. A journal article on the findings describe the use of the iterative sampling method. Shortly after the 'Mission to Planet Earth' program started, we began investigating the use of large reflector antennas in geostationary orbit for passive earth remote sensing. A study panel was coordinated by Virginia Tech to set technical goals for the effort. These were used to guide the design of several antennas. The original interest stemmed from an industrial (Reynolds Metals) need and currently involves work with industry (Prodelin Corporation) on high technology, low cost reflectors. The intervening years (1987 - 1993) is the period of this report and Virginia Tech's reflector antenna activity then was exclusively with NASA LaRC.

  14. Feasibility study of a synthesis procedure for array feeds to improve radiation performance of large distorted reflector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzman, W. L.; Takamizawa, K.; Lapean, J.

    1993-12-01

    There were several tangible products that resulted from the reflector antenna research program. The initial technical effort was to develop techniques to compensate for distortions over the surface of the main reflector of a large reflector antenna system. An in-depth investigation of this problem resulted in a new technique for the electronic correction of surface errors. A journal article on the findings describe the use of the iterative sampling method. Shortly after the 'Mission to Planet Earth' program started, we began investigating the use of large reflector antennas in geostationary orbit for passive earth remote sensing. A study panel was coordinated by Virginia Tech to set technical goals for the effort. These were used to guide the design of several antennas. The original interest stemmed from an industrial (Reynolds Metals) need and currently involves work with industry (Prodelin Corporation) on high technology, low cost reflectors. The intervening years (1987 - 1993) is the period of this report and Virginia Tech's reflector antenna activity then was exclusively with NASA LaRC.

  15. Terahertz Array Receivers with Integrated Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Llombart, Nuria; Lee, Choonsup; Jung, Cecile; Lin, Robert; Cooper, Ken B.; Reck, Theodore; Siles, Jose; Schlecht, Erich; Peralta, Alessandro; Thomas, Bertrand; Mehdi, Imran

    2011-01-01

    Highly sensitive terahertz heterodyne receivers have been mostly single-pixel. However, now there is a real need of multi-pixel array receivers at these frequencies driven by the science and instrument requirements. In this paper we explore various receiver font-end and antenna architectures for use in multi-pixel integrated arrays at terahertz frequencies. Development of wafer-level integrated terahertz receiver front-end by using advanced semiconductor fabrication technologies has progressed very well over the past few years. Novel stacking of micro-machined silicon wafers which allows for the 3-dimensional integration of various terahertz receiver components in extremely small packages has made it possible to design multi-pixel heterodyne arrays. One of the critical technologies to achieve fully integrated system is the antenna arrays compatible with the receiver array architecture. In this paper we explore different receiver and antenna architectures for multi-pixel heterodyne and direct detector arrays for various applications such as multi-pixel high resolution spectrometer and imaging radar at terahertz frequencies.

  16. Coplanar waveguide fed phased array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Ponchak, George E.; Lee, R. Q.; Fernandez, N. S.

    1990-01-01

    A K-band four element linear phased array was designed and tested. Coplanar waveguide (CPW) is used for the microwave distribution system. A CPW to twin strip transition is used to interface with the printed dipole antennas. MMIC phased shifters are used for phase control.

  17. Microstrip antenna arrays with parasitic elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kai-Fong

    1996-01-01

    This research was concerned with using parasitic elements to improve the bandwidth, gain and axial ratio characteristics of microstrip antennas and arrays. Significant improvements in these characteristics were obtained using stacked and coplanar parasitic elements. Details of the results are described in a total of 16 journal and 17 conference papers. These are listed in Section four of this report.

  18. Microstrip antenna array with parasitic elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kai F.; Acosta, Roberto J.; Lee, Richard Q.

    1987-01-01

    Discussed is the design of a large microstrip antenna array in terms of subarrays consisting of one fed patch and several parasitic patches. The potential advantages of this design are discussed. Theoretical radiation patterns of a subarray in the configuration of a cross are presented.

  19. Interleaved arrays antenna technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Phase one and two of a program to further develop and investigate advanced graphite epoxy waveguides, radiators, and components with application to space antennas are discussed. The objective of the two phases were to demonstrate mechanical integrity of a small panel of radiators and parts procured under a previous contract and to develop alternate designs and applications of the technology. Most of the emphasis was on the assembly and test of a 5 x 5 element module. This effort was supported by evaluation of adhesives and waveguide joint configurations. The evaluation and final assembly considered not only mechanical performance but also producibility in large scale.

  20. Phased array-fed antenna configuration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosswell, W. F.; Ball, D. E.; Taylor, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    The scope of this contract entails a configuration study for a phased array fed transmit antenna operating in the frequency band of 17.7 to 20.2 GHz. This initial contract provides a basis for understanding the design limitations and advantages of advanced phased array and cluster feeds (both utilizing intergral MMIC modules) illuminating folded reflector optics (both near field and focused types). Design parametric analyses are performed utilizing as constraints the objective secondary performance requirements of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (Table 1.0). The output of the study provides design information which serves as a data base for future active phased array fed antenna studies such as detailed designs required to support the development of a ground tested breadboard. In general, this study is significant because it provides the antenna community with an understanding of the basic principles which govern near field phased scanned feed effects on secondary reflector system performance. Although several articles have been written on analysis procedures and results for these systems, the authors of this report have observed phenomenon of near field antenna systems not previously documented. Because the physical justification for the exhibited performance is provided herein, the findings of this study add a new dimension to the available knowledge of the subject matter.

  1. Spiral slotted phased antenna array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, H., Jr. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A flush mounting, cavity-backed, dual orthogonal slot antenna for aircraft and space vehicles is described. Improved radiation pattern characteristics are obtained by making the spiral slot pattern elliptical in the aperture plane. A cavity and a flanged aperture plate are configured such that one slot pair is orthogonal with respect to another slot pair within the aperture plate. Coaxial split-tube baluns are used to drive the junctions between corresponding slot pairs. An optional cavity dielectric is provided and a drive coupling arrangement includes a four port comparator hybrid having sum and difference ports respectively, for alternate excitation to produce a single lobe or a double lobe pattern with null. Switching apparatus is provided to connect a common terminal to either of the ports.

  2. 802GHz integrated horn antennas imaging array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali-Ahmad, Walid Y.; Rebeiz, Gabriel M.; Dave, Hemant; Chin, Gordon

    1991-05-01

    Pattern measurements at 802GHz of a single element in 256-element integrated horn imaging array are presented. The integrated-horn antenna consists of a dipole-antenna suspended on a 1-micron dielectric membrane inside a pyramidal cavity etched in silicon. The theoretical far-field patterns, calculated using reciprocity and Floquet-modes representation of the free-space field, agree well with the measured far-field patterns at 802GHz. The associated directivity for a 1.40 lambda horn aperture, calculated from the measured E and H-plane patterns is 12.3dB + or - 0.2dB. This work demonstrates that high-efficiency integrated-horn antennas are easily scalable to terahertz frequencies and could be used for radio-astronomical and plasma-diagnostic applications.

  3. Spatially resolving antenna arrays using frequency diversity.

    PubMed

    Marks, Daniel L; Gollub, Jonah; Smith, David R

    2016-05-01

    Radio imaging devices and synthetic aperture radar typically use either mechanical scanning or phased arrays to illuminate a target with spatially varying radiation patterns. Mechanical scanning is unsuitable for many high-speed imaging applications, and phased arrays contain many active components and are technologically and cost prohibitive at millimeter and terahertz frequencies. We show that antennas deliberately designed to produce many different radiation patterns as the frequency is varied can reduce the number of active components necessary while still capturing high-quality images. This approach, called frequency-diversity imaging, can capture an entire two-dimensional image using only a single transmit and receive antenna with broadband illumination. We provide simple principles that ascertain whether a design is likely to achieve particular resolution specifications, and illustrate these principles with simulations. PMID:27140887

  4. General view of Sector Four Compound, looking north. Antenna Array ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of Sector Four Compound, looking north. Antenna Array is in background, behind Communications Antennas, Receiver Building, and Water Storage Tank - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Tulelake Radar Site Receive Sector Four Antenna Array, Unnamed Road West of Double Head Road, Tulelake, Siskiyou County, CA

  5. Coherent optical monolithic phased-array antenna steering system

    DOEpatents

    Hietala, Vincent M.; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Vawter, Gregory A.

    1994-01-01

    An optical-based RF beam steering system for phased-array antennas comprising a photonic integrated circuit (PIC). The system is based on optical heterodyning employed to produce microwave phase shifting by a monolithic PIC constructed entirely of passive components. Microwave power and control signal distribution to the antenna is accomplished by optical fiber, permitting physical separation of the PIC and its control functions from the antenna. The system reduces size, weight, complexity, and cost of phased-array antenna systems.

  6. Microstrip Antenna Arrays on Multilayer LCP Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Dane; Bairavasubramanian, Ramanan; Wang, Guoan; Kingsley, Nickolas D.; Papapolymerou, Ioannis; Tenteris, Emmanouil M.; DeJean, Gerald; Li, RonglLin

    2007-01-01

    A research and development effort now underway is directed toward satisfying requirements for a new type of relatively inexpensive, lightweight, microwave antenna array and associated circuitry packaged in a thin, flexible sheet that can readily be mounted on a curved or flat rigid or semi-rigid surface. A representative package of this type consists of microwave antenna circuitry embedded in and/or on a multilayer liquid- crystal polymer (LCP) substrate. The circuitry typically includes an array of printed metal microstrip patch antenna elements and their feedlines on one or more of the LCP layer(s). The circuitry can also include such components as electrostatically actuated microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) switches for connecting and disconnecting antenna elements and feedlines. In addition, the circuitry can include switchable phase shifters described below. LCPs were chosen over other flexible substrate materials because they have properties that are especially attractive for high-performance microwave applications. These properties include low permittivity, low loss tangent, low water-absorption coefficient, and low cost. By means of heat treatments, their coefficients of thermal expansion can be tailored to make them more amenable to integration into packages that include other materials. The nature of the flexibility of LCPs is such that large LCP sheets containing antenna arrays can be rolled up, then later easily unrolled and deployed. Figure 1 depicts a prototype three- LCP-layer package containing two four-element, dual-polarization microstrip-patch arrays: one for a frequency of 14 GHz, the other for a frequency of 35 GHz. The 35-GHz patches are embedded on top surface of the middle [15-mil (approx.0.13-mm)-thick] LCP layer; the 14- GHz patches are placed on the top surface of the upper [9-mil (approx. 0.23-mm)-thick] LCP layer. The particular choice of LCP layer thicknesses was made on the basis of extensive analysis of the effects of the

  7. Joint stars phased array radar antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shnitkin, Harold

    1994-10-01

    The Joint STARS phased array radar system is capable of performing long range airborne surveillance and was used during the Persian Gulf war on two E8-A aircraft to fly many around-the-clock missions to monitor the Kuwait and Iraq battlefield from a safe distance behind the front lines. This paper is a follow-on to previous publications on the subject of the Joint STARS antenna and deals mainly with mission performance and technical aspects not previously covered. Radar data of troop movements and armament installations will be presented, a brief review of the antenna design is given, followed by technical discussions concerning the three-port interferometry, gain and sidelobe design approach, cost control, range test implementation and future improvements.

  8. A novel array antenna for MSAT applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodnar, Donald G.; Rainer, B. Keith; Rahmat-Samii, Yahya

    1989-01-01

    The issue of reducing the cost of phased array vehicle antennas through the use of a lens feeding arrangement instead of phase shifters at each element is addressed. In particular, the economic viability of a mobile satellite system (MSAT) is largely dependent on the efficient use of the allocated scarce spectrum and orbit as well as the satellite power. the type of vehicle antenna used will play a critical role in achieving this efficiency. A standard design approach for an electronically steered array uses phase shifters at each element to provide beam steering. A method for reducing the required number of phase shifters by using an R-KR lens feed network is outlined. The authors briefly discuss the phase shifter approach to beam steering, examine various lens feed techniques, and describe the R-KR lens approach. The lens feed network architecture is examined, a computer model for simulation of the array is presented, and the results of analysis of a suggested design for the MSAT application are given. In addition, satellite acquisition and tracking considerations are investigated.

  9. Impulse Testing of Corporate-Fed Patch Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Neil F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses a novel method for detecting faults in antenna arrays. The method, termed Impulse Testing, was developed for corporate-fed patch arrays where the element is fed by a probe and is shorted at its center. Impulse Testing was devised to supplement conventional microwave measurements in order to quickly verify antenna integrity. The technique relies on exciting each antenna element in turn with a fast pulse (or impulse) that propagates through the feed network to the output port of the antenna. The resulting impulse response is characteristic of the path through the feed network. Using an oscilloscope, a simple amplitude measurement can be made to detect faults. A circuit model of the antenna elements and feed network was constructed to assess various fault scenarios and determine fault-detection thresholds. The experimental setup and impulse measurements for two patch array antennas are presented. Advantages and limitations of the technique are discussed along with applications to other antenna array topologies

  10. Research on planar antennas and arrays - 'Structures Rayonnantes'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, J. P.; Dubost, G.; Terret, C.; Citerne, J.; Drissi, M.

    1993-02-01

    Radiating antenna structures related to flat and wire antennas developed by the laboratory 'Structures Rayonnantes' of the University of Rennes I (France) are discussed with emphasis on flat antennas and arrays studied during the last three years and on their typical applications. Particular attention is given to basic planar radiating sources including patches with coaxial or microstrip feed, printed slots, slot-fed patches, slot-loaded patches, and electromagnetic coupled dipoles and patches; planar arrays including planar phased and planar passive arrays and dual-beam printed antennas; and arrays of microstrip dipoles.

  11. Adaptive antenna arrays for satellite communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Inder J.

    1989-01-01

    The feasibility of using adaptive antenna arrays to provide interference protection in satellite communications was studied. The feedback loops as well as the sample matric inversion (SMI) algorithm for weight control were studied. Appropriate modifications in the two were made to achieve the required interference suppression. An experimental system was built to test the modified feedback loops and the modified SMI algorithm. The performance of the experimental system was evaluated using bench generated signals and signals received from TVRO geosynchronous satellites. A summary of results is given. Some suggestions for future work are also presented.

  12. Research in large adaptive antenna arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkowitz, R. S.; Dzekov, T.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of microwave holographic imaging of targets near the earth using a large random conformal array on the earth's surface and illumination by a CW source on a geostationary satellite is investigated. A geometrical formulation for the illuminator-target-array relationship is applied to the calculation of signal levels resulting from L-band illumination supplied by a satellite similar to ATS-6. The relations between direct and reflected signals are analyzed and the composite resultant signal seen at each antenna element is described. Processing techniques for developing directional beam formation as well as SNR enhancement are developed. The angular resolution and focusing characteristics of a large array covering an approximately circular area on the ground are determined. The necessary relations are developed between the achievable SNR and the size and number of elements in the array. Numerical results are presented for possible air traffic surveillance system. Finally, a simple phase correlation experiment is defined that can establish how large an array may be constructed.

  13. Grounded Coplanar Waveguide Feeds Phased-Array Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, G.E.; Lee, R. Q.; Simons, R. N.; Fernandez, N.S.

    1993-01-01

    Prototype electronically steerable K-band end-fire antenna includes phased array of four printed-circuit linear dipole elements fed by grounded coplanar waveguide (GCPW). Distribution-and-phasing network of antenna fed through single entering antenna split equally by three GCPW T junctions onto four GCPW transmission lines.

  14. Infrared technology for satellite power conversion. [antenna arrays and bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, D. P.; Gouker, M. A.; Gallagher, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Successful fabrication of bismuth bolometers led to the observation of antenna action rom array elements. Fabrication of the best antennas arrays was made more facile with finding that increased argon flow during the dc sputtering produced more uniform bismuth films and bonding to antennas must be done with the substrate temperaure below 100 C. Higher temperatures damaged the bolometers. During the testing of the antennas, it was found that the use of a quasi-optical system provided a uniform radiation field. Groups of antennas were bonded in series and in parallel with the parallel configuration showing the greater response.

  15. S-band antenna phased array communications system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzer, D. R.; Chapman, J. E.; Griffin, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    The development of an S-band antenna phased array for spacecraft to spacecraft communication is discussed. The system requirements, antenna array subsystem design, and hardware implementation are examined. It is stated that the phased array approach offers the greatest simplicity and lowest cost. The objectives of the development contract are defined as: (1) design of a medium gain active phased array S-band communications antenna, (2) development and test of a model of a seven element planar array of radiating elements mounted in the appropriate cavity matrix, and (3) development and test of a breadboard transmit/receive microelectronics module.

  16. MSAT-X phased array antenna adaptions to airborne applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, C.; Chung, H. H.; Peng, S. Y.

    1988-01-01

    The Mobile Satellite Experiment (MSAT-X) phased array antenna is being modified to meet future requirements. The proposed system consists of two high gain antennas mounted on each side of a fuselage, and a low gain antenna mounted on top of the fuselage. Each antenna is an electronically steered phased array based on the design of the MSAT-X antenna. A beamforming network is connected to the array elements via coaxial cables. It is essential that the proposed antenna system be able to provide an adequate communication link over the required space coverage, which is 360 degrees in azimuth and from 20 degrees below the horizon to the zenith in elevation. Alternative design concepts are suggested. Both open loop and closed loop backup capabilities are discussed. Typical antenna performance data are also included.

  17. Magnetic current loop array in a reflector antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yung, Edward K. N.; Lee, Wilson W. S.

    1994-04-01

    A magnetic current loop antenna array is designed, implemented, and measured. Radiation pattern, input impedance, and efficiency of the array are presented. The array is intended as a feed in a reflector antenna. Using a 360 mm solid dish, the overall gain of the reflector antenna is 24.6 dB at 9 GHz. The tolerance in placing the feed at the focal point of the dish is high. The present feed is low cost, self-supportive, robust, and easy to manufacture. It is an ideal substitute for the horn in a TVRO (television receive only) or VSAT (very small aperature terminal) antenna.

  18. Absorbed Power Minimization in Cellular Users with Circular Antenna Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christofilakis, Vasilis; Votis, Constantinos; Tatsis, Giorgos; Raptis, Vasilis; Kostarakis, Panos

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays electromagnetic pollution of non ionizing radiation generated by cellular phones concerns millions of people. In this paper the use of circular antenna array as a means of minimizing the absorbed power by cellular phone users is introduced. In particular, the different characteristics of radiation patterns produced by a helical conventional antenna used in mobile phones operating at 900 MHz and those produced by a circular antenna array, hypothetically used in the same mobile phones, are in detail examined. Furthermore, the percentage of decrement of the power absorbed in the head as a function of direction of arrival is estimated for the circular antenna array.

  19. Silicon Micromachined Microlens Array for THz Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Choonsup; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Mehdi, IImran; Gill, John J.; Jung-Kubiak, Cecile D.; Llombart, Nuria

    2013-01-01

    5 5 silicon microlens array was developed using a silicon micromachining technique for a silicon-based THz antenna array. The feature of the silicon micromachining technique enables one to microfabricate an unlimited number of microlens arrays at one time with good uniformity on a silicon wafer. This technique will resolve one of the key issues in building a THz camera, which is to integrate antennas in a detector array. The conventional approach of building single-pixel receivers and stacking them to form a multi-pixel receiver is not suited at THz because a single-pixel receiver already has difficulty fitting into mass, volume, and power budgets, especially in space applications. In this proposed technique, one has controllability on both diameter and curvature of a silicon microlens. First of all, the diameter of microlens depends on how thick photoresist one could coat and pattern. So far, the diameter of a 6- mm photoresist microlens with 400 m in height has been successfully microfabricated. Based on current researchers experiences, a diameter larger than 1-cm photoresist microlens array would be feasible. In order to control the curvature of the microlens, the following process variables could be used: 1. Amount of photoresist: It determines the curvature of the photoresist microlens. Since the photoresist lens is transferred onto the silicon substrate, it will directly control the curvature of the silicon microlens. 2. Etching selectivity between photoresist and silicon: The photoresist microlens is formed by thermal reflow. In order to transfer the exact photoresist curvature onto silicon, there needs to be etching selectivity of 1:1 between silicon and photoresist. However, by varying the etching selectivity, one could control the curvature of the silicon microlens. The figure shows the microfabricated silicon microlens 5 x5 array. The diameter of the microlens located in the center is about 2.5 mm. The measured 3-D profile of the microlens surface has a

  20. Using Antenna Arrays to Motivate the Study of Sinusoids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, J. P.

    2010-01-01

    Educational activities involving antenna arrays to motivate the study of sinusoids are described. Specifically, using fundamental concepts related to phase and simple geometric arguments, students are asked to predict the location of interference nulls in the radiation pattern of two-element phased array antennas. The location of the radiation…

  1. View to the southwest of the antenna array, note the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View to the southwest of the antenna array, note the site fence in the foreground - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Christmas Valley Radar Site Transmit Sector Four Antenna Array, On unnamed road west of Lost Forest Road, Christmas Valley, Lake County, OR

  2. Remoting alternatives for a multiple phased-array antenna network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zan; Foshee, James J.

    2001-10-01

    Significant improvements in technology have made phased array antennas an attractive alternative to the traditional dish antenna for use on wide body airplanes. These improvements have resulted in reduced size, reduced cost, reduced losses in the transmit and receive channels (simplifying the design), a significant extension in the bandwidth capability, and an increase in the functional capability. Flush mounting (thus reduced drag) and rapid beam switching are among the evolving desirable features of phased array antennas. Beam scanning of phased array antennas is limited to +/-45 degrees at best and therefore multiple phased array antennas would need to be used to insure instantaneous communications with any ground station (stations located at different geographical locations on the ground) and with other airborne stations. The exact number of phased array antennas and the specific installation location of each antenna on the wide body airplane would need to be determined by the specific communication requirements, but it is conceivable as many as five phased array antennas may need to be used to provide the required coverage. Control and switching of these antennas would need to be accomplished at a centralized location on the airplane and since these antennas would be at different locations on the airplane an efficient scheme of remoting would need to be used. To save in cost and keep the phased array antennas as small as possible the design of the phased array antennas would need to be kept simple. A dish antenna and a blade antenna (small size) could also be used to augment the system. Generating the RF signals at the central location and then using RF cables or waveguide to get the signal to any given antenna could result in significant RF losses. This paper will evaluate a number of remoting alternatives to keep the system design simple, reduce system cost, and utilize the functional capability of networking multiple phased array antennas on a wide body

  3. Analysis of reconfigurable line pattern of capillary plasma antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramli, Noor Fadhilah; Dagang, Ahmad Nazri; Ali, Mohd Tarmizi

    2015-04-01

    Simulations by applying Computer Simulation Technology (CST) Microwave Studio have been done towards Hg-Ar (10 Torr and 20 Torr) capillary tubes. These capillary tubes which are 5 mm in diameter are designed as plasma antenna monopole antenna and antenna arrays (four line array, six line array and nine line array). They have been arranged in the two different dimensions, 4mm × 4mm and 8mm × 8mm. Their performance as an antenna have been analyzed and compared. The reconfigurable characteristics of these kinds of plasma antenna such as gain, directivity and return loss are calculated. The results of gain and directivity of 10 Torr of plasma antenna are stronger than 20 Torr in the 4mm × 4mm dimension. Return loss of these kinds of plasma antenna significantly dropped in different operating frequencies of microwave ranges make them suitable to be applied for multiple applications in antennas or telecommunications field. Gas pressure of plasma antenna and array distance between the capillary tubes give a significant effect to the antenna performance in range of 10 GHz and below.

  4. Development of impedance matching technologies for ICRF antenna arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R.I.

    1998-03-01

    All high power ICRF heating systems include devices for matching the input impedance of the antenna array to the generator output impedance. For most types of antennas used, the input impedance is strongly time-dependent on timescales as rapid as 10-4 s, while the rf generators used are capable of producing full power only into a stationary load impedance. Hence, the dynamic response of the matching method is of great practical importance. In this paper, world-wide developments in this field over the past decade are reviewed. These techniques may be divided into several classes. The edge plasma parameters that determine the antenna array`s input impedance may be controlled to maintain a fixed load impedance. The frequency of the rf source can be feedback controlled to compensate for changes in the edge plasma conditions, or fast variable tuning elements in the transmission line between the generator output and the antenna input connections can provide the necessary time-varying impedance transformation. In lossy passive schemes, reflected power due to the time-varying impedance of the antenna array is diverted to a dummy load. Each of these techniques can be applied to a pre-existing antenna system. If a new antenna is to be designed, recent advances allow the antenna array to have the intrinsic property of presenting a constant load to the feeding transmission lines despite the varying load seen by each antenna in the array.

  5. State-of-the-art and trends of Ground-Penetrating Radar antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vescovo, Roberto; Pajewski, Lara; Tosti, Fabio

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this contribution is to offer an overview on the antenna arrays for GPR systems, current trends and open issues. Antennas are a critical hardware component of a radar system, dictating its performance in terms of capability to detect targets. Nevertheless, most of the research efforts in the Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) area focus on the use of this imaging technique in a plethora of different applications and on the improvement of modelling/inversion/processing techniques, whereas a limited number of studies deal with technological issues related to the design of novel systems, including the synthesis, optimisation and characterisation of advanced antennas. Even fewer are the research activities carried out to develop innovative antenna arrays. GPR antennas operate in a strongly demanding environment and should satisfy a number of requirements, somehow unique and very different than those of conventional radar antennas. The same applies to GPR antenna arrays. The first requirement is an ultra-wide frequency band: the radar has to transmit and receive short-duration time-domain waveforms, in the order of a few nanoseconds, the time-duration of the emitted pulses being a trade-off between the desired radar resolution and penetration depth. Furthermore, GPR antennas should have a linear phase characteristic over the whole operational frequency range, predictable polarisation and gain. Due to the fact that a subsurface imaging system is essentially a short-range radar, the coupling between transmitting and receiving antennas has to be low and short in time. GPR antennas should have quick ring-down characteristics, in order to prevent masking of targets and guarantee a good resolution. The radiation patterns should ensure minimal interference with unwanted objects, usually present in the complex operational environment; to this aim, antennas should provide high directivity and concentrate the electromagnetic energy into a narrow solid angle. As GPR

  6. Antenna-coupled TES bolometers for the Keck array, Spider, and Polar-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brient, R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Ahmed, Z.; Aikin, R. W.; Amiri, M.; Benton, S.; Bischoff, C.; Bock, J. J.; Bonetti, J. A.; Brevik, J. A.; Burger, B.; Davis, G.; Day, P.; Dowell, C. D.; Duband, L.; Filippini, J. P.; Fliescher, S.; Golwala, S. R.; Grayson, J.; Halpern, M.; Hasselfield, M.; Hilton, G.; Hristov, V. V.; Hui, H.; Irwin, K.; Kernasovskiy, S.; Kovac, J. M.; Kuo, C. L.; Leitch, E.; Lueker, M.; Megerian, K.; Moncelsi, L.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nguyen, H. T.; Ogburn, R. W.; Pryke, C. L.; Reintsema, C.; Ruhl, J. E.; Runyan, M. C.; Schwarz, R.; Sheehy, C. D.; Staniszewski, Z.; Sudiwala, R.; Teply, G.; Tolan, J. E.; Turner, A. D.; Tucker, R. S.; Vieregg, A.; Wiebe, D. V.; Wilson, P.; Wong, C. L.; Wu, W. L. K.; Yoon, K. W.

    2012-09-01

    Between the BICEP2 and Keck Array experiments, we have deployed over 1500 dual polarized antenna coupled bolometers to map the Cosmic Microwave Background’s polarization. We have been able to rapidly deploy these detectors because they are completely planar with an integrated phased-array antenna. Through our experience in these experiments, we have learned of several challenges with this technology- specifically the beam synthesis in the antenna- and in this paper we report on how we have modified our designs to mitigate these challenges. In particular, we discus differential steering errors between the polarization pairs’ beam centroids due to microstrip cross talk and gradients of penetration depth in the niobium thin films of our millimeter wave circuits. We also discuss how we have suppressed side lobe response with a Gaussian taper of our antenna illumination pattern. These improvements will be used in Spider, Polar-1, and this season’s retrofit of Keck Array.

  7. An algorithm for the empirical optimization of antenna arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blank, S.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical technique is presented to optimize the performance of arbitrary antenna arrays under realistic conditions. An experimental-computational algorithm is formulated in which n-dimensional minimization methods are applied to measured data obtained from the antenna array. A numerical update formula is used to induce partial derivative information without requiring special perturbations of the array parameters. The algorithm provides a new design for the antenna array, and the method proceeds in an iterative fashion. Test case results are presented showing the effectiveness of the algorithm.

  8. Compensation of relector antenna surface distortion using an array feed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherrette, A. R.; Acosta, R. J.; Lam, P. T.; Lee, S. W.

    1988-01-01

    The dimensional stability of the surface of a large reflector antenna is important when high gain or low sidelobe performance is desired. If the surface is distorted due to thermal or structural reasons, antenna performance can be improved through the use of an array feed. The design of the array feed and its relation to the surface distortion are examined. The sensitivity of antenna performance to changing surface parameters for fixed feed array geometries is also studied. This allows determination of the limits of usefulness for feed array compensation.

  9. Compensation of reflector antenna surface distortion using an array feed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherrette, Alan R.; Acosta, Roberto J.; Lam, Peter T.; Lee, Shung-Wu

    1989-01-01

    The dimensional stability of the surface of a large reflector antenna is important when high gain or low sidelobe performance is desired. If the surface is distorted due to thermal or structural reasons, antenna performance can be improved through the use of an array feed. The design of the array feed and its relation to the surface distortion are examined. The sensitivity of antenna performance to changing surface parameters for fixed feed array geometries is also studied. This allows determination of the limits of usefulness for feed array compensation.

  10. Technique for Radiometer and Antenna Array Calibration with Two Antenna Noise Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Karthik; Limaye, Ashutosh; Laymon, Charles; Meyer, Paul

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a new technique to calibrate a microwave radiometer and phased array antenna system. This calibration technique uses a radiated noise source in addition to an injected noise sources for calibration. The plane of reference for this calibration technique is the face of the antenna and therefore can effectively calibration the gain fluctuations in the active phased array antennas. This paper gives the mathematical formulation for the technique and discusses the improvements brought by the method over the existing calibration techniques.

  11. Electronic Switching Spherical Array (ESSA) antenna systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hockensmith, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    ESSA (Electronic Switching Spherical Array) is an antenna system conceived, developed and qualified for linking satellite data transmissions with NASA's tracking and data relay satellites (TDRSS) and tracking and data acquisition satellites (TDAS). ESSA functions in the S band frequency region, cover 2 pi or more steradians with directional gain and operates in multiple selectable modes. ESSA operates in concert with the NASA's TDRS standard transponder in the retrodirective mode or independently in directional beam, program track and special modes. Organizations and projects to the ESSA applications for NASA's space use are introduced. Coverage gain, weight power and implementation and other performance information for satisfying a wide range of data rate requirements are included.

  12. A phased antenna array for surface plasmons.

    PubMed

    Dikken, Dirk Jan W; Korterik, Jeroen P; Segerink, Frans B; Herek, Jennifer L; Prangsma, Jord C

    2016-01-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons are electromagnetic waves that propagate tightly bound to metal surfaces. The concentration of the electromagnetic field at the surface as well as the short wavelength of surface plasmons enable sensitive detection methods and miniaturization of optics. We present an optical frequency plasmonic analog to the phased antenna array as it is well known in radar technology and radio astronomy. Individual holes in a thick gold film act as dipolar emitters of surface plasmon polaritons whose phase is controlled individually using a digital spatial light modulator. We show experimentally, using a phase sensitive near-field microscope, that this optical system allows accurate directional emission of surface waves. This compact and flexible method allows for dynamically shaping the propagation of plasmons and holds promise for nanophotonic applications employing propagating surface plasmons. PMID:27121099

  13. A phased antenna array for surface plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikken, Dirk Jan W.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Segerink, Frans B.; Herek, Jennifer L.; Prangsma, Jord C.

    2016-04-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons are electromagnetic waves that propagate tightly bound to metal surfaces. The concentration of the electromagnetic field at the surface as well as the short wavelength of surface plasmons enable sensitive detection methods and miniaturization of optics. We present an optical frequency plasmonic analog to the phased antenna array as it is well known in radar technology and radio astronomy. Individual holes in a thick gold film act as dipolar emitters of surface plasmon polaritons whose phase is controlled individually using a digital spatial light modulator. We show experimentally, using a phase sensitive near-field microscope, that this optical system allows accurate directional emission of surface waves. This compact and flexible method allows for dynamically shaping the propagation of plasmons and holds promise for nanophotonic applications employing propagating surface plasmons.

  14. A phased antenna array for surface plasmons

    PubMed Central

    Dikken, Dirk Jan W.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Segerink, Frans B.; Herek, Jennifer L.; Prangsma, Jord C.

    2016-01-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons are electromagnetic waves that propagate tightly bound to metal surfaces. The concentration of the electromagnetic field at the surface as well as the short wavelength of surface plasmons enable sensitive detection methods and miniaturization of optics. We present an optical frequency plasmonic analog to the phased antenna array as it is well known in radar technology and radio astronomy. Individual holes in a thick gold film act as dipolar emitters of surface plasmon polaritons whose phase is controlled individually using a digital spatial light modulator. We show experimentally, using a phase sensitive near-field microscope, that this optical system allows accurate directional emission of surface waves. This compact and flexible method allows for dynamically shaping the propagation of plasmons and holds promise for nanophotonic applications employing propagating surface plasmons. PMID:27121099

  15. The Submillimeter Array Antennas and Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blundell, R.

    The Submillimeter Array (SMA) was conceived at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in 1984 as a six element interferometer to operate in the major atmospheric windows from about 200 to 900 GHz. In 1996, the Academica Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics of Taiwan joined the project and agreed to provide additional hardware to expand the interferometer to eight elements. All eight antennas are now operating at the observatory site on Mauna Kea, and astronomical observations have been made in the 230, 345, and 650 GHz bands. The SMA antennas have a diameter of 6 m, a surface accuracy of better than 25 micron rms, and can be reconfigured to provide spatial resolutions down to about 0.5" at 200 GHz and, eventually, 0.1" at 850 GHz. Coupling to the receiver package within each antenna is achieved via a beam waveguide, in a bent Nasmyth configuration, comprised of a flat tertiary mirror and two ellipsoidal mirrors that form a secondary pupil used for receiver calibration. An additional fixed mirror and a rotating wire grid polarizer are then used for receiver selection. Each antenna houses a single cryostat, with an integrated cryocooler capable of cooling up to eight receivers to 4 K. In the current configuration only three receiver bands are available: 175-255 GHz, 250-350 GHz, and 600-720 GHz, and simultaneous operation of the 650 GHz receiver with either of the lower frequency receivers is possible. Eventually dual polarization will be available from 325-350 GHz, and dual frequency operation will be possible, pairing either of the lower frequency receivers with any of the high frequency units: 325-425 GHz, 425-510 GHz, 600-720 GHz, and 800-900 GHz. Each receiver currently uses a single superconductor-insulator-superconductor junction as the mixing element, and has first stage intermediate frequency amplification at 4 K with an instantaneous bandwidth of 2.5 GHz, centered at 5 GHz. The mixers are of a fixed-tuned waveguide design, are inherently broad

  16. Microstrip patch antenna receiving array operating in the Ku band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walcher, Douglas A.

    1996-01-01

    Microstrip patch antennas were first investigated from the idea that it would be highly advantageous to fabricate radiating elements (antennas) on the same dielectric substrate as RF circuitry and transmission lines. Other advantages were soon discovered to be its lightweight, low profile, conformability to shaped surfaces, and low manufacturing costs. Unfortunately, these same patches continually exhibit narrow bandwidths, wide beamwidths, and low antenna gain. This thesis will present the design and experimental results of a microstrip patch antenna receiving array operating in the Ku band. An antenna array will be designed in an attempt to improve its performance over a single patch. Most Ku band information signals are either wide band television images or narrow band data and voice channels. An attempt to improve the gain of the array by introducing parasitic patches on top of the array will also be presented in this thesis.

  17. Design and analysis of annular antenna arrays with different reflectors.

    PubMed

    Shi, G; Joines, W T

    2004-09-01

    The design and performance of annular antenna arrays with reflectors is presented. Arrays with three shapes of reflectors are analysed and simulated. These include the corner reflector, the circular reflector and the elliptical reflector. Power-density distributions within the annular arrays with and without reflectors are obtained by using the FDTD method. Also, the image theory method is used to verify the FDTD results in one case. By comparing the power-density distribution pattern of all four of the array designs (three with different reflectors, one without reflector), it is readily seen in each case that the array with reflectors yields better power-efficiency than the array without reflectors and the elliptical reflector yields the best performance. Comparisons of each array are made using 4, 6 and 8 antennae in the annular array. By using the optimized results of the elliptical reflector, the requirement for the input-power level to each antenna is greatly reduced. PMID:15370818

  18. Photonic Links for High-Performance Arraying of Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Shouhua; Tjoelker, Robert

    2009-01-01

    An architecture for arraying microwave antennas in the next generation of NASA s Deep Space Network (DSN) involves the use of all photonic links between (1) the antennas in a given array and (2) a signal processing center. In this architecture, all affected parts at each antenna pedestal [except a front-end low-noise amplifier for the radio-frequency (RF) signal coming from the antenna and an optical transceiver to handle monitor and control (M/C) signals] would be passive optical parts

  19. Integrated Solar-Panel Antenna Array for CubeSats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baktur, Reyhan

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the Integrated Solar-Panel Antenna Array for CubeSats (ISAAC) project is to design and demonstrate an effective and efficien toptically transparent, high-gain, lightweight, conformal X-band antenna array that is integrated with the solar panels of a CubeSat. The targeted demonstration is for a Near Earth Network (NEN)radio at X-band, but the design can be easilyscaled to other network radios for higher frequencies. ISAAC is a less expensive and more flexible design for communication systemscompared to a deployed dish antenna or the existing integrated solar panel antenna design.

  20. Antenna theory and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzman, W. L.; Thiele, G. A.

    Antenna fundamentals and definitions are examined, taking into account electromagnetic fundamentals, the solution of Maxwell's equations for radiation problems, the ideal dipole, the radiation pattern, directivity and gain, reciprocity and antenna pattern measurements, antenna impedance and radiation efficiency, antenna polarization, antennas in communication links and radar, and the receiving properties of antennas. Some simple radiating systems are considered along with arrays, line sources, wire antennas, broadband antennas, moment methods, and aperture antennas. High-frequency methods and aspects of antenna synthesis are discussed, giving attention to geometrical optics, physical optics, wedge diffraction theory, the ray-fixed coordinate system, the cylindrical parabolic antenna, and linear array methods.

  1. Study of the characteristics of reconfigurable plasma antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alias, Nur Salihah; Dagang, Ahmad Nazri; Ali, Mohd Tarmizi

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a design and simulation of a reconfigurable array of plasma antenna. The plasma column is used as radiating elements instead of metal to create an antenna. The advantages of the plasma antenna over the conventional antenna are its possible to change the operating parameters, such as the working pressure, input power, radius of the discharge tube, resonant frequency, and length of the plasma column. In addition, plasma antenna can be reconfigurable with respect to shape, frequency and radiation parameters in a very short time. The plasma discharge tube was designed with a length of 200 mm, the radius of the plasma column was 2.5 mm and the coupling sleeve was connected to the SMA as the ground. This simulation was performed by using the simulation software Computer Simulation Technology (CST). The frequency is set in the range of 1 GHz to 10 GHz. The performance of the designed antenna was analyzed in term of return loss, gain and radiation pattern. For reconfigurable plasma antenna array, it shows that the gain is increase when the number of antenna element is increase. The combination of the discharge tube and metal rod as an antenna array has been done, and the result shows that an array with the plasma element can achieve higher gain.

  2. Study of the characteristics of reconfigurable plasma antenna array

    SciTech Connect

    Alias, Nur Salihah; Dagang, Ahmad Nazri; Ali, Mohd Tarmizi

    2015-04-24

    This paper presents a design and simulation of a reconfigurable array of plasma antenna. The plasma column is used as radiating elements instead of metal to create an antenna. The advantages of the plasma antenna over the conventional antenna are its possible to change the operating parameters, such as the working pressure, input power, radius of the discharge tube, resonant frequency, and length of the plasma column. In addition, plasma antenna can be reconfigurable with respect to shape, frequency and radiation parameters in a very short time. The plasma discharge tube was designed with a length of 200 mm, the radius of the plasma column was 2.5 mm and the coupling sleeve was connected to the SMA as the ground. This simulation was performed by using the simulation software Computer Simulation Technology (CST). The frequency is set in the range of 1 GHz to 10 GHz. The performance of the designed antenna was analyzed in term of return loss, gain and radiation pattern. For reconfigurable plasma antenna array, it shows that the gain is increase when the number of antenna element is increase. The combination of the discharge tube and metal rod as an antenna array has been done, and the result shows that an array with the plasma element can achieve higher gain.

  3. Multilayer Microstrip Slot And Dipole Array Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tulintseff, Ann N.

    1994-01-01

    Multilayer antenna structure contains interleaved linear subarrays of microstrip dipole and slot radiating antenna elements to provide compact, dual-band antenna. Structure also contains associated microstrip transmission lines, plus high-power amplifiers for transmission and low-noise amplifiers for reception. Overall function is to transmit in horizontal polarization at frequency of 29.634 GHz and receive in vertical polarization at 19.914 GHz, in direction 44 degrees from broadside to antenna. Antenna structure is part of apparatus described in "Steerable K/Ka-band Antenna for Land-Mobile Satellite Applications," NPO-18772.

  4. A colocated magnetic loop, electric dipole array antenna (preliminary results)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overfelt, P. L.; Bowling, D. R.; White, D. J.

    1994-09-01

    We present a detailed electromagnetic analysis of an electrically small colocated electric dipole and magnetic loop antenna array. This antenna is the simplest example of the Grimes multipole class of antenna arrays. We have determined that since the interaction term between the two elements disappears from the radial complex power, we were able to set the radial reactance to zero by choosing appropriate current magnitudes and phases on the array elements. By driving the two elements in quadrature, we obtained a much increased radiation intensity and directivity as well as increased radiated power.

  5. Improvement of Beam Scanning Characteristics of a Dielectric Lens Antenna by Array Feeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, Yousuke; Yamada, Yoshihide

    In the Intelligent Transportation System, millimeter waves are used and antennas are required beam scanning ability. In the millimeter wave operation, a lens antenna is one of the prominent candidates which achieves wide angle beam scanning. Wide angle scanning can be achieved by introducing Abbe sine condition to lens surface shaping. Authors designed the shaped lens antenna that could achieve beam scanning ±30°. The narrow beam widths were maintained on the scanning plane. However, the beam widths were broadened on the transverse plane and large gain reduction was appeared. It was clarified that the reason of this beam deterioration was due to the phase delay on the antenna aperture. In this paper, an array feed composed of a group of rectangular horns is employed to compensate the phase delay on the antenna aperture. In designing the array feed, because there were no examples of phase radiation pattern synthesis, a new radiation pattern synthesis method is studied. Ability of the weighting matrix contained in the Least Mean Square synthesis method is raid attention. Adequate weighting matrix is found out. Satisfactory phase radiation pattern that can compensate the phase delay and an adequate amplitude radiation pattern are achieved. As a result, the improvement of scanned beam widths and antenna gains through the array feed are ensured. And adequate horn arrangements of the array feed for improving scanned beam are clarified. Moreover, in order to examine the realization of an actual array feed, the exact electromagnetic simulation is conducted. The validity of the radiation pattern synthesis is clarified.

  6. Design of a Foldable Low-loss Microstrip Array Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christodoulou, C. G.; Wahid, P. F.; Haque, M. M.; Bailey, M. C.

    1999-01-01

    The design and analysis of a series-fed, foldable microstrip array antenna for radiometer applications is presented. The array antenna is composed of two equal sub arrays. Each sub array consists of a series of patches connected together through segments of microstrip lines. The sub arrays are fed 180 degree out of phase to ensure a symmetric radiation pattern. The design approach, is accomplished using the IE3D code that utilizes the method of moments. All experimental and simulated data are presented and discussed.

  7. Array antennas design in dependence of element-phasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zichner, R.; Chandra, M.

    2009-05-01

    Array antennas are used in science as well as for commercial and military purposes. The used element antennas act in accordance to their desired uses, for example radars or stationer GPS satellites. Typical components are for example slotted waveguides, patches, yagi-antennas and helix-antennas. All these elements do stand out with their own characteristics based on their special applications. If these elements are formed into an array configuration, the effectiveness can be improved immensely. There is a relation between the array functions and the physical array properties like the element alignment (linear, planar, circular), distances between the elements and so on. Among the physical properties there are other attributes like phase or amplitude coefficients, which are of great significance. The aim of this study was to provide an insight into the problem of array design, as far as the antenna element phase is concerned. Along with this, array radiation characteristics effects are presented. With the help of the extracted cognitions beam forming behaviour can be shown and the array phase behaviour can be analysed. One of the main applications is to simulate the array characteristics, like the radiation characteristic or the gain, for displacements of the array feeding point. A software solution that simulates the phase shift of a given array pattern is sought to adjust the feeding point.

  8. Photonic spin-controlled multifunctional shared-aperture antenna array.

    PubMed

    Maguid, Elhanan; Yulevich, Igor; Veksler, Dekel; Kleiner, Vladimir; Brongersma, Mark L; Hasman, Erez

    2016-06-01

    The shared-aperture phased antenna array developed in the field of radar applications is a promising approach for increased functionality in photonics. The alliance between the shared-aperture concepts and the geometric phase phenomenon arising from spin-orbit interaction provides a route to implement photonic spin-control multifunctional metasurfaces. We adopted a thinning technique within the shared-aperture synthesis and investigated interleaved sparse nanoantenna matrices and the spin-enabled asymmetric harmonic response to achieve helicity-controlled multiple structured wavefronts such as vortex beams carrying orbital angular momentum. We used multiplexed geometric phase profiles to simultaneously measure spectrum characteristics and the polarization state of light, enabling integrated on-chip spectropolarimetric analysis. The shared-aperture metasurface platform opens a pathway to novel types of nanophotonic functionality. PMID:27103668

  9. Photonic spin-controlled multifunctional shared-aperture antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maguid, Elhanan; Yulevich, Igor; Veksler, Dekel; Kleiner, Vladimir; Brongersma, Mark L.; Hasman, Erez

    2016-06-01

    The shared-aperture phased antenna array developed in the field of radar applications is a promising approach for increased functionality in photonics. The alliance between the shared-aperture concepts and the geometric phase phenomenon arising from spin-orbit interaction provides a route to implement photonic spin-control multifunctional metasurfaces. We adopted a thinning technique within the shared-aperture synthesis and investigated interleaved sparse nanoantenna matrices and the spin-enabled asymmetric harmonic response to achieve helicity-controlled multiple structured wavefronts such as vortex beams carrying orbital angular momentum. We used multiplexed geometric phase profiles to simultaneously measure spectrum characteristics and the polarization state of light, enabling integrated on-chip spectropolarimetric analysis. The shared-aperture metasurface platform opens a pathway to novel types of nanophotonic functionality.

  10. Optical phased arrays with evanescently-coupled antennas

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Jie; Watts, Michael R; Yaacobi, Ami; Timurdogan, Erman

    2015-03-24

    An optical phased array formed of a large number of nanophotonic antenna elements can be used to project complex images into the far field. These nanophotonic phased arrays, including the nanophotonic antenna elements and waveguides, can be formed on a single chip of silicon using complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) processes. Directional couplers evanescently couple light from the waveguides to the nanophotonic antenna elements, which emit the light as beams with phases and amplitudes selected so that the emitted beams interfere in the far field to produce the desired pattern. In some cases, each antenna in the phased array may be optically coupled to a corresponding variable delay line, such as a thermo-optically tuned waveguide or a liquid-filled cell, which can be used to vary the phase of the antenna's output (and the resulting far-field interference pattern).

  11. Linearly tapered slot antenna circular array for mobile communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Kelly, Eron; Lee, Richard Q.; Taub, Susan R.

    1993-01-01

    The design, fabrication and testing of a conformal K-band circular array is presented. The array consists of sixteen linearly tapered slot antennas (LTSA). It is fed by a 1:16 microstrip line power splitter via electromagnetic coupling. The array has an omni-directional pattern in the azimuth plane. In the elevation plane the beam is displaced above the horizon.

  12. An adaptive array antenna for mobile satellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milne, Robert

    1990-01-01

    The design of an adaptive array antenna for land vehicle operation and its performance in an operational satellite system is described. Linear and circularly polarized antenna designs are presented. The acquisition and tracking operation of a satellite is described and the effect on the communications signal is discussed. A number of system requirements are examined that have a major impact on the antenna design. The results of environmental, power handling, and RFI testing are presented and potential problems are identified.

  13. Reproducible, high performance patch antenna array apparatus and method of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Strassner, II, Bernd H.

    2007-01-23

    A reproducible, high-performance patch antenna array apparatus includes a patch antenna array provided on a unitary dielectric substrate, and a feed network provided on the same unitary substrate and proximity coupled to the patch antenna array. The reproducibility is enhanced by using photolithographic patterning and etching to produce both the patch antenna array and the feed network.

  14. Integrated Solar Array and Reflectarray Antenna for High Bandwidth Cubesats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Dorothy; Martinez, Andres; Petro, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The Integrated Solar Array and Reflectarray Antenna (ISARA) mission will demonstrate a reflectarray antenna that increases downlink data rates for Cube- Sats from the existing baseline rate of 9.6 kilobits per second (kbps) to more than 100 megabits per second (Mbps). The ISARA spacecraft is slated for launch no earlier than Dec. 1, 2015.

  15. Evolutionary Design of a Phased Array Antenna Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Al; Linden, Derek; Lohn, Jason

    2006-01-01

    We present an evolved S-band phased array antenna element design that meets the requirements of NASA's TDRS-C communications satellite scheduled for launch early next decade. The original specification called for two types of elements, one for receive only and one for transmit/receive. We were able to evolve a single element design that meets both specifications thereby simplifying the antenna and reducing testing and integration costs. The highest performance antenna found using a genetic algorithm and stochastic hill-climbing has been fabricated and tested. Laboratory results are largely consistent with simulation. Researchers have been investigating evolutionary antenna design and optimization since the early 1990s, and the field has grown in recent years its computer speed has increased and electromagnetic simulators have improved. Many antenna types have been investigated, including wire antennas, antenna arrays and quadrifilar helical antennas. In particular, our laboratory evolved a wire antenna design for NASA's Space Technology 5 (ST5) spacecraft. This antenna has been fabricated, tested, and is scheduled for launch on the three spacecraft in 2006.

  16. a 40 GHZ Planar Array Antenna Using Hybrid Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wilt, F. P.; Strijbos, J. H. M.

    A new linearly polarized microstrip patch array is presented. The array is fed by using a combination of aperture coupling from a slotted waveguide and coplanar feeding using series-fed patch arrays. Advantages of this so-called hybrid coupling are easy control of the illumination of the array and a low feed loss, since the number of microstrip lines is kept to the minimum. In the paper we discuss how to design a Hybrid Coupled Planar Array (HCPA) antenna by using CAD modeling. Furthermore, we discuss several more features of the antenna type, such as its reasonable bandwidth, low cross-polarization and constructional simplicity. A 40 GHz 120-element HCPA antenna with a broadside beam has been built and tested. Experimental results for this array are presented.

  17. Linear antenna array optimization using flower pollination algorithm.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Prerna; Kothari, Ashwin

    2016-01-01

    Flower pollination algorithm (FPA) is a new nature-inspired evolutionary algorithm used to solve multi-objective optimization problems. The aim of this paper is to introduce FPA to the electromagnetics and antenna community for the optimization of linear antenna arrays. FPA is applied for the first time to linear array so as to obtain optimized antenna positions in order to achieve an array pattern with minimum side lobe level along with placement of deep nulls in desired directions. Various design examples are presented that illustrate the use of FPA for linear antenna array optimization, and subsequently the results are validated by benchmarking along with results obtained using other state-of-the-art, nature-inspired evolutionary algorithms such as particle swarm optimization, ant colony optimization and cat swarm optimization. The results suggest that in most cases, FPA outperforms the other evolutionary algorithms and at times it yields a similar performance. PMID:27066339

  18. MSAT mobile electronically steered phased array antenna development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Fred

    1988-01-01

    The Mobile Satellite Experiment (MSAT-X) breadboard antenna design demonstrates the feasibility of using a phased array in a mobile satellite application. An electronically steerable phased array capable of tracking geosynchronous satellites from anywhere in the Continental United States has been developed. The design is reviewed along with the test data. Cost analysis are presented which indicate that this design can be produced at a cost of $1620 per antenna.

  19. Antenna-coupled bolometer arrays using transition-edgesensors

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Michael J.; Ade, Peter; Engargiola, Greg; Holzapfel,William; Lee,Adrian T.; O'Brient, Roger; Richards, Paul L.; Smith, Andy; Spieler, Helmuth; Tran, Huan

    2004-06-08

    We describe the development of an antenna-coupled bolometer array for use in a Cosmic Microwave Background polarization experiment. Prototype single pixels using double-slot dipole antennas and integrated microstrip band defining filters have been built and tested. Preliminary results of optical testing and simulations are presented. A bolometer array design based on this pixel will also be shown and future plans for application of the technology will be discussed.

  20. Compact antenna arrays with wide bandwidth and low sidelobe levels

    SciTech Connect

    Strassner, II, Bernd H.

    2014-09-09

    Highly efficient, low cost, easily manufactured SAR antenna arrays with lightweight low profiles, large instantaneous bandwidths and low SLL are disclosed. The array topology provides all necessary circuitry within the available antenna aperture space and between the layers of material that comprise the aperture. Bandwidths of 15.2 GHz to 18.2 GHz, with 30 dB SLLs azimuthally and elevationally, and radiation efficiencies above 40% may be achieved. Operation over much larger bandwidths is possible as well.

  1. Imaging antenna array at 119 microns. [for plasma diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neikirk, N. P.; Tong, P. P.; Putledge, D. B.; Park, H.; Young, P. E.

    1982-01-01

    A focal-plane imaging antenna array has been demonstrated at 119 microns. The array is a line of evaporated silver bow-tie antennas with bismuth microbolometer detectors on a silicon substrate. Radiation is coupled into the array by a lens placed on the back of the substrate. The bolometers are thermally isolated from the silicon substrate with a half-micron layer of polyimide. The array performance is demonstrated by coherent imaging of a series of holes at half the diffraction-limited cut-off frequency.

  2. Microstrip Yagi array for MSAT vehicle antenna application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, John; Densmore, Arthur; Pozar, David

    1990-01-01

    A microstrip Yagi array was developed for the MSAT system as a low-cost mechanically steered medium-gain vehicle antenna. Because its parasitic reflector and director patches are not connected to any of the RF power distributing circuit, while still contributing to achieve the MSAT required directional beam, the antenna becomes a very efficient radiating system. With the complete monopulse beamforming circuit etched on a thin stripline board, the planar microstrip Yagi array is capable of achieving a very low profile. A theoretical model using the Method of Moments was developed to facilitate the ease of design and understanding of this antenna.

  3. Antenna-coupled arrays of voltage-biased superconducting bolometers

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Michael J.; Lee, Adrian T.; Richards, P.L.; Schwan, D.; Skidmore, J.T.; Smith, A.D.; Spieler, H.; Yoon, Jongsoo

    2001-07-23

    We report on the development of antenna-coupled Voltage-biased Superconducting Bolometers (VSBs) which use Transition-edge Sensors (TES). Antenna coupling can greatly simplify the fabrication of large multi-frequency bolometer arrays compared to horn-coupled techniques. This simplification can make it practical to implement 1000+ element arrays that fill the focal plane of mm/sub-mm wave telescopes. We have designed a prototype device with a double-slot dipole antenna, integrated band-defining filters, and a membrane-suspended bolometer. A test chip has been constructed and will be tested shortly.

  4. MSAT vehicular antennas with self scanning array elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafai, L.

    1990-01-01

    A new approach for designing low profile antennas for MSAT applications is presented. It is based on stacking two microstrip antennas that operate at two adjacent modes. The beam scanning is achieved by introducing a phase shift between the stacked elements and consequently a low cost self scan array element is developed. The concept is used to investigate two different antenna types: (1) a single element unit, with its phase shifter, that provides a moderate gain of about 7 dBic; and (2) a seven element array with a peak gain of about 14 dBic. Computed and measured data for each design are presented and discussed.

  5. Technique for Radiometer and Antenna Array Calibration - TRAAC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Paul; Sims, William; Varnavas, Kosta; McCracken, Jeff; Srinivasan, Karthik; Limaye, Ashutosh; Laymon, Charles; Richeson. James

    2012-01-01

    Highly sensitive receivers are used to detect minute amounts of emitted electromagnetic energy. Calibration of these receivers is vital to the accuracy of the measurements. Traditional calibration techniques depend on calibration reference internal to the receivers as reference for the calibration of the observed electromagnetic energy. Such methods can only calibrate errors in measurement introduced by the receiver only. The disadvantage of these existing methods is that they cannot account for errors introduced by devices, such as antennas, used for capturing electromagnetic radiation. This severely limits the types of antennas that can be used to make measurements with a high degree of accuracy. Complex antenna systems, such as electronically steerable antennas (also known as phased arrays), while offering potentially significant advantages, suffer from a lack of a reliable and accurate calibration technique. The proximity of antenna elements in an array results in interaction between the electromagnetic fields radiated (or received) by the individual elements. This phenomenon is called mutual coupling. The new calibration method uses a known noise source as a calibration load to determine the instantaneous characteristics of the antenna. The noise source is emitted from one element of the antenna array and received by all the other elements due to mutual coupling. This received noise is used as a calibration standard to monitor the stability of the antenna electronics.

  6. Microstrip Yagi array antenna for mobile satellite vehicle application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, John; Densmore, Arthur C.

    1991-01-01

    A novel antenna structure formed by combining the Yagi-Uda array concept and the microstrip radiator technique is discussed. This antenna, called the microstrip Yagi array, has been developed for the mobile satellite (MSAT) system as a low-profile, low-cost, and mechanically steered medium-gain land-vehicle antenna. With the antenna's active patches (driven elements) and parasitic patches (reflector and director elements) located on the same horizontal plane, the main beam of the array can be tilted, by the effect of mutual coupling, in the elevation direction providing optimal coverage for users in the continental United States. Because the parasitic patches are not connected to any of the lossy RF power distributing circuit the antenna is an efficient radiating system. With the complete monopulse beamforming and power distributing circuits etched on a single thin stripline board underneath the microstrip Yagi array, the overall L-band antenna system has achieved a very low profile for vehicle's rooftop mounting, as well as a low manufacturing cost. Experimental results demonstrate the performance of this antenna.

  7. Terahertz line detection by a microlens array coupled photoconductive antenna array.

    PubMed

    Pradarutti, B; Müller, R; Freese, W; Matthäus, G; Riehemann, S; Notni, G; Nolte, S; Tünnermann, A

    2008-10-27

    We present THz ultrashort pulse detection by a photoconductive antenna array consisting of 16 photoconductive antennas. The efficient excitation of the photoconductive antennas has been realized by a microlens array which generates 16 single spots from the exciting fs-laser beam. This combination of optoelectronics and microoptics improves the detection efficiency by an order of magnitude in comparison to an excitation by a line focus. PMID:18958123

  8. Suspended Patch Antenna Array With Electromagnetically Coupled Inverted Microstrip Feed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.

    2000-01-01

    The paper demonstrates a four-element suspended patch antenna array, with a parasitic patch layer and an electromagnetically coupled inverted microstrip feed, for linear polarization at K-Band frequencies. This antenna has the following advantages over conventional microstrip antennas: First, the inverted microstrip has lower attenuation than conventional microstrip; hence, conductor loss associated with the antenna corporate feed is lower resulting in higher gain and efficiency. Second, conventional proximity coupled patch antennas require a substrate for the feed and a superstrate for the patch. However, the inverted microstrip fed patch antenna makes use of a single substrate, and hence, is lightweight and low cost. Third, electromagnetic coupling results in wider bandwidth. Details regarding the design and fabrication will be presented as well as measured results including return loss, radiation patterns and cross-polarization levels.

  9. THz radiation properties of silver V-cone antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Jun; Huang, Mengya; Hu, Mingzhe

    2012-12-01

    In the present article, silver cone antenna and its arrays are designed according to the requirement of wide bandwidth terahertz irradiation property. Coordinate transformation method is employed to analyze the solution process of the integrate equation of the irradiated electromagnetic field. And CST microwave studio software is employed to simulate the terahertz irradiation properties of Ag cone antenna arrays. Theoretical analysis and simulation results both manifest that the single Ag cone antenna with micrometer scale size can irradiate a wide bandwidth THz wave with the gain of 22.7dBi, while its corresponding antenna arrays with proper configuration can further improve the radiation pattern and enhance the gain to 42.5dBi. The theoretical analysis and CST simulation results will be useful for the guidance of experimental investigation of terahertz irradiation sources.

  10. Antenna array geometry optimization for a passive coherent localisation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, Peter; Kuschel, Heiner; O'Hagan, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    Passive Coherent Localisation (PCL), also known as Passive Radar, making use of RF sources of opportunity such as Radio or TV Broadcasting Stations, Cellular Phone Network Base Stations, etc. is an advancing technology for covert operation because no active radar transmitter is required. It is also an attractive addition to existing active radar stations because it has the potential to discover low-flying and low-observable targets. The CORA (Covert Radar) experimental passive radar system currently developed at Fraunhofer-FHR features a multi-channel digital radar receiver and a circular antenna array with separate elements for the VHF- and the UHF-range and is used to exploit alternatively Digital Audio (DAB) or Video Broadcasting (DVB-T) signals. For an extension of the system, a wideband antenna array is being designed for which a new discone antenna element has been developed covering the full DVB-T frequency range. The present paper describes the outline of the system and the numerical modelling and optimisation methods applied to solve the complex task of antenna array design: Electromagnetic full wave analysis is required for the parametric design of the antenna elements while combinatorial optimization methods are applied to find the best array positions and excitation coefficients for a regular omni-directional antenna performance. The different steps are combined in an iterative loop until the optimum array layout is found. Simulation and experimental results for the current system will be shown.

  11. Large-Aperture Membrane Active Phased-Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasik, Boris; McGrath, William; Leduc, Henry

    2009-01-01

    Large-aperture phased-array microwave antennas supported by membranes are being developed for use in spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar systems. There may also be terrestrial uses for such antennas supported on stationary membranes, large balloons, and blimps. These antennas are expected to have areal mass densities of about 2 kg/sq m, satisfying a need for lightweight alternatives to conventional rigid phased-array antennas, which have typical areal mass densities between 8 and 15 kg/sq m. The differences in areal mass densities translate to substantial differences in total mass in contemplated applications involving aperture areas as large as 400 sq m. A membrane phased-array antenna includes patch antenna elements in a repeating pattern. All previously reported membrane antennas were passive antennas; this is the first active membrane antenna that includes transmitting/receiving (T/R) electronic circuits as integral parts. Other integral parts of the antenna include a network of radio-frequency (RF) feed lines (more specifically, a corporate feed network) and of bias and control lines, all in the form of flexible copper strip conductors on flexible polymeric membranes. Each unit cell of a prototype antenna (see Figure 1) contains a patch antenna element and a compact T/R module that is compatible with flexible membrane circuitry. There are two membrane layers separated by a 12.7-mm air gap. Each membrane layer is made from a commercially available flexible circuit material that, as supplied, comprises a 127-micron-thick polyimide dielectric layer clad on both sides with 17.5-micron-thick copper layers. The copper layers are patterned into RF, bias, and control conductors. The T/R module is located on the back side of the ground plane and is RF-coupled to the patch element via a slot. The T/R module is a hybrid multilayer module assembled and packaged independently and attached to the membrane array. At the time of reporting the information for

  12. Analysis of characteristics of plane microwave antennas with a linearly expanding aperture for disk antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayarnyi, V. P.; Parpula, A. A.; Girich, V. S.

    2014-11-01

    Mathematical models constructed for plane symmetric microwave antennas with a linearly expanding aperture make it possible to calculate the directional patterns depending on the aperture configuration. The directional patterns for analogous antennas operating in the range 5.9-12.5 GHz are measured experimentally; good agreement between the theoretical and experimental results is observed. The regularities in the influence of the aperture configuration of the antennas under investigation on the shape of the principal lobe of their directional patterns are established; these regularities are used for designing disk antenna arrays of circular and sector scan on their basis.

  13. Technique for Extension of Small Antenna Array Mutual-Coupling Data to Larger Antenna Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, M. C.

    1996-01-01

    A technique is presented whereby the mutual interaction between a small number of elements in a planar array can be interpolated and extrapolated to accurately predict the combined interactions in a much larger array of many elements. An approximate series expression is developed, based upon knowledge of the analytical characteristic behavior of the mutual admittance between small aperture antenna elements in a conducting ground plane. This expression is utilized to analytically extend known values for a few spacings and orientations to other element configurations, thus eliminating the need to numerically integrate a large number of highly oscillating and slowly converging functions. This paper shows that the technique can predict very accurately the mutual coupling between elements in a very large planar array with a knowledge of the self-admittance of an isolated element and the coupling between only two-elements arranged in eight different pair combinations. These eight pair combinations do not necessarily have to correspond to pairs in the large array, although all of the individual elements must be identical.

  14. Phased array-fed antenna configuration study: Technology assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croswell, W. F.; Ball, D. E.; Taylor, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    Spacecraft array fed reflector antenna systems were assessed for particular application to a multiple fixed spot beam/multiple scanning spot beam system. Reflector optics systems are reviewed in addition to an investigation of the feasibility of the use of monolithic microwave integrated circuit power amplifiers and phase shifters in each element of the array feed.

  15. Flexible 16 Antenna Array for Microwave Breast Cancer Detection.

    PubMed

    Bahramiabarghouei, Hadi; Porter, Emily; Santorelli, Adam; Gosselin, Benoit; Popović, Milica; Rusch, Leslie A

    2015-10-01

    Radar-based microwave imaging has been widely studied for breast cancer detection in recent times. Sensing dielectric property differences of tissues has been studied over a wide frequency band for this application. We design single- and dual-polarization antennas for wireless ultrawideband breast cancer detection systems using an inhomogeneous multilayer model of the human breast. Antennas made from flexible materials are more easily adapted to wearable applications. Miniaturized flexible monopole and spiral antennas on a 50-μm Kapton polyimide are designed, using a high-frequency structure simulator, to be in contact with biological breast tissues. The proposed antennas are designed to operate in a frequency range of 2-4 GHz (with reflection coefficient (S11) below -10 dB). Measurements show that the flexible antennas have good impedance matching when in different positions with different curvature around the breast. Our miniaturized flexible antennas are 20 mm × 20 mm. Furthermore, two flexible conformal 4 × 4 ultrawideband antenna arrays (single and dual polarization), in a format similar to that of a bra, were developed for a radar-based breast cancer detection system. By using a reflector for the arrays, the penetration of the propagated electromagnetic waves from the antennas into the breast can be improved by factors of 3.3 and 2.6, respectively. PMID:26011862

  16. Modern Design of Resonant Edge-Slot Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosselin, R. B.

    2006-01-01

    Resonant edge-slot (slotted-waveguide) array antennas can now be designed very accurately following a modern computational approach like that followed for some other microwave components. This modern approach makes it possible to design superior antennas at lower cost than was previously possible. Heretofore, the physical and engineering knowledge of resonant edge-slot array antennas had remained immature since they were introduced during World War II. This is because despite their mechanical simplicity, high reliability, and potential for operation with high efficiency, the electromagnetic behavior of resonant edge-slot antennas is very complex. Because engineering design formulas and curves for such antennas are not available in the open literature, designers have been forced to implement iterative processes of fabricating and testing multiple prototypes to derive design databases, each unique for a specific combination of operating frequency and set of waveguide tube dimensions. The expensive, time-consuming nature of these processes has inhibited the use of resonant edge-slot antennas. The present modern approach reduces costs by making it unnecessary to build and test multiple prototypes. As an additional benefit, this approach affords a capability to design an array of slots having different dimensions to taper the antenna illumination to reduce the amplitudes of unwanted side lobes. The heart of the modern approach is the use of the latest commercially available microwave-design software, which implements finite-element models of electromagnetic fields in and around waveguides, antenna elements, and similar components. Instead of building and testing prototypes, one builds a database and constructs design curves from the results of computational simulations for sets of design parameters. The figure shows a resonant edge-slot antenna designed following this approach. Intended for use as part of a radiometer operating at a frequency of 10.7 GHz, this antenna

  17. Phased array antenna investigation for CubeSat size satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Kien

    Increasing bandwidth of the communication link has been a challenge for CubeSat class satellite. Traditional satellites usually utilizes high gain antennas for this purpose, but these antenna are rarely seen in CubeSat because of its power, volume and weight constraints. To solve these issues, this dissertation presents a phased array antenna system prototyped at 2.45 GHz with 17.7 dBi gain at broadside, 14.2 dBi at +/-40°, 50 MHz bandwidth, and fits on a side of a 3U CubeSat. The gain can be increased by adding more antenna elements into the array as needed. Testing for electronic beam steering has been completed and detailed results will be presented.

  18. Slotted waveguide array antennas for spaceborne SAR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostrom, D. E.; Carnegis, G. A.; Golvin, B.; Knoell, A. C.

    1983-07-01

    Starting with mission definitions and constraints for the NASA proposed Shuttle Active Microwave Experiments (SAMEX) and Free Flying Imaging Radar Experiment (FIREX), Hughes Aircraft Company has compiled and studied the technology available for slotted waveguide planar array antennas suitable for spaceborne SAR application. Antenna performance is derived, and fabrication techniques are discussed. Mission requirements will always lead to an aperture subdivided into waveguide modules, thereby validating a module definition for other mission building blocks. Finally, a specific design is proposed for a SAMEX mission using the modules as RF aperture building blocks, resulting in a (nominal) 15.1 meter by 5.5 meter extensile dual polarized L-, C-, and X-band planar array with an associated extensile graphite/epoxy support structure. Antenna development begin with a fabrication method development study involving a representative portion of an antenna module.

  19. Slotted waveguide array antennas for spaceborne SAR applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bostrom, D. E.; Carnegis, G. A.; Golvin, B.; Knoell, A. C.

    1983-01-01

    Starting with mission definitions and constraints for the NASA proposed Shuttle Active Microwave Experiments (SAMEX) and Free Flying Imaging Radar Experiment (FIREX), Hughes Aircraft Company has compiled and studied the technology available for slotted waveguide planar array antennas suitable for spaceborne SAR application. Antenna performance is derived, and fabrication techniques are discussed. Mission requirements will always lead to an aperture subdivided into waveguide modules, thereby validating a module definition for other mission building blocks. Finally, a specific design is proposed for a SAMEX mission using the modules as RF aperture building blocks, resulting in a (nominal) 15.1 meter by 5.5 meter extensile dual polarized L-, C-, and X-band planar array with an associated extensile graphite/epoxy support structure. Antenna development begin with a fabrication method development study involving a representative portion of an antenna module.

  20. Applications of trimode waveguide feeds in adaptive virtual array antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahgholi Pour, Z.; Shafai, Lotfollah

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents the formation of an adaptive virtual array antenna in a symmetric parabolic reflector antenna illuminated by trimode circular waveguide feeds with different mode alignments. The modes of interest are the TE11, TE21, and TM01 type modes. The terms TE and TM stand for the transverse electric and transverse magnetic modes, respectively. By appropriately exciting these modes and varying the mode orientations inside the primary feed, the effective source of radiation is displaced on the reflector aperture, while the resulting secondary patterns remain axial. Different antenna parameters such as gain, cross polarization, and phase center locations are investigated. It is demonstrated that the extra third mode facilitates the formation of symmetric virtual array antennas with reasonable cross polarization discriminations at the diagonal plane.

  1. Modulation transfer function of antenna-coupled infrared detector arrays.

    PubMed

    Boreman, G D; Dogariu, A; Christodoulou, C; Kotter, D

    1996-11-01

    Individual antenna-coupled IR bolometers have recently been demonstrated at wavelengths near 10 μm. If focal-plane arrays (FPA's) of antenna-coupled detectors can be fabricated, enhancement of IR-imager performance is possible. A first step in the design process is to analyze the image-quality potential of antenna-coupled, FPA-based imagers in terms of the modulation transfer function (MTF). The key step in our analysis is development of a cross-talk MTF that accounts for the electromagnetic coupling between adjacent antennas in the FPA. We find that electromagnetic cross talk will not be a significant image-quality factor in antenna-coupled IR FPA's. PMID:21127627

  2. Modulation transfer function of antenna-coupled infrared detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boreman, Glenn D.; Dogariu, Aristide; Christodoulou, Christos; Kotter, Dale

    1996-11-01

    Individual antenna-coupled IR bolometers have recently been demonstrated at wavelengths near 10 mu m. If focal-plane arrays (FPA's) of antenna-coupled detectors can be fabricated, enhancement of IR-imager performance is possible. A first step in the design process is to analyze the image-quality potential of antenna-coupled, FPA-based imagers in terms of the modulation transfer function (MTF). The key step in our analysis is development of a cross-talk MTF that accounts for the electromagnetic coupling between adjacent antennas in the FPA. We find that electromagnetic cross talk will not be a significant image-quality factor in antenna-coupled IR FPA's.

  3. Method for calculating longitudinal microstrip antennas in planar phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indenbom, M. V.

    The characteristics of longitudinal microstrip antennas in a planar phased array are examined on the basis of the application of the finite element method to an integral equation for the 'charge' on the microstrip line. Microstrip dipoles, and Yagi and log-periodic antennas are examples of such radiators. The analysis takes into account the complex configuration of the conductors, both current components, and the presence of dielectric substrates and a protective coating.

  4. Accurate Insertion Loss Measurements of the Juno Patch Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Neil; Chen, Jacqueline; Hodges, Richard; Demas, John

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes two independent methods for estimating the insertion loss of patch array antennas that were developed for the Juno Microwave Radiometer instrument. One method is based principally on pattern measurements while the other method is based solely on network analyzer measurements. The methods are accurate to within 0.1 dB for the measured antennas and show good agreement (to within 0.1dB) of separate radiometric measurements.

  5. Algorithmic sensor failure detection on passive antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Joohwan; Luk, Franklin T.

    1991-12-01

    We present an algorithm that can detect and isolate a single passive antenna failure under the assumption of slowly time varying signal sources. Our failure detection algorithm recursively computes an eigenvalue decomposition of the covariance of the "syndrome" vector. The sensor failure is detected using the largest eigenvalue, and the faulty sensor is located using the corresponding eigenvector. The algorithm can also be used in conjunction with existing singular value decomposition or orthogonal triangularization based recursive antenna array processing methods.

  6. Planar array antenna for ERS-1 synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R.

    1986-08-01

    To meet ERS-1 SAR specifications as to high gain, very narrow beamwidth in azimuth, and a slightly tapered shaped beam in elevation, a long narrow antenna was designed. At 5.3 GHz center frequency, the slotted waveguide antenna concept was selected over the reflector or the microstrip principles. Reasons are the low losses, good beamshaping capability, and mechanical compactness. A resonant array is chosen. All waveguides are made from metallized CFRP for reasons of low mass. The mechanical antenna system features a deployable configuration, plus the associated mechanisms. The performance verification concept, through analyses, and tests at different levels, is described.

  7. A 32 GHz microstrip array antenna for microspacecraft application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J.

    1994-01-01

    JPL/NASA is currently developing microspacecraft systems for future deep space applications. One of the frequency bands being investigated for microspacecraft is the Ka-band (32 GHz), which can be used with smaller equipment and provides a larger bandwidth. This article describes the successful development of a circularly polarized microstrip array with 28 dBic of gain at 32 GHz. This antenna, which is thin, flat, and small, can be surface-mounted onto the microspacecraft and, hence, takes very little volume and mass of the spacecraft. The challenges in developing this antenna are minimizing the microstrip antenna's insertion loss and maintaining a reasonable frequency bandwidth.

  8. A 20 GHz circularly polarized, fan beam slot array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weikle, D. C.

    1982-03-01

    An EHF waveguide slot array was developed for possible use as a receive-only paging antenna for ground mobile terminals. The design, fabrication, and measured performance of this antenna are presented. The antenna generates a circularly polarized fan beam that is narrow in azimuth and broad in elevation. When mechanically rotated in azimuth, it can receive a 20 GHz satellite transmission independent of mobile terminal direction. Azimuth plane sidelobe levels, which are typically <-40 dB from the main lobe, provide for discrimination against ground and airborne jammers.

  9. Multi-carrier mobile TDMA system with active array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, Ryutaro; Matsumoto, Yasushi; Hamamoto, Naokazu

    1990-01-01

    A multi-carrier time division multiple access (TDMA) is proposed for the future mobile satellite communications systems that include a multi-satellite system. This TDMA system employs the active array antenna in which the digital beam forming technique is adopted to control the antenna beam direction. The antenna beam forming is carried out at the base band frequency by using the digital signal processing technique. The time division duplex technique is applied for the TDM/TDMA burst format, in order not to overlap transmit and receive timing.

  10. Thin conformal antenna array for microwave power conversions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, R. M. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A structure of a circularly polarized, thin conformal, antenna array which may be mounted integrally with the skin of an aircraft employs microstrip elliptical elements and interconnecting feed lines spaced from a circuit ground plane by a thin dielectric layer. The feed lines are impedance matched to the elliptical antenna elements by selecting a proper feedpoint inside the periphery of the elliptical antenna elements. Diodes connected between the feed lines and the ground plane rectify the microwave power, and microstrip filters (low pass) connected in series with the feed lines provide dc current to a microstrip bus. Low impedance matching strips are included between the elliptical elements and the rectifying and filtering elements.

  11. Design and fabrication of microstrip antenna arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A microstrip array project was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of designing and fabricating simple, low cost, low sidelobe phased arrays with circular disk microstrip radiating elements. Design data were presented for microstrip elements and arrays including the effects of the protective covers, the mutual interaction between elements, and stripline feed network design. Low cost multilayer laminate fabrication techniques were also investigated. Utilizing this design data two C-band low sidelobe arrays were fabricated and tested: an eight-element linear and a sixty-four element planar array. These arrays incorporated stripline Butler matrix feed networks to produce a low sidelobe broadside beam.

  12. MIMO communications within the HF band using compact antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunashekar, S. D.; Warrington, E. M.; Feeney, S. M.; Salous, S.; Abbasi, N. M.

    2010-12-01

    Measurements have been made over a 255 km radio path between Durham and Leicester in the UK in order to investigate the potential applicability of multiple input multiple output (MIMO) techniques to communications within the HF band. This paper describes the results from experiments in which compact heterogeneous antenna arrays have been employed. The results of these experiments indicate that traditional spaced HF antenna arrays can be replaced by compact, active, heterogeneous arrays in order to achieve the required levels of decorrelation between the various antenna elements. An example case study is also presented which highlights the importance of the variable nature of the ionosphere in the context of HF-MIMO radio links.

  13. Strong near field enhancement in THz nano-antenna arrays

    PubMed Central

    Feuillet-Palma, Cheryl; Todorov, Yanko; Vasanelli, Angela; Sirtori, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    A key issue in modern photonics is the ability to concentrate light into very small volumes, thus enhancing its interaction with quantum objects of sizes much smaller than the wavelength. In the microwave domain, for many years this task has been successfully performed by antennas, built from metals that can be considered almost perfect at these frequencies. Antenna-like concepts have been recently extended into the THz and up to the visible, however metal losses increase and limit their performances. In this work we experimentally study the light coupling properties of dense arrays of subwavelength THz antenna microcavities. We demonstrate that the combination of array layout with subwavelength electromagnetic confinement allows for 104-fold enhancement of the electromagnetic energy density inside the cavities, despite the low quality factor of a single element. This effect is quantitatively described by an analytical model that can be applied for the optimization of any nanoantenna array. PMID:23449101

  14. Strong near field enhancement in THz nano-antenna arrays.

    PubMed

    Feuillet-Palma, Cheryl; Todorov, Yanko; Vasanelli, Angela; Sirtori, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    A key issue in modern photonics is the ability to concentrate light into very small volumes, thus enhancing its interaction with quantum objects of sizes much smaller than the wavelength. In the microwave domain, for many years this task has been successfully performed by antennas, built from metals that can be considered almost perfect at these frequencies. Antenna-like concepts have been recently extended into the THz and up to the visible, however metal losses increase and limit their performances. In this work we experimentally study the light coupling properties of dense arrays of subwavelength THz antenna microcavities. We demonstrate that the combination of array layout with subwavelength electromagnetic confinement allows for 10(4)-fold enhancement of the electromagnetic energy density inside the cavities, despite the low quality factor of a single element. This effect is quantitatively described by an analytical model that can be applied for the optimization of any nanoantenna array. PMID:23449101

  15. Directional field enhancement of dielectric nano optical disc antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ivan; Du, Y.

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents a discussion on the directive field enhancement of dielectric disc antenna arrays in optical band. The property of dielectric material is addressed, and field modes in a cylindrical resonator are discussed. It is identified that the fundamental mode of HE 11δ generates the far field with a higher directivity than other modes. More effective field enhancement in the radiation direction could be achieved by using multiple-disc antenna arrays. Simulation examples indicate that the directivity of a disc antenna array varies with the disc spacing. The maximum directivity is observed when the disc spacing is approximately equal to the half of the vacuum wavelength. The maximum directivity can be improved significantly when the disc number is increased.

  16. Hydrostar Thermal and Structural Deformation Analyses of Antenna Array Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amundsen, Ruth M.; Hope, Drew J.

    1998-01-01

    The proposed Hydrostar mission used a large orbiting antenna array to demonstrate synthetic aperture technology in space while obtaining global soil moisture data. In order to produce accurate data, the array was required to remain as close as possible to its perfectly aligned placement while undergoing the mechanical and thermal stresses induced by orbital changes. Thermal and structural analyses for a design concept of this antenna array were performed. The thermal analysis included orbital radiation calculations, as well as parametric studies of orbit altitude, material properties and coating types. The thermal results included predicted thermal distributions over the array for several cases. The structural analysis provided thermally-driven deflections based on these cases, as well as based on a 1-g inertial load. In order to minimize the deflections of the array in orbit, the use of XN70, a carbon-reinforced polycyanate composite, was recommended.

  17. State-of-the-art and trends of Ground-Penetrating Radar antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vescovo, Roberto; Pajewski, Lara; Tosti, Fabio

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this contribution is to offer an overview on the antenna arrays for GPR systems, current trends and open issues. Antennas are a critical hardware component of a radar system, dictating its performance in terms of capability to detect targets. Nevertheless, most of the research efforts in the Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) area focus on the use of this imaging technique in a plethora of different applications and on the improvement of modelling/inversion/processing techniques, whereas a limited number of studies deal with technological issues related to the design of novel systems, including the synthesis, optimisation and characterisation of advanced antennas. Even fewer are the research activities carried out to develop innovative antenna arrays. GPR antennas operate in a strongly demanding environment and should satisfy a number of requirements, somehow unique and very different than those of conventional radar antennas. The same applies to GPR antenna arrays. The first requirement is an ultra-wide frequency band: the radar has to transmit and receive short-duration time-domain waveforms, in the order of a few nanoseconds, the time-duration of the emitted pulses being a trade-off between the desired radar resolution and penetration depth. Furthermore, GPR antennas should have a linear phase characteristic over the whole operational frequency range, predictable polarisation and gain. Due to the fact that a subsurface imaging system is essentially a short-range radar, the coupling between transmitting and receiving antennas has to be low and short in time. GPR antennas should have quick ring-down characteristics, in order to prevent masking of targets and guarantee a good resolution. The radiation patterns should ensure minimal interference with unwanted objects, usually present in the complex operational environment; to this aim, antennas should provide high directivity and concentrate the electromagnetic energy into a narrow solid angle. As GPR

  18. Optical beam forming techniques for phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Te-Kao; Chandler, C.

    1993-01-01

    Conventional phased array antennas using waveguide or coax for signal distribution are impractical for large scale implementation on satellites or spacecraft because they exhibit prohibitively large system size, heavy weight, high attenuation loss, limited bandwidth, sensitivity to electromagnetic interference (EMI) temperature drifts and phase instability. However, optical beam forming systems are smaller, lighter, and more flexible. Three optical beam forming techniques are identified as applicable to large spaceborne phased array antennas. They are (1) the optical fiber replacement of conventional RF phased array distribution and control components, (2) spatial beam forming, and (3) optical beam splitting with integrated quasi-optical components. The optical fiber replacement and the spatial beam forming approaches were pursued by many organizations. Two new optical beam forming architectures are presented. Both architectures involve monolithic integration of the antenna radiating elements with quasi-optical grid detector arrays. The advantages of the grid detector array in the optical process are the higher power handling capability and the dynamic range. One architecture involves a modified version of the original spatial beam forming approach. The basic difference is the spatial light modulator (SLM) device for controlling the aperture field distribution. The original liquid crystal light valve SLM is replaced by an optical shuffling SLM, which was demonstrated for the 'smart pixel' technology. The advantages are the capability of generating the agile beams of a phased array antenna and to provide simultaneous transmit and receive functions. The second architecture considered is the optical beam splitting approach. This architecture involves an alternative amplitude control for each antenna element with an optical beam power divider comprised of mirrors and beam splitters. It also implements the quasi-optical grid phase shifter for phase control and grid

  19. Synthesis of a large communications aperture using small antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Resch, George M.; Cwik, T. W.; Jamnejad, V.; Logan, R. T.; Miller, R. B.; Rogstad, Dave H.

    1994-01-01

    In this report we compare the cost of an array of small antennas to that of a single large antenna assuming both the array and single large antenna have equal performance and availability. The single large antenna is taken to be one of the 70-m antennas of the Deep Space Network. The cost of the array is estimated as a function of the array element diameter for three different values of system noise temperature corresponding to three different packaging schemes for the first amplifier. Array elements are taken to be fully steerable paraboloids and their cost estimates were obtained from commercial vendors. Array loss mechanisms and calibration problems are discussed. For array elements in the range 3 - 35 m there is no minimum in the cost versus diameter curve for the three system temperatures that were studied.

  20. Optimization of an antenna array using genetic algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Kiehbadroudinezhad, Shahideh; Noordin, Nor Kamariah; Sali, A.; Abidin, Zamri Zainal

    2014-06-01

    An array of antennas is usually used in long distance communication. The observation of celestial objects necessitates a large array of antennas, such as the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). Optimizing this kind of array is very important when observing a high performance system. The genetic algorithm (GA) is an optimization solution for these kinds of problems that reconfigures the position of antennas to increase the u-v coverage plane or decrease the sidelobe levels (SLLs). This paper presents how to optimize a correlator antenna array using the GA. A brief explanation about the GA and operators used in this paper (mutation and crossover) is provided. Then, the results of optimization are discussed. The results show that the GA provides efficient and optimum solutions among a pool of candidate solutions in order to achieve the desired array performance for the purposes of radio astronomy. The proposed algorithm is able to distribute the u-v plane more efficiently than GMRT with a more than 95% distribution ratio at snapshot, and to fill the u-v plane from a 20% to more than 68% filling ratio as the number of generations increases in the hour tracking observations. Finally, the algorithm is able to reduce the SLL to –21.75 dB.

  1. Theoretical design/synthesis of slotted waveguide arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangster, A. J.; McCormick, A. H. I.

    1989-02-01

    A computer-aided design/synthesis procedure for array antennas of the slotted-waveguide type is described. It differs from earlier contributions to this topic in that it uses theoretically evaluated self-admittances, rather than measured self-admittances, for the individual broadwall slots in the array. By adopting the moment method to generate the slot self-admittances, it is shown that accuracies which are comparable with those obtained from a measurement-based procedure can be achieved.

  2. Microwave power transmitting phased array antenna research project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    An initial design study and the development results of an S band RF power transmitting phased array antenna experiment system are presented. The array was to be designed, constructed and instrumented to permit wireless power transmission technology evaluation measurements. The planned measurements were to provide data relative to the achievable performance in the state of the art of flexible surface, retrodirective arrays, as a step in technically evaluating the satellite power system concept for importing to earth, via microwave beams, the nearly continuous solar power available in geosynchronous orbit. Details of the microwave power transmitting phased array design, instrumentation approaches, system block diagrams, and measured component and breadboard characteristics achieved are presented.

  3. Antenna of adjustable bandwidth based on a pentagonal array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tecpoyotl-Torres, M.; Vera-Dimas, J. G.; Cabello Ruiz, R.; García-García, O.; Escobedo-Alatorre, J.; Sanchez-Mondragon, J.; Torres-Cisneros, M.; Varona, J.; Vargas-Bernal, R.

    2011-09-01

    Antenna characteristics are chosen according to the features determined by the systems where they will be used. While some systems require a very narrow bandwidth, others may operate with a much wider bandwidth. Some techniques used for increasing the bandwidth of a given antenna have considered mechanical adjustment of the air layer thickness, with the consequent change on the effective permittivity and performance. Some other systems consider a suitable choice of feeding techniques and impedance matching network. However, approaches for reducing the bandwidth have not received the same level of attention. Narrow bandwidth antennas are of particular interest in security and surveillance systems. In this work we present a technique, based on the design of a pentagonal antenna array, which allows for adjusting the bandwidth in either direction. The array is formed by an inner patch designed at the desired operating frequency of the system and a gap coupled external ring centered at a different frequency (lower or very near the operating frequency), which determines the potential bandwidth increment or decrement. The feed point is located on the inner patch. As a proof-of-concept, this work offers a tuning range that goes from -40% of the center frequency up to +50% of the center operating frequency of the patch antenna. The single patch antenna of this work was designed and simulated at an operating frequency of 4.9 GHz on RT/Duroid 5880.

  4. View to the eastnortheast of the Antenna Array OvertheHorizon ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View to the east-northeast of the Antenna Array - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Christmas Valley Radar Site Transmit Sector Six Antenna Array, On unnamed road west of Lost Forest Road, Christmas Valley, Lake County, OR

  5. General view looking northnortheast at antenna array OvertheHorizon Backscatter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view looking north-northeast at antenna array - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Moscow Radar Site Transmit Sector Two Antenna Array, At the end of Steam Road, Moscow, Somerset County, ME

  6. Detail of antenna array, looking northnorthwest OvertheHorizon Backscatter Radar ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of antenna array, looking north-northwest - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Tulelake Radar Site Receive Sector Five Antenna Array, Unnamed Road West of Double Head Road, Tulelake, Siskiyou County, CA

  7. View to the east of the Antenna Array OvertheHorizon ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View to the east of the Antenna Array - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Christmas Valley Radar Site Transmit Sector Six Antenna Array, On unnamed road west of Lost Forest Road, Christmas Valley, Lake County, OR

  8. General view of Antenna Array, looking west OvertheHorizon Backscatter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of Antenna Array, looking west - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Tulelake Radar Site Receive Sector Six Antenna Array, Unnamed Road West of Double Head Road, Tulelake, Siskiyou County, CA

  9. View to the northeast of the antenna array OvertheHorizon ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View to the northeast of the antenna array - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Christmas Valley Radar Site Transmit Sector Four Antenna Array, On unnamed road west of Lost Forest Road, Christmas Valley, Lake County, OR

  10. General view looking northnortheast at antenna array OvertheHorizon Backscatter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view looking north-northeast at antenna array - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Moscow Radar Site Transmit Sector One Antenna Array, At the end of Steam Road, Moscow, Somerset County, ME

  11. Phased array antenna analysis using hybrid finite element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, Daniel T.

    1993-06-01

    This research in computational electromagnetics developed a new method for predicting the near-field mutual coupling effects in phased array antennas, using the finite element method (FEM) in combination with integral equations. Accurate feed modeling is accomplished by enforcing continuity between the FEM solution and an arbitrary number of wave guide models across a ground plane aperture. A periodic integral equation is imposed above the antenna's physical structure in order to enforce the radiation condition and to confine the analysis to an array unit cell. The electric field is expanded in terms of vector finite elements, and Galerkin's method is used to write the problem as a matrix equation. A general-purpose computer code was developed and validated by comparing its results to published data for several array types. Its versatility was demonstrated with predictions of the scanning properties of arrays of printed dipoles and printed flared notches.

  12. Flexible sixteen monopole antenna array for microwave breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, H; Porter, E; Santorelli, A; Gosselin, B; Popovic, M; Rusch, L A

    2014-01-01

    Radar based microwave imaging (MI) has been widely studied for breast cancer detection in recent times. Sensing dielectric property differences of tissues over a wide frequency band has been made possible by ultra-wideband (UWB) techniques. In this paper, a flexible, compact monopole antenna on a 100 μm Kapton polyimide is designed, using a high frequency structure simulator (HFSS), to be in contact with biological breast tissues over the 2-5GHz frequency range. The antenna parameters are optimized to obtain a good impedance match over the required frequency range. The designed antenna size is 18mm × 18mm. Further, a flexible conformal 4×4 ultra-wideband antenna array, in a format similar to that of a bra, was developed for a radar-based breast cancer detection system. PMID:25570813

  13. An adaptive array antenna for mobile satellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milne, Robert

    1988-01-01

    The adaptive array is linearly polarized and consists essentially of a driven lambda/4 monopole surrounded by an array of parasitic elements all mounted on a ground plane of finite size. The parasitic elements are all connected to ground via pin diodes. By applying suitable bias voltages, the desired parasitic elements can be activated and made highly reflective. The directivity and pointing of the antenna beam can be controlled in both the azimuth and elevation planes using high speed digital switching techniques. The antenna RF losses are neglible and the maximum gain is close to the theoretical value determined by the effective aperture size. The antenna is compact, has a low profile, is inexpensive to manufacture and can handle high transmitter power.

  14. Antenna-coupled TES bolometer arrays for CMB polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, C. L.; Bock, J. J.; Bonetti, J. A.; Brevik, J.; Chattopadhyay, G.; Day, P. K.; Golwala, S.; Kenyon, M.; Lange, A. E.; LeDuc, H. G.; Nguyen, H.; Ogburn, R. W.; Orlando, A.; Transgrud, A.; Turner, A.; Wang, G.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2008-07-01

    We describe the design and performance of polarization selective antenna-coupled TES arrays that will be used in several upcoming Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments: SPIDER, BICEP-2/SPUD. The fully lithographic polarimeter arrays utilize planar phased-antennas for collimation (F/4 beam) and microstrip filters for band definition (25% bandwidth). These devices demonstrate high optical efficiency, excellent beam shapes, and well-defined spectral bands. The dual-polarization antennas provide well-matched beams and low cross polarization response, both important for high-fidelity polarization measurements. These devices have so far been developed for the 100 GHz and 150 GHz bands, two premier millimeter-wave atmospheric windows for CMB observations. In the near future, the flexible microstrip-coupled architecture can provide photon noise-limited detection for the entire frequency range of the CMBPOL mission. This paper is a summary of the progress we have made since the 2006 SPIE meeting in Orlando, FL.

  15. Technique for Radiometer and Antenna Array Calibration with a Radiated Noise Diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Karthik; Limaye, Ashutosh; Laymon, Charles; Meyer, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new technique to calibrate a microwave radiometer and antenna array system. This calibration technique uses a radiated noise source in addition to two calibration sources internal to the radiometer. The method accurately calibrates antenna arrays with embedded active devices (such as amplifiers) which are used extensively in active phased array antennas.

  16. Monolithic and integrated phased array antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaubert, Daniel H.; Pozar, David M.

    Some of the problems relevant to the design of monolithic and integrated arrays are examined. In particular, attention is given to electrical and mechanical design considerations, restrictions they impose on the choice of elements and architecture of integrated arrays, and elements that can alleviate one or more of these restrictions. Monolithic array designs are compared with some multiple-layer and two-sided designs using such criteria as scan range, bandwidth, substrate size and configuration, polarization, and feed line radiation. Broadside radiating elements, such as microstrip dipoles and patches, as well as end-fire radiating slots are considered.

  17. The frequency response of phased-array antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, B. C.

    1989-02-01

    The phased-array antenna will be examined from the point of view of effects caused by changes in frequency. Both simple linear arrays and the more complex conformal array are examined. For the conformal array, a comparison between a corporate-feed structure and a row series-feed structure is included. There are two primary effects which will be discussed: beam-pointing errors and distortion of large bandwidth signals. A formula for estimating the operating or tunable array bandwidth for narrow-bandwidth signals is derived. An expression for the wide-bandwidth-signal transfer function is also obtained and examined. It will be shown that the transfer function depends both on the array scan angle and the position within the mainbeam.

  18. The frequency response of phased-array antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, B.C.

    1989-02-01

    The phased-array antenna will be examined from the point of view of effects caused by changes in frequency. Both simple linear arrays and the more complex conformal array are examined. For the conformal array, a comparison between a corporate-feed structure and a row series-feed structure is included. There are two primary effects which will be discussed: beam-pointing errors and distortion of large bandwidth signals. A formula for estimating the operating or tunable array bandwidth for narrow-bandwidth signals is derived. An expression for the wide-bandwidth-signal transfer function is also obtained and examined. It will be shown that the transfer function depends both on the array scan angle and the position within the mainbeam. 25 figs.

  19. Inflatably Deployed Membrane Waveguide Array Antenna for Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichodziejewski, David; Cravey, Robin; Hopkins, Glenn

    2003-01-01

    As an alternative to parabolic antennas and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems, waveguide arrays offer another method of providing RF transmit/receive communication apertures for spacecraft. The advantage of the membrane waveguide array concept, in addition to its lightweight and low packaged volume, is its inherent shape. Relative to parabolic antennas, the requirement to make an accurate doubly curved surface is removed. L'Garde and Langley Research Center (LaRC), are currently working in this area to develop lightweight waveguide array technologies utilizing thin film membrane structures. Coupled with an ultra-lightweight inflatably deployed rigidizable planar support structure, the system offers a very compelling technology in the fields of space-based radar, communications, and earth resource mapping.

  20. Out-of-band response of antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, David A.; Francis, Michael H.

    1987-11-01

    The response of antenna arrays to out-of-band frequencies has been analyzed using the effective-aperture approach. An average value of effective aperture can be obtained by averaging the incidence angle and the polarization of the incidence field. Far-field patterns have also been calculated by treating the array element excitations as random variables. The randomness in the element excitations causes a decrease in directivity and an increase in sidelobe level. Out-of-band measurements on a slotted-waveguide array confirm these trends.

  1. A microstrip array feed for MSAT spacecraft reflector antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, John

    1988-01-01

    An L-band circularly polarized microstrip array antenna with relatively wide bandwidth has been developed. The array has seven subarrays which form a single cluster as part of a large overlapping cluster reflector feed array. Each of the seven subarrays consists of four uniquely arranged linearly polarized microstrip elements. A 7.5 percent impedance (VSWR less than 1.5) as well as axial ratio (less than 1 dB) bandwidths have been achieved by employing a relatively thick honeycomb substrate with special impedance matching feed probes.

  2. Algorithm for Aligning an Array of Receiving Radio Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogstad, David

    2006-01-01

    A digital-signal-processing algorithm (somewhat arbitrarily) called SUMPLE has been devised as a means of aligning the outputs of multiple receiving radio antennas in a large array for the purpose of receiving a weak signal transmitted by a single distant source. As used here, aligning signifies adjusting the delays and phases of the outputs from the various antennas so that their relatively weak replicas of the desired signal can be added coherently to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for improved reception, as though one had a single larger antenna. The method was devised to enhance spacecraft-tracking and telemetry operations in NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN); the method could also be useful in such other applications as both satellite and terrestrial radio communications and radio astronomy. Heretofore, most commonly, alignment has been effected by a process that involves correlation of signals in pairs. This approach necessitates the use of a large amount of hardware most notably, the N(N - 1)/2 correlators needed to process signals from all possible pairs of N antennas. Moreover, because the incoming signals typically have low SNRs, the delay and phase adjustments are poorly determined from the pairwise correlations. SUMPLE also involves correlations, but the correlations are not performed in pairs. Instead, in a partly iterative process, each signal is appropriately weighted and then correlated with a composite signal equal to the sum of the other signals (see Figure 1). One benefit of this approach is that only N correlators are needed; in an array of N much greater than 1 antennas, this results in a significant reduction of the amount of hardware. Another benefit is that once the array achieves coherence, the correlation SNR is N - 1 times that of a pair of antennas.

  3. Search space scanning with planar electronically-controlled array antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanle, E.

    The demands which radar installations have to satisfy are rising with increasing traffic density in the case of civil applications and a growing threat level in the case of the military sector. In many instances, these demands can only be met by adapting the value of the transmitted power to the traffic density or the magnitude of the threat. Such an approach requires the employment of computer-aided radar systems with electronically-controlled antennas. The considered systems have currently also advantages with respect to reliability and cost effectiveness. The present investigation is concerned with suitable procedures for the improvement of the energy management, taking into account mainly aspects of radar control and signal processing. The discussion is based on the consideration of a planar array antenna. Differences arising in connection with the use of other types of antennas are also briefly examined. The employment of an immobile radar antenna for ground-based airspace observation is considered. Attention is given to the appropriate selection of the width of the lobe, the scanning, the tilt of the antenna, and antenna performance characteristics.

  4. Performance evaluation of antenna arrays with noisy carrier reference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, T. Y.; Clare, L. P.

    1981-01-01

    The performance evaluation of coherent receivers with noisy carrier references and multiple antennas is presented. The received signal is assumed to be residual carrier BPSK, with a PLL used for extracting the carrier. Explicit relationships between the error probabilities and the various system parameters are given. Specific results are given for the performance gain of combined carrier referencing over baseband only combining when the channel alignment process is ideal. A simple asymptotic expression for the performance gain is determined when the number of antennas used is increased without bound. Examples using Deep Space Network receivers illustrate the performance of each arraying structure.

  5. Spatial frequency multiplier with active linearly tapered slot antenna array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Lee, Richard Q.

    1994-01-01

    A frequency multiplier with active linearly tapered slot antennas (LTSA's) has been demonstrated at the second harmonic frequency. In each antenna element, a GaAs monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) distributed amplifier is integrated with two LTSA's. The multiplier has a very wide bandwidth and large dynamic range. The fundamental-to-second harmonic conversion efficiency is 8.1 percent. The spatially combined second harmonic signal is 50 dB above the noise level. The design is suitable for constructing a large array using monolithic integration techniques.

  6. Space Power Amplification with Active Linearly Tapered Slot Antenna Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Lee, Richard Q.

    1993-01-01

    A space power amplifier composed of active linearly tapered slot antennas (LTSA's) has been demonstrated and shown to have a gain of 30 dB at 20 GHz. In each of the antenna elements, a GaAs monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) three-stage power amplifier is integrated with two LTSA's. The LTSA and the MMIC power amplifier has a gain of 11 dB and power added efficiency of 14 percent respectively. The design is suitable for constructing a large array using monolithic integration techniques.

  7. 0.6-M Antennae for the Amiba Interferometry Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, P.; Raffin, P. A.; Proty Wu, J.-H.; et al.

    2006-10-01

    The Array for Microwave Background Anisotropy (AMiBA) is a hexapod telescope for astronomy. The fully steerable platform can accommodate up to 19 dishes. We present the design, simulation, manufacturing and performance verification for the 0.6m Cassegrain antennae. The primary and secondary mirrors are carbon fiber sandwich structures, manufactured by CoTec Inc., in Taichung, Taiwan. They are aluminium coated with a final surface rms of 20-30 and 10 μm, respectively. Simulated load conditions for the mirrors show maximum rms surface errors of less than 10 μm. The measured antenna beam pattern confirms the expected performance.

  8. Estimating Transmitted-Signal Phase Variations for Uplink Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paal, Leslie; Mukai, Ryan; Vilntrotter, Victor; Cornish, Timothy; Lee, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    A method of estimating phase drifts of microwave signals distributed to, and transmitted by, antennas in an array involves the use of the signals themselves as phase references. The method was conceived as part of the solution of the problem of maintaining precise phase calibration required for proper operation of an array of Deep Space Network (DSN) antennas on Earth used for communicating with distant spacecraft at frequencies between 7 and 8 GHz. The method could also be applied to purely terrestrial phased-array radar and other radio antenna array systems. In the DSN application, the electrical lengths (effective signal-propagation path lengths) of the various branches of the system for distributing the transmitted signals to the antennas are not precisely known, and they vary with time. The variations are attributable mostly to thermal expansion and contraction of fiber-optic and electrical signal cables and to a variety of causes associated with aging of signal-handling components. The variations are large enough to introduce large phase drifts at the signal frequency. It is necessary to measure and correct for these phase drifts in order to maintain phase calibration of the antennas. A prior method of measuring phase drifts involves the use of reference-frequency signals separate from the transmitted signals. A major impediment to accurate measurement of phase drifts over time by the prior method is the fact that although DSN reference-frequency sources separate from the transmitting signal sources are stable and accurate enough for most DSN purposes, they are not stable enough for use in maintaining phase calibrations, as required, to within a few degrees over times as long as days or possibly even weeks. By eliminating reliance on the reference-frequency subsystem, the present method overcomes this impediment. In a DSN array to which the present method applies (see figure), the microwave signals to be transmitted are generated by exciters in a signal

  9. Slotline fed microstrip antenna array modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Y. T.; Oberhart, M. L.; Brenneman, J. S.; Aoyagi, P.; Moore, J.; Lee, R. Q. H.

    1988-01-01

    A feed network comprised of a combination of coplanar waveguide and slot transmission line is described for use in an array module of four microstrip elements. Examples of the module incorporating such networks are presented as well as experimentally obtained impedance and radiation characteristics.

  10. Human tracking using a two-element antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Adrian; Ling, Hao

    2005-05-01

    We investigate the use of a low-cost, two-element receiving array for tracking human movements in indoor surveillance applications. Conventional direction of arrival (DOA) detection requires the use of an antenna array with multiple elements. Here we investigate the use of only two elements in the receiver array. The concept entails simultaneously resolving the Doppler frequencies of the returned signals from the moving targets and the DOA of the targets. Simulation is performed to demonstrate the concept. Both the monostatic and the bistatic scenario where the transmitter and the receiving array are placed at different locations are investigated. DOA errors and tolerances are analyzed for each scenario. An experimental system is constructed to test the concept. The system consists of a two-element receiver array operating at 2.4 GHz. Measurement results of various collection scenarios are presented.

  11. Time-delayed directional beam phased array antenna

    DOEpatents

    Fund, Douglas Eugene; Cable, John William; Cecil, Tony Myron

    2004-10-19

    An antenna comprising a phased array of quadrifilar helix or other multifilar antenna elements and a time-delaying feed network adapted to feed the elements. The feed network can employ a plurality of coaxial cables that physically bridge a microstrip feed circuitry to feed power signals to the elements. The cables provide an incremental time delay which is related to their physical lengths, such that replacing cables having a first set of lengths with cables having a second set of lengths functions to change the time delay and shift or steer the antenna's main beam. Alternatively, the coaxial cables may be replaced with a programmable signal processor unit adapted to introduce the time delay using signal processing techniques applied to the power signals.

  12. Cylindrical Antenna With Partly Adaptive Phased-Array Feed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussein, Ziad; Hilland, Jeff

    2003-01-01

    A proposed design for a phased-array fed cylindrical-reflector microwave antenna would enable enhancement of the radiation pattern through partially adaptive amplitude and phase control of its edge radiating feed elements. Antennas based on this design concept would be attractive for use in radar (especially synthetic-aperture radar) and other systems that could exploit electronic directional scanning and in which there are requirements for specially shaped radiation patterns, including ones with low side lobes. One notable advantage of this design concept is that the transmitter/ receiver modules feeding all the elements except the edge ones could be identical and, as a result, the antenna would cost less than in the cases of prior design concepts in which these elements may not be identical.

  13. Receiver Would Control Phasing of a Phased-Array Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Charles E.; Young, Lawrence E.

    2006-01-01

    In a proposed digital signal-processing technique, a radio receiver would control the phasing of a phased-array antenna to aim the peaks of the antenna radiation pattern toward desired signal sources while aiming the nulls of the pattern toward interfering signal sources. The technique was conceived for use in a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, for which the desired signal sources would be GPS satellites and typical interference sources would be terrestrial objects that cause multipath propagation. The technique could also be used to optimize reception in spread-spectrum cellular-telephone and military communication systems. During reception of radio signals in a conventional phased-array antenna system, received signals at their original carrier frequencies are phase-shifted, then combined by analog circuitry. The combination signal is then subjected to down-conversion and demodulation. In a system according to the proposed technique (see figure), the signal received by each antenna would be subjected to down-conversion, spread-spectrum demodulation, and correlation; this processing would be performed separately from, and simultaneously with, similar processing of signals received by the other antenna elements. Following analog down-conversion to baseband, the signals would be digitized, and all subsequent processing would be digital. In the digital process, residual carriers would be removed and each signal would be correlated with a locally generated model pseudorandum-noise code, all following normal GPS procedure. As part of this procedure, accumulated values would be added in software and the resulting signals would be phase-shifted in software by the amounts necessary to synthesize the desired antenna directional gain pattern of peaks and nulls. The principal advantage of this technique over the conventional radio-frequency-combining technique is that the parallel digital baseband processing of the signals from the various antenna elements would be

  14. Coplanar waveguide feeds for phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Lee, Richard Q.

    1992-01-01

    The design and performance of the following coplanar waveguide (CPW) microwave distribution networks for linear as well as circularly polarized microstrip patches and printed dipole arrays is presented: (1) CPW/microstrip line feed; (2) CPW/balanced stripline feed; (3) CPW/slotline feed; (4) grounded CPW (GCPW)/balanced coplanar stripline feed; and (5) CPW/slot coupled feed. Typical measured radiation patterns are presented, and their relative advantages and disadvantages are compared.

  15. Coplanar waveguide feeds for phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Lee, Richard Q.

    1991-01-01

    The design and performance is presented of the following coplanar waveguides (CPW) microwave distribution networks for linear as well as circularly polarized microstrip patches and dipole arrays: (1) CPW/microstrip line feed; (2) CPW/balanced stripline feed; (3) CPW/slotline feed; (4) grounded CPW/balanced coplanar stripline feed; and (5) CPW/slot coupled feed. Typical measured radiation patterns are presented, and their relative advantages and disadvantages are compared.

  16. Coplanar waveguide feeds for phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Lee, Richard Q.

    1991-01-01

    The design and performance is presented of the following Coplanar Waveguides (CPW) microwave distribution networks for linear as well as circularly polarized microstrip patches and dipole arrays: (1) CPW/Microstrip Line feed; (2) CPW/Balanced Stripline feed; (3) CPW/Slotline feed; (4) Grounded CPW/Balanced coplanar stripline feed; and (5) CPW/Slot coupled feed. Typical measured radiation patterns are presented, and their relative advantages and disadvantages are compared.

  17. Coplanar waveguide feeds for phased array antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Lee, Richard Q.

    1991-09-01

    The design and performance is presented of the following coplanar waveguides (CPW) microwave distribution networks for linear as well as circularly polarized microstrip patches and dipole arrays: (1) CPW/microstrip line feed; (2) CPW/balanced stripline feed; (3) CPW/slotline feed; (4) grounded CPW/balanced coplanar stripline feed; and (5) CPW/slot coupled feed. Typical measured radiation patterns are presented, and their relative advantages and disadvantages are compared.

  18. Coplanar waveguide feeds for phased array antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Lee, Richard Q.

    1992-08-01

    The design and performance of the following coplanar waveguide (CPW) microwave distribution networks for linear as well as circularly polarized microstrip patches and printed dipole arrays is presented: (1) CPW/microstrip line feed; (2) CPW/balanced stripline feed; (3) CPW/slotline feed; (4) grounded CPW (GCPW)/balanced coplanar stripline feed; and (5) CPW/slot coupled feed. Typical measured radiation patterns are presented, and their relative advantages and disadvantages are compared.

  19. Coplanar waveguide feeds for phased array antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Lee, Richard Q.

    1991-09-01

    The design and performance is presented of the following Coplanar Waveguides (CPW) microwave distribution networks for linear as well as circularly polarized microstrip patches and dipole arrays: (1) CPW/Microstrip Line feed; (2) CPW/Balanced Stripline feed; (3) CPW/Slotline feed; (4) Grounded CPW/Balanced coplanar stripline feed; and (5) CPW/Slot coupled feed. Typical measured radiation patterns are presented, and their relative advantages and disadvantages are compared.

  20. UHF Microstrip Antenna Array for Synthetic- Aperture Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Robert F.; Huang, John

    2003-01-01

    An ultra-high-frequency microstrippatch antenna has been built for use in airborne synthetic-aperture radar (SAR). The antenna design satisfies requirements specific to the GeoSAR program, which is dedicated to the development of a terrain-mapping SAR system that can provide information on geology, seismicity, vegetation, and other terrain-related topics. One of the requirements is for ultra-wide-band performance: the antenna must be capable of operating with dual linear polarization in the frequency range of 350 plus or minus 80 MHz, with a peak gain of 10 dB at the middle frequency of 350 MHz and a gain of at least 8 dB at the upper and lower ends (270 and 430 MHz) of the band. Another requirement is compactness: the antenna must fit in the wingtip pod of a Gulfstream II airplane. The antenna includes a linear array of microstrip-patch radiating elements supported over square cavities. Each patch is square (except for small corner cuts) and has a small square hole at its center.

  1. Frequency translating phase conjugation circuit for active retrodirective antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernoff, R.

    1980-11-01

    An active retrodirective antenna array which has central phasing from a reference antenna element through a "tree" structured network of transmission lines utilizes a number of phase conjugate circuits (PCCs) at each node and a phase reference regeneration circuit (PRR) at each node except the initial node. Each node virtually coincides with an element of the array. A PCC generates the exact conjugate phase of an incident signal using a phase locked loop which combines the phases in an up converter, divides the sum by 2 and mixes the result with the phase in a down converter for phase detection. The PRR extracts the phase from the conjugate phase. Both the PCC and the PRR are not only exact but also free from mixer degeneracy.

  2. Optimizing Satellite Communications With Adaptive and Phased Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingram, Mary Ann; Romanofsky, Robert; Lee, Richard Q.; Miranda, Felix; Popovic, Zoya; Langley, John; Barott, William C.; Ahmed, M. Usman; Mandl, Dan

    2004-01-01

    A new adaptive antenna array architecture for low-earth-orbiting satellite ground stations is being investigated. These ground stations are intended to have no moving parts and could potentially be operated in populated areas, where terrestrial interference is likely. The architecture includes multiple, moderately directive phased arrays. The phased arrays, each steered in the approximate direction of the satellite, are adaptively combined to enhance the Signal-to-Noise and Interference-Ratio (SNIR) of the desired satellite. The size of each phased array is to be traded-off with the number of phased arrays, to optimize cost, while meeting a bit-error-rate threshold. Also, two phased array architectures are being prototyped: a spacefed lens array and a reflect-array. If two co-channel satellites are in the field of view of the phased arrays, then multi-user detection techniques may enable simultaneous demodulation of the satellite signals, also known as Space Division Multiple Access (SDMA). We report on Phase I of the project, in which fixed directional elements are adaptively combined in a prototype to demodulate the S-band downlink of the EO-1 satellite, which is part of the New Millennium Program at NASA.

  3. Analysis of finite multifrequency slotted waveguide antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, L. I.; Rud', S. V.; Ryzhikov, A. V.

    1988-02-01

    A model of a finite multifrequency slotted waveguide antenna array based on multimode waveguides is developed on the basis of an integral-equation method. Numerical-analysis results are presented which make it possible to assess the mutual distortions introduced in the radiation characteristics in each of the operating subbands. It is noted that these distortions can be minimized by a proper mutual arrangement of the slots as well as by an appropriate type of waveguide excitation.

  4. Delivering both sum and difference beam distributions to a planar monopulse antenna array

    DOEpatents

    Strassner, II, Bernd H.

    2015-12-22

    A planar monopulse radar apparatus includes a planar distribution matrix coupled to a planar antenna array having a linear configuration of antenna elements. The planar distribution matrix is responsive to first and second pluralities of weights applied thereto for providing both sum and difference beam distributions across the antenna array.

  5. Development of horn antenna mixer array with internal local oscillator module for microwave imaging diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, D; Ito, N; Nagayama, Y; Yoshinaga, T; Yamaguchi, S; Yoshikawa, M; Kohagura, J; Sugito, S; Kogi, Y; Mase, A

    2014-11-01

    A new antenna array is proposed in order to improve the sensitivity and complexity of microwave imaging diagnostics systems such as a microwave imaging reflectometry, a microwave imaging interferometer, and an electron cyclotron emission imaging. The antenna array consists of five elements: a horn antenna, a waveguide-to-microstrip line transition, a mixer, a local oscillation (LO) module, and an intermediate frequency amplifier. By using an LO module, the LO optics can be removed, and the supplied LO power to each element can be equalized. We report details of the antenna array and characteristics of a prototype antenna array. PMID:25430218

  6. Development of horn antenna mixer array with internal local oscillator module for microwave imaging diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwahara, D.; Ito, N.; Nagayama, Y.; Yoshinaga, T.; Yamaguchi, S.; Yoshikawa, M.; Kohagura, J.; Sugito, S.; Kogi, Y.; Mase, A.

    2014-11-15

    A new antenna array is proposed in order to improve the sensitivity and complexity of microwave imaging diagnostics systems such as a microwave imaging reflectometry, a microwave imaging interferometer, and an electron cyclotron emission imaging. The antenna array consists of five elements: a horn antenna, a waveguide-to-microstrip line transition, a mixer, a local oscillation (LO) module, and an intermediate frequency amplifier. By using an LO module, the LO optics can be removed, and the supplied LO power to each element can be equalized. We report details of the antenna array and characteristics of a prototype antenna array.

  7. 2-D scalable optical controlled phased-array antenna system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Maggie Yihong; Howley, Brie; Wang, Xiaolong; Basile, Panoutsopoulos; Chen, Ray T.

    2006-02-01

    A novel optoelectronically-controlled wideband 2-D phased-array antenna system is demonstrated. The inclusion of WDM devices makes a highly scalable system structure. Only (M+N) delay lines are required to control a M×N array. The optical true-time delay lines are combination of polymer waveguides and optical switches, using a single polymeric platform and are monolithically integrated on a single substrate. The 16 time delays generated by the device are measured to range from 0 to 175 ps in 11.6 ps. Far-field patterns at different steering angles in X-band are measured.

  8. Ultra wideband photonic control of an adaptive phased array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Joseph L.; Zmuda, Henry; Li, Jian; Sforza, Pasquale M.

    2006-05-01

    This paper presents a new concept for a photonic implementation of a time reversed RF antenna array beamforming system. The process does not require analog to digital conversion to implement and is therefore particularly suited for high bandwidth applications. Significantly, propagation distortion due to atmospheric effects, clutter, etc. is automatically accounted for with the time reversal process. The approach utilizes the reflection of an initial interrogation signal from off an extended target to precisely time match the radiating elements of the array so as to re-radiate signals precisely back to the target's location. The backscattered signal(s) from the desired location is captured by each antenna and used to modulate a pulsed laser. An electrooptic switch acts as a time gate to eliminate any unwanted signals such as those reflected from other targets whose range is different from that of the desired location resulting in a spatial null at that location. A chromatic dispersion processor is used to extract the exact array parameters of the received signal location. Hence, other than an approximate knowledge of the steering direction needed only to approximately establish the time gating, no knowledge of the target position is required, and hence no knowledge of the array element time delay is required. Target motion and/or array element jitter is automatically accounted for. This paper presents the preliminary study of the photonic processor, analytical justification, and simulated results. The technology has a broad range of applications including aerospace and defense and in medical imaging.

  9. An Intelligent Fault Detection and Isolation Architecture for Antenna Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahnamai, K.; Arabshahi, P.; Yan, T.-Y.; Pham, T.; Finley, S. G.

    1997-10-01

    This article describes a general architecture for fault modeling, diagnosis, and isolation of the DSN antenna array based on computationally intelligent techniques(neural networks and fuzzy logic). It encompasses a suite of intelligent test and diagnosis algorithms in software. By continuously monitoring the health of the highly complex and nonlinear array observables, the automated diagnosis software will be able to identify and isolate the most likely causes of system failure in cases of faulty operation. Furthermore, it will be able to recommend a series of corresponding corrective actions and effectively act as an automated real-time and interactive system supervisor. In so doing, it will enhance the array capability by reducing the operational workload, increasing science information availability, reducing the overall cost of operation by reducing system downtimes, improving risk management, and making mission planning much more reliable. Operation of this architecture is illustrated using examples from observables available from the 34-meter arraying task.

  10. Antenna arrays for producing plane whistler waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, Reiner; Urrutia, J. Manuel

    2015-11-01

    In a large uniform laboratory plasma helicon modes with mode numbers 1 - 8 have been excited. Using a circular phased array it is shown that positive and negative modes can propagate equally well. The phase fronts of helicons form Archimedian screw surfaces. The electromagnetic field carries linear momentum due to the axial propagation and angular momentum due to the azimuthal propagation. Associated with the orbital angular momentum is a transverse Doppler shift. It is demonstrated that a rapidly rotating ``receiver'' observes a different frequency than the wave. This implies that a rotating electron can undergo cyclotron resonance when moving against the field rotation. Analogous to the axial Doppler shift cyclotron damping and cyclotron instabilities are possible due to the field rotation in helicons. Since helicons exist in unbounded laboratory plasma they should also exist in space plasmas. The angular wave-particle interaction may be an alternate approach for the remedial of energetic electrons. Work supported by NSF/DOE.

  11. Pros and Cons of Using Arrays of Small Antennas Versus Large Single Dish Antennas for the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagri, Durgadas S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper briefly describes pros and cons of using arrays of small antennas instead of large single dish antennas for spacecraft telemetry, command, and tracking (TT and C) - communications and navigation (C and N) - and science support that the Deep Space Network (DSN) normally provides. It considers functionality and performance aspects, mainly for TT and C, though it also considers science. It only briefly comments on the cost aspects that seem to favor arrays of small antennas over large single antennas, at least for receiving (downlinks).

  12. Distributed Antenna-Coupled TES for FIR Detectors Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Peter K.; Leduc, Henry G.; Dowell, C. Darren; Lee, Richard A.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2007-01-01

    We describe a new architecture for a superconducting detector for the submillimeter and far-infrared. This detector uses a distributed hot-electron transition edge sensor (TES) to collect the power from a focal-plane-filling slot antenna array. The sensors lay directly across the slots of the antenna and match the antenna impedance of about 30 ohms. Each pixel contains many sensors that are wired in parallel as a single distributed TES, which results in a low impedance that readily matches to a multiplexed SQUID readout These detectors are inherently polarization sensitive, with very low cross-polarization response, but can also be configured to sum both polarizations. The dual-polarization design can have a bandwidth of 50The use of electron-phonon decoupling eliminates the need for micro-machining, making the focal plane much easier to fabricate than with absorber-coupled, mechanically isolated pixels. We discuss applications of these detectors and a hybridization scheme compatible with arrays of tens of thousands of pixels.

  13. Antenna array bandwidth enhancement using polymeric nanocomposite substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhamad, W. A. W.; Ngah, R.; Jamlos, M. F.; Soh, P. J.; Jamlos, M. A.; Lago, H.

    2016-04-01

    A 4 × 2 array antenna is developed using a new nanocomposite polymeric magneto-dielectric substrate. The permittivity and permeability factors have been accounted in designing the proposed array antenna at the frequency of 2.6 GHz. A pure polydimethylsiloxane (P-PDMS) (ɛ r = 2.7) solution is mixed with ferrite III oxide (μ r = 1.2) to generate this new nanocomposite polymeric magneto-dielectric (NPMD) substrate. The NPMD surface is then hardened and located in between two P-PDMS layers. The 4 × 2 radiating elements are immersed to the top of P-PDMS layer, while SMA coaxial feeder is fed from underneath the ground layer. This sealing technique enabled the proposed antenna to be waterproof and flexible. This combination contributes to bandwidth enhancement of 52.65 %, size miniaturization of 176 × 156 mm2 and high gain of 10.8 dB. The measured results show a good agreement with simulations.

  14. New approaches to analysis and synthesis of reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galindo-Israel, V.; Mittra, R.

    1978-01-01

    Recently developed techniques are reviewed for analyzing and synthesizing single and dual antennas for high efficiency and wide angle scan. The problem of contour beam synthesis using superposition of pencil beams is also discussed.

  15. Mutual coupling, channel model, and BER for curvilinear antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhiyong

    This dissertation introduces a wireless communications system with an adaptive beam-former and investigates its performance with different antenna arrays. Mutual coupling, real antenna elements and channel models are included to examine the system performance. In a beamforming system, mutual coupling (MC) among the elements can significantly degrade the system performance. However, MC effects can be compensated if an accurate model of mutual coupling is available. A mutual coupling matrix model is utilized to compensate mutual coupling in the beamforming of a uniform circular array (UCA). Its performance is compared with other models in uplink and downlink beamforming scenarios. In addition, the predictions are compared with measurements and verified with results from full-wave simulations. In order to accurately investigate the minimum mean-square-error (MSE) of an adaptive array in MC, two different noise models, the environmental and the receiver noise, are modeled. The minimum MSEs with and without data domain MC compensation are analytically compared. The influence of mutual coupling on the convergence is also examined. In addition, the weight compensation method is proposed to attain the desired array pattern. Adaptive arrays with different geometries are implemented with the minimum MSE algorithm in the wireless communications system to combat interference at the same frequency. The bit-error-rate (BER) of systems with UCA, uniform rectangular array (URA) and UCA with center element are investigated in additive white Gaussian noise plus well-separated signals or random direction signals scenarios. The output SINR of an adaptive array with multiple interferers is analytically examined. The influence of the adaptive algorithm convergence on the BER is investigated. The UCA is then investigated in a narrowband Rician fading channel. The channel model is built and the space correlations are examined. The influence of the number of signal paths, number of the

  16. Computer-based designing of waveguide radiators of arbitrary cross section for antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voskresenskii, D. I.; Grinev, A. Iu.; Ilinskii, A. S.; Kotov, Iu. V.

    1980-02-01

    A multistep method is proposed for designing waveguide radiators for use in antenna arrays. A rigorous electrodynamic method for structure analysis is developed, along with a computer program and a numerical algorithm. The aperture performance of a quadruple-ridge rectangular waveguide in a phased array is examined, along with the directivity patterns of H-shaped, square, and circular radiators in antenna arrays.

  17. Phased-array-fed antenna configuration study, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorbello, R. M.; Zaghloul, A. I.; Lee, B. S.; Siddiqi, S.; Geller, B. D.

    1983-01-01

    Increased capacity in future satellite systems can be achieved through antenna systems which provide multiplicity of frequency reuses at K sub a band. A number of antenna configurations which can provide multiple fixed spot beams and multiple independent spot scanning beams at 20 GHz are addressed. Each design incorporates a phased array with distributed MMIC amplifiers and phasesifters feeding a two reflector optical system. The tradeoffs required for the design of these systems and the corresponding performances are presented. Five final designs are studied. In so doing, a type of MMIC/waveguide transition is described, and measured results of the breadboard model are presented. Other hardware components developed are described. This includes a square orthomode transducer, a subarray fed with a beamforming network to measure scanning performance, and another subarray used to study mutual coupling considerations. Discussions of the advantages and disadvantages of the final design are included.

  18. Optimization of the ITER Ion Cyclotron Heating Antenna Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, P. M.; Swain, D. W.; Carter, M. D.; Taylor, D. J.; Bosia, G.; D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.

    1996-11-01

    The present design of the ITER ICH antenna array comprises two poloidal by four toroidal current elements in each of four ports. Each current element forms a resonant double loop (RDL) with power fed to a pretuned matchpoint on the strap; the matching is accomplished using slow-wave transmission lines as adjustable shorted-stub tuners on either end of the current strap. The power requirement is 12.5 MW per port over the frequency range of 40--70 MHz, with extended operation to 80 MHz desirable. The antenna design optimization process includes strap shaping to minimize strap voltages and rf E-fields along B-field lines, (2) frame/Faraday shield geometry design to improve plasma coupling, wave spectrum directivity, and phase control, and (3) Faraday shield/bumper geometry to minimize rf sheath-induced structure heating and impurity generation.

  19. Microstrip Antennas with Polarization Diversity across a Wide Frequency Range and Phased Array Antennas for Radar and Satellite Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Kevin Ming-Jiang

    The thesis comprises of 3 projects; an L-band microstrip antenna with frequency agility and polarization diversity, X-band phased array antennas incorporating commercially packaged RFIC phased array chips, and studies for Ku/Ka-band shared aperture antenna array. The first project features the use of commercially packaged RF-MEMS SPDT switches, that boasts of high reliability, high linearity, low losses, hermetically packaged and fully compatible for SMTA processes for mass-assembly and production. Using the switches in a novel manner for the feed network, microstrip antennas with polarization diversity are presented. Frequency agility is achieved with the use of tuning diodes to provide capacitive loading to the antenna element. Additional inductance effects from surface-mounted capacitors, and its impact, is introduced. Theoretical cross-polarization of probe-fed antenna elements is presented for both linear and circular polarized microstrip antennas. Designs and measurements are presented, for microstrip antennas with polarization diversity, wide frequency tuning range, and both features. Replacement of the tuning diodes with commercially-packaged high Q RF MEMS tunable capacitors will allow for significant improvements to the radiation efficiency. In another project, multi-channel CMOS RFIC phased-array receiver chips are assembled in QFN packages and directly integrated on the same multi-layered PCB stack-up with the antenna arrays. Problems of isolation from the PCB-QFN interface, and potential performance degradation on antenna array from the use of commercial-grade laminates for assembly requirements, namely potential scan blindness and radiation efficiency, are presented. Causes for apparent drift of dielectric constant for microstrip circuits, and high conductor losses observed in measurements, are introduced. Finally, studies are performed for the design of a Ku/Ka-Band shared aperture array. Different approaches for developing dual-band shared apertures

  20. A study of microstrip antenna elements and arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Y. T.; Richards, W. F.; Simon, P.

    1980-12-01

    Thin microstrip antennas have many unique and attractive properties, but their operation is much limited in bandwidth. In this report an attempt is made to develop a procedure for array design, in particular, to determine whether or not the band of operation could be broadened by using a small array of two elements of slightly different dimensions. By broadband, it is meant that the antenna must have over the bandwidth: (1) an input impedance variation within a certain prescribed SWR (say 3:1); (2) a stable pattern (in particular a stable beam-pointing direction); (3) a small variation in gain (or efficiency); and (4) in some applications, small variations in beamwidth and sidelobe level. In this work only the first two fundamental performances are considered. Insofar as the impedance is considered, the array design is essentially a circuit problem. Our theory, based on the cavity model, has previously shown that the element impedance can adequately be described by a Foster network representation, namely, a series circuit of infinitely many parallel resonant circuits, each corresponding to a mode of the cavity. For frequencies in the vicinity of a certain mode, the circuit can further be reduced to a single parallel resonant circuit of that mode in series with an inductance. Our earlier investigation has also shown that, except for very close spacings, the mutual coupling effect between elements can be ignored.

  1. Adaptive array antenna for satellite cellular and direct broadcast communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horton, Charles R.; Abend, Kenneth

    1993-01-01

    Adaptive phased-array antennas provide cost-effective implementation of large, light weight apertures with high directivity and precise beamshape control. Adaptive self-calibration allows for relaxation of all mechanical tolerances across the aperture and electrical component tolerances, providing high performance with a low-cost, lightweight array, even in the presence of large physical distortions. Beam-shape is programmable and adaptable to changes in technical and operational requirements. Adaptive digital beam-forming eliminates uplink contention by allowing a single electronically steerable antenna to service a large number of receivers with beams which adaptively focus on one source while eliminating interference from others. A large, adaptively calibrated and fully programmable aperture can also provide precise beam shape control for power-efficient direct broadcast from space. Advanced adaptive digital beamforming technologies are described for: (1) electronic compensation of aperture distortion, (2) multiple receiver adaptive space-time processing, and (3) downlink beam-shape control. Cost considerations for space-based array applications are also discussed.

  2. Electrical optimization of the ICH antenna array for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, P. M.; Swain, D. W.; Carter, M. D.; Taylor, D. J.; Bosia, G.

    1997-04-01

    The present design of the ITER ICH antenna array comprises two poloidal by four toroidal current elements in each of four ports. Each current element forms a resonant double loop (RDL) with power fed to a pretuned matchpoint on the strap; the matching is accomplished using slow-wave transmission lines as adjustable shorted-stub tuners on other end of the current strap. The power requirement is 12.5 MW per port over the frequency range of 40-70 MHz, with extended operation to 80 MHz desirable. The antenna design optimization process includes (1) strap shaping to minimize strap voltages and rf E-fields along B-field lines and (2) frame/Faraday shield geometry design to improve plasma coupling, wave spectrum directivity, and phase control. For the ignited plasma parameters, the optimized array design delivers full power over the ranges of 40-80 MHz in frequency and 0° to 180° in phase. The maximum strap voltage is 41 kV and the maximum parallel E-field is 16 kV/cm for the worst case over these ranges. The array directivity for current drive operation is calculated to be close to 80%.

  3. Design of a 4-element Antenna Array for BDS Anti-jamming Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianxing; Shi, Hongyu; Li, Hang; Zhang, Anxue

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a compact 4-element antenna array with the dimension of 150 mm × 150 mm is proposed for BeiDou navigation satellite system (BDS) anti-jamming applications. The proposed antenna array comprises of four identical microstrip right-handed circularly polarized (RHCP) antenna elements. The four microstrip antenna elements are placed in the same polarity with a distance of 80 mm between adjacent elements. The antenna element which employs dual probe-fed structure has a relatively small volume of 45 mm × 45 mm × 5 mm. The antenna array has been fabricated and measured. The experimental results show that the proposed antenna array is quite suitable for BDS anti-jamming application.

  4. Ka-band Dielectric Waveguide Antenna Array for Millimeter Wave Active Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Weihai; Fei, Peng; Nian, Feng; Yang, Yujie; Feng, Keming

    2014-11-01

    Ka-band compact dielectric waveguide antenna array for active imaging system is given. Antenna array with WR28 metal waveguide direct feeding is specially designed with small size, high gain, good radiation pattern, easy realization, low insertion loss and low mutual coupling. One practical antenna array for 3-D active imaging system is shown with theoretic analysis and experimental results. The mutual coupling of transmitting and receiving units is less than -30dB, the gain from 26.5GHz to 40GHz is (12-16) dB. The results in this paper provide guidelines for the designing of millimeter wave dielectric waveguide antenna array.

  5. SAR processing with stepped chirps and phased array antennas.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2006-09-01

    Wideband radar signals are problematic for phased array antennas. Wideband radar signals can be generated from series or groups of narrow-band signals centered at different frequencies. An equivalent wideband LFM chirp can be assembled from lesser-bandwidth chirp segments in the data processing. The chirp segments can be transmitted as separate narrow-band pulses, each with their own steering phase operation. This overcomes the problematic dilemma of steering wideband chirps with phase shifters alone, that is, without true time-delay elements.

  6. Air shower measurements with the LOPES radio antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes Collaboration; Haungs, A.; Apel, W. D.; Arteaga, J. C.; Asch, T.; Auffenberg, J.; Badea, F.; Bähren, L.; Bekk, K.; Bertaina, M.; Biermann, P. L.; Blümer, J.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I. M.; Brüggemann, M.; Buchholz, P.; Buitink, S.; Cantoni, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cossavella, F.; Daumiller, K.; de Souza, V.; di Pierro, F.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Falcke, H.; Finger, M.; Fuhrmann, D.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Glasstetter, R.; Grupen, C.; Heck, D.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Huege, T.; Isar, P. G.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kang, D.; Kickelbick, D.; Kolotaev, Y.; Krömer, O.; Kuijpers, J.; Lafebre, S.; Łuczak, P.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Milke, J.; Mitrica, B.; Morello, C.; Navarra, G.; Nehls, S.; Nigl, A.; Oehlschläger, J.; Over, S.; Petcu, M.; Pierog, T.; Rautenberg, J.; Rebel, H.; Roth, M.; Saftoiu, A.; Schieler, H.; Schmidt, A.; Schröder, F.; Sima, O.; Singh, K.; Stümpert, M.; Toma, G.; Trinchero, G. C.; Ulrich, H.; Walkowiak, W.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.; Wommer, M.; Zabierowski, J.; Zensus, J. A.; LOPES Collaboration

    2009-06-01

    LOPES is set up at the location of the KASCADE-Grande extensive air shower experiment in Karlsruhe, Germany and aims to measure and investigate radio pulses from extensive air showers. Since radio waves suffer very little attenuation, radio measurements allow the detection of very distant or highly inclined showers. These waves can be recorded day and night, and provide a bolometric measure of the leptonic shower component. LOPES is designed as a digital radio interferometer using high bandwidths and fast data processing and profits from the reconstructed air shower observables of KASCADE-Grande. The LOPES antennas are absolutely amplitude calibrated allowing to reconstruct the electric field strength which can be compared with predictions from detailed Monte-Carlo simulations. We report about the analysis of correlations present in the radio signals measured by the LOPES 30 antenna array. Additionally, LOPES operates antennas of a different type (LOPESSTAR) which are optimized for an application at the Pierre Auger Observatory. Status, recent results of the data analysis and further perspectives of LOPES and the possible large scale application of this new detection technique are discussed.

  7. Computer simulation of the effects of a distributed array antenna on synthetic aperture radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    The ARL:UT orbital SAR simulation has been upgraded to use three-dimensional antenna gain patterns. This report describes the modifications and presents quantitative image analyses of a simulation using antenna patterns generated from the modeling of a distributed array antenna.

  8. The Digital Motion Control System for the Submillimeter Array Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, T. R.; Wilson, R. W.; Kimberk, R.; Leiker, P. S.; Patel, N. A.; Blundell, R.; Christensen, R. D.; Diven, A. R.; Maute, J.; Plante, R. J.; Riddle, P.; Young, K. H.

    2013-09-01

    We describe the design and performance of the digital servo and motion control system for the 6-meter parabolic antennas of the Submillimeter Array (SMA) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The system is divided into three nested layers operating at a different, appropriate bandwidth. (1) A rack-mounted, real-time Unix system runs the position loop which reads the high resolution azimuth and elevation encoders and sends velocity and acceleration commands at 100 Hz to a custom-designed servo control board (SCB). (2) The microcontroller-based SCB reads the motor axis tachometers and implements the velocity loop by sending torque commands to the motor amplifiers at 558 Hz. (3) The motor amplifiers implement the torque loop by monitoring and sending current to the three-phase brushless drive motors at 20 kHz. The velocity loop uses a traditional proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control algorithm, while the position loop uses only a proportional term and implements a command shaper based on the Gauss error function. Calibration factors and software filters are applied to the tachometer feedback prior to the application of the servo gains in the torque computations. All of these parameters are remotely adjustable in the software. The three layers of the control system monitor each other and are capable of shutting down the system safely if a failure or anomaly occurs. The Unix system continuously relays the antenna status to the central observatory computer via reflective memory. In each antenna, a Palm Vx hand controller displays the complete system status and allows full local control of the drives in an intuitive touchscreen user interface. The hand controller can also be connected outside the cabin, a major convenience during the frequent reconfigurations of the interferometer. Excellent tracking performance ( 0.3‧‧ rms) is achieved with this system. It has been in reliable operation on 8 antennas for over 10 years and has required minimal maintenance.

  9. Quasi-optical antenna-mixer-array design for terahertz frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Yong; Potter, Kent A.; Rutledge, David B.

    1992-01-01

    A new quasi-optical antenna-mixer-array design for terahertz frequencies is presented. In the design, antenna and mixer are combined into an entity, based on the technology in which millimeter-wave horn antenna arrays have been fabricated in silicon wafers. It consists of a set of forward- and backward-looking horns made with a set of silicon wafers. The front side is used to receive incoming signal, and the back side is used to feed local oscillator signal. Intermediate frequency is led out from the side of the array. Signal received by the horn array is picked up by antenna probes suspended on thin silicon-oxynitride membranes inside the horns. Mixer diodes will be located on the membranes inside the horns. Modeling of such an antenna-mixer-array design is done on a scaled model at microwave frequencies. The impedance matching, RF and LO isolation, and patterns of the array have been tested and analyzed.

  10. A finite element-boundary integral method for conformal antenna arrays on a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.; Woo, Alex C.; Yu, C. Long

    1992-01-01

    Conformal antenna arrays offer many cost and weight advantages over conventional antenna systems. In the past, antenna designers have had to resort to expensive measurements in order to develop a conformal array design. This is due to the lack of rigorous mathematical models for conformal antenna arrays, and as a result the design of conformal arrays is primarily based on planar antenna design concepts. Recently, we have found the finite element-boundary integral method to be very successful in modeling large planar arrays of arbitrary composition in a metallic plane. Herewith we shall extend this formulation for conformal arrays on large metallic cylinders. In this we develop the mathematical formulation. In particular we discuss the finite element equations, the shape elements, and the boundary integral evaluation, and it is shown how this formulation can be applied with minimal computation and memory requirements. The implementation shall be discussed in a later report.

  11. A finite element-boundary integral method for conformal antenna arrays on a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.

    1992-01-01

    Conformal antenna arrays offer many cost and weight advantages over conventional antenna systems. In the past, antenna designers have had to resort to expensive measurements in order to develop a conformal array design. This was due to the lack of rigorous mathematical models for conformal antenna arrays. As a result, the design of conformal arrays was primarily based on planar antenna design concepts. Recently, we have found the finite element-boundary integral method to be very successful in modeling large planar arrays of arbitrary composition in a metallic plane. We are extending this formulation to conformal arrays on large metallic cylinders. In doing so, we will develop a mathematical formulation. In particular, we discuss the finite element equations, the shape elements, and the boundary integral evaluation. It is shown how this formulation can be applied with minimal computation and memory requirements.

  12. Phase-locked laser array through global antenna mutual coupling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kao, Tsung -Yu; Reno, John L.; Hu, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Here, phase locking of an array of lasers is a highly effective way in beam shaping, to increase the output power, and to reduce lasing threshold. In this work, we present a novel phase-locking mechanism based on "antenna mutual coupling" wherein laser elements interact through far-field radiations with definite phase relations. This allows long-range global coupling among array elements to achieve robust 2-dimensional phase-locked laser array. The new scheme is ideal for lasers with deep sub-wavelength confined cavity such as nanolasers, where the divergent beam pattern could be used to form strong coupling among elements in the array. We experimentallymore » demonstrated such a scheme using sub-wavelength short-cavity surface-emitting lasers at terahertz frequency. More than 37 laser elements are phase-locked to each other, delivering up to 6.5 mW single-mode radiations at ~3 terahertz, with maximum 450-mW/A slope efficiency and near diffraction limit beam divergence.« less

  13. Phase-locked laser arrays through global antenna mutual coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Tsung-Yu; Reno, John L.; Hu, Qing

    2016-08-01

    Phase locking of an array of lasers is a highly effective method in beam shaping because it increases the output power and reduces the lasing threshold. Here, we show a conceptually novel phase-locking mechanism based on ‘antenna mutual coupling’ in which laser elements interact through far-field radiations with definite phase relations. This allows a long-range global coupling among the array elements to achieve a robust phase locking in two-dimensional laser arrays. The scheme is ideal for lasers with a deep subwavelength confined cavity, such as nanolasers, whose divergent beam patterns could be used to achieve a strong coupling among the elements in the array. We demonstrated experimentally such a scheme based on subwavelength short-cavity surface-emitting lasers at terahertz frequencies. More than 37 laser elements that span over ∼8 λo were phase locked to each other, and delivered up to 6.5 mW (in a pulsed operation) single-mode radiation at ∼3 THz, with a maximum 450 mW A–1 slope efficiency and a near-diffraction-limited beam divergence.

  14. Phase-locked laser array through global antenna mutual coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Tsung -Yu; Reno, John L.; Hu, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Here, phase locking of an array of lasers is a highly effective way in beam shaping, to increase the output power, and to reduce lasing threshold. In this work, we present a novel phase-locking mechanism based on "antenna mutual coupling" wherein laser elements interact through far-field radiations with definite phase relations. This allows long-range global coupling among array elements to achieve robust 2-dimensional phase-locked laser array. The new scheme is ideal for lasers with deep sub-wavelength confined cavity such as nanolasers, where the divergent beam pattern could be used to form strong coupling among elements in the array. We experimentally demonstrated such a scheme using sub-wavelength short-cavity surface-emitting lasers at terahertz frequency. More than 37 laser elements are phase-locked to each other, delivering up to 6.5 mW single-mode radiations at ~3 terahertz, with maximum 450-mW/A slope efficiency and near diffraction limit beam divergence.

  15. The DESDynI Synthetic Aperture Radar Array-Fed Reflector Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Neil; Ghaemi, Hirad; Giersch, Louis; Harcke, Leif; Hodges, Richard; Hoffman, James; Johnson, William; Jordan, Rolando; Khayatian, Behrouz; Rosen, Paul; Sadowy, Gregory; Shaffer, Scott; Shen, Yuhsyen; Veilleux, Louise; Wu, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    DESDynI is a mission being developed by NASA with radar and lidar instruments for Earth-orbit remote sensing. This paper focuses on the design of a largeaperture antenna for the radar instrument. The antenna comprises a deployable reflector antenna and an active switched array of patch elements fed by transmit/ receive modules. The antenna and radar architecture facilitates a new mode of synthetic aperture radar imaging called 'SweepSAR'. A system-level description of the antenna is provided, along with predictions of antenna performance.

  16. Advanced Antenna-Coupled Superconducting Detector Arrays for CMB Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, James

    2014-01-01

    We are developing high-sensitivity millimeter-wave detector arrays for measuring the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This development is directed to advance the technology readiness of the Inflation Probe mission in NASA's Physics of the Cosmos program. The Inflation Probe is a fourth-generation CMB satellite that will measure the polarization of the CMB to astrophysical limits, characterizing the inflationary polarization signal, mapping large-scale structure based on polarization induced by gravitational lensing, and mapping Galactic magnetic fields through measurements of polarized dust emission. The inflationary polarization signal is produced by a background of gravitational waves from the epoch of inflation, an exponential expansion of space-time in the early universe, with an amplitude that depends on the physical mechanism producing inflation. The inflationary polarization signal may be distinguished by its unique 'B-mode' vector properties from polarization from the density variations that predominantly source CMB temperature anisotropy. Mission concepts for the Inflation Probe are being developed in the US, Europe and Japan. The arrays are based on planar antennas that provide integral beam collimation, polarization analysis, and spectral band definition in a compact lithographed format that eliminates discrete fore-optics such as lenses and feedhorns. The antennas are coupled to transition-edge superconducting bolometers, read out with multiplexed SQUID current amplifiers. The superconducting sensors and readouts developed in this program share common technologies with NASA X-ray and FIR detector applications. Our program targets developments required for space observations, and we discuss our technical progress over the past two years and plans for future development. We are incorporating arrays into active sub-orbital and ground-based experiments, which advance technology readiness while producing state of the art CMB

  17. Antenna coupled detectors for 2D staring focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritz, Michael A.; Kolasa, Borys; Lail, Brian; Burkholder, Robert; Chen, Leonard

    2013-06-01

    Millimeter-wave (mmW)/sub-mmW/THz region of the electro-magnetic spectrum enables imaging thru clothing and other obscurants such as fog, clouds, smoke, sand, and dust. Therefore considerable interest exists in developing low cost millimeter-wave imaging (MMWI) systems. Previous MMWI systems have evolved from crude mechanically scanned, single element receiver systems into very complex multiple receiver camera systems. Initial systems required many expensive mmW integrated-circuit low-noise amplifiers. In order to reduce the cost and complexity of the existing systems, attempts have been made to develop new mmW imaging sensors employing direct detection arrays. In this paper, we report on Raytheon's recent development of a unique focal plane array technology, which operates broadly from the mmW through the sub-mmW/THz region. Raytheon's innovative nano-antenna based detector enables low cost production of 2D staring mmW focal plane arrays (mmW FPA), which not only have equivalent sensitivity and performance to existing MMWI systems, but require no mechanical scanning.

  18. Application of the moment method to the design of slotted waveguide array antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, A. H. I.

    1988-12-01

    Slotted waveguide array antennas, which are widely used in radar systems, are becoming increasingly more amenable to computer aided design/synthesis procedures, since the scattering characteristics of a slot in a waveguide can be predicted to a high degree of accuracy. An improved theoretical CAD package is presented to design arrays of this type. It differs from earlier such packages in that the reliance on measured data was avoided with a theoretical technique termed the moment method being used to provide the self admittance data for the slots. The efficient implementation of this package and in particular the incorporation of the moment method into it was aided considerably by using this method to make a prior study of nature of certain critical slot characteristics. Most of the more significant waveguide slot relationships were discussed in literature in one form or another except for those relating to slot width. A study employing the moment method was performed to eliminate this oversight and the functional relationship between this parameter and the slot resonance was determined. The moment method solution was also extended to permit the examination of round end slots, which are commonly used in practice, by developing a novel axis sectioning procedure. The evolution of the computer aided array design package is described in detail. The package was subsequently employed to design array examples, one of which was constructed. The experimental and theoretical results for this antenna were presented to demonstrate the plausibility of this technique. Some less conventional array configurations were also synthesized to demonstrate design flexibility.

  19. MSAT-X electronically steered phased array antenna system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, H. H.; Foy, W.; Schaffner, G.; Pagels, W.; Vayner, M.; Nelson, J.; Peng, S. Y.

    1988-01-01

    A low profile electronically steered phased array was successfully developed for the Mobile Satellite Experiment Program (MSAT-X). The newly invented cavity-backed printed crossed-slot was used as the radiating element. The choice of this element was based on its low elevation angle gain coverage and low profile. A nineteen-way radial type unequal power divider and eighteen three-bit diode phase shifters constitute the beamformer module which is used to scan the beams electronically. A complete hybrid mode pointing system was also developed. The major features of the antenna system are broad coverage, low profile, and fast acquisition and tracking performance, even under fading conditions. Excellent intersatellite isolation (better than 26 dB) was realized, which will provide good quality mobile satellite communication in the future.

  20. The study of microstrip antenna arrays and related problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Y. T.

    1984-01-01

    The physical layout of the array elements and the proximity of the microstrip feed network makes the input impedance and radiation pattern values dependent upon the effects of mutual coupling, feedline discontinuities and feed point location. The extent of these dependences was assessed and a number of single patch and module structures were constructed and measured at an operating frequency of approximately 4.0 GHz. The empirical results were compared with the ones which were theoretically predicted by the cavity model of thin microstrip antennas. Each element was modelled as an independent radiating patch and each microstrip feedline as an independent, quasi-TEM transmission line. The effects of the feedline discontinuities are approximated by lumped L-C circuit models.

  1. Monolithic microwave integrated circuit devices for active array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittra, R.

    1984-01-01

    Two different aspects of active antenna array design were investigated. The transition between monolithic microwave integrated circuits and rectangular waveguides was studied along with crosstalk in multiconductor transmission lines. The boundary value problem associated with a discontinuity in a microstrip line is formulated. This entailed, as a first step, the derivation of the propagating as well as evanescent modes of a microstrip line. The solution is derived to a simple discontinuity problem: change in width of the center strip. As for the multiconductor transmission line problem. A computer algorithm was developed for computing the crosstalk noise from the signal to the sense lines. The computation is based on the assumption that these lines are terminated in passive loads.

  2. Ultra-Wideband Tapered Slot Antenna Arrays with Parallel-Plate Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Miyashita, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Toru; Otsuka, Masataka; Konishi, Yoshihiko

    Owing to their ultra-wideband characteristics, tapered slot antennas (TSAs) are used as element antennas in wideband phased arrays. However, when the size of a TSA is reduced in order to prevent the generation of a grating lobe during wide-angle beam scanning, the original ultra-wideband characteristics are degraded because of increased reflections from the ends of the tapered slot aperture. To overcome this difficulty, we propose a new antenna structure in which parallel-plate waveguides are added to the TSA. The advantage of this new structure is that the reflection characteristics of individual antenna elements are not degraded even if the width of the antenna aperture is very small, i.e., approximately one-half the wavelength of the highest operating frequency. In this study, we propose a procedure for designing the new antenna through numerical simulations by using the FDTD method. In addition, we verify the performance of the antenna array by experiments.

  3. Prediction of heating patterns of a microwave interstitial antenna array at various insertion depths.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Joines, W T; Oleson, J R

    1991-01-01

    Measurements made on the interstitial microwave antennas used for hyperthermia cancer therapy indicate that the heating patterns vary with the insertion depths (defined as the distance from the antenna tip to air-tissue interface). The antennas are made of thin coaxial cables with a radiation gap or gaps on the outer conductor. The antennas are inserted into small polypropylene catheters implanted in the tumour volume. This type of antenna may be simulated as an asymmetric dipole with one arm being the tip section consisting of the expanded extension of the inner conductor, and the other arm being the section of the outer conductor from the gap to the insertion point (air-tissue interface). We use four of the antennas to form a 2 cm x 2 cm array. The antennas are positioned on the corners of a 2 cm square. Measurements on both single antennas and multi-antenna arrays show that the maximum heating is not stationary with position along the antenna when the depth of insertion is changed. This paper investigates the theoretical prediction of the changes in heating patterns of interstitial microwave antennas at different insertion depths. Each of the antennas in the array is simulated as an asymmetric dipole. The SAR (specific absorption rate) is computed by using the insulated dipole theory. The temperature distribution in absence of perfusion is obtained through a thermal simulation routine to convert the SAR pattern into the temperature pattern. Excellent qualitative agreement is found between the theoretical heating pattern and the measured pattern in a non-perfused phantom on a 2 cm x 2 antenna array. Since the insertion depths of the interstitial antennas are different from patient to patient, it is recommended that simulation of the heating be done before treatments, to confirm the delivery of power to the target region. PMID:2051073

  4. Active feed array compensation for reflector antenna surface distortions. Ph.D. Thesis - Akron Univ., Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.

    1988-01-01

    The feasibility of electromagnetic compensation for reflector antenna surface distortions is investigated. The performance characteristics of large satellite communication reflector antenna systems degrade as the reflector surface distorts, mainly due to thermal effects from solar radiation. The technique developed can be used to maintain the antenna boresight directivity and sidelobe level independent of thermal effects on the reflector surface. With the advent of monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC), a greater flexibility in array fed reflector antenna systems can be achieved. MMIC arrays provide independent control of amplitude and phase for each of the many radiating elements in the feed array. By assuming a known surface distortion profile, a simulation study is carried out to examine the antenna performance as a function of feed array size and number of elements. Results indicate that the compensation technique can effectively control boresight directivity and sidelobe level under peak surface distortion in the order of tenth of a wavelength.

  5. Lattice resonances in antenna arrays for liquid sensing in the terahertz regime.

    PubMed

    Ng, B; Hanham, S M; Giannini, V; Chen, Z C; Tang, M; Liew, Y F; Klein, N; Hong, M H; Maier, S A

    2011-07-18

    Terahertz antenna arrays supporting narrow lattice resonances are proposed as an alternative sensor-on-chip approach to liquid sensing. An array of metallic rectangular antennas fabricated on a polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) substrate is used to demonstrate the sensing of a number of fluids. Good agreement is shown between experiment and simulation with Q-factors of around 20 and a figure-of-merit (FOM) of 3.80 being achieved. Liquid sensing with antenna arrays is simple both in terms of fabrication and setup. The working frequency can be tuned with a suitable choice of substrates and array parameters. The nature of the lattice resonance means that the whole sample is used to provide the conditions required for resonance occurrence, eliminating the need to preferentially locate the sample in small areas of high field concentration. The antenna arrays could also potentially be coupled with a microfluidic system for in situ sensing or used in a reflection setup. PMID:21934827

  6. Experimental Study on MIMO Performance of Modulated Scattering Antenna Array in Indoor Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin; Chen, Qiang; Yuan, Qiaowei; Sawaya, Kunio

    The modulated scattering antenna array (MSAA) is composed of one normal antenna element and several modulated scattering elements (MSEs). In this paper, a 2-element MSAA is used as the receiving antenna in a 2 × 2 multiple input multiple output (MIMO) system. MIMO performance of MSAA with various array spacing is measured to investigate the relation between the array spacing and the MIMO performance of the MSAA experimentally in the non-line-of-sight (NLOS) indoor environment. It is found that the error vector magnitude (EVM) and the channel capacity, which reflect MIMO performance, can be affected by the array spacing. The measured results of the MSAA were compared with that of two-dipole antenna array at the same condition.

  7. Low-Cost Phased Array Antenna for Sounding Rockets, Missiles, and Expendable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullinix, Daniel; Hall, Kenneth; Smith, Bruce; Corbin, Brian

    2012-01-01

    A low-cost beamformer phased array antenna has been developed for expendable launch vehicles, rockets, and missiles. It utilizes a conformal array antenna of ring or individual radiators (design varies depending on application) that is designed to be fed by the recently developed hybrid electrical/mechanical (vendor-supplied) phased array beamformer. The combination of these new array antennas and the hybrid beamformer results in a conformal phased array antenna that has significantly higher gain than traditional omni antennas, and costs an order of magnitude or more less than traditional phased array designs. Existing omnidirectional antennas for sounding rockets, missiles, and expendable launch vehicles (ELVs) do not have sufficient gain to support the required communication data rates via the space network. Missiles and smaller ELVs are often stabilized in flight by a fast (i.e. 4 Hz) roll rate. This fast roll rate, combined with vehicle attitude changes, greatly increases the complexity of the high-gain antenna beam-tracking problem. Phased arrays for larger ELVs with roll control are prohibitively expensive. Prior techniques involved a traditional fully electronic phased array solution, combined with highly complex and very fast inertial measurement unit phased array beamformers. The functional operation of this phased array is substantially different from traditional phased arrays in that it uses a hybrid electrical/mechanical beamformer that creates the relative time delays for steering the antenna beam via a small physical movement of variable delay lines. This movement is controlled via an innovative antenna control unit that accesses an internal measurement unit for vehicle attitude information, computes a beam-pointing angle to the target, then points the beam via a stepper motor controller. The stepper motor on the beamformer controls the beamformer variable delay lines that apply the appropriate time delays to the individual array elements to properly

  8. Antenna array connections for efficient performance of distributed microbolometers in the IR.

    PubMed

    Silva-López, Manuel; Cuadrado, Alexander; Llombart, Nuria; Alda, Javier

    2013-05-01

    Optical antennas and resonant structures have been extensively investigated due to its potential for electromagnetic detection and energy harvesting applications. However their integration into large arrays and the role of connection lines between individual antennas has drawn little attention. This is necessary if we want to exploit its potential constructively and to enable economical large-scale fabrication. In this contribution we point out some features that an efficient antenna array should address. Experimental measurements on aluminum microbolometers are compared to electromagnetic simulations, it is shown that the finite size of a real array and the interconnection lines interact and affect the global performance. PMID:23669943

  9. Mechanical Development of a Very Non-Standard Patch Array Antenna for Extreme Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Richard; Chamberlain, Neil; Jakoboski, Julie; Petkov, Mihail

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the mechanical development of patch antenna arrays for the Juno mission. The patch arrays are part of a six-frequency microwave radiometer instrument that will be used to measure thermal emissions from Jupiter. The very harsh environmental conditions in Jupiter orbit, as well as a demanding launch environment, resulted in a design that departs radically from conventional printed circuit patch antennas. The paper discusses the development and qualification of the Juno patch array antennas, with emphasis on the materials approach that was devised to mitigate the effects of electron charging in Jupiter orbit.

  10. Fully Printed, Flexible, Phased Array Antenna for Lunar Surface Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbaraman, Harish; Hen, Ray T.; Lu, Xuejun; Chen, Maggie Yihong

    2013-01-01

    NASAs future exploration missions focus on the manned exploration of the Moon, Mars, and beyond, which will rely heavily on the development of a reliable communications infrastructure from planetary surface-to-surface, surface-to-orbit, and back to Earth. Flexible antennas are highly desired in many scenarios. Active phased array antennas (active PAAs) with distributed control and processing electronics at the surface of an antenna aperture offer numerous advantages for radar communications. Large-area active PAAs on flexible substrates are of particular interest in NASA s space radars due to their efficient inflatable package that can be rolled up during transportation and deployed in space. Such an inflatable package significantly reduces stowage volume and mass. Because of these performance and packaging advantages, large-area inflatable active PAAs are highly desired in NASA s surface-to-orbit and surface-to-relay communications. To address the issues of flexible electronics, a room-temperature printing process of active phased-array antennas on a flexible Kapton substrate was developed. Field effect transistors (FETs) based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs), with many unique physical properties, were successfully proved feasible for the PAA system. This innovation is a new type of fully inkjet-printable, two-dimensional, high-frequency PAA on a flexible substrate at room temperature. The designed electronic circuit components, such as the FET switches in the phase shifter, metal interconnection lines, microstrip transmission lines, etc., are all printed using a special inkjet printer. Using the developed technology, entire 1x4, 2x2, and 4x4 PAA systems were developed, packaged, and demonstrated at 5.3 GHz. Several key solutions are addressed in this work to solve the fabrication issues. The source/drain contact is developed using droplets of silver ink printed on the source/drain areas prior to applying CNT thin-film. The wet silver ink droplets allow the silver to

  11. Design of a low-loss series-fed microstrip array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahbub, M. R.; Christodoulou. C. G.; Bailey, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    The design and analysis of a series-fed, low-loss, inverted microstrip array antenna, operating at 1.413 GHz is presented. The array antenna is composed of two sub arrays. Each sub array consists of an equal number of microstrip patches all connected together through a series microstrip line. The first element of each sub array is coaxially fed but 180 degree out of phase. This approach ensures a symmetric radiation pattern. The design approach, is accomplished using the IE3D code that utilizes the method of moments. All experimental and simulated data are presented and discussed.

  12. Antenna coupled Kinetic Inductance arrays for space and ground based imaging arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, S. J. C.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Baryshev, A. M.; Neto, A.; Gerini, G.; Barends, R.; Lankwarden, Y. J. Y.

    2009-12-01

    Very large arrays of Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) have the potential to revolutionize ground and space based astronomy. They can offer in excess of 10000 pixels with large dynamic range and very high sensitivity in combination with very efficient frequency division multiplexing at GHz frequencies. In this paper we present the development for a ~100 pixel MKID demonstration array based upon an single pixel consisting of an integrated MKID-antenna detector, with the antenna placed in the second focus of an elliptical Si lens. The design presented can be scaled to any frequency between 80 GHz and >5 THz because there is no need for superconducting structures that become lossy at frequencies above the gap frequency of the materials used. We present measurements of the optical coupling efficiency, sensitivity and discuss array development. We have obtained a dark sensitivity of 7×10-19W/Hz1/2 using 100 nm thick A1 devices and an optical coupling efficiency of 35% referring to the power of a single polarization optical signal in front of the Si lens of the detector.

  13. Low Average Sidelobe Slot Array Antennas for Radiometer Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rengarajan, Sembiam; Zawardzki, Mark S.; Hodges, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    In radiometer applications, it is required to design antennas that meet low average sidelobe levels and low average return loss over a specified frequency bandwidth. It is a challenge to meet such specifications over a frequency range when one uses resonant elements such as waveguide feed slots. In addition to their inherent narrow frequency band performance, the problem is exacerbated due to modeling errors and manufacturing tolerances. There was a need to develop a design methodology to solve the problem. An iterative design procedure was developed by starting with an array architecture, lattice spacing, aperture distribution, waveguide dimensions, etc. The array was designed using Elliott s technique with appropriate values of the total slot conductance in each radiating waveguide, and the total resistance in each feed waveguide. Subsequently, the array performance was analyzed by the full wave method of moments solution to the pertinent integral equations. Monte Carlo simulations were also carried out to account for amplitude and phase errors introduced for the aperture distribution due to modeling errors as well as manufacturing tolerances. If the design margins for the average sidelobe level and the average return loss were not adequate, array architecture, lattice spacing, aperture distribution, and waveguide dimensions were varied in subsequent iterations. Once the design margins were found to be adequate, the iteration was stopped and a good design was achieved. A symmetric array architecture was found to meet the design specification with adequate margin. The specifications were near 40 dB for angular regions beyond 30 degrees from broadside. Separable Taylor distribution with nbar=4 and 35 dB sidelobe specification was chosen for each principal plane. A non-separable distribution obtained by the genetic algorithm was found to have similar characteristics. The element spacing was obtained to provide the required beamwidth and close to a null in the E

  14. Yagi-Uda optical antenna array collimated laser based on surface plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Long; Lin, Jie; Ma, Yuan; Liu, Bin; Tan, Jiubin; Jin, Peng

    2016-06-01

    The divergence and directivity of a laser with a periodic Yagi-Uda optical antenna array modulated surface are investigated by finite element method. The nanoparticle optical antenna arrays are optimized to achieve the high directivity and the small divergence by using of Helmholtz's reciprocity theorem. When the nanoparticle antenna replaced by a Yagi-Uda antenna with same size, the directivity and the signal-to-noise ratio of the modulated laser beam are notably enhanced. The main reason is that the directors of the Yagi-Uda antennas induce more energy to propagate towards the antenna transmitting direction. The results can provide valuable guidelines in designing collimated laser, which can be widely applied in the field of biologic detection, spatial optical communication and optical measurement.

  15. Parasitic antenna effect in terahertz plasmon detector array for real-time imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jong-Ryul; Lee, Woo-Jae; Ryu, Min Woo; Rok Kim, Kyung; Han, Seong-Tae

    2015-10-01

    The performance uniformity of each pixel integrated with a patch antenna in a terahertz plasmon detector array is very important in building the large array necessary for a real-time imaging system. We found a parasitic antenna effect in the terahertz plasmon detector whose response is dependent on the position of the detector pixel in the illumination area of the terahertz beam. It was also demonstrated that the parasitic antenna effect is attributed to the physical structure consisting of signal pads, bonding wires, and interconnection lines on a chip and a printed circuit board. Experimental results show that the performance of the detector pixel is determined by the sum of the effects of each parasitic antenna and the on-chip integrated antenna designed to detect signals at the operating frequency. The parasitic antenna effect can be minimized by blocking the interconnections with a metallic shield.

  16. Design of 4x1 microstrip patch antenna array for 5.8 GHz ISM band applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valjibhai, Gohil Jayesh; Bhatia, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the new design of four element antenna array using corporate feed technique. The proposed antenna array is developed on the Rogers 5880 dielectric material. The antenna array works on 5.8 GHz ISM band. The industrial, scientific and medical (ISM) radio bands are radio bands (portions of the radio spectrum) reserved internationally for the use of radio frequency (RF) energy for industrial, scientific and medical purposes other than communications. The array antennas have VSWR < 1.6 from 5.725 - 5.875 GHz. The simulated return loss characteristic of the antenna array is - 39.3 dB at 5.8 GHz. The gain of the antenna array is 12.3 dB achieved. The directivity of the broadside radiation pattern is 12.7 dBi at the 5.8 GHz operating frequency. The antenna array is simulated using High frequency structure simulation software.

  17. A Polarization Reconfigurable Aperture-Coupled Microstrip Antenna and Its Binary Array for MIMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Lei; Hong, Jin-Song; Zhou, Hong-Cheng

    2016-03-01

    In the paper, a singly fed circular patch antenna with polarization diversity is proposed, and its binary array for MIMO application is explored as well. The air substrate and aperture-coupled feed structure are adopted to increase bandwidth and simplify the bias circuit of PIN diodes. By controlling the states of four PIN diodes on the patch, the proposed antenna can produce linear polarization (LP), left- or right-hand circular polarization (LHCP or RHCP). For each polarization sense, the antenna exhibits wide impedance bandwidth, high gain and low cross-polarization. Two antennas are orthogonally placed to form a binary array for MIMO application, which has high isolation and low envelope correlation. The antenna and its array have advantages of simple biasing network, easy fabrication and adjustment, which can be widely applied in wireless communication systems.

  18. Directional antenna array (DAA) for communications, control, and data link protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molchanov, Pavlo A.; Contarino, Vincent M.

    2013-06-01

    A next generation of Smart antennas with point-to-point communication and jam, spoof protection capability by verification of spatial position is offered. A directional antenna array (DAA) with narrow irradiation beam provides counter terrorism protection for communications, data link, control and GPS. Communications are "invisible" to guided missiles because of 20 dB smaller irradiation outside the beam and spatial separation. This solution can be implemented with current technology. Directional antennas have higher gain and can be multi-frequency or have wide frequency band in contrast to phase antenna arrays. This multi-directional antenna array provides a multi-functional communication network and simultaneously can be used for command control, data link and GPS.

  19. Phased-array-fed antenna configuration study. Volume 1: Technology assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorbello, R. M.; Zaghloul, A. I.; Lee, B. S.; Siddiqi, S.; Geller, B. D.; Gerson, H. I.; Srinivas, D. N.

    1983-01-01

    The status of the technologies for phased-array-fed dual reflector systems is reviewed. The different aspects of these technologies, including optical performances, phased array systems, problems encountered in phased array design, beamforming networks, MMIC design and its incorporation into waveguide systems, reflector antenna structures, and reflector deployment mechanisms are addressed.

  20. System performance and performance enhancement relative to element position location errors for distributed linear antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrian, Andrew

    For the most part, antenna phased arrays have traditionally been comprised of antenna elements that are very carefully and precisely placed in very periodic grid structures. Additionally, the relative positions of the elements to each other are typically mechanically fixed as best as possible. There is never an assumption the relative positions of the elements are a function of time or some random behavior. In fact, every array design is typically analyzed for necessary element position tolerances in order to meet necessary performance requirements such as directivity, beamwidth, sidelobe level, and beam scanning capability. Consider an antenna array that is composed of several radiating elements, but the position of each of the elements is not rigidly, mechanically fixed like a traditional array. This is not to say that the element placement structure is ignored or irrelevant, but each element is not always in its relative, desired location. Relative element positioning would be analogous to a flock of birds in flight or a swarm of insects. They tend to maintain a near fixed position with the group, but not always. In the antenna array analog, it would be desirable to maintain a fixed formation, but due to other random processes, it is not always possible to maintain perfect formation. This type of antenna array is referred to as a distributed antenna array. A distributed antenna array's inability to maintain perfect formation causes degradations in the antenna factor pattern of the array. Directivity, beamwidth, sidelobe level and beam pointing error are all adversely affected by element relative position error. This impact is studied as a function of element relative position error for linear antenna arrays. The study is performed over several nominal array element spacings, from lambda to lambda, several sidelobe levels (20 to 50 dB) and across multiple array illumination tapers. Knowing the variation in performance, work is also performed to utilize a minimum

  1. Quasi-isotropic VHF antenna array design study for the International Ultraviolet Explorer satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raines, J. K.

    1975-01-01

    Results of a study to design a quasi-isotropic VHF antenna array for the IUE satellite are presented. A free space configuration was obtained that has no nulls deeper than -6.4 dbi in each of two orthogonal polarizations. A computer program named SOAP that analyzes the electromagnetic interaction between antennas and complicated conducting bodies, such as satellites was developed.

  2. Antennas for the array-based Deep Space Network: current status and future designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbriale, William A.; Gama, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Development of very large arrays1,2 of small antennas has been proposed as a way to increase the downlink capability of the NASA Deep Space Network DSN) by two or three orders of magnitude thereby enabling greatly increased science data from currently configured missions or enabling new mission concepts. The current concept is for an array of 400 x 12-m antennas at each of three longitudes. The DSN array will utilize radio astronomy sources for phase calibration and will have wide bandwidth correlation processing for this purpose. NASA has undertaken a technology program to prove the performance and cost of a very large DSN array. Central to that program is a 3-element interferometer to be completed in 2005. This paper describes current status of the low cost 6-meter breadboard antenna to be used as part of the interferometer and the RF design of the 12-meter antenna.

  3. Compensation of static deformation and vibrations of antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, Peter; Loecker, Claudius; Algermissen, Stephan; Sekora, Robert

    2012-11-01

    The effect of vibrations and static deformations on aerospace platforms and their influence on the performance of radar, navigation or communication systems are currently studied in the scope of the NATO Research Task Groups SET-131. The deformations may be caused by different effects, e.g. aerodynamic loads, vehicle motion, moving parts such as rudders or turbines, or the impact of a collision. Depending on their strength and the function of the wireless system, they may have a significant impact on the system performance. Structural aspects of the platform such as mechanical or thermal stability, aerodynamics or outer appearance are of great importance. The present paper gives an overview of the scope of work of the group and on-going investigations on system performance analysis and compensation methods such as adaptive signal processing or electronic phase compensation for military key applications such as RADAR, Communication, Electronic Support Measures (ESM) or Command and Control (C2). In addition, the development of an antenna array demonstrator with active vibration compensation using piezo sensors and actuators and control algorithms will be shown, including simulated as well as experimental results.

  4. The design and fabrication of microstrip omnidirectional array antennas for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, T. G.; Appleton, M. W.; Lusby, T. K.

    1976-01-01

    A microstrip antenna design concept was developed that will provide quasi-omnidirectional radiation pattern characteristics about cylindrical and conical aerospace structures. L-band and S-band antenna arrays were designed, fabricated, and, in some cases, flight tested for rocket, satellite, and aircraft drone applications. Each type of array design is discussed along with a thermal cover design that was required for the sounding rocket applications.

  5. A synthesis array for lunar submillimeter astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahoney, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a system concept for a synthesis array for lunar submillimeter astronomy (SALSA). It includes a brief discussion of the science objectives and the advantages of a placing such an array on the moon, the system concept, and a top-level discussion of the various subsystems, including the technology drivers associated with each.

  6. Electrically small, mixed modal antenna (MMA) array for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong-Hwoon; Grimes, Dale M.; Crimes, Craig A.

    Based on the modal antenna analysis due to Grimes (1986) near-field interaction between elements of an antenna ensemble wave used to produce resonant, directed radiation from a small antenna. By previous theory, mixed TE and TM modes are found to be orthogonal and, therefore, a small resonant and/or directional antenna is not possible. The authors recount the analysis showing that time-average power is orthogonal and reactive power is not. Nonorthogonal reactive power suggests that a small, resonant, directive antenna may be possible. Such an antenna is potentially useful for aerospace applications. This paper reports experimental progress to date. In agreement with the theory, it was found that the resonant frequency depends on the relative values of driving currents; the resonant frequency of the magnetic dipole decreased more than 30 percent when a 50-ohm resistive pad loaded the electric dipole.

  7. Systems applications of mechanically scanned slotted array antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, Richard A.

    1988-06-01

    Both military and nonmilitary applications of mechanically scanned slotted waveguide antennas are reviewed. Commercial applications include weather avoidance, maritime uses, high-resolution area mapping, and space flight. Military applications include tactical aircraft systems, air-to-air modes, air-to-ground modes, missile guidance systems, homing guidance systems, missile seeker antennas, and amplitude and phase comparison. It is anticipated that the use of such antennas in airborne radar and missile systems will extend through the 1990s and beyond.

  8. An active K/Ka-band antenna array for the NASA ACTS mobile terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tulintseff, A.; Crist, R.; Densmore, Art; Sukamto, L.

    1993-01-01

    An active K/Ka-band antenna array is currently under development for NASA's ACTS Mobile Terminal (AMT). The AMT task will demonstrate voice, data, and video communications to and from the AMT vehicle in Los Angeles, California, and a base station in Cleveland, Ohio, via the ACTS satellite at 30 and 20 GHz. Satellite tracking for the land-mobile vehicular antenna system involves 'mechanical dithering' of the antenna, where the antenna radiates a fixed beam 46 deg. above the horizon. The antenna is to transmit horizontal polarization and receive vertical polarization at 29.634 plus or minus 0.15 GHz and 19.914 plus or minus 0.15 GHz, respectively. The active array will provide a minimum of 22 dBW EIRP transmit power density and a -8 dB/K deg. receive sensitivity.

  9. Implementation of an Antenna Array Signal Processing Breadboard for the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro, Robert

    2006-01-01

    The Deep Space Network Large Array will replace/augment 34 and 70 meter antenna assets. The array will mainly be used to support NASA's deep space telemetry, radio science, and navigation requirements. The array project will deploy three complexes in the western U.S., Australia, and European longitude each with 400 12m downlink antennas and a DSN central facility at JPL. THis facility will remotely conduct all real-time monitor and control for the network. Signal processing objectives include: provide a means to evaluate the performance of the Breadboard Array's antenna subsystem; design and build prototype hardware; demonstrate and evaluate proposed signal processing techniques; and gain experience with various technologies that may be used in the Large Array. Results are summarized..

  10. A hybrid antenna array design for 3-d direction of arrival estimation.

    PubMed

    Saqib, Najam-Us; Khan, Imdad

    2015-01-01

    A 3-D beam scanning antenna array design is proposed that gives a whole 3-D spherical coverage and also suitable for various radar and body-worn devices in the Body Area Networks applications. The Array Factor (AF) of the proposed antenna is derived and its various parameters like directivity, Half Power Beam Width (HPBW) and Side Lobe Level (SLL) are calculated by varying the size of the proposed antenna array. Simulations were carried out in MATLAB 2012b. The radiators are considered isotropic and hence mutual coupling effects are ignored. The proposed array shows a considerable improvement against the existing cylindrical and coaxial cylindrical arrays in terms of 3-D scanning, size, directivity, HPBW and SLL. PMID:25790103

  11. Spaced-antenna wind estimation using an X-band active phased-array weather radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesh, Vijay

    Over the past few decades, several single radar methods have been developed to probe the kinematic structure of storms. All these methods trade angular-resolution to retrieve the wind-field. To date, the spaced-antenna method has been employed for profiling the ionosphere and the precipitation free lower atmosphere. This work focuses on applying the spaced-antenna method on an X-band active phased-array radar for high resolution horizontal wind-field retrieval from precipitation echoes. The ability to segment the array face into multiple displaced apertures allows for flexible spaced-antenna implementations. The methodology employed herein comprises of Monte-Carlo simulations to optimize the spaced-antenna system design and analysis of real data collected with the designed phased-array system. The contribution that underpins this dissertation is the demonstration of qualitative agreement between spaced-antenna and Doppler beam swinging retrievals based on real data. First, simulations of backscattered electric fields at the antenna array elements are validated using theoretical expressions. Based on the simulations, the degrees of freedom in the spaced-antenna system design are optimized for retrieval of mean baseline wind. We show that the designed X-band spaced-antenna system has lower retrieval uncertainty than the existing S-band spaced-antenna implementation on the NWRT. This is because of the flexibility to synthesize small overlapping apertures and the ability to obtain statistically independent samples at a faster rate at X-band. We then demonstrate a technique to make relative phase-center displacement measurements based on simulations and real data from the phased-array spaced-antenna system. This simple method uses statistics of precipitation echoes and apriori beamwidth measurements to make field repeatable phase-center displacement measurements. Finally, we test the hypothesis that wind-field curvature effects are common to both the spaced-antenna and

  12. 915 MHz microwave interstitial hyperthermia. Part II: Array of phase-monitored antennas.

    PubMed

    Camart, J C; Dubois, L; Fabre, J J; Vanloot, D; Chive, M

    1993-01-01

    In order to heat the whole volume of a tumour by microwave interstitial hyperthermia it is necessary to use an antenna array. The antenna modelization and the numerical solution of the bidimensional bioheat transfer equation allow determination of temperature evolution during a heating session. The calculations are taken for four antennas fed in phase and the theory is then proven by experiments on gel and on patients. Results are presented on cross-section heating patterns and their time evolution. Temperature distribution is calculated when feeding one antenna by a feeding current out of phase with the other currents. The phase difference value is optimized and it is then demonstrated that the heated volume is increased by successively feeding each antenna with an out-of-phase current. The time taken to feed each antenna one after the other is optimized. PMID:8515146

  13. Performance of TlCaBaCuO 30 GHz 64 element antenna array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, L. L.; Koepf, G.; Bhasin, K. B.; Richard, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    A 64-element, 30-GHz microstrip antenna array with corporate feed network was designed and built on a 0.254-mm (10-mil) thick lanthanum aluminate substrate. One antenna pattern was fabricated from gold film, and a second pattern used TlCaBaCuO high-temperature superconductor. Both antennas used gold ground planes deposited on the reverse side of the substrate. Gain and radiation patterns were measured for both antennas at room temperature and at cryogenic temperatures. Observations agree well with simple models for loss and microwave beam width, with a gain on boresight of 20.3 dB and beam width of 15 deg for the superconducting antenna. The antenna loss is only 1.9 dB.

  14. Design of 45-degree Linearly Polarized Substrate Integrated Waveguide-fed Slot Array Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qingfeng; Lu, Yilong

    2008-11-01

    This paper presents a method of designing substrate integrated waveguide-fed (SIW-fed) slot array antennas. The design theory is based on the circuit model of slot and via as well as the reflection canceling. To prove the feasibility of this method, a 10-element K-band SIW-fed 45-degree linearly polarized slot array antenna with uniform power distribution is designed. By full-wave simulation, the antenna has a good impedance bandwidth of 7.5% and uniform power distribution. Besides, a maximum gain of 15.3dBi is obtained in the broadside and the cross polarization is suppressed below -23.5dB in the boresight. This type of SIW-fed slot array antennas can be a good candidate for microwave and millimeter-wave applications, especially for auto-motive collision-avoidance radar systems.

  15. System concepts for transmit arrays of parabolic antennas for deep space uplinks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurd, William J.

    2005-01-01

    Phased arrays of parabolic antennas are a potentially lower-cost way to provide uplink transmission to distant spacecraft, compared to the 34-m and 70-m antennas now used by the NASA Deep Space Network. A large transmit array could provide very high EIRP when needed for spacecraft emergencies, such as the equivalent of 1 MW radiated from a 70-m antenna. Cost-effectiveness is realized by dividing the array into smaller arrays to provide routine support to many spacecraft simultaneously. The antennas might be as small as 12-m in diameter, with as many as 100 antennas covering an area of 0.5 km to 1 km in extent. Such arrays present significant technical challenges in phase alignment, which must be maintained at close to 1 mm. The concept requires a very stable system with accurately known antenna phase center locations. The system is first calibrated by transmitting from all antennas, and observing the signals at a target located in the far fields of the individual antennas. The antennas are then pointed to the operational targets, with the signal phases and time delays set to reinforce in the target directions. This requires accurate knowledge of the target directions and calculation of the required phases. The system must be phase-stable for all directions and over the time between calibrations, which is desired to be at least one day. In this paper, a system concept is presented, the major error sources are identified, a rough error budget is established, and key elements of the system are discussed. A calibration method is recommended which uses satellites as radar targets. The performance goal is to achieve a combining loss of less than 0.2 dB in good weather, and of less than 1 dB in all but extremely bad weather.

  16. Multi-Band Miniaturized Patch Antennas for a Compact, Shielded Microwave Breast Imaging Array

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Suzette M.; Al-Joumayly, Mudar A.; Burfeindt, Matthew J.; Behdad, Nader; Hagness, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of a class of multi-band miniaturized patch antennas designed for use in a 3D enclosed sensor array for microwave breast imaging. Miniaturization and multi-band operation are achieved by loading the antenna with non-radiating slots at strategic locations along the patch. This results in symmetric radiation patterns and similar radiation characteristics at all frequencies of operation. Prototypes were fabricated and tested in a biocompatible immersion medium. Excellent agreement was obtained between simulations and measurements. The trade-off between miniaturization and radiation efficiency within this class of patch antennas is explored via a numerical analysis of the effects of the location and number of slots, as well as the thickness and permittivity of the dielectric substrate, on the resonant frequencies and gain. Additionally, we compare 3D quantitative microwave breast imaging performance achieved with two different enclosed arrays of slot-loaded miniaturized patch antennas. Simulated array measurements were obtained for a 3D anatomically realistic numerical breast phantom. The reconstructed breast images generated from miniaturized patch array data suggest that, for the realistic noise power levels assumed in this study, the variations in gain observed across this class of multi-band patch antennas do not significantly impact the overall image quality. We conclude that these miniaturized antennas are promising candidates as compact array elements for shielded, multi-frequency microwave breast imaging systems. PMID:25392561

  17. Multi-Band Miniaturized Patch Antennas for a Compact, Shielded Microwave Breast Imaging Array.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Suzette M; Al-Joumayly, Mudar A; Burfeindt, Matthew J; Behdad, Nader; Hagness, Susan C

    2013-12-18

    We present a comprehensive study of a class of multi-band miniaturized patch antennas designed for use in a 3D enclosed sensor array for microwave breast imaging. Miniaturization and multi-band operation are achieved by loading the antenna with non-radiating slots at strategic locations along the patch. This results in symmetric radiation patterns and similar radiation characteristics at all frequencies of operation. Prototypes were fabricated and tested in a biocompatible immersion medium. Excellent agreement was obtained between simulations and measurements. The trade-off between miniaturization and radiation efficiency within this class of patch antennas is explored via a numerical analysis of the effects of the location and number of slots, as well as the thickness and permittivity of the dielectric substrate, on the resonant frequencies and gain. Additionally, we compare 3D quantitative microwave breast imaging performance achieved with two different enclosed arrays of slot-loaded miniaturized patch antennas. Simulated array measurements were obtained for a 3D anatomically realistic numerical breast phantom. The reconstructed breast images generated from miniaturized patch array data suggest that, for the realistic noise power levels assumed in this study, the variations in gain observed across this class of multi-band patch antennas do not significantly impact the overall image quality. We conclude that these miniaturized antennas are promising candidates as compact array elements for shielded, multi-frequency microwave breast imaging systems. PMID:25392561

  18. Wide-angle, circularly polarized, omnidirectional-array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, R. B.; Case, E. W.; Rosa, J.

    1971-01-01

    Modified conventional turnstile antenna features bifoliate pattern with relatively high gain and good circularity over solid area enclosed by the 0.26 and 1.31 radian angles of elevation. These antennas are intended for high altitude balloon use, their permissible weight is restricted to one pound.

  19. Reconfigurable Array Antenna Using Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Chun, Donghoon; Katehi, Linda P. B.

    2001-01-01

    The paper demonstrates a patch antenna integrated with a novel microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) actuator for reconfiguring the operating frequency. Experimental results demonstrate that the center frequency can be reconfigured by as much as 1.6 percent of the nominal operating frequency at K-Band In addition, a novel on-wafer antenna pattern measurement technique is demonstrated.

  20. Characteristics of block-periodic phased-array antennas with circular polarization of the radiated field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likhoded, Iu. V.; Mironnikov, A. S.

    1990-02-01

    The paper presents results of a numerical investigation of the directivity characteristics of a block-periodic waveguide phased-array antenna with circular polarization of the radiated field. The advantages of this array from the viewpoint of maximining the ellipticity coefficent of the radiated field in the scanning sector are pointed out.

  1. Aperture synthesis of monopulse antenna for radome analysis using limited measured pattern data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huddleston, G. K.; Roe, J. M.

    1982-02-01

    A planar aperture synthesis procedure which predicts measured radiation pattern data accurately and which exploits known physical parameters of the actual antenna is described for use in computer-aided radome analysis. The plane wave spectrum (PWS) representation, with the geometrical optics approximation, is used to characterize radiation from the array of four identical, discrete, conical horn elements that was studied. Solutions for the PWS of each element from measured array patterns over the visible region are presented, and a digital signal processing algorithm is described for extrapolating the aperture-limited PWS into the evanescent region as required to determine the near field of each element. The element near fields, having bounded support, are combined to produce a near field for the complete array. The array near field is used in a computer-aided radome analysis to demonstrate the accuracy to which the measured antenna patterns are predicted for the case of a free space radome. For completeness, comparisons of measured and computed patterns for a tangent ogive Rexolite radome are presented.

  2. Aperture synthesis of monopulse antenna for radome analysis using limited measured pattern data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huddleston, G. K.

    A planar aperture synthesis procedure which predicts measured radiation pattern data accurately and which exploits known physical parameters of the actual antenna is described for use in computer-aided radome analysis. The plane wave spectrum (PWS) representation, with the geometrical optics approximation, is used to characterize radiation from the array of four identical, discrete, conical horn elements that was studied. Solutions for the PWS of each element from measured array patterns over the visible region are presented, and a digital signal processing algorithm is described for extrapolating the aperture-limited PWS into the evanescent region as required to determine the near field of each element. The element near fields, having bounded support, are combined to produce a near field for the complete array. The array near field is used in a computer-aided radome analysis to demonstrate the accuracy to which the measured antenna patterns are predicted for the case of a free space radome. For completeness, comparisons of measured and computed patterns for a tangent ogive Rexolite (epsilon sub r = 2.54) radome are presented.

  3. Radar jammer with an antenna array of pseudo-randomly spaced radiating elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hacker, P.S.

    1984-08-21

    Disclosed herein is a radar jammer which utilizes an electronically agile, sparsely populated, phase controlled antenna array of pseudo-randomly spaced radiating elements to form a high gain, single narrow beam of radiation directed at a detected threat radar, but containing only a small fraction of the available transmitting power, While providing simultaneously therewith effective jamming radiation over a wide coverage region. Preferably, the plurality of radiating elements are sparsely disposed pseudo-randomly over an area surface to form an antenna array, the number of radiating elements in the array being less than the value of the surface area divided by the transmitting carrier wavelength (lambda) squared.

  4. Delay line and mutual coupling considerations for MST radar antenna arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brosnahan, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    Basic antenna theory which states that the field radiated from an antenna array is equal to the sum of the currents flowing in each element of the array is discussed. The feedline distribution system guarantees the proper amplitude and phase of the current for each element of an array. The difference in electrical lengths of the feedlines to the elements has to equal the desired phase angle. The current for voltage delay in a transmission line is equal to the transmission line electrical length in only a few special cases, when the transmission line is terminated in its characteristic impedance or when the transmission line's electrical length is a multiple of 90 degrees.

  5. Development of components for an S-band phased array antenna subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The system requirements, module test data, and S-band phased array subsystem test data are discussed. Of the two approaches to achieving antenna gain (mechanically steered reflector or electronically steered phased array), the phased array approach offers the greatest simplicity and lowest cost (size, weight, power, and dollars) for this medium gain. A competitive system design is described as well as hardware evaluation which will lead to timely availability of this technology for implementing such a system. The objectives of the study were: to fabricate and test six engineering model transmit/receive microelectronics modules; to design, fabricate, and test one dc and logic multilayer manifold; and to integrate and test an S-band phased array antenna subsystem composed of antenna elements, seven T/R modules, RF manifolds and dc manifold.

  6. Cophasal horizontal wideband array antennas for transmitting with asymmetric output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belousov, S. P.; Kliger, G. A.; Eskin, N. A.

    1985-03-01

    Type SGDRA cophasal horizontal wideband antennas for transmitters with asymmetric (single-stage) output are described. An antenna of this kind consists of rigid shunt vibrators and an asymmetric feeder channel. The latter is formed by symmetric overhead feeders, a symmetrizing device being available for operation with a single-stage transmitter. Two typical construction are: one tower section with four tiers of vibrator groups and two tower sections with eight tiers of vibrator groups on each, with an adapter from symmetric to asymmetric feeder channel in each case. Various arrangements for power feed are possible, coaxial cables being most suitable for this purpose. The performance characteristics of these antennas are discussed.

  7. Development And Test of A Digitally Steered Antenna Array for The Navigator GPS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinto, Heitor David; Valdez, Jennifer E.; Winternitz, Luke M. B.; Hassouneh, Munther A.; Price, Samuel R.

    2012-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS)-based navigation has become common for low-Earth orbit spacecraft as the signal environment is similar to that on the Earth s surface. The situation changes abruptly, however, for spacecraft whose orbital altitudes exceed that of the GPS constellation. Visibility is dramatically reduced and signals that are present may be very weak and more susceptible to interference. GPS receivers effective at these altitudes require increased sensitivity, which often requires a high-gain antenna. Pointing such an antenna can pose a challenge. One efficient approach to mitigate these problems is the use of a digitally steered antenna array. Such an antenna can optimally allocate gain toward desired signal sources and away from interferers. This paper presents preliminary results in the development and test of a digitally steered antenna array for the Navigator GPS research program at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center. In particular, this paper highlights the development of an array and front-end electronics, the development and test of a real-time software GPS receiver, and implementation of three beamforming methods for combining the signals from the array. Additionally, this paper discusses the development of a GPS signal simulator which produces digital samples of the GPS L1C/A signals as they would be received by an arbitrary antenna array configuration. The simulator models transmitter and receiver dynamics, near-far and multipath interference, and has been a critical component in both the development and test of the GPS receiver. The GPS receiver system was tested with real and simulated GPS signals. Preliminary results show that performance improvement was achieved in both the weak signal and interference environments, matching analytical predictions. This paper summarizes our initial findings and discusses the advantages and limitations of the antenna array and the various beamforming methods.

  8. Directions of arrival estimation with planar antenna arrays in the presence of mutual coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkar, Salem; Harabi, Ferid; Gharsallah, Ali

    2013-06-01

    Directions of arrival (DoAs) estimation of multiple sources using an antenna array is a challenging topic in wireless communication. The DoAs estimation accuracy depends not only on the selected technique and algorithm, but also on the geometrical configuration of the antenna array used during the estimation. In this article the robustness of common planar antenna arrays against unaccounted mutual coupling is examined and their DoAs estimation capabilities are compared and analysed through computer simulations using the well-known MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm. Our analysis is based on an electromagnetic concept to calculate an approximation of the impedance matrices that define the mutual coupling matrix (MCM). Furthermore, a CRB analysis is presented and used as an asymptotic performance benchmark of the studied antenna arrays. The impact of the studied antenna arrays geometry on the MCM structure is also investigated. Simulation results show that the UCCA has more robustness against unaccounted mutual coupling and performs better results than both UCA and URA geometries. The performed simulations confirm also that, although the UCCA achieves better performance under complicated scenarios, the URA shows better asymptotic (CRB) behaviour which promises more accuracy on DoAs estimation.

  9. Novel Compact Mushroom-Type EBG Structure for Electromagnetic Coupling Reduction of Microstrip Antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lizhong; Wang, Guangming; Liang, Jiangang; Zhang, Chenxin

    2015-03-01

    A novel compact electromagnetic bandgap (EBG) structure consisting of two turns complementary spiral resonator (CSR) and conventional mushroom EBG (CM-EBG) structure is introduced to suppress the mutual coupling in antenna arrays for multiple-input and multiple-output (MIMO) applications. Eigenmode calculation is used to investigate the proposed CSR-loaded mushroom-type EBG (MT-EBG), which proved to exhibit bandgap property and a miniaturization of 48.9% is realized compared with the CM-EBG. By inserting the proposed EBG structure between two E-plane coupled microstrip antennas, a mutual coupling reduction of 8.13 dB has been achieved numerically and experimentally. Moreover, the EBG-loaded antenna has better far-field radiation patterns compared with the reference antenna. Thus, this novel EBG structure with advantages of compactness and high decoupling efficiency opens an avenue to new types of antennas with super performances.

  10. Dual-Polarization, Multi-Frequency Antenna Array for use with Hurricane Imaging Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little, John

    2013-01-01

    Advancements in common aperture antenna technology were employed to utilize its proprietary genetic algorithmbased modeling tools in an effort to develop, build, and test a dual-polarization array for Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) applications. Final program results demonstrate the ability to achieve a lightweight, thin, higher-gain aperture that covers the desired spectral band. NASA employs various passive microwave and millimeter-wave instruments, such as spectral radiometers, for a range of remote sensing applications, from measurements of the Earth's surface and atmosphere, to cosmic background emission. These instruments such as the HIRAD, SFMR (Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer), and LRR (Lightweight Rainfall Radiometer), provide unique data accumulation capabilities for observing sea surface wind, temperature, and rainfall, and significantly enhance the understanding and predictability of hurricane intensity. These microwave instruments require extremely efficient wideband or multiband antennas in order to conserve space on the airborne platform. In addition, the thickness and weight of the antenna arrays is of paramount importance in reducing platform drag, permitting greater time on station. Current sensors are often heavy, single- polarization, or limited in frequency coverage. The ideal wideband antenna will have reduced size, weight, and profile (a conformal construct) without sacrificing optimum performance. The technology applied to this new HIRAD array will allow NASA, NOAA, and other users to gather information related to hurricanes and other tropical storms more cost effectively without sacrificing sensor performance or the aircraft time on station. The results of the initial analysis and numerical design indicated strong potential for an antenna array that would satisfy all of the design requirements for a replacement HIRAD array. Multiple common aperture antenna methodologies were employed to achieve exceptional gain over the entire

  11. Understanding and optimizing microstrip patch antenna cross polarization radiation on element level for demanding phased array antennas in weather radar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollbracht, D.

    2015-11-01

    The antenna cross polarization suppression (CPS) is of significant importance for the accurate calculation of polarimetric weather radar moments. State-of-the-art reflector antennas fulfill these requirements, but phased array antennas are changing their CPS during the main beam shift, off-broadside direction. Since the cross polarization (x-pol) of the array pattern is affected by the x-pol element factor, the single antenna element should be designed for maximum CPS, not only at broadside, but also for the complete angular electronic scan (e-scan) range of the phased array antenna main beam positions. Different methods for reducing the x-pol radiation from microstrip patch antenna elements, available from literature sources, are discussed and summarized. The potential x-pol sources from probe fed microstrip patch antennas are investigated. Due to the lack of literature references, circular and square shaped X-Band radiators are compared in their x-pol performance and the microstrip patch antenna size variation was analyzed for improved x-pol pattern. Furthermore, the most promising technique for the reduction of x-pol radiation, namely "differential feeding with two RF signals 180° out of phase", is compared to single fed patch antennas and thoroughly investigated for phased array applications with simulation results from CST MICROWAVE STUDIO (CST MWS). A new explanation for the excellent port isolation of dual linear polarized and differential fed patch antennas is given graphically. The antenna radiation pattern from single fed and differential fed microstrip patch antennas are analyzed and the shapes of the x-pol patterns are discussed with the well-known cavity model. Moreover, two new visual based electromagnetic approaches for the explanation of the x-pol generation will be given: the field line approach and the surface current distribution approach provide new insight in understanding the generation of x-pol component in microstrip patch antenna radiation

  12. A Study of Phased Array Antennas for NASA's Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamnejad, Vahraz; Huang, John; Cesarone, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we briefly discuss various options but focus on the feasibility of the phased arrays as a viable option for this application. Of particular concern and consideration will be the cost, reliability, and performance compared to the present 70-meter antenna system, particularly the gain/noise temperature levels in the receive mode. Many alternative phased arrays including planar horizontal arrays, hybrid mechanically/electronically steered arrays, phased array of mechanically steered reflectors, multi-faceted planar arrays, phased array-fed lens antennas, and planar reflect-arrays are compared and their viability is assessed. Although they have many advantages including higher reliability, near-instantaneous beam switching or steering capability, the cost of such arrays is presently prohibitive and it is concluded that the only viable array options at the present are the arrays of a few or many small reflectors. The active planar phased arrays, however, may become feasible options in the next decade and can be considered for deployment in smaller configurations as supplementary options.

  13. Performance, operational limits, of an Electronic Switching Spherical Array (ESSA) antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockton, R.

    1979-01-01

    The development of a microprocessor controller which provides multimode operational capability for the Electronic Switching Spherical Array (ESSA) Antenna is described. The best set of operating conditions were determined and the performance of an ESSA antenna was demonstrated in the following modes: (1) omni; (2) acquisition/track; (3) directive; and (4) multibeam. The control algorithms, software flow diagrams, and electronic circuitry were developed. The microprocessor and control electronics were built and interfaced with the antenna to carry out performance testing. The acquisition/track mode for users in the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System is emphasized.

  14. Integrated Antenna/Solar Array Cell (IA/SAC) System for Flexible Access Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ricard Q.; Clark, Eric B.; Pal, Anna Maria T.; Wilt, David M.; Mueller, Carl H.

    2004-01-01

    Present satellite communications systems normally use separate solar cells and antennas. Since solar cells generally account for the largest surface area of the spacecraft, co-locating the antenna and solar cells on the same substrate opens the possibility for a number of data-rate-enhancing communications link architecture that would have minimal impact on spacecraft weight and size. The idea of integrating printed planar antenna and solar array cells on the same surface has been reported in the literature. The early work merely attempted to demonstrate the feasibility by placing commercial solar cells besides a patch antenna. Recently, Integrating multiple antenna elements and solar cell arrays on the same surface was reported for both space and terrestrial applications. The application of photovoltaic solar cell in a planar antenna structure where the radiating patch antenna is replaced by a Si solar cell has been demonstrated in wireless communication systems (C. Bendel, J. Kirchhof and N. Henze, 3rd Would Photovotaic Congress, Osaka, Japan, May 2003). Based on a hybrid approach, a 6x1 slot array with circularly polarized crossdipole elements co-located on the same surface of the solar cells array has been demonstrated (S. Vaccaro, J. R. Mosig and P. de Maagt, IEEE Trans. Ant. and Propag., Vol. 5 1, No. 8, Aug. 2003). Amorphous silicon solar cells with about 5-10% efficiency were used in these demonstrations. This paper describes recent effort to integrate advanced solar cells with printed planar antennas. Compared to prior art, the proposed WSAC concept is unique in the following ways: 1) Active antenna element will be used to achieve dynamic beam steering; 2) High efficiency (30%) GaAs multi-junction solar cells will be used instead of Si, which has an efficiency of about 15%; 3) Antenna and solar cells are integrated on a common GaAs substrate; and 4) Higher data rate capability. The IA/SAC is designed to operate at X-band (8-12 GH) and higher frequencies

  15. Investigation of a wideband dual via fed circularly polarized patch antenna for applications in retrodirective arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Kyle

    Retrodirective arrays are an ongoing topic of research, particularly for applications on air mobile platforms such as Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV). To perform their task of establishing a broadband communications link in a dynamic environment requires electrically small, inexpensive, wideband antennas that are Circularly Polarized (CP). However most antennas that provide the bandwidth required with CP utilize non-standard components that cannot be manufactured in contemporary Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) facilities. This thesis explores ways to eliminate these non-standard components, principally air gaps and probes, and replace them with vias and multi-layer dielectrics. This investigation lead to the development of four configurations of a dual via fed circular patch antenna, with three different designs for the feed network: a two stage branch line coupler, a Wilkinson power divider with a 90 degree delay line, and a 90 degree hybrid. The experimental results included a version of this antenna operating at 3.0 GHz with a 33 % bandwidth across both the reflection coefficient and its axial ratio, comparing very well with simulations in Ansoft HFSS, and exceeding the performance of any published microstrip antenna that did not use non-standardard PCB components. This dual via fed design was then investigated in a 2 by 5 element linear array in order to develop an understanding of the coupling behaviour between elements. Keywords: microstrip antenna, mutual coupling, retrodirective arrays, circular polarization.

  16. High Rate User Ka-Band Phased Array Antenna Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caroglanian, Armen; Perko, Kenneth; Seufert, Steve; Dod, Tom; Warshowsky, Jay; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The High Rate User Phased Array Antenna (HRUPAA) is a Ka-Band planar phased array designed by the Harris Corporation for the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The HRUPAA permits a satellite to downlink data either to a ground station or through the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). The HRUPAA is scanned electronically by ground station / user satellite command over a 120 degree cone angle. The phased array has the advantage of not imparting attitude disturbances to the user spacecraft. The 288-element transmit-only array has distributed RF amplifiers integrated behind each of the printed patch antenna elements. The array has 33 dBW EIRP and is left-hand circularly polarized. An engineering model of a partially populated array has been developed and delivered to NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. This report deals with the testing of the engineering model at the Goddard Antenna Range near-field and compact range facilities. The antenna specifications are described first, followed by the test plan and test results.

  17. Determining Direction of Arrival at a Y-Shaped Antenna Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, Stan

    2003-01-01

    An algorithm computes the direction of arrival (both azimuth and elevation angles) of a lightning-induced electromagnetic signal from differences among the times of arrival of the signal at four antennas in a Y-shaped array on the ground. In the original intended application of the algorithm, the baselines of the array are about 90 m long and the array is part of a lightning-detection-and-ranging (LDAR) system. The algorithm and its underlying equations can also be used to compute directions of arrival of impulsive phenomena other than lightning on arrays of sensors other than radio antennas: for example, of an acoustic pulse arriving at an array of microphones.

  18. Feed array metrology and correction layer for large antenna systems in ASIC mixed signal technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centureli, F.; Scotti, G.; Tommasino, P.; Trifiletti, A.; Romano, F.; Cimmino, R.; Saitto, A.

    2014-08-01

    The paper deals with a possible use of the feed array present in a large antenna system, as a layer for measuring the antenna performance with a self-test procedure and a possible way to correct residual errors of the Antenna geometry and of the antenna distortions. Focus has been concentrated on a few key critical elements of a possible feed array metrology program. In particular, a preliminary contribution to the design and development of the feed array from one side, and the subsystem dedicated to antenna distortion monitoring and control from the other, have been chosen as the first areas of investigation. Scalability and flexibility principles and synergic approach with other coexistent technologies have been assumed of paramount importance to ensure ease of integrated operation and therefore allowing in principle increased performance and efficiency. The concept is based on the use of an existing feed array grid to measure antenna distortion with respect to the nominal configuration. Measured data are then processed to develop a multilayer strategy to control the mechanical movable devices (when existing) and to adjust the residual fine errors through a software controlled phase adjustment of the existing phase shifter The signal from the feed array is converted passing through a FPGA/ASIC level to digital data channels. The kind of those typically used for the scientific experiments. One additional channel is used for monitoring the antenna distortion status. These data are processed to define the best correction strategy, based on a software managed control system capable of operating at three different levels of the antenna system: reflector rotation layer, sub reflector rotation and translation layer (assuming the possibility of controlling a Stewart machine), phase shifter of the phased array layer. The project is at present in the design phase, a few elements necessary for a sound software design of the control subsystem have been developed at a

  19. Precise calibration of a GNSS antenna array for adaptive beamforming applications.

    PubMed

    Daneshmand, Saeed; Sokhandan, Negin; Zaeri-Amirani, Mohammad; Lachapelle, Gérard

    2014-01-01

    The use of global navigation satellite system (GNSS) antenna arrays for applications such as interference counter-measure, attitude determination and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) enhancement is attracting significant attention. However, precise antenna array calibration remains a major challenge. This paper proposes a new method for calibrating a GNSS antenna array using live signals and an inertial measurement unit (IMU). Moreover, a second method that employs the calibration results for the estimation of steering vectors is also proposed. These two methods are applied to the receiver in two modes, namely calibration and operation. In the calibration mode, a two-stage optimization for precise calibration is used; in the first stage, constant uncertainties are estimated while in the second stage, the dependency of each antenna element gain and phase patterns to the received signal direction of arrival (DOA) is considered for refined calibration. In the operation mode, a low-complexity iterative and fast-converging method is applied to estimate the satellite signal steering vectors using the calibration results. This makes the technique suitable for real-time applications employing a precisely calibrated antenna array. The proposed calibration method is applied to GPS signals to verify its applicability and assess its performance. Furthermore, the data set is used to evaluate the proposed iterative method in the receiver operation mode for two different applications, namely attitude determination and SNR enhancement. PMID:24887043

  20. Precise Calibration of a GNSS Antenna Array for Adaptive Beamforming Applications

    PubMed Central

    Daneshmand, Saeed; Sokhandan, Negin; Zaeri-Amirani, Mohammad; Lachapelle, Gérard

    2014-01-01

    The use of global navigation satellite system (GNSS) antenna arrays for applications such as interference counter-measure, attitude determination and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) enhancement is attracting significant attention. However, precise antenna array calibration remains a major challenge. This paper proposes a new method for calibrating a GNSS antenna array using live signals and an inertial measurement unit (IMU). Moreover, a second method that employs the calibration results for the estimation of steering vectors is also proposed. These two methods are applied to the receiver in two modes, namely calibration and operation. In the calibration mode, a two-stage optimization for precise calibration is used; in the first stage, constant uncertainties are estimated while in the second stage, the dependency of each antenna element gain and phase patterns to the received signal direction of arrival (DOA) is considered for refined calibration. In the operation mode, a low-complexity iterative and fast-converging method is applied to estimate the satellite signal steering vectors using the calibration results. This makes the technique suitable for real-time applications employing a precisely calibrated antenna array. The proposed calibration method is applied to GPS signals to verify its applicability and assess its performance. Furthermore, the data set is used to evaluate the proposed iterative method in the receiver operation mode for two different applications, namely attitude determination and SNR enhancement. PMID:24887043

  1. Catalytic enantioselective synthesis of vicinal dialkyl arrays.

    PubMed

    van Zijl, Anthoni W; Szymanski, Wiktor; López, Ferrnando; Minnaard, Adriaan J; Feringa, Ben L

    2008-09-19

    With a consecutive "asymmetric allylic alkylation (AAA)/cross-metathesis (CM)/conjugate addition (CA)" protocol it is possible to synthesize either stereoisomer of compounds containing a vicinal dialkyl array with excellent stereoselectivity. The versatility of this protocol in natural product synthesis is demonstrated in the preparation of the ant pheromones faranal and lasiol. PMID:18683977

  2. A study program on large aperture electronic scanning phased array antennas for the shuttle imaging microwave system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Fundamental phased array theory and performance parameters are discussed in terms of their application to microwave radiometry, and four scanning phased arrays representing current examples of state-of-the-art phased array technology are evaluated for potential use as components of the multispectral antenna system for the space shuttle imaging microwave system (SIMS). A discussion of problem areas, both in performance and fabrication is included, with extrapolations of performance characteristics for phased array antennas of increased sizes up to 20 m by 20 m. The possibility of interlacing two or more phased arrays to achieve a multifrequency aperture is considered, and, finally, a specific antenna system is recommended for use with SIMS.

  3. Time domain spectral method and its application on antenna array and PCB trace with periodic roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Minshen

    The primary interest of the electromagnetic behavior of a periodic structure is in its near field and far field. However, it is still numerically difficult to analyze either one in the time domain. The primary goal of this dissertation is to develop corresponding time domain technique to analyze two topics. The first one is to evaluate the far field of a realistic, large antenna array using an efficient method. The second one is to evaluate the propagation characteristic of a commercially available printed circuit board (PCB) with intentional roughness. Both of which are hot topics in the antenna and signal integrity (SI) society respectively; however, none of them have ever been solved in the time domain. To efficiently evaluate the far field pattern of a realistically large antenna array, the spectral domain method and the reciprocity theorem are implemented in the finite difference time domain (FDTD) technique to avoid the simulation of the near field. By taking advantage of the periodic boundary condition (PBC), the proposed method demonstrates its capability to speed up far field evaluation from hours to minutes. Good agreement of the results is provided for various cases: circular antenna array, arbitrary feeding array, and highly directional leaky wave antenna, etc. Periodic structure modeling with finite sized feedings is developed by the array scanning method (ASM) implemented in the FDTD technique. The minimally coupled electric and magnetic co-mingled antenna array is evaluated by the method. Moreover, a commercially available PCB with very small roughness is modeled by the ASM-FDTD and the propagation characteristic is evaluated. Both are evaluated by time domain method for the first time. Efficiency in terms of memory and computing time is shown for this method and parallelization in the future is proposed.

  4. Multiple-access phased array antenna simulator for a digital beam-forming system investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Yu, John; Walton, Joanne C.; Perl, Thomas D.; Andro, Monty; Alexovich, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    Future versions of data relay satellite systems are currently being planned by NASA. Being given consideration for implementation are on-board digital beamforming techniques which will allow multiple users to simultaneously access a single S-band phased array antenna system. To investigate the potential performance of such a system, a laboratory simulator has been developed at NASA's Lewis Research Center. This paper describes the system simulator, and in particular, the requirements, design and performance of a key subsystem, the phased array antenna simulator, which provides realistic inputs to the digital processor including multiple signals, noise, and nonlinearities.

  5. Heating characteristics of antenna arrays used in microwave ablation: A theoretical parametric study.

    PubMed

    Karampatzakis, Andreas; Kühn, Sven; Tsanidis, George; Neufeld, Esra; Samaras, Theodoros; Kuster, Niels

    2013-10-01

    A numerical study of the performance of antenna arrays used in microwave ablation (MWA) is carried out. Double-slot coaxial antennas in triangular and square configurations are studied. Clinical (healthy vs. malignant) and experimental (in vs. ex vivo) scenarios for hepatic cancer treatment are modeled, and further application in bone and lung tissue is examined. It is found that triangular arrays can create spherical ablation zones, while square configurations result in flatter ones. Thresholds in power and application times for creating continuous ablation zones are calculated, and the characteristics of the latter are quantified. PMID:24034722

  6. Multiple-access phased array antenna simulator for a digital beam forming system investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Yu, John; Walton, Joanne C.; Perl, Thomas D.; Andro, Monty; Alexovich, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    Future versions of data relay satellite systems are currently being planned by NASA. Being given consideration for implementation are on-board digital beamforming techniques which will allow multiple users to simultaneously access a single S-band phased array antenna system. To investigate the potential performance of such a system, a laboratory simulator has been developed at NASA's Lewis Research Center. This paper describes the system simulator, and in particular, the requirements, design, and performance of a key subsystem, the phased array antenna simulator, which provides realistic inputs to the digital processor including multiple signals, noise, and nonlinearities.

  7. Electric arc localization based on antenna arrays and MUSIC direction of arrival estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paun, Mirel; Digulescu, Angela; Tamas, Razvan; Ioana, Cornel

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents an application of antenna arrays and MUSIC algorithm for estimating the location of an electric arc source. The proposed technique can be used to localize arc faults in photovoltaic arrays and their associated transformation stations. The technique was implemented and tested in the laboratory. For this purpose, an experimental setup consisting of 4 antennas, a digital storage oscilloscope with computer connectivity and a PC (Personal Computer) for data processing was built. The results proved that the proposed method is able to estimate the direction of the electric arc source with reasonable accuracy.

  8. Development of local oscillator integrated antenna array for microwave imaging diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, D.; Ito, N.; Nagayama, Y.; Tsuchiya, H.; Yoshikawa, M.; Kohagura, J.; Yoshinaga, T.; Yamaguchi, S.; Kogi, Y.; Mase, A.; Shinohara, S.

    2015-12-01

    Microwave imaging diagnostics are powerful tools that are used to obtain details of complex structures and behaviors of such systems as magnetically confined plasmas. For example, microwave imaging reflectometry and microwave imaging interferometers are suitable for observing phenomena that are involved with electron density fluctuations; moreover, electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostics enable us to accomplish the significant task of observing MHD instabilities in large tokamaks. However, microwave imaging systems include difficulties in terms of multi-channelization and cost. Recently, we solved these problems by developing a Horn-antenna Mixer Array (HMA), a 50 - 110 GHz 1-D heterodyne- type antenna array, which can be easily stacked as a 2-D receiving array, because it uses an end-fire element. However, the HMA still evidenced problems owing to the requirement for local oscillation (LO) optics and an expensive high-power LO source. To solve this problem, we have developed an upgraded HMA, named the Local Integrated Antenna array (LIA), in which each channel has an internal LO supply using a frequency multiplier integrated circuit. Therefore, the proposed antenna array eliminates the need for both the LO optics and the high-power LO source. This paper describes the principle of the LIA, and provides details about an 8 channel prototype LIA.

  9. Review of specific antenna configurations: An estimate of cost and performance versus frequency for a simple (10 Lambda)-2 clear-air radar antenna array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ecklund, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    The building of operational clear air radar wind profilers is discussed. The choice of operating frequency and antenna configuration for these profilers is examined. The cost and performance of a (10 lambda) 2 antenna array versus operating frequency over the range 30 to 400 MHz is compared. To simplify the comparison the array beam will be fixed and the array will be uniformly fed. Yagi and coaxial collinear (COCO) cable antennas are compared, although other configurations may be competitive. It is assumed that the array is driven by a typical 50 kW peak power, 1 kW average, power transmitter located at the array edge when calculating feedline power handling requirements and when system performance is compared. For this comparison an array aperture of (10 lambda) 2 was chosen since a one way beam width of 5 deg or less is desirable to limit beam spreading effects.

  10. Large-Scale Arrays of Bowtie Nanoaperture Antennas for Nanoscale Dynamics in Living Cell Membranes.

    PubMed

    Flauraud, Valentin; van Zanten, Thomas S; Mivelle, Mathieu; Manzo, Carlo; Garcia Parajo, Maria F; Brugger, Jürgen

    2015-06-10

    We present a novel blurring-free stencil lithography patterning technique for high-throughput fabrication of large-scale arrays of nanoaperture optical antennas. The approach relies on dry etching through nanostencils to achieve reproducible and uniform control of nanoantenna geometries at the nanoscale, over millimeter-sizes in a thin aluminum film. We demonstrate the fabrication of over 400 000 bowtie nanoaperture (BNA) antennas on biocompatible substrates, having gap sizes ranging from (80 ± 5) nm down to (20 ± 10) nm. To validate their applicability on live cell research, we used the antenna substrates as hotspots of localized illumination to excite fluorescently labeled lipids on living cell membranes. The high signal-to-background afforded by the BNA arrays allowed the recording of single fluorescent bursts corresponding to the passage of freely diffusing individual lipids through hotspot excitation regions as small as 20 nm. Statistical analysis of burst length and intensity together with simulations demonstrate that the measured signals arise from the ultraconfined excitation region of the antennas. Because these inexpensive antenna arrays are fully biocompatible and amenable to their integration in most fluorescence microscopes, we foresee a large number of applications including the investigation of the plasma membrane of living cells with nanoscale resolution at endogenous expression levels. PMID:25926327

  11. The application of taylor weighting, digital phase shifters, and digital attenuators to phased-array antennas.

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, Billy C.

    2008-03-01

    Application of Taylor weighting (taper) to an antenna aperture can achieve low peak sidelobes, but combining the Taylor weighting with quantized attenuators and phase shifters at each radiating element will impact the performance of a phased-array antenna. An examination of array performance is undertaken from the simple point of view of the characteristics of the array factor. Design rules and guidelines for determining the Taylor-weighting parameters, the number of bits required for the digital phase shifter, and the dynamic range and number of bits required for the digital attenuator are developed. For a radar application, when each element is fed directly from a transmit/receive module, the total power radiated by the array will be reduced as a result of the taper. Consequently, the issue of whether to apply the taper on both transmit and receive configurations, or only on the receive configuration is examined with respect to two-way sidelobe performance.

  12. Phased-array antenna control by a monolithic photonic integrated circuit, COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Kravitz, S.H.; Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.; Meyer, W.J.

    1991-01-01

    Phased-array antenna systems are well known for rapid beam steering and their ability to bring high power to the target. Such systems are also quite complex and heavy, which have limited their usefulness. The issues of weight, size, power use, and complexity have been addressed through a system named COMPASS (Coherent Optical Monolithic Phased Array Steering System). All phased-array antenna systems need: (1) small size; (2) low power use; (3) high-speed beam steering; and (4) digitally-controlled phase shifting. COMPASS meets these basic requirements, and provides some very desirable additional features. These are: (1) phase control separate from the transmit/receive module; (2) simple expansion to large arrays; (3) fiber optic interconnect for reduced sensitivity to EMI; (4) an intrinsically radiation-hard GaAs chip; and (5) optical power provided by a commercially available continuous wave (CW) laser. 4 refs., 8 figs.

  13. The 20 GHz circularly polarized, high temperature superconducting microstrip antenna array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, Jarrett D.; Williams, Jeffery T.; Long, Stuart A.; Wolfe, John C.

    1994-01-01

    The primary goal was to design and characterize a four-element, 20 GHz, circularly polarized microstrip patch antenna fabricated from YBa2Cu3O(x) superconductor. The purpose is to support a high temperature superconductivity flight communications experiment between the space shuttle orbiter and the ACTS satellite. This study is intended to provide information into the design, construction, and feasibility of a circularly polarized superconducting 20 GHz downlink or cross-link antenna. We have demonstrated that significant gain improvements can be realized by using superconducting materials for large corporate fed array antennas. In addition, we have shown that when constructed from superconducting materials, the efficiency, and therefore the gain, of microstrip patches increases if the substrate is not so thick that the dominant loss mechanism for the patch is radiation into the surface waves of the conductor-backed substrate. We have considered two design configurations for a superconducting 20 GHz four-element circularly polarized microstrip antenna array. The first is the Huang array that uses properly oriented and phased linearly polarized microstrip patch elements to realize a circularly polarized pattern. The second is a gap-coupled array of circularly polarized elements. In this study we determined that although the Huang array operates well on low dielectric constant substrates, its performance becomes extremely sensitive to mismatches, interelement coupling, and design imperfections for substrates with high dielectric constants. For the gap-coupled microstrip array, we were able to fabricate and test circularly polarized elements and four-element arrays on LaAlO3 using sputtered copper films. These antennas were found to perform well, with relatively good circular polarization. In addition, we realized a four-element YBa2Cu3O(x) array of the same design and measured its pattern and gain relative to a room temperature copper array. The patterns were

  14. Microstrip patch array antenna on photonic crystal substrate at terahertz frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Kumud Ranjan; Singh, G.

    2012-01-01

    Recent advancement in the fabrication and packaging technology has led to the micrometer and nanometer-scale device modeling. This technological development and subsequent reduction in the dimension of devices like modulators, detectors and antennas has brought a thought of increasing the operating frequency of the system to the extent of sub-millimeter wavelength. In the view of the technical breakthrough in the area of fabrication and packaging, we have explored a printed antenna array on the photonic crystal in the terahertz spectrum in this paper. An equivalent circuit model of the antenna has been proposed and a methodology to investigate various electrical parameters is discussed. Tunable parameters of the structure have been explored to optimize the electrical performance of the proposed antenna. The analysis is also compared by using two simulators: (a) CST Microwave Studio based on finite integral technique and (b) Ansoft HFSS based on finite element method. The effect of the photonic crystal as substrate to enhance the gain of this kind of the antenna has also been demonstrated. The gain, directivity, front-to-back ratio (F/B ratio), and the radiation efficiency of the proposed antenna at 600 GHz is 16.88 dBi, 17.19 dBi, 14.77 dB and 89.72%, respectively. Finally, the performance of the antenna has been compared with the reported literature.

  15. Phase conjugation method and apparatus for an active retrodirective antenna array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, R. C.; Chernoff, R. C. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    An active retrodirective antenna array wherein a reference array element is used to generate a phase reference which is replicated at succeeding elements of the array. Each element of the array is associated with a phase regeneration circuit and the phase conjugation circuitry of an adjacent element. In one implementation, the phase reference circuit operates on the input signal at the reference element, a voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) output signal and the input pilot signal at the next array element received from a transmission line. By proper filtering and mixing, a phase component may be produced to which the VCO may be locked to produce the phase conjugate of the pilot signal at the next array element plus a transmission line delay. In another implementation, particularly suited for large arrays in space, two different input pilot frequencies are employed.

  16. Covariance analysis and phase ambiguity resolution for a linear interferometer antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, James Andrew

    This thesis explores the application of mathematical techniques for estimating the angle of arrival (AOA) using a receiving platform having a linear interferometer antenna array. It addresses the estimation accuracy of interferometer phase measurements of a signal with superposed Gaussian noise from multiple antenna baselines, and provides a method for resolving the modulo two-pi problem inherent to many phase measurement systems. The study extends prior theoretical work (Hanna, C., 1983) by laying a mathematical foundation to complement his geometrical approach, provides a robust method of performance prediction for such a system. Key elements include estimation accuracy of a signal parameter with additive noise; the design of the linear antenna array element spacings and the relationship to Diophantine equations; and the application of the Cramer-Rao lower bound on variance of parameter estimation. It is hoped that the work presented here will serve as a practical guide for research scientists and engineers.

  17. Protection of the main maximum in adaptive antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistolkors, A. A.

    1980-12-01

    An adaptive algorithm based on the solution of the problem of minimizing the noise at the output of an array when a constraint is imposed on the main maximum direction is discussed. The suppression depth for the cases of one and two interferences and the enhancement of the direction-finding capability and resolution of an adaptive array are investigated.

  18. Issues critical to the application of adaptive array antennas to missile seekers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trapp, R. L.; Ronnenburg, C. H.

    1983-09-01

    Missile seekers will confront complex and hostile signal environments that can inhibit severely their ability to intercept threatening targets. Dramatic target detection and homing performance improvement in main beam and sidelobe jamming is realizable with a seeker antenna that can optimally adapt, in real time, its response to the signal environment. Adaptive array antennas can be designed to optimize the signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio by forming pattern nulls directed toward sources of interference while simultaneously maximizing gain in the desired signal direction. Physical and operational missile constraints place severe requirements on an adaptive array. Nevertheless, there are several array configurations and adaptive processors that can satisfy these constraints in the next decade. Technology is a dominant limitation to adaptive array performance in a missile seeker. Signal processors and array implementations using state-of-the-art technology are required. Critical experimentation and representative simulations are needed to establish error effects, preferred adaptive array implementations, detailed requirements, and relative cost estimates. Although an adaptive missile seeker antenna is physically realizable in the next decade, the tradeoffs between cost, complexity, and performance will determine its utility and practicality.

  19. Templated Synthesis of Uniform Perovskite Nanowire Arrays.

    PubMed

    Ashley, Michael J; O'Brien, Matthew N; Hedderick, Konrad R; Mason, Jarad A; Ross, Michael B; Mirkin, Chad A

    2016-08-17

    While the chemical composition of semiconducting metal halide perovskites can be precisely controlled in thin films for photovoltaic devices, the synthesis of perovskite nanostructures with tunable dimensions and composition has not been realized. Here, we describe the templated synthesis of uniform perovskite nanowires with controlled diameter (50-200 nm). Importantly, by providing three examples (CH3NH3PbI3, CH3NH3PbBr3, and Cs2SnI6), we show that this process is composition general and results in oriented nanowire arrays on transparent conductive substrates. PMID:27501464

  20. Design of an optically controlled Ka-band GaAs MMIC phased-array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunath, Richard R.; Claspy, Paul C.; Richard, Mark A.; Bhasin, Kul B.

    1990-01-01

    Phased array antennas long were investigated to support the agile, multibeam radiating apertures with rapid reconfigurability needs of radar and communications. With the development of the Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC), phased array antennas having the stated characteristics are becoming realizable. However, at K-band frequencies (20 to 40 GHz) and higher, the problem of controlling the MMICs using conventional techniques either severely limits the array size or becomes insurmountable due to the close spacing of the radiating elements necessary to achieve the desired antenna performance. Investigations were made that indicate using fiber optics as a transmission line for control information for the MMICs provides a potential solution. By adding an optical interface circuit to pre-existing MMIC designs, it is possible to take advantage of the small size, lightweight, mechanical flexibility and RFI/EMI resistant characteristics of fiber optics to distribute MMIC control signals. The architecture, circuit development, testing and integration of optically controlled K-band MMIC phased array antennas are described.

  1. An Active K/K-Band Antenna Array for the NASA ACTS Mobile Terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tulintseff, A.; Crist, R.; Densmore, A.; Sukamto, L.

    1993-01-01

    An active K/K-band antenna array is currently under development for NASA's ACTS Mobile Terminal (AMT). The AMT task will demonstrate voice, data, and video communications to and from the AMT vehicle in Los Angeles, California, and a base station in Cleveland, Ohio, via the ACTS satellite at 30 and 20 GHz.

  2. Integrated patch and slot array antenna for terahertz quantum cascade lasers at 4.7 THz

    SciTech Connect

    Bonzon, C. Benea Chelmus, I. C.; Ohtani, K.; Geiser, M.; Beck, M.; Faist, J.

    2014-04-21

    Our work presents a slot and a patch array antenna at the front facet of a 4.7 THz quantum cascade laser as extractor, decreasing the facet reflectivity down to 2.6%. The resulting output power increases by a factor 2 and the slope efficiency by a factor 4. The simulated and the measured far-fields are in good agreement.

  3. Measuring phased-array antenna beampatterns with high dynamic range for the Murchison Widefield Array using 137 MHz ORBCOMM satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neben, A. R.; Bradley, R. F.; Hewitt, J. N.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Deshpande, A. A.; Goeke, R.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hazelton, B. J.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Lonsdale, C. J.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Oberoi, D.; Ord, S. M.; Prabu, T.; Shankar, N. Udaya; Srivani, K. S.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Tingay, S. J.; Wayth, R. B.; Webster, R. L.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.

    2015-07-01

    Detection of the fluctuations in a 21 cm line emission from neutral hydrogen during the Epoch of Reionization in thousand hour integrations poses stringent requirements on calibration and image quality, both of which necessitate accurate primary beam models. The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) uses phased-array antenna elements which maximize collecting area at the cost of complexity. To quantify their performance, we have developed a novel beam measurement system using the 137 MHz ORBCOMM satellite constellation and a reference dipole antenna. Using power ratio measurements, we measure the in situ beampattern of the MWA antenna tile relative to that of the reference antenna, canceling the variation of satellite flux or polarization with time. We employ angular averaging to mitigate multipath effects (ground scattering) and assess environmental systematics with a null experiment in which the MWA tile is replaced with a second-reference dipole. We achieve beam measurements over 30 dB dynamic range in beam sensitivity over a large field of view (65% of the visible sky), far wider and deeper than drift scans through astronomical sources allow. We verify an analytic model of the MWA tile at this frequency within a few percent statistical scatter within the full width at half maximum. Toward the edges of the main lobe and in the sidelobes, we measure tens of percent systematic deviations. We compare these errors with those expected from known beamforming errors.

  4. Reconfigurable antenna pattern verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drexler, Jerome P. (Inventor); Becker, Robert C. (Inventor); Meyers, David W. (Inventor); Muldoon, Kelly P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of verifying programmable antenna configurations is disclosed. The method comprises selecting a desired antenna configuration from a plurality of antenna configuration patterns, with the selected antenna configuration forming at least one reconfigurable antenna from reconfigurable antenna array elements. The method validates the formation of the selected antenna configuration to determine antenna performance of the at least one reconfigurable antenna.

  5. Near- and Far-Field Characterization of Planar mm-Wave Antenna Arrays with Waveguide-to-Microstrip Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salhi, Mohammed Adnan; Kazemipour, Alireza; Gentille, Gennaro; Spirito, Marco; Kleine-Ostmann, Thomas; Schrader, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    We present the design and characterization of planar mm-wave patch antenna arrays with waveguide-to-microstrip transition using both near- and far-field methods. The arrays were designed for metrological assessment of error sources in antenna measurement. One antenna was designed for the automotive radar frequency range at 77 GHz, while another was designed for the frequency of 94 GHz, which is used, e.g., for imaging radar applications. In addition to the antennas, a simple transition from rectangular waveguide WR-10 to planar microstrip line on Rogers 3003™ substrate has been designed based on probe coupling. For determination of the far-field radiation pattern of the antennas, we compare results from two different measurement methods to simulations. Both a far-field antenna measurement system and a planar near-field scanner with near-to-far-field transformation were used to determine the antenna diagrams. The fabricated antennas achieve a good matching and a good agreement between measured and simulated antenna diagrams. The results also show that the far-field scanner achieves more accurate measurement results with regard to simulations than the near-field scanner. The far-field antenna scanning system is built for metrological assessment and antenna calibration. The antennas are the first which were designed to be tested with the measurement system.

  6. Near- and Far-Field Characterization of Planar mm-Wave Antenna Arrays with Waveguide-to-Microstrip Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salhi, Mohammed Adnan; Kazemipour, Alireza; Gentille, Gennaro; Spirito, Marco; Kleine-Ostmann, Thomas; Schrader, Thorsten

    2016-09-01

    We present the design and characterization of planar mm-wave patch antenna arrays with waveguide-to-microstrip transition using both near- and far-field methods. The arrays were designed for metrological assessment of error sources in antenna measurement. One antenna was designed for the automotive radar frequency range at 77 GHz, while another was designed for the frequency of 94 GHz, which is used, e.g., for imaging radar applications. In addition to the antennas, a simple transition from rectangular waveguide WR-10 to planar microstrip line on Rogers 3003™ substrate has been designed based on probe coupling. For determination of the far-field radiation pattern of the antennas, we compare results from two different measurement methods to simulations. Both a far-field antenna measurement system and a planar near-field scanner with near-to-far-field transformation were used to determine the antenna diagrams. The fabricated antennas achieve a good matching and a good agreement between measured and simulated antenna diagrams. The results also show that the far-field scanner achieves more accurate measurement results with regard to simulations than the near-field scanner. The far-field antenna scanning system is built for metrological assessment and antenna calibration. The antennas are the first which were designed to be tested with the measurement system.

  7. Beam-forming Errors in Murchison Widefield Array Phased Array Antennas and their Effects on Epoch of Reionization Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neben, Abraham R.; Hewitt, Jacqueline N.; Bradley, Richard F.; Dillon, Joshua S.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Corey, B. E.; Deshpande, A. A.; Goeke, R.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hazelton, B. J.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Lonsdale, C. J.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Oberoi, D.; Ord, S. M.; Prabu, T.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Srivani, K. S.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Tingay, S. J.; Wayth, R. B.; Webster, R. L.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate antenna beam models are critical for radio observations aiming to isolate the redshifted 21 cm spectral line emission from the Dark Ages and the Epoch of Reionization (EOR) and unlock the scientific potential of 21 cm cosmology. Past work has focused on characterizing mean antenna beam models using either satellite signals or astronomical sources as calibrators, but antenna-to-antenna variation due to imperfect instrumentation has remained unexplored. We characterize this variation for the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) through laboratory measurements and simulations, finding typical deviations of the order of ±10%-20% near the edges of the main lobe and in the sidelobes. We consider the ramifications of these results for image- and power spectrum-based science. In particular, we simulate visibilities measured by a 100 m baseline and find that using an otherwise perfect foreground model, unmodeled beam-forming errors severely limit foreground subtraction accuracy within the region of Fourier space contaminated by foreground emission (the “wedge”). This region likely contains much of the cosmological signal, and accessing it will require measurement of per-antenna beam patterns. However, unmodeled beam-forming errors do not contaminate the Fourier space region expected to be free of foreground contamination (the “EOR window”), showing that foreground avoidance remains a viable strategy.

  8. Design and analysis of slotted waveguide antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Phillip N.; Yee, Hung Yuet

    1988-06-01

    The typical design of a waveguide slot array begins with an examination of the requirements connected with the definition of the size of the array, the types of slots, and feed methods; this is followed by analysis to determine the dimensions and positions of each slot, and a prediction of array performance; the final step is fabrication and test of a breadboard model to validate the analytical design. These design and analysis aspects are considered in connection with the types of waveguide slots, slot-array architecture, equivalent circuit models, pattern calculations, and analysis techniques. Attention is also given to the use of available design data, experimental techniques, tests using subarrays, experimental measurements of radiating slots, and near-field and far-field measurements.

  9. Enhanced vibrational spectroscopy, intracellular refractive indexing for label-free biosensing and bioimaging by multiband plasmonic-antenna array.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng-Kuang; Chang, Ming-Hsuan; Wu, Hsieh-Ting; Lee, Yao-Chang; Yen, Ta-Jen

    2014-10-15

    In this study, we report a multiband plasmonic-antenna array that bridges optical biosensing and intracellular bioimaging without requiring a labeling process or coupler. First, a compact plasmonic-antenna array is designed exhibiting a bandwidth of several octaves for use in both multi-band plasmonic resonance-enhanced vibrational spectroscopy and refractive index probing. Second, a single-element plasmonic antenna can be used as a multifunctional sensing pixel that enables mapping the distribution of targets in thin films and biological specimens by enhancing the signals of vibrational signatures and sensing the refractive index contrast. Finally, using the fabricated plasmonic-antenna array yielded reliable intracellular observation was demonstrated from the vibrational signatures and intracellular refractive index contrast requiring neither labeling nor a coupler. These unique features enable the plasmonic-antenna array to function in a label-free manner, facilitating bio-sensing and imaging development. PMID:24836017

  10. The Resonant Cavity Radiator (RCR). [waveguides and antenna arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, K. G.; Carlise, R. L.; Tomita, C. Y.

    1980-01-01

    The design of the resonant cavity radiator (RCR) is compared to that of the slotted waveguide array in terms of efficiency, weight, and structural integrity. It is shown that the RCR design has three significant potentials over the slotted waveguide array: (1) improvement in efficiency; (2) lighter weight; and (3) simpler structure which allows the RCR to be integrated with the RF tube to alleviate thermal interface problems.

  11. 1x2 Array of U-Slotted Rectangular Patch Antennas for HighSpeed LTE Mobile Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daud, P.; H, Sri.; Mahmudin, D.; Estu, T. T.; Fathnan, A. A.; Wijayanto, Y. N.; Armi, N.

    2016-01-01

    Microstrip antenna is a shaped thin board of antenna and capable for working at high frequencies. Microstrip antenna has a pattern strip shape in a various form, one of which is a rectangular shape. Microstrip antennas have some shortcomings which have narrow bandwidth and small gain, to cover the shortfall, the antenna is made using an array to increase the gain and u - slot to widen the bandwidth. In this paper will discuss the results of the antenna simulation using Ansoft HFSS software applications and their compliance with specifications designed antenna. In this issues we analysis the results of the design and simulation microstrip antenna at a frequency of 2.6 - 2.7 GHz for LTE applications

  12. The design of a microstrip antenna array for a UHF space telemetry link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, R. E.; Stephenson, D. T.

    1981-01-01

    An array of microstrip antenna panels was designed for use on a small instrumented satellite as part of a 400-MHz telemetry link between that satellite and NASA's shuttle spacecraft. A roughly omnidirectional phi-plane pattern was desired. The 1.4-wavelength diameter of the satellite and the various ports and structures on its surface presented strong constraints on the antenna array design. Eight antennas, each one a quarter-wavelength panel with one radiating and one shorted edge, were chosen. A phi-plane pattern ripple of 4.4 dB and a gain of at least 0.1 dB relative to a half-wavelength dipole were realized. The design technique used for the individual antenna panels included the study of feed-point location for impedance matching and the effect of losses in the dielectric. A superposition method was used to synthesize the radiation patterns for different numbers and different excitations of antennas on the satellite.

  13. Deployable reflector antenna performance optimization using automated surface correction and array-feed compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Lyle C.; Bailey, M. C.; Mitchell, John L.

    1992-01-01

    Methods for increasing the electromagnetic (EM) performance of reflectors with rough surfaces were tested and evaluated. First, one quadrant of the 15-meter hoop-column antenna was retrofitted with computer-driven and controlled motors to allow automated adjustment of the reflector surface. The surface errors, measured with metric photogrammetry, were used in a previously verified computer code to calculate control motor adjustments. With this system, a rough antenna surface (rms of approximately 0.180 inch) was corrected in two iterations to approximately the structural surface smoothness limit of 0.060 inch rms. The antenna pattern and gain improved significantly as a result of these surface adjustments. The EM performance was evaluated with a computer program for distorted reflector antennas which had been previously verified with experimental data. Next, the effects of the surface distortions were compensated for in computer simulations by superimposing excitation from an array feed to maximize antenna performance relative to an undistorted reflector. Results showed that a 61-element array could produce EM performance improvements equal to surface adjustments. When both mechanical surface adjustment and feed compensation techniques were applied, the equivalent operating frequency increased from approximately 6 to 18 GHz.

  14. Algorithms for systolic-array synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Yiwan.

    1989-01-01

    This dissertation presents efficient algorithms for solving some crucial transformation/optimization problems in the automatic synthesis of systolic arrays from algorithm specifications. The synthesis process consists of two steps. First, the given algorithm specification is transformed into a functionally equivalent form more amenable to systolic array implementation. Then, the computations defined by the equivalent form are assigned for execution on the processors (processor allocation) at different time steps (scheduling), with the objective that the time and space costs of the implementation be minimized. Many computation intensive algorithms, when expressed in their natural form, are unsuitable for systolic array implementations because they contain many-to-one data dependences (data sharing) which cannot be directly realized on processors with bounded fan-out and localized interconnections. A data routing scheme, called data propagation, is proposed which can be implemented as pipelining on a systolic array. It is shown that any data sharing can be transformed into data propagation and that the increase in I/O bandwidth requirement due to such transformation is bounded. Polynomial time procedures are devised for determining the necessary transformations. The time cost of a systolic array implementation of an algorithm is given by the product of two related quantities: the total number of systolic cycles required and the maximum duration of a cycle. It is shown that the scheduling which minimizes the time cost can be determined from solving a discrete optimization problem. Furthermore, the optimization problem is shown to have a bounded solution space, an efficient branch-and-bound method is proposed for determining the optimal solution. The space cost, on the other hand, is defined as the number of processors required for constructing the array.

  15. Zero-bias microwave detectors based on array of nanorectifiers coupled with a dipole antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasjoo, Shahrir R.; Singh, Arun K.; Mat Isa, Siti S.; Ramli, Muhammad M.; Mohamad Isa, Muammar; Ahmad, Norhawati; Mohd Nor, Nurul I.; Khalid, Nazuhusna; Song, Ai Min

    2016-04-01

    We report on zero-bias microwave detection using a large array of unipolar nanodevices, known as the self-switching diodes (SSDs). The large array was realized in a single lithography step without the need of interconnection layers, hence allowing for a simple and low-cost fabrication process. The SSD array was coupled with a narrowband dipole antenna with a resonant frequency of 890 MHz, to form a simple rectenna (rectifying antenna). The extrinsic voltage responsivity and noise-equivalent-power (NEP) of the rectenna were ∼70 V/W and ∼0.18 nW/Hz1/2, respectively, measured in the far-field region at unbiased condition. Nevertheless, the estimated intrinsic voltage responsivity can achieve up to ∼5 kV/W with NEP of ∼2.6 pW/Hz1/2.

  16. A 360-degree scanning antenna with cylindrical array of slotted waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnar, D. G.; Cofer, J. W., Jr.

    1984-07-01

    A 360 degree scanning antenna is disclosed which includes a mechanism for scanning the main beam of a cylindrical array in azimuth and over a limited angle in elevation in which a primary feedhorn illuminates a geodesic lens which in turn illuminates the cylindrical array structure. Energy is coupled from the parallel plate structure of the feedhorn assembly into the individual waveguides of the array via dielectric wedges extending from the waveguides. Scanning in elevation is accompanied by changing the transmitter frequency and in azimuth by rotating the primary feedhorn assembly.

  17. Impedance approach to the analysis of polarization losses in antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokarskij, P. L.

    1992-08-01

    The powers of the basic and parasitic components of the radiated field are expressed through currents at the inputs of the antenna array using Hermitian forms, whose coefficients comprise two matrices of polarization impedance, while their sum matrix forms the matrix of the array radiation resistance. A method for determining the mutual polarization resistances of arbitrary radiators is developed, and calculation formulas applicable to the Hertz dipole are obtained. This approach was used to calculate the polarization-loss coefficient of a hexagonal array of tourniquet radiators.

  18. A Compact Monopulse Radial Line Slot Array Antenna at Millimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Lizhi; Dou, W. B.

    2007-10-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of a radial line slot array antenna (RLSA) which generates sum or difference far field patterns. The antenna consists of rectangular waveguide to radial line transition, radial line and slot arrays etched on the upper plate of the radial line. A novel rectangular waveguide to radial line transition is designed to build up the dominate TEM mode in radial line to excite the slot arrays which are arranged in concentric rings on the upper plate of the radial line. The antenna radiates linear polarization at Ka band. Monopulse operation is obtained by a sum and difference network which is a compact eight-port comparator consisting of coplanar magic tees. The sum and difference network is waveguide structure whose loss is less than that of microstrip structure at millimeter wave lengths. The monopulse performances can be used in monopulse tracking and anti-collision application etc. Genetic algorithm (GA) is applied to optimize the parameters of the transition and antenna to obtain good performances.

  19. Comparison between different rectangular horn elements for array antenna applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lier, E.; Rengarjan, S.; Rahmat-Samii, Y.

    1991-08-01

    The coupling and directivity characteristics of an array with fundamental smooth-walled, soft and hard open-ended waveguide elements with rectangular cross-section are considered. Exact and approximate methods to analyze coupling in arrays are discussed. It is known that the coupling, which can be expressed by a quadruple integral across the rectangular apertures, can be reduced to double integrals by introducing a coordinate transformation. Calculations show that the soft waveguide elements are suited for applications where low return loss and mutual coupling are required. Arrays with hard waveguide elements yield high directivity for limited scan applications. Both elements can, in contrast to conventional smooth-walled (SW) horns, operate in dual polarization with high isolation between the orthogonal modes.

  20. Cavity-backed, micro-strip dipole antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, H., Jr.

    1981-09-01

    A flush-mounted antenna assembly includes a generally rectangular, conductive, box structure open along one face to form a cavity. Within the cavity a pair of mutually orthogonal dielectric plane surfaces in an "egg crate" arrangement are mounted normal to the plane of the open face, each diagonally within the cavity. Each dielectric plane supports a pair of printed circuit dipoles typically each fed from the opposite side of the dielectric plane by a printed "cone-shaped" feed line trace which also serve as an impedance matching device and functions as a balun connected from an unbalanced strip line external feed. The open face of the conductive cavity can be flush mounted with a randome thereover, the assembly thereby being flush with the skin of a aircraft or space vehicle.

  1. Cavity-backed, micro-strip dipole antenna array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, H., Jr. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A flush-mounted antenna assembly includes a generally rectangular, conductive, box structure open along one face to form a cavity. Within the cavity a pair of mutually orthogonal dielectric plane surfaces in an "egg crate" arrangement are mounted normal to the plane of the open face, each diagonally within the cavity. Each dielectric plane supports a pair of printed circuit dipoles typically each fed from the opposite side of the dielectric plane by a printed "cone-shaped" feed line trace which also serve as an impedance matching device and functions as a balun connected from an unbalanced strip line external feed. The open face of the conductive cavity can be flush mounted with a randome thereover, the assembly thereby being flush with the skin of a aircraft or space vehicle.

  2. The study of microstrip antenna arrays and related problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, R. Q.

    1984-01-01

    The work on rectangular microstrip antennas for dual frequency operation is reported on. The principle of this approach is based on the excitation of a patch for two or more different modes which correspond to different frequencies. However, for a given geometry, the modal frequencies have a fixed relationship; therefore, the usefulness of such a design is greatly limited. In this study three different methods have been contrived to control the frequency ratio over a wide range. First, as found prevously, if shorting pins are inserted at certain locations in the patch, the low frequency can be raised substantially. Second, if slots are cut in the patch, the high frequency can be lowered considerably. By using both techniques, the two frequency ratio can be varied approximately from 3 to 1.3. After that, the addition of more pins or slots becomes ineffective.

  3. X-band printed phased array antennas using high-performance CNT/ion gel/Ag transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubb, Peter M.; Bidoky, Fazel; Mahajan, Ankit; Subbaraman, Harish; Li, Wentao; Frisbie, Daniel; Chen, Ray T.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports a fully printed phased array antenna developed on a 125 micron thick flexible Kapton substrate. Switching for the phase delay lines is accomplished using printed carbon nanotube transistors with ion gel dielectric layers. Design of each element of the phased array antenna is reported, including a low loss constant impedance power divider, a phase shifter network, and patch antenna design. Steering of an X-band PAA operating at 10GHz from 0 degrees to 22.15 degrees is experimentally demonstrated. In order to completely package the array with electrical interconnects, a single substrate interconnect scheme is also investigated.

  4. Dual polarized receiving steering antenna array for measurement of ultrawideband pulse polarization structure.

    PubMed

    Balzovsky, E V; Buyanov, Yu I; Koshelev, V I; Nekrasov, E S

    2016-03-01

    To measure simultaneously two orthogonal components of the electromagnetic field of nano- and subnano-second duration, an antenna array has been developed. The antenna elements of the array are the crossed dipoles of dimension 5 × 5 cm. The arms of the dipoles are connected to the active four-pole devices to compensate the frequency response variations of a short dipole in the frequency band ranging from 0.4 to 4 GHz. The dipoles have superimposed phase centers allowing measuring the polarization structure of the field in different directions. The developed antenna array is the linear one containing four elements. The pattern maximum position is controlled by means of the switched ultrawideband true time delay lines. Discrete steering in seven directions in the range from -40° to +40° has been realized. The error at setting the pattern maximum position is less than 4°. The isolation of the polarization exceeds 29 dB in the direction orthogonal to the array axis and in the whole steering range it exceeds 23 dB. Measurement results of the polarization structure of radiated and scattered pulses with different polarization are presented as well. PMID:27036799

  5. Dual polarized receiving steering antenna array for measurement of ultrawideband pulse polarization structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzovsky, E. V.; Buyanov, Yu. I.; Koshelev, V. I.; Nekrasov, E. S.

    2016-03-01

    To measure simultaneously two orthogonal components of the electromagnetic field of nano- and subnano-second duration, an antenna array has been developed. The antenna elements of the array are the crossed dipoles of dimension 5 × 5 cm. The arms of the dipoles are connected to the active four-pole devices to compensate the frequency response variations of a short dipole in the frequency band ranging from 0.4 to 4 GHz. The dipoles have superimposed phase centers allowing measuring the polarization structure of the field in different directions. The developed antenna array is the linear one containing four elements. The pattern maximum position is controlled by means of the switched ultrawideband true time delay lines. Discrete steering in seven directions in the range from -40° to +40° has been realized. The error at setting the pattern maximum position is less than 4°. The isolation of the polarization exceeds 29 dB in the direction orthogonal to the array axis and in the whole steering range it exceeds 23 dB. Measurement results of the polarization structure of radiated and scattered pulses with different polarization are presented as well.

  6. Aperture-coupled thin-membrane microstrip array antenna for beam scanning application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, John; Sadowy, Gregory; Derksen, Chuck; Del Castillo, Linda; Smith, Phil; Hoffman, Jim; Hatake, Toshiro; Moussessian, Alina

    2005-01-01

    A microstrip array using aperture-slot-coupling technique with very thin membranes has been developed at the L-band frequency for beam scanning application. This technology-demonstration array with 4 x 2 elements achieved a relatively wide bandwidth of 100 MHz (8%) and +/-45(deg) beam scan. Very narrow coupling slots were used with each having an aspect ratio of 160 (conventional slot aspect ratio is between 10 to 30) for coupling through very thin membrane (0.05mm thickness). This thin-membrane aperture-coupling technique allows the array antenna elements to be more easily integrated with transmit/receive amplifier (T/R) and phase shifter modules. This paper addresses only the radiator portion of the array. The array and active components will be presented in a separate pape.

  7. Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes Array by CVD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, S.; Su, C.; Cochrane, J. C.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Muntele, I.; Ila, D.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Since the properties of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) are superior in many devices such as electronics and sensors, many efforts have been involved in synthesizing particular structural or dimensional MWCNT. Uniform aligned MWCNT array is one of the prototype structures for devices such as filed emission device and microelectromechanical systems in which a large length to diameter ratio may also be required. Most aligned MWCNT recently synthesized by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) have cone shaped structures. This presentation will illustrate aligned MWCNT array synthesized on silicon substrates using thermal CVD that could produce MWCNT with uniform diameter. An array of nickel particles was used as catalyst for MWCNT growth. A thin Ti or Au buffer layer was coated on the substrate prior to depositing nickel particles. Because the MWCNT size depends on the catalyst particle size, the nickel particle size annealed at various temperatures was investigated. MWCNT were grown on the substrate in the temperature range of 700 C - 1000 C and the pressure range of 1 to 300 torr. Methane and hydrogen gases with methane content of 1 - 10 % were used for the MWCNT synthesis. Morphology, length and diameter of MWCNT were determined by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The detailed results of synthesis and characterizations will be discussed in the presentation.

  8. Circularly polarized printed array antenna composed of end-fed strip dipoles and slots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, K.

    1984-07-01

    Addition of an end-fed strip dipole as a strip radiator on a circularly polarized printed array antenna (CP-PASS) is shown to enhance the gain. The feed structure is similar to that of microstrip slot antennas. A wider window and tapered line side window edge allow the strip dipole edge to function as a free space dipole. An electric field along the feed line excites the strip dipole and the magnetic field induces some excitation in the window edge. A numerical model is defined for the basic element pairs of CP-PASS antenna and design procedures are derived. Experimental results from 6- and 24-pair CP-PASS prototypes demonstrate a 15 dB gain with the latter. Further gains are indicated with more optimized configurations.

  9. Theoretical and measured electric field distributions within an annular phased array: consideration of source antennas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Joines, W T; Jirtle, R L; Samulski, T V

    1993-08-01

    The magnitude of E-field patterns generated by an annular array prototype device has been calculated and measured. Two models were used to describe the radiating sources: a simple linear dipole and a stripline antenna model. The stripline model includes detailed geometry of the actual antennas used in the prototype and an estimate of the antenna current based on microstrip transmission line theory. This more detailed model yields better agreement with the measured field patterns, reducing the rms discrepancy by a factor of about 6 (from approximately 23 to 4%) in the central region of interest where the SEM is within 25% of the maximum. We conclude that accurate modeling of source current distributions is important for determining SEM distributions associated with such heating devices. PMID:8258444

  10. Enhancing resolution properties of array antennas via field extrapolation: application to MIMO systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reggiannini, Ruggero

    2015-12-01

    This paper is concerned with spatial properties of linear arrays of antennas spaced less than half wavelength. Possible applications are in multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) wireless links for the purpose of increasing the spatial multiplexing gain in a scattering environment, as well as in other areas such as sonar and radar. With reference to a receiving array, we show that knowledge of the received field can be extrapolated beyond the actual array size by exploiting the finiteness of the interval of real directions from which the field components impinge on the array. This property permits to increase the performance of the array in terms of angular resolution. A simple signal processing technique is proposed allowing formation of a set of beams capable to cover uniformly the entire horizon with an angular resolution better than that achievable by a classical uniform-weighing half-wavelength-spaced linear array. Results are also applicable to active arrays. As the above approach leads to arrays operating in super-directive regime, we discuss all related critical aspects, such as sensitivity to external and internal noises and to array imperfections, and bandwidth, so as to identify the basic design criteria ensuring the array feasibility.

  11. An experimental SMI adaptive antenna array for weak interfering signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dilsavor, R. L.; Gupta, I. J.

    1989-01-01

    A modified sample matrix inversion (SMI) algorithm designed to increase the suppression of weak interference is implemented on an existing experimental array system. The algorithm itself is fully described as are a number of issues concerning its implementation and evaluation, such as sample scaling, snapshot formation, weight normalization, power calculation, and system calibration. Several experiments show that the steady state performance (i.e., many snapshots are used to calculate the array weights) of the experimental system compares favorably with its theoretical performance. It is demonstrated that standard SMI does not yield adequate suppression of weak interference. Modified SMI is then used to experimentally increase this suppression by as much as 13dB.

  12. A planar array antenna for TV broadcasting communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucci, A.; de Luca, A.

    The L-Sat planar array for satellite direct TV broadcasting is described. Still in the design stage, the array is intended for broadcasting on the X-band, within the 0.98 x 2.3 deg elliptical beam, sidelobe below -30 dB, circular polarization with low cross-polarization WARC requirements. The results of an analysis of the effects produced by the contour profile on the radiation pattern are presented. Further work has proceeded on a circuit model of a slot in a single subarray, the coupling of mutual slots, and the phase and amplitude behhavior of the coupled feeding and radiating waveguides. Finally, simulations have been performed of the thermally induced deformations, with attention given to warping and a tilted half-plane.

  13. Self-calibration of Antenna Errors Using Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napier, P. J.; Cornwell, T. J.

    The thery of focal-plane correlation is reviewed and applied to the problem of the self-calibration and self-correction of a radio telescope with errors in its reflecting surface. Curves are presented which allow the estimation of focal-plane array size and integration time needed for telescopes with varying amounts of error. It is suggested that the technique may have application to the problem of the construction of large telescopes in space.

  14. Synthesis Array Topology Metrics in Location Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugha Sundaram, GA

    2015-08-01

    Towards addressing some of the fundamental mysteries in physics at the micro- and macro-cosm level, that form the Key Science Projects (KSPs) for the Square Kilometer Array (SKA; such as Probing the Dark Ages and the Epoch of Reionization in the course of an Evolving Universe; Galaxy Evolution, Cosmology, and Dark Energy; and the Origin and evolution of Cosmic Magnetism) a suitable interfacing of these goals has to be achieved with its optimally designed array configuration, by means of a critical evaluation of the radio imagingcapabilities and metrics. Of the two forerunner sites, viz. Australia and South Africa, where pioneering advancements to state-of-the-art in synthesis array radio astronomy instrumentation are being attempted in the form of pathfinders to the SKA, for its eventual deployment, a diversity of site-dependent topology and design metrics exists. Here, the particular discussion involves those KSPs that relate to galactic morphology and evolution, and explores their suitability as a scientific research goal from the prespective of the location-driven instrument design specification. Relative merits and adaptability with regard to either site shall be presented from invoking well-founded and established array-design and optimization principles designed into a customized software tool.

  15. Amplitude calibration of a digital radio antenna array for measuring cosmic ray air showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehls, S.; Hakenjos, A.; Arts, M. J.; Blümer, J.; Bozdog, H.; van Cappellen, W. A.; Falcke, H.; Haungs, A.; Horneffer, A.; Huege, T.; Isar, P. G.; Krömer, O.

    2008-05-01

    Radio pulses are emitted during the development of air showers, where air showers are generated by ultra-high energy cosmic rays entering the Earth's atmosphere. These nano-second short pulses are presently investigated by various experiments for the purpose of using them as a new detection technique for cosmic particles. For an array of 30 digital radio antennas (LOPES experiment) an absolute amplitude calibration of the radio antennas including the full electronic chain of the data acquisition system is performed, in order to estimate absolute values of the electric field strength for these short radio pulses. This is mandatory, because the measured radio signals in the MHz frequency range have to be compared with theoretical estimates and with predictions from Monte Carlo simulations to reconstruct features of the primary cosmic particle. A commercial reference radio emitter is used to estimate frequency dependent correction factors for each single antenna of the radio antenna array. The expected received power is related to the power recorded by the full electronic chain. Systematic uncertainties due to different environmental conditions and the described calibration procedure are of order 20%.

  16. Ultra-small single-negative electric metamaterials for electromagnetic coupling reduction of microstrip antenna array.

    PubMed

    Xu, He-Xiu; Wang, Guang-Ming; Qi, Mei-Qing; Zeng, Hui-Yong

    2012-09-24

    We report initially the design, fabrication and measurement of using waveguided electric metamaterials (MTM) in the design of closely-spaced microtrip antenna arrays with mutual coupling reduction. The complementary spiral ring resonators (CSRs) which exhibit single negative resonant permittivity around 3.5GHz are used as the basic electric MTM element. For verification, two CSRs with two and three concentric rings are considered, respectively. By properly arranging these well engineered waveguided MTMs between two H-plane coupled patch antennas, both numerical and measured results indicate that more than 8.4 dB mutual coupling reduction is obtained. The mechanism has been studied from a physical insight. The electric MTM element is electrically small, enabling the resultant antenna array to exhibit a small separation (λo/8 at the operating wavelength) and thus a high directivity. The proposed strategy opens an avenue to new types of antenna with super performances and can be generalized for other electric resonators. PMID:23037347

  17. Hyperbolic Positioning with Antenna Arrays and Multi-Channel Pseudolite for Indoor Localization

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Kenjirou; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Wang, Wei; Arie, Hiroaki; Schmitz, Alexander; Sugano, Shigeki

    2015-01-01

    A hyperbolic positioning method with antenna arrays consisting of proximately-located antennas and a multi-channel pseudolite is proposed in order to overcome the problems of indoor positioning with conventional pseudolites (ground-based GPS transmitters). A two-dimensional positioning experiment using actual devices is conducted. The experimental result shows that the positioning accuracy varies centimeter- to meter-level according to the geometric relation between the pseudolite antennas and the receiver. It also shows that the bias error of the carrier-phase difference observables is more serious than their random error. Based on the size of the bias error of carrier-phase difference that is inverse-calculated from the experimental result, three-dimensional positioning performance is evaluated by computer simulation. In addition, in the three-dimensional positioning scenario, an initial value convergence analysis of the non-linear least squares is conducted. Its result shows that initial values that can converge to a right position exist at least under the proposed antenna setup. The simulated values and evaluation methods introduced in this work can be applied to various antenna setups; therefore, by using them, positioning performance can be predicted in advance of installing an actual system. PMID:26437405

  18. Operating the Upgraded NSTX HHFW Antenna Array in an Environment with Li-coated Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Philip Michael; Ellis, R.; Hosea, J.; Kung, C. C.; LeBlanc, B; Pinsker, R.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J. R.; NSTX Team,

    2011-01-01

    The single-feed, end-grounded straps of the NSTX 12-strap HHFW antenna array have been replaced with double-feed, center-grounded straps to reduce the voltages in the vicinity of the Faraday shield (FS) for a given strap current. The strap spacings to the FS and to the back plate were increased by 3 mm to decrease the electric fields for a given voltage. The electric fields near the FS have been roughly halved for the same strap currents, permitting a direct examination of the roles that internal fields play in determining antenna power limits in plasmas. Extensive RF/plasma conditioning of the antenna was required to remove enough of the evaporated Li deposits from prior wall conditioning to permit coupling in excess of 4 MW to L- and H-mode plasmas in 2009. Most arcs were associated with expulsion of Li from the FS/antenna frame surfaces. The center-grounded straps were less susceptible to arcing during ELMing Hmode plasmas. Reliable operation above 2 MW was difficult after the installation of the Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) in 2010. Li-compound dust was found in the antennas after this run and is believed to have contributed to the reduced power limit.

  19. Operating The Upgraded NSTX HHFW Antenna Array In An Environment With Li-coated Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, P. M.; Ellis, R.; Hosea, J. C.; Kung, C. C.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J. R.; Pinsker, R. I.

    2011-12-23

    The single-feed, end-grounded straps of the NSTX 12-strap HHFW antenna array have been replaced with double-feed, center-grounded straps to reduce the voltages in the vicinity of the Faraday shield (FS) for a given strap current. The strap spacings to the FS and to the back plate were increased by 3 mm to decrease the electric fields for a given voltage. The electric fields near the FS have been roughly halved for the same strap currents, permitting a direct examination of the roles that internal fields play in determining antenna power limits in plasmas. Extensive RF/plasma conditioning of the antenna was required to remove enough of the evaporated Li deposits from prior wall conditioning to permit coupling in excess of 4 MW to L- and H-mode plasmas in 2009. Most arcs were associated with expulsion of Li from the FS/antenna frame surfaces. The center-grounded straps were less susceptible to arcing during ELMing H-mode plasmas. Reliable operation above 2 MW was difficult after the installation of the Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) in 2010. Li-compound 'dust' was found in the antennas after this run and is believed to have contributed to the reduced power limit.

  20. Frequency translating phase conjugation circuit for active retrodirective antenna array. [microwave transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernoff, R. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An active retrodirective antenna array which has central phasing from a reference antenna element through a "tree" structured network of transmission lines utilizes a number of phase conjugate circuits (PCCs) at each node and a phase reference regeneration circuit (PRR) at each node except the initial node. Each node virtually coincides with an element of the array. A PCC generates the exact conjugate phase of an incident signal using a phase locked loop which combines the phases in an up converter, divides the sum by 2 and mixes the result with the phase in a down converter for phase detection. The PRR extracts the phase from the conjugate phase. Both the PCC and the PRR are not only exact but also free from mixer degeneracy.

  1. Angle resolution of wideband signals received by two slightly diverse linear antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagdasaryan, S. T.; Zinevich, Y. P.

    1984-05-01

    The problem of angle resolution is considered in the case of detection of wideband signals by means of antenna arrays with a discontinuous aperture. The receiver antenna is assumed to be linear and to consist of two separate equidistant arrays of weakly directional elements. The signals are assumed to appear at the receiver on plane electromagnetic waves together with interference and intrinsic noise, both centered stationary Gaussian random processes. Expressions are derived for the energy utilization factor, characterizing the signal to noise interference ratio relative to the signal noise ratio without interference. A comparison of that energy utilization factor corresponding to optimal processing of a narrow band signal and to nonoptimal processing of a wideband signal, respectively, yields the dependence of detectability and angle resolution on the signal bandwidth and the angular spacing of signal sources.

  2. Design and Application of Wuhan Ionospheric Oblique Backscattering Sounding System with the Addition of an Antenna Array (WIOBSS-AA)

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiao; Chen, Gang; Wang, Jin; Song, Huan; Gong, Wanlin

    2016-01-01

    The Wuhan Ionospheric Oblique Backscattering Sounding System with the addition of an antenna array (WIOBSS-AA) is the newest member of the WIOBSS family. It is a multi-channel radio system using phased-array antenna technology. The transmitting part of this radio system applies an array composed of five log-periodic antennas to form five beams that span an area to the northwest of the radar site. The hardware and the antenna array of the first multi-channel ionosonde in the WIOBSS family are introduced in detail in this paper. An ionospheric detection experiment was carried out in Chongyang, Hubei province, China on 16 March 2015 to examine the performance of WIOBSS-AA. The radio system demonstrated its ability to obtain ionospheric electron density information over a wide area. The observations indicate that during the experiment, the monitored large-area ionospheric F2-layer was calm and electron density increased with decreasing latitude. PMID:27314360

  3. Design and Application of Wuhan Ionospheric Oblique Backscattering Sounding System with the Addition of an Antenna Array (WIOBSS-AA).

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiao; Chen, Gang; Wang, Jin; Song, Huan; Gong, Wanlin

    2016-01-01

    The Wuhan Ionospheric Oblique Backscattering Sounding System with the addition of an antenna array (WIOBSS-AA) is the newest member of the WIOBSS family. It is a multi-channel radio system using phased-array antenna technology. The transmitting part of this radio system applies an array composed of five log-periodic antennas to form five beams that span an area to the northwest of the radar site. The hardware and the antenna array of the first multi-channel ionosonde in the WIOBSS family are introduced in detail in this paper. An ionospheric detection experiment was carried out in Chongyang, Hubei province, China on 16 March 2015 to examine the performance of WIOBSS-AA. The radio system demonstrated its ability to obtain ionospheric electron density information over a wide area. The observations indicate that during the experiment, the monitored large-area ionospheric F2-layer was calm and electron density increased with decreasing latitude. PMID:27314360

  4. A TSVD Analysis of the Impact of Polarization on Microwave Breast Imaging using an Enclosed Array of Miniaturized Patch Antennas

    PubMed Central

    Mays, R. Owen; Behdad, Nader; Hagness, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    Microwave breast imaging performance is fundamentally dependent on the quality of information contained within the scattering data. We apply a truncated singular-value decomposition (TSVD) method to evaluate the information contained in a simulated scattering scenario wherein a compact, shielded array of miniaturized patch antennas surrounds an anatomically realistic numerical breast phantom. In particular, we investigate the impact of different antenna orientations (and thus polarizations), namely two array configurations with uniform antenna orientations and one mixed-orientation array configuration. The latter case is of interest because it may offer greater flexibility in antenna and array design. The results of this analysis indicate that mixed-polarization configurations do not degrade information quality compared to uniform-polarization configurations and in fact may enhance imaging performance, and thus represent viable design options for microwave breast imaging systems. PMID:25705136

  5. Superconducting Quantum Arrays for Wideband Antennas and Low Noise Amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhanov, O.; Prokopemko, G.; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2014-01-01

    Superconducting Quantum Iinetference Filters (SQIF) consist of a two-dimensional array of niobium Josephson Junctions formed into N loops of incommensurate area. This structure forms a magnetic field (B) to voltage transducer with an impulse like response at B0. In principle, the signal-to-noise ratio scales as the square root of N and the noise can be made arbitrarily small (i.e. The SQIF chips are expected to exhibit quantum limited noise performance). A gain of about 20 dB was recently demonstrated at 10 GHz.

  6. Optical BEAMTAP beam-forming and jammer-nulling system for broadband phased-array antennas.

    PubMed

    Kriehn, G; Kiruluta, A; Silveira, P E; Weaver, S; Kraut, S; Wagner, K; Weverka, R T; Griffiths, L

    2000-01-10

    We present an approach to receive-mode broadband beam forming and jammer nulling for large adaptive antenna arrays as well as its efficient and compact optical implementation. This broadband efficient adaptive method for true-time-delay array processing (BEAMTAP) algorithm decreases the number of tapped delay lines required for processing an N-element phased-array antenna from N to only 2, producing an enormous savings in delay-line hardware (especially for large broadband arrays) while still providing the full NM degrees of freedom of a conventional N-element time-delay-and-sum beam former that requires N tapped delay lines with M taps each. This allows the system to adapt fully and optimally to an arbitrarily complex spatiotemporal signal environment that can contain broadband signals of interest, as well as interference sources and narrow-band and broadband jammers--all of which can arrive from arbitrary angles onto an arbitrarily shaped array--thus enabling a variety of applications in radar, sonar, and communication. This algorithm is an excellent match with the capabilities of radio frequency (rf) photonic systems, as it uses a coherent optically modulated fiber-optic feed network, gratings in a photorefractive crystal as adaptive weights, a traveling-wave detector for generating time delay, and an acousto-optic device to control weight adaptation. Because the number of available adaptive coefficients in a photorefractive crystal is as large as 10(9), these photonic systems can adaptively control arbitrarily large one- or two-dimensional antenna arrays that are well beyond the capabilities of conventional rf and real-time digital signal processing techniques or alternative photonic techniques. PMID:18337889

  7. Microwave monolithic integrated circuit development for future spaceborne phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anzic, G.; Kascak, T. J.; Downey, A. N.; Liu, D. C.; Connolly, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    The development of fully monolithic gallium arsenide (GaAs) receive and transmit modules suitable for phased array antenna applications in the 30/20 gigahertz bands is presented. Specifications and various design approaches to achieve the design goals are described. Initial design and performance of submodules and associated active and passive components are presented. A tradeoff study summary is presented highlighting the advantages of distributed amplifier approach compared to the conventional single power source designs.

  8. Development of a 20 GHz scanned beam microstrip antenna array with a proximity coupled YBCO feed network

    SciTech Connect

    Mittleman, S.D.; Herd, J.S.; Kenny, J.P.; Poles, L.D.; Champion, M.H.; Rainville, P.J.; Silva, J.H.

    1994-12-31

    A superconducting antenna array with a proximity coupled feed network operating at 20 GHz has been developed. The antenna is a 4x4 array and its performance was measured from 18 GHz to 22 GHz. At temperatures below 80 K, there was a 15 dBi gain measured at several frequencies in this range. The design of a low loss superconducting phase shifter monolithically incorporated into the YBCO feed network is indicated.

  9. Optically controlled phased-array antenna technology for space communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunath, Richard R.; Bhasin, Kul B.

    1988-01-01

    Using MMICs in phased-array applications above 20 GHz requires complex RF and control signal distribution systems. Conventional waveguide, coaxial cable, and microstrip methods are undesirable due to their high weight, high loss, limited mechanical flexibility and large volume. An attractive alternative to these transmission media, for RF and control signal distribution in MMIC phased-array antennas, is optical fiber. Presented are potential system architectures and their associated characteristics. The status of high frequency opto-electronic components needed to realize the potential system architectures is also discussed. It is concluded that an optical fiber network will reduce weight and complexity, and increase reliability and performance, but may require higher power.

  10. Frequency Tunable Antennas and Novel Phased Array Feeding Networks for Next Generation Communication Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avser, Bilgehan

    The thesis presents three dual-band frequency tunable antennas for carrier aggregation systems and two new feeding networks for reducing the number of phase shifters in limited-scan arrays. First, single- and dual-feed, dual-frequency, low-profile antennas with independent frequency tuning using varactor diodes are presented. The dual-feed planar inverted F-antenna (PIFA) has two operating frequencies which are independently tuned at 0.7--1.1 GHz and at 1.7--2.3 GHz with better than 10 dB impedance match. The isolation between the high-band and the low-band ports is > 13 dB; hence, one resonant frequency can be tuned without affecting the other. The single-feed contiguous-dual-band antenna has two resonant frequencies, which are independently tuned at 1.2--1.6 GHz at 1.6--2.3 GHz with better than 10 dB impedance match for most of the tuning range. And the single-feed dual-band antenna has two resonant frequencies, which are independently tuned at 0.7--1.0 GHz at 1.7--2.3 GHz with better than 10 dB impedance match for most of the tuning range. The tuning is done using varactor diodes with a capacitance range from 0.8 to 3.8 pF, which is compatible with RF MEMS devices. The antenna volumes are 63 x 100 x 3.15 mm3 on epsilon r = 3.55 substrates and the measured antenna efficiencies vary between 25% and 50% over the tuning range. The application areas are in carrier aggregation systems for fourth generation (4G) wireless systems. Next, a new phased array feeding network that employs random sequences of non-uniform sub-arrays (and a single phase shifter for each sub-array) is presented. When these sequences are optimized, the resulting phased arrays can scan over a wide region with low sidelobe levels. Equations for analyzing the random arrays and an algorithm for optimizing the array sequences are presented. Multiple random-solutions with different number of phase shifters and different set of sub-array groups are analyzed and design guidelines are presented. The

  11. Antenna-coupled TES Bolometers Used in BICEP2, Keck Array, and Spider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BICEP2 Collaboration; Keck Array Collaboration; SPIDER Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aikin, R. W.; Amiri, M.; Barkats, D.; Benton, S. J.; Bischoff, C. A.; Bock, J. J.; Bonetti, J. A.; Brevik, J. A.; Buder, I.; Bullock, E.; Chattopadhyay, G.; Davis, G.; Day, P. K.; Dowell, C. D.; Duband, L.; Filippini, J. P.; Fliescher, S.; Golwala, S. R.; Halpern, M.; Hasselfield, M.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hilton, G. C.; Hristov, V.; Hui, H.; Irwin, K. D.; Jones, W. C.; Karkare, K. S.; Kaufman, J. P.; Keating, B. G.; Kefeli, S.; Kernasovskiy, S. A.; Kovac, J. M.; Kuo, C. L.; LeDuc, H. G.; Leitch, E. M.; Llombart, N.; Lueker, M.; Mason, P.; Megerian, K.; Moncelsi, L.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nguyen, H. T.; O'Brient, R.; Ogburn, R. W., IV; Orlando, A.; Pryke, C.; Rahlin, A. S.; Reintsema, C. D.; Richter, S.; Runyan, M. C.; Schwarz, R.; Sheehy, C. D.; Staniszewski, Z. K.; Sudiwala, R. V.; Teply, G. P.; Tolan, J. E.; Trangsrud, A.; Tucker, R. S.; Turner, A. D.; Vieregg, A. G.; Weber, A.; Wiebe, D. V.; Wilson, P.; Wong, C. L.; Yoon, K. W.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2015-10-01

    We have developed antenna-coupled transition-edge sensor bolometers for a wide range of cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarimetry experiments, including Bicep2, Keck Array, and the balloon borne Spider. These detectors have reached maturity and this paper reports on their design principles, overall performance, and key challenges associated with design and production. Our detector arrays repeatedly produce spectral bands with 20%-30% bandwidth at 95, 150, or 230 GHz. The integrated antenna arrays synthesize symmetric co-aligned beams with controlled side-lobe levels. Cross-polarized response on boresight is typically ˜ 0.5%, consistent with cross-talk in our multiplexed readout system. End-to-end optical efficiencies in our cameras are routinely 35% or higher, with per detector sensitivities of NET ˜ 300 μ {K}{CMB}√{s}. Thanks to the scalability of this design, we have deployed 2560 detectors as 1280 matched pairs in Keck Array with a combined instantaneous sensitivity of ˜ 9 μ {K}{CMB}√{s}, as measured directly from CMB maps in the 2013 season. Similar arrays have recently flown in the Spider instrument, and development of this technology is ongoing.

  12. A Large Array of Small Antennas to Support Future NASA Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. L.; Weinreb, S.; Preston, R. A.

    2001-01-01

    A team of engineers and scientists at JPL is currently working on the design of an array of small radio antennas with a total collecting area up to twenty times that of the largest existing (70 m) DSN antennas. An array of this size would provide obvious advantages for high data rate telemetry reception and for spacecraft navigation. Among these advantages are an order-of-magnitude increase in sensitivity for telemetry downlink, flexible sub-arraying to track multiple spacecraft simultaneously, increased reliability through the use of large numbers of identical array elements, very accurate real-time angular spacecraft tracking, and a dramatic reduction in cost per unit area. NASA missions in many disciplines, including planetary science, would benefit from this increased DSN capability. The science return from planned missions could be increased, and opportunities for less expensive or completely new kinds of missions would be created. The DSN array would also bean immensely valuable instrument for radio astronomy. Indeed, it would be by far the most sensitive radio telescope in the world. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  13. Antenna-coupled TES bolometers used in BICEP2, Keck Array, and SPIDER

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aikin, R. W.; Amiri, M.; Barkats, D.; Benton, S. J.; Bischoff, C. A.; Bock, J. J.; Bonetti, J. A.; Brevik, J. A.; Buder, I.; et al

    2015-10-20

    We have developed antenna-coupled transition-edge sensor bolometers for a wide range of cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarimetry experiments, including Bicep2, Keck Array, and the balloon borne Spider. These detectors have reached maturity and this paper reports on their design principles, overall performance, and key challenges associated with design and production. Our detector arrays repeatedly produce spectral bands with 20%–30% bandwidth at 95, 150, or 230 GHz. The integrated antenna arrays synthesize symmetric co-aligned beams with controlled side-lobe levels. Cross-polarized response on boresight is typicallymore » $$\\sim 0.5\\%$$, consistent with cross-talk in our multiplexed readout system. End-to-end optical efficiencies in our cameras are routinely 35% or higher, with per detector sensitivities of NET ~ 300 $$\\mu {{\\rm{K}}}_{\\mathrm{CMB}}\\sqrt{{\\rm{s}}}$$. Thanks to the scalability of this design, we have deployed 2560 detectors as 1280 matched pairs in Keck Array with a combined instantaneous sensitivity of $$\\sim 9\\;\\mu {{\\rm{K}}}_{\\mathrm{CMB}}\\sqrt{{\\rm{s}}}$$, as measured directly from CMB maps in the 2013 season. Furthermore, similar arrays have recently flown in the Spider instrument, and development of this technology is ongoing.« less

  14. Spatio-Temporal Equalizer for a Receiving-Antenna Feed Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukai, Ryan; Lee, Dennis; Vilnrotter, Victor

    2010-01-01

    A spatio-temporal equalizer has been conceived as an improved means of suppressing multipath effects in the reception of aeronautical telemetry signals, and may be adaptable to radar and aeronautical communication applications as well. This equalizer would be an integral part of a system that would also include a seven-element planar array of receiving feed horns centered at the focal point of a paraboloidal antenna that would be nominally aimed at or near the aircraft that would be the source of the signal that one seeks to receive (see Figure 1). This spatio-temporal equalizer would consist mostly of a bank of seven adaptive finite-impulse-response (FIR) filters one for each element in the array - and the outputs of the filters would be summed (see Figure 2). The combination of the spatial diversity of the feedhorn array and the temporal diversity of the filter bank would afford better multipath-suppression performance than is achievable by means of temporal equalization alone. The seven-element feed array would supplant the single feed horn used in a conventional paraboloidal ground telemetry-receiving antenna. The radio-frequency telemetry signals re ceiv ed by the seven elements of the array would be digitized, converted to complex baseband form, and sent to the FIR filter bank, which would adapt itself in real time to enable reception of telemetry at a low bit error rate, even in the presence of multipath of the type found at many flight test ranges.

  15. An Integrated Circuit for Radio Astronomy Correlators Supporting Large Arrays of Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D’Addario, Larry R.; Wang, Douglas

    2016-03-01

    Radio telescopes that employ arrays of many antennas are in operation, and ever larger ones are being designed and proposed. Signals from the antennas are combined by cross-correlation. While the cost of most components of the telescope is proportional to the number of antennas N, the cost and power consumption of cross-correlation are proportional to N2 and dominate at sufficiently large N. Here, we report the design of an integrated circuit (IC) that performs digital cross-correlations for arbitrarily many antennas in a power-efficient way. It uses an intrinsically low-power architecture in which the movement of data between devices is minimized. In a large system, each IC performs correlations for all pairs of antennas but for a portion of the telescope’s bandwidth (the so-called “FX” structure). In our design, the correlations are performed in an array of 4096 complex multiply-accumulate (CMAC) units. This is sufficient to perform all correlations in parallel for 64 signals (N=32 antennas with two opposite-polarization signals per antenna). When N is larger, the input data are buffered in an on-chip memory and the CMACs are reused as many times as needed to compute all correlations. The design has been synthesized and simulated so as to obtain accurate estimates of the ICs size and power consumption. It is intended for fabrication in a 32nm silicon-on-insulator process, where it will require less than 12mm2 of silicon area and achieve an energy efficiency of 1.76-3.3pJ per CMAC operation, depending on the number of antennas. Operation has been analyzed in detail up to N=4096. The system-level energy efficiency, including board-level I/O, power supplies, and controls, is expected to be 5-7pJ per CMAC operation. Existing correlators for the JVLA (N=32) and ALMA (N=64) telescopes achieve about 5000pJ and 1000pJ, respectively using application-specific ICs (ASICs) in older technologies. To our knowledge, the largest-N existing correlator is LEDA at N=256; it

  16. An Integrated Circuit for Radio Astronomy Correlators Supporting Large Arrays of Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Addario, Larry R.; Wang, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Radio telescopes that employ arrays of many antennas are in operation, and ever larger ones are being designed and proposed. Signals from the antennas are combined by cross-correlation. While the cost of most components of the telescope is proportional to the number of antennas N, the cost and power consumption of cross-correlationare proportional to N2 and dominate at sufficiently large N. Here we report the design of an integrated circuit (IC) that performs digital cross-correlations for arbitrarily many antennas in a power-efficient way. It uses an intrinsically low-power architecture in which the movement of data between devices is minimized. In a large system, each IC performs correlations for all pairs of antennas but for a portion of the telescope's bandwidth (the so-called "FX" structure). In our design, the correlations are performed in an array of 4096 complex multiply-accumulate (CMAC) units. This is sufficient to perform all correlations in parallel for 64 signals (N=32 antennas with 2 opposite-polarization signals per antenna). When N is larger, the input data are buffered in an on-chipmemory and the CMACs are re-used as many times as needed to compute all correlations. The design has been synthesized and simulated so as to obtain accurate estimates of the IC's size and power consumption. It isintended for fabrication in a 32 nm silicon-on-insulator process, where it will require less than 12mm2 of silicon area and achieve an energy efficiency of 1.76 to 3.3 pJ per CMAC operation, depending on the number of antennas. Operation has been analyzed in detail up to N = 4096. The system-level energy efficiency, including board-levelI/O, power supplies, and controls, is expected to be 5 to 7 pJ per CMAC operation. Existing correlators for the JVLA (N = 32) and ALMA (N = 64) telescopes achieve about 5000 pJ and 1000 pJ respectively usingapplication-specific ICs in older technologies. To our knowledge, the largest-N existing correlator is LEDA atN = 256; it

  17. Evaluation of a hemi-spherical wideband antenna array for breast cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemm, M.; Craddock, I. J.; Preece, A.; Leendertz, J.; Benjamin, R.

    2008-12-01

    Using similar techniques to ground penetrating radars, microwave detection of breast tumors is a potential nonionizing and noninvasive alternative to traditional body-imaging techniques. In order to develop an imaging system, the team at Bristol have been working on a number of antenna array prototypes, based around a stacked-patch element, starting with simple pairs of elements and progressing to fully populated planar arrays. As the system commences human subject trials, a curved breast phantom has been developed along with an approximately hemi-spherical conformal array. This contribution will present details of the conformal array design and initial results from this unique experimental imaging system as applied to an anatomically shaped breast phantom.

  18. The study of microstrip antenna arrays and related problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Y. T.

    1986-01-01

    In February, an initial computer program to be used in analyzing the four-element array module was completed. This program performs the analysis of modules composed of four rectangular patches which are corporately fed by a microstrip line network terminated in four identical load impedances. Currently, a rigorous full-wave analysis of various types of microstrip line feed structures and patches is being performed. These tests include the microstrip line feed between layers of different electrical parameters. A method of moments was implemented for the case of a single dielectric layer and microstrip line fed rectangular patches in which the primary source is assumed to be a magnetic current ribbon across the line some distance from the patch. Measured values are compared with those computed by the program.

  19. Synthesis, verification, and optimization of systolic arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Rajopadhye, S.V.

    1986-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the issue of providing a sound theoretical basis for three important issues relating to systolic arrays, namely synthesis, verification, and optimization. Former research has concentrated on analysis of the dependency structure of the computation, and there have been numerous approaches to map this dependency structure onto a locally interconnected network. This study pursues a similar approach, but with a major generalization of the class of problems analyzed. In earlier research, it was essential that the dependencies were expressible as constant vectors (from a point in the domain to the points that it depended on); here they are permitted to be arbitrary linear functions of the point. Theory for synthesizing systolic architectures from such generalized specifications is developed. Also a systematic (mechanizable) approach to the synthesis of systolic architectures that have control signals is presented. In the areas of verification and optimization, a rigorous mathematical framework is presented that permits reasoning about the behavior of systolic arrays as functions on streams of data. Using this approach, the verification of such architectures reduces to the problem of verification of functional program.s

  20. A Novel Structure of Slot-Antenna Array for Producing Large-Area Planar Surface-Wave Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhaoquan; Liu, Minghai; Zhou, Peiqin; Chen, Wei; Lan, Chaohui; Hu, Xiwei

    2008-12-01

    The principle of surface wave plasma discharge in a rectangular cavity is introduced and the distribution of the electromagnetic field within a rectangular waveguide is analysed. A novel structure of a slot antenna array is presented. In comparison with the traditional slotantenna, it is shown that the designed slot antenna array can excite effectively the surface wave coupling into the chamber, and generate a stable large-area high-density plasma. These results are useful for exploring the optimized design of the slot-antenna for surface wave plasmas.

  1. Design of On-Chip N-Fold Orbital Angular Momentum Multicasting Using V-Shaped Antenna Array

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jing; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    We design a V-shaped antenna array to realize on-chip multicasting from a single Gaussian beam to four orbital angular momentum (OAM) beams. A pattern search assisted iterative (PSI) algorithm is used to design an optimized continuous phase pattern which is further discretized to generate collinearly superimposed multiple OAM beams. Replacing the designed discrete phase pattern with corresponding V-shaped antennas, on-chip N-fold OAM multicasting is achieved. The designed on-chip 4-fold OAM multicasting exploiting V-shaped antenna array shows favorable operation performance with low crosstalk less than -15 dB. PMID:25951325

  2. An Improved Solution for Integrated Array Optics in Quasi-Optical mm and Submm Receivers: the Hybrid Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buttgenbach, Thomas H.

    1993-01-01

    The hybrid antenna discussed here is defined as a dielectric lens-antenna as a special case of an extended hemi-spherical dielectric lens that is operated in the diffraction limited regime. It is a modified version of the planar antenna on a lens scheme developed by Rutledge. The dielectric lens-antenna is fed by a planar-structure antenna, which is mounted on the flat side of the dielectric lens-antenna using it as a substrate, and the combination is termed a hybrid antenna. Beam pattern and aperture efficiency measurements were made at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths as a function of extension of the hemi- spherical lens and different lens sizes. An optimum extension distance is found experimentally and numerically for which excellent beam patterns and simultaneously high aperture efficiencies can be achieved. At 115 GHz the aperture efficiency was measured to be (76 4 +/- 6) % for a diffraction limited beam with sidelobes below -17 dB. Results of a single hybrid antenna with an integrated Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor (SIS) detector and a broad-band matching structure at submillimeter wavelengths are presented. The hybrid antenna is diffraction limited, space efficient in an array due to its high aperture efficiency, and is easily mass produced, thus being well suited for focal plane heterodyne receiver arrays.

  3. An improved solution for integrated array optics in quasi-optical mm and submm receivers: The hybrid antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Buettgenback, T.H. . Div. of Physics)

    1993-10-01

    The hybrid antenna discussed here is defined as a dielectric lens-antenna as a special case of an extended hemispherical dielectric lens that is operated in the diffraction limited regime. It is a modified version of the planar antenna on a lens scheme developed by Rutledge. The dielectric lens-antenna is fed by a planar-structure antenna, which is mounted on the flat side of the dielectric lens-antenna using it as a substrate, and the combination is termed a hybrid antenna. Beam pattern and aperture efficiency measurements were made at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths as a function of extension of the hemispherical lens and different lens sizes. An optimum extension distance is found experimentally and numerically for which excellent beam patterns and simultaneously high aperture efficiencies can be achieved. At 115 GHz the aperture efficiency was measured to be (76 [+-] 6)% for a diffraction limited beam with sidelobes below [minus]17 dB. Results of a single hybrid antenna with an integrated Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor (SIS) detector and a broad-band matching structure at submillimeter wavelengths are presented. The hybrid antenna is diffraction limited, space efficient in an array due to its high aperture efficiency, and is easily mass produced, thus being well suited for focal plane heterodyne receiver arrays.

  4. Phased Array-Fed Reflector (PAFR) Antenna Architectures for Space-Based Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooley, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Communication link and target ranges for satellite communications (SATCOM) and space-based sensors (e.g. radars) vary from approximately 1000 km (for LEO satellites) to 35,800 km (for GEO satellites). At these long ranges, large antenna gains are required and legacy payloads have usually employed large reflectors with single beams that are either fixed or mechanically steered. For many applications, there are inherent limitations that are associated with the use of these legacy antennas/payloads. Hybrid antenna designs using Phased Array Fed Reflectors (PAFRs) provide a compromise between reflectors and Direct Radiating phased Arrays (DRAs). PAFRs provide many of the performance benefits of DRAs while utilizing much smaller, lower cost (feed) arrays. The primary limitation associated with hybrid PAFR architectures is electronic scan range; approximately +/-5 to +/- 10 degrees is typical, but this range depends on many factors. For LEO applications, the earth FOV is approximately +/-55 degrees which is well beyond the range of electronic scanning for PAFRs. However, for some LEO missions, limited scanning is sufficient or the CONOPS and space vehicle designs can be developed to incorporate a combination mechanical slewing and electronic scanning. In this paper, we review, compare and contrast various PAFR architectures with a focus on their general applicability to space missions. We compare the RF performance of various PAFR architectures and describe key hardware design and implementation trades. Space-based PAFR designs are highly multi-disciplinary and we briefly address key hardware engineering design areas. Finally, we briefly describe two PAFR antenna architectures that have been developed at Northrop Grumman.

  5. Phase Center Stabilization of a Horn Antenna and its Application in a Luneburg Lens Feed Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakauskas, Brian H.

    With any reflecting or refracting structure, such as a parabolic reflector or lens antenna, the knowledge of the focal point is critical in the design as it determines the point at which a feeding signal should originate for proper operation. Spherically symmetrical lenses have a distinct advantage over other structure types in that there exists an infinite number of focal points surrounding the lens. Due to this feature, a spherical lens can remain in a fixed position while a beam can be steered to any direction by movement of the feed only. Unlike phased arrays that beam-steer electronically, a spherical lens exhibits no beam deterioration at wide angles. The lens that accomplishes this is in practice called the Luneburg lens which has been studied since the 1940s. Due to the electromechanical properties of the horn antenna, it is often used to feed the above mentioned configurations. In the focusing of any feed antenna, its phase center is an approximate point in space that should be coincident with a reflector or lens's focal point to minimize phase error over the radiating aperture. Although this is often easily accomplished over a narrow bandwidth, over wide bandwidths some antennas have phase centers that vary significantly, making their focusing a challenge. This thesis seeks to explain the problem with focusing a Luneburg lens with a canonical horn antenna and offers a modified horn design that remains nearly focused over a frequency band of 18 -- 45 GHz. In addition to simulating the feed / lens configurations, the lens and feed horn will be fabricated and mounted for far field measurements to be taken in an anechoic antenna range. A final feed design will be implemented in an array configuration with the Luneburg lens, capable of transmitting and receiving multiple beams without requiring any moving parts or complex electronic beam-forming networks. As a tradeoff, a separate receiver or switching network is required to accommodate each feed antenna. This

  6. Results of lower hybrid wave experiments using a dielectric loaded waveguide array antenna on TST-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakatsuki, T.; Ejiri, A.; Shinya, T.; Takase, Y.; Furui, H.; Hiratsuka, J.; Imamura, K.; Inada, T.; Kakuda, H.; Kasahara, H.; Nagashima, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Nakanishi, A.; Oosako, T.; Saito, K.; Seki, T.; Shimpo, F.; Sonehara, M.; Togashi, H.; Tsuda, S.; Tsujii, N.; Yamaguchi, T.

    2014-02-01

    Lower hybrid current drive experiments were performed on the TST-2 spherical tokamak (R = 0.38 m, a = 0.25 m, Bt = 0.3 T, Ip = 0.1 MA). A waveguide array antenna consisting of four dielectric (alumina, ɛr = 10.0) loaded waveguides was used. The coupling characteristics were investigated over a wide range of input power (0.1 W - 40 kW). The reflection coefficient of this antenna increased when the input power exceeded approximately 1 kW. This result was compared with a numerical simulation based on the finite element method (FEM). The ponderomotive effect was calculated for the wave field calculated by COMSOL [1]. This calculation also showed variation of the reflection coefficient with the input power. Non-inductive plasma current start-up to 10 kA was demonstrated using 40 kW of lower hybrid wave (LHW) power. The current drive figure of merit (ηCD = IpneR/PRF) of this antenna was higher than that obtained using the combline antenna, which is designed to excite a travelling fast wave. The best current drive efficiency was obtained in the case in which the n∥ (= ck∥/ω) spectrum of the excited LHW was peaked around 9 and the toroidal field was higher than in previous experiments.

  7. Integrated Phase Array Antenna/Solar Cell System for Flexible Access Communication (IA/SAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, E. B.; Lee, R. Q.; Pal, A. T.; Wilt, D. M.; McElroy, B. D.; Mueller, C. H.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes recent efforts to integrate advanced solar cells with printed planar antennas. Several previous attempts have been reported in the literature, but this effort is unique in several ways. It uses Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) multi-junction solar cell technology. The solar cells and antennas will be integrated onto a common GaAs substrate. When fully implemented, IA/SAC will be capable of dynamic beam steering. In addition, this program targets the X-band (8 - 12 GHz) and higher frequencies, as compared to the 2.2 - 2.9 GHz arrays targeted by other organizations. These higher operating frequencies enable a greater bandwidth and thus higher data transfer rates. The first phase of the effort involves the development of 2 x 2 cm GaAs Monolithically Integrated Modules (MIM) with integrated patch antennas on the opposite side of the substrate. Subsequent work will involve the design and development of devices having the GaAs MIMs and the antennas on the same side of the substrate. Results from the phase one efforts will be presented.

  8. Aircraft antennas/conformal antennas missile antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solbach, Klaus

    1987-04-01

    Three major areas of airborne microwave antennas are examined. The basic system environment for missile telemetry/telecommand and fuze functions is sketched and the basic antenna design together with practical examples are discussed. The principle requirements of modern nose radar flat plate antennas are shown to result from missile/aircraft system requirements. Basic principles of slotted waveguide antenna arrays are sketched and practical antenna designs are discussed. The present early warning system designs are sketched to point out requirements and performance of practical radar warning and jamming antennas (broadband spiral antennas and horn radiators). With respect to newer developments in the ECM scenario, some demonstrated and proposed antenna systems (lens fed arrays, phased array, active array) are discussed.

  9. Initial studies of array feeds for the 70-meter antenna at 32 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, P. W.

    1991-01-01

    The results of a study to determine the feasibility of using array feed techniques to improve the performance of the 70 m antenna at 32 GHz are presented. Changing from 8.4 to 32 GHz has the potential of increasing the gain by 11.6 dB, but recent measurements indicate that additional losses of from 3 to 7 dB occur at 32 GHz, depending on the elevation angle. Array feeds were proposed to recover some of the losses by compensating for surface distortions that contribute to these losses. Results for both surface distortion compensation and pointing error correction are discussed. These initial studies, however, had one significant restriction: The mechanical finite element model was used to characterize the surface distortions, not the measured distortions from three angle holography data, which would be more representative of the actual antenna. Further work is required to provide for a more accurate estimate of performance that utilizes holography data and, in particular, one that evaluates the performance in the focal plane region of the antenna.

  10. Microwave reconstruction method using a circular antenna array cooperating with an internal transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Huiyuan; Narayanan, Ram M.; Balasingham, Ilangko

    2016-05-01

    This paper addresses the detection and imaging of a small tumor underneath the inner surface of the human intestine. The proposed system consists of an around-body antenna array cooperating with a capsule carrying a radio frequency (RF) transmitter located within the human body. This paper presents a modified Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm to reconstruct the dielectric profile with this new system architecture. Each antenna around the body acts both as a transmitter and a receiver for the remaining array elements. In addition, each antenna also acts as a receiver for the capsule transmitter inside the body to collect additional data which cannot be obtained from the conventional system. In this paper, the synthetic data are collected from biological objects, which are simulated for the circular phantoms using CST studio software. For the imaging part, the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, which is a kind of Newton inversion method, is chosen to reconstruct the dielectric profile of the objects. The imaging process involves a two-part innovation. The first part is the use of a dual mesh method which builds a dense mesh grid around in the region around the transmitter and a coarse mesh for the remaining area. The second part is the modification of the Levenberg-Marquardt method to use the additional data collected from the inside transmitter. The results show that the new system with the new imaging algorithm can obtain high resolution images even for small tumors.

  11. Design and analysis of an electronically steerable microstrip patch and a novel Coplanar Waveguide (CPW) fed slot antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldossary, Hamad

    Conformal Phased Array Antennas (CPAAs) are very attractive for their high gain, low profile, and beam scanning ability while being conformal to their mounting surface. Among them are microstrip patch phased arrays and wideband slot phased arrays which are of particular significance. In this work, first the study, design, and implementation of a conformal microstrip patch phased array is presented which consists of a high gain beam scanning array implemented using microstrip delay lines controlled using GaAs SPDT switches. Then the study and design of a wideband Coplanar Waveguide (CPW)-fed slot phased array antenna is presented. In both cases the array beam scanning properties are elucidated by incorporating the measured delay line scattering parameters inside Ansys Designer simulation models and then computing and presenting their full-wave radiation characteristics.

  12. Antennas for Terahertz Applications: Focal Plane Arrays and On-chip Non-contact Measurement Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trichopoulos, Georgios C.

    The terahertz (THz) band provides unique sensing opportunities that enable several important applications such as biomedical imaging, remote non-destructive inspection of packaged goods, and security screening. THz waves can penetrate most materials and can provide unique spectral information in the 0.1--10 THz band with high resolution. In contrast, other imaging modalities, like infrared (IR), suffer from low penetration depths and are thus not attractive for non-destructive evaluation. However, state-of-the-art THz imaging systems typically employ mechanical raster scans using a single detector to acquire two-dimensional images. Such devices tend to be bulky and complicated due to the mechanical parts, and are thus rather expensive to develop and operate. Thus, large-format (e.g. 100x100 pixels) and all-electronics based THz imaging systems are badly needed to alleviate the space, weight and power (SWAP) factors and enable cost effective utilization of THz waves for sensing and high-data-rate communications. In contrast, photonic sensors are very compact because light can couple directly to the photodiode without residing to radiation coupling topologies. However, in the THz band, due to the longer wavelengths and much lower photon energies, highly efficient antennas with optimized input impedance have to be integrated with THz sensors. Here, we implement novel antenna engineering techniques that are optimized to take advantage of recent technological advances in solid-state THz sensing devices. For example, large-format focal plane arrays (FPAs) have been the Achilles' heel of THz imaging systems. Typically, optical components (lenses, mirrors) are employed in order to improve the optical performance of FPAs, however, antenna sensors suffer from degraded performance when they are far from the optical axis, thus minimizing the number of useful FPA elements. By modifying the radiation pattern of FPA antennas we manage to alleviate the off-axis aberration

  13. Phased array antenna matching: Simulation and optimization of a planar phased array of circular waveguide elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudgeon, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    A computerized simulation of a planar phased array of circular waveguide elements is reported using mutual coupling and wide angle impedance matching in phased arrays. Special emphasis is given to circular polarization. The aforementioned computer program has as variable inputs: frequency, polarization, grid geometry, element size, dielectric waveguide fill, dielectric plugs in the waveguide for impedance matching, and dielectric sheets covering the array surface for the purpose of wide angle impedance matching. Parameter combinations are found which produce reflection peaks interior to grating lobes, while dielectric cover sheets are successfully employed to extend the usable scan range of a phased array. The most exciting results came from the application of computer aided optimization techniques to the design of this type of array.

  14. Design Concepts For A Long Pulse Upgrade For The DIII-D Fast Wave Antenna Array

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Philip Michael; Baity Jr, F Wallace; Caughman, John B; Goulding, Richard Howell; Hosea, J.; Greenough, Nevell; Nagy, Alex; Pinsker, R.; Rasmussen, David A

    2009-01-01

    A goal in the 5-year plan for the fast wave program on DIII-D is to couple a total of 3.6 MW of RF power into a long pulse, H-mode plasma for central electron heating. The present short-pulse 285/300 antenna array would need to be replaced with one capable of at least 1.2 MW, 10 s operation at 60 MHz into an H-mode (low resistive loading) plasma condition. The primary design under consideration uses a poloidally-segmented strap (3 sections) for reduced strap voltage near the plasma/Faraday screen region. Internal capacitance makes the antenna structure self-resonant at 60 MHz, strongly reducing peak E-fields in the vacuum coax and feed throughs.

  15. Design Concepts For A Long Pulse Upgrade For The DIII-D Fast Wave Antenna Array

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, P. M.; Baity, F. W.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Goulding, R. H.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Hosea, J. C.; Greenough, N. L.; Nagy, A.; Pinsker, R. I.

    2009-11-26

    A goal in the 5-year plan for the fast wave program on DIII-D is to couple a total of 3.6 MW of RF power into a long pulse, H-mode plasma for central electron heating. The present short-pulse 285/300 antenna array would need to be replaced with one capable of at least 1.2 MW, 10 s operation at 60 MHz into an H-mode (low resistive loading) plasma condition. The primary design under consideration uses a poloidally-segmented strap (3 sections) for reduced strap voltage near the plasma/Faraday screen region. Internal capacitance makes the antenna structure self-resonant at 60 MHz, strongly reducing peak E-fields in the vacuum coax and feed throughs.

  16. Electron Cyclotron / Bernstein Wave Heating and Current Drive Experiments using Phased-array Antenna in QUEST

    SciTech Connect

    Idei, H.; Zushi, H.; Hanada, K.; Nakamura, K.; Fujisawa, A.; Hasegawa, M.; Yoshida, N.; Watanebe, H.; Tokunaga, K.; Nagashima, Y.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakashima, H.; Higashijima, A.; Sakamoto, M.; Ejiri, A.; Takase, Y.; Sakaguchi, M.; Kalinnikova, E.; Ishiguro, M.; Tashima, S.

    2011-12-23

    The phased-array antenna system for Electron Cyclotron/Bernstein Wave Heating and Current Drive experiments has been developed in the QUEST. The antenna was designed to excite a pure O-mode wave in the oblique injection for the O-X-B mode conversion experiments, and its good performances were confirmed at a low power level. The plasma current (<{approx}15 kA) with an aspect ratio of 1.5 was started up and sustained by only RF injection in the low-density operations. The long pulse discharge of 10 kA was also attained for 37 s. The new density window to sustain the plasma current was observed in the high-density plasmas. The single-null divertor configuration with the high plasma current (<{approx}25 kA) was attained in the 17 s plasma sustainment.

  17. Beam-Switch Transient Effects in the RF Path of the ICAPA Receive Phased Array Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sands, O. Scott

    2003-01-01

    When the beam of a Phased Array Antenna (PAA) is switched from one pointing direction to another, transient effects in the RF path of the antenna are observed. Testing described in the report has revealed implementation-specific transient effects in the RF channel that are associated with digital clocking pulses that occur with transfer of data from the Beam Steering Controller (BSC) to the digital electronics of the PAA under test. The testing described here provides an initial assessment of the beam-switch phenomena by digitally acquiring time series of the RF communications channel, under CW excitation, during the period of time that the beam switch transient occurs. Effects are analyzed using time-frequency distributions and instantaneous frequency estimation techniques. The results of tests conducted with CW excitation supports further Bit-Error-Rate (BER) testing of the PAA communication channel.

  18. An efficient technique for the performance evaluation of antenna arrays with noisy carrier reference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, T. Y.; Clare, L.

    1981-01-01

    An efficient computational technique is developed to evaluate the performance of coherent receivers with noisy carrier reference and multiple antennas. The received signal is assumed to be uncoded residual carrier BPSK (binary phase shift keying), with a PLL (phase locked loop) used for extracting the carrier. Explicit relationships between the error probabilities and the various system parameters are given. Specific results are given for the performance gain of combined carrier referencing over baseband only combining when the channel alignment process is ideal. A simple asymptotic expression for the performance gain is determined when the number of antennas used is increased without bound. An example using a Block 3 Deep Space Network PLL illustrates the performance of each arraying structure. The technique used is applicable to the performance evaluation for other receivers having similar decision statistics.

  19. Modelling of broadband 1-18 GHz antipodal dual-polarized Vivaldi radiators for antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukhanov, Y. V.; Semenikhin, A. I.; Semenikhina, D. V.; Privalova, T. Y.

    2014-10-01

    Four models of 1 - 18 GHz antipodal Vivaldi radiators with dual orthogonal polarizations as part of the infinite antenna array (AA) are considered. The models have antipodal location of printed conductors on two sides of a substrate in tapered slot part of the antenna; elliptic resonators and a symmetry plane passing through a diagonal of Floquet's unit cell. For VSWR lowering and improvement of isolation of orthogonal channels at resonance frequencies the models can contain the rectangular plates or rods of an absorber. The best model of the radiator AA with long absorber rods has VSWR not higher than 2.55 and an isolation of orthogonal channels more than 19 dB.

  20. Definition Study for Space Shuttle Experiments Involving Large, Steerable Millimeter-Wave Antenna Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levis, C. A.

    1976-01-01

    The potential uses and techniques for the shuttle spacelab Millimeter Wave Large Aperture Antenna Experiment (MWLAE) are documented. Potential uses are identified: applications to radio astronomy, the sensing of atmospheric turbulence by its effect on water vapor line emissions, and the monitoring of oil spills by multifrequency radiometry. IF combining is preferable to RF combining with respect to signal to noise ratio for communications receiving antennas of the size proposed for MWLAE. A design approach using arrays of subapertures is proposed to reduce the number of phase shifters and mixers for uses which require a filled aperture. Correlation radiometry and a scheme utilizing synchronous Dicke switches and IF combining are proposed as potential solutions.

  1. System-Level Integrated Circuit (SLIC) development for phased array antenna applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shalkhauser, K. A.; Raquet, C. A.

    1991-01-01

    A microwave/millimeter wave system-level integrated circuit (SLIC) being developed for use in phased array antenna applications is described. The program goal is to design, fabricate, test, and deliver an advanced integrated circuit that merges radio frequency (RF) monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) technologies with digital, photonic, and analog circuitry that provide control, support, and interface functions. As a whole, the SLIC will offer improvements in RF device performance, uniformity, and stability while enabling accurate, rapid, repeatable control of the RF signal. Furthermore, the SLIC program addresses issues relating to insertion of solid state devices into antenna systems, such as the reduction in number of bias, control, and signal lines. Program goals, approach, and status are discussed.

  2. System-level integrated circuit (SLIC) development for phased array antenna applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shalkhauser, K. A.; Raquet, C. A.

    1991-01-01

    A microwave/millimeter wave system-level integrated circuit (SLIC) being developed for use in phased array antenna applications is described. The program goal is to design, fabricate, test, and deliver an advanced integrated circuit that merges radio frequency (RF) monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) technologies with digital, photonic, and analog circuitry that provide control, support, and interface functions. As a whole, the SLIC will offer improvements in RF device performance, uniformity, and stability while enabling accurate, rapid, repeatable control of the RF signal. Furthermore, the SLIC program addresses issues relating to insertion of solid state devices into antenna systems, such as the reduction in number of bias, control, and signal lines. Program goals, approach, and status are discussed.

  3. Synthesis and screening combinatorial arrays of zeolites

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Xiang, Xiaodong; Goldwasser, Isy

    2003-11-18

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  4. Required technologies for a lunar optical UV-IR synthesis array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Stewart W.; Wetzel, John P.

    1992-01-01

    A Lunar Optical UV-IR Synthesis Array (LOUISA) proposed to take advantage of the characteristics of the lunar environment requires appropriate advances in technology. These technologies are in the areas of contamination/interference control, test and evaluation, manufacturing, construction, autonomous operations and maintenance, power and heating/cooling, stable precision structures, optics, parabolic antennas, and communications/control. LOUISA needs to be engineered to operate for long periods with minimal intervention by humans or robots. What is essential for LOUISA operation is enforcement of a systems engineering approach that makes compatible all lunar operations associated with habitation, resource development, and science.

  5. The design and analysis of a phased array microstrip antenna for a low earth orbit communication satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barfield, William L.

    1994-06-01

    A Naval Postgraduate School spacecraft design class proposed a multiple beam, phased array, microstrip antenna as part of the preliminary design of a low earth orbit communication satellite. The antenna must provide coverage over the satellite's entire field of view while both uplink and down-link operate simultaneously on the same 1-band frequency. This thesis assesses the feasibility of the antenna proposed in that preliminary design. Design tradeoffs for a microstrip array constrained by both available surface area and a limited mass budget are examined. Two different substrate materials are considered in terms of weight and performance. Microstrip patch theory is applied to array element design and layout and antenna array theory is applied to determine phase and amplitude coefficients. The focus of the design is on obtaining the desired beam shape and orientation, given antenna size constraints. A corporate feed method is discussed and a general design presented. Antenna performance is predicted through the use of a computer model based on Modal Expansion theory and results are plotted in a series of graphs which demonstrate the limitations of the proposed design.

  6. A comparison of atmospheric effects on differential phase for a two-element antenna array and nearby site test interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morabito, David D.; D'Addario, Larry; Finley, Susan

    2016-02-01

    Phased arrays of reflector antennas can be used to obtain effective area and gain that are much larger than is practical with a single antenna. This technique is routinely used by NASA for receiving weak signals from deep space. Phase alignment of the signals can be disrupted by turbulence in the troposphere, which causes fluctuations in the differences of signal delays among the antennas. At the Deep Space Network stations, site test interferometers (STIs) are being used for long-term monitoring of these delay fluctuations using signals from geostationary satellites. In this paper, we compare the STI measurements with the phase variations seen by a nearby two-element array of 34 m diameter antennas tracking 8.4 GHz and 32 GHz signals from the Cassini spacecraft in orbit around Saturn. It is shown that the statistics of the STI delay fluctuations, after appropriate scaling for differences in antenna separation and elevation angle and conversion to phase at the spacecraft frequencies, provide reliable estimates of the phase fluctuations seen by the large antennas on the deep space signal. Techniques for adaptive compensation of the phase fluctuations are available when receiving a sufficiently strong signal, but compensation is often impractical or impossible when using the array for transmitting. These results help to validate the use of long-term STI data for assessing the feasibility of large transmitting arrays at various sites.

  7. Extending the scanning angle of a phased array antenna by using a null-space medium.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

    2014-01-01

    By introducing a columnar null-space region as the reference space, we design a radome that can extend the scanning angle of a phased array antenna (PAA) by a predetermined relationship (e.g. a linear relationship between the incident angle and steered output angle can be achieved). After some approximation, we only need two homogeneous materials to construct the proposed radome layer by layer. This kind of medium is called a null-space medium, which has been studied and fabricated for realizing hyper-lenses and some other devices. Numerical simulations verify the performance of our radome. PMID:25355198

  8. Extending the scanning angle of a phased array antenna by using a null-space medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

    2014-10-01

    By introducing a columnar null-space region as the reference space, we design a radome that can extend the scanning angle of a phased array antenna (PAA) by a predetermined relationship (e.g. a linear relationship between the incident angle and steered output angle can be achieved). After some approximation, we only need two homogeneous materials to construct the proposed radome layer by layer. This kind of medium is called a null-space medium, which has been studied and fabricated for realizing hyper-lenses and some other devices. Numerical simulations verify the performance of our radome.

  9. Extending the scanning angle of a phased array antenna by using a null-space medium

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

    2014-01-01

    By introducing a columnar null-space region as the reference space, we design a radome that can extend the scanning angle of a phased array antenna (PAA) by a predetermined relationship (e.g. a linear relationship between the incident angle and steered output angle can be achieved). After some approximation, we only need two homogeneous materials to construct the proposed radome layer by layer. This kind of medium is called a null-space medium, which has been studied and fabricated for realizing hyper-lenses and some other devices. Numerical simulations verify the performance of our radome. PMID:25355198

  10. Microwave monolithic integrated circuit development for future spaceborne phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anzic, G.; Kascak, T. J.; Downey, A. N.; Liu, D. C.; Connolly, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    The development of fully monolithic gallium arsenide (GaAs) receive and transmit modules suitable for phased array antenna applications in the 30/20 gigahertz bands is presented. Specifications and various design approaches to achieve the design goals are described. Initial design and performance of submodules and associated active and passive components are presented. A tradeoff study summary is presented, highlighting the advantages of a distributed amplifier approach compared to the conventional single power source designs. Previously announced in STAR as N84-13399

  11. Development of uncooled antenna-coupled microbolometer arrays for explosive detection and identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoens, F.; Arnaud, A.; Castelein, P.; Goudon, V.; Imperinetti, P.; Lalanne Dera, J.; Meilhan, J.; Ouvier Buffet, J. L.; Pocas, S.; Maillou, T.; Hairault, L.; Gellie, P.; Barbieri, S.; Sirtori, C.

    2010-10-01

    Uncooled antenna-coupled microbolometer focal plane arrays have been specifically tailored for optimum performance in the 1-5 Terahertz range. A prototyping batch of 160 × 120 pixel chips has been designed and then processed above 8" silicon substrates. An actively illuminated system has been experimentally tested where Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCLs) are associated with the room-temperature operating 2D sensor. Whereas explosives samples were introduced in the THz beam optical path, the profile of the modified beam has been sensed by a unique pixel translated via an X-Y stage. These represent the first demonstration essays of explosive identification using our system.

  12. Human Skin as Arrays of Helical Antennas in the Millimeter and Submillimeter Wave Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Yuri; Puzenko, Alexander; Ben Ishai, Paul; Caduff, Andreas; Agranat, Aharon J.

    2008-03-01

    Recent studies of the minute morphology of the skin by optical coherence tomography showed that the sweat ducts in human skin are helically shaped tubes, filled with a conductive aqueous solution. A computer simulation study of these structures in millimeter and submillimeter wave bands show that the human skin functions as an array of low-Q helical antennas. Experimental evidence is presented that the spectral response in the sub-Terahertz region is governed by the level of activity of the perspiration system. It is also correlated to physiological stress as manifested by the pulse rate and the systolic blood pressure.

  13. Human skin as arrays of helical antennas in the millimeter and submillimeter wave range.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Yuri; Puzenko, Alexander; Ben Ishai, Paul; Caduff, Andreas; Agranat, Aharon J

    2008-03-28

    Recent studies of the minute morphology of the skin by optical coherence tomography showed that the sweat ducts in human skin are helically shaped tubes, filled with a conductive aqueous solution. A computer simulation study of these structures in millimeter and submillimeter wave bands show that the human skin functions as an array of low-Q helical antennas. Experimental evidence is presented that the spectral response in the sub-Terahertz region is governed by the level of activity of the perspiration system. It is also correlated to physiological stress as manifested by the pulse rate and the systolic blood pressure. PMID:18517913

  14. Low-profile helical array antenna fed from a radial waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Hisamatsu; Takeda, Haruo; Kitamura, Yorihiro; Mimaki, Hiroaki; Yamauchi, Junji

    1992-03-01

    A low-profile array antenna composed of 2-turn 4 deg pitch angle helices is designed for a frequency band of 11.7 GHz to 12.0 GHz. The feed wire of each helix is inserted into a radial waveguide through a small hole and excited by a traveling wave flowing in the transverse electromagnetic mode between the two parallel plates of the waveguide. The measured aperture efficiency shows a maximum value of 77 percent for a beam radiated in the normal direction and 69 percent for a 30 deg beam tilt.

  15. Millimeter-wave imaging with frequency scanning antenna and optical arrayed waveguide gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yuntao; Yu, Guoxin; Fu, Xinyu; Jiang, Yuesong

    2012-12-01

    The principle of a novel passive millimeter-wave (MMW) imaging method using frequency scanning antenna (FSA) and arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) is analyzed theoretically. The imaging processes are divided to three stages and discussed respectively. Then the FSA with 33~ 43GHz frequency scanning range is designed carefully with a field of view of +/-25°for the MMW imaging system. An AWG of 1×24 is then simply designed with a channel spacing of 0.5GHz. The designing and simulating demonstrated the feasibility to build such an imaging system which is progressing.

  16. Bit error rate testing of fiber optic data links for MMIC-based phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shalkhauser, K. A.; Kunath, R. R.; Daryoush, A. S.

    1990-01-01

    The measured bit-error-rate (BER) performance of a fiber optic data link to be used in satellite communications systems is presented and discussed. In the testing, the link was measured for its ability to carry high burst rate, serial-minimum shift keyed (SMSK) digital data similar to those used in actual space communications systems. The fiber optic data link, as part of a dual-segment injection-locked RF fiber optic link system, offers a means to distribute these signals to the many radiating elements of a phased array antenna. Test procedures, experimental arrangements, and test results are presented.

  17. Xatcobeo: Small Mechanisms for CubeSat Satellites - Antenna and Solar Array Deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    EncinasPlaza, Jose Miguel; VilanVilan, Jose Antonio; AquadoAgelet, Fernando; BrandiaranMancheno, Javier; LopezEstevez, Miguel; MartinezFernandez, Cesar; SarmientoAres, Fany

    2010-01-01

    The Xatcobeo project, which includes the mechanisms dealt with here, is principally a university project to design and construct a CubeSat 1U-type satellite. This work describes the design and operational features of the system for antenna storage and deployment, and the design and simulations of the solar array deployment system. It explains the various problems faced and solutions adopted, with a view to providing valid data for any other applications that could find them useful, be they of a similar nature or not.

  18. Self-cohering large antenna arrays using the spatial correlation properties of radar clutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attia, E. Hesham; Steinberg, Bernard D.

    1989-01-01

    A technique for self-calibrating a large antenna array system in the absence of a beamforming point source is presented that uses the spatial correlation properties of radar clutter. The array could be real or synthetic. It is shown that if R(X), the spatial autocorrelation function of the field (as measured by adjacent element pairs), is ensured to be real and positive in the neighborhood of the origin, both periodic and aperiodic arrays can be synchronized, forming retrodirective beams pointing at the axis of symmetry of the radar transmitter, provided that the interelement spacing does not exceed some limit (the order of the size of the transmitting aperture). If the spatial autocorrelation function is complex but has a linear phase, it is shown that one can still synchronize both periodic and aperiodic arrays, while if the phase of R(X) is nonlinear, only periodic arrays can be synchronized. In both cases of complex R(X), a residual beam-pointing error occurs. Computer simulations and airborne sea clutter data are reported that verify the theory and practicality of the algorithm.

  19. Novel Giant-Size Plasmas Produced by Microwave Discharge with Slot Antenna Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugai, H.; Nojiri, Y.; Takasu, K.; Ishijima, T.; Stamate, E.

    2004-09-01

    There is a growing need for giant-scale high-density plasma sources for manufacturing a meter-size flat panel display and for surface modification of large-area various materials. Capacitive discharges at frequencies in VHF range have been studied to meet this demand, however standing wave effect and edge effect significantly degrade the plasma uniformity. Here, we present a new technology for generation of large-area flat high-density plasma based on surface wave excitation at 2.45 GHz. A critical challenge to avoid huge atmospheric pressure acting on a microwave window was dodged by fully filling a waveguide, which is directly inserted in a low-pressure discharge vessel. The second challenge is a discharge antenna construction to attain the plasma uniformity over meter-scale. This issue was solved by a careful design of slot antenna array. Surface waves propagating along the dielectric-plasma interface were investigated in FDT simulation. A surface wave mode was observed in plasma by a movable antenna, indicating the mode number predicted in the simulation. In a discharge vessel, 1 m long and 0.3 m wide, we obtained the plasma density of 5x10@super11@ cm@super-3@ with 10 and 50 mTorr Ar. Three-dimensional profiles of plasma density in different conditions measured by a Langmuir probe will be presented.

  20. Thermal imaging of plasma with a phased array antenna in QUEST

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Kishore Nagata, K.; Akimoto, R.; Banerjee, S.; Idei, H.; Zushi, H.; Hanada, K.; Hasegawa, M.; Nakamura, K.; Fujisawa, A.; Nagashima, Y.; Onchi, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Yamamoto, M. K.

    2014-11-15

    A thermal imaging system to measure plasma Electron Bernstein Emission (EBE) emanating from the mode conversion region in overdense plasma is discussed. Unlike conventional ECE/EBE imaging, this diagnostics does not employ any active mechanical scanning mirrors or focusing optics to scan for the emission cones in plasma. Instead, a standard 3 × 3 waveguide array antenna is used as a passive receiver to collect emission from plasma and imaging reconstruction is done by accurate measurements of phase and intensity of these signals by heterodyne detection technique. A broadband noise source simulating the EBE, is installed near the expected mode conversion region and its position is successfully reconstructed using phase array technique which is done in post processing.

  1. RF MEMS Phase Shifters and their Application in Phase Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian; Ponchak, George E.; Zaman, Afroz J.; Lee, Richard Q.

    2005-01-01

    Electronically scanned arrays are required for space based radars that are capable of tracking multiple robots, rovers, or other assets simultaneously and for beam-hopping communication systems between the various assets. ^Traditionally, these phased array antennas used GaAs Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) phase shifters, power amplifiers, and low noise amplifiers to amplify and steer the beam, but the development of RF MEMS switches over the past ten years has enabled system designers to consider replacing the GaAs MMIC phase shifters with RF Micro-Electro Mechanical System (MEMS) phase shifters. In this paper, the implication of replacing the relatively high loss GaAs MMICs with low loss MEMS phase shifters is investigated.

  2. Thermal imaging of plasma with a phased array antenna in QUEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Kishore; Idei, H.; Zushi, H.; Nagata, K.; Akimoto, R.; Yamamoto, M. K.; Hanada, K.; Hasegawa, M.; Nakamura, K.; Fujisawa, A.; Nagashima, Y.; Banerjee, S.; Onchi, T.; Kuzmin, A.

    2014-11-01

    A thermal imaging system to measure plasma Electron Bernstein Emission (EBE) emanating from the mode conversion region in overdense plasma is discussed. Unlike conventional ECE/EBE imaging, this diagnostics does not employ any active mechanical scanning mirrors or focusing optics to scan for the emission cones in plasma. Instead, a standard 3 × 3 waveguide array antenna is used as a passive receiver to collect emission from plasma and imaging reconstruction is done by accurate measurements of phase and intensity of these signals by heterodyne detection technique. A broadband noise source simulating the EBE, is installed near the expected mode conversion region and its position is successfully reconstructed using phase array technique which is done in post processing.

  3. Ultra-Wideband, Dual-Polarized, Beam-Steering P-Band Array Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    duToit, Cornelis

    2014-01-01

    A dual-polarized, wide-bandwidth (200 MHz for one polarization, 100 MHz for the orthogonal polarization) antenna array at P-band was designed to be driven by NASA's EcoSAR digital beam former. EcoSAR requires two wide P-band antenna arrays mounted on the wings of an aircraft, each capable of steering its main beam up to 35deg off-boresight, allowing the twin radar beams to be steered at angles to the flight path. The science requirements are mainly for dual-polarization capability and a wide bandwidth of operation of up to 200 MHz if possible, but at least 100 MHz with high polarization port isolation and low cross-polarization. The novel design geometry can be scaled with minor modifications up to about four times higher or down to about half the current design frequencies for any application requiring a dual-polarized, wide-bandwidth steerable antenna array. EcoSAR is an airborne interferometric P-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) research application for studying two- and three-dimensional fine-scale measurements of terrestrial ecosystem structure and biomass, which will ultimately aid in the broader study of the carbon cycle and climate change. The two 2×8 element Pband antenna arrays required by the system will be separated by a baseline of about 25 m, allowing for interferometry measurements. The wide 100-to- 200-MHz bandwidth dual-polarized beams employed will allow the determination of the amount of biomass and even tree height on the ground. To reduce the size of the patches along the boresight dimension in order to fit them into the available space, two techniques were employed. One technique is to add slots along the edges of each patch where the main electric currents are expected to flow, and the other technique is to bend the central part of the patch away from the ground plane. The latter also facilitates higher mechanical rigidity. The high port isolation of more than 40 dB was achieved by employing a highly symmetrical feed mechanism for each

  4. Substrate-guided wave true-time delay network for phased array antenna steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Zhenhai

    2000-11-01

    Military and civilian wireless communication systems require compact phased array antenna systems with high performance. Unlike narrow-bandwidth phase shifters or bulky and lossy metallic time delay lines, photonic true- time delay lines open the possibility of high-performance antenna systems, while at the same time meeting the stringent weight and size requirements. Substrate-guided wave true-time delay lines, which have many advantages over other proposed structures, are proposed herein. The system structures of one-dimensional and two-dimensional antenna arrays based on the proposed true-time delay modules, along with the corresponding signal distribution methods for both transmit and receive modes were proposed and discussed. To demonstrate the generation and detection of microwave- encoded optical signal sources for the optically controlled antenna array, up to 50 GHz microwave signals with greater than 20 dB signal-to-noise ratios were generated by the optical heterodyning of two lasers with slightly different wavelengths at 786 nm or 1550 nm, demodulated by an ultra-fast photodetector, and then measured by a spectrum analyzer. The diffraction efficiencies of volume holographic gratings recorded on DuPont photopolymer for S-wave, P- wave, and random wave under different wavelengths were investigated in detail. The shrinkage effect of the holographic grating was compensated for by a proposed method shown herein. A simple method was also used to equalize the fanout beams to within +/-5%. Based on the above fabrication techniques, up to 7-bit TTD modules working at 850 nm and 1550 nm, which have the most number of bits and the highest packing density ever reported, were fabricated and packaged. The delay steps of the fabricated delay modules were experimentally confirmed using an original setup based on a femto-second laser, a high-speed photodetector, and the equivalent time sampling technique. The bandwidth of the delay module is experimentally confirmed to

  5. Postwall waveguide slot array with cosecant radiation pattern and null filling for base station antennas in local multidistributed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirokawa, J.; Yamazaki, C.; Ando, M.

    2002-04-01

    The authors propose to use planar antennas of waveguide slots with the simple structure of postwall waveguide for base station antennas in Local Multipoint Distribution Systems (LMDS). The array has a cosecant radiation pattern with null filling in the vertical plane for uniform illumination in a sector area. The slots are paired as an element to achieve traveling wave excitation because the phase, as well as the amplitude, has to be controlled for null filling in a cosecant pattern. It is the first time to design an array of reflection-canceling slot pairs to get a tapered distribution both in amplitude and phase. This paper extends the designability of the reflection-canceling slot arrays. A 16-element array is designed at 25-26 GHz band. The model array has a cosecant pattern with 3-dB deviations and a peak gain of 17.1 dBi in measurements.

  6. Optical Phased Array Antennas using Coupled Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Carl H.; Rojas, Roberto A.; Nessel, James A.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2007-01-01

    High data rate communication links are needed to meet the needs of NASA as well as other organizations to develop space-based optical communication systems. These systems must be robust to high radiation environments, reliable, and operate over a wide temperature range. Highly desirable features include beam steering capability, reconfigurability, low power consumption, and small aperture size. Optical communication links, using coupled vertical cavity surface emitting laser radiating elements are promising candidates for the transmit portion of these communication links. In this talk we describe a mission scenario, and how the antenna requirements are derived from the mission needs. We describe a potential architecture for this type of antenna, and outline the advantages and drawbacks of this approach relative to competing technologies. The technology we are proposing used coupled arrays of 1550 nm vertical cavity surface emitting lasers for transmission. The feasibility of coupling these arrays together, to form coherent high-power beams that can be modulated at data rates exceeding 1 Gbps, will be explored. We will propose an architecture that enables electronic beam steering, thus mitigating the need for ancillary acquisition, tracking and beam pointing equipment such as needed for current optical communicatin systems. The beam-steering capability we are proposing also opens the possibility of using this technology for inter-satellite communicatin links, and satellite-to-surface links.

  7. Modeling the Atmospheric Phase Effects of a Digital Antenna Array Communications System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tkacenko, A.

    2006-01-01

    In an antenna array system such as that used in the Deep Space Network (DSN) for satellite communication, it is often necessary to account for the effects due to the atmosphere. Typically, the atmosphere induces amplitude and phase fluctuations on the transmitted downlink signal that invalidate the assumed stationarity of the signal model. The degree to which these perturbations affect the stationarity of the model depends both on parameters of the atmosphere, including wind speed and turbulence strength, and on parameters of the communication system, such as the sampling rate used. In this article, we focus on modeling the atmospheric phase fluctuations in a digital antenna array communications system. Based on a continuous-time statistical model for the atmospheric phase effects, we show how to obtain a related discrete-time model based on sampling the continuous-time process. The effects of the nonstationarity of the resulting signal model are investigated using the sample matrix inversion (SMI) algorithm for minimum mean-squared error (MMSE) equalization of the received signal

  8. Use of genetic algorithms in the optimization of patch antennas and patch antenna arrays for the observation of the 21cm H-I line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rispoli, Matthew N.

    Radio Astronomy allows for astrophysicists and astronomers to observe parts of the Universe outside of the visible spectrum. Within radio astronomy, the 21cm wavelength is a very popular choice for observation. The 21cm wavelength emission/absorption corresponds to transitions of neutral hydrogen electrons in their orbitals and is a very useful wavelength to observe due to the prevalence of neutral hydrogen gas throughout the Universe. However, due to the physical size of wavelengths in the radio spectrum, radio telescopes tend to be very large and therefore very expensive. This thesis uses evolutionary optimization algorithms to optimize the much cheaper and rugged micro-patch antennas in a phased array. The evolutionary algorithm optimizes the geometry of the micro-patch antenna and 2-D phased array parameters that will culminate in a single radio telescope. The micropatch antenna parameters to be optimized are the geometry of top metal patch, dielectric thickness, dielectric constant, and feed point. The array factor parameters that are optimized are the relative weights for each array element and their relative periodic spacing.

  9. Analysis and Uniform Design of a Single-Layer Slotted Waveguide Array Antenna with Baffles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Takehito; Hirokawa, Jiro; Ando, Makoto

    This paper presents the formulation for the evaluation of external coupling in the alternating-phase feed single-layer slotted waveguide array antenna with baffles by using the Spectrum of Two-Dimensional Solutions (S2DS) method. A one-dimensional slot array is extracted from the array by assuming the periodicity in transversal direction and introducing the perfect electric conductors in the external region. The uniform excitation over the finite array is synthesized iteratively to demonstrate the fast and accurate results by S2DS. A unit design model with the baffles is introduced to determine the initial parameters of the slot pair which accelerate the iteration. Experiment at 25.3GHz demonstrates good uniformity of the aperture field distribution as well as the effects of the baffles. The directivity is 32.7dB which corresponds to the aperture efficiency 90.5% and the reflection is below -15.0dB over 1.3GHz.

  10. Demonstration of a micromachined planar distribution network in gap waveguide technology for a linear slot array antenna at 100 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahiminejad, S.; Zaman, A. U.; Haasl, S.; Kildal, P.-S.; Enoksson, P.

    2016-07-01

    The need for high frequency antennas is rapidly increasing with the development of new wireless rate communication technology. Planar antennas have an attractive form factor, but they require a distribution network. Microstrip technology is most commonly used at low frequency but suffers from large dielectric and ohmic losses at higher frequencies and particularly above 100 GHz. Substrate-integrated waveguides also suffer from dielectric losses. In addition, standard rectangular waveguide interfaces are inconvenient due to the four flange screws that must be tightly fastened to the antenna to avoid leakage. The current paper presents a planar slot array antenna that does not suffer from any of these problems. The distribution network is realized by micromachining using low-loss gap waveguide technology, and it can be connected to a standard rectangular waveguide flange without using any screws or additional packaging. To realize the antenna at these frequencies, it was fabricated with micromachining, which offers the required high precision, and a low-cost fabrication method. The antenna was micromachined with DRIE in two parts, one silicon-on-insulator plate and one Si plate, which were both covered with Au to achieve conductivity. The input reflection coefficient was measured to be below 10 dB over a 15.5% bandwidth, and the antenna gain was measured to be 10.4 dBi, both of which are in agreement with simulations.

  11. Antennae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Atlas Image mosaic, covering 7' x 7' on the sky of the interacting galaxies NGC 4038 and NGC 4039, better known as the Antennae, or Ring Tail galaxies. The two galaxies are engaged in a tug-of-war as they collide. The mutual gravitation between them is working to distort each spiral galaxy's appearance as the two merge. The interaction is evidently impetus for an intense burst of new star formation, as can be seen from the many infrared-bright knots and bright galactic nuclei. Compare the 2MASS view of this system with that obtained by the Hubble Space Telescope in the optical. Many of the same features are seen, although 2MASS is able to peer through much of the dust seen in the galaxies' disks. The galaxy light looks smoother. Also, in the near-infrared the bright knots of star formation are likely highlighted by the light of massive red supergiant stars. The much more extended 'tidal tails,' which give the Antennae their name, are quite faint in the 2MASS image mosaic.

  12. Optical antenna arrays of carbon nanotubes and their fabrication on polyimide and transparent conducting oxides for direct device integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Kempa, K.; Kimball, B.; Ren, Z. F.

    2005-11-01

    Vertically-aligned carbon nanotubes/nanofibers grown on various substrates by a direct-current plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method have been shown experimentally to function as classical low-loss dipole antenna arrays at optical frequencies. Two fundamental antenna effects, e.g., the polarization effect and length matching effect, directly observed on large-scale CNT arrays in visible frequency range, hold them promising for industry-level fabrication of devices including linear/beam-splitting polarizers, solar energy converters, THz demodulators, etc., some of which will, however, require or prefer a flexible and/or transparent conducting substrate to be compatible for multi-level integration and low-cost manufacturing process. A low-energy dark discharge fabrication technique is therefore devised which successfully yields CNT antennas directly on polyimide films and transparent conducting oxides (ITO, ZnO) with the absence of a buffer layer.

  13. Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety Project Ku-Band and Ka-Band Phased Array Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, Donald E.; Valencia, Lisa M.; Birr, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety study is a multiphase project to increase data rates and flexibility and decrease costs by using space-based communications assets for telemetry during launches and landings. Phase 1 used standard S-band antennas with the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System to obtain a baseline performance. The selection process and available resources for Phase 2 resulted in a Ku-band phased array antenna system. Several development efforts are under way for a Ka-band phased array antenna system for Phase 3. Each phase includes test flights to demonstrate performance and capabilities. Successful completion of this project will result in a set of communications requirements for the next generation of launch vehicles.

  14. Ku- and Ka-Band Phased Array Antenna for the Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, Donald E.; Valencia, Lisa M.; Birr, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety study is a multiphase project to increase data rates and flexibility and decrease costs by using space-based communications assets for telemetry during launches and landings. Phase 1 used standard S-band antennas with the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System to obtain a baseline performance. The selection process and available resources for Phase 2 resulted in a Ku-band phased array antenna system. Several development efforts are under way for a Ka-band phased array antenna system for Phase 3. Each phase includes test flights to demonstrate performance and capabilities. Successful completion of this project will result in a set of communications requirements for the next generation of launch vehicles.

  15. Broadband slot array antenna with full-space steerable pattern in a composite right/left-handed waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-Tapia, María.; Esteban, Jaime; Camacho-Peñalosa, Carlos

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this paper is twofold. On the one hand, to provide a better understanding of a composite right/left-handed (CRLH) waveguide, going into those aspects of interest for an antenna designer. A longitudinal slot as a radiating element has been considered to be studied and compared with its classic counterpart. On the other hand, to present the new design approach that is needed when using the CRLH waveguide technology to built array antennas. To that end, a slot array antenna has been designed, built, and measured. The simulations and measurements are in excellent agreement, confirming not only the backward-to-forward beam steering and broadband far-field performance, but also the validity of the design procedure used.

  16. System-Level Integrated Circuit (SLIC) Technology Development for Phased Array Antenna Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Windyka, John A.; Zablocki, Ed G.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the efforts and progress in developing a 'system-level' integrated circuit, or SLIC, for application in advanced phased array antenna systems. The SLIC combines radio-frequency (RF) microelectronics, digital and analog support circuitry, and photonic interfaces into a single micro-hybrid assembly. Together, these technologies provide not only the amplitude and phase control necessary for electronic beam steering in the phased array, but also add thermally-compensated automatic gain control, health and status feedback, bias regulation, and reduced interconnect complexity. All circuitry is integrated into a compact, multilayer structure configured for use as a two-by-four element phased array module, operating at 20 Gigahertz, using a Microwave High-Density Interconnect (MHDI) process. The resultant hardware is constructed without conventional wirebonds, maintains tight inter-element spacing, and leads toward low-cost mass production. The measured performances and development issues associated with both the two-by-four element module and the constituent elements are presented. Additionally, a section of the report describes alternative architectures and applications supported by the SLIC electronics. Test results show excellent yield and performance of RF circuitry and full automatic gain control for multiple, independent channels. Digital control function, while suffering from lower manufacturing yield, also proved successful.

  17. Terahertz real-time imaging uncooled array based on antenna- and cavity-coupled bolometers.

    PubMed

    Simoens, François; Meilhan, Jérôme

    2014-03-28

    The development of terahertz (THz) applications is slowed down by the availability of affordable, easy-to-use and highly sensitive detectors. CEA-Leti took up this challenge by tailoring the mature infrared (IR) bolometer technology for optimized THz sensing. The key feature of these detectors relies on the separation between electromagnetic absorption and the thermometer. For each pixel, specific structures of antennas and a resonant quarter-wavelength cavity couple efficiently the THz radiation on a broadband range, while a central silicon microbridge bolometer resistance is read out by a complementary metal oxide semiconductor circuit. 320×240 pixel arrays have been designed and manufactured: a better than 30 pW power direct detection threshold per pixel has been demonstrated in the 2-4 THz range. Such performance is expected on the whole THz range by proper tailoring of the antennas while keeping the technological stack largely unchanged. This paper gives an overview of the developed bolometer-based technology. First, it describes the technology and reports the latest performance characterizations. Then imaging demonstrations are presented, such as real-time reflectance imaging of a large surface of hidden objects and THz time-domain spectroscopy beam two-dimensional profiling. Finally, perspectives of camera integration for scientific and industrial applications are discussed. PMID:24567477

  18. Three-dimensional theoretical temperature distributions produced by 915 MHz dipole antenna arrays with varying insertion depths in muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Mechling, J A; Strohbehn, J W; Ryan, T P

    1992-01-01

    Interstitial microwave antenna array hyperthermia (IMAAH) systems are currently being used in the treatment of cancer. The insertion depth of an interstitial microwave antenna, defined as the length of the antenna from the tip to the point of insertion in tissue, affects its ability to produce uniform power deposition patterns in tumor volumes. The effect of varying insertion depths on the ability of an IMAAH system to heat two theoretical tumor models was examined. Four dipole microwave antennas were implanted in a 2 x 2 cm array and driven at 915 MHz in muscle tissue. The explicit power deposition patterns were calculated for each insertion depth using known theory. The bioheat transfer equation was solved for the 3-dimensional steady-state temperature distributions in cylindrical and ellipsoidal tumor models using a finite element method. Homogeneous and nonhomogeneous blood flow models were considered. As a basis of comparison of the various temperature distributions, the volume of tumor heated to greater than or equal to 43 degrees C was calculated. Under the conditions of this study, the insertion depth was shown to have a significant effect on the ability of an IMAAH system to heat the tumor volumes. A sharp decrease in the percentage of tumor volume heated to greater than or equal to 43 degrees C was seen for insertion depths between 7.8 and 14.6 cm. At an insertion depth of 11.7 cm (3/4 lambda) there was virtually no heating of the tumor. Regions of elevated power occurred outside of the desired treatment volume, stressing the importance of adequate thermometry techniques and demonstrating the need for hyperthermia treatment planning prior to implantation of an antenna array. Plots of the power deposition patterns and the corresponding temperatures produced in the diagonal plane of the antenna arrays are present. PMID:1727110

  19. ISAAC: Inflatable Satellite of an Antenna Array for Communications, volume 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lodgard, Deborah; Ashton, Patrick; Cho, Margaret; Codiana, Tom; Geith, Richard; Mayeda, Sharon; Nagel, Kirsten; Sze, Steven

    1988-01-01

    The results of a study to design an antenna array satellite using rigid inflatable structure (RIS) technology are presented. An inflatable satellite allows for a very large structure to be compacted for transportation in the Space Shuttle to the Space Station where it is assembled. The proposed structure resulting from this study is a communications satellite for two-way communications with many low-power stations on the ground. Total weight is 15,438 kilograms which is within the capabilities of the Space Shuttle. The satellite will have an equivalent aperture greater than 100 meters in diameter and will be operable in K and C band frequencies, with a total power requirement of 10,720 watts.

  20. APS-Workshop on Characterization of MMIC (Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit) Devices for Array Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smetana, Jerry (Editor); Mittra, Raj (Editor); Laprade, Nick; Edward, Bryan; Zaghloul, Amir

    1987-01-01

    The IEEE AP-S ADCOM is attempting to expand its educational, tutorial and information exchange activities as a further benefit to all members. To this end, ADCOM will be forming specialized workshops on topics of interest to its members. The first such workshop on Characterization and Packaging of MMIC Devices for Array Antennas was conceived. The workshop took place on June 13, 1986 as part of the 1986 International Symposium sponsored by IEEE AP-S and URSI in Philadelphia, PA, June 9-13, 1986. The workshop was formed to foster the interchange of ideas among MMIC device users and to provide a forum to collect and focus information among engineers experienced and interested in the topic. After brief presentations by the panelists and comments from attendees on several subtopics, the group was divided into working committees. Each committee evaluated and made recommendations on one of the subtopics.

  1. Dual frequency, dual polarized, multi-layered microstrip slot and dipole array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tulintseff, Ann N. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An antenna array system is disclosed which uses subarrays of slots and subarrays of dipoles on separate planes. The slots and dipoles respectively are interleaved, which is to say there is minimal overlap between them. Each subarray includes a microstrip transmission line and a plurality of elements extending perpendicular thereto. The dipoles form the transmission elements and the slots form the receive elements. The plane in which the slots are formed also forms a ground plane for the dipoles--hence the feed to the dipole is on the opposite side of this ground plane as the feed to the slots. HPAs are located adjacent the dipoles on one side of the substrate and LNAs are located adjacent the slots on the other side of the substrate. The dipoles and slots are tuned by setting different offsets between each element and the microstrip transmission line.

  2. Highly integrated synthesis of heterogeneous nanostructures on nanowire heater array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chun Yan; Yun, Jeonghoon; Kim, Jung; Yang, Daejong; Kim, Dong Hwan; Ahn, Jae Hyuk; Lee, Kwang-Cheol; Park, Inkyu

    2014-11-01

    We have proposed a new method for the multiplexed synthesis of heterogeneous nanostructures using a top-down fabricated nanowire heater array. Hydrothermally synthesized nanostructures can be grown only on the heated nanowire through nanoscale temperature control using a Joule heated nanowire. We have demonstrated the selective synthesis of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires and copper oxide (CuO) nanostructures, as well as their surface modification with noble metal nanoparticles, using a nanowire heater array. Furthermore, we could fabricate an array of heterogeneous nanostructures via Joule heating of individual nanowire heaters and changing of the precursor solutions in a sequential manner. We have formed a parallel array of palladium (Pd) coated ZnO nanowires and gold (Au) coated ZnO nanowires, as well as a parallel array of ZnO nanowires and CuO nanospikes, in the microscale region by using the developed method.We have proposed a new method for the multiplexed synthesis of heterogeneous nanostructures using a top-down fabricated nanowire heater array. Hydrothermally synthesized nanostructures can be grown only on the heated nanowire through nanoscale temperature control using a Joule heated nanowire. We have demonstrated the selective synthesis of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires and copper oxide (CuO) nanostructures, as well as their surface modification with noble metal nanoparticles, using a nanowire heater array. Furthermore, we could fabricate an array of heterogeneous nanostructures via Joule heating of individual nanowire heaters and changing of the precursor solutions in a sequential manner. We have formed a parallel array of palladium (Pd) coated ZnO nanowires and gold (Au) coated ZnO nanowires, as well as a parallel array of ZnO nanowires and CuO nanospikes, in the microscale region by using the developed method. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr04216f

  3. Recirculating photonic filter: a wavelength-selective time delay for optically controlled phased-array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yegnanarayanan, Siva; Trinh, Paul D.; Jalali, Bahram

    1996-11-01

    A wavelength-selective photonic time delay filter is proposed and demonstrated. The device consists of an optical phased-array waveguide grating in a recirculating feedback configuration. It can function as a true-time-delay generator for squint-free beam steering in optically- controlled phased-array antennas. As the photonic filter uses the optical carrier wavelength to select the desired time delay, a one-to-one map is established between the optical carrier wavelength and the desired antenna direction, thus eliminating complex switching networks required to select the appropriate delay line. The proposed device can also function as the encoder/decoder in wavelength-CDMA. The concept uses a waveguide prism in a symmetric feedback (recirculating) configuration. The modulated optical carrier is steered by the waveguide prism to the appropriate integrated delay line depending on the carrier wavelength. The signal is delayed and is fed back into the symmetric input port. The prism then focuses the delayed beam into the common output port. Thus three sequential operations are performed: (1) wavelength demultiplexing, (2) time delay, and (3) wavelength multiplexing. It is important to note that the recirculating photonic filter has no 1/N loss; all the power at a given wavelength is diffracted into the output port. Furthermore, high resolution (6 - 8 bits) can be obtained in a compact integrated device. A prototype regular recirculating photonic filter true-time delay device was realized using a 8-channel arrayed-waveguide grating demultiplexer and external (off-chip) fiber delay lines. The grating was fabricated in the silica waveguide technology with 0.8 nm channel spacing (FSR equals 6.4 nm) and operating in the 1.5 micrometers wavelength range. Light from an external cavity tunable laser was rf modulated at 10 - 40 MHz and was coupled into the arrayed waveguide grating chip and time/phase measurements were performed sing a digital oscilloscope. Feedback delay

  4. Formation of a sector dip in the radiation pattern of a phased-array antenna in the case of the suppression of broadband noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusevskii, V. I.

    1991-05-01

    The linear relationship between the width of the noise spectrum and the magnitude of the sector dip in the radiation pattern of a linear equidistant antenna array is extended to the case of linear and planar phased-array antennas with arbitrary amplitude-phase distribution and arbitrary boundary of the antenna aperture. The nonlinear phase distribution law in the antenna aperture (necessary for the formation of the dip) is synthesized using the method of aperture orthogonal polynomials and is shown to be optimal according to the criterion of minimum gain losses in the noise-suppression process.

  5. Combining the switched-beam and beam-steering capabilities in a 2-D phased array antenna system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yi-Che; Chen, Yin-Bing; Hwang, Ruey-Bing

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the development, fabrication, and measurement of a novel beam-forming system consisting of 16 subarray antennas, each containing four aperture-coupled patch antennas, and the application of this system in smart wireless communication systems. The beam patterns of each of the subarray antennas can be switched toward one of nine zones over a half space by adjusting the specific phase delay angles among the four antenna elements. Furthermore, when all subarrays are pointed at the same zone, slightly continuous beam steering in around 1° increments can be achieved by dynamically altering the progressive phase delay angle among the subarrays. Phase angle calibration was implemented by coupling each transmitter output and down converter into the in-phase/quadrature baseband to calculate the correction factor to the weight. In addition, to validate the proposed concepts and the fabricated 2-D phased array antenna system, this study measured the far-field radiation patterns of the aperture-coupled patch array integrated with feeding networks and a phase-calibration system to carefully verify its spatially switched-beam and beam-steering characteristics at a center frequency of 2.4 GHz which can cover the industrial, scientific, and medical band and some long-term evolution applications. In addition, measured results were compared with calculated results, and agreement between them was observed.

  6. Compact optical true time delay beamformer for a 2D phased array antenna using tunable dispersive elements.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xingwei; Zhang, Fangzheng; Pan, Shilong

    2016-09-01

    A hardware-compressive optical true time delay architecture for 2D beam steering in a planar phased array antenna is proposed using fiber-Bragg-grating-based tunable dispersive elements (TDEs). For an M×N array, the proposed system utilizes N TDEs and M wavelength-fixed optical carriers to control the time delays. Both azimuth and elevation beam steering are realized by programming the settings of the TDEs. An experiment is carried out to demonstrate the delay controlling in a 2×2 array, which is fed by a wideband pulsed signal. Radiation patterns calculated from the experimentally measured waveforms at the four antennas match well with the theoretical results. PMID:27607946

  7. Multifrequency synthesis using two coupled nonlinear oscillator arrays.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Antonio; Carretero-González, Ricardo; Longhini, Patrick; Renz, Norbert; In, Visarath; Kho, Andy; Neff, Joseph D; Meadows, Brian K; Bulsara, Adi R

    2005-08-01

    We illustrate a scheme that exploits the theory of symmetry-breaking bifurcations for generating a spatio-temporal pattern in which one of two interconnected arrays, each with N Van der Pol oscillators, oscillates at N times the frequency of the other. A bifurcation analysis demonstrates that this type of frequency generation cannot be realized without the mutual interaction between the two arrays. It is also demonstrated that the mechanism for generating these frequencies between the two arrays is different from that of a master-slave interaction, a synchronization effect, or that of subharmonic and ultraharmonic solutions generated by forced systems. This kind of frequency generation scheme can find applications in the developed field of nonlinear antenna and radar systems. PMID:16196688

  8. 2D array of cold-electron nanobolometers with double polarised cross-dipole antennas

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A novel concept of the two-dimensional (2D) array of cold-electron nanobolometers (CEB) with double polarised cross-dipole antennas is proposed for ultrasensitive multimode measurements. This concept provides a unique opportunity to simultaneously measure both components of an RF signal and to avoid complicated combinations of two schemes for each polarisation. The optimal concept of the CEB includes a superconductor-insulator-normal tunnel junction and an SN Andreev contact, which provides better performance. This concept allows for better matching with the junction gate field-effect transistor (JFET) readout, suppresses charging noise related to the Coulomb blockade due to the small area of tunnel junctions and decreases the volume of a normal absorber for further improvement of the noise performance. The reliability of a 2D array is considerably increased due to the parallel and series connections of many CEBs. Estimations of the CEB noise with JFET readout give an opportunity to realise a noise equivalent power (NEP) that is less than photon noise, specifically, NEP = 4 10−19 W/Hz1/2 at 7 THz for an optical power load of 0.02 fW. PMID:22512950

  9. Conceptual Design and Prototype Performance of Phased-array Antenna for EBWH/CD Experiments in QUEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idei, Hiroshi; Sakaguchi, Masatsugu; Nagata, Kazuya; Hanada, Kazuaki; Zushi, Hideki; Nakamura, Kazuo; Hasegawa, Makoto; Sato, Kohnosuke; Sakamoto, Mizuki; Kawasaki, Shoji; Nakashima, Hisatoshi; Higashijima, Aki

    Electron Bernstein Wave Heating and Current Drive (EBWH/CD) experiments have been conducted to sustain a spherical tokamak configuration in a steady state in QUEST. In the EBWH/CD experiments on QUEST, the O-X-B mode conversion scenario was selected for plasma current sustainment in rather low-density plasmas. A new phased-array antenna system was proposed to launch a pure elliptically-polarized O-mode in the oblique injection. The prototype antenna system was designed and its performance was checked at low power test facilities. Good focusing and steering properties were confirmed in the low power test.

  10. A multi-static ground-penetrating radar with an array of resistively loaded vee dipole antennas for landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kangwook; Gurbuz, Ali C.; Scott, Waymond R., Jr.; McClellan, James H.

    2005-06-01

    A multi-static ground-penetrating radar (GPR) has been developed to investigate the potential of multi-static inversion algorithms. The GPR consists of a linear array of six resistively-loaded vee dipoles (RVDs), a network analyzer, and a microwave switch matrix all under computer control. The antennas in the array are spaced 12cm apart so the spacing between the transmitter and the receiver pairs in the measurements are from 12cm to 96cm in 12cm increments. The size of the array is suitable for the landmine problem and scaled measurements of the buried structure problem. The RVD is chosen as an array element because it is very "clean" in that it has very little self clutter and a very low radar cross section to lessen the reflections between the ground and the antenna. The shape and the loading profile of the antenna are designed to decrease the reflection at the drive point of the antenna while increasing the forward gain. The antenna and balun are made in a module, which is mechanically reliable without significant performance degradation. The multi-static GPR operation is demonstrated on targets buried in clean sand and targets buried under the ground covered by rocks. The responses of the targets are measured by each transmitter-receiver pair. A synthetic aperture, multi-static GPR imaging algorithm is extended from conventional monostatic back-projection techniques and used to process the data. Initial images obtained from the multi-static data are clearer than those obtained from bistatic data.

  11. Nucleic acid arrays and methods of synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Sabanayagam, Chandran R.; Sano, Takeshi; Misasi, John; Hatch, Anson; Cantor, Charles

    2001-01-01

    The present invention generally relates to high density nucleic acid arrays and methods of synthesizing nucleic acid sequences on a solid surface. Specifically, the present invention contemplates the use of stabilized nucleic acid primer sequences immobilized on solid surfaces, and circular nucleic acid sequence templates combined with the use of isothermal rolling circle amplification to thereby increase nucleic acid sequence concentrations in a sample or on an array of nucleic acid sequences.

  12. A novel neural network for the synthesis of antennas and microwave devices.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Heriberto Jose; Thursby, Michael H; Ham, Fredric M

    2005-11-01

    A novel artificial neural network (SYNTHESIS-ANN) is presented, which has been designed for computationally intensive problems and applied to the optimization of antennas and microwave devices. The antenna example presented is optimized with respect to voltage standing-wave ratio, bandwidth, and frequency of operation. A simple microstrip transmission line problem is used to further describe the ANN effectiveness, in which microstrip line width is optimized with respect to line impedance. The ANNs exploit a unique number representation of input and output data in conjunction with a more standard neural network architecture. An ANN consisting of a heteroassociative memory provided a very efficient method of computing necessary geometrical values for the antenna when used in conjunction with a new randomization process. The number representation used provides significant insight into this new method of fault-tolerant computing. Further work is needed to evaluate the potential of this new paradigm. PMID:16342499

  13. Fully Printed High-Frequency Phased-Array Antenna on Flexible Substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yihong; Lu, Xuejun

    2010-01-01

    To address the issues of flexible electronics needed for surface-to-surface, surface-to-orbit, and back-to-Earth communications necessary for manned exploration of the Moon, Mars, and beyond, a room-temperature printing process has been developed to create active, phased-array antennas (PAAs) on a flexible Kapton substrate. Field effect transistors (FETs) based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs), with many unique physical properties, were successfully proven feasible for phased-array antenna systems. The carrier mobility of an individual CNT is estimated to be at least 100,000 sq cm/V(dot)s. The CNT network in solution has carrier mobility as high as 46,770 sq cm/V(dot)s, and has a large current-density carrying capacity of approx. 1,000 mA/sq cm , which corresponds to a high carrying power of over 2,000 mW/ sq cm. Such high carrier mobility, and large current carrying capacity, allows the achievement of high-speed (>100 GHz), high-power, flexible electronic circuits that can be monolithically integrated on NASA s active phasedarray antennas for various applications, such as pressurized rovers, pressurized habitats, and spacesuits, as well as for locating beacon towers for lunar surface navigation, which will likely be performed at S-band and attached to a mobile astronaut. A fully printed 2-bit 2-element phasedarray antenna (PAA) working at 5.6 GHz, incorporating the CNT FETs as phase shifters, is demonstrated. The PAA is printed out at room temperature on 100-mm thick Kapton substrate. Four CNT FETs are printed together with microstrip time delay lines to function as a 2-bit phase shifter. The FET switch exhibits a switching speed of 0.2 ns, and works well for a 5.6-GHz RF signal. The operating frequency is measured to be 5.6 GHz, versus the state-of-the-art flexible FET operating frequency of 52 MHz. The source-drain current density is measured to be over 1,000 mA/sq cm, while the conventional organic FETs, and single carbon nanotube-based FETs, are typically in the m

  14. Quadrature transmit array design using single-feed circularly polarized patch antenna for parallel transmission in MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yong; Yu, Baiying; Vigneron, Daniel B; Zhang, Xiaoliang

    2014-02-01

    Quadrature coils are often desired in MR applications because they can improve MR sensitivity and also reduce excitation power. In this work, we propose, for the first time, a quadrature array design strategy for parallel transmission at 298 MHz using single-feed circularly polarized (CP) patch antenna technique. Each array element is a nearly square ring microstrip antenna and is fed at a point on the diagonal of the antenna to generate quadrature magnetic fields. Compared with conventional quadrature coils, the single-feed structure is much simple and compact, making the quadrature coil array design practical. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the decoupling between elements is better than -35 dB for all the elements and the RF fields are homogeneous with deep penetration and quadrature behavior in the area of interest. Bloch equation simulation is also performed to simulate the excitation procedure by using an 8-element quadrature planar patch array to demonstrate its feasibility in parallel transmission at the ultrahigh field of 7 Tesla. PMID:24649430

  15. Quadrature transmit array design using single-feed circularly polarized patch antenna for parallel transmission in MR imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yong; Yu, Baiying; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2014-01-01

    Quadrature coils are often desired in MR applications because they can improve MR sensitivity and also reduce excitation power. In this work, we propose, for the first time, a quadrature array design strategy for parallel transmission at 298 MHz using single-feed circularly polarized (CP) patch antenna technique. Each array element is a nearly square ring microstrip antenna and is fed at a point on the diagonal of the antenna to generate quadrature magnetic fields. Compared with conventional quadrature coils, the single-feed structure is much simple and compact, making the quadrature coil array design practical. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the decoupling between elements is better than –35 dB for all the elements and the RF fields are homogeneous with deep penetration and quadrature behavior in the area of interest. Bloch equation simulation is also performed to simulate the excitation procedure by using an 8-element quadrature planar patch array to demonstrate its feasibility in parallel transmission at the ultrahigh field of 7 Tesla. PMID:24649430

  16. Ultra-Wideband Vivaldi Antenna Array for High Resolution Subsurface Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yedlin, M. J.; Cresp, A.; Pichot, C.; Aliferis, I.; Dauvignac, J.; Fortino, N.; Gaffet, S.

    2008-05-01

    Use of ultra-wideband electromagnetic waves to image the subsurface yields enhanced resolution, provided sources, antennas and recording equipment can be developed and calibrated over the complete bandwidth of interest. We present a demonstration of the latest microwave transmission and recording technology to obtain high-resolution images. Our transmitter and receiver electronics are embodied in the vector network analyzer (PNA series) from Agilent, an eight-port vector network analyzer that records amplitude and phase. The analyzer is connected through a microwave multiplexer and microwave switch to an 8 element, balanced, antipodal Vivaldi antenna array, which can transmit or receive data over a bandwidth from 1.3 to 20 GHz. The bandwidth of the integrated system is determined by the bandwidth of the microwave switch, from DC to 18GHz, which interfaces the multiplexer to the PNA. The capabilities of a microwave multiplexer are employed to collect multi-channel data, by using one channel for transmission and reception on all 8 channels. The demonstration of this integrated system will be focussed on scattering from a single conducting cylinder as well as two cylinders, a dielectric and conducting cylinder, spaced at different intervals. The increased bandwidth, over that obtained in conventional GPR recording will result in pulses that have little ringing, allowing the detection of deeper reflections and eliminating any post-processing distortions that arise from deconvolving the traditional oscillatory waveform. Although the demonstration will be presented in the GHz bandwidth, suitable for imaging over a length scale to 1m, this integrated system will scale to lower bandwidths and can operate from 100 MHz to 3 GHz, with a resultant penetration depth of 10 to 20 m depending on the subsurface properties. Given the electronic constraints of the switch and the PNA, this scaling is simply achieved by enlarging the Vivaldi antenna dimensions. The advantage of using

  17. Investigation of the SIW technology for low cost 60 GHz radio over fiber based array antenna units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makris, D.; Tsiakas, P.; Voudouris, K.; Thakur, M. P.; Mikroulis, S.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a Substrate Integrated Waveguide (SIW) based photonic antenna suitable for RoF applications is presented. The millimeter-wave design is based on a diplexer, two Chebyshev bandpass filters, one for uplink (61,7GHz to 62,7 GHz) and one for downlink (59,3 GHz to 60,3 GHz) and one common 8x8 Slot array antenna, integrated on the same substrate. E/M simulations of a fully integrated planar RF Front End provide very good results, both in diplexer and filters and in antenna characteristics. Finally, a consideration regarding transition requirements for integration with a coplanar waveguide (CPW) photodiode is being presented.

  18. Opposite-Phased V-slot Array Located on the Narrowwall of the Rectangular Waveguide Antenna with Flange Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jyoti, G.; Usha, K. K.; Vani, R. M.; Satnoor, S. K.; Mulgi, S. N.; Farida, Sara F.; Hunagund, P. V.

    2007-07-01

    In this study we present the opposite-phased V-slot array located on the narrowwall of the rectangular waveguide antenna (V-SANWRWGA) with flange technique. The designed antenna consists of 3-pairs of symmetric, opposite-phase V-slots grooved on the narrowwall of the rectangular waveguide. Further, the metallic flanges are specially designed and machined which can be easily fixed to the V-SANWRWGA with help of hinges. The characteristics like radiation pattern, beam width and gain are measured experimentally for the different flange angles. The experimental radiation pattern is explained on the basis of Moullin's theory. The theoretical and experimental results are found to be in good agreement. Details of antenna design are described and experimental results are discussed.

  19. Colloidal Synthesis of Nanopatch Antennas for Applications in Plasmonics and Nanophotonics

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Thang B.; Huang, Jiani; Mikkelsen, Maiken H.

    2016-01-01

    We present a method for colloidal synthesis of silver nanocubes and the use of these in combination with a smooth gold film, to fabricate plasmonic nanoscale patch antennas. This includes a detailed procedure for the fabrication of thin films with a well-controlled thickness over macroscopic areas using layer-by-layer deposition of polyelectrolyte polymers, namely poly(allylamine) hydrochloride (PAH) and polystyrene sulfonate (PSS). These polyelectrolyte spacer layers serve as a dielectric gap in between silver nanocubes and a gold film. By controlling the size of the nanocubes or the gap thickness, the plasmon resonance can be tuned from about 500 nm to 700 nm. Next, we demonstrate how to incorporate organic sulfo-cyanine5 carboxylic acid (Cy5) dye molecules into the dielectric polymer gap region of the nanopatch antennas. Finally, we show greatly enhanced fluorescence of the Cy5 dyes by spectrally matching the plasmon resonance with the excitation energy and the Cy5 absorption peak. The method presented here enables the fabrication of plasmonic nanopatch antennas with well-controlled dimensions utilizing colloidal synthesis and a layer-by-layer dip-coating process with the potential for low cost and large-scale production. These nanopatch antennas hold great promise for practical applications, for example in sensing, ultrafast optoelectronic devices and for high-efficiency photodetectors. PMID:27285421

  20. Colloidal Synthesis of Nanopatch Antennas for Applications in Plasmonics and Nanophotonics.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Thang B; Huang, Jiani; Mikkelsen, Maiken H

    2016-01-01

    We present a method for colloidal synthesis of silver nanocubes and the use of these in combination with a smooth gold film, to fabricate plasmonic nanoscale patch antennas. This includes a detailed procedure for the fabrication of thin films with a well-controlled thickness over macroscopic areas using layer-by-layer deposition of polyelectrolyte polymers, namely poly(allylamine) hydrochloride (PAH) and polystyrene sulfonate (PSS). These polyelectrolyte spacer layers serve as a dielectric gap in between silver nanocubes and a gold film. By controlling the size of the nanocubes or the gap thickness, the plasmon resonance can be tuned from about 500 nm to 700 nm. Next, we demonstrate how to incorporate organic sulfo-cyanine5 carboxylic acid (Cy5) dye molecules into the dielectric polymer gap region of the nanopatch antennas. Finally, we show greatly enhanced fluorescence of the Cy5 dyes by spectrally matching the plasmon resonance with the excitation energy and the Cy5 absorption peak. The method presented here enables the fabrication of plasmonic nanopatch antennas with well-controlled dimensions utilizing colloidal synthesis and a layer-by-layer dip-coating process with the potential for low cost and large-scale production. These nanopatch antennas hold great promise for practical applications, for example in sensing, ultrafast optoelectronic devices and for high-efficiency photodetectors. PMID:27285421

  1. Size reduction and radiation pattern shaping of multi-fed DCC slot antennas used in conformal microwave array hyperthermia applicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccarini, Paolo F.; Arunachalam, Kavitha; Martins, Carlos D.; Stauffer, Paul R.

    2009-02-01

    The use of conformal antenna array in the treatment of superficial diseases can significantly increase patient comfort while enhancing the local control of large treatment area with irregular shapes. Originally a regular square multi-fed slot antenna (Dual Concentric Conductor - DCC) was proposed as basic unit cell of the array. The square DCC works well when the outline of the treatment area is rectangular such as in the main chest or back area but is not suitable to outline diseases spreading along the armpit and neck area. In addition as the area of the patch increases, the overall power density decreases affecting the efficiency and thus the ability to deliver the necessary thermal dose with medium power amplifier (<50W). A large number of small efficient antennas is preferable as the disease is more accurately contoured and the lower power requirement for the amplifiers correlates with system reliability, durability, linearity and overall reduced cost. For such reason we developed a set of design rules for multi-fed slot antennas with irregular contours and we implemented a design that reduce the area while increasing the perimeter of the slot, thus increasing the antenna efficiency and the power density. The simulation performed with several commercial packages (Ansoft HFSS, Imst Empire, SemcadX and CST Microwave Studio) show that the size reducing method can be applied to several shapes and for different frequencies. The SAR measurements of several DCCs are performed using an in-house high resolution scanning system with tumor equivalent liquid phantom both at 915 MHz for superficial hyperthermia systems in US) and 433 MHz (Europe). The experimental results are compared with the expected theoretical predictions and both simulated and measured patterns of single antennas of various size and shapes are then summed in various combinations using Matlab to show possible treatment irregular contours of complex diseases. The local control is expected to

  2. Size reduction and radiation pattern shaping of multi-fed DCC slot antennas used in conformal microwave array hyperthermia applicators.

    PubMed

    Maccarini, Paolo F; Arunachalam, Kavitha; Martins, Carlos D; Stauffer, Paul R

    2009-02-23

    The use of conformal antenna array in the treatment of superficial diseases can significantly increase patient comfort while enhancing the local control of large treatment area with irregular shapes. Originally a regular square multi-fed slot antenna (Dual Concentric Conductor - DCC) was proposed as basic unit cell of the array. The square DCC works well when the outline of the treatment area is rectangular such as in the main chest or back area but is not suitable to outline diseases spreading along the armpit and neck area. In addition as the area of the patch increases, the overall power density decreases affecting the efficiency and thus the ability to deliver the necessary thermal dose with medium power amplifier (<50W). A large number of small efficient antennas is preferable as the disease is more accurately contoured and the lower power requirement for the amplifiers correlates with system reliability, durability, linearity and overall reduced cost. For such reason we developed a set of design rules for multi-fed slot antennas with irregular contours and we implemented a design that reduce the area while increasing the perimeter of the slot, thus increasing the antenna efficiency and the power density. The simulation performed with several commercial packages (Ansoft HFSS, Imst Empire, SemcadX and CST Microwave Studio) show that the size reducing method can be applied to several shapes and for different frequencies. The SAR measurements of several DCCs are performed using an in-house high resolution scanning system with tumor equivalent liquid phantom both at 915 MHz for superficial hyperthermia systems in US) and 433 MHz (Europe). The experimental results are compared with the expected theoretical predictions and both simulated and measured patterns of single antennas of various size and shapes are then summed in various combinations using Matlab to show possible treatment irregular contours of complex diseases. The local control is expected to

  3. Reliability-centered maintenance for ground-based large optical telescopes and radio antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchiori, G.; Formentin, F.; Rampini, F.

    2014-07-01

    In the last years, EIE GROUP has been more and more involved in large optical telescopes and radio antennas array projects. In this frame, the paper describes a fundamental aspect of the Logistic Support Analysis (LSA) process, that is the application of the Reliability-Centered Maintenance (RCM) methodology for the generation of maintenance plans for ground-based large optical telescopes and radio antennas arrays. This helps maintenance engineers to make sure that the telescopes continue to work properly, doing what their users require them to do in their present operating conditions. The main objective of the RCM process is to establish the complete maintenance regime, with the safe minimum required maintenance, carried out without any risk to personnel, telescope and subsystems. At the same time, a correct application of the RCM allows to increase the cost effectiveness, telescope uptime and items availability, and to provide greater understanding of the level of risk that the organization is managing. At the same time, engineers shall make a great effort since the initial phase of the project to obtain a telescope requiring easy maintenance activities and simple replacement of the major assemblies, taking special care on the accesses design and items location, implementation and design of special lifting equipment and handling devices for the heavy items. This maintenance engineering framework is based on seven points, which lead to the main steps of the RCM program. The initial steps of the RCM process consist of: system selection and data collection (MTBF, MTTR, etc.), definition of system boundaries and operating context, telescope description with the use of functional block diagrams, and the running of a FMECA to address the dominant causes of equipment failure and to lay down the Critical Items List. In the second part of the process the RCM logic is applied, which helps to determine the appropriate maintenance tasks for each identified failure mode. Once

  4. Development of the theory and algorithms for synthesis of reflector antenna systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliker, Vladimir

    1995-01-01

    The main objective of this work was research and development of the theory and constructive computational algorithms for synthesis of single and dual reflector antenna systems in geometrical optics approximation. During the contracting period a variety of new analytic techniques and computational algorithms have been developed. In particular, for single and dual reflector antenna systems conditions for solvability of the synthesis equations have been established. Numerical algorithms for computing surface data of the reflectors have been developed and successfully tested. In addition, efficient techniques have been developed for computing radiation patterns produced by reflections/refractions off surfaces with arbitrary geometry. These techniques can be used for geometrical optics analysis of complex geometric structures such as aircrafts. They can also be applied to determine effectively the aperture excitations required to produce specified fields at given observation points. The results have a variety of applications in military, civilian, and commercial sectors.

  5. Fabrication and characterization of a hybrid SOI 1×4 silicon-slot optical modulator array incorporating EO polymers for optical phased-array antenna applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Richard S.; Szep, Attila; Usechak, Nicholas G.; Chen, Antao; Sun, Haishan; Shi, Shouyuan; Abeysinghe, Don; You, Young-Hwan; Dalton, Larry R.

    2012-03-01

    Optical phased arrays are promising candidates for both RF signal processing and optical beam forming and steering. These platforms not only enable accurate electrically controlled beam steering at high frequencies but also have the potential to significantly improve the performance of future free-space optical communications systems. In this work we exploit recent advancements in both nano-scale hybrid silicon-slot waveguides and electro-optic (EO) polymers to demonstrate an integrated optical phased-array antenna. Specifically, we create a hybrid integrated "photonic circuit" that connects an array of optical phase modulators, fed by a common optical signal and a 1x4 splitter, to a compact optical waveguide diffraction array for optical beam steering applications. The fundamental characteristics of the resulting integrated optical beam former, including the optical insertion loss, driving voltage, and phase control from the waveguide aperture are summarized in this letter.

  6. A hybrid finite element method for scattering and radiation by microstrip patch antennas and arrays residing in a cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jian-Ming; Volakis, John L.

    1991-11-01

    A hybrid numerical technique is presented for a characterization of the scattering and radiation properties of microstrip patch antennas and arrays residing in a cavity recessed in a ground plane. The technique combines the finite-element and boundary integral methods to formulate a system for the solution of the fields at the aperture and those inside the cavity via the biconjugate gradient method in conjunction with the fast Fourier transform (FFT). By virtue of the finite-element method, the proposed technique is applicable to patch antennas and arrays residing on or embedded in a layered dielectric substrate and is also capable of treating various feed configurations and impedance loads. Several numerical results are presented, demonstrating the validity, efficiency, and capability of the technique.

  7. Enchanced interference cancellation and telemetry reception in multipath environments with a single paraboic dish antenna using a focal plane array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukai, Ryan (Inventor); Vilnrotter, Victor A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An Advanced Focal Plane Array ("AFPA") for parabolic dish antennas that exploits spatial diversity to achieve better channel equalization performance in the presence of multipath (better than temporal equalization alone), and which is capable of receiving from two or more sources within a field-of-view in the presence of multipath. The AFPA uses a focal plane array of receiving elements plus a spatio-temporal filter that keeps information on the adaptive FIR filter weights, relative amplitudes and phases of the incoming signals, and which employs an Interference Cancelling Constant Modulus Algorithm (IC-CMA) that resolves multiple telemetry streams simultaneously from the respective aero-nautical platforms. This data is sent to an angle estimator to calculate the target's angular position, and then on to Kalman filters FOR smoothing and time series prediction. The resulting velocity and acceleration estimates from the time series data are sent to an antenna control unit (ACU) to be used for pointing control.

  8. Nano slot-antenna array refractive index sensors: approaching the conventional theoretical limit of the figure of merit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eitan, Michal; Yifat, Yuval; Iluz, Zeev; Boag, Amir; Hanein, Yael; Scheuer, Jacob

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate a refractive index (RI) detection technique based on an array of nanometer scale slot-antennas milled in a thin gold layer using a single lithographic step. Our experimental Figures of merit (FOMs) of 140-210 in the telecom wavelength range approach the fundamental limit for standard propagating SPR sensors (~250). The underlying mechanism enabling such high FOMs is the combination of a narrowband resonance of the slot-antennas with degeneracy breaking of Wood's anomaly under slightly non-perpendicular illumination. In addition, we study the sensitivity of the thickness of the analyte layer. This concept can be easily tuned to any desired wavelength and RI range by modifying the slot dimensions and the array spacing, thus rendering it highly attractive for numerous sensing applications.

  9. A K-Band Linear Phased Array Antenna Based on Ba(0.60)Sr(0.40)TiO3 Thin Film Phase Shifters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, R.; Bernhard, J.; Washington, G.; VanKeuls, F.; Miranda, F.; Cannedy, C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes the development of a 23.675 GHz linear 16-element scanning phased array antenna based on thin ferroelectric film coupled microstripline phase shifters and microstrip patch radiators.

  10. Ultra-wideband 4 × 4 Phased Array Containing Exponentially Tapered Slot Antennas and a True-Time Delay Phase Shifter at UHF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, J.; Jung, M.; Bonney, J.; Caspary, R.; Schüür, J.; Schöbel, J.

    For angular scanning a true-time array is developed for UHF ultra-wideband (UWB) applications in time and/or frequency domain. It is based on a 4 × 4 array with antipodal exponentially tapered slot antennas (ETSA, Vivaldi) and a 3-bit phase shifter. Distances of antenna elements are designed to be compromise between gain, scanning angle, side/grating lobe levels. The uniform spaced and fed array maximizes the overall gain. After defining the antenna shape, corrugations are introduced to improve antenna matching and gain pattern. Nine equally spaced beam positions for a 90° scanning angle are induced by an optimized 3-bit phase shifter on high permittivity substrate, while 4 bits are usually needed. Parasitic resonances are avoided by using PIN diodes in single pole double throw configuration. All components and the complete array system are simulated and verified in frequency domain with good agreement. Adaptation to UWB pulses is possible.

  11. An array of antenna-coupled superconducting microbolometers for passive indoors real-time THz imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luukanen, A.; Grönberg, L.; Helistö, P.; Penttilä, J. S.; Seppä, H.; Sipola, H.; Dietlein, C. R.; Grossman, E. N.

    2006-05-01

    The temperature resolving power (NETD) of millimeter wave imagers based on InP HEMT MMIC radiometers is typically about 1 K (30 ms), but the MMIC technology is limited to operating frequencies below ~ 150 GHz. In this paper we report the first results from a pixel developed for an eight pixel sub-array of superconducting antenna-coupled microbolometers, a first step towards a real-time imaging system, with frequency coverage of 0.2 - 3.6 THz. These detectors have demonstrated video-rate NETDs in the millikelvin range, close to the fundamental photon noise limit, when operated at a bath temperature of ~ 4K. The detectors will be operated within a turn-key cryogen-free pulse tube refrigerator, which allows for continuous operation without the need for liquid cryogens. The outstanding frequency agility of bolometric detectors allows for multi-frequency imaging, which greatly enhances the discrimination of e.g. explosives against innoncuous items concealed underneath clothing.

  12. Design and analysis of low frequency strut-straddling feed arrays for EVLA reflector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harun, M.; Ellingson, S. W.

    2011-06-01

    A new feed system is designed for operation below 100 MHz. The only existing system on the EVLA operating below 100 MHz is the "4 m" (74 MHz) system which uses crossed half-wave dipoles located in front of the Cassegrain subreflector as the feed. However, the dipole feeds of this system introduce blockage, and a reduction in system sensitivity (estimated to be ˜6% at 1.4 GHz) is observed at higher frequency bands; hence the dipoles are removed most of the time. An alternative feed concept is therefore proposed in this paper. The proposed system appears to reduce sensitivity degradation at 1.4 GHz by 3% and thus might be permanently mounted. Moreover, the new system has sensitivity comparable to the existing system at frequencies below 100 MHz. The feed for this system consists of dipoles mounted between the adjacent struts of the reflector and is thus referred to as a strut-straddling feed array. This design and the analysis methodology used in this paper should be applicable in meeting the contiguous frequency coverage requirement (50-470 MHz) of the new low frequency system proposed for the EVLA. Also, it may be applied in the modification of other existing large reflector antennas for low frequency operation.

  13. Cantilever RF-MEMS for monolithic integration with phased array antennas on a PCB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Armenta, C. J.; Porter, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    This article presents the development and operation of a novel electrostatic metal-to-metal contact cantilever radio-frequency microelectromechanical system (RF-MEMS) switch for monolithic integration with microstrip phased array antennas (PAAs) on a printed circuit board. The switch is fabricated using simple photolithography techniques on a Rogers 4003c substrate, with a footprint of 200 µm × 100 µm, based on a 1 µm-thick copper cantilever. An alternative wet-etching technique for effectively releasing the cantilever is described. Electrostatic and electromagnetic measurements show that the RF-MEMS presents an actuation voltage of 90 V for metal-to-metal contact, an isolation of -8.7 dB, insertion loss of -2.5 dB and a return loss of -15 dB on a 50 Ω microstrip line at 12.5 GHz. For proof-of-concept, a beam-steering 2 × 2 microstrip PAA, based on two 1-bit phase shifters suitable for the monolithic integration of the RF-MEMS, has been designed and measured at 12.5 GHz. Measurements show that the beam-steering system presents effective radiation characteristics with scanning capabilities from broadside towards 29° in the H-plane.

  14. A Wearable Microwave Antenna Array for Time-Domain Breast Tumor Screening.

    PubMed

    Porter, Emily; Bahrami, Hadi; Santorelli, Adam; Gosselin, Benoit; Rusch, Leslie A; Popovic, Milica

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we present a clinical prototype with a wearable patient interface for microwave breast cancer detection. The long-term aim of the prototype is a breast health monitoring application. The system operates using multistatic time-domain pulsed radar, with 16 flexible antennas embedded into a bra. Unlike the previously reported, table-based prototype with a rigid cup-like holder, the wearable one requires no immersion medium and enables simple localization of breast surface. In comparison with the table-based prototype, the wearable one is also significantly more cost-effective and has a smaller footprint. To demonstrate the improved functionality of the wearable prototype, we here report the outcome of daily testing of the new, wearable prototype on a healthy volunteer over a 28-day period. The resulting data (both signals and reconstructed images) is compared to that obtained with our table-based prototype. We show that the use of the wearable prototype has improved the quality of collected volunteer data by every investigated measure. This work demonstrates the proof-of-concept for a wearable breast health monitoring array, which can be further optimized in the future for use with patients with various breast sizes and tissue densities. PMID:26780788

  15. Fast terahertz optoelectronic amplitude modulator based on plasmonic metamaterial antenna arrays and graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessop, David S.; Sol, Christian W. O.; Xiao, Long; Kindness, Stephen J.; Braeuninger-Weimer, Philipp; Lin, Hungyen; Griffiths, Jonathan P.; Ren, Yuan; Kamboj, Varun S.; Hofmann, Stephan; Zeitler, J. Axel; Beere, Harvey E.; Ritchie, David A.; Degl'Innocenti, Riccardo

    2016-02-01

    The growing interest in terahertz (THz) technologies in recent years has seen a wide range of demonstrated applications, spanning from security screening, non-destructive testing, gas sensing, to biomedical imaging and communication. Communication with THz radiation offers the advantage of much higher bandwidths than currently available, in an unallocated spectrum. For this to be realized, optoelectronic components capable of manipulating THz radiation at high speeds and high signal-to-noise ratios must be developed. In this work we demonstrate a room temperature frequency dependent optoelectronic amplitude modulator working at around 2 THz, which incorporates graphene as the tuning medium. The architecture of the modulator is an array of plasmonic dipole antennas surrounded by graphene. By electrostatically doping the graphene via a back gate electrode, the reflection characteristics of the modulator are modified. The modulator is electrically characterized to determine the graphene conductivity and optically characterization, by THz time-domain spectroscopy and a single-mode 2 THz quantum cascade laser, to determine the optical modulation depth and cut-off frequency. A maximum optical modulation depth of ~ 30% is estimated and is found to be most (least) sensitive when the electrical modulation is centered at the point of maximum (minimum) differential resistivity of the graphene. A 3 dB cut-off frequency > 5 MHz, limited only by the area of graphene on the device, is reported. The results agree well with theoretical calculations and numerical simulations, and demonstrate the first steps towards ultra-fast, graphene based THz optoelectronic devices.

  16. A methodological proposal for the development of an HPC-based antenna array scheduler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonvallet, Roberto; Hoffstadt, Arturo; Herrera, Diego; López, Daniela; Gregorio, Rodrigo; Almuna, Manuel; Hiriart, Rafael; Solar, Mauricio

    2010-07-01

    As new astronomy projects choose interferometry to improve angular resolution and to minimize costs, preparing and optimizing schedules for an antenna array becomes an increasingly critical task. This problem shares similarities with the job-shop problem, which is known to be a NP-hard problem, making a complete approach infeasible. In the case of ALMA, 18000 projects per season are expected, and the best schedule must be found in the order of minutes. The problem imposes severe difficulties: the large domain of observation projects to be taken into account; a complex objective function, composed of several abstract, environmental, and hardware constraints; the number of restrictions imposed and the dynamic nature of the problem, as weather is an ever-changing variable. A solution can benefit from the use of High-Performance Computing for the final implementation to be deployed, but also for the development process. Our research group proposes the use of both metaheuristic search and statistical learning algorithms, in order to create schedules in a reasonable time. How these techniques will be applied is yet to be determined as part of the ongoing research. Several algorithms need to be implemented, tested and evaluated by the team. This work presents the methodology proposed to lead the development of the scheduler. The basic functionality is encapsulated into software components implemented on parallel architectures. These components expose a domain-level interface to the researchers, enabling then to develop early prototypes for evaluating and comparing their proposed techniques.

  17. Graphene-based fine-tunable optical delay line for optical beamforming in phased-array antennas.

    PubMed

    Tatoli, Teresa; Conteduca, Donato; Dell'Olio, Francesco; Ciminelli, Caterina; Armenise, Mario N

    2016-06-01

    The design of an integrated graphene-based fine-tunable optical delay line on silicon nitride for optical beamforming in phased-array antennas is reported. A high value of the optical delay time (τg=920  ps) together with a compact footprint (4.15  mm2) and optical loss <27  dB make this device particularly suitable for highly efficient steering in active phased-array antennas. The delay line includes two graphene-based Mach-Zehnder interferometer switches and two vertically stacked microring resonators between which a graphene capacitor is placed. The tuning range is obtained by varying the value of the voltage applied to the graphene electrodes, which controls the optical path of the light propagation and therefore the delay time. The graphene provides a faster reconfigurable time and low values of energy dissipation. Such significant advantages, together with a negligible beam-squint effect, allow us to overcome the limitations of conventional RF beamformers. A highly efficient fine-tunable optical delay line for the beamsteering of 20 radiating elements up to ±20° in the azimuth direction of a tile in a phased-array antenna of an X-band synthetic aperture radar has been designed. PMID:27411185

  18. Antenna-coupled TES bolometers used in BICEP2, Keck Array, and SPIDER

    SciTech Connect

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aikin, R. W.; Amiri, M.; Barkats, D.; Benton, S. J.; Bischoff, C. A.; Bock, J. J.; Bonetti, J. A.; Brevik, J. A.; Buder, I.; Bullock, E.; Chattopadhyay, G.; Davis, G.; Day, P. K.; Dowell, C. D.; Duband, L.; Filippini, J. P.; Fliescher, S.; Golwala, S. R.; Halpern, M.; Hasselfield, M.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hilton, G. C.; Hristov, V.; Hui, H.; Irwin, K. D.; Jones, W. C.; Karkare, K. S.; Kaufman, J. P.; Keating, B. G.; Kefeli, S.; Kernasovskiy, S. A.; Kovac, J. M.; Kuo, C. L.; LeDuc, H. G.; Leitch, E. M.; Llombart, N.; Lueker, M.; Mason, P.; Megerian, K.; Moncelsi, L.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nguyen, H. T.; O’Brient, R.; IV, R. W. Ogburn; Orlando, A.; Pryke, C.; Rahlin, A. S.; Reintsema, C. D.; Richter, S.; Runyan, M. C.; Schwarz, R.; Sheehy, C. D.; Staniszewski, Z. K.; Sudiwala, R. V.; Teply, G. P.; Tolan, J. E.; Trangsrud, A.; Tucker, R. S.; Turner, A. D.; Vieregg, A. G.; Weber, A.; Wiebe, D. V.; Wilson, P.; Wong, C. L.; Yoon, K. W.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2015-10-20

    We have developed antenna-coupled transition-edge sensor bolometers for a wide range of cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarimetry experiments, including Bicep2, Keck Array, and the balloon borne Spider. These detectors have reached maturity and this paper reports on their design principles, overall performance, and key challenges associated with design and production. Our detector arrays repeatedly produce spectral bands with 20%–30% bandwidth at 95, 150, or 230 GHz. The integrated antenna arrays synthesize symmetric co-aligned beams with controlled side-lobe levels. Cross-polarized response on boresight is typically $\\sim 0.5\\%$, consistent with cross-talk in our multiplexed readout system. End-to-end optical efficiencies in our cameras are routinely 35% or higher, with per detector sensitivities of NET ~ 300 $\\mu {{\\rm{K}}}_{\\mathrm{CMB}}\\sqrt{{\\rm{s}}}$. Thanks to the scalability of this design, we have deployed 2560 detectors as 1280 matched pairs in Keck Array with a combined instantaneous sensitivity of $\\sim 9\\;\\mu {{\\rm{K}}}_{\\mathrm{CMB}}\\sqrt{{\\rm{s}}}$, as measured directly from CMB maps in the 2013 season. Furthermore, similar arrays have recently flown in the Spider instrument, and development of this technology is ongoing.

  19. Experimental results for a photonic time reversal processor for the adaptive control of an ultra wideband phased array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zmuda, Henry; Fanto, Michael; McEwen, Thomas

    2008-04-01

    This paper describes a new concept for a photonic implementation of a time reversed RF antenna array beamforming system. The process does not require analog to digital conversion to implement and is therefore particularly suited for high bandwidth applications. Significantly, propagation distortion due to atmospheric effects, clutter, etc. is automatically accounted for with the time reversal process. The approach utilizes the reflection of an initial interrogation signal from off an extended target to precisely time match the radiating elements of the array so as to re-radiate signals precisely back to the target's location. The backscattered signal(s) from the desired location is captured by each antenna and used to modulate a pulsed laser. An electrooptic switch acts as a time gate to eliminate any unwanted signals such as those reflected from other targets whose range is different from that of the desired location resulting in a spatial null at that location. A chromatic dispersion processor is used to extract the exact array parameters of the received signal location. Hence, other than an approximate knowledge of the steering direction needed only to approximately establish the time gating, no knowledge of the target position is required, and hence no knowledge of the array element time delay is required. Target motion and/or array element jitter is automatically accounted for. Presented here are experimental results that demonstrate the ability of a photonic processor to perform the time-reversal operation on ultra-short electronic pulses.

  20. System and method for controlling the phase of an antenna array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conroy, Bruce (Inventor); Hoppe, Daniel (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A system and method for controlling power transferred to an aircraft. The system includes a master antenna and a plurality of slave antennas on the ground. Each slave antenna transmits an uplink signal of a unique phase modulated frequency. The master antenna transmits a master uplink signal. The aircraft receives all the uplink signals and modulates a composite of those signals to produce a downlink beacon that has multiple phase components, each of which corresponds to one of the slave antennas and has a unique frequency. Each of the slave antennas receives the downlink beacon and uses the corresponding phase component to adjust the phase of the slave uplink signal relative to the master uplink signal.

  1. Estimating movement and survival rates of a small saltwater fish using autonomous antenna receiver arrays and passive integrated transponder tags

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rudershausen, Paul J.; Buckel, Jeffery A.; Dubreuil, Todd; O'Donnell, Matthew J.; Hightower, Joseph E.; Poland, Steven J.; Letcher, Benjamin H.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of small (12.5 mm long) passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags and custom detection antennas for obtaining fine-scale movement and demographic data of mummichog Fundulus heteroclitus in a salt marsh creek. Apparent survival and detection probability were estimated using a Cormack Jolly Seber (CJS) model fitted to detection data collected by an array of 3 vertical antennas from November 2010 to March 2011 and by a single horizontal antenna from April to August 2011. Movement of mummichogs was monitored during the period when the array of vertical antennas was used. Antenna performance was examined in situ using tags placed in wooden dowels (drones) and in live mummichogs. Of the 44 tagged fish, 42 were resighted over the 9 mo monitoring period. The in situ detection probabilities of the drone and live mummichogs were high (~80-100%) when the ambient water depth was less than ~0.8 m. Upstream and downstream movement of mummichogs was related to hourly water depth and direction of tidal current in a way that maximized time periods over which mummichogs utilized the intertidal vegetated marsh. Apparent survival was lower during periods of colder water temperatures in December 2010 and early January 2011 (median estimate of daily apparent survival = 0.979) than during other periods of the study (median estimate of daily apparent survival = 0.992). During late fall and winter, temperature had a positive effect on the CJS detection probability of a tagged mummichog, likely due to greater fish activity over warmer periods. During the spring and summer, this pattern reversed possibly due to mummichogs having reduced activity during the hottest periods. This study demonstrates the utility of PIT tags and continuously operating autonomous detection systems for tracking fish at fine temporal scales, and improving estimates of demographic parameters in salt marsh creeks that are difficult or impractical to sample with active fishing gear.

  2. L-Band Transmit/Receive Module for Phase-Stable Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andricos, Constantine; Edelstein, Wendy; Krimskiy, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) has been shown to provide very sensitive measurements of surface deformation and displacement on the order of 1 cm. Future systematic measurements of surface deformation will require this capability over very large areas (300 km) from space. To achieve these required accuracies, these spaceborne sensors must exhibit low temporal decorrelation and be temporally stable systems. An L-band (24-cmwavelength) InSAR instrument using an electronically steerable radar antenna is suited to meet these needs. In order to achieve the 1-cm displacement accuracy, the phased array antenna requires phase-stable transmit/receive (T/R) modules. The T/R module operates at L-band (1.24 GHz) and has less than 1- deg absolute phase stability and less than 0.1-dB absolute amplitude stability over temperature. The T/R module is also high power (30 W) and power efficient (60-percent overall efficiency). The design is currently implemented using discrete components and surface mount technology. The basic T/R module architecture is augmented with a calibration loop to compensate for temperature variations, component variations, and path loss variations as a function of beam settings. The calibration circuit consists of an amplitude and phase detector, and other control circuitry, to compare the measured gain and phase to a reference signal and uses this signal to control a precision analog phase shifter and analog attenuator. An architecture was developed to allow for the module to be bidirectional, to operate in both transmit and receive mode. The architecture also includes a power detector used to maintain a transmitter power output constant within 0.1 dB. The use of a simple, stable, low-cost, and high-accuracy gain and phase detector made by Analog Devices (AD8302), combined with a very-high efficiency T/R module, is novel. While a self-calibrating T/R module capability has been sought for years, a practical and cost-effective solution has

  3. The analysis of complex antenna structures (like the ITER array) using TOPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggiora, R.; Milanesio, D.; Lancellotti, V.; Meneghini, O.; Vecchi, G.

    2007-09-01

    TOPICA (Torino Polytechnic Ion Cyclotron Antenna) code is an innovative tool for the 3D/1D simulation of Ion Cyclotron Radio Frequency (ICRF) antennas, i.e. accounting for realistic 3D antenna geometries and for accurate 1D plasma models. The tool calculates the antenna input parameters at the feeding ports given the exact port excitation. Moreover, it calculates the current distribution and electric field maps wherever specified. The recent upgraded parallelized version of TOPICA permits the analysis of large and complex antenna structures in a reasonable simulation time (less than one day). A detailed analysis of the performances of two ITER ICRF antenna geometries has been carried out, underlining the strong dependence and the asymmetries of the antenna input parameters due to plasma conditions. An optimization of the antenna dimensions has also been accomplished. Electric current distribution on conductors in the vacuum region and electric field distribution in the vacuum region and at the interface with plasma edge have been calculated as well. The analysis shows the strong capabilities of the parallelized TOPICA code as a predictive tool and its usefulness to ICRF antennas final design.

  4. A compact cylindrical-shape microstrip structure with cloaking properties for mutual coupling reduction in array antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naqvi, Syed Aftab

    A cylindrical-shaped microstrip structure with cloaking properties is presented as a shielding device to reduce the mutual coupling between two patch antennas. The surface comprises of a number of 2-port microstrip (2-PM) elements printed on individual substrates and, to enclose a particular region, several 2-PM elements are interconnected into a cylindrical shape. Each 2-PM element has the capability of coupling an incident EM field on the surface to the adjacent interconnected elements. Then, because the 2-PM elements are connected into a cylindrical shape, the incident EM field is re-radiated from the other interconnected 2-PM elements in a direction away from the transmitter; achieving a behavior similar to a cloak. The prototypes in this dissertation illustrates that this surface has the additional benefit of overcoming many of the manufacturing difficulties of traditional cloaks because microstrip structures are used. To demonstrate this concept, a cylindrical surface operating at 3.89 GHz and a frequency reconfigurable surface (consisting of 2-port frequency reconfigurable microstrip elements (2-PFRM)) operating at 3.68 GHz and 3.89 GHz is simulated in HFSS, manufactured and measured in a full anechoic chamber. Moreover, as an application, the cylindrical surface operating at 3.89 GHz is used to reduce the mutual coupling between two patch antennas operating simultaneously at 3.89 GHz. The radiation pattern and the gain of a 2-element array is measured to demonstrate the negligible effects of a cylindrical surface on the far field antenna array parameters. Simulation and measurement results are in good agreement and validate the proposed EM cloak-based surface for applications such as antenna array shielding, radar cross section and communications in complex EM environments.

  5. The Rectangular Waveguide Board Wall Slot Array Antenna Integrated with One Dimensional Subwavelength Periodic Corrugated Grooves and Artificially Soft Surface Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Cheng; Zhao, Zeyu; Luo, Xiangang

    2009-04-01

    In this letter, we propose a high gain rectangular waveguide board wall slot array antenna, which is integrated with one dimensional subwavelength periodic corrugated grooves and artificially soft surface structure. The corresponding far field radiation characteristics are investigated. The simulation results show that the gain of planar 2 × 8 slot array antenna with the introduction of corrugated grooves structure is increased to 26.1 dB, and half power beamwidth in the E plane is considerably reduced. Compared with the subwavelength periodic grooves slits array antenna proposed by Huang et al.[Appl. Phys. Lett. 91, 143512 (2007)], the side and back lobe level of this antenna are also significantly reduced by 6 dB and 10 dB, respectively. The physical mechanism for radiation-pattern improvement has been well explained by the modulation of surface wave, the reradiation of surface energy, and suppression of surplus surface wave at the grounded edge.

  6. Three-dimensional confocal imaging for breast cancer detection using CMOS Gaussian monocycle pulse transmitter and 4 × 4 ultra wideband antenna array with impedance matching layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugitani, Takumi; Kubota, Shinichi; Hafiz, Mohiuddin; Xiao, Xia; Kikkawa, Takamaro

    2014-01-01

    A time-domain reflectometry breast cancer detection system was developed, which was composed of a Gaussian monocycle pulse (GMP) transmitter circuit fabricated by complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) 65 nm technology and an ultra wide-band (UWB) planar slot antenna array. The center frequency and bandwidth of the antenna were 6 and 9.2 GHz, respectively. The GMP train having the pulse width of 160 ps was generated by the 65 nm CMOS logic circuit with a core area of 0.0017 mm2 and was emitted by the 4 × 4 planar slot antenna array. The fabricated planar 4 × 4 antenna array with the matching layer could resolve the two separate 5 × 5 × 5 mm3 breast tumor phantoms, which were located at the depth of 22 mm with the spacing of 8 mm.

  7. Effects of Antenna Beam Chromaticity on Redshifted 21 cm Power Spectrum and Implications for Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Parsons, Aaron R.; DeBoer, David R.; Bowman, Judd D.; Ewall-Wice, Aaron M.; Neben, Abraham R.; Patra, Nipanjana

    2016-07-01

    Unaccounted for systematics from foregrounds and instruments can severely limit the sensitivity of current experiments from detecting redshifted 21 cm signals from the Epoch of Reionization (EoR). Upcoming experiments are faced with a challenge to deliver more collecting area per antenna element without degrading the data with systematics. This paper and its companions show that dishes are viable for achieving this balance using the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) as an example. Here, we specifically identify spectral systematics associated with the antenna power pattern as a significant detriment to all EoR experiments which causes the already bright foreground power to leak well beyond ideal limits and contaminate the otherwise clean EoR signal modes. A primary source of this chromaticity is reflections in the antenna-feed assembly and between structures in neighboring antennas. Using precise foreground simulations taking wide-field effects into account, we provide a generic framework to set cosmologically motivated design specifications on these reflections to prevent further EoR signal degradation. We show that HERA will not be impeded by such spectral systematics and demonstrate that even in a conservative scenario that does not perform removal of foregrounds, HERA will detect the EoR signal in line-of-sight k-modes, {k}\\parallel ≳ 0.2 h Mpc‑1, with high significance. Under these conditions, all baselines in a 19-element HERA layout are capable of detecting EoR over a substantial observing window on the sky.

  8. Collaboration on Modeling of Ion Bernstein Wave Antenna Array and Coupling to Plasma on Tokamak Fusion Text Reactor. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Intrator, T.

    2000-06-01

    This proposal was peer reviewed and funded as a Collaboration on ''Low Phase Speed Radio Frequency Current Drive Experiments at the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor''. The original plans we had were to carry out the collaboration proposal by including a post doctoral scientist stationed at PPPL. In response to a 60+% funding cut, all expenses were radically pruned. The post doctoral position was eliminated, and the Principal Investigator (T. Intrator) carried out the brunt of the collaboration. Visits to TFTR enabled T. Intrator to set up access to the TFTR computing network, database, and get familiar with the new antennas that were being installed in TFTR during an up to air. One unfortunate result of the budget squeeze that TFTR felt for its last year of operation was that the experiments that we specifically got funded to perform were not granted run time on TFTR., On the other hand we carried out some modeling of the electric field structure around the four strap direct launch Ion Bernstein Wave (IBW) antenna that was operated on TFTR. This turned out to be a useful exercise and shed some light on the operational characteristics of the IBW antenna and its coupling to the plasma. Because of this turn of events, the project was renamed ''Modeling of Ion Bernstein Wave Antenna Array and Coupling to Plasma on Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor''.

  9. Demonstration and Evaluation of the Ka-Band Array Feed Compensation System on the 70-Meter Antenna at DSS 14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilnrotter, V.; Fort, D.

    1999-07-01

    This article documents the results of experiments designed to verify the gravity-compensation and tracking performance of a novel seven-channel 32-GHz (Ka-band) array feed compensation system (AFCS) for the DSN's 70-m antennas. The AFCS (along with other proposed compensation systems) was installed on the spare holography cone that was placed temporarily on the 70-m antenna in place of the X-band K-band radar (XKR) cone, which has been removed for repairs. These experiments took place from November 1998 through February 1999 and consisted of both quasar and spacecraft observations. Compensation performance was characterized in terms of both antenna-efficiency improvement and total signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gain, while simultaneous-tracking capability was demonstrated by means of a least-squares tracking algorithm. A combined system consisting of the AFCS together with a deformable flat plate (DFP), designed to refocus divergent rays back in the array, also was examined briefly at low elevations. The results indicate that a properly designed real-time compensation system regains most of the SNR lost to deformations at low elevations and has the potential for similar improvements at high elevations, although this remains to be demonstrated.

  10. Properties of single wall carbon nanotubes array antennas in the optical regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaofang; Jiang, Yuesong; Hua, Houqiang

    2014-11-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) can be metallic, depending on their chirality. For their nanoscale geometric dimension, SWCNTs can be used as antennas to convert high-frequency electromagnetic radiation such as optical radiation into localized energy and vice versa. However, at optical frequencies, traditional antenna design theory fails for metals behave as strongly coupled plasmas. As a matter of fact, an optical antenna responds to a shorter effective wavelength which depends on the material properties and geometric parameters. In this letter, we derived the relationship of effective wavelength with the wavelength of incident radiation for SWCNTs optical antenna, assuming that the SWCNTs can be described by a free electron gas according to the Drude model. SWCNTs optical antenna holds great promise for increasing solar energy conversion efficiency.

  11. Novel 60 GHz CPW array antennas with beam-forming features for indoor wireless over fiber networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petropoulos, Ioannis; Mikroulis, Spiros; Bogris, Adonis; Simos, Hercules; Voudouris, Kostantinos

    2013-01-01

    In this study two types of coplanar waveguide (CPW) array antennas are designed and analyzed for use in a 60GHz Radio over Fiber indoor network. The first one is based on high permittivity Rogers 6010 and Indium Phosphide (InP) substrates incorporating slots as radiating elements. The second one utilizes stacked geometry based on the above substrates. Both arrays present more 1 GHz bandwidth and 10dBi gain. Furthermore they can provide beam-forming operation by properly adjusting the signal's amplitude and phase. A Least Mean Square (LMS) algorithm is generated for this purpose and the radiation pattern is steered accordingly. At last, a photodiode is simulated using equivalent circuit and is adopted with the proposed arrays, and an optical beam forming scenario is discussed.

  12. Antenna-coupled microbolometer based uncooled 2D array and camera for 2D real-time terahertz imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoens, F.; Meilhan, J.; Gidon, S.; Lasfargues, G.; Lalanne Dera, J.; Ouvrier-Buffet, J. L.; Pocas, S.; Rabaud, W.; Guellec, F.; Dupont, B.; Martin, S.; Simon, A. C.

    2013-09-01

    CEA-Leti has developed a monolithic large focal plane array bolometric technology optimized for 2D real-time imaging in the terahertz range. Each pixel consists in a silicon microbolometer coupled to specific antennas and a resonant quarter-wavelength cavity. First prototypes of imaging arrays have been designed and manufactured for optimized sensing in the 1-3.5THz range where THz quantum cascade lasers are delivering high optical power. NEP in the order of 1 pW/sqrt(Hz) has been assessed at 2.5 THz. This paper reports the steps of this development, starting from the pixel level, to an array associated monolithically to its CMOS ROIC and finally a stand-alone camera. For each step, modeling, technological prototyping and experimental characterizations are presented.

  13. Cell-free protein synthesis in microfluidic array devices.

    PubMed

    Mei, Qian; Fredrickson, Carl K; Simon, Andrew; Khnouf, Ruba; Fan, Z Hugh

    2007-01-01

    We report the development of a microfluidic array device for continuous-exchange, cell-free protein synthesis. The advantages of protein expression in the microfluidic array include (1) the potential to achieve high-throughput protein expression, matching the throughput of gene discovery; (2) more than 2 orders of magnitude reduction in reagent consumption, decreasing the cost of protein synthesis; and (3) the possibility to integrate with detection for rapid protein analysis, eliminating the need to harvest proteins. The device consists of an array of units, and each unit can be used for production of an individual protein. The unit comprises a tray chamber for in vitro protein expression and a well chamber as a nutrient reservoir. The tray is nested in the well, and they are separated by a dialysis membrane and connected through a microfluidic connection that provides a means to supply nutrients and remove the reaction byproducts. The device is demonstrated by synthesis of green fluorescent protein, chloramphenicol acetyl-transferase, and luciferase. Protein expression in the device lasts 5-10 times longer and the production yield is 13-22 times higher than in a microcentrifuge tube. In addition, we studied the effects of the operation temperature and hydrostatic flow on the protein production yield. PMID:17924644

  14. Effect of Two Different Superstrate Layers On Bismuth Titanate (BiT) Array Antennas

    PubMed Central

    Wee, F. H.; Malek, F.; Al-Amani, A. U.; Ghani, Farid

    2014-01-01

    The microwave industry has shown increasing interest in electronic ceramic material (ECM) due to its advantages, such as light weight, low cost, low loss, and high dielectric strength. In this paper, simple antennas covered by superstrate layers for 2.30 GHz to 2.50 GHz are proposed. The antennas are compact and have the capability of producing high performance in terms of gain, directivity, and radiation efficiency. Bismuth titanate with high dielectric constant of 21, was utilized as the ECM, while the superstrate layers chosen included a split ring resonator and dielectric material. The superstrate layers were designed for some improvement in the performance of directivity, gain, and return loss. The proposed antennas were simulated and fabricated. The results obtained were small antennas that possess high gain and high directivity with 360°, omni-directional signal transmission that resonant types of conventional dipole antenna cannot achieve. The gain of the antenna with the superstrate layer was enhanced by about 1 dBi over the antenna without a superstrate layer at 2.40 GHz. PMID:24424254

  15. Effect of two different superstrate layers on bismuth titanate (BiT) array antennas.

    PubMed

    Wee, F H; Malek, F; Al-Amani, A U; Ghani, Farid

    2014-01-01

    The microwave industry has shown increasing interest in electronic ceramic material (ECM) due to its advantages, such as light weight, low cost, low loss, and high dielectric strength. In this paper, simple antennas covered by superstrate layers for 2.30 GHz to 2.50 GHz are proposed. The antennas are compact and have the capability of producing high performance in terms of gain, directivity, and radiation efficiency. Bismuth titanate with high dielectric constant of 21, was utilized as the ECM, while the superstrate layers chosen included a split ring resonator and dielectric material. The superstrate layers were designed for some improvement in the performance of directivity, gain, and return loss. The proposed antennas were simulated and fabricated. The results obtained were small antennas that possess high gain and high directivity with 360°, omni-directional signal transmission that resonant types of conventional dipole antenna cannot achieve. The gain of the antenna with the superstrate layer was enhanced by about 1 dBi over the antenna without a superstrate layer at 2.40 GHz. PMID:24424254

  16. Method and apparatus for synthesis of arrays of DNA probes

    DOEpatents

    Cerrina, Francesco; Sussman, Michael R.; Blattner, Frederick R.; Singh-Gasson, Sangeet; Green, Roland

    2002-04-23

    The synthesis of arrays of DNA probes sequences, polypeptides, and the like is carried out using a patterning process on an active surface of a substrate. An image is projected onto the active surface of the substrate utilizing an image former that includes a light source that provides light to a micromirror device comprising an array of electronically addressable micromirrors, each of which can be selectively tilted between one of at least two positions. Projection optics receives the light reflected from the micromirrors along an optical axis and precisely images the micromirrors onto the active surface of the substrate, which may be used to activate the surface of the substrate. The first level of bases may then be applied to the substrate, followed by development steps, and subsequent exposure of the substrate utilizing a different pattern of micromirrors, with further repeats until the elements of a two dimensional array on the substrate surface have an appropriate base bound thereto. The micromirror array can be controlled in conjunction with a DNA synthesizer supplying appropriate reagents to a flow cell containing the active substrate to control the sequencing of images presented by the micromirror array in coordination of the reagents provided to the substrate.

  17. A Fast MoM Solver (GIFFT) for Large Arrays of Microstrip and Cavity-Backed Antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Fasenfest, B J; Capolino, F; Wilton, D

    2005-02-02

    A straightforward numerical analysis of large arrays of arbitrary contour (and possibly missing elements) requires large memory storage and long computation times. Several techniques are currently under development to reduce this cost. One such technique is the GIFFT (Green's function interpolation and FFT) method discussed here that belongs to the class of fast solvers for large structures. This method uses a modification of the standard AIM approach [1] that takes into account the reusability properties of matrices that arise from identical array elements. If the array consists of planar conducting bodies, the array elements are meshed using standard subdomain basis functions, such as the RWG basis. The Green's function is then projected onto a sparse regular grid of separable interpolating polynomials. This grid can then be used in a 2D or 3D FFT to accelerate the matrix-vector product used in an iterative solver [2]. The method has been proven to greatly reduce solve time by speeding up the matrix-vector product computation. The GIFFT approach also reduces fill time and memory requirements, since only the near element interactions need to be calculated exactly. The present work extends GIFFT to layered material Green's functions and multiregion interactions via slots in ground planes. In addition, a preconditioner is implemented to greatly reduce the number of iterations required for a solution. The general scheme of the GIFFT method is reported in [2]; this contribution is limited to presenting new results for array antennas made of slot-excited patches and cavity-backed patch antennas.

  18. Bit-error-rate testing of fiber optic data links for MMIC-based phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shalkhauser, K. A.; Kunath, R. R.; Daryoush, A. S.

    1990-01-01

    The measured bit-error-rate (BER) performance of a fiber optic data link to be used in satellite communications systems is presented and discussed. In the testing, the link was measured for its ability to carry high burst rate, serial-minimum shift keyed (SMSK) digital data similar to those used in actual space communications systems. The fiber optic data link, as part of a dual-segment injection-locked RF fiber optic link system, offers a means to distribute these signals to the many radiating elements of a phased array antenna. Test procedures, experimental arrangements, and test results are presented.

  19. Recent advances in electromagnetic synthesis and analysis of dual-shaped reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galindo-Israel, V.; Rahmat-Samii, Y.; Imbriale, W.; Mittra, R.

    1982-01-01

    Dual-shaped reflectors have been used for many years. Thus, these reflectors have been used as high gain antennas on Voyagers 1 and 2. The objectives of the geometrical optics (GO) dual shaped synthesis are considered. Concerning the synthesis of dual shaped reflectors, it has been shown for circular symmetric reflectors that an exact GO solution can be found to the problem of transforming, by two reflections, any feed pattern into any aperture distribution. This problem involves solving two simultaneous nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The same approach for offset geometry leads to two simultaneous nonlinear partial differential equations. It is shown that these equations could also be integrated numerically, except that in general these equations are not total and therefore, in general, they do not have a 'smooth' solution. It is further shown that the offset partial differentials often very nearly form a total differential in many cases of practical importance.

  20. Measurement of the Mutual Coherence Function of an Incoherent Infrared Field with a Gold Nano-wire Dipole Antenna Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middlebrook, Christopher; Roggemann, Michael; Boreman, Glenn; Subotic, Nikola; Cooper, Kyle; Buller, William; Yang, Weidong; Alda, Javier

    2008-02-01

    The first direct measurement of the mutual coherence function of a spatially incoherent infrared beam was performed at 10.6 μm using a pair of infrared dipole nano-wire antennas that were connected to a common bolometer in the center of the pair by short lengths of coplanar strip transmission line. A spatially incoherent source was constructed by dithering a BaF2 diffuser near the focus of a CO2 laser beam. The distance from the diffuser to the nano-wire antenna pair was held constant while the distance from the focus of the laser beam to the diffuser was varied to control the effective diameter of the source. The measured bolometer signal was proportional to the magnitude of the mutual coherence function at the plane of the antennas. The experimental results were found to match the predicted performance closely. If this technology can be extended to large arrays, a form of synthetic aperture optical imaging based on the Van Cittert-Zernike theorem is possible, similar to that performed at microwave frequencies now by astronomers. This has the potential to greatly increase the angular resolution attainable with optical instruments.