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Sample records for antenna bacteriochlorophyll aggregates

  1. Femtosecond probe of structural analogies between chlorosomes and bacteriochlorophyll c aggregates.

    PubMed Central

    Savikhin, S; van Noort, P I; Blankenship, R E; Struve, W S

    1995-01-01

    Bacteriochlorophyll c pigments extracted from light harvesting chlorosomes in green photosynthetic bacteria are known to self-assemble into aggregates whose electronic spectroscopy resembles that of intact chlorosomes. Femtosecond optical experiments reveal that the chlorosomes and their reconstituted aggregates exhibit closely analogous internal energy transfer kinetics and exciton state evolution. These comparisons furnish compelling new evidence that proteins do not exert a major local role in the BChl c antenna pigment organization of intact chlorosomes. PMID:8519963

  2. Optical spectroscopy of a highly fluorescent aggregate of bacteriochlorophyll c

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Causgrove, T. P.; Cheng, P.; Brune, D. C.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1993-01-01

    Bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) c and a similar model compound, Mg-methyl bacteriopheophorbide d, form several types of aggregates in nonpolar solvents. One of these aggregates is highly fluorescent, with a quantum yield higher than that of the monomer. This aggregate is also unusual in that it shows a rise time in its fluorescence emission decay at certain wavelengths, which is ascribed to a change in conformation of the aggregate. An analysis of fluorescence depolarization data is consistent with either a linear aggregate of four or five monomers or preferably a cyclic arrangement of three dimers.

  3. Low-temperature spectroscopy of bacteriochlorophyll c aggregates.

    PubMed

    Paleček, David; Dědic, Roman; Alster, Jan; Hála, Jan

    2014-03-01

    Chlorosomes from green photosynthetic bacteria belong to the most effective light-harvesting antennas found in nature. Quinones incorporated in bacterichlorophyll (BChl) c aggregates inside chlorosomes play an important redox-dependent photo-protection role against oxidative damage of bacterial reaction centers. Artificial BChl c aggregates with and without quinones were prepared. We applied hole-burning spectroscopy and steady-state absorption and emission techniques at 1.9 K and two different redox potentials to investigate the role of quinones and redox potential on BChl c aggregates at low temperatures. We show that quinones quench the excitation energy in a similar manner as at room temperature, yet the quenching process is not as efficient as for chlorosomes. Interestingly, our data suggest that excitation quenching partially proceeds from higher excitonic states competing with ultrafast exciton relaxation. Moreover, we obtained structure-related parameters such as reorganization energies and inhomogeneous broadening of the lowest excited state, providing experimental ground for theoretical studies aiming at designing plausible large-scale model for BChl c aggregates including disorder. PMID:24318566

  4. Energy transfer in aggregates of bacteriochlorophyll c self-assembled with azulene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Matěnová, Martina; Lorelei Horhoiu, Viviana; Dang, Florian-Xuan; Pospíšil, Petr; Alster, Jan; Burda, Jaroslav V; Balaban, Teodor Silviu; Pšenčík, Jakub

    2014-08-21

    Bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) c is the main light-harvesting pigment of certain photosynthetic bacteria. It is found in the form of self-assembled aggregates in the so-called chlorosomes. Here we report the results of co-aggregation experiments of BChl c with azulene and its tailored derivatives. We have performed spectroscopic and quantum chemical characterization of the azulenes, followed by self-assembly experiments. The results show that only azulenes with sufficient hydrophobicity are able to induce aggregation of BChl c. Interestingly, only azulene derivatives possessing a conjugated phenyl ring were capable of efficient (∼50%) excitation energy transfer to BChl molecules. These aggregates represent an artificial light-harvesting complex with enhanced absorption between 220 and 350 nm compared to aggregates of pure BChl c. The results provide insight into the principles of self-assembly of BChl aggregates and suggest an important role of the π-π interactions in efficient energy transfer. PMID:24999619

  5. Theoretical prediction of spectral and optical properties of bacteriochlorophylls in thermally disordered LH2 antenna complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janosi, Lorant; Kosztin, Ioan; Damjanović, Ana

    2006-07-01

    A general approach for calculating spectral and optical properties of pigment-protein complexes of known atomic structure is presented. The method, that combines molecular dynamics simulations, quantum chemistry calculations, and statistical mechanical modeling, is demonstrated by calculating the absorption and circular dichroism spectra of the B800-B850 bacteriochlorophylls of the LH2 antenna complex from Rs. molischianum at room temperature. The calculated spectra are found to be in good agreement with the available experimental results. The calculations reveal that the broadening of the B800 band is mainly caused by the interactions with the polar protein environment, while the broadening of the B850 band is due to the excitonic interactions. Since it contains no fitting parameters, in principle, the proposed method can be used to predict optical spectra of arbitrary pigment-protein complexes of known structure.

  6. Self-assembly and energy transfer in artificial light-harvesting complexes of bacteriochlorophyll c with astaxanthin.

    PubMed

    Alster, J; Polívka, T; Arellano, J B; Hříbek, P; Vácha, F; Hála, J; Pšenčík, J

    2012-03-01

    Chlorosomes, the light-harvesting antennae of green photosynthetic bacteria, are based on large aggregates of bacteriochlorophyll molecules. Aggregates with similar properties to those in chlorosomes can also be prepared in vitro. Several agents were shown to induce aggregation of bacteriochlorophyll c in aqueous environments, including certain lipids, carotenes, and quinones. A key distinguishing feature of bacteriochlorophyll c aggregates, both in vitro and in chlorosomes, is a large (>60 nm) red shift of their Q(y) absorption band compared with that of the monomers. In this study, we investigate the self-assembly of bacteriochlorophyll c with the xanthophyll astaxanthin, which leads to the formation of a new type of complexes. Our results indicate that, due to its specific structure, astaxanthin molecules competes with bacteriochlorophylls for the bonds involved in the aggregation, thus preventing the formation of any significant red shift compared with pure bacteriochlorophyll c in aqueous buffer. A strong interaction between both the types of pigments in the developed assemblies, is manifested by a rather efficient (~40%) excitation energy transfer from astaxanthin to bacteriochlorophyll c, as revealed by fluorescence excitation spectroscopy. Results of transient absorption spectroscopy show that the energy transfer is very fast (<500 fs) and proceeds through the S(2) state of astaxanthin. PMID:21833799

  7. Hexanol-induced order-disorder transitions in lamellar self-assembling aggregates of bacteriochlorophyll c in Chlorobium tepidum chlorosomes.

    PubMed

    Arellano, Juan B; Torkkeli, Mika; Tuma, Roman; Laurinmäki, Pasi; Melø, Thor B; Ikonen, Teemu P; Butcher, Sarah J; Serimaa, Ritva E; Psencík, Jakub

    2008-03-01

    Chlorosomes are light-harvesting complexes of green photosynthetic bacteria. Chlorosomes contain bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) c, d, or e aggregates that exhibit strong excitonic coupling. The short-range order, which is responsible for the coupling, has been proposed to be augmented by pigment arrangement into undulated lamellar structures with spacing between 2 and 3 nm. Treatment of chlorosomes with hexanol reversibly converts the aggregated chlorosome chlorophylls into a form with spectral properties very similar to that of the monomer. Although this transition has been extensively studied, the structural basis remains unclear due to variability in the obtained morphologies. Here we investigated hexanol-induced structural changes in the lamellar organization of BChl c in chlorosomes from Chlorobium tepidum by a combination of X-ray scattering, electron cryomicroscopy, and optical spectroscopy. At a low hexanol/pigment ratio, the lamellae persisted in the presence of hexanol while the short-range order and exciton interactions between chlorin rings were effectively eliminated, producing a monomer-like absorption. The result suggested that hexanol hydroxyls solvated the chlorin rings while the aliphatic tail partitioned into the hydrophobic part of the lamellar structure. This partitioning extended the chlorosome along its long axis. Further increase of the hexanol/pigment ratio produced round pigment-hexanol droplets, which lost all lamellar order. After hexanol removal the spectral properties were restored. In the samples treated under the high hexanol/pigment ratio, lamellae reassembled in small domains after hexanol removal while the shape and long-range order were irreversibly lost. Thus, all the interactions required for establishing the short-range order by self-assembly are provided by BChl c molecules alone. However, the long-range order and overall shape are imposed by an external structure, e.g., the proteinaceous chlorosome baseplate. PMID:18197717

  8. The structure of the aggregate form of bacteriochlorophyll c showing the Q y absorption above 740 nm: a 1H-NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Matsuura, Katsumi; Shimada, Keizo; Koyama, Yasushi

    1996-09-01

    Bacteriochlorophyll c (3 1S, 8-isobutyl-12-ethyl, farnesyl) was dissolved in a mixture of methylene chloride and carbon tetrachloride (1 : 3), and changes in the 1H-NMR spectrum caused by the titration of methanol were traced. On the basis of the changes in chemical shift due to the ring-current effect of the neighboring macrocycles and in peak intensity (broadening) due to their stacking, the structure of the aggregate form showing the Q y absorption band above 740 nm is proposed: the macrocycles are stacked to form a one-dimensional inclined column, the y axis of each macrocycle being parallel to the long axis of the column.

  9. Effect of carotenoids and monogalactosyl diglyceride on bacteriochlorophyll c aggregates in aqueous buffer: implications for the self-assembly of chlorosomes.

    PubMed

    Klinger, Pavel; Arellano, Juan B; Vácha, Frantisek; Hála, Jan; Psencík, Jakub

    2004-01-01

    Aggregation of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) c from chlorosomes, the main light-harvesting complex of green bacteria, has been studied in aqueous buffer. Unlike other chlorophyll-like molecules, BChl c is rather soluble in aqueous buffer, forming dimers. When BChl c is mixed with carotenoids (Car), the BChl c Qy transition is further redshifted, in respect to that of monomers and dimers. The results suggest that Car are incorporated in the aggregates and induce further aggregation of BChl c. The redshift of the BChl c Qy band is proportional to the Car concentration. In contrast, the mixture of bacteriochlorophyllide (BChlide) c, which lacks the nonpolar esterifying alcohol, does not form aggregates with Car in aqueous buffer or nonpolar solvents. Instead, the position of the BChlide c Qy transition remains unshifted in respect to that of the monomeric molecule, and Car precipitates with the course of time in aqueous buffer. Similar effects on both BChl c and BChlide c are also observed when monogalactosyl diglyceride (MGDG), which forms the monolayer envelope of chlorosomes, is used instead of (or together with) Car. The results show that the hydrophobic interactions of the BChl c esterifying alcohols with themselves and the nonpolar carbon skeleton of Car, or the fatty acid tails of MGDG, are essential driving forces for BChl aggregation in chlorosomes. PMID:15623345

  10. Scrambled self-assembly of bacteriochlorophylls c and e in aqueous Triton X-100 micelles.

    PubMed

    Saga, Yoshitaka; Saiki, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Naoya; Shibata, Yutaka; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) e was coassembled with BChl c in Triton X-100 micelles in aqueous solutions. The Qy absorption bands of the coaggregates were positioned between those of aggregates consisting solely of BChl c or e. The electronic absorption spectra of the coaggregates could not be reproduced by linear combinations of the spectra of the aggregates consisting solely of each pigment, but they were in line with the simulated spectra for the self-aggregates in which both BChls were randomly distributed. These suggest that BChls c and e are not spatially separated; they are homogenously distributed over the self-aggregates to give electronic spectra that are different from those of the aggregate consisting solely of each pigment. Deaggregation of the scrambled self-aggregates by excess Triton X-100 did not produce any spectral components assigned to an aggregate consisting solely of either BChl c or e. Acid-induced decomposition of the scrambled aggregates showed different kinetics from those of the aggregates consisting solely of each pigment. These also support the homogeneous distribution of BChls c and e in the scrambled self-aggregates. These results will be useful to investigate the major light-harvesting antenna systems of green photosynthetic bacteria that contain two kinds of chlorosomal BChls. PMID:24308290

  11. Exciton dynamics in circular aggregates: application to antenna of photosynthetic purple bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Novoderezhkin, V I; Razjivin, A P

    1995-01-01

    A theoretical model of exciton dynamics in circular molecular aggregates of light-harvesting bacteriochlorophyll of photosynthetic bacteria is proposed. The spectra and anisotropy of photoinduced absorption changes in the femto- and picosecond time domain are under its scope. The excited state of aggregate was treated due to the standard exciton theory, taking into account a pigment inhomogeneity. Dephasing processes via the exciton-phonon interactions were described by means of the Haken-Strobl equation. It was shown that only two exciton levels are dipole-allowed in the case of homogeneous circular aggregate. The pigment inhomogeneity results in the appearance of several weak transitions to higher exciton levels. It was proposed that the minor band (B896) in an absorption spectrum of the B875 complex as well as the similar minor band in spectra of B800-850 complex correspond to electron transition from the ground to the lowest exciton level, whereas the major band corresponds to transition to the higher exciton level. The proposed model shows the subpicosecond decay of anisotropy at the short-wavelength side of absorption band and a high degree of anisotropy at the long-wavelength side, even at high temperatures. PMID:7756528

  12. A seventh bacterial chlorophyll driving a large light-harvesting antenna

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Jiro; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Tsukatani, Yusuke; Noguchi, Masato; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of new chlorophyllous pigments would provide greater understanding of the mechanisms and evolution of photosynthesis. Bacteriochlorophyll f has never been observed in nature, although this name was proposed ~40 years ago based on structurally related compounds. We constructed a bacteriochlorophyll f–accumulating mutant of the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum limnaeum, which originally produced bacteriochlorophyll e, by knocking out the bchU gene encoding C-20 methyltransferase based on natural transformation. This novel pigment self-aggregates in an in vivo light-harvesting antenna, the chlorosome, and exhibits a Qy peak of 705 nm, more blue-shifted than any other chlorosome reported so far; the peak overlaps the maximum (~700 nm) of the solar photon flux spectrum. Bacteriochlorophyll f chlorosomes can transfer light energy from core aggregated pigments to another bacteriochlorophyll in the chlorosomal envelope across an energy gap of ~100 nm, and is thus a promising material for development of new bioenergy applications. PMID:22993696

  13. Ultrafast exciton relaxation in the B850 antenna complex of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, V.; Alden, R. G.; Williams, J. C.; Parson, W. W.

    1996-01-01

    Spectral changes were measured with femtosecond resolution following low-intensity, broad-band excitation of the peripheral antenna complex of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Absorption anisotropy decays also were measured. We identified a 35-fs relaxation of the absorption and emission spectra of the excited state, as well as a 20-fs anisotropy decay. We interpret these results as interlevel relaxation and dephasing, respectively, of extensively delocalized exciton states of the circular bacteriochlorophyll aggregate. PMID:8943011

  14. Structure of Light-Harvesting Aggregates in Individual Chlorosomes.

    PubMed

    Günther, Lisa M; Jendrny, Marc; Bloemsma, Erik A; Tank, Marcus; Oostergetel, Gert T; Bryant, Donald A; Knoester, Jasper; Köhler, Jürgen

    2016-06-23

    Among all photosynthetic organisms, green bacteria have evolved one of the most efficient light-harvesting antenna, the chlorosome, that contains hundreds of thousands of bacteriochlorophyll molecules, allowing these bacteria to grow photosynthetically by absorbing only a few photons per bacteriochlorophyll molecule per day. In contrast to other photosynthetic light-harvesting antenna systems, for which a protein scaffold imposes the proper positioning of the chromophores with respect to each other, in chlorosomes, this is accomplished solely by self-assembly. This has aroused enormous interest in the structure-function relations of these assemblies, as they can serve as blueprints for artificial light harvesting systems. In spite of these efforts, conclusive structural information is not available yet, reflecting the sample heterogeneity inherent to the natural system. Here we combine mutagenesis, polarization-resolved single-particle fluorescence-excitation spectroscopy, cryo-electron microscopy, and theoretical modeling to study the chlorosomes of the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum. We demonstrate that only the combination of these techniques yields unambiguous information on the structure of the bacteriochlorophyll aggregates within the chlorosomes. Moreover, we provide a quantitative estimate of the curvature variation of these aggregates that explains ongoing debates concerning the chlorosome structure. PMID:27240572

  15. Circular dichroism study on the diastereoselective self-assembly of bacteriochlorophyll cs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaban, Teodor S.; Holzwarth, Alfred R.; Schaffner, Kurt

    1995-04-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) spectra of self-assembled bacteriochlorophyll cs (BChl cs) aggregates show a pronounced dependency on the solvent, the concentration and on the stereochemistry of the 3 1-hydroxy groups. In n-hexane a psi-type CD is obtained due to the formation of nanostructural aggregates.

  16. In vitro synthesis and characterization of bacteriochlorophyll-f and its absence in bacteriochlorophyll-e producing organisms.

    PubMed

    Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Komada, Jun; Kunieda, Michio; Fukai, Kazuhiro; Yoshitomi, Taichi; Harada, Jiro; Mizoguchi, Tadashi

    2011-02-01

    Bacteriochlorophyll(BChl)-f which has not yet been found in natural phototrophs was prepared by chemically modifying chlorophyll-b. The retention time of reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography of the synthetic monomeric BChl-f as well as its visible absorption and fluorescence emission spectra in a solution were identified and compared with other naturally occurring chlorophyll pigments obtained from the main light-harvesting antenna systems of green sulfur bacteria, BChls-c/d/e. Based on the above data, BChl-f was below the level of detection in three strains of green photosynthetic bacteria producing BChl-e. PMID:21161597

  17. Conformational and environmental effects on bacteriochlorophyll optical spectra: Correlations of calculated spectra with structural results

    SciTech Connect

    Gudowska-Nowak, E.; Newton, M.D.; Fajer, J. )

    1990-07-26

    Recent structural data for porphyrins and (bacterio)chlorophylls have demonstrated the skeletal flexibility of the chromophores. Experimental redox and optical results for puckered porphyrins have also established that such conformational variations can affect the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals of the chromophores and thereby modulate their light-absorption properties. The concept is applied to the bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl) antenna protein complex from Prosthecochloris aestuarii, whose structure has been solved by x-ray diffraction. INDO/s calculations, based on the crystallographic data for the seven individual BChls that comprise the antenna complex, yield absorption maxima that reflect the observed conformational variations and clearly establish that skeletal differences can influence the optical properties of the chromophores. Additional effects due to axial ligands, substituent orientations, and neighboring residues are also assessed.

  18. Mechanism of energy transfer from carotenoids to bacteriochlorophyll : light-harvesting by carotenoids having different extents of {pi}-electron conjugation incorporated into the B850 antenna complex from the carotenoidless bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26.1.

    SciTech Connect

    Desamero, R. Z. B.; Chynwat, V.; van der Hoef, I.; Jansen, F. J.; Lugtenburg, J.; Gosztola, D.; Wasielewski, M. R.; Cua, A.; Bocian, D. F.; Frank, H. A.; Univ. of Connecticut; Leiden Univ.; Northwestern Univ.; Univ. of California; Univ. of connecticut

    1998-10-15

    Spheroidene and a series of spheroidene analogues with extents of p-electron conjugation ranging from 7 to 13 carbon-carbon double bonds were incorporated into the B850 light-harvesting complex of Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26.1. The structures and spectroscopic properties of the carotenoids and the dynamics of energy transfer from the carotenoid to bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) in the B850 complex were studied by using steady-state absorption, fluorescence, fluorescence excitation, resonance Raman, and time-resolved absorption spectroscopy. The spheroidene analogues used in this study were 5',6'-dihydro-7',8'-didehydrospheroidene, 7',8'-didehydrospheroidene, and 1',2'-dihydro-3',4',7',8'-tetradehydrospheroidene. These data, taken together with results from 3,4,7,8-tetrahydrospheroidene, 3,4,5,6-tetrahydrospheroidene, 3,4-dihydrospheroidene, and spheroidene already published (Frank, H. A.; Farhoosh, R.; Aldema, M. L.; DeCoster, B.; Christensen, R. L.; Gebhard, R.; Lugtenburg, J. Photochem. Photobiol. 1993, 57, 49. Farhoosh, R.; Chynwat, V.; Gebhard, R.; Lugtenburg, J.; Frank, H. A. Photosynth. Res. 1994, 42, 157), provide a systematic series of molecules for understanding the molecular features that determine the mechanism of energy transfer from carotenoids to BChl in photosynthetic bacterial light-harvesting complexes. The data support the hypothesis that only carotenoids having 10 or less carbon-carbon double bonds transfer energy via their 21Ag (S1) states to BChl to any significant degree. Energy transfer via the 11Bu (S2) state of the carotenoid becomes more important than the S1 route as the number of conjugated carbon-carbon double bonds increases. The results also suggest that the S2 state associated with the Qx transition of the B850 BChl is the most likely acceptor state for energy transfer originating from both the 2{sup 1}A{sub g} (S{sub 1}) and 1{sup 1}B{sub u} (S{sub 2}) states of all carotenoids.

  19. Exciton Theory for Supramolecular Chlorosomal Aggregates: 1. Aggregate Size Dependence of the Linear Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Prokhorenko, V. I.; Steensgaard, D. B.; Holzwarth, A. R.

    2003-01-01

    The interior of chlorosomes of green bacteria forms an unusual antenna system organized without proteins. The steady-spectra (absorption, circular dichroism, and linear dichroism) have been modeled using the Frenkel Hamiltonian for the large tubular aggregates of bacteriochlorophylls with geometries corresponding to those proposed for Chloroflexus aurantiacus and Chlorobium tepidum chlorosomes. For the Cf. aurantiacus aggregates we apply a structure used previously (V. I. Prokhorenko., D. B. Steensgaard, and A. R. Holzwarth, Biophys. J. 2000, 79:2105–2120), whereas for the Cb. tepidum aggregates a new extended model of double-tube aggregates, based on recently published solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance studies (B.-J. van Rossum, B. Y. van Duhl, D. B. Steensgaard, T. S. Balaban, A. R. Holzwarth, K. Schaffner, and H. J. M. de Groot, Biochemistry 2001, 40:1587–1595), is developed. We find that the circular dichroism spectra depend strongly on the aggregate length for both types of chlorosomes. Their shape changes from “type-II” (negative at short wavelengths to positive at long wavelengths) to the “mixed-type” (negative-positive-negative) in the nomenclature proposed in K. Griebenow, A. R. Holzwarth, F. van Mourik, and R. van Grondelle, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1991, 1058:194–202, for an aggregate length of 30–40 bacteriochlorophyll molecules per stack. This “size effect” on the circular dichroism spectra is caused by appearance of macroscopic chirality due to circular distribution of the transition dipole moment of the monomers. We visualize these distributions, and also the corresponding Frenkel excitons, using a novel presentation technique. The observed size effects provide a key to explain many previously puzzling and seemingly contradictory experimental data in the literature on the circular and linear dichroism spectra of seemingly identical types of chlorosomes. PMID:14581217

  20. Antennae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Atlas Image mosaic, covering 7' x 7' on the sky of the interacting galaxies NGC 4038 and NGC 4039, better known as the Antennae, or Ring Tail galaxies. The two galaxies are engaged in a tug-of-war as they collide. The mutual gravitation between them is working to distort each spiral galaxy's appearance as the two merge. The interaction is evidently impetus for an intense burst of new star formation, as can be seen from the many infrared-bright knots and bright galactic nuclei. Compare the 2MASS view of this system with that obtained by the Hubble Space Telescope in the optical. Many of the same features are seen, although 2MASS is able to peer through much of the dust seen in the galaxies' disks. The galaxy light looks smoother. Also, in the near-infrared the bright knots of star formation are likely highlighted by the light of massive red supergiant stars. The much more extended 'tidal tails,' which give the Antennae their name, are quite faint in the 2MASS image mosaic.

  1. Self-assembly of [Et,Et]-bacteriochlorophyll cF on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite revealed by scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Möltgen, H; Kleinermanns, K; Jesorka, A; Schaffner, K; Holzwarth, A R

    2002-06-01

    The chlorosomal light-harvesting antennae of green phototrophic bacteria consist of large supramolecular aggregates of bacteriochlorophyll c (BChl c). The supramolecular structure of (3(1)-R/S)-BChl c on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has been investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). On MoS2, we observed single BChl c molecules, dimers or tetramers, depending on the polarity of the solvent. On HOPG, we observed extensive self-assembly of the dimers and tetramers. We propose C=O...H-O...Mg bonding networks for the observed dimer chains, in agreement with former ultraviolet-visible and infrared spectroscopic work. The BChl c moieties in the tetramers are probably linked by four C=O...H-O hydrogen bonds to form a circle and further stabilized by Mg...O-H bondings to underlying BChl c layers. The tetramers form highly ordered, distinct chains and extended two-dimensional networks. We investigated semisynthetic chlorins for comparison by STM but observed that only BChl c self-assembles to well-structured large aggregates on HOPG. The results on the synthetic chlorins support our structure proposition. PMID:12081324

  2. Regioisomerically controlled self-aggregation of zinc 3-hydroxymethyl-13-formyl-chlorin/porphyrin and their 3,13-inverted pigments.

    PubMed

    Kunieda, Michio; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2007-03-30

    Zinc 3-hydroxymethyl-13-formyl-chlorin, 1, and its 3,13-inverted (3-formyl-13-hydroxymethyl) regioisomer, 2, and their corresponding 17,18-dehydrogenated porphyrins, 3 and 4, were synthesized for models of natural bacteriochlorophylls-c/d/e possessing 3(1)-OH and 13-C=O groups which self-aggregate in main light-harvesting antenna systems of green photosynthetic bacteria. Zinc chlorins 1 and 2 were monomers in neat THF and gave an obvious difference in their visible absorption spectra, indicating that sole inversion of the 3- and 13-substituents in a chlorin chromophore controlled their optical properties. In an aqueous Triton X-100 solution (a nonionic surfactant), zinc 3(1)-OH-13-CHO-chlorin 1 and porphyrin 3 self-aggregated as do natural bacteriochlorophylls, while zinc 3-CHO-13(1)-OH chlorin 2 and porphyrin 4 (the 3,13-inverted regioisomers of 1 and 3) hardly formed such large oligomers, showing that the inversion of the peripheral 3,13-substituents made their oligomerization unfavorable. FT-IR spectra of aggregated 1-4 in the solid film and their molecular modeling calculations suggested that the 17(2)-C=O moiety in inverted 2/4 interacted with its own 13(1)-OH group to disturb further aggregation. PMID:17338568

  3. Multireference Excitation Energies for Bacteriochlorophylls A within Light Harvesting System 2.

    PubMed

    Anda, André; Hansen, Thorsten; De Vico, Luca

    2016-03-01

    Light-harvesting system 2 (LH2) of purple bacteria is one of the most popular antenna complexes used to study Nature's way of collecting and channeling solar energy. The dynamics of the absorbed energy is probed by ultrafast spectroscopy. Simulation of these experiments relies on fitting a range of parameters to reproduce the spectra. Here, we present a method that can determine key parameters to chemical accuracy. These will eliminate free variables in the modeling, thus reducing the problem. Using MS-RASPT2/RASSCF calculations, we compute excitation energies and transition dipole moments of all bacteriochlorophylls in LH2. We find that the excitation energies vary among the bacteriochlorophyll monomers and that they are regulated by the curvature of the macrocycle ring and the dihedral angle of an acetyl moiety. Increasing the curvature lifts the ground state energy, which causes a red shift of the excitation energy. Increasing the torsion of the acetyl moiety raises the excited state energy, resulting in a blue shift of the excitation energy. The obtained results mark a giant leap for multiconfigurational multireference quantum chemical methods in the photochemistry of biological systems, which can prove instrumental in exposing the underlying physics of photosynthetic light-harvesting. PMID:26796483

  4. Substantiation of the mechanism of biphoton nonresonance excitation of molecules of bacteriochlorophyll of purple bacteria by femtosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, A. Yu.

    2010-11-01

    In a series of published experimental works, there has been observed nonresonance biphoton excitation, by femtosecond IR pulses (1250-1500 nm) of molecules of bacteriochlorophyll-a and the pigment in the composition of light-absorbing natural "antenna" complexes of photosynthesizing purple bacteria. The authors of these works believe that IR quanta excite hypothetical forbidden levels of pigments of these bacteria in the dual frequency range of 625-750 nm. In this study, an alternative mechanism of intramolecular electron transport apparently responsible for this phenomenon is suggested and substantiated. The mechanism should manifest itself in powerful electric fields, which are achieved in the pulses of picofemtosecond lasers.

  5. Solvent effects on the resonance Raman spectra of bacteriochlorophyll a cation radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misono, Yasuhito; Nishizawa, Ei-ichi; Limantara, Leenawaty; Koyama, Yasushi; Itoh, Koichi

    1995-04-01

    Resonance Raman (RR) spectra were measured for the cation radical of bacteriochlorophyll a in acetone, methanol, dichloromethane and mixed solvents of acetone and methanol. The ring-breathing (C a-C m stretching) frequency of the radical (abbreviated as vr+) was observed at 1601 cm -1 in acetone (forming a penta-coordinated monomer), at 1587 cm -1 in a methanol (forming a hexa-coordinated monomer) and at 1600 cm -1 in dichloromethane (forming a penta-coordinated aggregate). The RR spectrum of the radical in dichloromethane is almost identical to the transient RR spectrum ascribed to 'the aggregated T 1 species of Bchl a' formed in the particular solvent by Nishizawa, Limantara, Nanjou, Nagae, Kakuno and Koyama, indicating that their interpretation needs to be revised.

  6. Benchmarking Calculations of Excitonic Couplings between Bacteriochlorophylls.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Elise P; Kassal, Ivan

    2016-01-14

    Excitonic couplings between (bacterio)chlorophyll molecules are necessary for simulating energy transport in photosynthetic complexes. Many techniques for calculating the couplings are in use, from the simple (but inaccurate) point-dipole approximation to fully quantum-chemical methods. We compared several approximations to determine their range of applicability, noting that the propagation of experimental uncertainties poses a fundamental limit on the achievable accuracy. In particular, the uncertainty in crystallographic coordinates yields an uncertainty of about 20% in the calculated couplings. Because quantum-chemical corrections are smaller than 20% in most biologically relevant cases, their considerable computational cost is rarely justified. We therefore recommend the electrostatic TrEsp method across the entire range of molecular separations and orientations because its cost is minimal and it generally agrees with quantum-chemical calculations to better than the geometric uncertainty. Understanding these uncertainties can guard against striving for unrealistic precision; at the same time, detailed benchmarks can allow important qualitative questions-which do not depend on the precise values of the simulation parameters-to be addressed with greater confidence about the conclusions. PMID:26651217

  7. Engineered biosynthesis of bacteriochlorophyll b in Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Canniffe, Daniel P.; Hunter, C. Neil

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriochlorophyll b has the most red-shifted absorbance maximum of all naturally occurring photopigments. It has a characteristic ethylidene group at the C8 position in place of the more common ethyl group, the product of a C8-vinyl reductase, which is carried by the majority of chlorophylls and bacteriochlorophylls used in photosynthesis. The subsequent and first step exclusive to bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis, the reduction of the C7 = C8 bond, is catalyzed by chlorophyllide oxidoreductase. It has been demonstrated that the enzyme from bacteriochlorophyll a-utilizing bacteria can catalyze the formation of compounds carrying an ethyl group at C8 from both ethyl- and vinyl-carrying substrates, indicating a surprising additional C8-vinyl reductase function, while the enzyme from organisms producing BChl b could only catalyze C7 = C8 reduction with a vinyl substrate, but this product carried an ethylidene group at the C8 position. We have replaced the native chlorophyllide oxidoreductase-encoding genes of Rhodobacter sphaeroides with those from Blastochloris viridis, but the switch from bacteriochlorophyll a to b biosynthesis is only detected when the native conventional C8-vinyl reductase is absent. We propose a non-enzymatic mechanism for ethylidene group formation based on the absence of cellular C8-vinyl reductase activity. PMID:25058304

  8. The contribution of the carotenoid to the visible circular dichroism of the light-harvesting antenna of Rhodospirillum rubrum.

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, R M; Fernández-Cabrera, C; Ramírez, J M

    1990-01-01

    The visible c.d. spectrum of wild-type Rhodospirillum rubrum shows positive bands [Dratz, Schultz & Sauer (1966) Brookhaven Symp. Biol. 19, 303-318] that are largely due to the B880 antenna pigments, bacteriochlorophyll a and carotenoids. The bacteriochlorophyll c.d. band was absent from the spectrum of R. rubrum G9, a mutant unable to synthesize coloured carotenoids, and could be partly restored by adding extracted carotenoids to freeze-dried membrane vesicles isolated from that mutant. Therefore it seems to arise from either bacteriochlorophyll-carotenoid interactions or bacteriochlorophyll-protein interactions that are induced by the carotenoid. The more complex carotenoid c.d. band had different shapes in native and reconstituted carotenoid-containing membranes. Such differences suggest that the optical activity of the carotenoid in the B880 antenna arises from both non-degenerate and degenerate interactions. PMID:2119174

  9. De novo synthesis and properties of analogues of the self-assembling chlorosomal bacteriochlorophylls

    SciTech Connect

    Mass, Olga; Pandithavidana, Dinesh R.; Ptaszek, Marcin; Santiago, Koraliz; Springer, Joseph W.; Jiao, Jieying; Tang, Qun; Kirmaier, Christine; Bocian, David F.; Holten, Dewey; Lindsey, Jonathan S.

    2011-01-01

    Natural photosynthetic pigments bacteriochlorophyllsc, d and e in green bacteria undergo self-assembly to create an organized antenna system known as the chlorosome, which collects photons and funnels the resulting excitation energy toward the reaction centers. Mimicry of chlorosome function is a central problem in supramolecular chemistry and artificial photosynthesis, and may have relevance for the design of photosynthesis-inspired solar cells. The main challenge in preparing artificial chlorosomes remains the synthesis of the appropriate pigment (chlorin) equipped with a set of functional groups suitable to direct the assembly and assure efficient energy transfer. Prior approaches have entailed derivatization of porphyrins or semisynthesis beginning with chlorophylls. This paper reports a third approach, the de novo synthesis of macrocycles that contain the same hydrocarbon skeleton as chlorosomal bacteriochlorophylls. The synthesis here of Zn(II) 3-(1-hydroxyethyl)-10-aryl-13¹-oxophorbines (the aryl group consists of phenyl, mesityl, or pentafluorophenyl) entails selective bromination of a 3,13-diacetyl-10-arylchlorin, palladium-catalyzed 13¹-oxophorbine formation, and selective reduction of the 3-acetyl group using BH₃·tBuNH₂. Each macrocycle contains a geminal dimethyl group in the pyrroline ring to provide stability toward adventitious dehydrogenation. A Zn(II) 7-(1-hydroxyethyl)-10-phenyl-17-oxochlorin also has been prepared. Altogether, 30 new hydroporphyrins were synthesized. The UV-Vis absorption spectra of the new chlorosomal bacteriochlorophyll mimics reveal a bathochromic shift of [similar]1800 cm-1 of the Qy band in nonpolar solvent, indicating extensive assembly in solution. The Zn(II) 3-(1-hydroxyethyl)-10-aryl-13¹-oxophorbines differ in the propensity to form assemblies based on the 10-substituent in the following order: mesityl

  10. Strategy of ring-shaped aggregates in excitation energy transfer for removing disorder-induced shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tei, Go; Nakatani, Masatoshi; Ishihara, Hajime

    2013-06-01

    Peripheral light harvesting complex (LH2), which is found in photosynthetic antenna systems of purple photosynthetic bacteria, has important functions in the photosynthetic process, such as harvesting sunlight and transferring its energy to the photosynthetic reaction center. The key component in excitation energy transfer (EET) between LH2s is B850, which is a characteristic ring-shaped aggregate of pigments usually formed by 18 or 16 bacteriochlorophylls in LH2. We theoretically study the strategy of the ring-shaped aggregate structure, which maximizes EET efficiency, by using the standard Frenkel exciton model and the self-consistent calculation method for the Markovian quantum master equation and Maxwell equation. As a result, we have revealed a simple but ingenious strategy of the ring-shaped aggregate structure. The combination of three key properties of the ring unit system maximizes the EET efficiency, namely the large dipole moment of aggregates causes the basic improvement of EET efficiency, and the isotropic nature and the large occupying area are critically effective to remove the disorder-induced shielding that inhibits EET in the presence of the randomness of orientation and alignment of carriers of excitation energy.

  11. The supramolecular organization of self-assembling chlorosomal bacteriochlorophyll c, d, or e mimics

    PubMed Central

    Jochum, Tobias; Reddy, Chilla Malla; Eichhöfer, Andreas; Buth, Gernot; Szmytkowski, Jędrzej; Kalt, Heinz; Moss, David; Balaban, Teodor Silviu

    2008-01-01

    Bacteriochlorophylls (BChls) c, d, and e are the main light-harvesting pigments of green photosynthetic bacteria that self-assemble into nanostructures within the chlorosomes forming the most efficient antennas of photosynthetic organisms. All previous models of the chlorosomal antennae, which are quite controversially discussed because no single crystals could be grown so far from these organelles, involve a strong hydrogen-bonding interaction between the 31 hydroxyl group and the 131 carbonyl group. We have synthesized different self-assemblies of BChl c mimics having the same functional groups as the natural counterparts, that is, a hydroxyethyl substituent, a carbonyl group and a divalent metal atom ligated by a tetrapyrrole. These artificial BChl mimics have been shown by single crystal x-ray diffraction to form extended stacks that are packed by hydrophobic interactions and in the absence of hydrogen bonding. Time-resolved photoluminescence proves the ordered nature of the self-assembled stacks. FT-IR spectra show that on self-assembly the carbonyl frequency is shifted by ≈30 cm−1 to lower wavenumbers. From the FT-IR data we can infer the proximal interactions between the BChls in the chlorosomes consistent with a single crystal x-ray structure that shows a weak electrostatic interaction between carbonyl groups and the central zinc atom. PMID:18755898

  12. The supramolecular organization of self-assembling chlorosomal bacteriochlorophyll c, d, or e mimics.

    PubMed

    Jochum, Tobias; Reddy, Chilla Malla; Eichhöfer, Andreas; Buth, Gernot; Szmytkowski, Jedrzej; Kalt, Heinz; Moss, David; Balaban, Teodor Silviu

    2008-09-01

    Bacteriochlorophylls (BChls) c, d, and e are the main light-harvesting pigments of green photosynthetic bacteria that self-assemble into nanostructures within the chlorosomes forming the most efficient antennas of photosynthetic organisms. All previous models of the chlorosomal antennae, which are quite controversially discussed because no single crystals could be grown so far from these organelles, involve a strong hydrogen-bonding interaction between the 3(1) hydroxyl group and the 13(1) carbonyl group. We have synthesized different self-assemblies of BChl c mimics having the same functional groups as the natural counterparts, that is, a hydroxyethyl substituent, a carbonyl group and a divalent metal atom ligated by a tetrapyrrole. These artificial BChl mimics have been shown by single crystal x-ray diffraction to form extended stacks that are packed by hydrophobic interactions and in the absence of hydrogen bonding. Time-resolved photoluminescence proves the ordered nature of the self-assembled stacks. FT-IR spectra show that on self-assembly the carbonyl frequency is shifted by approximately 30 cm(-1) to lower wavenumbers. From the FT-IR data we can infer the proximal interactions between the BChls in the chlorosomes consistent with a single crystal x-ray structure that shows a weak electrostatic interaction between carbonyl groups and the central zinc atom. PMID:18755898

  13. Temperature and Ionic Strength Effects on the Chlorosome Light-Harvesting Antenna Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Kuo-Hsiang; Zhu, Liying; Urban, Volker S; Collins, Aaron M.; Biswas, Pratim; Blankenship, R. E.

    2011-03-15

    Chlorosomes, the peripheral light-harvesting antenna complex from green photosynthetic bacteria, are the largest and one of the most efficient light-harvesting antenna complexes found in nature. In contrast to other light-harvesting antennas, chlorosomes are constructed from more than 150,000 self-assembled bacteriochlorophylls (BChls) and contain relatively few proteins that play secondary roles. These unique properties have led to chlorosomes as an attractive candidate for developing biohybrid solar cell devices. In this article, we investigate the temperature and ionic strength effects on the viability of chlorosomes from the photosynthetic green bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus using small-angle neutron scattering and dynamic light scattering. Our studies indicate that chlorosomes remain intact up to 75 °C and that salt induces the formation of large aggregates of chlorosomes. No internal structural changes are observed for the aggregates. The salt-induced aggregation, which is a reversible process, is more efficient with divalent metal ions than with monovalent metal ions. Moreover, with treatment at 98 °C for 2 min, the bulk of the chlorosome pigments are undamaged, while the baseplate is destroyed. Chlorosomes without the baseplate remain rodlike in shape and are 30-40% smaller than with the baseplate attached. Further, chlorosomes are stable from pH 5.5 to 11.0. Together, this is the first time such a range of characterization tools have been used for chlorosomes, and this has enabled elucidation of properties that are not only important to understanding their functionality but also may be useful in biohybrid devices for effective light harvesting.

  14. Spectral heterogeneity and carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in LH2 light-harvesting complexes from Allochromatium vinosum.

    PubMed

    Magdaong, Nikki M; LaFountain, Amy M; Hacking, Kirsty; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Gibson, George N; Cogdell, Richard J; Frank, Harry A

    2016-02-01

    Photosynthetic organisms produce a vast array of spectral forms of antenna pigment-protein complexes to harvest solar energy and also to adapt to growth under the variable environmental conditions of light intensity, temperature, and nutrient availability. This behavior is exemplified by Allochromatium (Alc.) vinosum, a photosynthetic purple sulfur bacterium that produces different types of LH2 light-harvesting complexes in response to variations in growth conditions. In the present work, three different spectral forms of LH2 from Alc. vinosum, B800-820, B800-840, and B800-850, were isolated, purified, and examined using steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, and ultrafast time-resolved absorption spectroscopy. The pigment composition of the LH2 complexes was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography, and all were found to contain five carotenoids: lycopene, anhydrorhodovibrin, spirilloxanthin, rhodopin, and rhodovibrin. Spectral reconstructions of the absorption and fluorescence excitation spectra based on the pigment composition revealed significantly more spectral heterogeneity in these systems compared to LH2 complexes isolated from other species of purple bacteria. The data also revealed the individual carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer efficiencies which were correlated with the kinetic data from the ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopic experiments. This series of LH2 complexes allows a systematic exploration of the factors that determine the spectral properties of the bound pigments and control the rate and efficiency of carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer. PMID:26048106

  15. On the biphoton excitation of the fluorescence of the bacteriochlorophyll molecules of purple photosynthetic bacteria by powerful near IR femto-picosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, A. Yu.

    2011-11-01

    The authors of a number of experimental works detected nonresonance biphoton excitation of bacteriochlorophyll molecules, which represent the main pigment in the light-absorbing natural "antenna" complexes of photosynthesizing purple bacteria, by femtosecond IR pulses (1250-1500 nm). They believe that IR quanta excite hypothetic forbidden levels of the pigments of these bacteria in the double frequency range 625-750 nm. We propose and ground an alternative triplet mechanism to describe this phenomenon. According to our hypothesis, the mechanism of biphoton excitation of molecules by IR quanta can manifest itself specifically, through high triplet levels of molecules in the high fields induced by femtosecond-picosecond laser pulses.

  16. On the biphoton excitation of the fluorescence of the bacteriochlorophyll molecules of purple photosynthetic bacteria by powerful near IR femto-picosecond pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Borisov, A. Yu.

    2011-11-15

    The authors of a number of experimental works detected nonresonance biphoton excitation of bacteriochlorophyll molecules, which represent the main pigment in the light-absorbing natural 'antenna' complexes of photosynthesizing purple bacteria, by femtosecond IR pulses (1250-1500 nm). They believe that IR quanta excite hypothetic forbidden levels of the pigments of these bacteria in the double frequency range 625-750 nm. We propose and ground an alternative triplet mechanism to describe this phenomenon. According to our hypothesis, the mechanism of biphoton excitation of molecules by IR quanta can manifest itself specifically, through high triplet levels of molecules in the high fields induced by femtosecond-picosecond laser pulses.

  17. Origin of Bacteriochlorophyll a and the Early Diversification of Photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Cardona, Tanai

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthesis originated in the domain Bacteria billions of years ago; however, the identity of the last common ancestor to all phototrophic bacteria remains undetermined and speculative. Here I present the evolution of BchF or 3-vinyl-bacteriochlorophyll hydratase, an enzyme exclusively found in bacteria capable of synthetizing bacteriochlorophyll a. I show that BchF exists in two forms originating from an early divergence, one found in the phylum Chlorobi, including its paralogue BchV, and a second form that was ancestral to the enzyme found in the remaining anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria. The phylogeny of BchF is consistent with bacteriochlorophyll a evolving in an ancestral phototrophic bacterium that lived before the radiation event that gave rise to the phylum Chloroflexi, Chlorobi, Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Gemmatimonadetes, but only after the divergence of Type I and Type II reaction centers. Consequently, it is suggested that the lack of phototrophy in many groups of extant bacteria is a derived trait. PMID:26953697

  18. Simulated two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy of the eight-bacteriochlorophyll FMO complex

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Shu-Hao; Kais, Sabre

    2014-12-21

    The Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) protein-pigment complex acts as a molecular wire conducting energy between the outer antenna system and the reaction center; it is an important photosynthetic system to study the transfer of excitonic energy. Recent crystallographic studies report the existence of an additional (eighth) bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) in some of the FMO monomers. To understand the functionality of this eighth BChl, we simulated the two-dimensional electronic spectra of both the 7-site (apo form) and the 8-site (holo form) variant of the FMO complex from green sulfur bacteria, Prosthecochloris aestuarii. By comparing the spectrum, it was found that the eighth BChl can affect two different excitonic energy transfer pathways: (1) it is directly involved in the first apo form pathway (6 → 3 → 1) by passing the excitonic energy to exciton 6; and (2) it facilitates an increase in the excitonic wave function overlap between excitons 4 and 5 in the second pathway (7 → 4,5 → 2 → 1) and thus increases the possible downward sampling routes across the BChls.

  19. Polarized pump--probe spectroscopy of electronic excitation transport in photosynthetic antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Struve, W.S. )

    1990-08-01

    Polarized pump--probe spectroscopy was performed with 1.5--2 psec resolution on the bacteriochlorophyll a protein antenna complex from the green sulfur bacterium Prosthecochloris aestuarii and on native and enriched photosystem I particles from spinach. The resulting photobleaching profiles reflect the details of singlet electronic-excitation transport in these photosynthetic antennas, in which the pigments are complexed by proteins into clusters of five or more chromophores.

  20. Alternating syn-anti bacteriochlorophylls form concentric helical nanotubes in chlorosomes

    PubMed Central

    Ganapathy, Swapna; Oostergetel, Gert T.; Wawrzyniak, Piotr K.; Reus, Michael; Gomez Maqueo Chew, Aline; Buda, Francesco; Boekema, Egbert J.; Bryant, Donald A.; Holzwarth, Alfred R.; de Groot, Huub J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Chlorosomes are the largest and most efficient light-harvesting antennae found in nature, and they are constructed from hundreds of thousands of self-assembled bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) c, d, or e pigments. Because they form very large and compositionally heterogeneous organelles, they had been the only photosynthetic antenna system for which no detailed structural information was available. In our approach, the structure of a member of the chlorosome class was determined and compared with the wild type (WT) to resolve how the biological light-harvesting function of the chlorosome is established. By constructing a triple mutant, the heterogeneous BChl c pigment composition of chlorosomes of the green sulfur bacteria Chlorobaculum tepidum was simplified to nearly homogeneous BChl d. Computational integration of two different bioimaging techniques, solid-state NMR and cryoEM, revealed an undescribed syn-anti stacking mode and showed how ligated BChl c and d self-assemble into coaxial cylinders to form tubular-shaped elements. A close packing of BChls via π–π stacking and helical H-bonding networks present in both the mutant and in the WT forms the basis for ultrafast, long-distance transmission of excitation energy. The structural framework is robust and can accommodate extensive chemical heterogeneity in the BChl side chains for adaptive optimization of the light-harvesting functionality in low-light environments. In addition, syn-anti BChl stacks form sheets that allow for strong exciton overlap in two dimensions enabling triplet exciton formation for efficient photoprotection. PMID:19435848

  1. Characterization of an FMO Variant of Chlorobaculum tepidum Carrying Bacteriochlorophyll a Esterified by Geranylgeraniol

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Jianzhong; Harada, Jiro; Buyle, Kenny; Yuan, Kevin; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Oh-oka, Hirozo; Loomis, Richard A; Blankenship, R. E.

    2010-06-15

    The Fenna-Matthews-Olson light-harvesting antenna (FMO) protein has been a model system for understanding pigment-protein interactions in the energy transfer process in photosynthesis. All previous studies have utilized wild-type FMO proteins from several species. Here we report the purification and characterization of the first FMO protein variant generated via replacement of the esterifying alcohol at the C-17 propionate residue of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) a, phytol, with geranylgeraniol, which possesses three more double bonds. The FMO protein still assembles with the modified pigment, but both the whole cell absorption and the biochemical purification indicate that the mutant cells contain a much less mature FMO protein. The gene expression was checked using qRT-PCR, and none of the genes encoding BChl a-binding proteins are strongly regulated at the transcriptional level. The smaller amount of the FMO protein in the mutant cell is probably due to the degradation of the apo-FMO protein at different stages after it does not bind the normal pigment. The absorption, fluorescence, and CD spectra of the purified FMO variant protein are similar to those of the wild-type FMO protein except the conformations of most pigments are more heterogeneous, which broadens the spectral bands. Interestingly, the lowest-energy pigment binding site seems to be unchanged and is the only peak that can be well resolved in 77 K absorption spectra. The excited-state lifetime of the variant FMO protein is unchanged from that of the wild type and shows a temperature-dependent modulation similar to that of the wild type. The variant FMO protein is less thermally stable than the wild type. The assembly of the FMO protein and also the implications of the decreased FMO/chlorosome stoichiometry are discussed in terms of the topology of these two antennas on the cytoplasmic membrane.

  2. Photoprotection Mechanism of Light-Harvesting Antenna Complex from Purple Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kosumi, Daisuke; Horibe, Tomoko; Sugisaki, Mitsuru; Cogdell, Richard J; Hashimoto, Hideki

    2016-02-11

    Photosynthetic light-harvesting apparatus efficiently capture sunlight and transfer the energy to reaction centers, while they safely dissipate excess energy to surrounding environments for a protection of their organisms. In this study, we performed pump-probe spectroscopic measurements with a temporal window ranging from femtosecond to submillisecond on the purple bacterial antenna complex LH2 from Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 to clarify its photoprotection functions. The observed excited state dynamics in the time range from subnanosecond to microsecond exhibits that the triplet-triplet excitation energy transfer from bacteriochlorophyll a to carotenoid takes place with a time constant of 16.7 ns. Furthermore, ultrafast spectroscopic data suggests that a molecular assembly of bacteriochlorophyll a in LH2 efficiently suppresses a generation of triple bacteriochlorophyll a. PMID:26800035

  3. Bacteriochlorophyll f: properties of chlorosomes containing the “forbidden chlorophyll”

    PubMed Central

    Vogl, Kajetan; Tank, Marcus; Orf, Gregory S.; Blankenship, Robert E.; Bryant, Donald A.

    2012-01-01

    The chlorosomes of green sulfur bacteria (GSB) are mainly assembled from one of three types of bacteriochlorophylls (BChls), BChls c, d, and e. By analogy to the relationship between BChl c and BChl d (20-desmethyl-BChl c), a fourth type of BChl, BChl f (20-desmethyl-BChl e), should exist but has not yet been observed in nature. The bchU gene (bacteriochlorophyllide C-20 methyltransferase) of the brown-colored green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum limnaeum was inactivated by conjugative transfer from Eshcerichia coli and homologous recombination of a suicide plasmid carrying a portion of the bchU. The resulting bchU mutant was greenish brown in color and synthesized BChl fF. The chlorosomes of the bchU mutant had similar size and polypeptide composition as those of the wild type (WT), but the Qy absorption band of the BChl f aggregates was blue-shifted 16 nm (705 nm vs. 721 nm for the WT). Fluorescence spectroscopy showed that energy transfer to the baseplate was much less efficient in chlorosomes containing BChl f than in WT chlorosomes containing BChl e. When cells were grown at high irradiance with tungsten or fluorescent light, the WT and bchU mutant had identical growth rates. However, the WT grew about 40% faster than the bchU mutant at low irradiance (10 μmol photons m−2 s-1). Less efficient energy transfer from BChl f aggregates to BChl a in the baseplate, the much slower growth of the strain producing BChl f relative to the WT, and competition from other phototrophs, may explain why BChl f is not observed naturally. PMID:22908012

  4. Identification of a Gene Essential for the First Committed Step in the Biosynthesis of Bacteriochlorophyll c*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenfeng; Bryant, Donald A.

    2011-01-01

    Bacteriochlorophylls (BChls) c, d, and e are the major chlorophylls in chlorosomes, which are the largest and one of the most efficient antennae produced by chlorophototrophic organisms. In the biosynthesis of these three BChls, a C-132-methylcarboxyl group found in all other chlorophylls (Chls) must be removed. This reaction is postulated to be the first committed step in the synthesis of these BChls. Analyses of gene neighborhoods of (B)Chl biosynthesis genes and distribution patterns in organisms producing chlorosomes helped to identify a gene (bciC) that appeared to be a good candidate to produce the enzyme involved in this biochemical reaction. To confirm that this was the case, a deletion mutant of an open reading frame orthologous to bciC, CT1077, was constructed in Chlorobaculum tepidum, a genetically tractible green sulfur bacterium. The CT1077 deletion mutant was unable to synthesize BChl c but still synthesized BChl a and Chl a. The deletion mutant accumulated large amounts of various (bacterio)pheophorbides, all of which still had C-132-methylcarboxyl groups. A C. tepidum strain in which CT1077 was replaced by an orthologous gene, Cabther_B0031 from “Candidatus Chloracidobacterium thermophilum” was constructed. Although the product of Cabther_B0031 was only 28% identical to the product of CT1077, this strain synthesized BChl c, BChl a, and Chl a in amounts similar to wild-type C. tepidum cells. To indicate their roles in the first committed step of BChl c, d, and e biosynthesis, open reading frames CT1077 and Cabther_B0031 have been redesignated bciC. The potential mechanism by which BciC removes the C-132-methylcarboxyl moiety of chlorophyllide a is discussed. PMID:21550979

  5. Perturbation of bacteriochlorophyll molecules in Fenna-Matthews-Olson protein complexes through mutagenesis of cysteine residues.

    PubMed

    Saer, Rafael; Orf, Gregory S; Lu, Xun; Zhang, Hao; Cuneo, Matthew J; Myles, Dean A A; Blankenship, Robert E

    2016-09-01

    The Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) pigment-protein complex in green sulfur bacteria transfers excitation energy from the chlorosome antenna complex to the reaction center. In understanding energy transfer in the FMO protein, the individual contributions of the bacteriochlorophyll pigments to the FMO complex's absorption spectrum could provide detailed information with which molecular and energetic models can be constructed. The absorption properties of the pigments, however, are such that their spectra overlap significantly. To overcome this, we used site-directed mutagenesis to construct a series of mutant FMO complexes in the model green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum (formerly Chlorobium tepidum). Two cysteines at positions 49 and 353 in the C. tepidum FMO complex, which reside near hydrogen bonds between BChls 2 and 3, and their amino acid binding partner serine 73 and tyrosine 15, respectively, were changed to alanine residues. The resulting C49A, C353A, and C49A C353A double mutants were analyzed with a combination of optical absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies. Our results revealed changes in the absorption properties of several underlying spectral components in the FMO complex, as well as the redox behavior of the complex in response to the reductant sodium dithionite. A high-resolution X-ray structure of the C49A C353A double mutant reveals that these spectral changes appear to be independent of any major structural rearrangements in the FMO mutants. Our findings provide important tests for theoretical calculations of the C. tepidum FMO absorption spectrum, and additionally highlight a possible role for cysteine residues in the redox activity of the pigment-protein complex. PMID:27114180

  6. Identification of the Bacteriochlorophylls, Carotenoids, Quinones, Lipids, and Hopanoids of “Candidatus Chloracidobacterium thermophilum”

    PubMed Central

    Garcia Costas, Amaya M.; Tsukatani, Yusuke; Rijpstra, W. Irene C.; Schouten, Stefan; Welander, Paula V.; Summons, Roger E.

    2012-01-01

    “Candidatus Chloracidobacterium thermophilum” is a recently discovered chlorophototroph from the bacterial phylum Acidobacteria, which synthesizes bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) c and chlorosomes like members of the green sulfur bacteria (GSB) and the green filamentous anoxygenic phototrophs (FAPs). The pigments (BChl c homologs and carotenoids), quinones, lipids, and hopanoids of cells and chlorosomes of this new chlorophototroph were characterized in this study. “Ca. Chloracidobacterium thermophilum” methylates its antenna BChls at the C-82 and C-121 positions like GSB, but these BChls were esterified with a variety of isoprenoid and straight-chain alkyl alcohols as in FAPs. Unlike the chlorosomes of other green bacteria, “Ca. Chloracidobacterium thermophilum” chlorosomes contained two major xanthophyll carotenoids, echinenone and canthaxanthin. These carotenoids may confer enhanced protection against reactive oxygen species and could represent a specific adaptation to the highly oxic natural environment in which “Ca. Chloracidobacterium thermophilum” occurs. Dihydrogenated menaquinone-8 [menaquinone-8(H2)], which probably acts as a quencher of energy transfer under oxic conditions, was an abundant component of both cells and chlorosomes of “Ca. Chloracidobacterium thermophilum.” The betaine lipid diacylglycerylhydroxymethyl-N,N,N-trimethyl-β-alanine, esterified with 13-methyl-tetradecanoic (isopentadecanoic) acid, was a prominent polar lipid in the membranes of both “Ca. Chloracidobacterium thermophilum” cells and chlorosomes. This lipid may represent a specific adaptive response to chronic phosphorus limitation in the mats. Finally, three hopanoids, diploptene, bacteriohopanetetrol, and bacteriohopanetetrol cyclitol ether, which may help to stabilize membranes during diel shifts in pH and other physicochemical conditions in the mats, were detected in the membranes of “Ca. Chloracidobacterium thermophilum.” PMID:22210764

  7. Native electrospray mass spectrometry reveals the nature and stoichiometry of pigments in the FMO photosynthetic antenna protein†

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jianzhong; Zhang, Hao; Gross, Michael L.; Blankenship, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    The nature and stoichiometry of pigments in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) photosynthetic antenna protein complex were determined by native electrospray mass spectrometry. The FMO antenna complex was the first chlorophyll-containing protein that was crystallized. Previous results indicate that the FMO protein forms a trimer with seven bacteriochlorophyll a in each monomer. This model has long been a working basis to understand the molecular mechanism of energy transfer through pigment/pigment and pigment/protein coupling. Recent results have suggested, however, that an eighth bacteriochlorophyll is present in some subunits. In this report, a direct mass-spectrometry measurement of the molecular weight of the intact FMO protein complex clearly indicates the existence of an 8th pigment, which is assigned as a bacteriochlorophyll a by mass analysis of the complex and HPLC analysis of the pigment. The 8th pigment is found to be easily lost during purification, which results in its partial occupancy in the mass spectra of the intact complex prepared by different procedures. The results are consistent with the recent X-ray structural models. The existence of the 8th bacteriochlorophyll a in this model antenna protein gives new insights into the functional role of the FMO protein and motivates the need for new theoretical and spectroscopic assignments of spectral features of the FMO protein. PMID:21449539

  8. Native Electrospray Mass Spectrometry Reveals the Nature and Stoichiometry of Pigments in the FMO Photosynthetic Antenna Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Jianzhong; Zhang, Hao; Gross, Michael L; Blankenship, R. E.

    2011-05-03

    The nature and stoichiometry of pigments in the Fenna–Matthews–Olson (FMO) photosynthetic antenna protein complex were determined by native electrospray mass spectrometry. The FMO antenna complex was the first chlorophyll-containing protein that was crystallized. Previous results indicate that the FMO protein forms a trimer with seven bacteriochlorophyll a in each monomer. This model has long been a working basis to understand the molecular mechanism of energy transfer through pigment/pigment and pigment/protein coupling. Recent results have suggested, however, that an eighth bacteriochlorophyll is present in some subunits. In this report, a direct mass spectrometry measurement of the molecular weight of the intact FMO protein complex clearly indicates the existence of an eighth pigment, which is assigned as a bacteriochlorophyll a by mass analysis of the complex and HPLC analysis of the pigment. The eighth pigment is found to be easily lost during purification, which results in its partial occupancy in the mass spectra of the intact complex prepared by different procedures. The results are consistent with the recent X-ray structural models. The existence of the eighth bacteriochlorophyll a in this model antenna protein gives new insights into the functional role of the FMO protein and motivates the need for new theoretical and spectroscopic assignments of spectral features of the FMO protein.

  9. Aircraft antennas/conformal antennas missile antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solbach, Klaus

    1987-04-01

    Three major areas of airborne microwave antennas are examined. The basic system environment for missile telemetry/telecommand and fuze functions is sketched and the basic antenna design together with practical examples are discussed. The principle requirements of modern nose radar flat plate antennas are shown to result from missile/aircraft system requirements. Basic principles of slotted waveguide antenna arrays are sketched and practical antenna designs are discussed. The present early warning system designs are sketched to point out requirements and performance of practical radar warning and jamming antennas (broadband spiral antennas and horn radiators). With respect to newer developments in the ECM scenario, some demonstrated and proposed antenna systems (lens fed arrays, phased array, active array) are discussed.

  10. Self-assembly of natural light-harvesting bacteriochlorophylls of green sulfur photosynthetic bacteria in silicate capsules as stable models of chlorosomes.

    PubMed

    Saga, Yoshitaka; Akai, Sho; Miyatake, Tomohiro; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2006-01-01

    Naturally occurring bacteriochlorophyll(BChl)s-c, -d, and -e from green sulfur photosynthetic bacteria were self-assembled in an aqueous solution in the presence of octadecyltriethoxysilane and tetraethoxysilane, followed by polycondensation of the alkoxysilanes by incubation for 50 h at 25 degrees C. The resulting BChl self-assemblies in silicate capsules exhibited visible absorption and circular dichroism spectra similar to the corresponding natural light-harvesting systems (chlorosomes) of green sulfur bacteria. Dynamic light scattering measurements indicated that the silicate capsules had an average hydrodynamic diameter of several hundred nanometers. BChl self-aggregates in silicate capsules were significantly stable to a nonionic surfactant Triton X-100, which was apt to decompose the BChl aggregates to their monomeric form, compared with conventional micelle systems. BChls in silicate capsules were more tolerant to demetalation of the central magnesium under acidic conditions than the natural systems. PMID:16848406

  11. Nonpigmented and Bacteriochlorophyll-Containing Bradyrhizobia Isolated from Aeschynomene indica

    PubMed Central

    van Berkum, P.; Tully, R. E.; Keister, D. L.

    1995-01-01

    The legume genus Aeschynomene is unusual, since many species develop stem nodules and the bradyrhizobia isolated from these nodules produce bacteriochlorophyll (Bchl). Evidence is presented that the bradyrhizobia of Aeschynomene indica have wide distribution throughout the world, since A. indica was nodulated when grown in 58 soils collected in 14 different countries. Only 38 of 79 isolates tested synthesized Bchl and carotenoids during heterotrophic growth. Nine isolates produced Bchl constitutively, and cultures were pigmented after growth in the dark. The other isolates required light for Bchl production. The DNA from seven pigmented and three nonpigmented bradyrhizobia hybridized with a DNA probe containing the genes for the photosynthetic apparatus of Rhodobacter capsulatus, but DNA from two other nonpigmented isolates did not hybridize with this probe. A relationship between pigmentation in culture and symbiotic phenotype was not evident, since bradyrhizobia of both Bchl phenotypes nodulated stems of A. indica and formed nitrogen-fixing symbioses. Several isolates, which were ineffective on A. indica, probably do belong to the proposed cross-inoculation group 3 (D. Alazard, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 50:732-734, 1985), since they did not nodulate Aeschynomene americana or Macroptilium atropurpureum. Since it has been suggested that extant rhizobia arose from photosynthetic ancestors (J. I. Sprent, p. 45-54, in P. M. Gresshoff, L. E. Roth, G. Stacey, and W. E. Newton, ed., Nitrogen Fixation: Achievements and Objectives, 1990), we propose that the nonpigmented isolates may represent an extant lineage of an intermediate evolutionary stage. PMID:16534933

  12. Ultrafast intramolecular relaxation dynamics of Mg- and Zn-bacteriochlorophyll a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosumi, Daisuke; Nakagawa, Katsunori; Sakai, Shunsuke; Nagaoka, Yuya; Maruta, Satoshi; Sugisaki, Mitsuru; Dewa, Takehisa; Nango, Mamoru; Hashimoto, Hideki

    2013-07-01

    Ultrafast excited-state dynamics of the photosynthetic pigment (Mg-)bacteriochlorophyll a and its Zn-substituted form were investigated by steady-state absorption/fluorescence and femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopic measurements. The obtained steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectra of bacteriochlorophyll a in solution showed that the central metal compound significantly affects the energy of the Qx state, but has almost no effect on the Qy state. Photo-induced absorption spectra were recorded upon excitation of Mg- and Zn-bacteriochlorophyll a into either their Qx or Qy state. By comparing the kinetic traces of transient absorption, ground-state beaching, and stimulated emission after excitation to the Qx or Qy state, we showed that the Qx state was substantially incorporated in the ultrafast excited-state dynamics of bacteriochlorophyll a. Based on these observations, the lifetime of the Qx state was determined to be 50 and 70 fs for Mg- and Zn-bacteriochlorophyll a, respectively, indicating that the lifetime was influenced by the central metal atom due to the change of the energy gap between the Qx and Qy states.

  13. Ultrafast intramolecular relaxation dynamics of Mg- and Zn-bacteriochlorophyll a

    SciTech Connect

    Kosumi, Daisuke; Nagaoka, Yuya; Maruta, Satoshi; Sugisaki, Mitsuru; Dewa, Takehisa; Hashimoto, Hideki

    2013-07-21

    Ultrafast excited-state dynamics of the photosynthetic pigment (Mg-)bacteriochlorophyll a and its Zn-substituted form were investigated by steady-state absorption/fluorescence and femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopic measurements. The obtained steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectra of bacteriochlorophyll a in solution showed that the central metal compound significantly affects the energy of the Q{sub x} state, but has almost no effect on the Q{sub y} state. Photo-induced absorption spectra were recorded upon excitation of Mg- and Zn-bacteriochlorophyll a into either their Q{sub x} or Q{sub y} state. By comparing the kinetic traces of transient absorption, ground-state beaching, and stimulated emission after excitation to the Q{sub x} or Q{sub y} state, we showed that the Q{sub x} state was substantially incorporated in the ultrafast excited-state dynamics of bacteriochlorophyll a. Based on these observations, the lifetime of the Q{sub x} state was determined to be 50 and 70 fs for Mg- and Zn-bacteriochlorophyll a, respectively, indicating that the lifetime was influenced by the central metal atom due to the change of the energy gap between the Q{sub x} and Q{sub y} states.

  14. B850 pigment-protein complex of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides: Extinction coefficients, circular dichroism, and the reversible binding of bacteriochlorophyll

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Roderick K.; Clayton, Betty J.

    1981-01-01

    Chromatophores of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides yield the antenna complex B850 in either of two states, depending on the method of isolation. Methods using dodecyl (= lauryl) dimethylamine oxide yield B850 with an absorption spectrum like that in vivo: the bands at 800 and 850 nm, due to the bacteriochlorophyll (Bchl) components Bchl-800 and Bchl-850, are in ratio A800/A850 = 0.65 ± 0.05. When B850 is isolated by methods using dodecyl sulfate, the Bchl-800 is attenuated or absent. Bchl assays of these materials and of the isolated antenna complex B875 yielded the following extinction coefficients, ±SD, on the basis of the molarity of Bchl: For B875, ε875 = 126 ± 8 mM-1 cm-1. For B850 in the normal (high-Bchl-800) state, ε850 = 132 ± 10 mM-1 cm-1. For the individual components of Bchl in B850, ε850 of Bchl-850 = 184 ± 13 mM-1 cm-1 and ε800 of Bchl-800 = 213 ± 28 mM-1 cm-1. With these coefficients the molecular ratio of Bchl-850 to Bchl-800 equals 1.8 ± 0.4 for B850 in the high-Bchl-800 state. Starting with B850 depleted of Bchl-800, the addition of dodecyldimethylamine oxide restored the 800-nm absorption band. The 850-nm band became shifted toward the blue, narrowed, and slightly attenuated, and its associated circular dichroism became 20% more intense. Free Bchl added with dodecyldimethylamine oxide accelerated the restoration of Bchl-800 and retarded the attenuation of Bchl-850. We conclude that free Bchl can interact reversibly with a binding site for Bchl-800 in the B850 complex, with dodecyl sulfate favoring dissociation and dodecyldimethylamine oxide promoting association. Thus the reversible dissociation of a native chlorophyll-protein complex has now been demonstrated. PMID:16593090

  15. The nature of coherences in the B820 bacteriochlorophyll dimer revealed by two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Marco; Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I; Romero, Elisabet; Augulis, Ramunas; Pandit, Anjali; Zigmantas, Donatas; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2014-06-01

    Light-harvesting in photosynthesis is determined by the excitonic interactions in disordered antennae and the coupling of collective electronic excitations to fast nuclear motions, producing efficient energy transfer with a complicated interplay between exciton and vibrational coherences. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES) is a powerful tool to study the presence of these coherences in photosynthetic complexes. However, the unambiguous assignment of the nature of the observed coherences is still under debate. In this paper we apply 2DES to an excitonically coupled bacteriochlorophyll dimer, the B820 subunit of the light harvesting complex 1 (LH1-RC) of R. rubrum G9. Fourier analysis of the measured kinetics and modeling of the spectral responses in a complete basis of electronic and vibrational states allow us to distinguish between pure vibrational, mixed exciton-vibrational (vibronic), and predominantly exciton coherences. The mixed coherences have been found in a wide range of oscillation frequencies, whereas exciton coherences give the biggest contributions for the frequencies in the 400-550 cm(-1) range, corresponding to the exciton splitting energy of the B820 dimer. Significant exciton coherences are also present at higher frequencies, i.e., up to 800 cm(-1), which are determined by realizations of the disorder with a large energy gap between the two pigments (which increases the apparent value of the exciton splitting). Although the B820 dimer is a model system, the approach presented here represents a basis for further analyses of more complicated systems, providing a tool for studying the interplay between electronic and vibrational coherences in disordered photosynthetic antennae and reaction centres. PMID:24430275

  16. Deployable antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Dobbins, Justin A. (Inventor); Lin, Greg Y. (Inventor); Chu, Andrew W. (Inventor); Scully, Robert C. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A deployable antenna and method for using wherein the deployable antenna comprises a collapsible membrane having at least one radiating element for transmitting electromagnetic waves, receiving electromagnetic waves, or both.

  17. User Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamnejad, Vahraz; Cramer, Paul

    1990-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) impact of frequency change of user and spacecraft antenna gain and size; (2) basic personal terminal antennas (impact of 20/30 GHz frequency separation; parametric studies - gain, size, weight; gain and figure of merit (G/T); design data for selected antenna concepts; critical technologies and development goals; and recommendations); and (3) user antenna radiation safety concerns.

  18. Reconfigurable antenna pattern verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drexler, Jerome P. (Inventor); Becker, Robert C. (Inventor); Meyers, David W. (Inventor); Muldoon, Kelly P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of verifying programmable antenna configurations is disclosed. The method comprises selecting a desired antenna configuration from a plurality of antenna configuration patterns, with the selected antenna configuration forming at least one reconfigurable antenna from reconfigurable antenna array elements. The method validates the formation of the selected antenna configuration to determine antenna performance of the at least one reconfigurable antenna.

  19. Evidence for a cysteine-mediated mechanism of excitation energy regulation in a photosynthetic antenna complex.

    PubMed

    Orf, Gregory S; Saer, Rafael G; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Zhang, Hao; McIntosh, Chelsea L; Schultz, Jason W; Mirica, Liviu M; Blankenship, Robert E

    2016-08-01

    Light-harvesting antenna complexes not only aid in the capture of solar energy for photosynthesis, but regulate the quantity of transferred energy as well. Light-harvesting regulation is important for protecting reaction center complexes from overexcitation, generation of reactive oxygen species, and metabolic overload. Usually, this regulation is controlled by the association of light-harvesting antennas with accessory quenchers such as carotenoids. One antenna complex, the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) antenna protein from green sulfur bacteria, completely lacks carotenoids and other known accessory quenchers. Nonetheless, the FMO protein is able to quench energy transfer in aerobic conditions effectively, indicating a previously unidentified type of regulatory mechanism. Through de novo sequencing MS, chemical modification, and mutagenesis, we have pinpointed the source of the quenching action to cysteine residues (Cys49 and Cys353) situated near two low-energy bacteriochlorophylls in the FMO protein from Chlorobaculum tepidum Removal of these cysteines (particularly removal of the completely conserved Cys353) through N-ethylmaleimide modification or mutagenesis to alanine abolishes the aerobic quenching effect. Electrochemical analysis and electron paramagnetic resonance spectra suggest that in aerobic conditions the cysteine thiols are converted to thiyl radicals which then are capable of quenching bacteriochlorophyll excited states through electron transfer photochemistry. This simple mechanism has implications for the design of bio-inspired light-harvesting antennas and the redesign of natural photosynthetic systems. PMID:27335466

  20. Light-Harvesting Antenna System from the Phototrophic Bacterium Roseiflexus castenholzii

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Aaron M.; Qian, Pu; Tang, Qun; Bocian, David F; Hunter, C. Neil; Blankenship, Robert E.

    2010-08-12

    Photosynthetic organisms have evolved diverse light-harvesting complexes to harness light of various qualities and intensities. Photosynthetic bacteria can have (bacterio)chlorophyll Qy antenna absorption bands ranging from ~650 to ~1100 nm. This broad range of wavelengths has allowed many organisms to thrive in unique light environments. Roseiflexus castenholzii is a niche-adapted, filamentous anoxygenic phototroph (FAP) that lacks chlorosomes, the dominant antenna found in most green bacteria, and here we describe the purification of a full complement of photosynthetic complexes: the light-harvesting (LH) antenna, reaction center (RC), and core complex (RC-LH). By high-performance liquid chromatography separation of bacteriochlorophyll and bacteriopheophytin pigments extracted from the core complex and the RC, the number of subunits that comprise the antenna was determined to be 15 ± 1. Resonance Raman spectroscopy of the carbonyl stretching region displayed modes indicating that 3C-acetyl groups of BChl a are all involved in molecular interactions probably similar to those found in LH1 complexes from purple photosynthetic bacteria. Finally, two-dimensional projections of negatively stained core complexes and the LH antenna revealed a closed, slightly elliptical LH ring with an average diameter of 130 ± 10 Å surrounding a single RC that lacks an H-subunit but is associated with a tetraheme c-type cytochrome.

  1. Broadband 2D Electronic Spectroscopy Reveals Coupling Between Dark 1Bu- State of Carotenoid and Qx State of Bacteriochlorophyll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostroumov, Evgeny E.; Jumper, Chanelle C.; Mulvaney, Rachel M.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Scholes, Gregory D.

    2013-03-01

    The study of LH2 protein of purple bacteria by broadband 2D electronic spectroscopy is presented. The dark 1Bu- carotenoid state is directly observed in 2D spectra and its role in carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll interaction is discussed.

  2. Active antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, John F.

    1994-05-01

    An antenna, which may be a search coil, is connected to an operational amplifier circuit which provides negative impedances, each of which is in the order of magnitude of the positive impedances which characterize the antenna. The antenna is connected to the inverting input of the operational amplifier; a resistor is connected between the inverting input and the output of the operational amplifier; a capacitor-resistor network, in parallel, is connected between the output and the noninverting input of the operational amplifier; and a resistor is connected from the noninverting input and the circuit common. While this circuit provides a negative resistance and a negative inductance, in series, which appear, looking into the noninverting input of the operational amplifier, in parallel with the antenna, these negative impedances appear in a series loop with the antenna positive impedances, so as to algebraically add. This circuit is tuned by varying the various circuit components so that the negative impedances are very close, but somewhat less, in magnitude, to the antenna impedances. The result is to increase the sensitivity of the antenna by lowering its effective impedance. This, in turn, increases the effective area of the antenna, which may be broadband.

  3. Active antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, John F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An antenna, which may be a search coil, is connected to an operational amplifier circuit which provides negative impedances, each of which is in the order of magnitude of the positive impedances which characterize the antenna. The antenna is connected to the inverting input of the operational amplifier; a resistor is connected between the inverting input and the output of the operational amplifier; a capacitor-resistor network, in parallel, is connected between the output and the noninverting input of the operational amplifier; and a resistor is connected from the noninverting input and the circuit common. While this circuit provides a negative resistance and a negative inductance, in series, which appear, looking into the noninverting input of the operational amplifier, in parallel with the antenna, these negative impedances appear in a series loop with the antenna positive impedances, so as to algebraically add. This circuit is tuned by varying the various circuit components so that the negative impedances are very close, but somewhat less, in magnitude, to the antenna impedances. The result is to increase the sensitivity of the antenna by lowering its effective impedance. This, in turn, increases the effective area of the antenna, which may be broadband.

  4. Carotenoid-to-Bacteriochlorophyll Energy Transfer in the LH1-RC Core Complex of a Bacteriochlorophyll b Containing Purple Photosynthetic Bacterium Blastochloris viridis.

    PubMed

    Magdaong, Nikki Cecil M; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Goodson, Carrie; Blankenship, Robert E

    2016-06-16

    Carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer has been widely investigated in bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) a-containing light harvesting complexes. Blastochloris viridis utilizes BChl b, whose absorption spectrum is more red-shifted than that of BChl a. This has implications on the efficiency and pathways of carotenoid-to-BChl energy transfer in this organism. The carotenoids that comprise the light-harvesting reaction center core complex (LH1-RC) of B. viridis are 1,2-dihydroneurosporene and 1,2-dihydrolycopene, which are derivatives of carotenoids found in the light harvesting complexes of several BChl a-containing purple photosynthetic bacteria. Steady-state and ultrafast time-resolved optical spectroscopic measurements were performed on the LH1-RC complex of B. viridis at room and cryogenic temperatures. The overall efficiency of carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer obtained from steady-state absorption and fluorescence measurements were determined to be ∼27% and ∼36% for 1,2-dihydroneurosporene and 1,2-dihydrolycopene, respectively. These results were combined with global fitting and target analyses of the transient absorption data to elucidate the energetic pathways by which the carotenoids decay and transfer excitation energy to BChl b. 1,2-Dihydrolycopene transfers energy to BChl b via the S2 → Qx channel with kET2 = (500 fs)(-1) while 1,2-dihydroneurosporene transfers energy via S1→ Qy (kET1 = (84 ps)(-1)) and S2 → Qx (kET2 = (2.2 ps)(-1)) channels. PMID:27218197

  5. Pigment oligomers as natural and artificial photosynthetic antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenship, R.E.

    1996-12-31

    Green photosynthetic bacteria contain antenna complexes known as chlorosomes. These complexes are appressed to the cytoplasmic side of the inner cell membrane and function to absorb light and transfer the energy to the photochemical reaction center, where photochemical energy storage takes place. Chlorosomes differ from all other known photosynthetic antenna complexes in that the geometrical arrangement of pigments is determined primarily by pigment-pigment interactions instead of pigment-protein interactions. The bacteriochlorophyll c, d or e pigments found in chlorosomes form large oligomers with characteristic spectral properties significantly perturbed from those exhibited by monomeric pigments. Because of their close spatial interaction, the pigments are thought to be strongly coupled electronically, and many of the optical properties result from exciton interactions. This presentation will summarize existing knowledge on the chemical composition and properties of chlorosomes, the evidence for the oligomeric nature of chlorosome pigment organization and proposed structures for the oligomers, and the kinetics and mechanisms of energy transfer in chlorosomes.

  6. Structural and spectral characterisation of the antenna complexes of Rhodocyclus gelatinosus. Indications of a hairpin-like-arranged antenna apoprotein with an unusually high alanine content.

    PubMed

    Brunisholz, R A; Suter, F; Zuber, H

    1994-06-01

    The core antenna/reaction-centre complex RC-B875 and the peripheral antenna complex B800-850 of the two strains DSM 149 and DSM 151 of the purple non-sulphur bacterium Rhodocyclus gelatinosus have been isolated from photosynthetic membranes by means of lauryl-N,N-dimethyl-amineoxide as a detergent and subsequent sucrose-gradient centrifugation. The two complexes were characterised spectroscopically by absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy at room temperature. CD measurements revealed very weak signals for the core antenna B875 whereas for the peripheral antenna B800-850, a strong biphasic CD signal was observed, attributable to the B850 pigments. There is apparently no CD signal present for the B800 pigments. The core and the peripheral antenna complex are built up by a distinct alpha/beta-polypeptide pair. The pigment/protein ratio in the peripheral antenna complex is 3 bacteriochlorophyll/(alpha/beta)-polypeptide pair. The amino acid sequences of the alpha and beta polypeptides of both complexes from the two strains of Rc. gelatinosus were established by automated Edman degradation, chemical and enzymic digestion, amino acid composition analyses and carboxypeptidase digestion. In the case of the beta polypeptides, the amino acid sequence determination was confirmed by ion-spray MS of the isolated antenna apoproteins. The inter-strain (DSM 149 and 151) positional identity between the equivalent apoproteins is extremely large and varies in the range 90-100%. The B875-beta polypeptide from Rc. gelatinosus exhibits shortened C-termini, as detected for the analogous antenna apoproteins of Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Rhodobacter capsulatus, which can be correlated with weak core antenna near-infrared CD signals. However, the B800-850-alpha polypeptide of Rc. gelatinosus, with 71 amino acids, exhibits an extended C-terminal portion indicative of the formation of a second transmembrane domain, which so far has not been observed for bacterial antenna

  7. Elucidation of the preferred routes of C8-vinyl reduction in chlorophyll and bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Canniffe, Daniel P.; Chidgey, Jack W.; Hunter, C. Neil

    2014-01-01

    Most of the chlorophylls and bacteriochlorophylls utilized for light harvesting by phototrophic organisms carry an ethyl group at the C8 position of the molecule, the product of a C8-vinyl reductase acting on a chlorophyll/bacteriochlorophyll biosynthetic precursor. Two unrelated classes of C8-vinyl reductase are known to exist, BciA and BciB, found in the purple phototroph Rhodobacter sphaeroides and the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 respectively. We constructed strains of each bacterium with the native C8-vinyl reductase swapped for the other class of the enzyme, and combined these replacements with a series of deletions of the native bch and chl genes. In vivo data indicate that the preferred substrates for both classes of the enzyme is C8-vinyl chlorophyllide, with C8-vinyl protochlorophyllide reduced only under conditions in which this pigment accumulates as a result of perturbed formation of chlorophyllide. PMID:24942864

  8. Spectral properties of bacteriochlorophyll c in nematic liquid crystal. Part 1. Monomeric forms of dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkowiak, A.; Francke, C.; Amesz, J.; Planner, A.; Hanyz, I.; Fraçkowiak, D.

    1996-02-01

    The spectroscopic features of bacteriochlorophyll c and bacteriopheophytin c in a nematic liquid crystal matrix have been investigated. Absorption, circular dichroism, fluorescence and time resolved delayed luminescence spectra have been measured. The pigment is introduced to the liquid crystal from a dry and from a hydrated chloroform solution. In both cases the pigment is in the monomeric form. Hydration of the solvent and the presence or absence of the central Mg atom affect the interaction of the pigment molecules with the liquid crystal matrix, changing the fluorescence anisotropy. A model for the bacteriochlorophyll c orientation in the liquid crystal is proposed and the averaged angles between the transition moments and the liquid crystal orientation axis are determined. A slow process (in the microsecond range) of radiative deactivation of energy absorbed by the pigments is observed. This delayed emission could be due to pigment ionization and delayed charge recombination and/or thermal activation from the triplet to the excited singlet state.

  9. The Effect of Bacteriochlorophyll g Oxidation on Energy and Electron Transfer in Reaction Centers from Heliobacterium modesticaldum.

    PubMed

    Ferlez, Bryan; Dong, Weibing; Siavashi, Reza; Redding, Kevin; Hou, Harvey J M; Golbeck, John H; van der Est, Art

    2015-10-29

    The heliobacteria are a family of strictly anaerobic, Gram-positive, photoheterotrophs in the Firmicutes. They make use of a homodimeric type I reaction center (RC) that contains ∼20 antenna bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) g molecules, a special pair of BChl g' molecules (P800), two 8(1)-OH-Chl aF molecules (A0), a [4Fe-4S] iron-sulfur cluster (FX), and a carotenoid (4,4'-diaponeurosporene). It is known that in the presence of light and oxygen BChl g is converted to a species with an absorption spectrum identical to that of Chl a. Here, we show that main product of the conversion is 8(1)-OH-Chl aF. Smaller amounts of two other oxidized Chl aF species are also produced. In the presence of light and oxygen, the kinetics of the conversion are monophasic and temperature dependent, with an activation energy of 66 ± 2 kJ mol(-1). In the presence of oxygen in the dark, the conversion occurs in two temperature-dependent kinetic phases: a slow phase followed by a fast phase with an activation energy of 53 ± 1 kJ mol(-1). The loss of BChl g' occurs at the same rate as the loss of Bchl g; hence, the special pair converts at the same rate as the antenna Chl's. However, the loss of P800 photooxidiation and flavodoxin reduction is not linear with the loss of BChl g. In anaerobic RCs, the charge recombination between P800(+) and FX(-) at 80 K is monophasic with a lifetime of 4.2 ms, but after exposure to oxygen, an additional phase with a lifetime of 0.3 ms is observed. Transient EPR data show that the line width of P800(+) increases as BChl g is converted to Chl aF and the rate of electron transfer from A0 to FX, as estimated from the net polarization generated by singlet-triplet mixing during the lifetime of P800(+)A0(-), is unchanged. The transient EPR data also show that conversion of the BChl g results in increased formation of triplet states of both BChl g and Chl aF. The nonlinear loss of P800 photooxidiation and flavodoxin reduction, the biphasic backreaction kinetics, and

  10. Chlorophyllide a Oxidoreductase Works as One of the Divinyl Reductases Specifically Involved in Bacteriochlorophyll a Biosynthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Jiro; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Tsukatani, Yusuke; Yokono, Makio; Tanaka, Ayumi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriochlorophyll a is widely distributed among anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria. In bacteriochlorophyll a biosynthesis, the reduction of the C8 vinyl group in 8-vinyl-chlorophyllide a is catalyzed to produce chlorophyllide a by an 8-vinyl reductase called divinyl reductase (DVR), which has been classified into two types, BciA and BciB. However, previous studies demonstrated that mutants lacking the DVR still synthesize normal bacteriochlorophyll a with the C8 ethyl group and suggested the existence of an unknown “third” DVR. Meanwhile, we recently observed that chlorophyllide a oxidoreductase (COR) of a purple bacterium happened to show the 8-vinyl reduction of 8-vinyl-chlorophyllide a in vitro. In this study, we made a double mutant lacking BciA and COR of the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides in order to investigate whether the mutant still produces pigments with the C8 ethyl group or if COR actually works as the third DVR. The single mutant deleting BciA or COR showed production of the C8 ethyl group pigments, whereas the double mutant accumulated 8-vinyl-chlorophyllide, indicating that there was no enzyme other than BciA and COR functioning as the unknown third DVR in Rhodobacter sphaeroides (note that this bacterium has no bciB gene). Moreover, some COR genes derived from other groups of anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria were introduced into the double mutant, and all of the complementary strains produced normal bacteriochlorophyll a. This observation indicated that COR of these bacteria performs two functions, reductions of the C8 vinyl group and the C7=C8 double bond, and that such an activity is probably conserved in the widely ranging groups. PMID:24637023

  11. Long-Wavelength-Absorbing Forms of Bacteriochlorophyll a in Solutions of Triton X-100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottstein, J.; Scheer, H.

    1983-04-01

    At leat three forms of Triton X-100-solubilized bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) have been characterized by UV/visible/near-IR absorption and CD spectra. One, absorbing at 770 nm, is similar to a monomeric solution in methanol. The two others have strongly red-shifted absorption peaks (860 nm and 930, 835 nm) and intense and complex CD bands in this region, indicative of strong interaction of at least two and three molecules of BChl a, respectively.

  12. Notch Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.

    2004-01-01

    Notch antennas, also known as the tapered slot antenna (TSA), have been the topics of research for decades. TSA has demonstrated multi-octave bandwidth, moderate gain (7 to 10 dB), and symmetric E- and H- plane beam patterns and can be used for many different applications. This chapter summarizes the research activities on notch antennas over the past decade with emphasis on their most recent advances and applications. This chapter begins with some discussions on the designs of single TSA; then follows with detailed discussions of issues associated with TSA designs and performance characteristics. To conclude the chapter, some recent developments in TSA arrays and their applications are highlighted.

  13. Spacecraft Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamnejad, Vahraz; Manshadi, Farzin; Rahmat-Samii, Yahya; Cramer, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Some of the various categories of issues that must be considered in the selection and design of spacecraft antennas for a Personal Access Satellite System (PASS) are addressed, and parametric studies for some of the antenna concepts to help the system designer in making the most appropriate antenna choice with regards to weight, size, and complexity, etc. are provided. The question of appropriate polarization for the spacecraft as well as for the User Terminal Antenna required particular attention and was studied in some depth. Circular polarization seems to be the favored outcome of this study. Another problem that has generally been a complicating factor in designing the multiple beam reflector antennas, is the type of feeds (single vs. multiple element and overlapping vs. non-overlapping clusters) needed for generating the beams. This choice is dependent on certain system design factors, such as the required frequency reuse, acceptable interbeam isolation, antenna efficiency, number of beams scanned, and beam-forming network (BFN) complexity. This issue is partially addressed, but is not completely resolved. Indications are that it may be possible to use relatively simple non-overlapping clusters of only a few elements, unless a large frequency reuse and very stringent isolation levels are required.

  14. Antenna theory and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzman, W. L.; Thiele, G. A.

    Antenna fundamentals and definitions are examined, taking into account electromagnetic fundamentals, the solution of Maxwell's equations for radiation problems, the ideal dipole, the radiation pattern, directivity and gain, reciprocity and antenna pattern measurements, antenna impedance and radiation efficiency, antenna polarization, antennas in communication links and radar, and the receiving properties of antennas. Some simple radiating systems are considered along with arrays, line sources, wire antennas, broadband antennas, moment methods, and aperture antennas. High-frequency methods and aspects of antenna synthesis are discussed, giving attention to geometrical optics, physical optics, wedge diffraction theory, the ray-fixed coordinate system, the cylindrical parabolic antenna, and linear array methods.

  15. Recent Progress in Chemical Modifications of Chlorophylls and Bacteriochlorophylls for the Applications in Photodynamic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Staron, Jakub; Boron, Bożena; Karcz, Dariusz; Szczygieł, Małgorzata; Fiedor, Leszek

    2015-01-01

    Since photodynamic therapy emerged as a promising cancer treatment, the development of photosensitizers has gained great interest. In this context, the photosynthetic pigments, chlorophylls and bacteriochlorophylls, as excellent natural photosensitizers, attracted much attention. In effect, several (bacterio) chlorophyll-based phototherapeutic agents have been developed and (or are about to) enter the clinics. The aim of this review article is to give a survey of the advances in the synthetic chemistry of these pigments which have been made over the last decade, and which are pertinent to the application of their derivatives as photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy (PDT). The review focuses on the synthetic strategies undertaken to obtain novel derivatives of (bacterio)chlorophylls with both enhanced photosensitizing and tumorlocalizing properties, and also improved photo- and chemical stability. These include modifications of the C- 17-ester moiety, the isocyclic ring, the central binding pocket, and the derivatization of peripheral functionalities at the C-3 and C-7 positions with carbohydrate-, peptide-, and nanoparticle moieties or other residues. The effects of these modifications on essential features of the pigments are discussed, such as the efficiency of reactive oxygen species generation, photostability, phototoxicity and interactions with living organisms. The review is divided into several sections. In the first part, the principles of PDT and photosensitizer action are briefly described. Then the relevant photophysical features of (bacterio)chlorophylls and earlier approaches to their modification are summarized. Next, a more detailed overview of the progress in synthetic methods is given, followed by a discussion of the effects of these modifications on the photophysics of the pigments and on their biological activity. PMID:26282940

  16. Molecular genetic and molecular evolutionary studies on the bacteriochlorophyll synthesis genes of Rhodobacter capsulatus

    SciTech Connect

    Burke-Agueero, D.H.

    1992-08-01

    Rhodobacter capsulatus, purple bacterium capable of either aerobic or photosynthetic growth, has proven to be very useful in genetic studies of photosynthesis. Forty-four genes clustered together within a 46 kilobase region are required to establish photosynthetic ability in R. capsulatus. Approximately twenty of these genes are involved in bacteriochlorophyll synthesis of which eight ``bch`` genes are the subject of this thesis. Six of these genes were found to code for the two ring reductases. The first converts protochlorophyllide (PChlide) into a chlorin, the immediate precursor to chlorophyll a, and then into a bacteriochlorin. Each reductase is shown to be made up of three subunits. PChlide reductase is coded by the genes bchN, bchB, and bchL. Proteins with amino acid sequences markedly similar to those of bchN and bchL have been shown in other organisms to be required for chlorophyll synthesis; hence, their designation as chlN and chlB. A third chloroplast-encoded gene of heretofore unknown function shares amino acid identities with bchB and is probably the third subunit of the plant PChlide reductase. The bchA locus, which encodes the chlorin reductase, is found to be made up of three separate, translationally coupled genes, referred to as bchX, bchY, and bchZ. Amino acid similarities between bchX, bchL, and the nitrogenase reductase protein nifH suggest that all three classes of proteins share certain three-dimensional structural features, including elements that are central to the enzymatic mechanism of nifH. PChlide reductase and chlorin reductase are clearly derived from a common ancestor. Several lines of analysis suggests the ancestor of both enzyme systems reduced PChlide twice to produce bacteriochlorophyll supporting the concept bacteriochlorophyll as the ancestral reaction center pigment.

  17. Molecular genetic and molecular evolutionary studies on the bacteriochlorophyll synthesis genes of Rhodobacter capsulatus

    SciTech Connect

    Burke-Agueero, D.H.

    1992-08-01

    Rhodobacter capsulatus, purple bacterium capable of either aerobic or photosynthetic growth, has proven to be very useful in genetic studies of photosynthesis. Forty-four genes clustered together within a 46 kilobase region are required to establish photosynthetic ability in R. capsulatus. Approximately twenty of these genes are involved in bacteriochlorophyll synthesis of which eight bch'' genes are the subject of this thesis. Six of these genes were found to code for the two ring reductases. The first converts protochlorophyllide (PChlide) into a chlorin, the immediate precursor to chlorophyll a, and then into a bacteriochlorin. Each reductase is shown to be made up of three subunits. PChlide reductase is coded by the genes bchN, bchB, and bchL. Proteins with amino acid sequences markedly similar to those of bchN and bchL have been shown in other organisms to be required for chlorophyll synthesis; hence, their designation as chlN and chlB. A third chloroplast-encoded gene of heretofore unknown function shares amino acid identities with bchB and is probably the third subunit of the plant PChlide reductase. The bchA locus, which encodes the chlorin reductase, is found to be made up of three separate, translationally coupled genes, referred to as bchX, bchY, and bchZ. Amino acid similarities between bchX, bchL, and the nitrogenase reductase protein nifH suggest that all three classes of proteins share certain three-dimensional structural features, including elements that are central to the enzymatic mechanism of nifH. PChlide reductase and chlorin reductase are clearly derived from a common ancestor. Several lines of analysis suggests the ancestor of both enzyme systems reduced PChlide twice to produce bacteriochlorophyll supporting the concept bacteriochlorophyll as the ancestral reaction center pigment.

  18. Terminal steps of bacteriochlorophyll a phytol formation in purple photosynthetic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Shioi, Y.; Sasa, T.

    1984-04-01

    Four chemically different bacteriochlorophylls (Bchls) a esterified with geranylgeraniol, dihydrogeranyl-geraniol, tetrahydrogeraniol, and phytol have been detected by high-pressure liquid chromatography in cell extracts from Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides and Chromatium vinosum. Bchl a containing phytol is the principal component, and the other three Bchls a comprise about 4% of the total Bchls a in stationary-phase cells of R. sphaeroides and C. vinosum. The high levels of the minor pigments occur in the beginning of Bchl a phytol formation, indicating that they are not degradation products, but intermediates of Bchl a phytol formation.

  19. DIRECTIONAL ANTENNA

    DOEpatents

    Bittner, B.J.

    1958-05-20

    A high-frequency directional antenna of the 360 d scaring type is described. The antenna has for its desirable features the reduction in both size and complexity of the mechanism for rotating the antenna through its scanning movement. These advantages result from the rotation of only the driven element, the reflector remaining stationary. The particular antenna structure comprises a refiector formed by a plurality of metallic slats arranged in the configuration of an annular cage having the shape of a zone of revolution. The slats are parallel to each other and are disposed at an angle of 45 d to the axis of the cage. A directional radiator is disposed inside the cage at an angle of 45 d to the axis of the cage in the same direction as the reflecting slats which it faces. As the radiator is rotated, the electromagnetic wave is reflected from the slats facing the radiator and thereafter passes through the cage on the opposite side, since these slats are not parallel with the E vector of the wave.

  20. Separation of bacteriochlorophyll homologues from green photosynthetic sulfur bacteria by reversed-phase HPLC.

    PubMed

    Borrego, C M; Garcia-Gil, L J

    1994-07-01

    A reversed-phase High Performance Liquid Cromatography (HPLC) method has been developed to accurately separate bacteriochlorophyllsc, d ande homologues in a reasonably short run time of 60 minutes. By using this method, two well-defined groups of bacteriochlorophyll homologue peaks can be discriminated. The first one consists of 4 peaks (min 24 to 30), which corresponds to the four main farnesyl homologues. The second peak subset is formed by a cluster of up to 10 minor peaks (min 33 to 40). These peaks can be related with series of several alcohol esters of the different chlorosome chlorophylls. The number of homologues was, however, quite variable depending on both, the bacteriochlorophyll and the bacterial species. The method hereby described, also provides a good separation of other photosynthetic pigments, either bacterial (Bacteriochlorophylla, chlorobactene, isorenieratene and okenone) or algal ones (Chlorophylla, Pheophytina and β-carotene). A preliminary screening of the homologue composition of several green photosynthetic bacterial species and isolates, has revealed different relative quantitative patterns. These differences seem to be related to physiological aspects rather than to taxonomic ones. The application of the method to the study of natural populations avoids the typical drawbacks on the pigment identification of overlapping eukaryotic and prokaryotic phototrophic microorganisms, giving further information about their physiological status. PMID:24310022

  1. Photostability of bacteriochlorophyll a and derivatives: potential sensitizers for photodynamic tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Limantara, Leenawaty; Koehler, Peter; Wilhelm, Brigitte; Porra, Robert J; Scheer, Hugo

    2006-01-01

    The photostabilities of bacteriochlorophyll a and several of its derivatives, which are of interest as potential sensitizers in photodynamic tumor therapy, were investigated. The pigments were irradiated with light >630 nm in organic solvents (acetone, tetrahydrofuran, pyridine, methanol, ethanol, n-propanol, 2-propanol and toluene) and in aqueous detergent solutions (cetyl-trimethyl-ammonium bromide [CTAB], lauryldimethyl-aminoxide [LDAO] or sodium dodecyl-sulfate [SDS] and Triton X-100 [TX100]). Their stabilities in these different solvents were determined in the presence and absence of an external sensitizer (pyromethyl-pheophorbide a), oxygen, sodium ascorbate and inert gas (Ar) or vacuum. The photodegradation products of bacteriochlorophyll a in acetone solution were isolated, purified by HPLC and analyzed by their absorption spectra and mass spectroscopy. Besides the well-known dehydrogenation products, such as [3-acetyl]-chlorophyll a, which were obtained as by-products, the major products had low absorption in the visible-near infrared spectral range. The spectral signature of the major component of these products was characteristic of linear open-chain tetrapyrroles, but they lacked the characteristic protonation-deprotonation behavior and reactivity of bilins with Zn(++). PMID:16438618

  2. Third order nonlinear optical properties of stacked bacteriochlorophylls in bacterial photosynthetic light-harvesting proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.X.; Laible, P.D.; Spano, F.C.; Manas, E.S.

    1997-09-01

    Enhancement of the nonresonant second order molecular hyperpolarizabilities {gamma} were observed in stacked macrocyclic molecular systems, previously in a {micro}-oxo silicon phthalocyanine (SiPcO) monomer, dimer and trimer series, and now in bacteriochlorophyll a (BChla) arrays of light harvesting (LH) proteins. Compared to monomeric BChla in a tetrahydrofuran (THF) solution, the <{gamma}> for each macrocycle was enhanced in naturally occurring stacked macrocyclic molecular systems in the bacterial photosynthetic LH proteins where BChla`s are arranged in tilted face-to-face arrays. In addition, the {gamma} enhancement is more significant in B875 of LH1 than in B850 in LH2. Theoretical modeling of the nonresonant {gamma} enhancement using simplified molecular orbitals for model SiPcO indicated that the energy level of the two photon state is crucial to the {gamma} enhancement when a two photon process is involved, whereas the charge transfer between the monomers is largely responsible when one photon near resonant process is involved. The calculated results can be extended to {gamma} enhancement in B875 and B850 arrays, suggesting that BChla in B875 are more strongly coupled than in B850. In addition, a 50--160 fold increase in <{gamma}> for the S{sub 1} excited state of relative to S{sub 0} of bacteriochlorophyll in vivo was observed which provides an alternative method for probing excited state dynamics and a potential application for molecular switching.

  3. Distribution and Physiology of Aerobic Bacteria Containing Bacteriochlorophyll a on the East and West Coasts of Australia †

    PubMed Central

    Shiba, Tsuneo; Shioi, Yuzo; Takamiya, Ken-Ichiro; Sutton, David C.; Wilkinson, Clive R.

    1991-01-01

    Aerobic heterotrophic bacteria containing bacteriochlorophyll were isolated from specimens from a wide variety of marine environments on the west (Shark Bay, Lake Clifton, Lake Heyward, and Perth) and east (near Townsville and Brisbane) coasts of Australia. The bacteria were found in a high proportion (10 to 30%) of the total heterotrophic bacterial strains isolated from marine algae, seagrasses, stromatolites, the epiphytes on stromatolites, seawater, and sands; in some cases they constituted up to 49% of the total. This is much higher than the previous report of 6% from Japan. A high percentage, 13%, was also found in the seawater of Hamelin Pool, at Shark Bay, where the salinity was 66%. The number of these bacteria was generally low in seawater and sands, with a few exceptions. There were no aerobic bacteriochlorophyll-containing bacteria on sponges or corals. The isolated strains were orange or pink, and most had absorption maxima around 800 and 850 to 870 nm, the latter range being the absorption of bacteriochlorophyll a in vivo. The maximum bacteriochlorophyll content was 1 nmol/mg (dry weight) of bacterial cells. Most of the bacteria did not grow phototrophically under anaerobic conditions in a broth medium containing succinate. Cells and cell extracts grown under aerobic conditions had photochemical activities such as reversible photooxidations of the reaction center and cytochrome(s). Some strains showed denitrifying activity. The optimal salinity for bacterial growth varied between strains. PMID:16348398

  4. Astigmatism in reflector antennas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogdell, J. R.; Davis, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    Astigmatic phase error in large parabolic reflector antennas is discussed. A procedure for focusing an antenna and diagnosing the presence and degree of astigmatism is described. Theoretical analysis is conducted to determine the nature of this error in such antennas.

  5. Raman spectrum of bacteriochlorophyll a in the S1 state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizawa, Ei-ichi; Hashimoto, Hideki; Koyama, Yasushi

    1991-07-01

    The S 1 Raman spectrum of bacteriochlorophyll a is reported for the first time. A one-color experiment using the 351 nm picosecond pulses (duration 50 ps and repetition 1 kHz) for tetrahydrofuran solution detected a transient species, which showed distinct Raman lines at 1567, 1409 and 1320 cm -1 and weak profiles around 1169, 1092, 1051 and 794 cm -1. The other one-color experiment using the 355 nm nanosecond pulses (duration 12 ns and repetition 10 Hz) detected the T 1 species reported previously showing Raman lines at 1578 and 1330 cm -1. Thus, the newly identified transient species, which was pumped and probed within 50 ps, is assigned to S 1.

  6. Singlet and triplet excited state properties of natural chlorophylls and bacteriochlorophylls

    SciTech Connect

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz; Blankenship, R. E.

    2010-11-18

    Ten naturally occurring chlorophylls (a, b, c{sub 2}, d) and bacteriochlorophylls (a, b, c, d, e, g) were purified and studied using the optical spectroscopic techniques of both steady state and time-resolved absorption and fluorescence. The studies were carried out at room temperature in nucleophilic solvents in which the central Mg is hexacoordinated. The comprehensive studies of singlet excited state lifetimes show a clear dependency on the structural features of the macrocycle and terminal substituents. The wide-ranging studies of triplet state lifetime demonstrate the existence of an energy gap law for these molecules. The knowledge of the dynamics and the energies of the triplet state that were obtained in other studies allowed us to construct an energy gap law expression that can be used to estimate the triplet state energies of any (B)chlorophyll molecule from its triplet lifetime obtained in a liquid environment.

  7. Adaptive antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, P.

    1987-04-01

    The basic principles of adaptive antennas are outlined in terms of the Wiener-Hopf expression for maximizing signal to noise ratio in an arbitrary noise environment; the analogy with generalized matched filter theory provides a useful aid to understanding. For many applications, there is insufficient information to achieve the above solution and thus non-optimum constrained null steering algorithms are also described, together with a summary of methods for preventing wanted signals being nulled by the adaptive system. The three generic approaches to adaptive weight control are discussed; correlation steepest descent, weight perturbation and direct solutions based on sample matrix conversion. The tradeoffs between hardware complexity and performance in terms of null depth and convergence rate are outlined. The sidelobe cancellor technique is described. Performance variation with jammer power and angular distribution is summarized and the key performance limitations identified. The configuration and performance characteristics of both multiple beam and phase scan array antennas are covered, with a brief discussion of performance factors.

  8. Triplet energy transfer between bacteriochlorophyll and carotenoids in B850 light-harvesting complexes ofRhodobacter sphaeroides R-26.1.

    PubMed

    Farhoosh, R; Chynwat, V; Gebhard, R; Lugtenburg, J; Frank, H A

    1994-11-01

    The build-up and decay of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) and carotenoid triplet states were studied by flash absorption spectroscopy in (a) the B800-850 antenna complex ofRhodobacter (Rb.)sphaeroides wild type strain 2.4.1, (b) theRb. sphaeroides R-26.1 B850 light-harvesting complex incorporated with spheroidene, (c) the B850 complex incorporated with 3,4-dihydrospheroidene, (d) the B850 complex incorporated with 3,4,5,6-tetrahydrospheroidene and (e) theRb. sphaeroides R-26.1 B850 complex lacking carotenoids. Steady state absorption and circular dichroism spectroscopy were used to evaluate the structural integrity of the complexes. The transient data were fit according to either single or double exponential rate expressions. The triplet lifetimes of the carotenoids were observed to be 7.0±0.1 μs for the B800-850 complex, 14±2 μs for the B850 complex incorporated with spheroidene, and 19±2 μs for the B850 complex incorporated with 3,4-dihydrospheroidene. The BChl triplet lifetime in the B850 complex was 80±5 μs. No quenching of BChl triplet states was seen in the B850 complex incorporated with 3,4,5,6-tetrahydrospheroidene. For the B850 complex incorporated with spheroidene and with 3,4-dihydrospheroidene, the percentage of BChl quenched by carotenoids was found to be related to the percentage of carotenoid incorporation. The triplet energy transfer efficiencies are compared to the values for singlet energy transfer measured previously (Frank et al. (1993) Photochem. Photobiol. 57: 49-55) on the same samples. These studies provide a systematic approach to exploring the effects of state energies and lifetimes on energy transfer between BChls and carotenoids in vivo. PMID:24306503

  9. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1995-01-01

    Part of the 1994 Industrial Minerals Review. The production, consumption, and applications of construction aggregates are reviewed. In 1994, the production of construction aggregates, which includes crushed stone and construction sand and gravel combined, increased 7.7 percent to 2.14 Gt compared with the previous year. These record production levels are mostly a result of funding for highway construction work provided by the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991. Demand is expected to increase for construction aggregates in 1995.

  10. Computer controlled antenna system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raumann, N. A.

    1972-01-01

    The application of small computers using digital techniques for operating the servo and control system of large antennas is discussed. The advantages of the system are described. The techniques were evaluated with a forty foot antenna and the Sigma V computer. Programs have been completed which drive the antenna directly without the need for a servo amplifier, antenna position programmer or a scan generator.

  11. ARISE antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewski, Arthur B.; Noca, Muriel; Ulvestad, James

    2000-03-01

    Supermassive black holes are among the most spectacular objects in the Universe, and are laboratories for physics in extreme conditions. Understanding the physics of massive black holes and related phenomena is a primary goal of the ARISE mission. The scientific goals of the mission are described in detail on the ARISE web site http://arise.ipl.nasa.gov and in the ARISE Science Goals document. The following paper, as the title suggests, is not intended to be a comprehensive description of ARISE, but deals only with one aspect of the ARISE mission-the inflatable antenna which is the key element of the ARISE spacecraft. This spacecraft,due to the extensive reliance on inflatables, may be considered as the first generation Gossamer spacecraft

  12. Weighted aggregation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiveson, A. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The use of a weighted aggregation technique to improve the precision of the overall LACIE estimate is considered. The manner in which a weighted aggregation technique is implemented given a set of weights is described. The problem of variance estimation is discussed and the question of how to obtain the weights in an operational environment is addressed.

  13. A reconfigurable plasma antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rajneesh; Bora, Dhiraj

    2010-03-15

    An experiment aimed at investigating the antenna properties of different plasma structures of a plasma column as a reconfigurable plasma antenna, is reported. A 30 cm long plasma column is excited by surface wave, which acts as a plasma antenna. By changing the operating parameters, e.g., working pressure, drive frequency, input power, radius of glass tube, length of plasma column, and argon gas, single plasma antenna (plasma column) can be transformed to multiple small antenna elements (plasma blobs). It is also reported that number, length, and separation between two antenna elements can be controlled by operating parameters. Moreover, experiments are also carried out to study current profile, potential profile, conductivity profile, phase relations, radiation power patterns, etc. of the antenna elements. The effect on directivity with the number of antenna elements is also studied. Findings of the study indicate that entire structure of antenna elements can be treated as a phased array broadside vertical plasma antenna, which produces more directive radiation pattern than the single plasma antenna as well as physical properties and directivity of such antenna can be controlled by operating parameters. The study reveals the advantages of a plasma antenna over the conventional antenna in the sense that different antennas can be formed by tuning the operating parameters.

  14. Introduction of perfluoroalkyl chain into the esterifying moiety of bacteriochlorophyll c in the green sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum by pigment biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Saga, Yoshitaka; Yamashita, Hayato; Hirota, Keiya

    2016-09-15

    The green sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Chlorobaculum (Cba.) tepidum was grown in liquid cultures containing perfluoro-1-decanol, 1H,1H,2H,2H-heptadecafluoro-1-decanol [CF3(CF2)7(CH2)2OH] or 1H,1H-nonadecafluoro-1-decanol [CF3(CF2)8CH2OH], to introduce rigid and fluorophilic chains into the esterifying moiety of light-harvesting bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) c. Exogenous 1H,1H,2H,2H-heptadecafluoro-1-decanol was successfully attached to the 17(2)-carboxy group of bacteriochlorophyllide (BChlide) c in vivo: the relative ratio of the unnatural BChl c esterified with this perfluoroalcohol over the total BChl c was 10.3%. Heat treatment of the liquid medium containing 1H,1H,2H,2H-heptadecafluoro-1-decanol with β-cyclodextrin before inoculation increased the relative ratio of the BChl c derivative esterified with this alcohol in the total BChl c in Cba. tepidum. In a while, 1H,1H-nonadecafluoro-1-decanol was not attached to BChlide c in Cba. tepidum, which was grown by its supplementation. These results suggest that the rigidity close to the hydroxy group of the esterifying alcohol is not suitable for the recognition by the BChl c synthase called BchK in Cba. tepidum. The unnatural BChl c esterified with 1H,1H,2H,2H-heptadecafluoro-1-decanol participated in BChl c self-aggregates in chlorosomes. PMID:27427396

  15. Spectral properties of BChl c in nematic liquid crystals. II: Aggregated form of dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkowiak, A.; Francke, C.; Amesz, J.; Planner, A.; Frackowiak, D.

    1996-11-01

    The orientation properties of aggregated bacteriochlorophyll c in a nematic liquid crystal matrix have been studied by means of polarized steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopy. The pigment introduced to the model system was predominantly in tetrameric (or hexameric) form with absorption maxima located at about 670 and 710 nm. Two tetramers with long-wavelength maxima at 704 and 722 nm could be distinguished. They exhibited different orientations in liquid crystal and different yields of fluorescence. Both tetramers exhibited delayed luminescence in the μs time region.

  16. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, W.H.; Tepordei, V.V.; Bolen, W.P.

    2000-01-01

    Construction aggregates consist primarily of crushed stone and construction sand and gravel. Total estimated production of construction aggregates increased in 1999 by about 2% to 2.39 Gt (2.64 billion st) compared with 1998. This record production level continued an expansion that began in 1992. By commodities, crushed stone production increased 3.3%, while sand and gravel production increased by about 0.5%.

  17. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1994-01-01

    Part of a special section on industrial minerals in 1993. The 1993 production of construction aggregates increased 6.3 percent over the 1992 figure, to reach 2.01 Gt. This represents the highest estimated annual production of combined crushed stone and construction sand and gravel ever recorded in the U.S. The outlook for construction aggregates and the issues facing the industry are discussed.

  18. Lifetimes of bacteriochlorophyll fluorescence in Rhodopseudomonas viridis and Heliobacterium chlorum at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinherenbrink, F. A.; Cheng, P.; Amesz, J.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1993-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetimes of isolated membranes of Rhodopseudomonas viridis were measured in the temperature range of 77 K to 25 K. At room temperature, the main component of the fluorescence decay of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) b had a time constant of 50 ps. In contrast to other purple bacteria, the emission at low temperature was spectrally homogeneous and showed essentially single lifetimes of 140 ps at 77 K and 180 ps at 25 K, with the primary electron donor in the oxidized state. Taking into account the relative fluorescence yields with open and closed reaction centers, we arrive at numbers of 125 ps and 215 ps, respectively, for open reaction centers. These numbers are significantly smaller than expected on the basis of measurements of the efficiency of charge separation, perhaps suggesting that the excitation decay in the absence of reaction centers is considerably faster at low temperature than at room temperature. At least four different spectral components with different lifetimes were observed at 25 K in the emission of Heliobacterium chlorum, a short-wavelength component of about 30 ps and three longer-wavelength components of about 100 ps, 300 ps, and 900 ps. This indicates a strong heterogeneity in the emitting pigment, BChl g-808. The component with the shortest lifetime does not appear to be affected by the redox state of the reaction center and might reflect energy transfer to BChl g species which are connected to the reaction center.

  19. Solvation Effect of Bacteriochlorophyll Excitons in Light-Harvesting Complex LH2

    PubMed Central

    Urbonienė, V.; Vrublevskaja, O.; Trinkunas, G.; Gall, A.; Robert, B.; Valkunas, L.

    2007-01-01

    We have characterized the influence of the protein environment on the spectral properties of the bacteriochlorophyll (Bchl) molecules of the peripheral light-harvesting (or LH2) complex from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The spectral density functions of the pigments responsible for the 800 and 850 nm electronic transitions were determined from the temperature dependence of the Bchl absorption spectra in different environments (detergent micelles and native membranes). The spectral density function is virtually independent of the hydrophobic support that the protein experiences. The reorganization energy for the B850 Bchls is 220 cm−1, which is almost twice that of the B800 Bchls, and its Huang-Rhys factor reaches 8.4. Around the transition point temperature, and at higher temperatures, both the static spectral inhomogeneity and the resonance interactions become temperature-dependent. The inhomogeneous distribution function of the transitions exhibits less temperature dependence when LH2 is embedded in membranes, suggesting that the lipid phase protects the protein. However, the temperature dependence of the fluorescence spectra of LH2 cannot be fitted using the same parameters determined from the analysis of the absorption spectra. Correct fitting requires the lowest exciton states to be additionally shifted to the red, suggesting the reorganization of the exciton spectrum. PMID:17513366

  20. Solvent effects on the resonance Raman and electronic absorption spectra of bacteriochlorophyll a cation radical

    SciTech Connect

    Misono, Yasuhito; Itoh, Koichi; Limanatara, Leenawaty; Koyama, Yasushi

    1996-02-08

    Resonance Raman and electronic absorption spectra of bacteriocholrophyll a cation radical (BChl a{sup .+}) were recorded in 14 different kinds of solvents. The frequency of the ring-breathing Raman band of BChl a{sup .+} was in the region of 1596-1599 cm{sup -1} in solvents forming the pentacoordinated state in neutral bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a), while it was in the region of 1584-1588 cm{sup -1} in solvents forming the hexacoordinated state. BChl a{sup .+} exhibited a key absorption band in the regions 546-554 and 557-563 nm in the above penta- and hexa-coordinating solvents. Therefore, it has been concluded that the penta- and hexa-coordinated states are retained even after conversion of BChl a into BChl a{sup .+} (one-electron oxidization). Application of this rule to the case of 2-propanol solution showed transformation from the penta- to the hexa-coordinated state upon one-electron oxidation in this particular solution. The coordination states of BChl a{sup .+} could be correlated with the donor number(DN) and the Taft parameters, {Beta} and {pi}{sup *}, of the solvent: The hexacoordinated state was formed in solvents with DN >= 18 or {Beta} > 0.5 showing higher electron donating power, while the pentacoordinated state was formed in solvents with {pi}{sup *} > 0.65 showing higher dielectric stabilization. 27 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Physicochemical studies of demetalation of light-harvesting bacteriochlorophyll isomers purified from green sulfur photosynthetic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Yuki; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Kashimura, Shigenori; Saga, Yoshitaka

    2009-01-01

    Demetalation kinetics of bacteriochlorophylls (BChls) c, d and e from green sulfur photosynthetic bacteria were studied under weakly acidic conditions. Demetalation rate constants of BChl e possessing a formyl group at the 7-position were significantly smaller than those of BChls c and d, which had a methyl group at this position. The activation energy of demetalation of 3(1)R-8,12-diethyl([E,E])-BChl e was 1.5-times larger than that of 3(1)R-[E,E]-BChl c. 15N-labeled 3(1)R-[E,E]-BChls c and e were purified from cells of green sulfur bacteria grown in a medium containing 15NH4Cl, and their 15N NMR spectra were measured. The chemical shifts of N21, N22 and N23 atoms of 3(1)R-[E,E]-BChl e were lower-field shifted than those of 3(1)R-[E,E]-BChl c, respectively, and especially the difference in chemical shifts of N22 was significantly large. These results suggest that the electron-withdrawing formyl group at the 7-position of BChl e affected an electronic state of the chlorin macrocycle and caused BChl e to be more tolerant for removal of the central magnesium compared with BChls c and d. PMID:19558420

  2. Quantification of two forms of green sulfur bacteria in their natural habitat using bacteriochlorophyll fluorescence spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharcheva, Anastasia V.; Zhiltsova, Anna A.; Lunina, Olga N.; Savvichev, Alexander S.; Patsaeva, Svetlana V.

    2016-04-01

    Detection of phototropic organisms in their natural habitat using optical instruments operating under water is urgently needed for many tasks of ecological monitoring. While fluorescence methods are widely applied nowadays to detect and characterize phytoplankton communities, the techniques for detection and recognition of anoxygenic phototrophs are considered challenging. Differentiation of the forms of anoxygenic green sulfur bacteria in natural water using spectral techniques remains problematic. Green sulfur bacteria could be found in two forms, green-colored (containing BChl d in pigment compound) and brown-colored (containing BChl e), have the special ecological niche in such reservoirs. Separate determination of these microorganisms by spectral methods is complicated because of similarity of spectral characteristics of their pigments. We describe the novel technique of quantification of two forms of green sulfur bacteria directly in water using bacteriochlorophyll fluorescence without pigment extraction. This technique is noninvasive and could be applied in remote mode in the water bodies with restricted water circulation to determine simultaneously concentrations of two forms of green sulfur bacteria in their natural habitat.

  3. JPL antenna technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeland, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    Systems-level technology for evolving cost-effective, STS compatible antennas that will be automatically deployed in orbit to perform a variety of missions in the 1985 to 2000 time period is discussed. For large space-based antenna systems, the LSST program has selected deployable antennas for development. The maturity of this class of antenna, demonstrated by the success of smaller size apertures, provides a potential capability for satisfying a significant number of near-term, space-based applications. The offset wrap-rib concept development is the basis of the JPL LSST antenna technology development program. Supporting technology to the antenna concept development include analytical performance prediction, the capability for measuring and evaluating mechanical antenna performance in the intended service environment, and the development of candidate system-level configurations for potential applications utilizing the offset wrap-rib antenna concept.

  4. Antenna development at DARPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corey, Larry; Jaska, Esko

    2004-09-01

    This paper reviews recent and ongoing antenna technology and systems development in the Special Projects Office of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA/SPO). These programs fall into two categories: development and application of antenna component technologies and development of transportable phased-array radar antennas. These development programs are presented in a chronological order.

  5. Space-communications antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyrev, Nikolai D.

    This textbook examines the design principles, requirements, and technical characteristics of earth-station and space-station antennas. Methods for realizing high gain and low noise temperature are examined along with ways to enhance antenna performance. Particular attention is given to the antenna-feed sections of earth stations.

  6. Coherently combining antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dybdal, Robert B. (Inventor); Curry, Samuel J. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An apparatus includes antenna elements configured to receive a signal including pseudo-random code, and electronics configured to use the pseudo-random code to determine time delays of signals incident upon the antenna elements and to compensate the signals to coherently combine the antenna elements.

  7. Structure, Function and Reconstitution of Antenna Complexes of Green Photosynthetic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenship, Robert E.

    2005-06-10

    Most chlorophyll-type pigments in a photosynthetic organism function as an antenna, absorbing light and transferring excitations to a photochemical reaction center where energy storage takes place by a series of chemical reactions. The green photosynthetic bacteria are characterized by large antenna complexes known as chlorosomes, in which pigment-pigment interactions are of dominant importance. The overall objective of this project is to determine the mechanisms of excitation transfer and regulation of this unique antenna system, including how it is integrated into the rest of the photosynthetic energy transduction apparatus. Techniques that are being used in this research include biochemical analysis, spectroscopy, microscopy, X-ray structural studies, and reconstitution from purified components. Our recent results indicate that the chlorosome baseplate structure, which is the membrane attachment site for the chlorosome to the membrane, is a unique pigment-protein that contains large amounts of carotenoids and small amounts of bacteriochlorophyll a. Reconstitution of directed energy transfer in chlorosomes will be carried out using purified baseplates and oligomeric pigments. The integral membrane B808-866 antenna complex from Chloroflexus aurantiacus and the Fenna-Matthews-Olson protein-reaction center complex from green sulfur bacteria will be characterized by spectroscopic and structural techniques.

  8. Design of a minimal polypeptide unit for bacteriochlorophyll binding and self-assembly based on photosynthetic bacterial light-harvesting proteins.

    PubMed

    Noy, Dror; Dutton, P Leslie

    2006-02-21

    We introduce LH1beta24, a minimal 24 amino acid polypeptide that binds and assembles bacteriochlorophylls (BChls) in micelles of octyl beta-glucoside (OG) into complexes with spectral properties that resemble those of B820, a universal intermediate in the assembly of native purple bacterial light-harvesting complexes (LHs). LH1beta24 was designed by a survey of sequences and crystal structures of bacterial LH proteins from different organisms combined with currently available information from in vitro reconstitution studies and genetically modified LHs in vivo. We took as a template for the design sphbeta31, a truncated 31 amino acid analogue of the native beta-apoprotein from the core LH complex of Rhodobacter sphaeroides. This peptide self-assembles with BChls to form B820 and, upon cooling and lowering OG concentration, forms red-shifted B850 spectral species that are considered analogous to native LH complexes. We find that LH1beta24 self-assembles with BChl in OG to form homodimeric B820-type subunits comprising two LH1beta24 and two BChl molecules per subunit. We demonstrate, by modeling the structure using the highly homologous structure of LH2 from Rhodospirillum molischianum, that it has the minimal size for BChl binding. Additionally, we have compared the self-assembly of sphbeta31 and LH1beta24 with BChls and discovered that the association enthalpies and entropies of both species are similar to those measured for native LH1 from Rhodospirillum rubrum. However, sphbeta31 readily aggregates into intermediate higher oligomeric species and further to form B850 species; moreover, the assembly process of these oligomers is not reversible, and they are apparently large nonspecific BChl-peptide coaggregates rather than well-defined nativelike LH complexes. Similar aggregates were observed during LH1beta24 assembly, but these were formed less readily and required lower temperatures than sphbeta31. In view of these results, we reevaluate previous in vitro

  9. JPL antenna technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeland, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Plans for evaluating, designing, fabricating, transporting and deploying cost effective and STS compatible offset wrap rib antennas up to 300 meters in diameter for mobile communications, Earth resources observation, and for the orbiting VLBI are reviewed. The JPL surface measurement system, intended for large mesh deployable antenna applications will be demonstrated and validated as part of the antenna ground based demonstration program. Results of the offset wrap rib deployable antenna technology development will include: (1) high confidence structural designs for antennas up to 100 meters in diameter; (2) high confidence estimates of functional performance and fabrication cost for a wide range of antenna sizes (up to 300 meters in diameter); (3) risk assessment for fabricating the large size antennas; and (4) 55 meter diameter flight quality hardware that can be cost effectively completed toto accommodate a flight experiment and/or application.

  10. Antenna Controller Replacement Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Roger Y.; Morgan, Scott C.; Strain, Martha M.; Rockwell, Stephen T.; Shimizu, Kenneth J.; Tehrani, Barzia J.; Kwok, Jaclyn H.; Tuazon-Wong, Michelle; Valtier, Henry; Nalbandi, Reza; Wert, Michael; Leung, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    The Antenna Controller Replacement (ACR) software accurately points and monitors the Deep Space Network (DSN) 70-m and 34-m high-efficiency (HEF) ground-based antennas that are used to track primarily spacecraft and, periodically, celestial targets. To track a spacecraft, or other targets, the antenna must be accurately pointed at the spacecraft, which can be very far away with very weak signals. ACR s conical scanning capability collects the signal in a circular pattern around the target, calculates the location of the strongest signal, and adjusts the antenna pointing to point directly at the spacecraft. A real-time, closed-loop servo control algorithm performed every 0.02 second allows accurate positioning of the antenna in order to track these distant spacecraft. Additionally, this advanced servo control algorithm provides better antenna pointing performance in windy conditions. The ACR software provides high-level commands that provide a very easy user interface for the DSN operator. The operator only needs to enter two commands to start the antenna and subreflector, and Master Equatorial tracking. The most accurate antenna pointing is accomplished by aligning the antenna to the Master Equatorial, which because of its small size and sheltered location, has the most stable pointing. The antenna has hundreds of digital and analog monitor points. The ACR software provides compact displays to summarize the status of the antenna, subreflector, and the Master Equatorial. The ACR software has two major functions. First, it performs all of the steps required to accurately point the antenna (and subreflector and Master Equatorial) at the spacecraft (or celestial target). This involves controlling the antenna/ subreflector/Master-Equatorial hardware, initiating and monitoring the correct sequence of operations, calculating the position of the spacecraft relative to the antenna, executing the real-time servo control algorithm to maintain the correct position, and

  11. Contribution of bacteriochlorophyll conformation to the distribution of site-energies in the FMO protein.

    PubMed

    MacGowan, Stuart A; Senge, Mathias O

    2016-04-01

    The structural data for the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) protein indicate that the bacteriochlorophylls (BChls) display a significant degree of conformational heterogeneity of their peripheral substituents and the protein-induced nonplanar skeletal deformations of the tetrapyrrole macrocycle. As electronic properties of chromophores are altered by such differences, a conformational effect may influence the site-energies of specific pigments and thus play a role in mediating the excitation energy transfer dynamics, but this has not yet been established. The difficulty of assessing this question is shown to be partly the result of the inability of the sequential truncation approach usually employed to account for interactions between the conformations of the macrocycle and its substituents and an alternative approach is suggested. By assigning the BChl atoms to meaningful atom groups and performing all possible permutations of partial optimizations in a full-factorial design, where each group is either frozen in the crystal geometry or optimized in vacuo, followed by excited state calculations on each resulting structure (PM6//ZIndo/S), the specific effects of the conformations of each BChl component as well as mutual interactions between the molecular fragments on the site-energy can be delineated. This factorial relaxation procedure gives different estimates of the macrocycle conformational perturbation than the approach of sequentially truncating the BChl periphery. The results were evaluated in the context of published site-energies for the FMO pigments from three species to identify how conformational effects contribute to their distribution and instances of cross-species conservation and functional divergence of the BChl nonplanarity conformational contribution are described. PMID:26851682

  12. Redox effects on the excited-state lifetime in chlorosomes and bacteriochlorophyll c oligomers.

    PubMed Central

    van Noort, P I; Zhu, Y; LoBrutto, R; Blankenship, R E

    1997-01-01

    Oligomers of [E,E] BChl CF (8, 12-diethyl bacteriochlorophyll c esterified with farnesol (F)) and [Pr,E] BChl CF (analogously, M methyl, Pr propyl) in hexane and aqueous detergent or lipid micelles were studied by means of steady-state absorption, time-resolved fluorescence, and electron spin resonance spectroscopy. The maximum absorption wavelength, excited-state dynamics, and electron spin resonance (EPR) linewidths are similar to those of native and reconstituted chlorosomes of Chlorobium tepidum. The maximum absorption wavelength of oligomers of [E,E] BChl CF was consistently blue-shifted as compared to that of [Pr,E] BChl CF oligomers, which is ascribed to the formation of smaller oligomers with [E,E] BChl CF than [Pr,E] BChl CF. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements show an excited-state lifetime of 10 ps or less in nonreduced samples of native and reconstituted chlorosomes of Chlorobium tepidum. Under reduced conditions the excited-state lifetime increased to tens of picoseconds, and energy transfer to BChl a or long-wavelength absorbing BChl c was observed. Oligomers of [E,E] BChl CF and [Pr,E] BChl CF in aqueous detergent or lipid micelles show a similar short excited-state lifetime under nonreduced conditions and an increase up to several tens of picoseconds upon reduction. These results indicate rapid quenching of excitation energy in nonreduced samples of chlorosomes and aqueous BChl c oligomers. EPR spectroscopy shows that traces of oxidized BChl c radicals are present in nonreduced and absent in reduced samples of chlorosomes and BChl c oligomers. This suggests that the observed short excited-state lifetimes in nonreduced samples of chlorosomes and BChl c oligomers may be ascribed to excited-state quenching by BChl c radicals. The narrow EPR linewidth suggests that the BChl c are arranged in clusters of 16 and 6 molecules in chlorosomes of Chlorobium tepidum and Chloroflexus aurantiacus, respectively. PMID:8994616

  13. Temperature dependence of optical spectra of bacteriochlorophyll a in solution and in low-temperature glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Bellacchio, E.; Sauer, K. |

    1999-03-25

    Absorption, fluorescence emission, and fluorescence excitation spectra of bacteriochlorophyll a [BChL a] are examined throughout the temperature range from 298 to 79 K in several glass-forming solvents. Changes in the absorption spectra that occur continuously throughout this range may reflect increased extent of coordination of the central Mg, changes in solvent dielectric, and/or altered hydrogen bonding. Fluorescence emission spectra exhibit a new feature that grows steadily, beginning at temperatures below about 250 K in solvents that are hydrogen-bond donors: I-propanol and 2-propanol. The emerging fluorescence band, located about 300 cm{sup {minus}1} to the blue of the fluorescence band seen at higher temperatures, achieves nearly equal amplitude at 163 K and below. It is noteworthy that no corresponding feature appears in the absorption on the blue side of the Q{sub y} absorption band. The Kennard-Stepanov relation between absorption and fluorescence, which holds with somewhat elevated T{sup *} values in the high-temperature region, is seen to fail dramatically at lower temperatures as the short-wavelength fluorescence feature grows. The short-wavelength feature is interpreted as fluorescence resulting from an excited electronic state that is conformationally unrelaxed. At temperatures below 178 K evidence for additional spectroscopic features appears, especially in conjunction with measurements of emission spectra using different excitation wavelengths and of excitation spectra of fluorescence measured at different emission wavelengths. This is in the region of matrix glass formation, and the new BChl a components may reflect site inhomogeneity. Similar spectroscopic studies of BChl a in non-hydrogen-bonding solvents do not provide evidence of new blue-shifted fluorescence in the 298--79 K temperature range. They do, however, exhibit evidence of site inhomogeneity in the low-temperature glass matrices. Implications are discussed regarding the interpretation

  14. Bacteriochlorophyll and community structure of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria in a particle-rich estuary.

    PubMed

    Cottrell, Matthew T; Ras, Josephine; Kirchman, David L

    2010-07-01

    Photoheterotrophic microbes use organic substrates and light energy to satisfy their demand for carbon and energy and seem to be well adapted to eutrophic estuarine and oligotrophic oceanic environments. One type of photoheterotroph, aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP) bacteria, is especially abundant in particle-rich, turbid estuaries. To explore questions regarding the controls of these photoheterotrophic bacteria, we examined their abundance by epifluorescence microscopy, concentrations of the light-harvesting pigment, bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) and the diversity of pufM and 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes in the Chesapeake Bay. Concentrations of BChl a varied substantially, much more so than AAP bacterial abundance, along the estuarine salinity gradient. The BChl a concentration was correlated with turbidity only when oceanic and estuarine waters were considered together. Concentrations of BChl a and BChl a quotas were higher in particle-associated than in free-living AAP bacterial communities and appear to reflect physiological adaptation, not different AAP bacterial communities; pufM genes did not differ between particle-associated and free-living communities. In contrast, particle-associated and free-living bacterial communities were significantly different, on the basis of the analysis of 16S rRNA genes. The BChl a quota of AAP bacteria was not correlated with turbidity, suggesting that pigment synthesis varies in direct response to particles, not light attenuation. The AAP bacteria seem to synthesize more BChl a when dissolved and particulate substrates are available than when only dissolved materials are accessible, which has implications for understanding the impact of substrates on the level of photoheterotrophy compared with heterotrophy in AAP bacteria. PMID:20182527

  15. Specific Gene bciD for C7-Methyl Oxidation in Bacteriochlorophyll e Biosynthesis of Brown-Colored Green Sulfur Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Jiro; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Satoh, Souichirou; Tsukatani, Yusuke; Yokono, Makio; Noguchi, Masato; Tanaka, Ayumi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    The gene named bciD, which encodes the enzyme involved in C7-formylation in bacteriochlorophyll e biosynthesis, was found and investigated by insertional inactivation in the brown-colored green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum limnaeum (previously called Chlorobium phaeobacteroides). The bciD mutant cells were green in color, and accumulated bacteriochlorophyll c homologs bearing the 7-methyl group, compared to C7-formylated BChl e homologs in the wild type. BChl-c homolog compositions in the mutant were further different from those in Chlorobaculum tepidum which originally produced BChl c: (31S)-8-isobutyl-12-ethyl-BChl c was unusually predominant. PMID:23560066

  16. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1993-01-01

    Part of a special section on the market performance of industrial minerals in 1992. Production of construction aggregates increased by 4.6 percent in 1992. This increase was due, in part, to the increased funding for transportation and infrastructure projects. The U.S. produced about 1.05 Gt of crushed stone and an estimated 734 Mt of construction sand and gravel in 1992. Demand is expected to increase by about 5 percent in 1993.

  17. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1996-01-01

    Part of the Annual Commodities Review 1995. Production of construction aggregates such as crushed stone and construction sand and gravel showed a marginal increase in 1995. Most of the 1995 increases were due to funding for highway construction work. The major areas of concern to the industry included issues relating to wetlands classification and the classification of crystalline silica as a probable human carcinogen. Despite this, an increase in demand is anticipated for 1996.

  18. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, T.I.; Bolen, W.P.

    2007-01-01

    Construction aggregates, primarily stone, sand and gravel, are recovered from widespread naturally occurring mineral deposits and processed for use primarily in the construction industry. They are mined, crushed, sorted by size and sold loose or combined with portland cement or asphaltic cement to make concrete products to build roads, houses, buildings, and other structures. Much smaller quantities are used in agriculture, cement manufacture, chemical and metallurgical processes, glass production and many other products.

  19. A True Metasurface Antenna

    PubMed Central

    Badawe, Mohamed El; Almoneef, Thamer S.; Ramahi, Omar M.

    2016-01-01

    We present a true metasurface antenna based on electrically-small resonators. The resonators are placed on a flat surface and connected to one feed point using corporate feed. Unlike conventional array antennas where the distance between adjacent antennas is half wavelength to reduce mutual coupling between adjacent antennas, here the distance between the radiating elements is electrically very small to affect good impedance matching of each resonator to its feed. A metasurface antenna measuring 1.2λ × 1.2λ and designed to operate at 3 GHz achieved a gain of 12 dBi. A prototype was fabricated and tested showing good agreement between numerical simulations and experimental results. Through numerical simulation, we show that the metasurface antenna has the ability to provide beam steering by phasing all the resonators appropriately. PMID:26759177

  20. A True Metasurface Antenna.

    PubMed

    El Badawe, Mohamed; Almoneef, Thamer S; Ramahi, Omar M

    2016-01-01

    We present a true metasurface antenna based on electrically-small resonators. The resonators are placed on a flat surface and connected to one feed point using corporate feed. Unlike conventional array antennas where the distance between adjacent antennas is half wavelength to reduce mutual coupling between adjacent antennas, here the distance between the radiating elements is electrically very small to affect good impedance matching of each resonator to its feed. A metasurface antenna measuring 1.2λ × 1.2λ and designed to operate at 3 GHz achieved a gain of 12 dBi. A prototype was fabricated and tested showing good agreement between numerical simulations and experimental results. Through numerical simulation, we show that the metasurface antenna has the ability to provide beam steering by phasing all the resonators appropriately. PMID:26759177

  1. A True Metasurface Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawe, Mohamed El; Almoneef, Thamer S.; Ramahi, Omar M.

    2016-01-01

    We present a true metasurface antenna based on electrically-small resonators. The resonators are placed on a flat surface and connected to one feed point using corporate feed. Unlike conventional array antennas where the distance between adjacent antennas is half wavelength to reduce mutual coupling between adjacent antennas, here the distance between the radiating elements is electrically very small to affect good impedance matching of each resonator to its feed. A metasurface antenna measuring 1.2λ × 1.2λ and designed to operate at 3 GHz achieved a gain of 12 dBi. A prototype was fabricated and tested showing good agreement between numerical simulations and experimental results. Through numerical simulation, we show that the metasurface antenna has the ability to provide beam steering by phasing all the resonators appropriately.

  2. Vibronic coupling explains the ultrafast carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in natural and artificial light harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlík, Václav; Seibt, Joachim; Cranston, Laura J.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Lincoln, Craig N.; Savolainen, Janne; Šanda, František; Mančal, Tomáš; Hauer, Jürgen

    2015-06-01

    The initial energy transfer steps in photosynthesis occur on ultrafast timescales. We analyze the carotenoid to bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in LH2 Marichromatium purpuratum as well as in an artificial light-harvesting dyad system by using transient grating and two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with 10 fs time resolution. We find that Förster-type models reproduce the experimentally observed 60 fs transfer times, but overestimate coupling constants, which lead to a disagreement with both linear absorption and electronic 2D-spectra. We show that a vibronic model, which treats carotenoid vibrations on both electronic ground and excited states as part of the system's Hamiltonian, reproduces all measured quantities. Importantly, the vibronic model presented here can explain the fast energy transfer rates with only moderate coupling constants, which are in agreement with structure based calculations. Counterintuitively, the vibrational levels on the carotenoid electronic ground state play the central role in the excited state population transfer to bacteriochlorophyll; resonance between the donor-acceptor energy gap and the vibrational ground state energies is the physical basis of the ultrafast energy transfer rates in these systems.

  3. Vibronic coupling explains the ultrafast carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in natural and artificial light harvesters.

    PubMed

    Perlík, Václav; Seibt, Joachim; Cranston, Laura J; Cogdell, Richard J; Lincoln, Craig N; Savolainen, Janne; Šanda, František; Mančal, Tomáš; Hauer, Jürgen

    2015-06-01

    The initial energy transfer steps in photosynthesis occur on ultrafast timescales. We analyze the carotenoid to bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in LH2 Marichromatium purpuratum as well as in an artificial light-harvesting dyad system by using transient grating and two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with 10 fs time resolution. We find that Förster-type models reproduce the experimentally observed 60 fs transfer times, but overestimate coupling constants, which lead to a disagreement with both linear absorption and electronic 2D-spectra. We show that a vibronic model, which treats carotenoid vibrations on both electronic ground and excited states as part of the system's Hamiltonian, reproduces all measured quantities. Importantly, the vibronic model presented here can explain the fast energy transfer rates with only moderate coupling constants, which are in agreement with structure based calculations. Counterintuitively, the vibrational levels on the carotenoid electronic ground state play the central role in the excited state population transfer to bacteriochlorophyll; resonance between the donor-acceptor energy gap and the vibrational ground state energies is the physical basis of the ultrafast energy transfer rates in these systems. PMID:26049454

  4. Vibronic coupling explains the ultrafast carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in natural and artificial light harvesters

    SciTech Connect

    Perlík, Václav; Seibt, Joachim; Šanda, František; Mančal, Tomáš; Cranston, Laura J.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Lincoln, Craig N.; Hauer, Jürgen; Savolainen, Janne

    2015-06-07

    The initial energy transfer steps in photosynthesis occur on ultrafast timescales. We analyze the carotenoid to bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in LH2 Marichromatium purpuratum as well as in an artificial light-harvesting dyad system by using transient grating and two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with 10 fs time resolution. We find that Förster-type models reproduce the experimentally observed 60 fs transfer times, but overestimate coupling constants, which lead to a disagreement with both linear absorption and electronic 2D-spectra. We show that a vibronic model, which treats carotenoid vibrations on both electronic ground and excited states as part of the system’s Hamiltonian, reproduces all measured quantities. Importantly, the vibronic model presented here can explain the fast energy transfer rates with only moderate coupling constants, which are in agreement with structure based calculations. Counterintuitively, the vibrational levels on the carotenoid electronic ground state play the central role in the excited state population transfer to bacteriochlorophyll; resonance between the donor-acceptor energy gap and the vibrational ground state energies is the physical basis of the ultrafast energy transfer rates in these systems.

  5. Phased array antenna control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doland, G. D. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Several new and useful improvements in steering and control of phased array antennas having a small number of elements, typically on the order of 5 to 17 elements are provided. Among the improvements are increasing the number of beam steering positions, reducing the possibility of phase transients in signals received or transmitted with the antennas, and increasing control and testing capacity with respect to the antennas.

  6. Tunable circular patch antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, G.-L.; Sengupta, D. L.

    1985-10-01

    A method to control the resonant or operating frequencies of circular patch antennas has been investigated experimentally and theoretically. It consists of the placement of passive metallic or tuning posts at approximate locations within the input region of the antenna. Comparison of measured and analytical results seems to establish the validity of a theoretical model proposed to determine the input performance of such circular patch antennas.

  7. Redox regulation of energy transfer efficiency in antennas of green photosynthetic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, R. E.; Cheng, P.; Causgrove, T. P.; Brune, D. C.; Wang, J.

    1993-01-01

    The efficiency of energy transfer from the peripheral chlorosome antenna structure to the membrane-bound antenna in green sulfur bacteria depends strongly on the redox potential of the medium. The fluorescence spectra and lifetimes indicate that efficient quenching pathways are induced in the chlorosome at high redox potential. The midpoint redox potential for the induction of this effect in isolated chlorosomes from Chlorobium vibrioforme is -146 mV at pH 7 (vs the normal hydrogen electrode), and the observed midpoint potential (n = 1) decreases by 60 mV per pH unit over the pH range 7-10. Extraction of isolated chlorosomes with hexane has little effect on the redox-induced quenching, indicating that the component(s) responsible for this effect are bound and not readily extractable. We have purified and partially characterized the trimeric water-soluble bacteriochlorophyll a-containing protein from the thermophilic green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum. This protein is located between the chlorosome and the membrane. Fluorescence spectra of the purified protein indicate that it also contains groups that quench excitations at high redox potential. The results indicate that the energy transfer pathway in green sulfur bacteria is regulated by redox potential. This regulation appears to operate in at least two distinct places in the energy transfer pathway, the oligomeric pigments in the interior of the chlorosome and in the bacteriochlorophyll a protein. The regulatory effect may serve to protect the cell against superoxide-induced damage when oxygen is present. By quenching excitations before they reach the reaction center, reduction and subsequent autooxidation of the low potential electron acceptors found in these organisms is avoided.

  8. Turnstile slot antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munson, R. E. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A turnstile slot antenna is disclosed, the antenna being for and integral with a spacecraft having a substantially cylindrical body portion. The antenna comprises a circumferential slot about the periphery of the spacecraft body portion with an annular wave guide cavity defining a radial transmission line disposed within the spacecraft body portion behind and in communication with the circumferential slot. Feed stubs and associated transmission apparatus are provided to excite the annular cavity in quadrature phase such that an omnidirectional, circularly polarized, rotating radiation pattern is generated. The antenna of the instant invention has utility both as a transmitting and receiving device, and ensures continuous telemetry and command coverage with the spacecraft.

  9. Antennas for diverse requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukamp, Joachim

    An account is given of a major German aerospace manufacturer's state-of-the-art methods for development, design, construction, testing and certification of a wide variety of civilian and military communications and radar antennas. Attention is given to reflector antennas for very large aperture/wavelength ratios, slotted waveguide arrays in which the radiating aperture is synthesized by guided structures, and both microstrip arrays and active arrays, for the creation of very large area antennas. Antenna tests and measurements are conducted in an anechoic chamber.

  10. The single antenna interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Fitch, J.P.

    1990-01-15

    Air and space borne platforms using synthetic aperture radars (SAR) have made interferometric measurements by using either two physical antennas mounted on one air-frame or two passes of one antenna over a scene. In this paper, a new interferometric technique using one pass of a single-antenna SAR system is proposed and demonstrated on data collected by the NASA-JPL AirSAR. Remotely sensed L-band microwave data are used to show the sensitivity of this technique to ocean surface features as well as a baseline for comparison with work by others using two-antenna systems. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  11. MASTER TELEVISION ANTENNA SYSTEM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island State Dept. of Education, Providence.

    SPECIFICATIONS FOR THE FURNISHING AND INSTALLATION OF TELEVISION MASTER ANTENNA SYSTEMS FOR SECONDARY AND ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS ARE GIVEN. CONTRACTOR REQUIREMENTS, EQUIPMENT, PERFORMANCE STANDARDS, AND FUNCTIONS ARE DESCRIBED. (MS)

  12. Cellular Reflectarray Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    The cellular reflectarray antenna is intended to replace conventional parabolic reflectors that must be physically aligned with a particular satellite in geostationary orbit. These arrays are designed for specified geographical locations, defined by latitude and longitude, each called a "cell." A particular cell occupies nominally 1,500 square miles (3,885 sq. km), but this varies according to latitude and longitude. The cellular reflectarray antenna designed for a particular cell is simply positioned to align with magnetic North, and the antenna surface is level (parallel to the ground). A given cellular reflectarray antenna will not operate in any other cell.

  13. MSU Antenna Pattern Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, Tsan; Kleespies, Thomas J.; Green, J. Philip

    2000-01-01

    The Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) antenna pattern data for nine MSU Flight Models (FMs) have been successfully rescued from 22-year old 7-track and 9-track magnetic tapes and cartridges. These antenna pattern data were unpacked into user-friendly ASCII format, and are potentially useful for making antenna pattern corrections to MSU antenna temperatures in retrieving the true brightness temperatures. We also properly interpreted the contents of the data and show how to convert the measured antenna signal amplitude in volts into relative antenna power in dB with proper normalization. It is found that the data are of high quality with a 60-dB drop in the co-polarized antenna patterns from the central peak value to its side-lobe regions at scan angles beyond 30 deg. The unpacked antenna pattern data produced in this study provide a useful database for data users to correct the antenna side-lobe contribution to MSU measurements. All of the data are available to the scientific community on a single CD-ROM.

  14. Recent results for plasma antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Alexeff, Igor; Anderson, Ted; Farshi, Esmaeil; Karnam, Naresh; Pulasani, Nanditha Reddy

    2008-05-15

    Plasma antennas are just as effective as metal antennas. They can transmit, receive, and reflect radio waves just as well as metal antennas. In addition, plasma generated noise does not appear to be a problem.

  15. Bacteriopheophytin g: Properties and some speculations on a possible primary role for bacteriochlorophylls b and g in the biosynthesis of chlorophylls

    PubMed Central

    Michalski, T. J.; Hunt, J. E.; Bowman, M. K.; Smith, U.; Bardeen, K.; Gest, H.; Norris, J. R.; Katz, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Bacteriopheophytin g and small amounts of bacteriochlorophyll g have been obtained in high purity from the recently discovered photosynthetic bacterium Heliobacterium chlorum. Preparative methods and precautions in handling these sensitive compounds are described. The compounds have been characterized by californium-252 plasma desorption mass spectrometry, HPLC, visible absorption, and electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Our results agree with the structure of bacteriochlorophyll g advanced by H. Brockmann and A. Lipinski [(1983) Arch. Microbiol. 136, 17-19], with the exception that we find the esterifying alcohol to be farnesol and not geranylgeraniol as originally suggested. Zero field splitting parameters of triplet state bacteriopheophytin g and the ESR properties of the cation free radical of bacteriochlorophyll g are reported. The photoisomerization of the subject compounds has been studied. Bacteriopheophytin g undergoes photo-isomerization in white light to pheophytin a with a half-time of ≈42 min. We suggest that all of the chlorophylls are biosynthesized from a common intermediate containing an ethylidine group, [unk]CH—CH3, such as is present in bacteriochlorophylls b and g. PMID:16593826

  16. Blastomonas aquatica sp. nov., a bacteriochlorophyll-containing bacterium isolated from lake water.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Na; Liu, Yongqin; Liu, Xiaobo; Gu, Zhengquan; Jiao, Nianzhi; Liu, Hongcan; Zhou, Yuguang; Shen, Liang

    2015-05-01

    Yellow or orange-to-brown pigmented, ovoid or rod-shaped, Gram-negative staining, aerobic strains PE 4-5(T) and N5-10 m-1 were isolated from brackish water in Lake Peng Co and fresh to brackish water in Lake Namtso on the Tibetan Plateau, China. Bacteriochlorophyll a was produced by the isolates. The predominant cellular fatty acids were C16 : 1, C17 : 1 and C18 : 1 unsaturated fatty acids, C17 : 1ω6c (55.3%), C17 : 1ω8c (13.0%) and C18 : 1ω7c (10.4%) for PE 4-5(T) and C18 : 1ω7c (54.7%) and C16 : 1ω7c (18.0%) for N5-10 m-1. The polar lipid profiles of strains PE 4-5(T) and N5-10 m-1 were composed of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine (not detected in N5-10 m-1), phosphatidyldimethylethanolamine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, sphingoglycolipid and an unknown phospholipid. The predominant respiratory quinone was ubiquinone Q10 and the DNA G+C content was 66.0 mol% for both strains. The16S rRNA gene sequence of strain PE 4-5(T) shared 99.0% similarity with that of N5-10 m-1, and 97.56% similarity with those of Blastomonas natatoria LMG 17322(T) and Blastomonas ursincola DSM 9006(T), respectively. The DNA-DNA hybridization relatedness between strains PE 4-5(T) and N5-10 m-1 was 79.0 ± 1.0%, but below 70% with the type strains in the genus Blastomonas . Based on the variability of phylogenetic and phenotypic characteristics, the isolates should be classified as representatives of a novel species of the genus Blastomonas; the name Blastomonas aquatica sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is PE 4-5(T) ( =JCM 30179(T) =CGMCC 1.12851(T)). PMID:25724744

  17. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bolen, W.P.; Tepordei, V.V.

    2001-01-01

    The estimated production during 2000 of construction aggregates, crushed stone, and construction sand and gravel increased by about 2.6% to 2.7 Gt (3 billion st), compared with 1999. The expansion that started in 1992 continued with record production levels for the ninth consecutive year. By commodity, construction sand and gravel production increased by 4.5% to 1.16 Gt (1.28 billion st), while crushed stone production increased by 1.3% to 1.56 Gt (1.72 billion st).

  18. Scanning means for Cassegrainian antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giandomenico, A.; Rusch, W. V. T.

    1967-01-01

    Mechanical antenna beam switching device detects weak signals over atmospheric and equipment noise sources in microwave antennas. It periodically nutates the paraboloidal subdish in a Cassegrainian reflector system.

  19. Nonphotochemical Hole-Burning Studies of Energy Transfer Dynamics in Antenna Complexes of Photosynthetic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Satoshi Matsuzaki

    2002-08-01

    This thesis contains the candidate's original work on excitonic structure and energy transfer dynamics of two bacterial antenna complexes as studied using spectral hole-burning spectroscopy. The general introduction is divided into two chapters (1 and 2). Chapter 1 provides background material on photosynthesis and bacterial antenna complexes with emphasis on the two bacterial antenna systems related to the thesis research. Chapter 2 reviews the underlying principles and mechanism of persistent nonphotochemical hole-burning (NPHB) spectroscopy. Relevant energy transfer theories are also discussed. Chapters 3 and 4 are papers by the candidate that have been published. Chapter 3 describes the application of NPHB spectroscopy to the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex from the green sulfur bacterium Prosthecochloris aestuarii; emphasis is on determination of the low energy vibrational structure that is important for understanding the energy transfer process associated within three lowest energy Qy-states of the complex. The results are compared with those obtained earlier on the FMO complex from Chlorobium tepidum. In Chapter 4, the energy transfer dynamics of the B800 molecules of intact LH2 and B800-deficient LH2 complexes of the purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila are compared. New insights on the additional decay channel of the B800 ring of bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) molecules are provided. General conclusions are given in Chapter 5.

  20. mm-wave antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhs, H. P.

    1985-07-01

    The present low profile seeker front end's slotted waveguide antenna was primarily developed to investigate the feasibility of the application of standard manufacturing techniques to mm-wave hardware. A dual plane monopulse comparator was constructed to mate with the antenna via integrated packaging techniques. The comparator was fabricated by CAD/CAM milling operations.

  1. Airborne antenna pattern calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagherian, A. B.; Mielke, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    Use of calculation program START and modeling program P 3D to produce radiation patterns of antennas mounted on a space station is discussed. Basic components of two space stations in the early design stage are simulated and radiation patterns for antennas mounted on the modules are presented.

  2. Experiments with Dipole Antennas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2009-01-01

    Employment of a data-acquisition system for data collection and calculations makes experiments with antennas more convenient and less time consuming. The determined directional patterns of the dipole antennas of different lengths are in reasonable agreement with theory. The enhancement of the signal by using a reflector is demonstrated, and a…

  3. Milestones in Broadcasting: Antennas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Media in Education and Development, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Briefly describes the development of antennas in the prebroadcast era (elevated antenna, selectivity to prevent interference between stations, birth of diplex, directional properties, support structures), as well as technological developments used in long-, medium-, and short-wave broadcasting, VHF/FM and television broadcasting, and satellite…

  4. Deformations in VLBI antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, T. A.; Thomsen, P.

    1988-01-01

    A study is presented of deformations in antennas with the emphasis on their influence on VLBI measurements. The GIFTS structural analysis program has been used to model the VLBI antenna in Fairbanks (Alaska). The report identifies key deformations and studies the effect of gravity, wind, and temperature. Estimates of expected deformations are given.

  5. Parabolic torus transreflector antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, L. M.; Smith, M. S.

    1984-12-01

    The possible scan rate of conventional radar antennas using parabolic dishes is limited to about 60 rev/min. This limitation is related to mechanical rotation requirements. Many radar applications require high data renewal rates, including short-range defense systems and systems for reduction of sea clutter. Faster scan rates can be obtained by using phased arrays and electronic scanning. However, the use of the required equipment introduces considerable complexity and cost. The present investigation is concerned with a novel form of antenna permitting high scan rates, taking into account a parabolic torus transreflector antenna. The feed horn illuminates one side of the radome with polarization parallel to the wires, which therefore reflect the radiation like a dish antenna. In the antenna considered, rotation of the beam is effected by mechanical rotation of the horn feed only, and this provides the potential for high scanning rates.

  6. GPS antenna designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laube, Samuel J. P.

    1987-01-01

    Application of the current GPS NAVSTAR system to civilian service requires that a right hand, circularly polarized, -160 dBW spread spectrum signal be received from an orbiting satellite, where the antenna environment is also moving. This presents a design challenge when inexpensive antennas are desired. The intent of this survey is to provide information on the antennas mentioned and to construct and test prototypes to determine whether the choice made by the industry, the quadrifilar helix, is the best. The helix antenna is currently the low cost standard for GPS. Prototype versions were constructed using 12 gauge wire and subminiature coaxial hardline. The constructed antennas were tested using a signal generator and a reference turnstile. A spectrum analyzer was used to measure the level of the received signal.

  7. GPS antenna designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laube, Samuel J. P.

    1987-05-01

    Application of the current GPS NAVSTAR system to civilian service requires that a right hand, circularly polarized, -160 dBW spread spectrum signal be received from an orbiting satellite, where the antenna environment is also moving. This presents a design challenge when inexpensive antennas are desired. The intent of this survey is to provide information on the antennas mentioned and to construct and test prototypes to determine whether the choice made by the industry, the quadrifilar helix, is the best. The helix antenna is currently the low cost standard for GPS. Prototype versions were constructed using 12 gauge wire and subminiature coaxial hardline. The constructed antennas were tested using a signal generator and a reference turnstile. A spectrum analyzer was used to measure the level of the received signal.

  8. The role of charge-transfer states in energy transfer and dissipation within natural and artificial bacteriochlorophyll-proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wahadoszamen, Md.; Margalit, Iris; Ara, Anjue Mane; van Grondelle, Rienk; Noy, Dror

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how specific protein environments affect the mechanisms of non-radiative energy dissipation within densely assembled chlorophylls in photosynthetic protein complexes is of great interest to the construction of bioinspired solar energy conversion devices. Mixing of charge-transfer and excitonic states in excitonically interacting chlorophylls was implicated in shortening excited states lifetimes but its relevance to active control of energy dissipation in natural systems is under considerable debate. Here we show that the degree of fluorescence quenching in two similar pairs of excitonically interacting bacteriochlorophyll derivatives is directly associated with increasing charge transfer character in the excited state, and that the protein environment may control non-radiative dissipation by affecting the mixing of charge transfer and excitonic states. The capability of local protein environments to determine the fate of excited states, and thereby to confer different functionalities to excitonically coupled dimers substantiates the dimer as the basic functional element of photosynthetic enzymes. PMID:25342121

  9. Calculations of the ionization potentials and electron affinities of bacteriochlorophyll and bacteriopheophytin via ab initio quantum chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Crystal, J.; Friesner, R.A.

    2000-03-23

    Ionization potentials (IP) and electron affinities (EA) are calculated for bacteriopheophytin (BPh) and bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) in the photosynthetic reaction center utilizing density functional methods implemented in a parallel version of the JAGUAR electronic structure code. These quantities are studied as a function of basis set size and molecular geometry. The results indicate the necessity of using large basis sets with diffuse functions in order to obtain reliable IP and EA in the gas phase. The relative reduction potentials of BChl and BPh in dimethylformamide solution are also calculated and compared with experimental results. Excellent agreement between theory and experiment is obtained when ligand binding of solvent molecules to the central Mg atom of BNhl is incorporated in the calculations.

  10. Autonomous omnidirectional spacecraft antenna system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, T. H.

    1983-01-01

    The development of a low gain Electronically Switchable Spherical Array Antenna is discussed. This antenna provides roughly 7 dBic gain for receive/transmit operation between user satellites and the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System. When used as a pair, the antenna provides spherical coverage. The antenna was tested in its primary operating modes: directed beam, retrodirective, and Omnidirectional.

  11. RF MEMS Based Reconfigurable Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.

    2004-01-01

    The presentation will first of all address the advantages of RF MEMS circuit in antenna applications and also the need for electronically reconfigurable antennas. Next, discuss some of the recent examples of RF MEMS based reconfigurable microstrip antennas. Finally, conclude the talk with a summary of MEMS antenna performance.

  12. Antenna Technologies for NASA Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2006-01-01

    This presentation addresses the efforts being performed at GRC to develop antenna technology in support of NASA s Exploration Vision. In particular, the presentation discusses the communications architecture asset-specific data services, as well as wide area coverage, high gain, low mass deployable antennas. Phased array antennas as well as electrically small, lightweight, low power, multifunctional antennas will be also discussed.

  13. Antenna Technologies for NASA Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix

    2007-01-01

    This presentation addresses the efforts being performed at GRC to develop antenna technology in support of NASA s Exploration Vision. In particular, the presentation discusses the communications architecture asset-specific data services, as well as wide area coverage, high gain, low mass deployable antennas. Phased array antennas as well as electrically small, lightweight, low power, multifunctional antennas will be also discussed.

  14. X-Antenna: A graphical interface for antenna analysis codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, B. L.; Newman, E. H.; Shamansky, H. T.

    1995-01-01

    This report serves as the user's manual for the X-Antenna code. X-Antenna is intended to simplify the analysis of antennas by giving the user graphical interfaces in which to enter all relevant antenna and analysis code data. Essentially, X-Antenna creates a Motif interface to the user's antenna analysis codes. A command-file allows new antennas and codes to be added to the application. The menu system and graphical interface screens are created dynamically to conform to the data in the command-file. Antenna data can be saved and retrieved from disk. X-Antenna checks all antenna and code values to ensure they are of the correct type, writes an output file, and runs the appropriate antenna analysis code. Volumetric pattern data may be viewed in 3D space with an external viewer run directly from the application. Currently, X-Antenna includes analysis codes for thin wire antennas (dipoles, loops, and helices), rectangular microstrip antennas, and thin slot antennas.

  15. Satellite Antenna Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Through the Technology Affiliates Program at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the ACTS antenna system was transferred from experimental testing status to commercial development with KVH Industries, Inc. The ACTS design enables mobile satellite antennas to remain pointed at the satellite, regardless of the motion or vibration on which it is mounted. KVH's first product based on the ACTS design is a land-mobile satellite antenna system that will enable direct broadcast satellite television aboard moving trucks, recreational vehicles, trains, and buses. Future products could include use in broadcasting, emergency medical and military vehicles.

  16. SAR antenna calibration techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carver, K. R.; Newell, A. C.

    1978-01-01

    Calibration of SAR antennas requires a measurement of gain, elevation and azimuth pattern shape, boresight error, cross-polarization levels, and phase vs. angle and frequency. For spaceborne SAR antennas of SEASAT size operating at C-band or higher, some of these measurements can become extremely difficult using conventional far-field antenna test ranges. Near-field scanning techniques offer an alternative approach and for C-band or X-band SARs, give much improved accuracy and precision as compared to that obtainable with a far-field approach.

  17. Deep space antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Three 26-m tracking antennas operated by the NASA Deep Space Network at Goldstone, Calif.; Madrid, Spain; and near Canberra, Australia, will cease operations on Dec. 1, 1981. The stations will continue to operate 64-m and 34-m deep space tracking antennas. Ending operation of the 26-m antennas will cause a reduction of about 30%; of the Deep Space Network tracking and data acquisition capability. This means less support for NASA planetary spacecraft. Currently, the Deep Space Network is supporting Voyagers 1 and 2, Helios 1, the Mars Viking 1 Lander and Pioneers 6 through 12.

  18. NASA technology for large space antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, R. A.; Campbell, T. G.; Freeland, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    Some leading concepts for deployable antennas are described and an assessment of the state of the art in deployable antennas is presented. The advanced sunflower precision antenna, the radial rib antenna and the maypole (hoop/column) antenna, the wrap rib antenna and the parabolic erectable truss antenna are covered. In addition, a discussion on the technology development program for two deployable antenna concepts that are responsive to the antenna mission requirements as defined in the NASA mission model is presented.

  19. Electrically driven optical antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Johannes; Kullock, René; Prangsma, Jord; Emmerling, Monika; Kamp, Martin; Hecht, Bert

    2015-09-01

    Unlike radiowave antennas, so far optical nanoantennas cannot be fed by electrical generators. Instead, they are driven by light or indirectly via excited discrete states in active materials in their vicinity. Here we demonstrate the direct electrical driving of an in-plane optical antenna by the broadband quantum-shot noise of electrons tunnelling across its feed gap. The spectrum of the emitted photons is determined by the antenna geometry and can be tuned via the applied voltage. Moreover, the direction and polarization of the light emission are controlled by the antenna resonance, which also improves the external quantum efficiency by up to two orders of magnitude. The one-material planar design offers facile integration of electrical and optical circuits and thus represents a new paradigm for interfacing electrons and photons at the nanometre scale, for example for on-chip wireless communication and highly configurable electrically driven subwavelength photon sources.

  20. Antenna pattern study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Warren

    1988-01-01

    Prediction of antenna radiation patterns has long been an important function in the design of command, communication, and tracking systems for rocket vehicles and spacecraft. An acceptable degree of assurance that a radio link will provide the required quality of data or certainty of correct command execution must be acquired by some means if the system is to be certified as reliable. Two methods have been used to perform this function: (1) Theoretical analysis, based on the known properties of basic antenna element types and their behavior in the presence of conductive structures of simple shape, and (2) Measurement of the patterns on scale models of the spacecraft or rocket vehicle on which the antenna is located. Both of these methods are ordinarily employed in the antenna design process.

  1. Rotary antenna attenuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, R. M.; Hardy, J. C.

    1969-01-01

    Radio frequency attenuator, having negligible insertion loss at minimum attenuation, can be used for making precise antenna gain measurements. It is small in size compared to a rotary-vane attenuator.

  2. CIRCULAR CAVITY SLOT ANTENNA

    DOEpatents

    Kerley, P.L.

    1959-01-01

    A small-size antenna having a doughnut-shaped field pattern and which can act both as an antenna and a resonant circuit is described. The antenna is of the slotted type and comprises a resonant cavity with a center hole. A circular slot is provided in one wall of the cavity concentric with the hole and a radio frequency source is connected across the slot. The pattern and loading of the antenna are adjusted by varying the position and shape of a center element slidably disposed within the hole and projecting from the slotted side of the resonant cavity. The disclosed structure may also be used to propagate the oscillator signal down a transniission line by replacing the center element with one leg of the transmission line in a spaced relation from the walls of the cavity.

  3. Coaxial phased array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, H., Jr.

    1980-08-01

    A coaxial antenna array for communicating circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation is disclosed. A pair of open ended antenna cavities is coaxially constructed and operates by excitation of linear radiation elements arranged within each of the cavities. A pair of crossed dipole radiation devices is centered within the inner cavity and operated by means of a phase shifting network circuit to transmit as well as receive circularly polarized radiation. Four monopole radiation devices are symmetrically arranged to operate in the outer cavity in phase quadrature by means of the phase shifting network circuit to both transmit and receive circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation. Combined operation of the two antenna cavities with a 180 deg phase differential between the fields related to the two antenna cavities provides a broad beam, relatively wide frequency bandwidth communication capability. Particular embodiments disclosed feature a generally square cavity array as well as a circular cavity array.

  4. Coaxial phased array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, H., Jr. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A coaxial antenna array for communicating circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation is disclosed. A pair of open ended antenna cavities is coaxially constructed and operates by excitation of linear radiation elements arranged within each of the cavities. A pair of crossed dipole radiation devices is centered within the inner cavity and operated by means of a phase shifting network circuit to transmit as well as receive circularly polarized radiation. Four monopole radiation devices are symmetrically arranged to operate in the outer cavity in phase quadrature by means of the phase shifting network circuit to both transmit and receive circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation. Combined operation of the two antenna cavities with a 180 deg phase differential between the fields related to the two antenna cavities provides a broad beam, relatively wide frequency bandwidth communication capability. Particular embodiments disclosed feature a generally square cavity array as well as a circular cavity array.

  5. Microwave antenna holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochblatt, David J.; Seidel, Boris L.

    1992-01-01

    This microwave holography technique utilizes the Fourier transform relation between the complex far field radiation pattern of an antenna and the complex aperture field distribution. Resulting aperture phase and amplitude distribution data can be used to precisely characterize various crucial performance parameters, including panel alignment, panel shaping, subreflector position, antenna aperture illumination, directivity at various frequencies, and gravity deformation effects. The methodology of data processing presented here was successfully applied to the Deep Space Network (DSN) 34-m beam waveguide antennas. The antenna performance was improved at all operating frequencies by reducing the main reflector mechanical surface rms error to 0.43 mm. At Ka-band (32 GHz), the estimated improvement is 4.1 dB, resulting in an aperture efficiency of 52 percent. The performance improvement was verified by efficiency measurements and additional holographic measurements.

  6. Dielectric Covered Planar Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Llombart Juan, Nuria (Inventor); Lee, Choonsup (Inventor); Chattopadhyay, Goutam (Inventor); Gill, John J. (Inventor); Skalare, Anders J. (Inventor); Siegel, Peter H. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An antenna element suitable for integrated arrays at terahertz frequencies is disclosed. The antenna element comprises an extended spherical (e.g. hemispherical) semiconductor lens, e.g. silicon, antenna fed by a leaky wave waveguide feed. The extended spherical lens comprises a substantially spherical lens adjacent a substantially planar lens extension. A couple of TE/TM leaky wave modes are excited in a resonant cavity formed between a ground plane and the substantially planar lens extension by a waveguide block coupled to the ground plane. Due to these modes, the primary feed radiates inside the lens with a directive pattern that illuminates a small sector of the lens. The antenna structure is compatible with known semiconductor fabrication technology and enables production of large format imaging arrays.

  7. Polarized Antenna Splitting Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Peskin, Michael E.; /SLAC

    2009-10-17

    We consider parton showers based on radiation from QCD dipoles or 'antennae'. These showers are built from 2 {yields} 3 parton splitting processes. The question then arises of what functions replace the Altarelli-Parisi splitting functions in this approach. We give a detailed answer to this question, applicable to antenna showers in which partons carry definite helicity, and to both initial- and final-state emissions.

  8. Intelsat VI antenna system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, M. F.; Lane, S. O.; Taormina, F. A.

    The antenna system design of a series of five new communications satellites known as Intelsat VI is described in detail. Each satellite will utilize 50 transponders operating in the C and K band portions of the frequency spectrum. The transponders are interconnectible using either static switch matrices or a network which provides satellite switched time division multiple access capability. The antenna coverages, characteristics, and special design features are shown and discussed.

  9. MLS airborne antenna research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, C. L.; Burnside, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    The geometrical theory of diffraction was used to analyze the elevation plane pattern of on-aircraft antennas. The radiation patterns for basic elements (infinitesimal dipole, circumferential and axial slot) mounted on fuselage of various aircrafts with or without radome included were calculated and compared well with experimental results. Error phase plots were also presented. The effects of radiation patterns and error phase plots on the polarization selection for the MLS airborne antenna are discussed.

  10. Large Deployable Reflectarray Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Houfei; Huang, John; Lou, Michael

    2006-01-01

    A report discusses a 7-meter-diameter reflectarray antenna that has been conceived in a continuing effort to develop large reflectarray antennas to be deployed in outer space. Major underlying concepts were reported in three prior NASA Tech Briefs articles: "Inflatable Reflectarray Antennas" (NPO-20433), Vol. 23, No. 10 (October 1999), page 50; "Tape-Spring Reinforcements for Inflatable Structural Tubes" (NPO-20615), Vol. 24, No. 7 (July 2000), page 58; and "Self-Inflatable/Self-Rigidizable Reflectarray Antenna" (NPO-30662), Vol. 28, No. 1 (January 2004), page 61. Like previous antennas in the series, the antenna now proposed would include a reflectarray membrane stretched flat on a frame of multiple inflatable booms. The membrane and booms would be rolled up and folded for compact stowage during transport. Deployment in outer space would be effected by inflating the booms to unroll and then to unfold the membrane, thereby stretching the membrane out flat to its full size. The membrane would achieve the flatness for a Ka-band application. The report gives considerable emphasis to designing the booms to rigidify themselves upon deployment: for this purpose, the booms could be made as spring-tape-reinforced aluminum laminate tubes like those described in two of the cited prior articles.

  11. Antenna engineering handbook /2nd edition/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. C.; Jasik, H.

    Essential principles, methods, and data for solving a wide range of problems in antenna design and application are presented. The basic concepts and fundamentals of antennas are reviewed, followed by a discussion of arrays of discrete elements. Then all primary types of antennas currently in use are considered, providing concise descriptions of operating principles, design methods, and performance data. Small antennas, microstrip antennas, frequency-scan antennas, conformal and low-profile arrays, adaptive antennas, and phased arrays are covered. The major applications of antennas and the design methods peculiar to those applications are discussed in detail. The employment of antennas to meet the requirements of today's complex electronic systems is emphasized, including earth station antennas, satellite antennas, seeker antennas, microwave-relay antennas, tracking antennas, radiometer antennas, and ECM and ESM antennas. Finally, significant topics related to antenna engineering, such as transmission lines and waveguides, radomes, microwave propagation, and impedance matching and broadbanding, are addressed.

  12. The energies and kinetics of triplet carotenoids in the LH2 antenna complexes as determined by phosphorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondonuwu, Ferdy S.; Taguchi, Tokio; Fujii, Ritsuko; Yokoyama, Kyosuke; Koyama, Yasushi; Watanabe, Yasutaka

    2004-01-01

    The triplet (T 1) states of carotenoids (Cars) and bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl) in the LH2 antenna complexes from Rhodobacter sphaeroides G1C, Rba. sphaeroides 2.4.1 and Rhodospirillum molischianum, containing neurosporene, spheroidene and lycopene, respectively, were examined by stationary-state and time-resolved phosphorescence spectroscopy. The T 1 energies of Cars were determined, irrespective of the Car or BChl excitation, to be 7030 cm -1 (neurosporene), 6920 cm -1 (spheroidene) and 6870 cm -1 (lycopene), respectively, whereas that of BChl to be 7590 cm -1. In the Rba. sphaeroides G1C, the Car and BChl triplet states decayed in similar time constant as the BChl Q y state, a fact which indicates that the pair of triplet states decays through the triplet-triplet annihilation mechanism.

  13. VLF/LF transmitting antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belrose, John S.

    1993-05-01

    Very Low Frequency (VLF) transmitting antenna design is a specialized field of engineering that requires the combined skill of radio, civil, and mechanical engineers. The antenna systems used for this band (15-30 kHz) are enormous structures. Vertical radiators with very extensive top-loading (non-radiating top-hats) are necessary because the electrical height of practical towers is small. For tower heights of 300-450 meters (1000-1500 feet) the electrical heights are only fifteen to forty-five one thousandths of a wavelength. This presentation discusses the following topics: antenna design concepts, antenna fundamentals, tools for antenna modeling, a mini-study of conventional antennas, multiple tuned antenna systems, and a comparison between performance (measured and predicted) for multiple tuned antennas vs. single tuned antennas.

  14. Carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll singlet energy transfer in carotenoid-incorporated B850 light-harvesting complexes of Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26.1.

    PubMed

    Frank, H A; Farhoosh, R; Aldema, M L; DeCoster, B; Christensen, R L; Gebhard, R; Lugtenburg, J

    1993-01-01

    Four carotenoids, 3,4,7,8-tetrahydrospheroidene, 3,4,5,6-tetrahydrospheroidene, 3,4-dihydrospheroidene and spheroidene, have been incorporated into the B850 light-harvesting complex of the carotenoidless mutant, photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26.1. The extent of pi-electron conjugation in these molecules increases from 7 to 10 carbon-carbon double bonds. Carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll singlet state energy transfer efficiencies were measured using steady-state fluorescence excitation spectroscopy to be 54 +/- 2%, 66 +/- 4%, 71 +/- 6% and 56 +/- 3% for the carotenoid series. These results are discussed with respect to the position of the energy levels and the magnitude of spectral overlap between the S1 (2(1)Ag) state emission from the isolated carotenoids and the bacteriochlorophyll absorption of the native complex. These studies provide a systematic approach to exploring the effect of excited state energies, spectral overlap and excited state lifetimes on the efficiencies of carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll singlet energy transfer in photosynthetic systems. PMID:8502725

  15. Modeling of compact loop antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Baity, F.W.

    1987-01-01

    A general compact loop antenna model which treats all elements of the antenna as lossy transmission lines has been developed. In addition to capacitively-tuned resonant double loop (RDL) antennas the model treats stub-tuned resonant double loop antennas. Calculations using the model have been compared with measurements on full-scale mockups of resonant double loop antennas for ATF and TFTR in order to refine the transmission line parameters. Results from the model are presented for RDL antenna designs for ATF, TFTR, Tore Supra, and for the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT).

  16. Modeling of compact loop antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baity, F. W.

    A general compact loop antenna model which treats all elements of the antenna as lossy transmission lines has been developed. In addition to capacitively-tuned resonant double loop (RDL) antennas the model treats stub-tuned resonant double loop antennas. Calculations using the model have been compared with measurements on full-scale mockups of resonant double loop antennas for ATF and TFTR in order to refine the transmission line parameters. Results from the model are presented for RDL antenna designs for ATF, TFTR, Tore Supra, and for the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT).

  17. Modeling of compact loop antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baity, F. W.

    1987-09-01

    A general compact loop antenna model which treats all elements of the antenna as lossy transmission lines has been developed. In addition to capacitively tuned resonant double loop (RDL) antennas, the model treats sub-tuned RDL antennas. Calculations using the model have been compared with measurements on full-scale mock-ups of RDL antennas for ATF and TFTR in order to refine the transmission line parameters. Results from the model are presented for RDL antenna designs for ATF, TFTR, Tore Supra, and the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT).

  18. Multibeam antenna study, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellamy, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    A multibeam antenna concept was developed for providing spot beam coverage of the contiguous 48 states. The selection of a suitable antenna concept for the multibeam application and an experimental evaluation of the antenna concept selected are described. The final analysis indicates that the preferred concept is a dual-antenna, circular artificial dielectric lens. A description of the analytical methods is provided, as well as a discussion of the absolute requirements placed on the antenna concepts. Finally, a comparative analysis of reflector antenna off-axis beam performance is presented.

  19. Adaptive antenna design considerations for satellite communication antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayhan, J. T.

    1983-02-01

    The present investigation is concerned with some general considerations inherent in designing an adaptive antenna system for use on a geosynchronous satellite illuminating the earth field of view. The problem has been addressed from the viewpoint of the system designer who has to determine the required antenna characteristics and the antenna aperture size. Concerning the choice of the antenna type, it usually has to be decided whether to use a phased array (PA) or a multiple-beam antenna (MBA). Attention is given to nulling resolution and MBA/PA configuration, taking into account the phased array and multiple-beam antennas. The choice of which antenna type to use depends on the nulling bandwidth, the number of weighted channels in the adaptive processor, and the overall coverage area to be served by the antenna system.

  20. Antenna cab interior showing equipment rack and fiberglass antenna panels, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Antenna cab interior showing equipment rack and fiberglass antenna panels, looking southeast. - Western Union Telegraph Company, Jennerstown Relay, Laurel Summit Road off U.S. 30, Laughlintown, Westmoreland County, PA

  1. Antenna cab interior showing equipment rack and fiberglass antenna panels, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Antenna cab interior showing equipment rack and fiberglass antenna panels, looking west. - Western Union Telegraph Company, Jennerstown Relay, Laurel Summit Road off U.S. 30, Laughlintown, Westmoreland County, PA

  2. Antenna cab interior showing waveguide from external parabolic antenna (later ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Antenna cab interior showing waveguide from external parabolic antenna (later addition), looking north. - Western Union Telegraph Company, Jennerstown Relay, Laurel Summit Road off U.S. 30, Laughlintown, Westmoreland County, PA

  3. View of Antenna #1 (foreground), and Antenna #2 surface doors. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Antenna #1 (foreground), and Antenna #2 surface doors. Image looking northeast - Titan One Missile Complex 2A, .3 miles west of 129 Road and 1.5 miles north of County Line Road, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  4. Satellite dual antenna pointing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keigler, John E. (Inventor); Hartshorne, Frank A. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A satellite antenna pointing system for separately pointing separated transmit and receive high gain antenna systems includes means for separately and sequentially applying a beacon signal to the transmit and receive antenna systems and a broad beam width antenna which has a coverage area greater than the overall coverage region of the spot beam antenna systems. The system includes ground stations located at or near the periphery of the overall coverage region adapted to receive these beacon signals. At a central control station these beacon signals are compared to provide first signals proportional to the ratio of said beacon signals received from said transmit antenna system and said broad beam width antenna and second signals proportional to the ratio of said beacon signals received from said satellite receive antenna system and said broad beam width antenna. The central station generates from said first signals transmit antenna control signals which are sent to the satellite to control the orientation of said transmit antenna system. Likewise, the central control station generates from the second signals receiver antenna control signals which are applied to the satellite to control the orientation of the satellite receive antenna system.

  5. Industrial Plasma Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeff, Igor

    2007-11-01

    This presentation summarizes an extensive program on plasma antennas. Plasma antennas are just as effective as metal antennas. In addition, they can transmit, receive and reflect lower frequency signals while being transparent to higher frequency signals. When de-energized, they electrically disappear. Plasma noise does not appear to be a problem. New technology that has been developed include a method of operating at high plasma density at minimal power consumption, a novel technique of noise reduction, and a method of opening a plasma window in a plasma microwave barrier on a time scale of microseconds rather than the usual time scale of milliseconds due to plasma decay. We are at present testing an intelligent plasma antenna in which a plasma ``window'' in a circular plasma barrier surrounding an antenna rotates azimuthally, seeking a radio transmitter. When located, a computer locks onto the transmitter. When the transmitter is de-energized, the plasma window recommences scanning. Commercial interest is strong, with invited papers being presented for 4 years in succession at the SMi Stealth Conference in London, UK, an operating model on permanent exhibition at the Booze-Allen headquarters in Alexandria, VA, and strong interest from Lockheed-Martin. In collaboration with Ted Anderson, Haleakala R&D Corp.; Esmaeil Farshi, Fred Dyer, Jeffrey Peck, Eric Pradeep, Nanditha Pulasani, and Naresh Karnam, University of Tennessee.

  6. Imaging antenna arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, D. B.; Muha, M. S.

    1982-01-01

    Many millimeter and far-infrared imaging systems are limited in sensitivity and speed because they depend on a single scanned element. Because of recent advances in planar detectors such as Schottky diodes, superconducting tunnel junctions, and microbolometers, an attractive approach to this problem is a planar antenna array with integrated detectors. A planar line antenna array and optical system for imaging has been developed. The significant advances are a 'reverse-microscope' optical configuration and a modified bow-tie antenna design. In the 'reverse-microscope' configuration, a lens is attached to the bottom of the substrate containing the antennas. Imaging is done through the substrate. This configuration eliminates the troublesome effects of substrate surface waves. The substrate lens has only a single refracting surface, making possible a virtually aplanatic system, with little spherical aberration or coma. The array is characterized by an optical transfer function that is easily measured. An array with 19 dB crosstalk levels between adjacent antennas has been tested and it was found that the array captured 50 percent of the available power. This imaging system was diffraction limited.

  7. Aperture excited dielectric antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosswell, W. F.; Chatterjee, J. S.; Mason, V. B.; Tai, C. T.

    1974-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the effect of placing dielectric objects over the aperture of waveguide antennas are presented. Experimental measurements of the radiation patterns, gain, impedance, near-field amplitude, and pattern and impedance coupling between pairs of antennas are given for various Plexiglas shapes, including the sphere and the cube, excited by rectangular, circular, and square waveguide feed apertures. The waveguide excitation of a dielectric sphere is modeled using the Huygens' source, and expressions for the resulting electric fields, directivity, and efficiency are derived. Calculations using this model show good overall agreement with experimental patterns and directivity measurements. The waveguide under an infinite dielectric slab is used as an impedance model. Calculations using this model agree qualitatively with the measured impedance data. It is concluded that dielectric loaded antennas such as the waveguide excited sphere, cube, or sphere-cylinder can produce directivities in excess of that obtained by a uniformly illuminated aperture of the same cross section, particularly for dielectric objects with dimensions of 2 wavelengths or less. It is also shown that for certain configurations coupling between two antennas of this type is less than that for the same antennas without dielectric loading.

  8. Electrochemically Programmable Plasmonic Antennas.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shi; Zhang, Kai; Yu, Zhiping; Fan, Jonathan A

    2016-07-26

    Plasmonic antennas are building blocks in advanced nano-optical systems due to their ability to tailor optical response based on their geometry. We propose an electrochemical approach to program the optical properties of dipole antennas in a scalable, fast, and energy-efficient manner. These antennas comprise two arms, one serving as an anode and the other a cathode, separated by a solid electrolyte. As a voltage is applied between the antenna arms, a conductive filament either grows or dissolves within the electrolyte, modifying the antenna load. We probe the dynamics of stochastic filament formation and their effects on plasmonic mode programming using a combination of three-dimensional optical and electronic simulations. In particular, we identify device operation regimes in which the charge-transfer plasmon mode can be programmed to be "on" or "off." We also identify, unexpectedly, a strong correlation between DC filament resistance and charge-transfer plasmon mode frequency that is insensitive to the detailed filament morphology. We envision that the scalability of our electrochemical platform can generalize to large-area reconfigurable metamaterials and metasurfaces for on-chip and free-space applications. PMID:27328022

  9. Cup Cylindrical Waveguide Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.; Darby, William G.; Kory, Carol L.; Lambert, Kevin M.; Breen, Daniel P.

    2008-01-01

    The cup cylindrical waveguide antenna (CCWA) is a short backfire microwave antenna capable of simultaneously supporting the transmission or reception of two distinct signals having opposite circular polarizations. Short backfire antennas are widely used in mobile/satellite communications, tracking, telemetry, and wireless local area networks because of their compactness and excellent radiation characteristics. A typical prior short backfire antenna contains a half-wavelength dipole excitation element for linear polarization or crossed half-wavelength dipole elements for circular polarization. In order to achieve simultaneous dual circular polarization, it would be necessary to integrate, into the antenna feed structure, a network of hybrid components, which would introduce significant losses. The CCWA embodies an alternate approach that entails relatively low losses and affords the additional advantage of compactness. The CCWA includes a circular cylindrical cup, a circular disk subreflector, and a circular waveguide that serves as the excitation element. The components that make it possible to obtain simultaneous dual circular polarization are integrated into the circular waveguide. These components are a sixpost polarizer and an orthomode transducer (OMT) with two orthogonal coaxial ports. The overall length of the OMT and polarizer (for the nominal middle design frequency of 2.25 GHz) is about 11 in. (approximately equal to 28 cm), whereas the length of a commercially available OMT and polarizer for the same frequency is about 32 in. (approximately equal to 81 cm).

  10. In situ high-resolution structure of the baseplate antenna complex in Chlorobaculum tepidum.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jakob Toudahl; Kulminskaya, Natalia V; Bjerring, Morten; Linnanto, Juha M; Rätsep, Margus; Pedersen, Marie Østergaard; Lambrev, Petar H; Dorogi, Márta; Garab, Győző; Thomsen, Karen; Jegerschöld, Caroline; Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Lindahl, Martin; Nielsen, Niels Chr

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthetic antenna systems enable organisms harvesting light and transfer the energy to the photosynthetic reaction centre, where the conversion to chemical energy takes place. One of the most complex antenna systems, the chlorosome, found in the photosynthetic green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum (Cba.) tepidum contains a baseplate, which is a scaffolding super-structure, formed by the protein CsmA and bacteriochlorophyll a. Here we present the first high-resolution structure of the CsmA baseplate using intact fully functional, light-harvesting organelles from Cba. tepidum, following a hybrid approach combining five complementary methods: solid-state NMR spectroscopy, cryo-electron microscopy, isotropic and anisotropic circular dichroism and linear dichroism. The structure calculation was facilitated through development of new software, GASyCS for efficient geometry optimization of highly symmetric oligomeric structures. We show that the baseplate is composed of rods of repeated dimers of the strongly amphipathic CsmA with pigments sandwiched within the dimer at the hydrophobic side of the helix. PMID:27534696

  11. In situ high-resolution structure of the baseplate antenna complex in Chlorobaculum tepidum

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Jakob Toudahl; Kulminskaya, Natalia V.; Bjerring, Morten; Linnanto, Juha M.; Rätsep, Margus; Pedersen, Marie Østergaard; Lambrev, Petar H.; Dorogi, Márta; Garab, Győző; Thomsen, Karen; Jegerschöld, Caroline; Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Lindahl, Martin; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthetic antenna systems enable organisms harvesting light and transfer the energy to the photosynthetic reaction centre, where the conversion to chemical energy takes place. One of the most complex antenna systems, the chlorosome, found in the photosynthetic green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum (Cba.) tepidum contains a baseplate, which is a scaffolding super-structure, formed by the protein CsmA and bacteriochlorophyll a. Here we present the first high-resolution structure of the CsmA baseplate using intact fully functional, light-harvesting organelles from Cba. tepidum, following a hybrid approach combining five complementary methods: solid-state NMR spectroscopy, cryo-electron microscopy, isotropic and anisotropic circular dichroism and linear dichroism. The structure calculation was facilitated through development of new software, GASyCS for efficient geometry optimization of highly symmetric oligomeric structures. We show that the baseplate is composed of rods of repeated dimers of the strongly amphipathic CsmA with pigments sandwiched within the dimer at the hydrophobic side of the helix. PMID:27534696

  12. View north of the antenna array, note the communications antenna ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View north of the antenna array, note the communications antenna in the middleground - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Christmas Valley Radar Site Transmit Sector Four Antenna Array, On unnamed road west of Lost Forest Road, Christmas Valley, Lake County, OR

  13. View of antenna tunnel end. Right to Antenna Silo #1, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of antenna tunnel end. Right to Antenna Silo #1, left to Antenna Silo #2 - Titan One Missile Complex 2A, .3 miles west of 129 Road and 1.5 miles north of County Line Road, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  14. Hemispheric ultra-wideband antenna.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2006-04-01

    This report begins with a review of reduced size ultra-wideband (UWB) antennas and the peculiar problems that arise when building a UWB antenna. It then gives a description of a new type of UWB antenna that resolves these problems. This antenna, dubbed the hemispheric conical antenna, is similar to a conventional conical antenna in that it uses the same inverted conical conductor over a ground plane, but it also uses a hemispheric dielectric fill in between the conductive cone and the ground plane. The dielectric material creates a fundamentally new antenna which is reduced in size and much more rugged than a standard UWB conical antenna. The creation of finite-difference time domain (FDTD) software tools in spherical coordinates, as described in SAND2004-6577, enabled this technological advance.

  15. Dual polarization flat plate antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Kenneth C.

    Rectangular waveguides with radiating slots are used in groups to form planar array microwave antennas with large apertures and small depth. Such flat plate antennas are widely used on spacecraft and aircraft. Typically, flat plate antennas provide fixed linear polarization. The present paper describes a new flat plate antenna which produces two coincident beams that are distinguished by their orthogonal linear polarizations. The antenna has two ports, one for each of the coicident beams. Completely external to the antenna, connecting a simple network to those terminal ports enables the antenna to provide right circular polarization from one port and left from the other. A different external network enables the antenna to have arbitrarily adjustable polarizations.

  16. Microstrip antenna technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carver, K. R.; Mink, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    A survey of microstrip antenna elements is presented, with emphasis on theoretical and practical design techniques. Available substrate materials are reviewed along with the relation between dielectric constant tolerance and resonant frequency of microstrip patches. Several theoretical analysis techniques are summarized, including transmission-line and modal-expansion (cavity) techniques as well as numerical methods such as the method of moments and finite-element techniques. Practical procedures are given for both standard rectangular and circular patches, as well as variations on those designs including circularly polarized microstrip patches. The quality, bandwidth, and efficiency factors of typical patch designs are discussed. Microstrip dipole and conformal antennas are summarized. Finally, critical needs for further research and development for this antenna are identified.

  17. The ACTS multibeam antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regier, Frank A.

    1992-06-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) to be launched in 1993 is briefly introduced. Its multibeam antenna, consisting of electrically similar 30 GHz receive and 20 GHz transmit offset Cassegrain systems, both utilizing orthogonal polarizations, is described. Dual polarization is achieved by using one feed assembly for each polarization in conjunction with nested front and back subreflectors, the gridded front subreflector acting as a window for one polarization and a reflector for the other. The antennas produce spot beams with approximately 0.3 degree beamwidth and gains of approximately 50 dbi. High surface accuracy and high edge taper produce low sidelobe levels and high cross-polarization isolation. A brief description is given of several Ka-band components fabricated for ACTS. These include multiflare antenna feedhorns, beam-forming networks utilizing latching ferrite waveguide switches, a 30 GHz HEMT low-noise amplifier and a 20 GHz TWT power amplifier.

  18. The ACTS multibeam antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regier, Frank A.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) to be launched in 1993 is briefly introduced. Its multibeam antenna, consisting of electrically similar 30 GHz receive and 20 GHz transmit offset Cassegrain systems, both utilizing orthogonal polarizations, is described. Dual polarization is achieved by using one feed assembly for each polarization in conjunction with nested front and back subreflectors, the gridded front subreflector acting as a window for one polarization and a reflector for the other. The antennas produce spot beams with approximately 0.3 degree beamwidth and gains of approximately 50 dbi. High surface accuracy and high edge taper produce low sidelobe levels and high cross-polarization isolation. A brief description is given of several Ka-band components fabricated for ACTS. These include multiflare antenna feedhorns, beam-forming networks utilizing latching ferrite waveguide switches, a 30 GHz HEMT low-noise amplifier and a 20 GHz TWT power amplifier.

  19. Launching large antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandli, H. W.

    1983-09-01

    Large antennas will provide communication to rural and remote areas in times of need. This is seen as facilitating the work of law enforcement agencies. All mobile radio communications will enjoy advantages in distances covered and information relayed owing to the large number of beams possible from super radio transmitters in space. If the antennas are placed in low-earth orbit, advantages will be realized in the remote sensing of the earth's resources. It is pointed out that with umbrella or bicyclelike antennas turned outward toward space, the universe could be scouted for signals from intelligent life. Various concepts that have been put forward by U.S. companies are described. These include the radial rib, wrap rib, and parabolic erectable truss designs. Others are the mesh hoop column collapsable umbrella made of gold and molybdenum and the maypole design.

  20. Dielectric coated wire antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, J. H.; Newman, E. H.

    1976-01-01

    An electrically thin dielectric insulating shell on an antenna composed of electrically thin circular cylindrical wires is examined. A moment method solution is obtained, and the insulating shell is modeled by equivalent volume polarization currents. These polarization currents are related in a simple manner to the surface charge density on the wire antenna. In this way the insulating shell causes no new unknowns to be introduced, and the size of the impedance matrix is the same as for the uninsulated wires. The insulation is accounted for entirely through a modification of the symmetric impedance matrix. This modification influences the current distribution, impedance, efficiency, field patterns, and scattering properties. The theory is compared with measurement for dielectric coated antennas in air.

  1. Ionospheric effects to antenna impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bethke, K. H.

    1986-01-01

    The reciprocity between high power satellite antennas and the surrounding plasma are examined. The relevant plasma states for antenna impedance calculations are presented and plasma models, and hydrodynamic and kinetic theory, are discussed. A theory from which a variation in antenna impedance with regard to the radiated power can be calculated for a frequency range well above the plasma resonance frequency is give. The theory can include photo and secondary emission effects in antenna impedance calculations.

  2. Galileo satellite antenna modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigenberger, Peter; Dach, Rolf; Prange, Lars; Montenbruck, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    The space segment of the European satellite navigation system Galileo currently consists of six satellites. Four of them belong to the first generation of In-Orbit Validation (IOV) satellites whereas the other two are Full Operational Capability (FOC) satellites. High-precision geodetic applications require detailed knowledge about the actual phase center of the satellite and receiver antenna. The deviation of this actual phase center from a well-defined reference point is described by phase center offsets (PCOs) and phase center variations (PCVs). Unfortunately, no public information is available about the Galileo satellite antenna PCOs and PCVs, neither for the IOV, nor the FOC satellites. Therefore, conventional values for the IOV satellite antenna PCOs have been adopted for the Multi-GNSS experiment (MGEX) of the International GNSS Service (IGS). The effect of the PCVs is currently neglected and no PCOs for the FOC satellites are available yet. To overcome this deficiency in GNSS observation modeling, satellite antenna PCOs and PCVs are estimated for the Galileo IOV satellites based on global GNSS tracking data of the MGEX network and additional stations of the legacy IGS network. Two completely independent solutions are computed with the Bernese and Napeos software packages. The PCO and PCV values of the individual satellites are analyzed and the availability of two different solutions allows for an accuracy assessment. The FOC satellites are built by a different manufacturer and are also equipped with another type of antenna panel compared to the IOV satellites. Signal transmission of the first FOC satellite has started in December 2014 and activation of the second satellite is expected for early 2015. Based on the available observations PCO estimates and, optionally PCVs of the FOC satellites will be presented as well. Finally, the impact of the new antenna model on the precision and accuracy of the Galileo orbit determination is analyzed.

  3. Biohybrid photosynthetic antenna complexes for enhanced light-harvesting.

    PubMed

    Springer, Joseph W; Parkes-Loach, Pamela S; Reddy, Kanumuri Ramesh; Krayer, Michael; Jiao, Jieying; Lee, Gregory M; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Harris, Michelle A; Kirmaier, Christine; Bocian, David F; Lindsey, Jonathan S; Holten, Dewey; Loach, Paul A

    2012-03-14

    Biohybrid antenna systems have been constructed that contain synthetic chromophores attached to 31mer analogues of the bacterial photosynthetic core light-harvesting (LH1) β-polypeptide. The peptides are engineered with a Cys site for bioconjugation with maleimide-terminated chromophores, which include synthetic bacteriochlorins (BC1, BC2) with strong near-infrared absorption and commercial dyes Oregon green (OGR) and rhodamine red (RR) with strong absorption in the blue-green to yellow-orange regions. The peptides place the Cys 14 (or 6) residues before a native His site that binds bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl-a) and, like the native LH proteins, have high helical content as probed by single-reflection IR spectroscopy. The His residue associates with BChl-a as in the native LH1 β-polypeptide to form dimeric ββ-subunit complexes [31mer(-14Cys)X/BChl](2), where X is one of the synthetic chromophores. The native-like BChl-a dimer has Q(y) absorption at 820 nm and serves as the acceptor for energy from light absorbed by the appended synthetic chromophore. The energy-transfer characteristics of biohybrid complexes have been characterized by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence and absorption measurements. The quantum yields of energy transfer from a synthetic chromophore located 14 residues from the BChl-coordinating His site are as follows: OGR (0.30) < RR (0.60) < BC2 (0.90). Oligomeric assemblies of the subunit complexes [31mer(-14Cys)X/BChl](n) are accompanied by a bathochromic shift of the Q(y) absorption of the BChl-a oligomer as far as the 850-nm position found in cyclic native photosynthetic LH2 complexes. Room-temperature stabilized oligomeric biohybrids have energy-transfer quantum yields comparable to those of the dimeric subunit complexes as follows: OGR (0.20) < RR (0.80) < BC1 (0.90). Thus, the new biohybrid antennas retain the energy-transfer and self-assembly characteristics of the native antenna complexes, offer enhanced coverage of the solar

  4. Satellite communication antenna technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittra, R. (Editor); Imbriale, W. A. (Editor); Maanders, E. J. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    A general overview of current technology in the field of communication satellite antennas is presented. Among the topics discussed are: the design of multiple beam systems; frequency reuse; and polarization control of antenna measurements. Consideration is also given to: contour beam synthesis; dual shaped reflector synthesis; beam shaping; and offset reflector design. The applications of the above technologies to present and future generations of communications satellites is considered, with emphasis given to such systems as: the Intelsats; the Defense Satellite Communications System, (DSCS-III); Satellite Business System (SBS), and Comstar.

  5. Furlable spacecraft antenna development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, R. E.; Wilson, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    The development of large furlable spacecraft antennas using conical main reflectors is described. Two basic antenna configurations which utilize conical main reflectors have been conceived and are under development. In the conical-Gregorian configuration each ray experiences two reflections in traveling from the feed center to the aperture plane. In the Quadreflex (four reflection) configuration, each ray experiences four reflections, one at each of two subreflector surfaces and two at the main conical reflector surface. The RF gain measurements obtained from 6-ft and 30-in. models of the conical-Gregorian and Quadreflex concepts respectively were sufficiently encouraging to warrant further development of the concepts.

  6. Collapsible high gain antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cribb, H. E. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A lightweight small high gain antenna which is capable of being packaged in a collapsed form and automatically expanded when in use is described. The antenna includes a cylindrical housing having a rod with a piston adjacent to one end extending through it. Attached to the outer end of the rod in a normally collapsed state is a helical wire coil. When the gas producing means is activated the piston and rod are shifted outwardly to expand the wire coil. A latch is provided for holding the helical coil in the expanded position.

  7. Spaced antenna drift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royrvik, O.

    1983-01-01

    It has been suggested that the spaced antenna drift (SAD) technique could be successfully used by VHF radars and that it would be superior to a Doppler-beam-swinging (DBS) technique because it would take advantage of the aspect sensitivity of the scattered signal, and might also benefit from returns from single meteors. It appears, however, that the technique suffers from several limitations. On the basis of one SAD experiment performed at the very large Jicamarca radar, it is concluded that the SAD technique can be compared in accuracy to the DBS technique only if small antenna dimensions are used.

  8. DSN Microwave Antenna Holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochblatt, D. J.; Seidel, B. L.

    1984-01-01

    The DSN microwave antenna holography project will obtain three-dimensional pictures of the large DSN antenna surfaces. These pictures must be of suffi icient resolution to allow adjustment of the reflector panels to an rms surface of 0.5 mm (0.25 mm, goal). The major parameters and equations needed to define a holographic measurement system are outlined and then the proof of concept demonstration measurement that was made at DSS-43 (Australia) that resulted in contour maps with spatial resolution of 7 m in the aperture plane and resolution orthogonal to the aperture plane of 0.7 mm was discussed.

  9. A century of antenna development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olver, A. D.

    The paper describes a century of antenna development as part of a century of radio communications. This historical review examines, chronologically, the pre-Hertz period, Hertz antennas, the microwave optics period, the Marconi era, short waves, theoretical design before and after computers, and radar. Consideration is also given to mobile antennas, microwave comunications, radio astronomy, and satellite comunications.

  10. The JPL mechanically steered antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berner, Jeff B.; Bell, David J.

    1988-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has designed and developed a mechanically steered antenna for tracking satellites in a mobile environment. This antenna was used to track an L-band beacon on the MARISAT satellite. A description of the antenna and the results of the satellite experiment are given.

  11. Picosecond dynamics of excitons in mesoscopic pigment aggregates of photosynthetic proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freiberg, Arvi; Kukk, Peeter; Tars, Märt; Miller, Mette

    1996-04-01

    Population relaxation of Frenkel excitons in a natural photosynthetic light-harvesting pigment-protein complex (FMO protein: aggregate of 21 bacteriochlorophyll a molecules, hold together by a protein backbone) has been studied by ps fluorescence emission decay as a function of temperature between 5 K and 300 K. At low temperatures a gradual slowing down of relaxation rates was observed (from ps-1 to about ns-1) when recording at lower energies. At higher energies the rates were instrument-limited. The dependence of relaxation rates on recording wavelength was smeared out at temperatures ≥100 K. The relatively slow rates are probably due to low density of exciton states and/or to specific coupling to vibrational modes. A strong thermally induced quenching of fluorescence intensity was observed from about 20 K. This leads to a short (<100 ps) fluorescence lifetime, measured at the band maximum at room temperature, compared to 1.1 ns at 5 K.

  12. Rhodobacter sphaeroides mutants overexpressing chlorophyllide a oxidoreductase of Blastochloris viridis elucidate functions of enzymes in late bacteriochlorophyll biosynthetic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Tsukatani, Yusuke; Harada, Jiro; Nomata, Jiro; Yamamoto, Haruki; Fujita, Yuichi; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    In previous studies we have demonstrated that chlorophyllide a oxidoreductases (CORs) from bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) a-producing Rhodobacter species and BChl b-producing Blastochloris viridis show distinct substrate recognition and different catalytic hydrogenation reactions, and that these two types of CORs therefore cause committed steps for BChls a and b biosynthesis. In this study, COR genes from B. viridis were incorporated and overexpressed in a series of Rhodobacter sphaeroides mutants. We found that the following two factors are essential in making R. sphaeroides produce BChl b: the loss of functions of both intrinsic COR and 8-vinyl reductase (BciA) in the host R. sphaeroides strain; and expression of the BchYZ catalytic components of COR from B. viridis, not the complete set of COR (BchXYZ), in the host strain. In addition, we incorporated bchYZ of B. viridis into the R. sphaeroides mutant lacking BchJ and BciA, resulting in the strain accumulating both BChl a and BChl b. This is the first example of an anoxygenic photosynthetic bacterium producing BChls a and b together. The results suggest that BchJ enhances activity of the intrinsic COR. The physiological significance of BchJ in pigment biosynthetic pathways will be discussed. PMID:25978726

  13. Antenna array research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, C.

    1973-01-01

    Antenna array research on electromagnetic field problems in inhomogeneous media is presented along with characteristics of the Eaton lens. Comparisons are given of the radiation pattern and directivity of small Luneburg lens with a homogeneous lens. References and figure captions on radiation patterns are included.

  14. Airborne antenna pattern calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knerr, T. J.; Schaffner, P. R.; Mielke, R. R.; Gilreath, M. C.

    1980-01-01

    A procedure for numerically calculating radiation patterns of fuselage-mounted airborne antennas using the Volumetric Pattern Analysis Program is presented. Special attention is given to aircraft modeling. An actual case study involving a large commercial aircraft is included to illustrate the analysis procedure.

  15. Community Antenna Television (CATV).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    The number of households hooked up to cable television or community antenna television (CATV) is expanding rapidly, and Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has been developing regulations since 1962 to guide the growth of the industry. By 1965 the FCC had claimed jurisdiction over all CATV systems in the U. S. This jurisdiction was challenged…

  16. Quartz antenna with hollow conductor

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Benabou, Elie

    2002-01-01

    A radio frequency (RF) antenna for plasma ion sources is formed of a hollow metal conductor tube disposed within a glass tube. The hollow metal tubular conductor has an internal flow channel so that there will be no coolant leakage if the outer glass tube of the antenna breaks. A portion of the RF antenna is formed into a coil; the antenna is used for inductively coupling RF power to a plasma in an ion source chamber. The antenna is made by first inserting the metal tube inside the glass tube, and then forming the glass/metal composite tube into the desired coil shape.

  17. Mobile terminal antennas for helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Te-Kao; Farazian, K.; Golshan, N.; Divsalar, D.; Hinedi, S.; Woo, K.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of using an L-band low gain antenna (LGA) as a mobile terminal antenna for helicopters is described. The objective is to select the lowest cost antenna system which can be easily mounted on a helicopter and capable of communicating with a geosynchronous satellite. To ensure that all the antenna options are being considered, the steerable high gain reflector and medium gain array antennas as well as LGA are studied and compared in an exhaustive survey. The high gain reflector antenna in L-band is usually very large in size and heavy in weight. In addition, a bulky and expensive tracking system is needed to steer the antenna beam to the satellite direction. The medium gain antennas (including mechanically and electronically steered arrays) are also more expensive and less reliable than an LGA due to the addition of a beam steering system to track the satellite. The omni-directional LGA is simple, reliable, and inexpensive. It is typically ten times smaller than the medium gain antenna. This makes the position, selection, and mounting on the helicopter relatively easier. Therefore, the LGA is selected as a mobile terminal antenna for helicopters. Among the many LGA's (cross-dipole, helix, spiral, and slot antennas), the helix antenna is the most inexpensive. One can also change the size, shape, or pitch angle of the helix to optimize the gain in the desired direction. Therefore, the helix antenna is selected for further study. Both 2-arm and 4-arm helices are studied theoretically and experimentally to determine the antenna's performance and the scattering effects from the helicopter body and the blades. The multipath, Doppler, and Doppler rate issues as well as the periodic fading effects caused by the helicopter rotor blades will be briefly discussed in the paper.

  18. Platelet aggregation test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003669.htm Platelet aggregation test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The platelet aggregation blood test checks how well platelets , a ...

  19. Thermodynamics of Protein Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Kenneth L.; Barz, Bogdan; Bachmann, Michael; Strodel, Birgit

    Amyloid protein aggregation characterizes many neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Creutz- feldt-Jakob disease. Evidence suggests that amyloid aggregates may share similar aggregation pathways, implying simulation of full-length amyloid proteins is not necessary for understanding amyloid formation. In this study we simulate GNNQQNY, the N-terminal prion-determining domain of the yeast protein Sup35 to investigate the thermodynamics of structural transitions during aggregation. We use a coarse-grained model with replica-exchange molecular dynamics to investigate the association of 3-, 6-, and 12-chain GNNQQNY systems and we determine the aggregation pathway by studying aggregation states of GN- NQQNY. We find that the aggregation of the hydrophilic GNNQQNY sequence is mainly driven by H-bond formation, leading to the formation of /3-sheets from the very beginning of the assembly process. Condensation (aggregation) and ordering take place simultaneously, which is underpinned by the occurrence of a single heat capacity peak only.

  20. Platelet aggregation test

    MedlinePlus

    The platelet aggregation blood test checks how well platelets , a part of blood, clump together and cause blood to clot. ... Decreased platelet aggregation may be due to: Autoimmune ... Fibrin degradation products Inherited platelet function defects ...

  1. Nonphotochemical Hole-Burning Studies of Energy Transfer Dynamics in Antenna Complexes of Photosynthetic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Satoshi Matsuzaki

    2002-06-27

    This thesis contains the candidate's original work on excitonic structure and energy transfer dynamics of two bacterial antenna complexes as studied using spectral hole-burning spectroscopy. The general introduction is divided into two chapters (1 and 2). Chapter 1 provides background material on photosynthesis and bacterial antenna complexes with emphasis on the two bacterial antenna systems related to the thesis research. Chapter 2 reviews the underlying principles and mechanism of persistent nonphotochemical hole-burning (NPHB) spectroscopy. Relevant energy transfer theories are also discussed. Chapters 3 and 4 are papers by the candidate that have been published. Chapter 3 describes the application of NPHB spectroscopy to the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex from the green sulfur bacterium Prosthecochloris aestuarii; emphasis is on determination of the low energy vibrational structure that is important for understanding the energy transfer process associated within three lowest energy Q{sub y}-states of the complex. The results are compared with those obtained earlier on the FMO complex from Chlorobium tepidum. In Chapter 4, the energy transfer dynamics of the B800 molecules of intact LH2 and B800-deficient LH2 complexes of the purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila are compared. New insights on the additional decay channel of the B800 ring of bacteriochlorophyll{sub a} (BChl{sub a}) molecules are provided. General conclusions are given in Chapter 5. A version of the hole spectrum simulation program written by the candidate for the FMO complex study (Chapter 3) is included as an appendix. The references for each chapter are given at the end of each chapter.

  2. Microsecond switchable thermal antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Abdallah, Philippe Benisty, Henri; Besbes, Mondher

    2014-07-21

    We propose a thermal antenna that can be actively switched on and off at the microsecond scale by means of a phase transition of a metal-insulator material, the vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}). This thermal source is made of a periodically patterned tunable VO{sub 2} nanolayer, which support a surface phonon-polariton in the infrared range in their crystalline phase. Using electrodes properly registered with respect to the pattern, the VO{sub 2} phase transition can be locally triggered by ohmic heating so that the surface phonon-polariton can be diffracted by the induced grating, producing a highly directional thermal emission. Conversely, when heating less, the VO{sub 2} layers cool down below the transition temperature, the surface phonon-polariton cannot be diffracted anymore so that thermal emission is inhibited. This switchable antenna could find broad applications in the domain of active thermal coatings or in those of infrared spectroscopy and sensing.

  3. The role of betaArg-10 in the B800 bacteriochlorophyll and carotenoid pigment environment within the light-harvesting LH2 complex of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Fowler, G J; Hess, S; Pullerits, T; Sundström, V; Hunter, C N

    1997-09-16

    Previous work has suggested that the betaArg-10 residue forms part of the binding site for the B800 bacteriochlorophyll in the LH2 complex of Rhodobactersphaeroides [Crielaard, W., Visschers, R. W., Fowler, G. J. S., van Grondelle, R., Hellingwerf, K. J., Hunter, C. N. (1994) Biochim. Biophys. Acta1183, 473-482], and this is consistent with the X-ray crystallographic data that have been subsequently obtained for the related LH2 complex from Rhodopseudomonas acidophila [McDermott, G., Prince, S. M., Freer, A. A., Hawthornthwaite-Lawless, A. M., Papiz, M. Z., Cogdell, R. J., Isaacs, N. W. (1995) Nature 374, 517-521]. Therefore, in order obtain more information about the B800 binding site and its effect on the B800 absorption band, betaArg-10 was replaced by residues Met, His, Asn, Leu, and Lys (in addition to the Glu mutant described in our previous work); these residues were thought to represent a suitable range of amino acid shape, charge, and hydrogen-bonding ability. This new series of betaArg-10 mutants, in the form of LH2 complexes in the native membrane, has been characterized using a variety of biochemical and spectroscopic techniques in order to determine the ways in which the mutants differ from wild-type (WT) LH2. For example, most of the mutant LH2 complexes were found to have blue-shifted B800 absorption bands ranging from 794 to 783 nm at 77 K; the exception to this trend is the betaArg-10 to Met mutant, which absorbs maximally at 798 nm. These blue shifts decrease the spectral overlap between the "B800" and B850 pigments, which allowed us to examine the nature of the B800 to B850 transfer step for the betaArg-10 mutant LH2 complexes by carrying out a series of room temperature subpicosecond energy transfer measurements. The results of these measurements demonstrated that the reduced overlap leads to a slower B800 to B850 transfer, although the alterations at betaArg-10 were found to have little effect on the efficiency of internal energy transfer

  4. JPL Large Advanced Antenna Station Array Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    In accordance with study requirements, two antennas are described: a 30 meter standard antenna and a 34 meter modified antenna, along with a candidate array configuration for each. Modified antenna trade analyses are summarized, risks analyzed, costs presented, and a final antenna array configuration recommendation made.

  5. 47 CFR 80.863 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.863 Section 80.863... Antenna system. (a) An antenna system must be installed which is as nondirectional and as efficient as is... construction of the required antenna must insure operation in time of emergency. (b) If the required antenna...

  6. 47 CFR 80.863 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.863 Section 80.863... Antenna system. (a) An antenna system must be installed which is as nondirectional and as efficient as is... construction of the required antenna must insure operation in time of emergency. (b) If the required antenna...

  7. 47 CFR 80.866 - Spare antenna.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Spare antenna. 80.866 Section 80.866... Spare antenna. A spare transmitting antenna completely assembled for immediate erection must be provided. If the installed transmitting antenna is suspended between supports, this spare antenna must be...

  8. 47 CFR 80.863 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.863 Section 80.863... Antenna system. (a) An antenna system must be installed which is as nondirectional and as efficient as is... construction of the required antenna must insure operation in time of emergency. (b) If the required antenna...

  9. 47 CFR 80.866 - Spare antenna.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Spare antenna. 80.866 Section 80.866... Spare antenna. A spare transmitting antenna completely assembled for immediate erection must be provided. If the installed transmitting antenna is suspended between supports, this spare antenna must be...

  10. 47 CFR 80.866 - Spare antenna.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Spare antenna. 80.866 Section 80.866... Spare antenna. A spare transmitting antenna completely assembled for immediate erection must be provided. If the installed transmitting antenna is suspended between supports, this spare antenna must be...

  11. 47 CFR 80.866 - Spare antenna.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Spare antenna. 80.866 Section 80.866... Spare antenna. A spare transmitting antenna completely assembled for immediate erection must be provided. If the installed transmitting antenna is suspended between supports, this spare antenna must be...

  12. 47 CFR 80.863 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.863 Section 80.863... Antenna system. (a) An antenna system must be installed which is as nondirectional and as efficient as is... construction of the required antenna must insure operation in time of emergency. (b) If the required antenna...

  13. 47 CFR 80.863 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.863 Section 80.863... Antenna system. (a) An antenna system must be installed which is as nondirectional and as efficient as is... construction of the required antenna must insure operation in time of emergency. (b) If the required antenna...

  14. 47 CFR 80.866 - Spare antenna.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Spare antenna. 80.866 Section 80.866... Spare antenna. A spare transmitting antenna completely assembled for immediate erection must be provided. If the installed transmitting antenna is suspended between supports, this spare antenna must be...

  15. Different effects of identical symmetry-related mutations near the bacteriochlorophyll dimer in the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Vasilieva, L G; Fufina, T Y; Gabdulkhakov, A G; Shuvalov, V A

    2015-06-01

    In the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center (RC), asymmetric protein environment of the bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) dimer largely determines the photophysical and photochemical properties of the primary electron donor. Previously, we noticed significant differences in properties of Rhodobacter sphaeroides RCs with identical mutations in symmetry-related positions - I(M206)H and I(L177)H. The substitution I(L177)H resulted in covalent binding of BChl PA with the L-subunit, as well as in 6-coordination of BChl BB, whereas in RC I(M206)H no such changes of pigment-protein interactions were found. In addition, the yield of RC I(M206)H after its isolation from membranes was significantly lower than the yield of RC I(L177)H. This study shows that replacement of amino acid residues in the M203-M206 positions near BChls PB and BA by symmetry-related residues from the L-subunit near BChls PA and BB leads to further decrease in RC amount in the membranes associated obviously with poor assembly of the complex. Introduction of a new hydrogen bond between BChl PB and its protein environment by means of the F(M197)H mutation stabilized the mutant RC but did not affect its low yield. We suggest that the mutation I(M206)H and substitution of amino acid residues in M203-M205 positions could disturb glycolipid binding on the RC surface near BChl BA that is important for stable assembly of the complex in the membrane. PMID:26531011

  16. Rim loaded reflector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucci, O. M.; Franceschetti, G.

    1980-05-01

    A general theory of reflector antennas loaded by surface impedances is presented. Spatial variation of primary illumination is taken into account using a generalized slope diffraction coefficient. The theory is experimentally checked on surface loaded square plate scatterers and then used for computing the radiation diagram of parabolic and hyperbolic dishes. Computer programs and computed diagrams refer to the case of focal illumination and negligible tapering of primary illumination.

  17. The ACTS multibeam antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regier, Frank A.

    1992-04-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) to be launched in 1993 introduces several new technologies including a multibeam antenna (MBA) operating at Ka-band. The satellite is introduced briefly, and then the MBA, consisting of electrically similar 30 GHz received and 20 GHz transmit offset Cassegrain systems utilizing orthogonal linear polarizations, is described. Dual polarization is achieved by using one feed assembly for each polarization in conjunction with nested front and back subreflectors, the gridded front subreflector acting as a window for one polarization and a reflector for the other. The antennas produce spot beams with approximately 0.3 deg beamwidth and gains of approximately 50 dbi. High surface accuracy and high edge taper produce low sidelobe levels and high cross-polarization isolation. A brief description is given of several Ka-band components fabricated for ACTS. These include multiflare antenna feedhorns, beam-forming networks utilizing latching ferrite waveguide switches, a 30 GHz high mobility electron transmitter (HEMT) low-noise amplifier and a 20 GHz TWT power amplifier.

  18. SPS antenna element evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunden, C. D.; Lund, W. W.; Nalos, E. J.

    1980-01-01

    The SPS transmitting array requires an architecture which will provide a low weight, high efficiency and high structural rigidity. Waveguide slot arrays constitute the most desirable option. Consequently, such an array was chosen for the SPS. Waveguide slot arrays offer high efficiency, uniform illumination, and are fairly lightweight. Bandwidths of such arrays are narrow, typically 1/2-2%. Although this does not directly impact the SPS, which transmits power at a single frequency of 2.45 GHz, the narrow bandwidth does constrain the thermal and mechanical tolerances of the antenna. The purpose of this program is to better define the electronic aspects of an SPS specific waveguide slot array. The specific aims of the program are as follows: (1) To build a full-scale half-module, 10 stick, array, the design parameters for which are to be determined analytical considerations tempered by experimental data on a single slotted radiating stick, (2) To experimentally evaluate the completed array with respect to antenna pattern, impedance and return loss; and (3) To measure swept transmission amplitude and phase to provide a data base for design of a receiving antenna.

  19. Modular antenna design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribble, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanical design of a modular antenna concept was developed sufficiently to allow manufacture of a working demonstration model of a module, to predict mass properties, and to make performance estimates for antenna reflectors composed of these modules. The primary features of this concept are: (1) each module is an autonomous structural element which can be attached to adjacent modules through a three point connection; (2) the upper surface is a folding hexagonal truss plate mechanism which serves as the supporting structure for a reflective surface; and (3) the entire truss and surface can be folded into a cylindrical envelope in which all truss elements are essentially parallel. The kinematic studies and engineering demonstration model fully verified the deployment kinematics, stowing philosophy, and deployment sequencing for large antenna modules. It was established that such modules can be stowed in packages as small as 25 cm in diameter, using 1.27 cm diameter structural tubes. The development activity indicates that this deployable modular approach towards building large structures in space will support erection of 450 m apertures for operation up to 3 GHz with a single space shuttle flight.

  20. The ACTS multibeam antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regier, Frank A.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) to be launched in 1993 introduces several new technologies including a multibeam antenna (MBA) operating at Ka-band. The satellite is introduced briefly, and then the MBA, consisting of electrically similar 30 GHz received and 20 GHz transmit offset Cassegrain systems utilizing orthogonal linear polarizations, is described. Dual polarization is achieved by using one feed assembly for each polarization in conjunction with nested front and back subreflectors, the gridded front subreflector acting as a window for one polarization and a reflector for the other. The antennas produce spot beams with approximately 0.3 deg beamwidth and gains of approximately 50 dbi. High surface accuracy and high edge taper produce low sidelobe levels and high cross-polarization isolation. A brief description is given of several Ka-band components fabricated for ACTS. These include multiflare antenna feedhorns, beam-forming networks utilizing latching ferrite waveguide switches, a 30 GHz high mobility electron transmitter (HEMT) low-noise amplifier and a 20 GHz TWT power amplifier.

  1. Helicopter Rotor Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pogorzelski, Ronald J.; Cable, Vaughn P.

    2001-01-01

    This effort was directed toward demonstration of the efficacy of a concept for mitigation of the rotor blade modulation problem in helicopter communications. An antenna is envisioned with radiating elements mounted on the rotor and rotating with it. The rf signals are coupled to the radio stationary with respect to the airframe via a coupler of unique design. The coupler has an rf cavity within which a mode is established and the field distribution of this mode is sampled by probes rotating with the radiating elements. In this manner the radiated pattern is "despun" with respect to the rotor. Theoretical analysis has indicated that this arrangement will be less susceptible to rotor blade modulation that would be a conventional fixed mounted antenna. A small coupler operating at S-band was designed, fabricated, and mounted on a mockup representative of a helicopter body. A small electric motor was installed to rotate the rotor portion of the coupler along with a set of radiating elements during testing. This test article was be evaluated using the JPL Mesa Antenna Measurement Facility to establish its ability to mitigate rotor blade modulation. It was found that indeed such a coupler will result in a despun pattern and that such a pattern can be effective in mitigation of rotor blade modulation.

  2. Large furlable antenna study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, G. K. C.

    1975-01-01

    The parametric study of the performance of large furlable antennas is described and the availability of various size antennas is discussed. Three types of unfurlable reflector designs are considered: the wrapped rib, the polyconic, and the maypole. On the basis of these approaches, a space shuttle launch capability, and state-of-the-art materials, it is possible to design unfurlable reflectors as large as 130 feet (40 meters) in diameter to operate at 10 GHz and 600 feet (183 meters) in diameter at 0.5 GHz. These figures can be increased if very low thermal coefficient of expansion materials can be developed over the next 2-5 years. It is recommended that a special effort be made to develop light weight materials that would provide nearly zero thermal coefficient of expansion and good thermal conductivity within the next 10 years. A conservative prediction of the kinds of unfurlable spacecraft antennas that will be available by 1985 with orbital performance predicted on the basis of test data and with developed manufacturing processes is summarized.

  3. Antenna Calibration and Measurement Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochblatt, David J.; Cortes, Manuel Vazquez

    2012-01-01

    A document describes the Antenna Calibration & Measurement Equipment (ACME) system that will provide the Deep Space Network (DSN) with instrumentation enabling a trained RF engineer at each complex to perform antenna calibration measurements and to generate antenna calibration data. This data includes continuous-scan auto-bore-based data acquisition with all-sky data gathering in support of 4th order pointing model generation requirements. Other data includes antenna subreflector focus, system noise temperature and tipping curves, antenna efficiency, reports system linearity, and instrument calibration. The ACME system design is based on the on-the-fly (OTF) mapping technique and architecture. ACME has contributed to the improved RF performance of the DSN by approximately a factor of two. It improved the pointing performances of the DSN antennas and productivity of its personnel and calibration engineers.

  4. A Mars Riometer: Antenna Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, Craig D.

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report on NASA Grant NAG5-9706. This project explored riometer (relative ionospheric opacity meter) antenna designs that would be practical for a Mars surface or balloon mission. The riometer is an important radio science instrument for terrestrial aeronomy investigations. The riometer measures absorption of cosmic radio waves by the overhead ionosphere. Studies have shown the instrument should work well on Mars, which has an appreciable daytime ionosphere. There has been concern that the required radio receiver antenna (with possibly a 10 meter scale size) would be too large or too difficult to deploy on Mars. This study addresses those concerns and presents several antenna designs and deployment options. It is found that a Mars balloon would provide an excellent platform for the riometer antenna. The antenna can be incorporated into the envelope design, allowing self-deployment of the antenna as the balloon inflates.

  5. Antenna structure with distributed strip

    SciTech Connect

    Rodenbeck, Christopher T.

    2008-10-21

    An antenna comprises electrical conductors arranged to form a radiating element including a folded line configuration and a distributed strip configuration, where the radiating element is in proximity to a ground conductor. The folded line and the distributed strip can be electrically interconnected and substantially coplanar. The ground conductor can be spaced from, and coplanar to, the radiating element, or can alternatively lie in a plane set at an angle to the radiating element. Embodiments of the antenna include conductor patterns formed on a printed wiring board, having a ground plane, spacedly adjacent to and coplanar with the radiating element. Other embodiments of the antenna comprise a ground plane and radiating element on opposed sides of a printed wiring board. Other embodiments of the antenna comprise conductors that can be arranged as free standing "foils". Other embodiments include antennas that are encapsulated into a package containing the antenna.

  6. Antenna structure with distributed strip

    SciTech Connect

    Rodenbeck, Christopher T.

    2008-03-18

    An antenna comprises electrical conductors arranged to form a radiating element including a folded line configuration and a distributed strip configuration, where the radiating element is in proximity to a ground conductor. The folded line and the distributed strip can be electrically interconnected and substantially coplanar. The ground conductor can be spaced from, and coplanar to, the radiating element, or can alternatively lie in a plane set at an angle to the radiating element. Embodiments of the antenna include conductor patterns formed on a printed wiring board, having a ground plane, spacedly adjacent to and coplanar with the radiating element. Other embodiments of the antenna comprise a ground plane and radiating element on opposed sides of a printed wiring board. Other embodiments of the antenna comprise conductors that can be arranged as free standing "foils". Other embodiments include antennas that are encapsulated into a package containing the antenna.

  7. Microstrip antenna theory and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, J. R.; Hall, P. S.; Wood, C.

    Microstrip is the name given to a type of open waveguiding structure which is now commonly used in present-day electronics, not only as a transmission line but for circuit components such as filters, couplers, and resonators. The idea of using microstrip to construct antennas is a much more recent development. The purpose of this monograph is to present the reader with an appreciation of useful antenna design approaches and the overall state-of-the art situation. Flat-plate antenna techniques and constraints on performance are considered along with microstrip design equations and data, the radiation mechanism of an open-circuit microstrip termination and the resulting design implications, the basic methods of calculation and design of patch antennas, and linear array techniques. Attention is also given to techniques and design limitations in two-dimensional arrays, circular polarization techniques, manufacturing and operational problems of microstrip antennas, recent advances in microstrip antenna analysis, and possible future developments.

  8. Efficient Placement of Directional Antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Feng; Kasiviswanathan, Shiva

    2010-09-20

    Directional antenna is an technology for the proliferation of wireless networks. In centralized wireless network, wireless devices communicate through base stations. Directed antennas are placed on base stations and form a backbone of communication. The communication between base stations and wireless devices can be interfered due to a large number of wireless device. Methodically positioning and orienting directed antennas can help to reduce the interference while saving energy. An integer linear programming is developed for siting and directing antennas on multiple base stations, and this formulation can be extended to model non-overlapping channels. Through the integer programming formulation, optimal antenna positions can be used to analyze the performance of directed antennas with different parameters like the number base stations and the number of non-overlapping channels.

  9. Multi-functional Chassis-based Antennas Using Characteristic Mode Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishor, Krishna Kumar

    Designing antennas for handheld devices is quite challenging primarily due to the limited real-estate available, and the fact that internal antennas occupy a large volume. With the need to support a variety of radio systems such as GSM, LTE and WiFi that operate in a wide range of frequency bands, multi-band, wideband and frequency reconfigurable antenna designs have been explored in the literature. Moreover, to support higher data rates, the Long Term Evolution Advanced (LTE-A) standard has been introduced, which requires supporting multiple input multiple output (MIMO) antenna technology and carrier aggregation (CA) on a handheld device. Both of these benefit from the use of multiple antennas or multi-port antennas, but with the limited space available, adding more internal antennas may not be easily possible. Additionally, to realize the benefits of these technologies the multiple antenna ports have to be well isolated from each other. This thesis explores the utilization of the ground plane (or chassis) of a handheld device as an antenna to meet some of these challenges. To achieve this, the theory of characteristic modes (TCM) for conducting bodies is relied upon, to determine the eigen-currents supported on the chassis. The orthogonality properties of these eigencurrents, and their corresponding far-field eigenfields (electric and magnetic) makes TCM a good tool to design multiple antennas with high isolation. This is demonstrated in this thesis via the design of four chassis-based antennas that have different functionalities. The first design is a two port MIMO antenna utilizing a combination of eigenmodes to achieve port isolation. The second design is a pattern reconfigurable MIMO antenna that can operate in two states at 2.28 GHz. The third design is a four port antenna that operates in three frequency bands, with two bands below 1 GHz for CA and the remaining two ports for MIMO communication. The final design is a five port antenna that supports MIMO

  10. Analysis of rectangular microstrip antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, M. C.; Deshpande, M. D.

    1984-01-01

    The problem of microstrip antennas covered by a dielectric substrate is formulated in terms of coupled integro-differential equations with the current distribution on the conducting patch as an unknown quantity. The Galerkin method is used to solve for the unknown patch current. Using the present formulation, the radiation pattern, the resonant frequency, and the bandwidth of a rectangular microstrip antenna are computed. Design data for a rectangular microstrip antenna are also presented.

  11. Deployable antenna phase A study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, J.; Bernstein, J.; Fischer, G.; Jacobson, G.; Kadar, I.; Marshall, R.; Pflugel, G.; Valentine, J.

    1979-01-01

    Applications for large deployable antennas were re-examined, flight demonstration objectives were defined, the flight article (antenna) was preliminarily designed, and the flight program and ground development program, including the support equipment, were defined for a proposed space transportation system flight experiment to demonstrate a large (50 to 200 meter) deployable antenna system. Tasks described include: (1) performance requirements analysis; (2) system design and definition; (3) orbital operations analysis; and (4) programmatic analysis.

  12. Electronic switching spherical array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockton, R.

    1978-01-01

    This work was conducted to demonstrate the performance levels attainable with an ESSA (Electronic Switching Spherical Array) antenna by designing and testing an engineering model. The antenna was designed to satisfy general spacecraft environmental requirements and built to provide electronically commandable beam pointing capability throughout a hemisphere. Constant gain and beam shape throughout large volumetric coverage regions are the principle characteristics. The model is intended to be a prototype of a standard communications and data handling antenna for user scientific spacecraft with the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). Some additional testing was conducted to determine the feasibility of an integrated TDRSS and GPS (Global Positioning System) antenna system.

  13. Antenna system for MSAT mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlsson, Ingmar; Patenaude, Yves; Stipelman, Leora

    1988-01-01

    Spar has evaluated and compared several antenna concepts for the North American Mobile Satellite. The paper describes some of the requirements and design considerations for the antennas and demonstrates the performance of antenna concepts that can meet them. Multiple beam reflector antennas are found to give best performance and much of the design effort has gone into the design of the primary feed radiators and beam forming networks to achieve efficient beams with good overlap and flexibility. Helices and cup dipole radiators have been breadboarded as feed element candidates and meausured results are presented. The studies and breadboard activities have made it possible to proceed with a flight program.

  14. Spiral Microstrip Antenna with Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shively, David G. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A spiral microstrip antenna having resistor elements embedded in each of the spiral arms is provided. The antenna is constructed using a conductive back plane as a base. The back plane supports a dielectric slab having a thickness between one-sixteenth and one-quarter of an inch. A square spiral, having either two or four arms, is attached to the dielectric slab. Each arm of the spiral has resistor elements thereby dissipating an excess energy not already emitted through radiation. The entire configuration provides a thin, flat, high gain, wide bandwidth antenna which requires no underlying cavity. The configuration allows the antenna to be mounted conformably on an aircraft surface.

  15. Large Space Antenna Systems Technology, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, W. J. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    Mission applications for large space antenna systems; large space antenna structural systems; materials and structures technology; structural dynamics and control technology, electromagnetics technology, large space antenna systems and the Space Station; and flight test and evaluation were examined.

  16. Ferrite attenuator modulation improves antenna performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooks, J. C.; Larson, S. G.; Shorkley, F. H.; Williams, B. T.

    1970-01-01

    Ferrite attenuator inserted into appropriate waveguide reduces the gain of the antenna element which is causing interference. Modulating the ferrite attenuator to change the antenna gain at the receive frequency permits ground tracking until the antenna is no longer needed.

  17. Design aspects of commercial satellite antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, K. C.; Taormina, F. A.

    General design considerations for commercial satellite antennas are reviewed, and design factors of shaped beam reflector antennas are described, including shaped beam efficiency, flat-topping and boundary matching, and analysis by Fourier transforms. Attention is then given to the design of the Telesat Anik 17/Westar/Palapa communications antenna, the Comstar I communications antenna, the SBS communications antenna, and Intelsat IV A communications antenna.

  18. Microelectromechanical Systems Actuator Based Reconfigurable Printed Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A polarization reconfigurable patch antenna is disclosed. The antenna includes a feed element, a patch antenna element electrically connected to the feed element, and at least one microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) actuator, with a partial connection to the patch antenna element along an edge of the patch antenna element. The polarization of the antenna can be switched between circular polarization and linear polarization through action of the at least one MEMS actuator.

  19. View of Antenna #2 (foreground), and Antenna #1 surface doors. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Antenna #2 (foreground), and Antenna #1 surface doors. Orientation Target #1 in background. Image looking northwest - Titan One Missile Complex 2A, .3 miles west of 129 Road and 1.5 miles north of County Line Road, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  20. View of Antenna #1 (foreground), and Antenna #2 surface doors. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Antenna #1 (foreground), and Antenna #2 surface doors. Orientation Target #2 in background. Image looking northeast - Titan One Missile Complex 2A, .3 miles west of 129 Road and 1.5 miles north of County Line Road, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  1. COBRA meteor radar antenna designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zainuddin, Mohamad

    A meteor radar system is one of the effective remote sensing techniques in measuring atmospheric parameters such as wind velocities, temperature, pressure and density which are essential in understanding the atmospheric dynamics in the Mesosphere Lower Thermosphere (MLT) region. Previous studies of very high frequency (VHF) meteors radar systems suggest that the minimum error for the estimation of the horizontal wind velocity from a radar interferometry algorithm should occur when the main beams of the transmit and receive antennas are pointing to between 30° to 50° elevation angles. Therefore, an ideal antenna design for VHF meteor radar systems would produce a pencil beam radiation pattern at a 45° elevation angle. However, both the transmit and receive antenna of the COBRA meteor radar system have major beams are pointing to between 60° to 65° degree elevation angles above a perfect ground plane. Besides transmitting maximum power at low elevation angles, the current antennas of the COBRA meteor radar are highly dependent on the ground plane to radiate maximum gains to between 60° to 65° degree elevation angles. Typically, the earth ground is considered as a common ground plane for many VHF antenna with acceptable performance. However, the earth ground could not effectively reflect most of the power at all time. Because the antennas are dependent on ground to radiate power at certain direction, an artificial ground plane or ground screen has to be built for the COBRA antenna system at the South Pole station, which is located on top of more than 2000 meter thick of ice sheet. This dissertation focuses on the analysis of the performance of the individual current antenna design with four different conditions namely in free space, above an infinite ground, lossy ground and finite ground. In the analysis of finite ground, the effects of varying wire spacing and the size of finite ground to the radiation pattern of a cross folded dipole antenna are investigated

  2. Antenna research and development at Ericsson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlsjo, Olof

    1992-04-01

    This article gives an overview of the antenna research and development activities at Ericsson Radar Electronics AB, in Molndal, Sweden. The article covers different types of microwave antennas, such as twist-Cassegrain antennas, shaped-reflector antennas, microstrip antennas, dichroic surfaces, slotted-waveguide-array antennas, omnidirectional antennas, and electronically-steered-array antennas. Measurement methods, such as near-field and diagnostic techniques, are also discussed. The applications are for radar and microwave communication systems, for use in ground, naval, airborne, and space environments.

  3. Antennas - Our electronic eyes and ears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, John D.

    1989-01-01

    Although the number of antenna types is vast, all antenna properties may be characterized in terms of the same basic parameters of radiation pattern, impedance, radar cross-section, and temperature. A comprehensive introduction is presented to antenna configurations; these encompass, among antennas constructed of wire or tubing, such wideband and circularly polarized types as helices, linear conductors, and loops. Sheet-conductor antenna families include reflectors, waveguides, and slotted antennas. Nonconducting dielectric antennas are lenses, polyrods, and slabs. Antenna array types range over 'driven', parasitic, and adaptive configurations. 'Two half-wavelength' and 'four half-wavelength' element arrays are also discussed.

  4. Airborne antenna pattern calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knerr, T. J.; Mielke, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    Progress on the development of modeling software, testing software against caclulated data from program VPAP and measured patterns, and calculating roll plane patterns for general aviation aircraft is reported. Major objectives are the continued development of computer software for aircraft modeling and use of this software and program OSUVOL to calculate principal plane and volumetric radiation patterns. The determination of proper placement of antennas on aircraft to meet the requirements of the Microwave Landing System is discussed. An overview of the performed work, and an example of a roll plane model for the Piper PA-31T Cheyenne aircraft and the resulting calculated roll plane radiation pattern are included.

  5. Patch antenna terahertz photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Palaferri, D.; Todorov, Y. Chen, Y. N.; Madeo, J.; Vasanelli, A.; Sirtori, C.; Li, L. H.; Davies, A. G.; Linfield, E. H.

    2015-04-20

    We report on the implementation of 5 THz quantum well photodetector exploiting a patch antenna cavity array. The benefit of our plasmonic architecture on the detector performance is assessed by comparing it with detectors made using the same quantum well absorbing region, but processed into a standard 45° polished facet mesa. Our results demonstrate a clear improvement in responsivity, polarization insensitivity, and background limited performance. Peak detectivities in excess of 5 × 10{sup 12} cmHz{sup 1/2}/W have been obtained, a value comparable with that of the best cryogenic cooled bolometers.

  6. Antenna feedhorn software upgrade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, P. D.

    1979-01-01

    The HYBRIDHORN computer program was developed to serve as an item of general purpose antenna feedhorn design and analysis software. The formulation contains a small flare angle approximation which is subject to question for designs such as the S- and X-band feedhorn. Additionally, the original formulation did not allow azimuthal variation indexes other than unity. The HYBRIDHORN program was upgraded to correct both of these deficiencies. A large flare angle formulation was found. In the upgrade, all of the major program elements were converted to Univac 1108 compatible structured FORTRAN (SFTRAN) for ease of software maintenance. The small and large angle formulations are described and sample numerical results are presented.

  7. Optical antenna enhanced spontaneous emission.

    PubMed

    Eggleston, Michael S; Messer, Kevin; Zhang, Liming; Yablonovitch, Eli; Wu, Ming C

    2015-02-10

    Atoms and molecules are too small to act as efficient antennas for their own emission wavelengths. By providing an external optical antenna, the balance can be shifted; spontaneous emission could become faster than stimulated emission, which is handicapped by practically achievable pump intensities. In our experiments, InGaAsP nanorods emitting at ∼ 200 THz optical frequency show a spontaneous emission intensity enhancement of 35 × corresponding to a spontaneous emission rate speedup ∼ 115 ×, for antenna gap spacing, d = 40 nm. Classical antenna theory predicts ∼ 2,500 × spontaneous emission speedup at d ∼ 10 nm, proportional to 1/d(2). Unfortunately, at d < 10 nm, antenna efficiency drops below 50%, owing to optical spreading resistance, exacerbated by the anomalous skin effect (electron surface collisions). Quantum dipole oscillations in the emitter excited state produce an optical ac equivalent circuit current, I(o) = qω|x(o)|/d, feeding the antenna-enhanced spontaneous emission, where q|x(o)| is the dipole matrix element. Despite the quantum-mechanical origin of the drive current, antenna theory makes no reference to the Purcell effect nor to local density of states models. Moreover, plasmonic effects are minor at 200 THz, producing only a small shift of antenna resonance frequency. PMID:25624503

  8. Optical antenna enhanced spontaneous emission

    PubMed Central

    Eggleston, Michael S.; Messer, Kevin; Zhang, Liming; Yablonovitch, Eli; Wu, Ming C.

    2015-01-01

    Atoms and molecules are too small to act as efficient antennas for their own emission wavelengths. By providing an external optical antenna, the balance can be shifted; spontaneous emission could become faster than stimulated emission, which is handicapped by practically achievable pump intensities. In our experiments, InGaAsP nanorods emitting at ∼200 THz optical frequency show a spontaneous emission intensity enhancement of 35× corresponding to a spontaneous emission rate speedup ∼115×, for antenna gap spacing, d = 40 nm. Classical antenna theory predicts ∼2,500× spontaneous emission speedup at d ∼ 10 nm, proportional to 1/d2. Unfortunately, at d < 10 nm, antenna efficiency drops below 50%, owing to optical spreading resistance, exacerbated by the anomalous skin effect (electron surface collisions). Quantum dipole oscillations in the emitter excited state produce an optical ac equivalent circuit current, Io = qω|xo|/d, feeding the antenna-enhanced spontaneous emission, where q|xo| is the dipole matrix element. Despite the quantum-mechanical origin of the drive current, antenna theory makes no reference to the Purcell effect nor to local density of states models. Moreover, plasmonic effects are minor at 200 THz, producing only a small shift of antenna resonance frequency. PMID:25624503

  9. Emergency-vehicle VHF antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. E.; Carlson, A. W.; Lewis, J.

    1977-01-01

    Helical VHF antenna mounts on roof of moving vehicle to communicate with distant stations via earth satellites. Antenna requires no pointing and can provide two-way communication while vehicle moves at high speed. Device has proved extremely successful in electrocardiogram transmission tests between medical services vehicle and hospital emergency room.

  10. Astronaut space suit communication antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, J. F., III; Nason, G. H.

    1968-01-01

    Astronaut space suit communication antenna consists of a spring steel monopole in a blade-type configuration. This antenna is mounted in a copper cup filled with a potting compound that is recessed in the center to facilitate bending the blade flat for stowing when not in use.

  11. Biosynthesis of unnatural bacteriochlorophyll c derivatives esterified with α,ω-diols in the green sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum.

    PubMed

    Nishimori, Risato; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Kashimura, Shigenori; Saga, Yoshitaka

    2011-09-13

    Unnatural bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) c derivatives possessing a hydroxy group at the terminus of a hydrocarbon chain at the 17-propionate were biosynthesized in the green sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum. Addition of exogenous 1,8-octanediol, 1,12-dodecanediol, and 1,16-hexadecanediol in acetone to liquid cultures resulted in accumulation of BChl c monoesterified with the corresponding diols. The relative ratios of the novel BChl c derivatives esterified with 1,8-, 1,12-, and 1,16-diols to totally producing BChl c were 8.2, 50.2, and 57.6% in the cells grown with additive α,ω-diols at concentrations of 1.5, 0.06, and 0.06 mM, respectively, at the final concentration. The homologue composition of BChl c derivatives esterified with these α,ω-diols was similar to that of original, coexisting BChl c esterified with farnesol (BChl c(F)), suggesting that esterification of α,ω-diols occurred at the last step of the BChl c biosynthetic pathway by BChl c synthase, BchK, in the same manner as in BChl c(F). Chlorosomes, which were isolated from cells grown in the presence of exogenous α,ω-diols, contained a ratio and a composition of BChl c derivatives esterified with the diols similar to those in the whole cells, indicating that these BChl c derivatives were actually present in chlorosomes. Q(y) absorption bands of C. tepidum cells containing the novel BChl c derivatives were shifted to a shorter wavelength, although their bandwidths were analogous to those of cells obtained by normal cultivation. Circular dichroism spectra of cells that had BChl c derivatives esterified with α,ω-diols exhibited S-shaped signals in the Q(y) region, whose polarities were the reverse of those of cells grown in the normal medium and by supplementation with neat acetone as a control experiment. These spectral features of C. tepidum possessing BChl c derivatives esterified with α,ω-diols imply that the novel BChl c derivatives possessing a hydroxy group at the

  12. Mimics of the self-assembling chlorosomal bacteriochlorophylls: regio- and stereoselective synthesis and stereoanalysis of acyl(1-hydroxyalkyl)porphyrins.

    PubMed

    Balaban, Teodor Silviu; Bhise, Anil Dnyanoba; Bringmann, Gerhard; Bürck, Jochen; Chappaz-Gillot, Cyril; Eichhöfer, Andreas; Fenske, Dieter; Götz, Daniel C G; Knauer, Michael; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Mössinger, Dennis; Rösner, Harald; Roussel, Christian; Schraut, Michaela; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Vanthuyne, Nicolas

    2009-10-14

    Diacylation of copper 10,20-bis(3,5-di-tert-butylphenylporphyrin) using Friedel-Crafts conditions at short reaction times, high concentrations of catalyst, and 0-4 degrees C affords only the 3,17-diacyl-substituted porphyrins, out of the 12 possible regioisomers. At longer reaction times and higher temperatures, the 3,13-diacyl compounds are also formed, and the two isomers can be conveniently separated by normal chromatographic techniques. Monoreduction of these diketones affords in good yields the corresponding acyl(1-hydroxyalkyl)porphyrins, which after zinc metalation are mimics of the natural chlorosomal bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) d. Racemate resolution by HPLC on a variety of chiral columns was achieved and further optimized, thus permitting easy access to enantiopure porphyrins. Enantioselective reductions proved to be less effective in this respect, giving moderate yields and only 79% ee in the best case. The absolute configuration of the 3(1)-stereocenter was assigned by independent chemical and spectroscopic methods. Self-assembly of a variety of these zinc BChl d mimics proves that a collinear arrangement of the hydroxyalkyl substituent with the zinc atom and the carbonyl substituent is not a stringent requirement, since both the 3,13 and the 3,17 regioisomers self-assemble readily as the racemates. Interestingly, the separated enantiomers self-assemble less readily, as judged by absorption, fluorescence, and transmission electron microscopy studies. Circular dichroism spectra of the self-assemblies show intense Cotton effects, which are mirror-images for the two 3(1)-enantiomers, proving that the supramolecular chirality is dependent on the configuration at the 3(1)-stereocenter. Upon disruption of these self-assemblies with methanol, which competes with zinc ligation, only very weak monomeric Cotton effects are present. The favored heterochiral self-assembly process may also be encountered for the natural BChls. This touches upon the long

  13. Electron Transfer in Bacterial Reaction Centers with the Photoactive Bacteriopheophytin Replaced by a Bacteriochlorophyll through Coordinating Ligand Substitution.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jie; Saer, Rafael; Lin, Su; Beatty, J Thomas; Woodbury, Neal W

    2016-09-01

    The influence of amino acid substitutions at position M214 (M-subunit, residue 214) on the rate and pathway of electron transfer involving the bacteriopheophytin cofactor, HA, in a bacterial photosynthetic reaction center has been explored in a series of Rhodobacter sphaeroides mutants. The M214 leucine (L) residue of the wild type was replaced with histidine (H), glutamine (Q), and asparagine (N), creating the mutants M214LH, M214LQ, and M214LN, respectively. As has been reported previously for M214LH, each of these mutations resulted in a bacteriochlorophyll molecule in place of a bacteriopheophytin in the HA pocket, forming so-called β-type mutants (in which the HA cofactor is called βA). In addition, these mutations changed the properties of the surrounding protein environment in terms of charge distribution and the amino acid side chain volume. Electron transfer reactions from the excited primary donor P to the acceptor QA were characterized using ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopic techniques. Similar to that of the previously characterized M214LH (β mutant), the strong energetic mixing of the P(+)BA(-) and P(+)βA(-) states (the mixed anion is denoted I(-)) increased the rate of charge recombination between P(+) and I(-) in competition with the I(-) → QA forward reaction. This reduced the overall yield of charge separation forming the P(+)QA(-) state. While the kinetics of the primary electron transfer forming P(+)I(-) were essentially identical in all three β mutants, the rates of the βA(-) (I(-)) → QA electron transfer in M214LQ and M214LH were very similar but quite different from that of the M214LN mutant. The observed yield changes and the differences in kinetics are correlated more closely with the volume of the mutated amino acid than with their charge characteristics. These results are consistent with those of previous studies of a series of M214 mutants with different sizes of amino acid side chains that did not alter the HA

  14. Graphene-antenna sandwich photodetector.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zheyu; Liu, Zheng; Wang, Yumin; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2012-07-11

    Nanoscale antennas sandwiched between two graphene monolayers yield a photodetector that efficiently converts visible and near-infrared photons into electrons with an 800% enhancement of the photocurrent relative to the antennaless graphene device. The antenna contributes to the photocurrent in two ways: by the transfer of hot electrons generated in the antenna structure upon plasmon decay, as well as by direct plasmon-enhanced excitation of intrinsic graphene electrons due to the antenna near field. This results in a graphene-based photodetector achieving up to 20% internal quantum efficiency in the visible and near-infrared regions of the spectrum. This device can serve as a model for merging the light-harvesting characteristics of optical frequency antennas with the highly attractive transport properties of graphene in new optoelectronic devices. PMID:22703522

  15. Small high directivity ferrite antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, T. M. B.

    A centimeter-wavelength antenna of millimetric dimensions, which uses the intrinsic angular sensitivity of ferrites, is described, with an emphasis on the modification of the material's permeability. The construction of both the ferrite film lens antenna and the ferrite film cassegrain antenna are detailed; both can be devised in a number of configurations for appropriate beam positioning and rf filtering. The antenna design, discussed primarily in the context of smart missiles, electronic warfare, and satellite systems, presents the possibility of magnetically switching between the transmit and receive modes within the antenna structure itself. Finally, it is noted that for a simple 2-dipole array the angular resolution can be two orders of magnitude higher than with the conventional techniques.

  16. Reflector antennas for ultrawideband usage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, P. R.

    1993-01-01

    The provision of high gain antennas for ultrawideband systems is limited not only by the electromagnetic problems but also by the mechanical aspects such as the volume required. Single antenna elements such as TEM horns can provide gains of 20.0 dBi at the highest operating frequencies but any additional gain requires the use of other techniques. The simplest techniques are to use an array of elements or to use a reflector antenna. This paper deals with the design of reflector antennas. The transforming effect of the reflector surface is such that a constant aperture feed results in a constant gain reflector while a constant gain feed results in a constant aperture reflector. However this elegant postulate is somewhat degraded in practice by the presence of blockage, spillover and diffraction from the rim in a reflector antenna.

  17. Self-assembly of J-aggregate nanotubes and their applications for sensing dopamine.

    PubMed

    Liang, Weilang; He, Sihui; Fang, Jiyu

    2014-01-28

    J-aggregates are an attractive supramolecular structure with interesting excitation properties found in the light-harvesting antenna of green sulfur bacteria. To structurally mimic the light-harvesting antenna, we synthesize J-aggregate nanotubes with a sharp and intense absorption band (J-band) by the coassembly of lithocholic acid (LCA) and 3,3'-dipropylthiadicarbocyanine iodide (DiSC3(5)) in aqueous solution. We show that the J-aggregate nanotubes can be used as a supramolecular probe for the sensitive and selective detection of dopamine (DA) in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution with the detection limit of ∼0.4 nM by simply observing the intensity change of the J-band due to the efficient photoinduced electron transfer from the J-aggregate nanotubes to the adsorbed DA. PMID:24397785

  18. Soret Fishnet Metalens Antenna

    PubMed Central

    Orazbayev, Bakhtiyar; Beruete, Miguel; Pacheco-Peña, Víctor; Crespo, Gonzalo; Teniente, Jorge; Navarro-Cía, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    At the expense of frequency narrowing, binary amplitude-only diffractive optical elements emulate refractive lenses without the need of large profiles. Unfortunately, they also present larger Fresnel reflection loss than conventional lenses. This is usually tackled by implementing unattractive cumbersome designs. Here we demonstrate that simplicity is not at odds with performance and we show how the fishnet metamaterial can improve the radiation pattern of a Soret lens. The building block of this advanced Soret lens is the fishnet metamaterial operating in the near-zero refractive index regime with one of the edge layers designed with alternating opaque and transparent concentric rings made of subwavelength holes. The hybrid Soret fishnet metalens retains all the merits of classical Soret lenses such as low profile, low cost and ease of manufacturing. It is designed for the W-band of the millimeter-waves range with a subwavelength focal length FL = 1.58 mm (0.5λ0) aiming at a compact antenna or radar systems. The focal properties of the lens along with its radiation characteristics in a lens antenna configuration have been studied numerically and confirmed experimentally, showing a gain improvement of ~2 dB with respect to a fishnet Soret lens without the fishnet metamaterial. PMID:25950243

  19. Transcatheter Microwave Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, Dickey G. (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor); Ngo, Phong (Inventor); Raffoul, George W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A method, simulation, and apparatus are provided that are highly suitable for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). A catheter is disclosed that includes a small diameter disk loaded monopole antenna surrounded by fusion material having a high heat of fusion and a melting point preferably at or near body temperature. Microwaves from the antenna heat prostatic tissue to promote necrosing of the prostatic tissue that relieves the pressure of the prostatic tissue against the urethra as the body reabsorbs the necrosed or dead tissue. The fusion material keeps the urethra cool by means of the heat of fusion of the fusion material. This prevents damage to the urethra while the prostatic tissue is necrosed. A computer simulation is provided that can be used to predict the resulting temperature profile produced in the prostatic tissue. By changing the various control features of the catheter and method of applying microwave energy a temperature profile can be predicted and produced that is similar to the temperature profile desired for the particular patient.

  20. Soret fishnet metalens antenna.

    PubMed

    Orazbayev, Bakhtiyar; Beruete, Miguel; Pacheco-Peña, Víctor; Crespo, Gonzalo; Teniente, Jorge; Navarro-Cía, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    At the expense of frequency narrowing, binary amplitude-only diffractive optical elements emulate refractive lenses without the need of large profiles. Unfortunately, they also present larger Fresnel reflection loss than conventional lenses. This is usually tackled by implementing unattractive cumbersome designs. Here we demonstrate that simplicity is not at odds with performance and we show how the fishnet metamaterial can improve the radiation pattern of a Soret lens. The building block of this advanced Soret lens is the fishnet metamaterial operating in the near-zero refractive index regime with one of the edge layers designed with alternating opaque and transparent concentric rings made of subwavelength holes. The hybrid Soret fishnet metalens retains all the merits of classical Soret lenses such as low profile, low cost and ease of manufacturing. It is designed for the W-band of the millimeter-waves range with a subwavelength focal length FL = 1.58 mm (0.5λ0) aiming at a compact antenna or radar systems. The focal properties of the lens along with its radiation characteristics in a lens antenna configuration have been studied numerically and confirmed experimentally, showing a gain improvement of ~2 dB with respect to a fishnet Soret lens without the fishnet metamaterial. PMID:25950243

  1. Aggregations in Flatworms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liffen, C. L.; Hunter, M.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a school project to investigate aggregations in flatworms which may be influenced by light intensity, temperature, and some form of chemical stimulus released by already aggregating flatworms. Such investigations could be adopted to suit many educational levels of science laboratory activities. (DS)

  2. Implantable multilayer microstrip antenna for retinal prosthesis: antenna testing.

    PubMed

    Permana, Hans; Fang, Qiang; Rowe, Wayne S T

    2012-01-01

    Retinal prosthesis has come to a more mature stage and become a very strategic answer to Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) and Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) diseases. In a retinal prosthesis system, wireless link holds a great importance for the continuity of the system. In this paper, an implantable multilayer microstrip antenna was proposed for the retinal prosthesis system. Simulations were performed in High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS) with the surrounding material of air and Vitreous Humor fluid. The fabricated antenna was measured for characteristic validation in free space. The results showed that the real antenna possessed similar return loss and radiation pattern, while there was discrepancy with the gain values. PMID:23366231

  3. L-band orthogonal-mode crossed-slot antenna and VHF crossed-loop antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsson, T.

    1972-01-01

    A low gain, circularly polarized, L-band antenna; a low gain, linealy polarized, L-band antenna; and a low gain, circularly polarized, upper hemisphere, VHF satellite communications antenna intended for airborne applications are described. The text includes impedance and antenna radiation pattern data, along with physical description of the construction of the antennas.

  4. 47 CFR 73.1675 - Auxiliary antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Auxiliary antennas. 73.1675 Section 73.1675... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1675 Auxiliary antennas. (a)(1) An auxiliary antenna is one that is permanently installed and available for use when the main antenna is out of service...

  5. 47 CFR 95.1013 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1013 Section 95.1013... SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1013 Antennas. (a) The maximum allowable... this chapter, at the band edges. (b) AMTS stations must employ directional antennas. (c) Antennas...

  6. 47 CFR 95.51 - Antenna height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna height. 95.51 Section 95.51... SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.51 Antenna height. (a) Certain antenna structures used in... this chapter. (b) The antenna for a small base station or for a small control station must not be...

  7. 47 CFR 95.51 - Antenna height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna height. 95.51 Section 95.51... SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.51 Antenna height. (a) Certain antenna structures used in... this chapter. (b) The antenna for a small base station or for a small control station must not be...

  8. 47 CFR 73.753 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.753 Section 73.753... International Broadcast Stations § 73.753 Antenna systems. All international broadcasting stations shall operate with directional antennas. Such antennas shall be designed and operated so that the radiated power...

  9. 47 CFR 73.510 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.510 Section 73.510... Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.510 Antenna systems. (a) All noncommercial educational... § 73.316 concerning antenna systems contained in subpart B of this part. (b) Directional antenna....

  10. 47 CFR 95.1013 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1013 Section 95.1013... SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1013 Antennas. (a) The maximum allowable... this chapter, at the band edges. (b) AMTS stations must employ directional antennas. (c) Antennas...

  11. 47 CFR 95.1213 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1213 Section 95.1213... SERVICES Medical Device Radiocommunication Service (MedRadio) § 95.1213 Antennas. No antenna for a MedRadio transmitter shall be configured for permanent outdoor use. In addition, any MedRadio antenna used...

  12. 47 CFR 73.510 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.510 Section 73.510... Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.510 Antenna systems. (a) All noncommercial educational... § 73.316 concerning antenna systems contained in subpart B of this part. (b) Directional antenna....

  13. 47 CFR 73.1675 - Auxiliary antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Auxiliary antennas. 73.1675 Section 73.1675... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1675 Auxiliary antennas. (a)(1) An auxiliary antenna is one that is permanently installed and available for use when the main antenna is out of service...

  14. 47 CFR 95.51 - Antenna height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna height. 95.51 Section 95.51... SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.51 Antenna height. (a) Certain antenna structures used in... this chapter. (b) The antenna for a small base station or for a small control station must not be...

  15. 47 CFR 95.51 - Antenna height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna height. 95.51 Section 95.51... SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.51 Antenna height. (a) Certain antenna structures used in... this chapter. (b) The antenna for a small base station or for a small control station must not be...

  16. 47 CFR 73.1675 - Auxiliary antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Auxiliary antennas. 73.1675 Section 73.1675... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1675 Auxiliary antennas. (a)(1) An auxiliary antenna is one that is permanently installed and available for use when the main antenna is out of service...

  17. 47 CFR 73.510 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.510 Section 73.510... Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.510 Antenna systems. (a) All noncommercial educational... § 73.316 concerning antenna systems contained in subpart B of this part. (b) Directional antenna....

  18. 47 CFR 73.1675 - Auxiliary antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Auxiliary antennas. 73.1675 Section 73.1675... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1675 Auxiliary antennas. (a)(1) An auxiliary antenna is one that is permanently installed and available for use when the main antenna is out of service...

  19. 47 CFR 73.1680 - Emergency antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Emergency antennas. 73.1680 Section 73.1680... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1680 Emergency antennas. (a) An emergency antenna is one that is erected for temporary use after the authorized main and auxiliary antennas are damaged...

  20. 47 CFR 95.1013 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1013 Section 95.1013... SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1013 Antennas. (a) The maximum allowable... this chapter, at the band edges. (b) AMTS stations must employ directional antennas. (c) Antennas...

  1. 47 CFR 73.1680 - Emergency antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Emergency antennas. 73.1680 Section 73.1680... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1680 Emergency antennas. (a) An emergency antenna is one that is erected for temporary use after the authorized main and auxiliary antennas are damaged...

  2. 47 CFR 95.1013 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1013 Section 95.1013... SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1013 Antennas. (a) The maximum allowable... this chapter, at the band edges. (b) AMTS stations must employ directional antennas. (c) Antennas...

  3. 47 CFR 73.753 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.753 Section 73.753... International Broadcast Stations § 73.753 Antenna systems. All international broadcasting stations shall operate with directional antennas. Such antennas shall be designed and operated so that the radiated power...

  4. 47 CFR 95.51 - Antenna height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna height. 95.51 Section 95.51... SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.51 Antenna height. (a) Certain antenna structures used in... this chapter. (b) The antenna for a small base station or for a small control station must not be...

  5. 47 CFR 73.753 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.753 Section 73.753... International Broadcast Stations § 73.753 Antenna systems. All international broadcasting stations shall operate with directional antennas. Such antennas shall be designed and operated so that the radiated power...

  6. 47 CFR 73.753 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.753 Section 73.753... International Broadcast Stations § 73.753 Antenna systems. All international broadcasting stations shall operate with directional antennas. Such antennas shall be designed and operated so that the radiated power...

  7. 47 CFR 73.1675 - Auxiliary antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Auxiliary antennas. 73.1675 Section 73.1675... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1675 Auxiliary antennas. (a)(1) An auxiliary antenna is one that is permanently installed and available for use when the main antenna is out of service...

  8. 47 CFR 73.1680 - Emergency antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency antennas. 73.1680 Section 73.1680... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1680 Emergency antennas. (a) An emergency antenna is one that is erected for temporary use after the authorized main and auxiliary antennas are damaged...

  9. 47 CFR 95.1013 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1013 Section 95.1013... SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1013 Antennas. (a) The maximum allowable... this chapter, at the band edges. (b) AMTS stations must employ directional antennas. (c) Antennas...

  10. 47 CFR 73.1680 - Emergency antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Emergency antennas. 73.1680 Section 73.1680... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1680 Emergency antennas. (a) An emergency antenna is one that is erected for temporary use after the authorized main and auxiliary antennas are damaged...

  11. 47 CFR 73.1680 - Emergency antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Emergency antennas. 73.1680 Section 73.1680... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1680 Emergency antennas. (a) An emergency antenna is one that is erected for temporary use after the authorized main and auxiliary antennas are damaged...

  12. 47 CFR 95.1213 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1213 Section 95.1213... SERVICES Medical Device Radiocommunication Service (MedRadio) § 95.1213 Antennas. No antenna for a MedRadio transmitter shall be configured for permanent outdoor use. In addition, any MedRadio antenna used...

  13. 47 CFR 73.510 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.510 Section 73.510... Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.510 Antenna systems. (a) All noncommercial educational... § 73.316 concerning antenna systems contained in subpart B of this part. (b) Directional antenna....

  14. 47 CFR 73.510 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.510 Section 73.510... Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.510 Antenna systems. (a) All noncommercial educational... § 73.316 concerning antenna systems contained in subpart B of this part. (b) Directional antenna....

  15. 47 CFR 73.753 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.753 Section 73.753... International Broadcast Stations § 73.753 Antenna systems. All international broadcasting stations shall operate with directional antennas. Such antennas shall be designed and operated so that the radiated power...

  16. Antenna sunshield membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogorad, Alexander (Inventor); Bowman, Jr., Charles K. (Inventor); Meder, Martin G. (Inventor); Dottore, Frank A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An RF-transparent sunshield membrane covers an antenna reflector such as a parabolic dish. The blanket includes a single dielectric sheet of polyimide film 1/2-mil thick. The surface of the film facing away from the reflector is coated with a transparent electrically conductive coating such as vapor-deposited indium-tin oxide. The surface of the film facing the reflector is reinforced by an adhesively attached polyester or glass mesh, which in turn is coated with a white paint. In a particular embodiment of the invention, polyurethane paint is used. In another embodiment of the invention, a layer of paint primer is applied to the mesh under a silicone paint, and the silicone paint is cured after application for several days at room temperature to enhance adhesion to the primer.

  17. Metal Patch Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Neil F. (Inventor); Hodges, Richard E. (Inventor); Zawadzki, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a patch antenna comprises a planar conductive patch attached to a ground plane by a support member, and a probe connector in electrical communication with the conductive patch arranged to conduct electromagnetic energy to or from the conductive patch, wherein the conductive patch is disposed essentially parallel to the ground plane and is separated from the ground plane by a spacing distance; wherein the support member comprises a plurality of sides disposed about a central axis oriented perpendicular to the conductive patch and the ground plane; wherein the conductive patch is solely supported above the ground plane by the support member; and wherein the support member provides electrical communication between the planer conductive patch and the ground plane.

  18. EHF SATCOM monopulse antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D.

    The author describes a coaxial dual-band monopulse feed design specifically tailored to the EHF (extremely high-frequency/SATCOM frequency bands. The device utilizes low-loss waveguide circuits throughout and employs a corrugated feed horn that provides symmetrical primary patterns with steeply tapered skirts. The dimensions in the horn throat/coaxial section were empirically adjusted for good primary patterns in the 45-GHz band. Fortuitously, this also provided good primary performance in the 21-GHz band. In the autotrack mode, the phase and amplitude of the error channel are compared with those of the data channel to obtain tracking error magnitude and sense. The feed and test antenna geometries are described. Measured performance demonstrating nominal efficiencies in the 55 percent-60 percent range, along with good pattern, phase, and impedance match, is presented.

  19. Ion source with external RF antenna

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ji, Qing; Wilde, Stephen

    2005-12-13

    A radio frequency (RF) driven plasma ion source has an external RF antenna, i.e. the RF antenna is positioned outside the plasma generating chamber rather than inside. The RF antenna is typically formed of a small diameter metal tube coated with an insulator. An external RF antenna assembly is used to mount the external RF antenna to the ion source. The RF antenna tubing is wound around the external RF antenna assembly to form a coil. The external RF antenna assembly is formed of a material, e.g. quartz, which is essentially transparent to the RF waves. The external RF antenna assembly is attached to and forms a part of the plasma source chamber so that the RF waves emitted by the RF antenna enter into the inside of the plasma chamber and ionize a gas contained therein. The plasma ion source is typically a multi-cusp ion source.

  20. Designing Rectangular RHCP Microstrip Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Shayla E.

    1987-01-01

    RHCP, Right-Handed, Circularly Polarized Microstrip Antenna program, aids in design of rectangular microstrip-antenna element, given desired frequency of operation and characteristics of substrate. Begins design calculations on basis of square element with linear polarization. Effective dielectric constant and changes in electrical length due to fringing at edges of radiating element taken into account. Coaxial feed inset with 50 ohms input impedance. Placement of feed such that two orthonormal modes produced in antenna cavity, right- or left-handed circular polarization obtained. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  1. Smart antennas based on graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Aldrigo, Martino; Dragoman, Mircea; Dragoman, Daniela

    2014-09-21

    We report two configurations of smart graphene antennas, in which either the radiation pattern of the antenna or the backscattering of the periodic metallic arrays is controlled by DC biases that induce metal-insulator reversible transitions of graphene monolayers. Such a transition from a high surface resistance (no bias) to a low surface resistance state (finite bias voltage) causes the radiation pattern of metallic antennas backed with graphene to change dramatically, from omnidirectional to broadside. Moreover, reflectarrays enhance the backscattered field due to the same metal-dielectric transition.

  2. Moths smell with their antennae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Thomas; Ballard, Matthew; Alexeev, Alexander; Hu, David

    2015-11-01

    Moths are reported to smell each other from over 6 miles away, locating each other with just 200 airborne molecules. In this study, we investigate how the structure of the antennae influences particle capture. We measure the branching patterns of over 40 species of moths, across two orders of magnitude in weight. We find that moth antennae have 3 levels of hierarchy, with dimensions on each level scaling with body size. We perform lattice-Boltzman simulations to determine optimal flow patterns around antennae branches allowing for capture of small particles.

  3. Conical quadreflex antenna analytical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, P. W., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A method for evaluating the performance of a four-reflection or quadreflex antenna is reported. Geometrical optics was used initially to determine the ideal feed pattern required to produce uniform illumination on the aperture of the conical reflector and the reverse problem of quickly finding the aperture illumination given an arbitrary feed pattern. The knowledge of the aperture illumination makes it possible to compute the antenna efficiency, which is useful for comparing antenna performance during tradeoff studies. Scattering calculations, using physical optics techniques, were then used to more accurately determine the performance of a specific design.

  4. Charged Dust Aggregate Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2015-11-01

    A proper understanding of the behavior of dust particle aggregates immersed in a complex plasma first requires a knowledge of the basic properties of the system. Among the most important of these are the net electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments on the dust aggregate as well as the manner in which the aggregate interacts with the local electrostatic fields. The formation of elongated, fractal-like aggregates levitating in the sheath electric field of a weakly ionized RF generated plasma discharge has recently been observed experimentally. The resulting data has shown that as aggregates approach one another, they can both accelerate and rotate. At equilibrium, aggregates are observed to levitate with regular spacing, rotating about their long axis aligned parallel to the sheath electric field. Since gas drag tends to slow any such rotation, energy must be constantly fed into the system in order to sustain it. A numerical model designed to analyze this motion provides both the electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments of the aggregate while including the forces due to thermophoresis, neutral gas drag, and the ion wakefield. This model will be used to investigate the ambient conditions leading to the observed interactions. This research is funded by NSF Grant 1414523.

  5. Semi hemi antenna. [balloon parachuted microwave antenna for stratospheric testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repucci, T. A.; Ferris, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    The University of Michigan minipod, which is released from a balloon and floats down on a parachute, is designed for stratospheric testing. The present paper briefly describes the evolution of antenna designs for the minipod 1.5 GHz transceiver, which communicates with and relays information to an aircraft and ground station. The following stages are noted: ordinary monopole, crossed dipole, capacitative antenna, fat monopole, the addition of parasitic elements, and a thinner monopole with taper.

  6. Electrically floating, near vertical incidence, skywave antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Allen A.; Kaser, Timothy G.; Tremblay, Paul A.; Mays, Belva L.

    2014-07-08

    An Electrically Floating, Near Vertical Incidence, Skywave (NVIS) Antenna comprising an antenna element, a floating ground element, and a grounding element. At least part of said floating ground element is positioned between said antenna element and said grounding element. The antenna is separated from the floating ground element and the grounding element by one or more electrical insulators. The floating ground element is separated from said antenna and said grounding element by one or more electrical insulators.

  7. Aggregate and the environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, William H.; Drew, Lawrence J.; Sachs, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    This book is designed to help you understand our aggregate resources-their importance, where they come from, how they are processed for our use, the environmental concerns related to their mining and processing, how those concerns are addressed, and the policies and regulations designed to safeguard workers, neighbors, and the environment from the negative impacts of aggregate mining. We hope this understanding will help prepare you to be involved in decisions that need to be made-individually and as a society-to be good stewards of our aggregate resources and our living planet.

  8. Inflatable Antennas Support Emergency Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Glenn Research Center awarded Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts to ManTech SRS Technologies, of Newport Beach, California, to develop thin film inflatable antennas for space communication. With additional funding, SRS modified the concepts for ground-based inflatable antennas. GATR (Ground Antenna Transmit and Receive) Technologies, of Huntsville, Alabama, licensed the technology and refined it to become the world s first inflatable antenna certified by the Federal Communications Commission. Capable of providing Internet access, voice over Internet protocol, e-mail, video teleconferencing, broadcast television, and other high-bandwidth communications, the systems have provided communication during the wildfires in California, after Hurricane Katrina in Mississippi, and following the 2010 Haiti earthquake.

  9. The new 34-meter antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pompa, M. F.

    1986-01-01

    The new 34-m high efficiency Azimuth - Elevation antenna configuration, including its features, dynamic characteristics and performance at 8.4-GHz frequencies is described. The current-technology features of this antenna produce a highly reliable configuration by incorporation of a main wheel and track azimuth support, central pintle pivot bearing, close tolerance surface panels and all-welded construction. Also described are basic drive controls that, as slaved to three automatic microprocessors, provide accurate and safe control of the antenna's steering tasks. At this time antenna installations are completed at Goldstone and Canberra and have operationally supported the Voyager - Uranus encounter. A third installation is being constructed currently in Madrid and is scheduled for completion in late 1986.

  10. Planar microstrip YAGI antenna array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, John (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A directional microstrip antenna includes a driven patch surrounded by an isolated reflector and one or more coplanar directors, all separated from a ground plane on the order of 0.1 wavelength or less to provide end fire beam directivity without requiring power dividers or phase shifters. The antenna may be driven at a feed point a distance from the center of the driven patch in accordance with conventional microstrip antenna design practices for H-plane coupled or horizontally polarized signals. The feed point for E-plane coupled or vertically polarized signals is at a greater distance from the center than the first distance. This feed point is also used for one of the feed signals for circularly polarized signals. The phase shift between signals applied to feed points for circularly polarized signals must be greater than the conventionally required 90 degrees and depends upon the antenna configuration.

  11. Circularly-Polarized Microstrip Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanton, P. H.

    1985-01-01

    Microstrip construction compact for mobile applications. Circularly polarized microstrip antenna made of concentric cylindrical layers of conductive and dielectric materials. Coaxial cable feedlines connected to horizontal and vertical subelements from inside. Vertical subelement acts as ground for horizontal subelement.

  12. NASA Antenna Gets its Bearings

    NASA Video Gallery

    The historic "Mars antenna" at NASA's Deep Space Network site in Goldstone, Calif. has finished a major, delicate surgery that lasted seven months. The operation on the giant, 70-meter-wide (230-fo...

  13. Dual-frequency microwave antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathker, D. A.; Brunstein, S. A.; Ludwig, A. C.; Potter, P. D.

    1980-01-01

    Single antenna using two feed horns (one for receiving and radiation X-band signals, and one for S-band signals), in conjunction with ellipsoid reflector and dichronic plate, can accommodate two different frequencies simultaneously.

  14. The new 34-meter antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompa, M. F.

    1986-05-01

    The new 34-m high efficiency Azimuth - Elevation antenna configuration, including its features, dynamic characteristics and performance at 8.4-GHz frequencies is described. The current-technology features of this antenna produce a highly reliable configuration by incorporation of a main wheel and track azimuth support, central pintle pivot bearing, close tolerance surface panels and all-welded construction. Also described are basic drive controls that, as slaved to three automatic microprocessors, provide accurate and safe control of the antenna's steering tasks. At this time antenna installations are completed at Goldstone and Canberra and have operationally supported the Voyager - Uranus encounter. A third installation is being constructed currently in Madrid and is scheduled for completion in late 1986.

  15. Uncovering the mechanism for selective control of the visible and near-IR absorption bands in bacteriochlorophylls a, b and g

    PubMed Central

    Fujisawa, Jun-ichi; Nagata, Morio

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriochlorophylls (BChls) play an important role as light harvesters in photosynthetic bacteria. Interestingly, bacteriochlorophylls (BChls) a, b, and g selectively tune their visible (Qx) and near IR (Qy) absorption bands by the substituent changes. In this paper, we theoretically study the mechanism for the selective control of the absorption bands. Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) and four-orbital model analyses reveal that the selective red-shift of the Qy band with the substituent change from BChl a to b occurs with the lower-energy shift of the (HOMO, LUMO) excited state directly induced by the molecular-orbital energy changes. In contrast, the Qx band hardly shifts by the cancellation between the higher- and lower-energy shifts of the (HOMO-1, LUMO) excited state directly induced by the molecular-orbital energy changes and configuration interaction, respectively. On the other hand, with the substituent changes from BChl a to g, the Qx band selectively blue-shifts by the larger higher-energy shift of the (HOMO-1, LUMO) excited state directly induced by the molecular-orbital energy shifts than the lower-energy shift due to the configuration interaction. In contrast, the Qy band hardly shifts by the cancellation between the higher- and lower-energy shifts of the (HOMO, LUMO) excited state directly induced by the molecular-orbital energy changes and configuration interaction, respectively. Our work provides the important knowledge for understanding how nature controls the light-absorption properties of the BChl dyes, which might be also useful for design of porphyrinoid chromophores. PMID:27493495

  16. Absence of the cbb3 Terminal Oxidase Reveals an Active Oxygen-Dependent Cyclase Involved in Bacteriochlorophyll Biosynthesis in Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guangyu E.; Martin, Elizabeth C.; Hunter, C. Neil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The characteristic green color associated with chlorophyll pigments results from the formation of an isocyclic fifth ring on the tetrapyrrole macrocycle during the biosynthesis of these important molecules. This reaction is catalyzed by two unrelated cyclase enzymes employing different chemistries. Oxygenic phototrophs such as plants and cyanobacteria utilize an oxygen-dependent enzyme, the major component of which is a diiron protein named AcsF, while BchE, an oxygen-sensitive [4Fe-4S] cluster protein, dominates in phototrophs inhabiting anoxic environments, such as the purple phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. We identify a potential acsF in this organism and assay for activity of the encoded protein in a strain lacking bchE under various aeration regimes. Initially, cells lacking bchE did not demonstrate AcsF activity under any condition tested. However, on removal of a gene encoding a subunit of the cbb3-type respiratory terminal oxidase, cells cultured under regimes ranging from oxic to micro-oxic exhibited cyclase activity, confirming the activity of the oxygen-dependent enzyme in this model organism. Potential reasons for the utilization of an oxygen-dependent enzyme in anoxygenic phototrophs are discussed. IMPORTANCE The formation of the E ring of bacteriochlorophyll pigments is the least well characterized step in their biosynthesis, remaining enigmatic for over 60 years. Two unrelated enzymes catalyze this cyclization step; O2-dependent and O2-independent forms dominate in oxygenic and anoxygenic phototrophs, respectively. We uncover the activity of an O2-dependent enzyme in the anoxygenic purple phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, initially by inactivation of the high-affinity terminal respiratory oxidase, cytochrome cbb3. We propose that the O2-dependent form allows for the biosynthesis of a low level of bacteriochlorophyll under oxic conditions, so that a rapid initiation of photosynthetic processes is possible for

  17. Protein Colloidal Aggregation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the pathways and kinetics of protein aggregation to allow accurate predictive modeling of the process and evaluation of potential inhibitors to prevalent diseases including cataract formation, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease and others.

  18. Fin-line horn antenna

    DOEpatents

    Reindel, John

    1990-01-01

    A fin line circuit card containing a fin line slot feeds a dipole antenna ich extends a quarterwave outside the waveguide and provides an energy beam focal point at or near the open end of the waveguide. The dipole antenna thus maintains a wide and nearly constant beamwidth, low VSWR and a circular symmetric radiation pattern for use in electronic warfare direction finding and surveillance applications.

  19. Antennas for mobile satellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, John

    1991-01-01

    A NASA sponsored program, called the Mobile Satellite (MSAT) system, has prompted the development of several innovative antennas at L-band frequencies. In the space segment of the MSAT system, an efficient, light weight, circularly polarized microstrip array that uses linearly polarized elements was developed as a multiple beam reflector feed system. In the ground segment, a low-cost, low-profile, and very efficient microstrip Yagi array was developed as a medium-gain mechanically steered vehicle antenna. Circularly shaped microstrip patches excited at higher-order modes were also developed as low-gain vehicle antennas. A more recent effort called for the development of a 20/30 GHz mobile terminal antenna for future-generation mobile satellite communications. To combat the high insertion loss encountered at 20/30 GHz, series-fed Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) microstrip array antennas are currently being developed. These MMIC arrays may lead to the development of several small but high-gain Ka-band antennas for the Personal Access Satellite Service planned for the 2000s.

  20. Electromagnetic antenna modeling (EAM) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packer, Malcolm; Powers, Robert; Tsitsopoulos, Paul

    1994-12-01

    The determination of foreign communications capabilities and intent is an important assessment function performed by the USAF National Air Intelligence Center (NAIC). In this context, Rome Laboratory became the NAIC engineering agent for the development of an NAIC requirement for the rapid analysis and evaluation of antenna structures based on often vague to sometimes detailed dimensional information. To this end, the Rome Laboratory sponsored development of the Electromagnetic Antenna Modeling (EAM) System, a state-of-the-art Pascal program with an MS Windows graphical user interface (GUI) pre- and post-processor. Users of NAIC capabilities initiate antenna analysis efforts that range from simple parametric studies to more complex, detailed antenna design and communication-system evaluations. Accordingly, EAM provides a modeling capability 'matched' to the sophistication of the individual analyst, with features appropriate for users ranging from nontechnical analysts to experienced antenna engineers. This capability is particularly valuable in the military-intelligence environment, in which high-speed assessments are required. In particular, EAM meets the specific antenna-analysis requirements of NAIC with a versatile graphical user interface.

  1. NASA technology for large space antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, R. A.; Campbell, T. G.; Freeland, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Technology developed by NASA in conjunction with industry for potential large, deployable space antennas with applications in communication, radio astronomy and earth observation is reviewed. Concepts for deployable antennas that have been developed to the point of detail design are summarized, including the advanced sunflower precision antenna, the radial rib antenna, the maypole (hoop/column) antenna and the parabolic erectable truss antenna. The assessment of state-of-the-art deployable antenna technology is discussed, and the approach taken by the NASA Large Space Systems Technology (LSST) Program to the development of technology for large space antenna systems is outlined. Finally, the further development of the wrap-rib antenna and the maypole (hoop/column) concept, which meet mission model requirements, to satisfy LSST size and frequency requirements is discussed.

  2. Multiple band circularly polarized microstrip antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, I. P. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A multiple antenna assembly for communicating electromagnetic radiation is disclosed. An antenna element stack is constructed of a plurality of elliptical lamina antenna elements mutally separated by layers of dielectric material, and separated from a ground plane by dielectric material. The antenna assembly is coupled through a feed line in contact with the top antenna element. A conductor joins the remaining antenna elements to the ground plane. Each individual antenna element is operable for communication reception and transmission within a frequency band determined by the size of the particular antenna element. The sizes of the antenna elements may be selected to provide electromagnetic radiation communication over several distinct frequency bands, or to connect the individual bands into a broad band.

  3. E-Textile Antennas for Space Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Timothy F.; Fink, Patrick W.; Chu, Andrew W.

    2007-01-01

    The ability to integrate antennas and other radio frequency (RF) devices into wearable systems is increasingly important as wireless voice, video, and data sources become ubiquitous. Consumer applications including mobile computing, communications, and entertainment, as well as military and space applications for integration of biotelemetry, detailed tracking information and status of handheld tools, devices and on-body inventories are driving forces for research into wearable antennas and other e-textile devices. Operational conditions for military and space applications of wireless systems are often such that antennas are a limiting factor in wireless performance. The changing antenna platform, i.e. the dynamic wearer, can detune and alter the radiation characteristics of e-textile antennas, making antenna element selection and design challenging. Antenna designs and systems that offer moderate bandwidth, perform well with flexure, and are electronically reconfigurable are ideally suited to wearable applications. Several antennas, shown in Figure 1, have been created using a NASA-developed process for e-textiles that show promise in being integrated into a robust wireless system for space-based applications. Preliminary characterization of the antennas with flexure indicates that antenna performance can be maintained, and that a combination of antenna design and placement are useful in creating robust designs. Additionally, through utilization of modern smart antenna techniques, even greater flexibility can be achieved since antenna performance can be adjusted in real-time to compensate for the antenna s changing environment.

  4. Mobile antenna development at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J.; Jamnejad, V.; Densmore, A.; Tulintseff, A.; Thomas, R.; Woo, K.

    1993-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), under the sponsorship of NASA, has pioneered the development of land vehicle antennas for commercial mobile satellite communications. Several novel antennas have been developed at L-band frequencies for the Mobile Satellite (MSAT) program initiated about a decade ago. Currently, two types of antennas are being developed at K- and Ka-band frequencies for the ACTS (Advanced Communications Technology Satellite) Mobile Terminal (AMT) project. For the future, several hand-held antenna concepts are proposed for the small terminals of the Ka-band Personal Access Satellite System (PASS). For the L-band MSAT program, a number of omni-directional low-gain antennas, such as the crossed drooping-dipoles, the higher-order-mode circular microstrip patch, the quadrifilar helix, and the wrapped-around microstrip 'mast' array, have been developed for lower data rate communications. Several medium-gain satellite tracking antennas, such as the electronically scanned low-profile phased array, the mechanically steered tilted microstrip array, the mechanically steered low-profile microstrip Yagi array, and the hybrid electronically/mechanically steered low-profile array, have been developed for the MSAT's higher data rate and voice communications. To date, for the L-band vehicle application, JPL has developed the world's lowest-profile phased array (1.8 cm height), as well as the lowest-profile mechanically steered antenna (3.7 cm height). For the 20/30 GHz AMT project, a small mechanically steered elliptical reflector antenna with a gain of 23 dBi has recently been developed to transmit horizontal polarization at 30 GHz and receive vertical polarization at 20 GHz. Its hemispherical radome has a height of 10 cm and a base diameter of 23 cm. In addition to the reflector, a mechanically steered printed MMIC active array is currently being developed to achieve the same electrical requirements with a low profile capability. These AMT antenna developments

  5. Wide scanning spherical antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Bing (Inventor); Stutzman, Warren L. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A novel method for calculating the surface shapes for subreflectors in a suboptic assembly of a tri-reflector spherical antenna system is introduced, modeled from a generalization of Galindo-Israel's method of solving partial differential equations to correct for spherical aberration and provide uniform feed to aperture mapping. In a first embodiment, the suboptic assembly moves as a single unit to achieve scan while the main reflector remains stationary. A feed horn is tilted during scan to maintain the illuminated area on the main spherical reflector fixed throughout the scan thereby eliminating the need to oversize the main spherical reflector. In an alternate embodiment, both the main spherical reflector and the suboptic assembly are fixed. A flat mirror is used to create a virtual image of the suboptic assembly. Scan is achieved by rotating the mirror about the spherical center of the main reflector. The feed horn is tilted during scan to maintain the illuminated area on the main spherical reflector fixed throughout the scan.

  6. Feed Structure For Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Chu, Andrew W. (Inventor); Dobbins, Justin A. (Inventor); Lin, Greg Y. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A novel feed structure, for an antenna having a resonant electric field structure, comprising a patch element, an integrated circuit attached to the patch element, at least one inner conductor electrically connected to and terminating at the integrated circuit on a first end of the at least one inner conductor, wherein the at least one inner conductor extends through and is not electrically connected to the patch element, and wherein the at least one inner conductor is available for electrical connectivity on a second end of the at least one inner conductor, and an outer conductor electrically connected to and terminating at the patch element on a first end of the outer conductor, wherein the outer conductor is available for electrical connectivity on a second end of the outer conductor, and wherein the outer conductor concentrically surrounds the at least one inner conductor from the second end of the at least one inner conductor available for electrical connectivity to the first end of the outer conductor terminating at the patch element.

  7. Magnetic antenna excitation of whistler modes. II. Antenna arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2014-12-15

    The excitation of whistler modes from magnetic loop antennas has been investigated experimentally. The field topology of the excited wave driven by a single loop antenna has been measured for different loop orientations with respect to the uniform background field. The fields from two or more antennas at different locations are then created by superposition of the single-loop data. It is shown that an antenna array can produce nearly plane waves which cannot be achieved with single antennas. By applying a phase shift along the array, oblique wave propagation is obtained. This allows a meaningful comparison with plane wave theory. The Gendrin mode and oblique cyclotron resonance are demonstrated. Wave helicity and polarization in space and time are demonstrated and distinguished from the magnetic helicity of the wave field. The superposition of two oblique plane whistler modes produces in a “whistler waveguide” mode whose polarization and helicity properties are explained. The results show that single point measurements cannot properly establish the wave character of wave packets. The laboratory observations are relevant for excitation and detection of whistler modes in space plasmas.

  8. Imaging Antenna Structure For Submillimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebeiz, G.; Rutledge, D.

    1990-01-01

    Integrated-circuit antenna structure contains two-dimensional array of antennas and antenna reflectors. In receiving mode, each antenna acts as part of detector for one picture element in millimeter- or submillimeter-wavelength imaging radar system. Millimeter-wave imaging system used to view objects through fog, smoke, or smog with resolution intermediate between microwave and visible-light imaging systems. Antenna elements, supports, and reflectors made by integrated-circuit techniques. Structures fabricated on front and back substrates separately. Substrates then joined. Inexpensive way to provide large number of small antenna elements required for imaging, all mounted rigidly in way that does not degrade operation.

  9. Systems analysis for DSN microwave antenna holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochblatt, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    Proposed systems for Deep Space Network (DSN) microwave antenna holography are analyzed. Microwave holography, as applied to antennas, is a technique which utilizes the Fourier Transform relation between the complex far-field radiation pattern of an antenna and the complex aperture field distribution to provide a methodology for the analysis and evaluation of antenna performance. Resulting aperture phase and amplitude distribution data are used to precisely characterize various crucial performance parameters, including panel alignment, subreflector position, antenna aperture illumination, directivity at various frequencies, and gravity deformation. Microwave holographic analysis provides diagnostic capacity as well as being a powerful tool for evaluating antenna design specifications and their corresponding theoretical models.

  10. Broadband monopole optical nano-antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Rongguo; Ding, Jun; Arigong, Bayaner; Lin, Yuankun; Zhang, Hualiang

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, a novel design of broadband monopole optical nano-antennas is proposed. It consists of a corrugated halfelliptical patch inside an elliptical aperture. Full-wave electromagnetic simulations have been used to investigate the performance of the nano-antenna. The predicted performance of the proposed monopole nano-antenna is remarkably broadband. Moreover, the proposed broadband nano-antenna can respond to light waves with different polarizations. The proposed optical antenna will pave the way towards the development of high performance optical antennas and optical systems.

  11. Multilayer Microstrip Slot And Dipole Array Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tulintseff, Ann N.

    1994-01-01

    Multilayer antenna structure contains interleaved linear subarrays of microstrip dipole and slot radiating antenna elements to provide compact, dual-band antenna. Structure also contains associated microstrip transmission lines, plus high-power amplifiers for transmission and low-noise amplifiers for reception. Overall function is to transmit in horizontal polarization at frequency of 29.634 GHz and receive in vertical polarization at 19.914 GHz, in direction 44 degrees from broadside to antenna. Antenna structure is part of apparatus described in "Steerable K/Ka-band Antenna for Land-Mobile Satellite Applications," NPO-18772.

  12. Vehicle antenna development for mobile satellite applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, K.

    1988-01-01

    The paper summarizes results of a vehicle antenna program at JPL in support of a developing U.S. mobile satellite services (MSS) designed to provide telephone and data services for the continental United States. Two classes of circularly polarized vehicle antennas have been considered for the MSS: medium-gain, satellite-tracking antennas with 10-12-dBic gain; and low-gain, azimuthally omnidirectional antennas with 3-5-dBic gain. The design and performance of these antennas are described, and the two antennas are shown to have peculiar advantages and disadvantages.

  13. Research on Size Reduction of Plasma Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jian; Xu, Yuemin; Sun, Hailong

    The structure of plasma antenna is more complex than metal antenna to reach ideal gain, efficiency, matching, etc. Therefore, earlier plasma antenna prototypes were always featured with larger size and weight. The NSSC research team has developed new prototypes with equivalent performance as metal antenna. In recent research, we also optimized the antenna structure to reduce size and weight. The new plasma antenna prototype is much smaller than the former ones, and its power consumption is also reduced from more than 100 watts to about 30 watts.

  14. Satellite Communications with NRAO Green Bank Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, John M.; Ford, H. Alyson; Watts, Galen

    2014-11-01

    The National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Green Bank facility has several medium and large antennas that are available for satellite communications. The 100 meter Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT), the largest and most sensitive antenna on site, is capable of receiving signals at frequencies as high as 86 GHz. In addition to the GBT are the fully operational 43 meter, 20 meter, and 13.7 meter antennas, and three mothballed 26 meter antennas. A transmitter could be fitted to any of these antennas for spacecraft uplinks. We discuss the characteristics of these antennas and possible operational models for future planetary science mission support.

  15. Antenna for passive RFID tags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiopu, Paul; Manea, Adrian; Cristea, Ionica; Grosu, Neculai; Vladescu, Marian; Craciun, Anca-Ileana; Craciun, Alexandru

    2015-02-01

    Minuscule devices, called RFID tags are attached to objects and persons and emit information which positioned readers may capture wirelessly. Many methods of identification have been used, but that of most common is to use a unique serial number for identification of person or object. RFID tags can be characterized as either active or passive [1,2]. Traditional passive tags are typically in "sleep" state until awakened by the reader's emitted field. In passive tags, the reader's field acts to charge the capacitor that powers the badge and this can be a combination of antenna and barcodes obtained with SAW( Surface Acoustic Wave) devices [1,2,3] . The antenna in an RFID tag is a conductive element that permits the tag to exchange data with the reader. The paper contribution are targeted to antenna for passive RFID tags. The electromagnetic field generated by the reader is somehow oriented by the reader antenna and power is induced in the tag only if the orientation of the tag antenna is appropriate. A tag placed orthogonal to the reader yield field will not be read. This is the reason that guided manufacturers to build circular polarized antenna capable of propagating a field that is alternatively polarized on all planes passing on the diffusion axis. Passive RFID tags are operated at the UHF frequencies of 868MHz (Europe) and 915MHz (USA) and at the microwave frequencies of 2,45 GHz and 5,8 GHz . Because the tags are small dimensions, in paper, we present the possibility to use circular polarization microstrip antenna with fractal edge [2].

  16. Excitation migration in fluctuating light-harvesting antenna systems.

    PubMed

    Chmeliov, Jevgenij; Trinkunas, Gediminas; van Amerongen, Herbert; Valkunas, Leonas

    2016-01-01

    Complex multi-exponential fluorescence decay kinetics observed in various photosynthetic systems like photosystem II (PSII) have often been explained by the reversible quenching mechanism of the charge separation taking place in the reaction center (RC) of PSII. However, this description does not account for the intrinsic dynamic disorder of the light-harvesting proteins as well as their fluctuating dislocations within the antenna, which also facilitate the repair of RCs, state transitions, and the process of non-photochemical quenching. Since dynamic fluctuations result in varying connectivity between pigment-protein complexes, they can also lead to non-exponential excitation decay kinetics. Based on this presumption, we have recently proposed a simple conceptual model describing excitation diffusion in a continuous medium and accounting for possible variations of the excitation transfer pathways. In the current work, this model is further developed and then applied to describe fluorescence kinetics originating from very diverse antenna systems, ranging from PSII of various sizes to LHCII aggregates and even the entire thylakoid membrane. In all cases, complex multi-exponential fluorescence kinetics are perfectly reproduced on the entire relevant time scale without assuming any radical pair equilibration at the side of the excitation quencher, but using just a few parameters reflecting the mean excitation energy transfer rate as well as the overall average organization of the photosynthetic antenna. PMID:25605669

  17. Technology meets aggregate

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.; Swan, C.

    2007-07-01

    New technology carried out at Tufts University and the University of Massachusetts on synthetic lightweight aggregate has created material from various qualities of fly ash from coal-fired power plants for use in different engineered applications. In pilot scale manufacturing tests an 'SLA' containing 80% fly ash and 20% mixed plastic waste from packaging was produced by 'dry blending' mixed plastic with high carbon fly ash. A trial run was completed to produce concrete masonry unit (CMU) blocks at a full-scale facility. It has been shown that SLA can be used as a partial substitution of a traditional stone aggregate in hot asphalt mix. 1 fig., 2 photos.

  18. Electronic Energy transfer in light-harvesting antenna complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossein-Nejad, Hoda

    The studies presented in this thesis explore electronic energy transfer (EET) in light-harvesting antenna complexes and investigate the role of quantum coherence in EET. The dynamics of energy transfer are investigated in three distinct length scales and a different formulation of the exciton transport problem is applied at each scale. These scales include: the scale of a molecular dimer, the scale of a single protein and the scale of a molecular aggregate. The antenna protein phycoerythrin 545 (PE545) isolated from the photosynthetic cryptophyte algae Rhodomonas CS4 is specifically studied in two chapters of this thesis. It is found that formation of small aggregates delocalizes the excitation across chromophores of adjacent proteins, and that this delocalization has a dramatic effect in enhancing the rate of energy transfer between pigments. Furthermore, we investigate EET from a donor to an acceptor via an intermediate site and observe that interference of coherent pathways gives a finite correction to the transfer rate that is sensitively dependent on the nature of the vibrational interactions in the system. The statistical fluctuations of a system exhibiting EET are investigated in the final chapter. The techniques of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics are applied to investigate the steady-state of a typical system exhibiting EET that is perturbed out of equilibrium due to its interaction with a fluctuating bath.

  19. Mechanisms of the Rosetta high gain antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Carlos

    2001-09-01

    This paper describes the antenna pointing mechanism (APM) and the hold down and release mechanism (HRM) used in the high gain antenna of the ROSETTA mission. The hold down and release mechanism consists of three units which compensate the tolerance mismatch between antenna and spacecraft through incorporation of potting rings. Given that the activation mode is pyrotechnic, release shock is a major concern and is minimised through integration of shock absorbers which allow stroking of the separation nuts. The antenna pointing mechanism is a dual drive (azimuth over elevation) unit which allows controlled rotation of the antenna. The drive units incorporate spring loaded end stops to prevent the antenna from hitting the spacecraft, and optical encoders which register the absolute position of the antenna. The pointing and the hold down mechanisms of the ROSETTA antenna are fully qualified and will withstand the high launch loads of the Ariane-5 and the environmental demands of deep space operation.

  20. Integrated resonant tunneling diode based antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Hietala, Vincent M.; Tiggers, Chris P.; Plut, Thomas A.

    2000-01-01

    An antenna comprising a plurality of negative resistance devices and a method for making same comprising employing a removable standoff layer to form the gap between the microstrip antenna metal and the bottom contact layer.

  1. Wrap-rib antenna concept development overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, A. A., Jr.; Garcia, N. F.

    1983-01-01

    The wrap rib antenna design of a parabolic reflector large space antenna is discussed. Cost estimates, design/mission compatibility, deployment sequence, ground based tests, and fabrication are discussed.

  2. Microwave Antenna With Reduced Noise Leakage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cha, A. G.

    1986-01-01

    Gain or gain-to-temperature ratio of dual-shaped subreflector receiving antenna increased when illumination is tapered near aperture edge. Taper imposed in antenna feed reduces spillover in transmitting mode and reduces noise pickup in receiving mode.

  3. Antenna Technology Shuttle Experiment (ATSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeland, R. E.; Mettler, E.; Miller, L. J.; Rahmet-Samii, Y.; Weber, W. J., III

    1987-01-01

    Numerous space applications of the future will require mesh deployable antennas of 15 m in diameter or greater for frequencies up to 20 GHz. These applications include mobile communications satellites, orbiting very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) astrophysics missions, and Earth remote sensing missions. A Lockheed wrap rip antennas was used as the test article. The experiments covered a broad range of structural, control, and RF discipline objectives, which is fulfilled in total, would greatly reduce the risk of employing these antenna systems in future space applications. It was concluded that a flight experiment of a relatively large mesh deployable reflector is achievable with no major technological or cost drivers. The test articles and the instrumentation are all within the state of the art and in most cases rely on proven flight hardware. Every effort was made to design the experiments for low cost.

  4. Compact Low Frequency Radio Antenna

    DOEpatents

    Punnoose, Ratish J.

    2008-11-11

    An antenna is disclosed that comprises a pair of conductive, orthogonal arches and a pair of conductive annular sector plates, wherein adjacent legs of each arch are fastened to one of the annular sector plates and the opposite adjacent pair of legs is fastened to the remaining annular sector plate. The entire antenna structure is spaced apart from a conductive ground plane by a thin dielectric medium. The antenna is driven by a feed conduit passing through the conductive ground plane and dielectric medium and attached to one of the annular sector plates, wherein the two orthogonal arched act as a pair of crossed dipole elements. This arrangement of elements provides a radiation pattern that is largely omni-directional above the horizon.

  5. Antenna coupled photonic wire lasers.

    PubMed

    Kao, Tsung-Yu; Cai, Xiaowei; Lee, Alan W M; Reno, John L; Hu, Qing

    2015-06-29

    Slope efficiency (SE) is an important performance metric for lasers. In conventional semiconductor lasers, SE can be optimized by careful designs of the facet (or the modulation for DFB lasers) dimension and surface. However, photonic wire lasers intrinsically suffer low SE due to their deep sub-wavelength emitting facets. Inspired by microwave engineering techniques, we show a novel method to extract power from wire lasers using monolithically integrated antennas. These integrated antennas significantly increase the effective radiation area, and consequently enhance the power extraction efficiency. When applied to wire lasers at THz frequency, we achieved the highest single-side slope efficiency (~450 mW/A) in pulsed mode for DFB lasers at 4 THz and a ~4x increase in output power at 3 THz compared with a similar structure without antennas. This work demonstrates the versatility of incorporating microwave engineering techniques into laser designs, enabling significant performance enhancements. PMID:26191717

  6. A fractal circular polarized RFID tag antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaouki, Guesmi; Ferchichi, Abdelhak; Gharsallah, Ali

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we present a novel fractal antenna for radiofrequency identification (RFID) tags. The proposed antenna has a resonant frequency equal to 2.45GHz and circular polarization. The fractal technique was very useful to obtain a miniaturization of antenna size by more than 30%. The gain and directivity of the antenna are acceptable for the desired RFID application. All the results are obtained using CST Microwave simulation tool.

  7. Bandwidth characteristics of monopulse slotted waveguide antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derneryd, A.; Peterson, R.

    Slotted waveguide antennas are of resonant and nonresonant type; the former generate a beam normal to the aperture, rendering them suitable for monopulse antenna applications. Attention is presently given to the improvement of resonant antenna impedance matching through a process of waveguide overloading. The combination of an overloaded waveguide and a transformer will generally have a broader impedance match than the antenna matched by itself; this phenomenon is discussed from both impedance-match and sidelobe level viewpoints.

  8. Large Space Antenna Systems Technology, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, W. J. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    Papers are presented which provide a comprehensive review of space missions requiring large antenna systems and of the status of key technologies required to enable these missions. Topic areas include mission applications for large space antenna systems, large space antenna structural systems, materials and structures technology, structural dynamics and control technology, electromagnetics technology, large space antenna systems and the space station, and flight test and evaluation.

  9. The Galileo high gain antenna deployment anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Michael R.

    1994-01-01

    On April 11, 1991, the Galileo spacecraft executed a sequence that would open the spacecraft's High Gain Antenna. The Antenna's launch restraint had been released just after deployment sequence, the antenna, which opens like an umbrella, never reached the fully deployed position. The analyses and tests that followed allowed a conclusive determination of the likely failure mechanisms and pointed to some strategies to use for recovery of the high gain antenna.

  10. A printed circuit cylindrical array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Ashok K.; Powell, Walter E.

    1986-11-01

    The design and performance of a Ku-band cylindrical antenna are described. The antenna is designed to provide a 360-deg azimuth coverage with 20-dB sidelobes and an operating bandwidth of 1 GHz (16.0-17.0 GHz). The antenna consists of 16 facets of 2 x 4 dipole arrays. The 360-deg coverage is obtained with a switch matrix network. The antenna elements and the feeding switch matrix network are printed on a single printed circuit board.

  11. Nested-cone transformer antenna

    DOEpatents

    Ekdahl, Carl A.

    1991-01-01

    A plurality of conical transmission lines are concentrically nested to form n output antenna for pulsed-power, radio-frequency, and microwave sources. The diverging conical conductors enable a high power input density across a bulk dielectric to be reduced below a breakdown power density at the antenna interface with the transmitting medium. The plurality of cones maintain a spacing between conductors which minimizes the generation of high order modes between the conductors. Further, the power input feeds are isolated at the input while enabling the output electromagnetic waves to add at the transmission interface. Thus, very large power signals from a pulse rf, or microwave source can be radiated.

  12. Interleaved array antenna technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    This is the third phase of a program to establish an antenna concept for shuttle and free flying spacecraft earth resources experiments using Synthetic Aperture Radar. The feasibility of a plated graphite epoxy waveguide for a space antenna was evaluated. A quantity of flat panels and waveguides were developed, procured, and tested for electrical and mechanical properties. In addition, processes for the assembly of a unique waveguide array were investigated. Finally, trades between various configurations that would allow elevation (range) electronic scanning and that would minimize feed complexity for various RF bandwidths were made.

  13. High Resolution Scanning Reflectarray Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R. (Inventor); Miranda, Felix A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a High Resolution Scanning Reflectarray Antenna (HRSRA) for the purpose of tracking ground terminals and space craft communication applications. The present invention provides an alternative to using gimbaled parabolic dish antennas and direct radiating phased arrays. When compared to a gimbaled parabolic dish, the HRSRA offers the advantages of vibration free steering without incurring appreciable cost or prime power penalties. In addition, it offers full beam steering at a fraction of the cost of direct radiating arrays and is more efficient.

  14. Nested-cone transformer antenna

    DOEpatents

    Ekdahl, C.A.

    1991-05-28

    A plurality of conical transmission lines are concentrically nested to form an output antenna for pulsed-power, radio-frequency, and microwave sources. The diverging conical conductors enable a high power input density across a bulk dielectric to be reduced below a breakdown power density at the antenna interface with the transmitting medium. The plurality of cones maintain a spacing between conductors which minimizes the generation of high order modes between the conductors. Further, the power input feeds are isolated at the input while enabling the output electromagnetic waves to add at the transmission interface. Thus, very large power signals from a pulse rf, or microwave source can be radiated. 6 figures.

  15. Antenna reconfiguration verification and validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Robert C. (Inventor); Meyers, David W. (Inventor); Muldoon, Kelly P. (Inventor); Carlson, Douglas R. (Inventor); Drexler, Jerome P. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method of testing the electrical functionality of an optically controlled switch in a reconfigurable antenna is provided. The method includes configuring one or more conductive paths between one or more feed points and one or more test point with switches in the reconfigurable antenna. Applying one or more test signals to the one or more feed points. Monitoring the one or more test points in response to the one or more test signals and determining the functionality of the switch based upon the monitoring of the one or more test points.

  16. Microstrip antenna developments at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, John

    1991-01-01

    The in-house development of microstrip antennas, initiated in 1981, when a spaceborne lightweight and low-profile planar array was needed for a satellite communication system, is described. The work described covers the prediction of finite-ground-plane effects by the geometric theory of diffraction, higher-order-mode circularly polarized circular patch antennas, circularly polarized microstrip arrays with linearly polarized elements, an impedance-matching teardrop-shaped probe feed, a dual-polarized microstrip array with high isolation and low cross-polarization, a planar microstrip Yagi array, a microstrip reflectarray, a Ka-band MMIC array, and a series-fed linear arrays.

  17. Microstrip Patch Antenna And Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for a microstrip feeder structure for supplying properly phased signals to each radiator element in a microstrip antenna array that may be utilized for radiating circularly polarized electromagnetic waves. In one disclosed embodiment. the microstrip feeder structure includes a plurality of microstrip sections many or all of which preferably have an electrical length substantially equal to one-quarter wavelength at the antenna operating frequency. The feeder structure provides a low loss feed structure that may be duplicated multiple times through a set of rotations and translations to provide a radiating array of the desired size.

  18. Aggregates, broccoli and cauliflower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grey, Francois; Kjems, Jørgen K.

    1989-09-01

    Naturally grown structures with fractal characters like broccoli and cauliflower are discussed and compared with DLA-type aggregates. It is suggested that the branching density can be used to characterize the growth process and an experimental method to determine this parameter is proposed.

  19. Microwave performance characterization of large space antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathker, D. A. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    Performance capabilities of large microwave space antenna configurations with apertures generally from 100 wavelengths upwards are discussed. Types of antennas considered include: phased arrays, lenses, reflectors, and hybrid combinations of phased arrays with reflectors or lenses. The performance characteristics of these broad classes of antennas are examined and compared in terms of applications.

  20. Small X-Band Oscillator Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.; Miranda, Felix A.; Clark, Eric B.; Wilt, David M.; Mueller, Carl H.; Kory, Carol L.; Lambert, Kevin M.

    2009-01-01

    A small, segmented microstrip patch antenna integrated with an X-band feedback oscillator on a high-permittivity substrate has been built and tested. This oscillator antenna is a prototype for demonstrating the feasibility of such devices as compact, low-power-consumption building blocks of advanced, lightweight, phased antenna arrays that would generate steerable beams for communication and remotesensing applications.

  1. 47 CFR 80.1017 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.1017 Section 80.1017 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Radiotelephone Installations Required by the Bridge-to-Bridge Act § 80.1017 Antenna system. (a) An antenna must be...

  2. 47 CFR 80.1017 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.1017 Section 80.1017 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Radiotelephone Installations Required by the Bridge-to-Bridge Act § 80.1017 Antenna system. (a) An antenna must be...

  3. 47 CFR 80.1017 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.1017 Section 80.1017 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Radiotelephone Installations Required by the Bridge-to-Bridge Act § 80.1017 Antenna system. (a) An antenna must be...

  4. 47 CFR 80.1017 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.1017 Section 80.1017 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Radiotelephone Installations Required by the Bridge-to-Bridge Act § 80.1017 Antenna system. (a) An antenna must be...

  5. 47 CFR 80.967 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.967 Section 80.967... MARITIME SERVICES Radiotelephone Installation Required for Vessels on the Great Lakes § 80.967 Antenna system. The antenna must be omni-directional, vertically polarized and located as high as practicable...

  6. 47 CFR 15.203 - Antenna requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna requirement. 15.203 Section 15.203... Antenna requirement. An intentional radiator shall be designed to ensure that no antenna other than that furnished by the responsible party shall be used with the device. The use of a permanently attached...

  7. 47 CFR 101.115 - Directional antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Directional antennas. 101.115 Section 101.115... SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.115 Directional antennas. (a) Unless otherwise authorized upon specific... antenna adjusted with the center of the major lobe of radiation in the horizontal plane directed...

  8. 47 CFR 73.816 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antennas. 73.816 Section 73.816... Low Power FM Broadcast Stations (LPFM) § 73.816 Antennas. (a) Permittees and licensees may employ nondirectional antennas with horizontal only polarization, vertical only polarization, circular polarization...

  9. 47 CFR 101.115 - Directional antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Directional antennas. 101.115 Section 101.115... SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.115 Directional antennas. (a) Unless otherwise authorized upon specific... antenna adjusted with the center of the major lobe of radiation in the horizontal plane directed...

  10. 47 CFR 95.859 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antennas. 95.859 Section 95.859... SERVICES 218-219 MHz Service Technical Standards § 95.859 Antennas. (a) The overall height from ground to topmost tip of the CTS antenna shall not exceed the height necessary to assure adequate service....

  11. 47 CFR 95.1213 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1213 Section 95.1213... SERVICES Medical Device Radiocommunication Service (MedRadio) § 95.1213 Antennas. Link to an amendment published at 77 FR 55733, Sept. 11, 2012. No antenna for a MedRadio transmitter shall be configured...

  12. 47 CFR 74.641 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna systems. 74.641 Section 74.641... Stations § 74.641 Antenna systems. (a) For fixed stations operating above 2025 MHz, the following standards apply: (1) Fixed TV broadcast auxiliary stations shall use directional antennas that meet...

  13. 47 CFR 73.816 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antennas. 73.816 Section 73.816... Low Power FM Broadcast Stations (LPFM) § 73.816 Antennas. (a) Permittees and licensees may employ nondirectional antennas with horizontal only polarization, vertical only polarization, circular polarization...

  14. 47 CFR 80.923 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.923 Section 80.923... MARITIME SERVICES Compulsory Radiotelephone Installations for Small Passenger Boats § 80.923 Antenna system. An antenna must be provided in accordance with the applicable requirements of § 80.81 of this...

  15. 47 CFR 73.816 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antennas. 73.816 Section 73.816... Low Power FM Broadcast Stations (LPFM) § 73.816 Antennas. (a) Permittees and licensees may employ nondirectional antennas with horizontal only polarization, vertical only polarization, circular polarization...

  16. 47 CFR 74.641 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna systems. 74.641 Section 74.641... Stations § 74.641 Antenna systems. (a) For fixed stations operating above 2025 MHz, the following standards apply: (1) Fixed TV broadcast auxiliary stations shall use directional antennas that meet...

  17. 47 CFR 101.117 - Antenna polarization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna polarization. 101.117 Section 101.117... SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.117 Antenna polarization. Except as set forth herein, stations operating... polarization for antennas located within 20 kilometers of the outermost edge of their service area....

  18. 47 CFR 101.517 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antennas. 101.517 Section 101.517... SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.517 Antennas. (a) Transmitting antennas may be omnidirectional or directional, consistent with coverage and interference requirements....

  19. 47 CFR 101.115 - Directional antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Directional antennas. 101.115 Section 101.115... SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.115 Directional antennas. (a) Unless otherwise authorized upon specific... antenna adjusted with the center of the major lobe of radiation in the horizontal plane directed...

  20. 47 CFR 15.203 - Antenna requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna requirement. 15.203 Section 15.203... Antenna requirement. An intentional radiator shall be designed to ensure that no antenna other than that furnished by the responsible party shall be used with the device. The use of a permanently attached...

  1. 47 CFR 101.115 - Directional antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Directional antennas. 101.115 Section 101.115... SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.115 Directional antennas. Link to an amendment published at 77 FR 54432... authorized under the rules of this part must employ a directional antenna adjusted with the center of...

  2. 47 CFR 80.967 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.967 Section 80.967... MARITIME SERVICES Radiotelephone Installation Required for Vessels on the Great Lakes § 80.967 Antenna system. The antenna must be omni-directional, vertically polarized and located as high as practicable...

  3. 47 CFR 15.203 - Antenna requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna requirement. 15.203 Section 15.203... Antenna requirement. An intentional radiator shall be designed to ensure that no antenna other than that furnished by the responsible party shall be used with the device. The use of a permanently attached...

  4. 47 CFR 80.923 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.923 Section 80.923... MARITIME SERVICES Compulsory Radiotelephone Installations for Small Passenger Boats § 80.923 Antenna system. An antenna must be provided in accordance with the applicable requirements of § 80.81 of this...

  5. 47 CFR 101.517 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antennas. 101.517 Section 101.517... SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.517 Antennas. (a) Transmitting antennas may be omnidirectional or directional, consistent with coverage and interference requirements....

  6. 47 CFR 95.1213 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1213 Section 95.1213... SERVICES Medical Device Radiocommunication Service (MedRadio) § 95.1213 Antennas. Except for the 2390-2400 MHz band, no antenna for a MedRadio transmitter shall be configured for permanent outdoor use....

  7. 47 CFR 101.517 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antennas. 101.517 Section 101.517... SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.517 Antennas. (a) Transmitting antennas may be omnidirectional or directional, consistent with coverage and interference requirements....

  8. 47 CFR 101.517 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antennas. 101.517 Section 101.517... SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.517 Antennas. (a) Transmitting antennas may be omnidirectional or directional, consistent with coverage and interference requirements....

  9. 47 CFR 74.641 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna systems. 74.641 Section 74.641... Stations § 74.641 Antenna systems. (a) For fixed stations operating above 2025 MHz, the following standards apply: (1) Fixed TV broadcast auxiliary stations shall use directional antennas that meet...

  10. 47 CFR 80.923 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.923 Section 80.923... MARITIME SERVICES Compulsory Radiotelephone Installations for Small Passenger Boats § 80.923 Antenna system. An antenna must be provided in accordance with the applicable requirements of § 80.81 of this...

  11. 47 CFR 74.641 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna systems. 74.641 Section 74.641... Stations § 74.641 Antenna systems. (a) For fixed stations operating above 2025 MHz, the following standards apply: (1) Fixed TV broadcast auxiliary stations shall use directional antennas that meet...

  12. 47 CFR 80.967 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.967 Section 80.967... MARITIME SERVICES Radiotelephone Installation Required for Vessels on the Great Lakes § 80.967 Antenna system. The antenna must be omni-directional, vertically polarized and located as high as practicable...

  13. 47 CFR 73.816 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antennas. 73.816 Section 73.816... Low Power FM Broadcast Stations (LPFM) § 73.816 Antennas. (a) Permittees and licensees may employ nondirectional antennas with horizontal only polarization, vertical only polarization, circular polarization...

  14. 47 CFR 74.641 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna systems. 74.641 Section 74.641... Stations § 74.641 Antenna systems. (a) For fixed stations operating above 2025 MHz, the following standards apply: (1) Fixed TV broadcast auxiliary stations shall use directional antennas that meet...

  15. 47 CFR 78.105 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna systems. 78.105 Section 78.105... SERVICE Technical Regulations § 78.105 Antenna systems. (a) For fixed stations operating in the 12.7-13.2... directional antennas that meet the performance standards indicated in the following table. (i) Stations...

  16. 47 CFR 15.203 - Antenna requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna requirement. 15.203 Section 15.203... Antenna requirement. An intentional radiator shall be designed to ensure that no antenna other than that furnished by the responsible party shall be used with the device. The use of a permanently attached...

  17. 47 CFR 101.117 - Antenna polarization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna polarization. 101.117 Section 101.117... SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.117 Antenna polarization. Except as set forth herein, stations operating... polarization for antennas located within 20 kilometers of the outermost edge of their service area....

  18. 47 CFR 101.117 - Antenna polarization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna polarization. 101.117 Section 101.117... SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.117 Antenna polarization. Except as set forth herein, stations operating... polarization for antennas located within 20 kilometers of the outermost edge of their service area....

  19. 47 CFR 101.117 - Antenna polarization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna polarization. 101.117 Section 101.117... SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.117 Antenna polarization. Except as set forth herein, stations operating... polarization for antennas located within 20 kilometers of the outermost edge of their service area....

  20. 47 CFR 95.1213 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1213 Section 95.1213... SERVICES Medical Device Radiocommunication Service (MedRadio) § 95.1213 Antennas. Except for the 2390-2400 MHz band, no antenna for a MedRadio transmitter shall be configured for permanent outdoor use....

  1. 47 CFR 95.859 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antennas. 95.859 Section 95.859... SERVICES 218-219 MHz Service Technical Standards § 95.859 Antennas. (a) The overall height from ground to topmost tip of the CTS antenna shall not exceed the height necessary to assure adequate service....

  2. 47 CFR 78.105 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna systems. 78.105 Section 78.105... SERVICE Technical Regulations § 78.105 Antenna systems. (a) For fixed stations operating in the 12.7-13.2... directional antennas that meet the performance standards indicated in the following table. (i) Stations...

  3. 47 CFR 73.816 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antennas. 73.816 Section 73.816... Low Power FM Broadcast Stations (LPFM) § 73.816 Antennas. (a) Permittees and licensees may employ nondirectional antennas with horizontal only polarization, vertical only polarization, circular polarization...

  4. 47 CFR 95.859 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antennas. 95.859 Section 95.859... SERVICES 218-219 MHz Service Technical Standards § 95.859 Antennas. (a) The overall height from ground to topmost tip of the CTS antenna shall not exceed the height necessary to assure adequate service....

  5. 47 CFR 15.203 - Antenna requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna requirement. 15.203 Section 15.203... Antenna requirement. An intentional radiator shall be designed to ensure that no antenna other than that furnished by the responsible party shall be used with the device. The use of a permanently attached...

  6. 47 CFR 80.923 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.923 Section 80.923... MARITIME SERVICES Compulsory Radiotelephone Installations for Small Passenger Boats § 80.923 Antenna system. An antenna must be provided in accordance with the applicable requirements of § 80.81 of this...

  7. 47 CFR 78.105 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna systems. 78.105 Section 78.105... SERVICE Technical Regulations § 78.105 Antenna systems. (a) For fixed stations operating in the 12.7-13.2... directional antennas that meet the performance standards indicated in the following table. (i) Stations...

  8. Antenna Construction and Propagation of Radio Waves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    Developed as part of the Marine Corps Institute (MCI) correspondence training program, this course on antenna construction and propagation of radio waves is designed to provide communicators with instructions in the selection and/or construction of the proper antenna(s) for use with current field radio equipment. Introductory materials include…

  9. 47 CFR 80.967 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.967 Section 80.967... MARITIME SERVICES Radiotelephone Installation Required for Vessels on the Great Lakes § 80.967 Antenna system. The antenna must be omni-directional, vertically polarized and located as high as practicable...

  10. 47 CFR 80.967 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.967 Section 80.967... MARITIME SERVICES Radiotelephone Installation Required for Vessels on the Great Lakes § 80.967 Antenna system. The antenna must be omni-directional, vertically polarized and located as high as practicable...

  11. 47 CFR 80.923 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.923 Section 80.923... MARITIME SERVICES Compulsory Radiotelephone Installations for Small Passenger Boats § 80.923 Antenna system. An antenna must be provided in accordance with the applicable requirements of § 80.81 of this...

  12. 47 CFR 101.517 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antennas. 101.517 Section 101.517... SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.517 Antennas. (a) Transmitting antennas may be omnidirectional or directional, consistent with coverage and interference requirements....

  13. 47 CFR 78.105 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna systems. 78.105 Section 78.105... SERVICE Technical Regulations § 78.105 Antenna systems. (a) For fixed stations operating in the 12.7-13.2... directional antennas that meet the performance standards indicated in the following table. (i) Stations...

  14. 47 CFR 95.859 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antennas. 95.859 Section 95.859... SERVICES 218-219 MHz Service Technical Standards § 95.859 Antennas. (a) The overall height from ground to topmost tip of the CTS antenna shall not exceed the height necessary to assure adequate service....

  15. 47 CFR 101.117 - Antenna polarization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna polarization. 101.117 Section 101.117... SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.117 Antenna polarization. Except as set forth herein, stations operating... polarization for antennas located within 20 kilometers of the outermost edge of their service area....

  16. 47 CFR 101.115 - Directional antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Directional antennas. 101.115 Section 101.115... SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.115 Directional antennas. Link to an amendment published at 76 FR 59572... authorized under the rules of this part must employ a directional antenna adjusted with the center of...

  17. 47 CFR 95.859 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antennas. 95.859 Section 95.859... SERVICES 218-219 MHz Service Technical Standards § 95.859 Antennas. (a) The overall height from ground to topmost tip of the CTS antenna shall not exceed the height necessary to assure adequate service....

  18. Collapsible structure for an antenna reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trubert, M. R. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A collapsible support for an antenna reflector for use in supporting spacecraft antennas is described. The support has a regid base and a number of struts which are pivoted at the base. The deployment of the struts and their final configuration for supporting the antenna are illustrated.

  19. 47 CFR 73.69 - Antenna monitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... citations affecting § 73.69 see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna monitors. 73.69 Section 73.69... Broadcast Stations § 73.69 Antenna monitors. (a) Each station using a directional antenna must have...

  20. 47 CFR 73.69 - Antenna monitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna monitors. 73.69 Section 73.69 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.69 Antenna monitors. (a) Each station using a directional antenna must have in operation at the transmitter site...

  1. 47 CFR 73.69 - Antenna monitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... citations affecting § 73.69 see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna monitors. 73.69 Section 73.69... Broadcast Stations § 73.69 Antenna monitors. (a) Each station using a directional antenna must have...

  2. 47 CFR 73.69 - Antenna monitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... citations affecting § 73.69 see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna monitors. 73.69 Section 73.69... Broadcast Stations § 73.69 Antenna monitors. (a) Each station using a directional antenna must have...

  3. 47 CFR 73.69 - Antenna monitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna monitors. 73.69 Section 73.69 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.69 Antenna monitors. (a) Each station using a directional antenna must have in operation at the transmitter site...

  4. Advanced control technology for LSST antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Y. H.

    1981-01-01

    The control technology for the realization of large space system technology (LSST) antenna systems was identified and developed. Emphasis was directed at the control of LSST wrap-rib offset-feed antenna. The overall dynamic and control performance of offset-feed antenna was evaluated. Quantitative definitions of control problems were provided and control concepts for future development were identified.

  5. Inflatable antenna for earth observing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong-Jian; Guan, Fu-ling; Xu, Yan; Yi, Min

    2010-09-01

    This paper describe mechanical design, dynamic analysis, and deployment demonstration of the antenna , and the photogrammetry detecting RMS of inflatable antenna surface, the possible errors results form the measurement are also analysed. Ticra's Grasp software are used to predict the inflatable antenna pattern based on the coordinates of the 460 points on the parabolic surface, the final results verified the whole design process.

  6. Compact Dual-Mode Microwave Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, K. L.

    1982-01-01

    Compact dual-mode antenna, 3.66 cm wide by 1.83 cm thick is used both for heating and thermographic detection of tumors in cancer research. Temperature sensor operates independently or simultaneously with heater. Antenna includes 1.6-GHz transmitter and 4.76-GHz receiver. Strip heater between antennas controls temperature of device. Maximum power output is 25 W.

  7. Descriptions of Roseiarcus fermentans gen. nov., sp. nov., a bacteriochlorophyll a-containing fermentative bacterium related phylogenetically to alphaproteobacterial methanotrophs, and of the family Roseiarcaceae fam. nov.

    PubMed

    Kulichevskaya, Irina S; Danilova, Olga V; Tereshina, Vera M; Kevbrin, Vadim V; Dedysh, Svetlana N

    2014-08-01

    A light-pink-pigmented, microaerophilic bacterium was obtained from a methanotrophic consortium enriched from acidic Sphagnum peat and designated strain Pf56(T). Cells of this bacterium were Gram-negative, non-motile, thick curved rods that contained a vesicular intracytoplasmic membrane system characteristic of some purple non-sulfur alphaproteobacteria. The absorption spectrum of acetone/methanol extracts of cells grown in the light showed maxima at 363, 475, 505, 601 and 770 nm; the peaks at 363 and 770 nm are characteristic of bacteriochlorophyll a. However, in contrast to purple non-sulfur bacteria, strain Pf56(T) was unable to grow phototrophically under anoxic conditions in the light. Best growth occurred on some sugars and organic acids under micro-oxic conditions by means of fermentation. The fermentation products were propionate, acetate and hydrogen. Slow chemo-organotrophic growth was also observed under fully oxic conditions. Light stimulated growth. C1 substrates were not utilized. Strain Pf56(T) grew at pH 4.0-7.0 (optimum pH 5.5-6.5) and at 15-30 °C (optimum 22-28 °C). The major cellular fatty acids were 19 : 0 cyclo ω8c and 18 : 1ω7c; quinones were represented by ubiquinone Q-10. The G+C content of the DNA was 70.0 mol%. Strain Pf56 displays 93.6-94.7 and 92.7-93.7% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to members of the families Methylocystaceae and Beijerinckiaceae, respectively, and belongs to a large cluster of environmental sequences retrieved from various wetlands and forest soils in cultivation-independent studies. Phenotypic, genotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics of strain Pf56(T) suggest that it represents a novel genus and species of bacteriochlorophyll a-containing fermentative bacteria, for which the name Roseiarcus fermentans gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. Strain Pf56(T) ( = DSM 24875(T) = VKM B-2876(T)) is the type strain of Roseiarcus fermentans, and is also the first characterized member of a novel family

  8. The Antenna Bride and Bridegroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-03-01

    ALMA Achieves Major Milestone With Antenna-Link Success The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), an international telescope project, reached a major milestone on 2 March, when two 12-m ALMA prototype antennas were first linked together as an integrated system to observe an astronomical object. "This achievement results from the integration of many state-of-the-art components from Europe and North America and bodes well for the success of ALMA in Chile", said Catherine Cesarsky, ESO's Director General. ESO PR Photo 10/07 ESO PR Photo 10/07 The Prototype Antennas The milestone achievement, technically termed 'First Fringes', came at the ALMA Test Facility (ATF), located near Socorro in New Mexico. Faint radio waves emitted by the planet Saturn were collected by two ALMA prototype antennas, then processed by new, high-tech electronics to turn the two antennas into a single, high-resolution telescope system, called an interferometer. The planet's radio emissions at a frequency of 104 gigahertz were tracked by the ALMA system for more than an hour. Such pairs of antennas are the basic building blocks of the multi-antenna imaging system ALMA. In such a system, the signals recorded by each antenna are electronically combined with the signals of every other antenna to form a multitude of pairs. Each pair contributes unique information that is used to build a highly detailed image of the astronomical object under observation. When completed in the year 2012, ALMA will have 66 antennas. "Our congratulations go to the dedicated team of scientists, engineers and technicians who produced this groundbreaking achievement for ALMA. Much hard work and many long hours went into this effort, and we appreciate it all. This team should be very proud today," said NRAO Director Fred K.Y. Lo. "With this milestone behind us, we now can proceed with increased confidence toward completing ALMA," he added. ALMA, located at an elevation of 5,000m in the Atacama Desert of

  9. Antenna surface contour control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahl, Elvin L. (Inventor); Miller, James B. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The invention is a system for automatically controlling the surface contour of a deployable and restowable antenna having a mesh reflector surface supported by a circular, folding hoop affixed to a central, telescoping column. The antenna, when deployed, forms a quad-aperture reflector with each quadrant of the mesh surface shaped to provide an offset parabolic radio frequency (RF) reflector. The hoop is supported and positioned by quartz support cords attached to the top of a column and by lower graphite hoop control cords that extend between the hoop and base of the column. The antenna, an RF reflective surface, is a gold plated molybdenum wire mesh supported on a graphite cord truss structure that includes the hoop control cords and a plurality of surface control cords attached at selected points on the surface and to the base of the column. The contour of the three-dimensional surface of the antenna is controlled by selectively adjusting the lengths of the surface control cords and the graphite hoop control cords by means of novel actuator assemblies that automatically sense and change the lengths of the lower hoop control cords and surface control cords.

  10. Antenna radome sample test report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Leonard H.; Bratton, Thomas D.

    1991-01-01

    The antenna radome sample test conducted at the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Technical Center by the Secondary Surveillance Systems Branch, ACN-220 is documented. The test configuration consisted of the antenna radome sample centered between the Discrete Address Beacon System's (DABS) antenna and its remote Calibration Performance Monitor Equipment (CPME). The Range and Azimuth Accuracy (RAA) diagnostic program was used to determine changes in DABS performance. There were two test objectives. The first test objective was to determine if existing FAA en route radar antenna radomes would distort the signal characteristics detected by a beacon monopulse processor system. The second test objective was to determine whether this test configuration could be used to test radome samples supplied by prospective contractors in the en route radome replacement program. The RAA diagnostic program could not determine if the radome sample depicted changes in the DABS performance. It is recommended that this test procedure be abandoned due to inconclusive test results. The prospective radome manufacturers should provide the FAA with sufficient test data to confirm that it meets the requirements of the radome procurement specification.

  11. Photogrammetry Of A Parabolic Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrick, W. D.; Lansing, F. L.; Stoller, F. W.; Lobb, V. B.

    1988-01-01

    Surface measured with accuracy better than 10 to the negative fifth power times diameter. Report describes use of advanced close-range photogrammetry to determine deviations of 34-m-diameter antenna main reflector and subreflector from nominal paraboloidal shapes. Measurements enable removal of linear offsets and angular misalignments of subreflector, with consequent increase of 4 percent in aperture efficiency.

  12. Trislot-cavity microstrip antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Flush-mountable assembly composed of disk radiator sandwiched between planes of metal-clad dielectric board has greater bandwidths and beamwidths than simple disk antenna. Conducting planes connect so that disk is enclosed in cavity with Y-shaped slot in top plane. Cavity is excited by microwave energy from disk and radiates from trislot aperature.

  13. Benchmark simulations of ICRF antenna coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louche, F.; Lamalle, P. U.; Messiaen, A. M.; Van Compernolle, B.; Milanesio, D.; Maggiora, R.

    2007-09-01

    The paper reports on ongoing benchmark numerical simulations of antenna input impedance parameters in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies with different coupling codes: CST Microwave Studio, TOPICA and ANTITER 2. In particular we study the validity of the approximation of a magnetized plasma slab by a dielectric medium of suitably chosen permittivity. Different antenna models are considered: a single-strap antenna, a 4-strap antenna and the 24-strap ITER antenna array. Whilst the diagonal impedances are mostly in good agreement, some differences between the mutual terms predicted by Microwave Studio and TOPICA have yet to be resolved.

  14. Benchmark simulations of ICRF antenna coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Louche, F.; Lamalle, P. U.; Messiaen, A. M.; Compernolle, B. van; Milanesio, D.; Maggiora, R.

    2007-09-28

    The paper reports on ongoing benchmark numerical simulations of antenna input impedance parameters in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies with different coupling codes: CST Microwave Studio, TOPICA and ANTITER 2. In particular we study the validity of the approximation of a magnetized plasma slab by a dielectric medium of suitably chosen permittivity. Different antenna models are considered: a single-strap antenna, a 4-strap antenna and the 24-strap ITER antenna array. Whilst the diagonal impedances are mostly in good agreement, some differences between the mutual terms predicted by Microwave Studio and TOPICA have yet to be resolved.

  15. Measurement of Antenna Bore-Sight Gain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortinberry, Jarrod; Shumpert, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The absolute or free-field gain of a simple antenna can be approximated using standard antenna theory formulae or for a more accurate prediction, numerical methods may be employed to solve for antenna parameters including gain. Both of these methods will result in relatively reasonable estimates but in practice antenna gain is usually verified and documented via measurements and calibration. In this paper, a relatively simple and low-cost, yet effective means of determining the bore-sight free-field gain of a VHF/UHF antenna is proposed by using the Brewster angle relationship.

  16. Endfire tapered slot antennas on dielectric substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yngvesson, K. S.; Schaubert, D. H.; Korzeniowski, T. L.; Kollberg, E. L.; Thungren, T.

    1985-01-01

    Endfire-tapered slot antennas are suitable for many integrated circuit applications, imaging and phased arrays. An investigation of single elements of such antennas, including slots which are exponentially tapered (Vivaldi), linearly tapered, and constant width. For antennas of all types, a good general agreement is obtained for curves of beamwidth-versus-length, normalized to wavelength, when one compares the data with that for traveling-wave antennas published by Zucker (1961). An important condition for this agreement is that the effective dielectric thickness, defined in the text, is in a certain optimum range. This condition is qualitatively explained in terms of the theory for traveling-wave antennas.

  17. Endfire tapered slot antennas on dielectric substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yngvesson, K. S.; Schaubert, D. H.; Korzeniowski, T. L.; Kollberg, E. L.; Thungren, T.

    1985-12-01

    Endfire-tapered slot antennas are suitable for many integrated circuit applications, imaging and phased arrays. An investigation of single elements of such antennas, including slots which are exponentially tapered (Vivaldi), linearly tapered, and constant width. For antennas of all types, a good general agreement is obtained for curves of beamwidth-versus-length, normalized to wavelength, when one compares the data with that for traveling-wave antennas published by Zucker (1961). An important condition for this agreement is that the effective dielectric thickness, defined in the text, is in a certain optimum range. This condition is qualitatively explained in terms of the theory for traveling-wave antennas.

  18. The 34-meter antenna drive control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Detailed definitions of the baseline antenna drive and control/instrumentation equipment for 34 meter antennas included in Network Consolidation Program of the Deep Space Network are presented. The overall antenna control and monitor system and its interfaces with other higher level control and monitor equipment is described. Explicit descriptions of the antenna axis drive motors and motor controllers, the axis angle encoding systems, and miscellaneous antenna located components are presented, and related to system functional and performance requirements. Some potential alternates to the baseline system configuration are described and discussed.

  19. Photophoretic force on aggregate grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Lorin S.; Kimery, Jesse B.; Wurm, Gerhard; de Beule, Caroline; Kuepper, Markus; Hyde, Truell W.

    2016-01-01

    The photophoretic force may impact planetary formation by selectively moving solid particles based on their composition and structure. This generates collision velocities between grains of different sizes and sorts the dust in protoplanetary discs by composition. This numerical simulation studied the photophoretic force acting on fractal dust aggregates of μm-scale radii. Results show that aggregates tend to have greater photophoretic drift velocities than spheres of similar mass or radii, though with a greater spread in the velocity. While the drift velocities of compact aggregates continue to increase as the aggregates grow larger in size, fluffy aggregates have drift velocities which are relatively constant with size. Aggregates formed from an initially polydisperse size distribution of dust grains behave differently from aggregates formed from a monodisperse population, having smaller drift velocities with directions which deviate substantially from the direction of illumination. Results agree with microgravity experiments which show the difference of photophoretic forces with aggregation state.

  20. Design of broadband single polarized antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Phoo Kho; Aziz, Mohamad Zoinol Abidin Abd.; Ahmad, Badrul Hisham; Ramli, Mohamad Hafize Bin; Fauzi, Noor Azamiah Md; Malek, Mohd Fareq Abd

    2015-05-01

    In practical wireless communication application, bandwidth enhancement becomes one of the major design considerations. At the same time, circular polarized (CP) antenna received much attention for the applications of modern wireless communication system when compared to linear polarized (LP) antenna. This is because CP antenna can reduce the multipath effect. Hence, broadband antenna with operating frequency at 2.4GHz for WLAN application is proposed. The proposed antenna is done by using L-probe amendment with rectangular patch. The rectangular patch and copper ground plane is separated with 10mm air gap. This approach is used to enhance the bandwidth and the gain of the proposed antenna. The bandwidth of the designed antenna is more than 200MHz which meet broadband application. The return loss for the antenna is below -10dB to achieved 90% matching efficiency. The position of L-probe feed is altered in order to obtained different polarizations. The broadband antenna had been designed and simulated by using Computer Simulation Technology (CST) software. In this paper, the comparison for single polarized antenna with the design of non-inverted patch and inverted patch is discussed. The characteristics of the S-parameter, axial ratio, gain, surface current for each designed antenna are analyzed.

  1. Low profile antennas for MSAT applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafai, L.; Moheb, H.; Chamma, W.; Barakat, M.

    1995-01-01

    For MSAT applications, a number of different antennas have been designed and investigated. They include low gain omnidirectional antennas and medium gain to high gain directional antennas. The latter include both portable and vehicular antennas. While portable units are desirable to be low profile and low cost, the vehicular antennas have proved to be the most challenging antenna types for the mobile satellite application. The results of our efforts in design of such antennas are described briefly. Low profile designs are emphasized in most cases, and microstrip type radiators are therefore selected. The single radiator provides low gain omnidirectional patterns and is optimized for low cost applications. It provides low gains around 2-6 dBic and is useful mostly for the data transmission. Medium to high gain antennas are developed as arrays of omnidirectional elements. Again, different designs are optimized to meet the needs of different applications. For portable units, the array configuration can be flexible and is optimized for maximum broadside gains. For vehicular units, however the configurations are desirable to be low profile, or compact, and have means for scanning the antenna beam. For simplicity, fixed beam antennas with mechanical beam scan are selected. For these antennas, as well, different designs, having low profile or compact size, are selected and optimized to meet the MSAT gain and G/T requirements.

  2. Distortion of conformal antennas on aircraft structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schippers, Harmen; van Tongeren, Hans; Verpoorte, Jaco; Vos, Guus

    2001-08-01

    Conformal antennas on aircraft allow the use of non-conventional antenna locations such as the skin of the aircraft. However, when antennas are installed at these locations they are subject to steady and unsteady aerodynamic loads. The inertial forces and these aerodynamic loads will cause deformations and vibrations of the total antenna surface. The effect of these distortions on antenna performance will be most significant on highly directional antennas. The aim of the present paper is to describe technology development for estimating the effects of surface distortion on antenna performance. The technology is applied to a Side-Looking Airborne Radar (SLAR) antenna on a reconnaissance pod mounted on a fighter type aircraft. This generic SLAR antenna is a phased array antenna covering two faces of the pod: one part on the vertical side face and one part on the lower face of the pod. Radiation patterns are computed for distorted antenna surfaces. The computational model for the determination of the disturbed radiation pattern is based on geometrical parameterisation of the Stratton-Chu integral equations.

  3. Low Cost Large Space Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chmielewski, Artur B.; Freeland, Robert

    1997-01-01

    The mobile communication community could significantly benefit from the availability of low-cost, large space-deployable antennas. A new class of space structures, called inflatable deployable structures, will become an option for this industry in the near future. This new technology recently made significant progress with respect to reducing the risk of flying large inflatable structures in space. This progress can be attributed to the successful space flight of the Inflatable Antenna Experiment in May of 1996, which prompted the initiation of the NASA portion of the joint NASA/DOD coordinated Space Inflatables Program, which will develop the technology to be used in future mobile communications antennas along with other users. The NASA/DOD coordinated Space Inflatables Program was initiated in 1997 as a direct result of the Inflatable Antenna Experiment. The program adds a new NASA initiative to a substantial DOD program that involves developing a series of ground test hardware, starting with 3 meter diameter units and advancing the manufacturing techniques to fabricate a 25 meter ground demonstrator unit with surface accuracy exceeding the requirements for mobile communication applications. Simultaneously, the program will be advancing the state of the art in several important inflatable technology areas, such as developing rigidizable materials for struts and tori and investigating thin film technology issues, such as application of coatings, property measurement and materials processing and assembly techniques. A very important technology area being addressed by the program is deployment control techniques. The program will sponsor activities that will lead to understanding the effects of material strain energy release, residual air in the stowed structure, and the design of the launch restraint and release system needed to control deployment dynamics. Other technology areas directly applicable to developing inflatable mobile communication antennas in the near

  4. Non-Gimbaled Antenna Pointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vigil, Jeannine S.

    1997-01-01

    The small satellite community has been interested in accessing fixed ground stations for means of space-to-ground transmissions, although a problem arises from the limited global coverage. There is a growing interest for using the Space Network (SN) or Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS) as the primary support for communications because of the coverage it provides. This thesis will address the potential for satellite access of the Space Network with a non-gimbaled antenna configuration and low-power, coded transmission. The non-gimbaled antenna and the TDRS satellites, TDRS-East, TDRS-West, and TDRS-Zone of Exclusion, were configured in an orbital analysis software package called Satellite Tool Kit to emulate the three-dimensional position of the satellites. The access potential, which is the average number of contacts per day and the average time per contact, were obtained through simulations run over a 30-day period to gain all the possible orientations. The orbital altitude was varied from 600 km through 1200 km with the results being a function of orbital inclination angles varying from 20 deg through 100 deg and pointing half-angles of I0 deg through 40 deg. To compare the validity of the simulations, Jet Propulsion Laboratory granted the use of the TOPEX satellite. The TOPEX satellite was configured to emulate a spin-stabilized antenna with its communications antenna stowed in the zenith-pointing direction. This mimicked the antenna pointing spin-stabilized satellite in the simulations. To make valid comparisons, the TOPEX orbital parameters were entered into Satellite Tool Kit and simulated over five test times provided by Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  5. Land vehicle antennas for satellite mobile communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, H. A.; Paschen, D.; Pieper, B. V.

    1985-01-01

    Antenna designs applicable to future satellite mobile vehicle communications are examined. Microstrip disk, quadrifilar helix, cylindrical microstrip, and inverted V and U crossed-dipole low gain antennas (3-5 dBic) that provide omnidirectional coverage are described. Diagrams of medium gain antenna (9-12 dBic) concepts are presented; the antennas are classified into three types: (1) electronically steered with digital phase shifters; (2) electronically switched with switchable power divider/combiner; and (3) mechanically steered with motor. The operating characteristics of a conformal antenna with electronic beam steering and a nonconformal design with mechanical steering are evaluated with respect to isolation levels in a multiple satellite system. Vehicle antenna pointing systems and antenna system costs are investigated.

  6. The Radarsat SAR multi-beam antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins-Camelo, L.; Cooper, R. T.; Zimcik, D. G.

    1984-10-01

    Radarsat, the Canadian radar imaging satellite, will have a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) antenna as one of its sensors. The requirements on the performance of the SAR antenna are such as to make it a complex system. Radarsat is required to have some unique characteristics which present some new challenges to the antenna designers. The requirements for switchability among 4 shaped beams and high power of transmit operation are major design constraints which strongly impact on the antenna complexity, weight, and cost. A trade-off study was carried out to select the preferred antenna type for the Radarsat SAR function. The antenna types analyzed were planar-array and array-fed reflector. A set of comparison criteria was developed. The antenna concepts studied were then compared against these criteria, and a final decision was reached.

  7. Integrated broadband bowtie antenna on transparent substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xingyu; Wang, Shiyi; Subbaraman, Harish; Zhan, Qiwen; Pan, Zeyu; Chung, Chi-jui; Yan, Hai; Chen, Ray T.

    2015-03-01

    The bowtie antenna is a topic of growing interest in recent years. In this paper, we design, fabricate, and characterize a modified gold bowtie antenna integrated on a transparent glass substrate. We numerically investigate the antenna characteristics, specifically its resonant frequency and enhancement factor. We simulate the dependence of resonance frequency on bowtie geometry, and verify the simulation results through experimental investigation, by fabricating different sets of bowtie antennas on glass substrates utilizing CMOS compatible processes and measuring their resonance frequencies. Our designed bowtie antenna provides a strong broadband electric field enhancement in its feed gap. The far-field radiation pattern of the bowtie antenna is measured, and it shows dipole-like characteristics with large beam width. Such a broadband antenna will be useful for a myriad of applications, ranging from wireless communications to electromagnetic wave detection.

  8. A phased array tracking antenna for vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohmori, Shingo; Mano, Kazukiko; Tanaka, Kenji; Matsunaga, Makoto; Tsuchiya, Makio

    1990-01-01

    An antenna system including antenna elements and a satellite tracking method is considered a key technology in implementing land mobile satellite communications. In the early stage of land mobile satellite communications, a mechanical tracking antenna system is considered the best candidate for vehicles, however, a phased array antenna will replace it in the near future, because it has many attractive advantages such as a low and compact profile, high speed tracking, and potential low cost. Communications Research Laboratory is now developing a new phased array antenna system for land vehicles based on research experiences of the airborne phased array antenna, which was developed and evaluated in satellite communication experiments using the ETS-V satellite. The basic characteristics of the phased array antenna for land vehicles are described.

  9. Foldable nanopaper antennas for origami electronics.

    PubMed

    Nogi, Masaya; Komoda, Natsuki; Otsuka, Kanji; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2013-05-21

    Foldable antennas are required for small-sized electronic devices with high portability. Antennas on plastic substrates provide high flexibility and high sensitivity but are not foldable. Antennas on paper substrates are foldable, but their sensitivity is poor because of their coarse surfaces. In this paper, nanopapers with smooth surfaces and high foldability are fabricated from 30 nm wide cellulose nanofibers for use as foldable antenna substrates. Silver nanowires are then printed on the nanopapers to act as antenna lines. These nanopaper antennas with silver nanowires exhibit high sensitivity because of their smooth surfaces and high foldability because of their network structures. Also, their high foldability allows the mechanical tuning of their resonance points over a wide frequency range without using additional components such as condensers and coils. Nanopaper antennas with silver nanowires are therefore suitable for the realization of future foldable electronics. PMID:23575553

  10. Characterization of the chlorosome antenna of the filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium Chloronema sp. strain UdG9001.

    PubMed

    Gich, Frederic; Airs, Ruth L; Danielsen, Marianne; Keely, Brendan J; Abella, Carles A; Garcia-Gil, Jesús; Miller, Mette; Borrego, Carles M

    2003-12-01

    The absorption and fluorescence properties of chlorosomes of the filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium Chloronema sp. strain UdG9001 were analyzed. The chlorosome antenna of Chloronema consists of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) d and BChl c together with gamma-carotene as the main carotenoid. HPLC analysis combined with APCI LC-MS/MS showed that the chlorosomal BChls comprise a highly diverse array of homologues that differ in both the degree of alkylation of the macrocycle at C-8 and/or C-12 and the alcohol moiety esterified to the propionic acid group at C-17. BChl c and BChl d from Chloronema were mainly esterified with geranylgeraniol (33% of the total), heptadecanol (24%), octadecenol (19%), octadecanol (14%), and hexadecenol (9%). Despite this pigment heterogeneity, fluorescence emission of the chlorosomes showed a single peak centered at 765 nm upon excitation at wavelengths ranging from 710 to 740 nm. This single emission, assigned to BChl c, indicates an energy transfer from BChl d to BChl c within the same chlorosome. Likewise, incubation of chlorosomes under reducing conditions caused a weak increase in fluorescence emission, which indicates a small redox-dependent fluorescence. Finally, protein analysis of Chloronema chlorosomes using SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF-MS revealed the presence of a chlorosomal polypeptide with a molecular mass of 5.7 kDa, resembling the CsmA protein found in Chloroflexus aurantiacus and Chlorobium tepidum chlorosomes. Several minor polypeptides were also detected but not identified. These results indicate that, compared with other members of filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria and green sulfur bacteria, Chloronema possesses an antenna system with novel features that may be of interest for further investigations. PMID:14610639

  11. Proteins aggregation and human diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chin-Kun

    2015-04-01

    Many human diseases and the death of most supercentenarians are related to protein aggregation. Neurodegenerative diseases include Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), frontotemporallobar degeneration, etc. Such diseases are due to progressive loss of structure or function of neurons caused by protein aggregation. For example, AD is considered to be related to aggregation of Aβ40 (peptide with 40 amino acids) and Aβ42 (peptide with 42 amino acids) and HD is considered to be related to aggregation of polyQ (polyglutamine) peptides. In this paper, we briefly review our recent discovery of key factors for protein aggregation. We used a lattice model to study the aggregation rates of proteins and found that the probability for a protein sequence to appear in the conformation of the aggregated state can be used to determine the temperature at which proteins can aggregate most quickly. We used molecular dynamics and simple models of polymer chains to study relaxation and aggregation of proteins under various conditions and found that when the bending-angle dependent and torsion-angle dependent interactions are zero or very small, then protein chains tend to aggregate at lower temperatures. All atom models were used to identify a key peptide chain for the aggregation of insulin chains and to find that two polyQ chains prefer anti-parallel conformation. It is pointed out that in many cases, protein aggregation does not result from protein mis-folding. A potential drug from Chinese medicine was found for Alzheimer's disease.

  12. Full scale LANDSAT-D antenna pattern measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The design verification of the LANDSAT-D antenna subsystem is addressed. In particular, the analysis of the antenna radiation patterns utilizing a full scale mockup of the LANDSAT-D satellite is discussed. Test antennas included two S-Band shaped beam antennas, two S-Band omni unit radiators (to operate in array), a GPS antenna, an X-Band shaped beam antenna, and one S-Band high-gain parabolic antenna.

  13. WST11, a novel water-soluble bacteriochlorophyll derivative; cellular uptake, pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and vascular-targeted photodynamic activity using melanoma tumors as a model.

    PubMed

    Mazor, Ohad; Brandis, Alexander; Plaks, Vicki; Neumark, Eran; Rosenbach-Belkin, Varda; Salomon, Yoram; Scherz, Avigdor

    2005-01-01

    WST11 is a novel negatively charged water-soluble palladium-bacteriochlorophyll derivative that was developed for vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy (VTP) in our laboratory. The in vitro results suggest that WST11 cellular uptake, clearance and phototoxicity are mediated by serum albumin trafficking. In vivo, WST11 was found to clear rapidly from the circulation (t1/2=1.65 min) after intravenous bolus injection in the mouse, whereas a longer clearance time (t1/2=7.5 min) was noted in rats after 20 min of infusion. The biodistribution of WST11 in mouse tissues indicates hepatic clearance (t1/2=20 min), with minor (kidney, lung and spleen) or no intermediary accumulation in other tissues. As soon as 1 h after injection, WST11 had nearly cleared from the body of the mouse, except for a temporal accumulation in the lungs from which it cleared within 40 min. On the basis of these results, we set the VTP protocol for a short illumination period (5 min), delivered immediately after WST11 injection. On subjecting M2R melanoma xenografts to WST11-VTP, we achieved 100% tumor flattening at all doses and a 70% cure with 9 mg/kg and a light exposure dose of 100 mW/cm2. These results provide direct evidence that WST11 is an effective agent for VTP and provide guidelines for further development of new candidates. PMID:15623318

  14. Complete genome sequence of the bacteriochlorophyll a-containing Roseibacterium elongatum type strain (DSM 19469(T)), a representative of the Roseobacter group isolated from Australian coast sand.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Thomas; Fiebig, Anne; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2014-06-15

    Roseibacterium elongatum Suzuki et al. 2006 is a pink-pigmented and bacteriochlorophyll a-producing representative of the Roseobacter group within the alphaproteobacterial family Rhodobacteraceae. Representatives of the marine 'Roseobacter group' were found to be abundant in the ocean and play an important role in global and biogeochemical processes. In the present study we describe the features of R. elongatum strain OCh 323(T) together with its genome sequence and annotation. The 3,555,102 bp long genome consists of one circular chromosome with no extrachromosomal elements and is one of the smallest known Roseobacter genomes. It contains 3,540 protein-coding genes and 59 RNA genes. Genome analysis revealed the presence of a photosynthetic gene cluster, which putatively enables a photoheterotrophic lifestyle. Gene sequences associated with quorum sensing, motility, surface attachment, and thiosulfate and carbon monoxide oxidation could be detected. The genome was sequenced as part of the activities of the Transregional Collaborative Research Centre 51 (TRR51) funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). PMID:25197467

  15. Complete genome sequence of the bacteriochlorophyll a-containing Roseibacterium elongatum type strain (DSM 19469T), a representative of the Roseobacter group isolated from Australian coast sand

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Thomas; Fiebig, Anne; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Roseibacterium elongatum Suzuki et al. 2006 is a pink-pigmented and bacteriochlorophyll a-producing representative of the Roseobacter group within the alphaproteobacterial family Rhodobacteraceae. Representatives of the marine ‘Roseobacter group’ were found to be abundant in the ocean and play an important role in global and biogeochemical processes. In the present study we describe the features of R. elongatum strain OCh 323T together with its genome sequence and annotation. The 3,555,102 bp long genome consists of one circular chromosome with no extrachromosomal elements and is one of the smallest known Roseobacter genomes. It contains 3,540 protein-coding genes and 59 RNA genes. Genome analysis revealed the presence of a photosynthetic gene cluster, which putatively enables a photoheterotrophic lifestyle. Gene sequences associated with quorum sensing, motility, surface attachment, and thiosulfate and carbon monoxide oxidation could be detected. The genome was sequenced as part of the activities of the Transregional Collaborative Research Centre 51 (TRR51) funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). PMID:25197467

  16. Genome sequence of the Roseovarius mucosus type strain (DSM 17069T), a bacteriochlorophyll a-containing representative of the marine Roseobacter group isolated from the dinoflagellate Alexandrium ostenfeldii

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Roseovarius mucosus Biebl et al. 2005 is a bacteriochlorophyll a-producing representative of the marine Roseobacter group within the alphaproteobacterial family Rhodobacteraceae, which was isolated from the dinoflagellate Alexandrium ostenfeldii. The marine Roseobacter group was found to be abundant in the ocean and plays an important role for global and biogeochemical processes. Here we describe the features of the R. mucosus strain DFL-24T together with its genome sequence and annotation generated from a culture of DSM 17069T. The 4,247,724 bp containing genome sequence encodes 4,194 protein-coding genes and 57 RNA genes. In addition to the presence of four plasmids, genome analysis revealed the presence of genes associated with host colonization, DMSP utilization, cytotoxins, and quorum sensing that could play a role in the interrelationship of R. mucosus with the dinoflagellate A. ostenfeldii and other marine organisms. Furthermore, the genome encodes genes associated with mixotrophic growth, where both reduced inorganic compounds for lithotrophic growth and a photoheterotrophic lifestyle using light as additional energy source could be used. PMID:26203330

  17. Ultra-broadband 2D electronic spectroscopy of carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll interactions in the LH1 complex of a purple bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiuri, Margherita; Réhault, Julien; Carey, Anne-Marie; Hacking, Kirsty; Garavelli, Marco; Lüer, Larry; Polli, Dario; Cogdell, Richard J.; Cerullo, Giulio

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the excitation energy transfer (EET) pathways in the photosynthetic light harvesting 1 (LH1) complex of purple bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum with ultra-broadband two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). We employ a 2DES apparatus in the partially collinear geometry, using a passive birefringent interferometer to generate the phase-locked pump pulse pair. This scheme easily lends itself to two-color operation, by coupling a sub-10 fs visible pulse with a sub-15-fs near-infrared pulse. This unique pulse combination allows us to simultaneously track with extremely high temporal resolution both the dynamics of the photoexcited carotenoid spirilloxanthin (Spx) in the visible range and the EET between the Spx and the B890 bacterio-chlorophyll (BChl), whose Qx and Qy transitions peak at 585 and 881 nm, respectively, in the near-infrared. Global analysis of the one-color and two-color 2DES maps unravels different relaxation mechanisms in the LH1 complex: (i) the initial events of the internal conversion process within the Spx, (ii) the parallel EET from the first bright state S2 of the Spx towards the Qx state of the B890, and (iii) the internal conversion from Qx to Qy within the B890.

  18. Ultra-broadband 2D electronic spectroscopy of carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll interactions in the LH1 complex of a purple bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Maiuri, Margherita; Réhault, Julien; Polli, Dario; Cerullo, Giulio; Carey, Anne-Marie; Hacking, Kirsty; Cogdell, Richard J.; Garavelli, Marco; Lüer, Larry

    2015-06-07

    We investigate the excitation energy transfer (EET) pathways in the photosynthetic light harvesting 1 (LH1) complex of purple bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum with ultra-broadband two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). We employ a 2DES apparatus in the partially collinear geometry, using a passive birefringent interferometer to generate the phase-locked pump pulse pair. This scheme easily lends itself to two-color operation, by coupling a sub-10 fs visible pulse with a sub-15-fs near-infrared pulse. This unique pulse combination allows us to simultaneously track with extremely high temporal resolution both the dynamics of the photoexcited carotenoid spirilloxanthin (Spx) in the visible range and the EET between the Spx and the B890 bacterio-chlorophyll (BChl), whose Q{sub x} and Q{sub y} transitions peak at 585 and 881 nm, respectively, in the near-infrared. Global analysis of the one-color and two-color 2DES maps unravels different relaxation mechanisms in the LH1 complex: (i) the initial events of the internal conversion process within the Spx, (ii) the parallel EET from the first bright state S{sub 2} of the Spx towards the Q{sub x} state of the B890, and (iii) the internal conversion from Q{sub x} to Q{sub y} within the B890.

  19. Ultra-broadband 2D electronic spectroscopy of carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll interactions in the LH1 complex of a purple bacterium.

    PubMed

    Maiuri, Margherita; Réhault, Julien; Carey, Anne-Marie; Hacking, Kirsty; Garavelli, Marco; Lüer, Larry; Polli, Dario; Cogdell, Richard J; Cerullo, Giulio

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the excitation energy transfer (EET) pathways in the photosynthetic light harvesting 1 (LH1) complex of purple bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum with ultra-broadband two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). We employ a 2DES apparatus in the partially collinear geometry, using a passive birefringent interferometer to generate the phase-locked pump pulse pair. This scheme easily lends itself to two-color operation, by coupling a sub-10 fs visible pulse with a sub-15-fs near-infrared pulse. This unique pulse combination allows us to simultaneously track with extremely high temporal resolution both the dynamics of the photoexcited carotenoid spirilloxanthin (Spx) in the visible range and the EET between the Spx and the B890 bacterio-chlorophyll (BChl), whose Qx and Qy transitions peak at 585 and 881 nm, respectively, in the near-infrared. Global analysis of the one-color and two-color 2DES maps unravels different relaxation mechanisms in the LH1 complex: (i) the initial events of the internal conversion process within the Spx, (ii) the parallel EET from the first bright state S2 of the Spx towards the Qx state of the B890, and (iii) the internal conversion from Qx to Qy within the B890. PMID:26049453

  20. Direct observation of sub-picosecond equilibration of excitation energy in the light-harvesting antenna of Rhodospirillum rubrum.

    PubMed Central

    Visser, H M; Somsen, O J; van Mourik, F; Lin, S; van Stokkum, I H; van Grondelle, R

    1995-01-01

    Excitation energy transfer in the light-harvesting antenna of Rhodospirillum rubrum was studied at room temperature using sub-picosecond transient absorption measurements. Upon excitation of Rs. rubrum membranes with a 200 fs, 600 nm laser flash in the Qx transition of the bacteriochlorophyll-a (BChl-a) absorption, the induced transient absorption changes in the Qy region were monitored. In Rs. rubrum membranes the observed delta OD spectrum exhibits ground state bleaching, excited state absorption and stimulated emission. Fast Qx --> Qy relaxation occurs in approximately 100-200 fs as reflected by the building up of stimulated emission. An important observation is that the zero-crossing of the transient difference absorption (delta OD) spectrum exhibits a dynamic redshift from 863 to 875 nm that can be described with by a single exponential with 325 fs time constant. The shape of the transient difference spectrum observed in a purified subunit of the core light-harvesting antenna, B820, consisting of only a single interacting pair of BChl-as, is similar to the spectrum observed in Rs. rubrum membranes and clearly different from the spectrum of BChl-a in a protein/detergent mixture. In the B820 and monomeric BChl-a preparations the 100-200 fs Qx --> Qy relaxation is still observed, but the dynamic redshift of the delta OD spectrum is absent. The spectral kinetics observed in the Rs. rubrum membranes are interpreted in terms of the dynamics of excitation equilibration among the antenna subunits that constitute the inhomogeneously broadened antenna. A simulation of this process using a set of reasonable physical parameters is consistent with an average hopping time in the core light harvesting of 220-270 fs, resulting in an average single-site excitation lifetime of 50-70 fs. The observed rate of this equilibration process is in reasonable agreement with earlier estimations for the hopping time from more indirect measurements. The implications of the findings for the

  1. Direct observation of sub-picosecond equilibration of excitation energy in the light-harvesting antenna of Rhodospirillum rubrum.

    PubMed

    Visser, H M; Somsen, O J; van Mourik, F; Lin, S; van Stokkum, I H; van Grondelle, R

    1995-09-01

    Excitation energy transfer in the light-harvesting antenna of Rhodospirillum rubrum was studied at room temperature using sub-picosecond transient absorption measurements. Upon excitation of Rs. rubrum membranes with a 200 fs, 600 nm laser flash in the Qx transition of the bacteriochlorophyll-a (BChl-a) absorption, the induced transient absorption changes in the Qy region were monitored. In Rs. rubrum membranes the observed delta OD spectrum exhibits ground state bleaching, excited state absorption and stimulated emission. Fast Qx --> Qy relaxation occurs in approximately 100-200 fs as reflected by the building up of stimulated emission. An important observation is that the zero-crossing of the transient difference absorption (delta OD) spectrum exhibits a dynamic redshift from 863 to 875 nm that can be described with by a single exponential with 325 fs time constant. The shape of the transient difference spectrum observed in a purified subunit of the core light-harvesting antenna, B820, consisting of only a single interacting pair of BChl-as, is similar to the spectrum observed in Rs. rubrum membranes and clearly different from the spectrum of BChl-a in a protein/detergent mixture. In the B820 and monomeric BChl-a preparations the 100-200 fs Qx --> Qy relaxation is still observed, but the dynamic redshift of the delta OD spectrum is absent. The spectral kinetics observed in the Rs. rubrum membranes are interpreted in terms of the dynamics of excitation equilibration among the antenna subunits that constitute the inhomogeneously broadened antenna. A simulation of this process using a set of reasonable physical parameters is consistent with an average hopping time in the core light harvesting of 220-270 fs, resulting in an average single-site excitation lifetime of 50-70 fs. The observed rate of this equilibration process is in reasonable agreement with earlier estimations for the hopping time from more indirect measurements. The implications of the findings for the

  2. Antenna design and characterization based on the elementary antenna concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligthart, L. P.

    An antenna-design technique based on an elementary-antenna model (an infinitesimal pillbox structure carrying electric and magnetic currents and containing propagating TEM fields) is developed and demonstrated. An EM description of a waveguide aperture is obtained by applying approximate boundary conditions at specific points; the transmitted field is developed locally into a set of TEM field components to compute the radiation pattern; and aperture matching is achieved by calculating the aperture reflection as well. Parallel-plate, circular, and rectangular waveguides; two single-polarization TEM waveguide radiators (with and without dielectric filling); a dielectric-filled dual-polarization TE(01) waveguide radiator; and a hybrid reflector array with limited beam switching based on the TE(01) radiator are presented.

  3. Dynamics of fire ant aggregations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennenbaum, Michael; Hu, David; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    Fire ant aggregations are an inherently active system. Each ant harvests its own energy and can convert it into motion. The motion of individual ants contributes non-trivially to the bulk material properties of the aggregation. We have measured some of these properties using plate-plate rheology, where the response to an applied external force or deformation is measured. In this talk, we will present data pertaining to the aggregation behavior in the absence of any external force. We quantify the aggregation dynamics by monitoring the rotation of the top plate and by measuring the normal force. We then compare the results with visualizations of 2D aggregations.

  4. Antenna impedance measurements in a magnetized plasma. II. Dipole antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, David D.; Walker, David N.; Messer, Sarah J.; Amatucci, William E.

    2007-09-15

    This paper presents experimental impedance measurements of a dipole antenna immersed in a magnetized plasma. The impedance was derived from the magnitude and phase of the reflected power using a network analyzer over a frequency range of 1 MHz-1 GHz. The plasma density was varied between 10{sup 7} and 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3} in weakly ({omega}{sub ce}<{omega}{sub pe}) and strongly ({omega}{sub ce}>{omega}{sub pe}) magnetized plasmas in the Space Physics Simulation Chamber at the Naval Research Laboratory. Over this range of plasma conditions the wavelength in the plasma varies from the short dipole limit ({lambda}>>L) to the long dipole limit ({lambda}{approx}L). As with previous impedance measurements, there are two resonant frequencies observed as frequencies where the impedance of the antenna is real. Measurements have indicated that in the short dipole limit the majority of the power deposition takes place at the lower resonance frequency which lies between the cyclotron frequency and the upper hybrid frequency. These measured curves agree very well with the analytic theory for a short dipole in a magnetoplasma. In the long dipole regime, in addition to the short dipole effects still being present, there is resonant energy deposition which peaks at much higher frequencies and correlates to 1/2 and 3/2 wavelength dipole resonances. The wavelengths in the plasma predicted by these resonances are consistent with the antenna radiating R and L-waves.

  5. Hexagonal and Pentagonal Fractal Multiband Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Philip W.; Wahid, Parveen

    2005-01-01

    Multiband dipole antennas based on hexagonal and pentagonal fractals have been analyzed by computational simulations and functionally demonstrated in experiments on prototypes. These antennas are capable of multiband or wide-band operation because they are subdivided into progressively smaller substructures that resonate at progressively higher frequencies by virtue of their smaller dimensions. The novelty of the present antennas lies in their specific hexagonal and pentagonal fractal configurations and the resonant frequencies associated with them. These antennas are potentially applicable to a variety of multiband and wide-band commercial wireless-communication products operating at different frequencies, including personal digital assistants, cellular telephones, pagers, satellite radios, Global Positioning System receivers, and products that combine two or more of the aforementioned functions. Perhaps the best-known prior multiband antenna based on fractal geometry is the Sierpinski triangle antenna (also known as the Sierpinski gasket), shown in the top part of the figure. In this antenna, the scale length at each iteration of the fractal is half the scale length of the preceding iteration, yielding successive resonant frequencies related by a ratio of about 2. The middle and bottom parts of the figure depict the first three iterations of the hexagonal and pentagonal fractals along with typical dipole-antenna configuration based on the second iteration. Successive resonant frequencies of the hexagonal fractal antenna have been found to be related by a ratio of about 3, and those of the pentagonal fractal antenna by a ratio of about 2.59.

  6. Negative ion source with external RF antenna

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Hahto, Sami K.; Hahto, Sari T.

    2007-02-13

    A radio frequency (RF) driven plasma ion source has an external RF antenna, i.e. the RF antenna is positioned outside the plasma generating chamber rather than inside. The RF antenna is typically formed of a small diameter metal tube coated with an insulator. An external RF antenna assembly is used to mount the external RF antenna to the ion source. The RF antenna tubing is wound around the external RF antenna assembly to form a coil. The external RF antenna assembly is formed of a material, e.g. quartz, which is essentially transparent to the RF waves. The external RF antenna assembly is attached to and forms a part of the plasma source chamber so that the RF waves emitted by the RF antenna enter into the inside of the plasma chamber and ionize a gas contained therein. The plasma ion source is typically a multi-cusp ion source. A converter can be included in the ion source to produce negative ions.

  7. Transparent antennas for solar cell integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Tursunjan

    Transparent patch antennas are microstrip patch antennas that have a certain level of optical transparency. Highly transparent patch antennas are potentially suitable for integration with solar panels of small satellites, which are becoming increasingly important in space exploration. Traditional patch antennas employed on small satellites compete with solar cells for surface area. However, a transparent patch antenna can be placed directly on top of solar cells and resolve the issue of competing for limited surface real estate. For such an integration, a high optical transparency of the patch antenna is required from the solar cells' point of view. On the other hand, the antenna should possess at least acceptable radiation properties at the same time. This dissertation focuses on some of the most important concerns from the perspective of small satellite applications. For example, an optimization method to simultaneously improve both optical transparency and radiation efficiency of the antenna is studied. Active integrated antenna design method is extended to meshed patch applications in an attempt to improve the overall power efficiency of the front end communication subsystem. As is well known, circular polarization is immune from Faraday rotation effect in the ionosphere and thus can avoid a 3-dB loss in geo-satellite communication. Therefore, this research also aims to present design methods for circularly polarized meshed patch antennas. Moreover, a meshed patch antenna capable of supporting a high communication data rate is investigated. Lastly, other types of transparent patch antennas are also analyzed and compared to meshed patches. In summary, many properties of transparent patch antennas are examined in order to meet different design requirements.

  8. Wideband Patch Antenna for Land based Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangwar, R. P. S.; Dutt, Sanjay

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, an irregular pentagon shaped patch antenna has been presented. The proposed antenna operates over a wide band in frequency range from 12 to 26 GHz with VSWR < 2. It has a partial ground plane with two-inverted L and one I shaped slots in the radiation patch to attain wide bandwidth. The antenna consists of FR4 epoxy as a dielectric substrate with dielectric constant 4.4 and loss tangent 0.002. The size of the antenna is 30 × 30 × 1.57 mm3 and is fed by the microstrip line. The size of the fabricated proposed antenna is smaller than that of the antenna under reference (elliptical radiating patch with defected ground plane). The simulation has been done using high frequency structure simulator (HFSS) which is a finite element method (FEM) based tool. The proposed antenna exhibits the return loss of 21.85, 28.03 and 29.14 dB and gain of 6.6, 5.67 and 7.0 dB at resonant frequencies 16.7, 19.00 and 21.4 GHz, respectively. The bandwidth of the antenna is 10 GHz with normalized radiation efficiencies of 65, 69 and 70 % at corresponding resonant frequencies. The measured results of the fabricated proposed antenna have been compared with the simulated results and there has been a close agreement between both the results. Also the simulated results of the proposed antenna have been compared with the antenna under reference and it is found that the performance of the proposed antenna is far better. The proposed antenna can be used for land based vehicles in both Ku-band (12-18 GHz) and K-band (18-26 GHz).

  9. Automated Antenna Design with Evolutionary Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linden, Derek; Hornby, Greg; Lohn, Jason; Globus, Al; Krishunkumor, K.

    2006-01-01

    Current methods of designing and optimizing antennas by hand are time and labor intensive, and limit complexity. Evolutionary design techniques can overcome these limitations by searching the design space and automatically finding effective solutions. In recent years, evolutionary algorithms have shown great promise in finding practical solutions in large, poorly understood design spaces. In particular, spacecraft antenna design has proven tractable to evolutionary design techniques. Researchers have been investigating evolutionary antenna design and optimization since the early 1990s, and the field has grown in recent years as computer speed has increased and electromagnetic simulators have improved. Two requirements-compliant antennas, one for ST5 and another for TDRS-C, have been automatically designed by evolutionary algorithms. The ST5 antenna is slated to fly this year, and a TDRS-C phased array element has been fabricated and tested. Such automated evolutionary design is enabled by medium-to-high quality simulators and fast modern computers to evaluate computer-generated designs. Evolutionary algorithms automate cut-and-try engineering, substituting automated search though millions of potential designs for intelligent search by engineers through a much smaller number of designs. For evolutionary design, the engineer chooses the evolutionary technique, parameters and the basic form of the antenna, e.g., single wire for ST5 and crossed-element Yagi for TDRS-C. Evolutionary algorithms then search for optimal configurations in the space defined by the engineer. NASA's Space Technology 5 (ST5) mission will launch three small spacecraft to test innovative concepts and technologies. Advanced evolutionary algorithms were used to automatically design antennas for ST5. The combination of wide beamwidth for a circularly-polarized wave and wide impedance bandwidth made for a challenging antenna design problem. From past experience in designing wire antennas, we chose to

  10. Research on MLS airborne antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, C. L.; Burnside, W. D.

    1976-01-01

    Numerical solutions for the radiation patterns of antennas mounted on aircraft are developed. The airborne antenna problems associated with the Microwave Landing System (MLS) are emphasized. Based on the requirements of the MLS, volumetric pattern solutions are essential. Previous attempts at solving for the volumetric patterns were found to be far too complex and very inefficient. However as a result of previous efforts, it is possible to combine the elevation and roll plane pattern solutions to give the complete volumetric pattern. This combination is described as well as the aircraft simulation models used in the analysis. A numerical technique is presented to aid in the simulation of the aircraft studied. Finally, a description of the input data used in the computer code is given.

  11. Distributed antenna system and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Dobbins, Justin A. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    System and methods are disclosed for employing one or more radiators having non-unique phase centers mounted to a body with respect to a plurality of transmitters to determine location characteristics of the body such as the position and/or attitude of the body. The one or more radiators may consist of a single, continuous element or of two or more discrete radiation elements whose received signals are combined. In a preferred embodiment, the location characteristics are determined using carrier phase measurements whereby phase center information may be determined or estimated. A distributed antenna having a wide angle view may be mounted to a moveable body in accord with the present invention. The distributed antenna may be utilized for maintaining signal contact with multiple spaced apart transmitters, such as a GPS constellation, as the body rotates without the need for RF switches to thereby provide continuous attitude and position determination of the body.

  12. Plasmonic Antenna Coupling for QWIPs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, John

    2007-01-01

    In a proposed scheme for coupling light into a quantum-well infrared photodetector (QWIP), an antenna or an array of antennas made of a suitable metal would be fabricated on the face of what would otherwise be a standard QWIP. This or any such coupling scheme is required to effect polarization conversion: Light incident perpendicularly to the face is necessarily polarized in the plane of the face, whereas, as a matter of fundamental electrodynamics and related quantum selection rules, light must have a non-zero component of perpendicular polarization in order to be absorbed in the photodetection process. In a prior coupling scheme, gratings in the form of surface corrugations diffract normally gles, thereby imparting some perpendicular polarization. Unfortunately, the corrugation- fabrication process increases the overall nonuniformity of a large QWIP array. The proposed scheme is an alternative to the use of surface corrugations.

  13. Slotted antenna waveguide plasma source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A high density plasma generated by microwave injection using a windowless electrodeless rectangular slotted antenna waveguide plasma source has been demonstrated. Plasma probe measurements indicate that the source could be applicable for low power ion thruster applications, ion implantation, and related applications. This slotted antenna plasma source invention operates on the principle of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR). It employs no window and it is completely electrodeless and therefore its operation lifetime is long, being limited only by either the microwave generator itself or charged particle extraction grids if used. The high density plasma source can also be used to extract an electron beam that can be used as a plasma cathode neutralizer for ion source beam neutralization applications.

  14. Photo-generated THz antennas

    PubMed Central

    Georgiou, G.; Tyagi, H. K.; Mulder, P.; Bauhuis, G. J.; Schermer, J. J.; Rivas, J. Gómez

    2014-01-01

    Electromagnetic resonances in conducting structures give rise to the enhancement of local fields and extinction efficiencies. Conducting structures are conventionally fabricated with a fixed geometry that determines their resonant response. Here, we challenge this conventional approach by demonstrating the photo-generation of THz linear antennas on a flat semiconductor layer by the structured optical illumination through a spatial light modulator. Free charge carriers are photo-excited only on selected areas, which enables the realization of different conducting antennas on the same sample by simply changing the illumination pattern, thus without the need of physically structuring the sample. These results open a wide range of possibilities for the all-optical spatial control of resonances on surfaces and the concomitant control of THz extinction and local fields. PMID:24394920

  15. 47 CFR 22.365 - Antenna structures; air navigation safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna structures; air navigation safety. 22... Antenna structures; air navigation safety. Licensees that own their antenna structures must not allow these antenna structures to become a hazard to air navigation. In general, antenna structure owners...

  16. 47 CFR 22.365 - Antenna structures; air navigation safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna structures; air navigation safety. 22... Antenna structures; air navigation safety. Licensees that own their antenna structures must not allow these antenna structures to become a hazard to air navigation. In general, antenna structure owners...

  17. 47 CFR 73.316 - FM antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false FM antenna systems. 73.316 Section 73.316... Broadcast Stations § 73.316 FM antenna systems. (a) It shall be standard to employ horizontal polarization...) Directional antennas. A directional antenna is an antenna that is designed or altered for the purpose...

  18. 47 CFR 22.365 - Antenna structures; air navigation safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna structures; air navigation safety. 22... Antenna structures; air navigation safety. Licensees that own their antenna structures must not allow these antenna structures to become a hazard to air navigation. In general, antenna structure owners...

  19. 47 CFR 22.365 - Antenna structures; air navigation safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna structures; air navigation safety. 22... Antenna structures; air navigation safety. Licensees that own their antenna structures must not allow these antenna structures to become a hazard to air navigation. In general, antenna structure owners...

  20. 47 CFR 22.365 - Antenna structures; air navigation safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna structures; air navigation safety. 22... Antenna structures; air navigation safety. Licensees that own their antenna structures must not allow these antenna structures to become a hazard to air navigation. In general, antenna structure owners...