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Sample records for antenna straps design

  1. Simulation Results for the New NSTX HHFW Antenna Straps Design by Using Microwave Studio

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, C C; Brunkhorst, C; Greenough, N; Fredd, E; Castano, A; Miller, D; D'Amico, G; Yager, R; Hosea, J; Wilson, J R; Ryan, P

    2009-05-26

    Experimental results have shown that the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) at 30 MHz can provide substantial plasma heating and current drive for the NSTX spherical tokamak operation. However, the present antenna strap design rarely achieves the design goal of delivering the full transmitter capability of 6 MW to the plasma. In order to deliver more power to the plasma, a new antenna strap design and the associated coaxial line feeds are being constructed. This new antenna strap design features two feedthroughs to replace the old single feed-through design. In the design process, CST Microwave Studio has been used to simulate the entire new antenna strap structure including the enclosure and the Faraday shield. In this paper, the antenna strap model and the simulation results will be discussed in detail. The test results from the new antenna straps with their associated resonant loops will be presented as well.

  2. First results with 3-strap ICRF antennas in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobkov, V.; Braun, F.; Dux, R.; Herrmann, A.; Faugel, H.; Fünfgelder, H.; Kallenbach, A.; Neu, R.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Ochoukov, R.; Pütterich, Th.; Tuccilo, A.; Tudisco, O.; Wang, Y.; Yang, Q.; ASDEX Upgrade team

    2016-08-01

    The 3-strap antennas in ASDEX Upgrade allow ICRF operation with low tungsten (W) content in the confined plasma with W-coated antenna limiters. With the 3-strap antenna configuration, the local W impurity source at the antenna is drastically reduced and the core W concentration is similar to that of the boron coated 2-strap antenna at a given ICRF power. Operation of the 3-strap antennas with the power ratio between the central and the outer straps of 1.5:1 and 2:1 is adopted to minimize the ICRF-specific W release.

  3. Upgrades to the 4-strap ICRF Antenna in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    G. Schilling; J.C. Hosea; J.R. Wilson; W. Beck; R.L. Boivin; P.T. Bonoli; D. Gwinn; W.E. Lee; E. Nelson-Melby; M. Porkolab; R. Vieira; S.J. Wukitch; and J.A. Goetz

    2001-06-12

    A 4-strap ICRF antenna suitable for plasma heating and current drive has been designed and fabricated for the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. Initial operation in plasma was limited by high metallic impurity injection resulting from front surface arcing between protection tiles and from current straps to Faraday shields. Antenna modifications were made in February 2000, resulting in impurity reduction, but low-heating efficiency was observed when the antenna was operated in its 4-strap rather than a 2-strap configuration. Further modifications were made in July 2000, with the installation of BN plasma-facing tiles and radio- frequency bypassing of the antenna backplane edges and ends to reduce potential leakage coupling to plasma surface modes. Good heating efficiency was now observed in both heating configurations, but coupled power was limited to 2.5 MW in H-mode, 3 MW in L-mode, by plasma-wall interactions. Additional modifications were started in February 2001 and will be completed by this meeting. All the above upgrades and their effect on antenna performance will be presented.

  4. Upgrades to the 4-strap ICRF antenna in Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, G.; Hosea, J. C.; Wilson, J. R.; Beck, W.; Boivin, R. L.; Bonoli, P. T.; Gwinn, D.; Lee, W. D.; Nelson-Melby, E.; Porkolab, M.; Vieira, R.; Wukitch, S. J.; Goetz, J. A.

    2001-10-01

    A 4-strap ICRF antenna suitable for plasma heating and current drive has been designed and fabricated for the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. Initial operation in plasma was limited by high metallic impurity injection resulting from front surface arcing between protection tiles and from current straps to Faraday shields. Antenna modifications were made in 2/2000, resulting in impurity reduction, but low heating efficiency was observed when the antenna was operated in its 4-strap rather than a 2-strap configuration. Further modifications were made in 7/2000, with the installation of BN plasma-facing tiles and radiofrequency bypassing of the antenna backplane edges and ends to reduce potential leakage coupling to plasma surface modes. Good heating efficiency was now observed in both heating configurations, but coupled power was limited to 2.5 MW in H-mode, 3 MW in L-mode, by plasma-wall interactions. Additional modifications were started in 2/2001 and will be completed by this meeting. All the above upgrades and their effect on antenna performance will be presented.

  5. Analysis of 4-strap ICRF Antenna Performance in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    G. Schilling; S.J. Wukitch; R.L. Boivin; J.A. Goetz; J.C. Hosea; J.H. Irby; Y. Lin; A. Parisot; M. Porkolab; J.R. Wilson; the Alcator C-Mod Team

    2003-07-31

    A 4-strap ICRF antenna was designed and fabricated for plasma heating and current drive in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. Initial upgrades were carried out in 2000 and 2001, which eliminated surface arcing between the metallic protection tiles and reduced plasma-wall interactions at the antenna front surface. A boron nitride septum was added at the antenna midplane to intersect electric fields resulting from radio-frequency sheath rectification, which eliminated antenna corner heating at high power levels. The current feeds to the radiating straps were reoriented from an E||B to E parallel B geometry, avoiding the empirically observed {approx}15 kV/cm field limit and raising antenna voltage holding capability. Further modifications were carried out in 2002 and 2003. These included changes to the antenna current strap, the boron nitride tile mounting geometry, and shielding the BN-metal interface from the plasma. The antenna heating efficiency, power, and voltage characteristics under these various configurations will be presented.

  6. Theoretical analysis of the EAST 4-strap ion cyclotron range of frequency antenna with variational theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jia-Hui; Zhang, Xin-Jun; Zhao, Yan-Ping; Qin, Cheng-Ming; Chen, Zhao; Yang, Lei; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2016-08-01

    A variational principle code which can calculate self-consistently currents on the conductors is used to assess the coupling characteristic of the EAST 4-strap ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antenna. Taking into account two layers of antenna conductors without lateral frame but with slab geometry, the antenna impedances as a function of frequency and the structure of RF field excited inside the plasma in various phasing cases are discussed in this paper. Project supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program, China (Grant No. 2015GB101001) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11375236 and 11375235).

  7. Influence of mutual coupling between ICRH antenna straps on the load resilience of hybrid couplers

    SciTech Connect

    Lamalle, P. U.; Messiaen, A.

    2007-09-28

    The mutual coupling present between ICRF antenna straps can strongly reduce the performance of quadrature hybrid couplers when used as 'ELM dump' circuits. An analytical study of this effect shows that during resistive ELM-like load perturbations of a matched circuit configuration, the fraction of the reflected power returned to the generator through the hybrid has a lower bound that rapidly increases with the ratio {xi}{approx} (mutual reactance between straps)/(strap input resistance). At very low levels of mutual the reflected power is efficiently diverted to the dummy load. However when {xi} becomes of order 1, which readily occurs at low resistive loading, the load resilience of the quadrature hybrid coupler becomes inhibited. Illustrations based on matching circuit simulations for the JET ITER-like ICRF antenna are presented. The behaviour of the hybrids is found the same with the load resilient 'conjugate T' circuit as in the case of 'classic' tuners. The insertion of decoupling circuits between the tuners and the antenna significantly improves the load resilience.

  8. The IGNITOR ICRH Antenna Design with TOPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggiora, Riccardo; Kyrytsya, Volodymyr; Milanesio, Daniele; Meneghini, Orso; Vecchi, Giuseppe

    2007-11-01

    A flexible auxiliary Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) system (f = 80 -- 120 MHz) has been included in the IGNITOR machine design. ICRH systems have been successfully tested on a number of existing devices especially at high density. Ignition can be accelerated significantly by relatively low levels of ICRH (about 5 MW, a fraction of the final fusion heating) when applied during the current ramp-up. In addition, ICRH provides a useful tool to control the evolution of the current density profile. Four antennas, each composed by 4 straps independently fed by 4 matching systems, can deliver a minimum RF power of about 12 MW in the entire adopted frequency range. The possibility of adding two more antennas has been considered. The antenna design and optimization have been based on the simulation results obtained with TOPICA (Torino Polytechnic Ion Cyclotron Antenna code)[1]. [1] V. Lancellotti et al., Nuclear Fusion, 46 (2006) S476-S499

  9. The ITER ICRF Antenna Design with TOPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanesio, Daniele; Maggiora, Riccardo; Meneghini, Orso; Vecchi, Giuseppe

    2007-11-01

    TOPICA (Torino Polytechnic Ion Cyclotron Antenna) code is an innovative tool for the 3D/1D simulation of Ion Cyclotron Radio Frequency (ICRF), i.e. accounting for antennas in a realistic 3D geometry and with an accurate 1D plasma model [1]. The TOPICA code has been deeply parallelized and has been already proved to be a reliable tool for antennas design and performance prediction. A detailed analysis of the 24 straps ITER ICRF antenna geometry has been carried out, underlining the strong dependence and asymmetries of the antenna input parameters due to the ITER plasma response. We optimized the antenna array geometry dimensions to maximize loading, lower mutual couplings and mitigate sheath effects. The calculated antenna input impedance matrices are TOPICA results of a paramount importance for the tuning and matching system design. Electric field distributions have been also calculated and they are used as the main input for the power flux estimation tool. The designed optimized antenna is capable of coupling 20 MW of power to plasma in the 40 -- 55 MHz frequency range with a maximum voltage of 45 kV in the feeding coaxial cables. [1] V. Lancellotti et al., Nuclear Fusion, 46 (2006) S476-S499

  10. Field-aligned ICRF antenna design for EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wukitch, S. J.; Lin, Y.; Qin, C.; Zhang, X.; Beck, W.; Koert, P.; Zhou, L.

    2015-12-01

    For ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF), a number of physics and technological challenges remain for steady state, toroidal devices. Among the most critical is maintaining good coupling and maximizing the coupled power through plasma variations including edge localized modes (ELMs) and confinement transitions. As pulse length increases, enhanced localized heat loads associated with antenna operation can challenge antenna integrity. In addition, ICRF impurity sources and contamination need to be minimized to enable effective plasma heating. Here, we report on a four strap field aligned (FA) antenna design for the EAST tokamak. A FA antenna is an antenna where the current straps and antenna side enclosure are perpendicular to the total magnetic field while the Faraday screen rods are parallel to the total magnetic field. In C-Mod, a FA antenna has been shown to be inherently load tolerant which allows for robust power delivery to the plasma. Furthermore, the RF enhanced heat flux and antenna impurity source were nearly eliminated. For both L and H-mode discharges, the core impurity contamination is 20-30% lower but not eliminated. The emerging physics understanding is that the local RF impurity sources and RF enhanced heat flux is reduced due to the geometric alignment of the FA antenna while impurity contamination is a result of far field sheaths. An important aspect of antenna design is to identify a core absorption scenario that is characterized by strong single pass absorption for a broad range of target discharges. To maximize power coupling, the antenna spectrum needs to balance the k|| needed for strong single pass absorption and high coupling efficiency through evanescent layer. The latest design for a FA four strap adapted to EAST device is balance between geometrical constraints and physics requirements.

  11. GPS antenna designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laube, Samuel J. P.

    1987-01-01

    Application of the current GPS NAVSTAR system to civilian service requires that a right hand, circularly polarized, -160 dBW spread spectrum signal be received from an orbiting satellite, where the antenna environment is also moving. This presents a design challenge when inexpensive antennas are desired. The intent of this survey is to provide information on the antennas mentioned and to construct and test prototypes to determine whether the choice made by the industry, the quadrifilar helix, is the best. The helix antenna is currently the low cost standard for GPS. Prototype versions were constructed using 12 gauge wire and subminiature coaxial hardline. The constructed antennas were tested using a signal generator and a reference turnstile. A spectrum analyzer was used to measure the level of the received signal.

  12. GPS antenna designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laube, Samuel J. P.

    1987-05-01

    Application of the current GPS NAVSTAR system to civilian service requires that a right hand, circularly polarized, -160 dBW spread spectrum signal be received from an orbiting satellite, where the antenna environment is also moving. This presents a design challenge when inexpensive antennas are desired. The intent of this survey is to provide information on the antennas mentioned and to construct and test prototypes to determine whether the choice made by the industry, the quadrifilar helix, is the best. The helix antenna is currently the low cost standard for GPS. Prototype versions were constructed using 12 gauge wire and subminiature coaxial hardline. The constructed antennas were tested using a signal generator and a reference turnstile. A spectrum analyzer was used to measure the level of the received signal.

  13. Antenna theory and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzman, W. L.; Thiele, G. A.

    Antenna fundamentals and definitions are examined, taking into account electromagnetic fundamentals, the solution of Maxwell's equations for radiation problems, the ideal dipole, the radiation pattern, directivity and gain, reciprocity and antenna pattern measurements, antenna impedance and radiation efficiency, antenna polarization, antennas in communication links and radar, and the receiving properties of antennas. Some simple radiating systems are considered along with arrays, line sources, wire antennas, broadband antennas, moment methods, and aperture antennas. High-frequency methods and aspects of antenna synthesis are discussed, giving attention to geometrical optics, physical optics, wedge diffraction theory, the ray-fixed coordinate system, the cylindrical parabolic antenna, and linear array methods.

  14. Designing the IShTAR antenna: Physics and engineering aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louche, F.; Jacquot, J.; Crombé, K.; Van Eester, D.; D'Inca, R.; Devaux, S.; Faudot, E.; Faugel, H.; Fünfgelder, H.; Heuraux, S.; Morgal, I.; Moritz, J.; Ochoukov, R.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    2015-12-01

    IShTAR (Ion cyclotron Sheath Test ARrangement) is a magnetised plasma test facility installed at the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik in Garching, Germany. The main purpose of this device is the study of RF sheaths generated in front of ICRF (Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency) antennas in magnetically confined plasmas. The plasma is generated by a helical RF antenna potentially able to reach a helicon mode. We present in this work recent modelling activities dedicated to IShTAR. On the one hand a parameterized magnetostatic model of the magnetic configuration was created with the finite element solver COMSOL Multiphysics [3]. The model considers two non-axial sets of coils and notably reproduces the magnetic field lines deviation at the center of the main vessel and the ripples observed during experiments. From this model we can infer that kA are required in the 2 main large coils of IShTAR for 1 kA in the 4 small coils to generate a "smooth" magnetic field along field lines. On the other hand an ICRF antenna has been designed for IShTAR. A tridimensional model of the IShTAR vessel was developed with the electromagnetic code MicroWave Studio (MWS [4]) for this purpose and a first antenna model made of a single strap inside a box was included. The strap is fed through the upper port located at the helicon source side. The antenna is fully immersed into the loading medium (plasma or homogeneous dielectric) and the curved strap front face is aligned with the magnetic surfaces to simplify the modelling. The initial design of this antenna has been studied with MWS in the presence of homogeneous dielectric. The presence of a back wall will be discussed.

  15. Three-Dimensional Electromagnetic Modeling of the ITER ICRF Antenna (External Matching Design)

    SciTech Connect

    Louche, F.; Lamalle, P.U.; Dumortier, P.; Messiaen, A.M.

    2005-09-26

    The present work reports on 3D radio-frequency (RF) analysis of a design for the ITER antenna with the CST Microwave Studio registered software. The four-port junctions which connect the straps in triplets have been analyzed. Non-TEM effects do not play any significant role in the relevant frequency domain, and a well-balanced splitting of current between the straps inside a triplet is achieved. The scattering matrix has also been compared with RF measurements on a scaled antenna mockup, and the agreement is very good. Electric field patterns along the system have been obtained, and the RF optimization of the feeding sections is under way.

  16. Resonant loop antenna design with a 2-D steady state analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G.I.; Ryan, P.M.; Hoffman, D.J.; Baity, F.W.; Swain, D.W.; Whealton, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    Evaluation of resonant loop antenna designs for ICRF heating of plasmas requires information concerning the electrical characteristics of the structure. Our 2-D steady state model described herein provides us with current strap inductance and capacitance, surface current distributions, and flux linkage to the plasma. These are used to determine the current and voltage requirements, ohmic dissipation, frequency limits and matching requirements, maximum electric fields, and plasma loading in order to compare antenna designs.

  17. Modular antenna design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribble, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanical design of a modular antenna concept was developed sufficiently to allow manufacture of a working demonstration model of a module, to predict mass properties, and to make performance estimates for antenna reflectors composed of these modules. The primary features of this concept are: (1) each module is an autonomous structural element which can be attached to adjacent modules through a three point connection; (2) the upper surface is a folding hexagonal truss plate mechanism which serves as the supporting structure for a reflective surface; and (3) the entire truss and surface can be folded into a cylindrical envelope in which all truss elements are essentially parallel. The kinematic studies and engineering demonstration model fully verified the deployment kinematics, stowing philosophy, and deployment sequencing for large antenna modules. It was established that such modules can be stowed in packages as small as 25 cm in diameter, using 1.27 cm diameter structural tubes. The development activity indicates that this deployable modular approach towards building large structures in space will support erection of 450 m apertures for operation up to 3 GHz with a single space shuttle flight.

  18. Design and implementation of interactive strap-down inertial navigation simulation system for UAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chuan-qi; Cheng, Xiang; Hao, Xiang-yang; Zhao, Man-dan

    2016-01-01

    Strap-down inertial navigation system (SINS) is widely used in military field, to facilitate the study of SINS algorithms and various coupled navigation algorithms, a simulation system of SINS is designed. Based on modular design, with good portability and expansibility, the system consists of four independent modules: analysis module of motion state, trajectory simulator, IMU simulation module and SINS calculation module. With graphical interface, the system can control every motion state of the trajectory, which is convenient to generate various trajectories efficiently. Using rotation vector attitude algorithm to process simulation data, experiment results show that the attitude, velocity and position error is consistent with the theoretical value, which verifies the rationality of the simulation model and the availability of the simulation system.

  19. Microstrip antenna theory and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, J. R.; Hall, P. S.; Wood, C.

    Microstrip is the name given to a type of open waveguiding structure which is now commonly used in present-day electronics, not only as a transmission line but for circuit components such as filters, couplers, and resonators. The idea of using microstrip to construct antennas is a much more recent development. The purpose of this monograph is to present the reader with an appreciation of useful antenna design approaches and the overall state-of-the art situation. Flat-plate antenna techniques and constraints on performance are considered along with microstrip design equations and data, the radiation mechanism of an open-circuit microstrip termination and the resulting design implications, the basic methods of calculation and design of patch antennas, and linear array techniques. Attention is also given to techniques and design limitations in two-dimensional arrays, circular polarization techniques, manufacturing and operational problems of microstrip antennas, recent advances in microstrip antenna analysis, and possible future developments.

  20. Design of the ICRH antenna for TPX

    SciTech Connect

    Fogelman, C.H.; Goranson, P.L.; Swain, D.W.

    1996-01-01

    A 6-MW ion cyclotron (IC) system for the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) is in the preliminary design phase. In conjunction with the 3-MW Lower Hybrid system and the 8-MW neutral beam system, the IC system will provide heating and current-drive capabilities to explore advanced tokamak physics and long-pulse (1000 s) operation. The IC launcher consists of six nickel-plated current straps arranged toroidally in pairs behind three water-cooled Faraday shields. The Faraday shields can be independently mid remotely detached by cutting water lines at the back of the launcher and removing bolts at the front to free each shield. The antenna can be located at the +2 cm flux line and retracted 10 cm. Faraday shields are usually copper- or nickel-plated stainless steel or inconel. Titanium is the preferred material to minimize activation without greatly decreasing electrical resistivity and therefore increasing disruption loads. The IC antenna research and development programs have provided data that confirm the feasibility of B{sub 4}C-coated nickel-plated titanium alloy in the TPX environment.

  1. COBRA meteor radar antenna designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zainuddin, Mohamad

    A meteor radar system is one of the effective remote sensing techniques in measuring atmospheric parameters such as wind velocities, temperature, pressure and density which are essential in understanding the atmospheric dynamics in the Mesosphere Lower Thermosphere (MLT) region. Previous studies of very high frequency (VHF) meteors radar systems suggest that the minimum error for the estimation of the horizontal wind velocity from a radar interferometry algorithm should occur when the main beams of the transmit and receive antennas are pointing to between 30° to 50° elevation angles. Therefore, an ideal antenna design for VHF meteor radar systems would produce a pencil beam radiation pattern at a 45° elevation angle. However, both the transmit and receive antenna of the COBRA meteor radar system have major beams are pointing to between 60° to 65° degree elevation angles above a perfect ground plane. Besides transmitting maximum power at low elevation angles, the current antennas of the COBRA meteor radar are highly dependent on the ground plane to radiate maximum gains to between 60° to 65° degree elevation angles. Typically, the earth ground is considered as a common ground plane for many VHF antenna with acceptable performance. However, the earth ground could not effectively reflect most of the power at all time. Because the antennas are dependent on ground to radiate power at certain direction, an artificial ground plane or ground screen has to be built for the COBRA antenna system at the South Pole station, which is located on top of more than 2000 meter thick of ice sheet. This dissertation focuses on the analysis of the performance of the individual current antenna design with four different conditions namely in free space, above an infinite ground, lossy ground and finite ground. In the analysis of finite ground, the effects of varying wire spacing and the size of finite ground to the radiation pattern of a cross folded dipole antenna are investigated

  2. Designing Rectangular RHCP Microstrip Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Shayla E.

    1987-01-01

    RHCP, Right-Handed, Circularly Polarized Microstrip Antenna program, aids in design of rectangular microstrip-antenna element, given desired frequency of operation and characteristics of substrate. Begins design calculations on basis of square element with linear polarization. Effective dielectric constant and changes in electrical length due to fringing at edges of radiating element taken into account. Coaxial feed inset with 50 ohms input impedance. Placement of feed such that two orthonormal modes produced in antenna cavity, right- or left-handed circular polarization obtained. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  3. Design aspects of commercial satellite antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, K. C.; Taormina, F. A.

    General design considerations for commercial satellite antennas are reviewed, and design factors of shaped beam reflector antennas are described, including shaped beam efficiency, flat-topping and boundary matching, and analysis by Fourier transforms. Attention is then given to the design of the Telesat Anik 17/Westar/Palapa communications antenna, the Comstar I communications antenna, the SBS communications antenna, and Intelsat IV A communications antenna.

  4. Coupling Of The JET ICRF Antennas In ELMy H-mode Plasmas With ITER Relevant Plasma-Straps Distance

    SciTech Connect

    Mayoral, M.-L.; Monakhov, I.; Jacquet, P.; Brix, M.; Graham, M.; Erents, K.; Korotkov, A.; Lomas, P.; Mailloux, J.; McDonald, D. C.; Stamp, M.; Walden, A.; Hobirk, J.; Ongena, J.

    2007-09-28

    In ITER, the requirement for the ICRF antenna is to deliver 20 MW in ELMy H-mode plasmas with an averaged antenna - plasma separatrix distance of 14 cm. Two major problems will have to be solved: the very fast change in antenna loading during ELMs and the decrease of the loading when the plasma is pushed far away from the antenna. JET has the capability to combine these conditions and for the first time, experiments were performed in ELMy H-mode at antenna--separatrix distance, referred as ROG, varied from 10 to 14 cm. When ROG was increased, the perturbation caused by ELMs was found to decrease significantly and the loading between ELMs was found to deteriorate to very low values. In order to compensate the latter unwanted effect, different levels of deuterium gas were injected in the edge either from the divertor, the midplane or the top of the tokamak. Using this technique, the loading was increased by up to a factor 6 and up to 8 MW of ICRF power were coupled.

  5. Adaptive antenna design considerations for satellite communication antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayhan, J. T.

    1983-02-01

    The present investigation is concerned with some general considerations inherent in designing an adaptive antenna system for use on a geosynchronous satellite illuminating the earth field of view. The problem has been addressed from the viewpoint of the system designer who has to determine the required antenna characteristics and the antenna aperture size. Concerning the choice of the antenna type, it usually has to be decided whether to use a phased array (PA) or a multiple-beam antenna (MBA). Attention is given to nulling resolution and MBA/PA configuration, taking into account the phased array and multiple-beam antennas. The choice of which antenna type to use depends on the nulling bandwidth, the number of weighted channels in the adaptive processor, and the overall coverage area to be served by the antenna system.

  6. Design Concepts For A Long Pulse Upgrade For The DIII-D Fast Wave Antenna Array

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Philip Michael; Baity Jr, F Wallace; Caughman, John B; Goulding, Richard Howell; Hosea, J.; Greenough, Nevell; Nagy, Alex; Pinsker, R.; Rasmussen, David A

    2009-01-01

    A goal in the 5-year plan for the fast wave program on DIII-D is to couple a total of 3.6 MW of RF power into a long pulse, H-mode plasma for central electron heating. The present short-pulse 285/300 antenna array would need to be replaced with one capable of at least 1.2 MW, 10 s operation at 60 MHz into an H-mode (low resistive loading) plasma condition. The primary design under consideration uses a poloidally-segmented strap (3 sections) for reduced strap voltage near the plasma/Faraday screen region. Internal capacitance makes the antenna structure self-resonant at 60 MHz, strongly reducing peak E-fields in the vacuum coax and feed throughs.

  7. Design Concepts For A Long Pulse Upgrade For The DIII-D Fast Wave Antenna Array

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, P. M.; Baity, F. W.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Goulding, R. H.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Hosea, J. C.; Greenough, N. L.; Nagy, A.; Pinsker, R. I.

    2009-11-26

    A goal in the 5-year plan for the fast wave program on DIII-D is to couple a total of 3.6 MW of RF power into a long pulse, H-mode plasma for central electron heating. The present short-pulse 285/300 antenna array would need to be replaced with one capable of at least 1.2 MW, 10 s operation at 60 MHz into an H-mode (low resistive loading) plasma condition. The primary design under consideration uses a poloidally-segmented strap (3 sections) for reduced strap voltage near the plasma/Faraday screen region. Internal capacitance makes the antenna structure self-resonant at 60 MHz, strongly reducing peak E-fields in the vacuum coax and feed throughs.

  8. Design of an ICRH antenna for RF-plasma interaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caughman, J. B. O.; Ryan, P. M.; Bigelow, T. S.; Diem, S. J.; Goulding, R. H.; Rasmussen, D. A.

    2012-10-01

    The interaction between an ion cyclotron resonant heating antenna and the near-field plasma can lead to rectified (high voltage) sheath formation and subsequent material erosion. This issue will be studied by using a simple loop antenna operated on the Physics Integration eXperiment (PhIX) at ORNL, which is a linear plasma device that uses an ECH heated helicon plasma source to create a high-density plasma suitable for use in a plasma-material interaction test stand. The antenna consists of a single strap with a single-tier Faraday shield. The antenna is ˜one-quarter wavelength long at 50 MHz and grounded at one end, which will allow for strap voltages of >20 kV to be located near the plasma. The PhIX edge plasma near the antenna is similar to typical edge conditions, with ne˜1-2x10^18/m^3 and Te=5-10 eV, with a magnetic field of 0.1-0.2 Tesla. Several diagnostics will be used to characterize the near-field interaction, including Langmuir and capacitive probes, energy analyzers, Stark effect spectroscopy, and local/remote material erosion measurements. Details of the antenna design and initial characterization will be presented.

  9. Mechanical design proposal of an Ions Cyclotron Resonant Heating antenna for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Agarici, G.; Argouarch, A.; Brun, C.; Mitteau, R.; Mollard, P.; Patterlini, J. C.; Vulliez, K.; Testoni, P.; Maggiora, R.; Milanesio, D.

    2007-09-28

    The antenna design proposed here is based on the resonant double loop concept with conjugate T matching to make the circuit resilient to strong plasma load variations as ELMs. The antenna is constituted of two main parts; the in-vessel launcher which is inside the primary torus vacuum and the Compact Vacuum Tuners (CVT) that is located after the first barrier in a private vacuum. This CVT allows to match at the strap location, the antenna impedance with the plasma load, over the 45 to 55 MHz frequency range. It has been designed to ease its repair and maintenance, and can be easily removed from the rear without breaking the primary vacuum. Apart from the Faradays screens fit to shape the plasma edge, the in-vessel launcher and CVT are made out of 6 identical modules, to allow the best economical approach for the manufacture, the assembly and the maintenance of the antenna.

  10. Design of a High Power Prototype for the new JET-EP ICRF antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulding, R. H.; Baity, F. W.; Jones, G. H.; Nelson, B. E.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Swain, D. W.; Hosea, J. C.; Loesser, G. D.; Wilson, J. R.; Durodie, F.; Beaumont, B.; Lamalle, P. U.; Walton, R.

    2001-10-01

    A high power prototype (HPP) of a new ICRF antenna for JET ("JET-EP antenna") is being designed and constructed in a collaborative effort between Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, and the European Fusion Development Agreement-Joint European Torus. The JET-EP launcher is designed for 8 MW input power ( 9 MW/m^2) at 30-55 MHz. Current straps are arranged in a 4 poloidal by 2 toroidal array, minimizing voltage. A modified resonant double loop (RDL) matching circuit uses internal capacitors, and passively accommodates rapidly changing plasma loads. The HPP, consisting of one antenna quadrant, will be tested at ORNL in vaccum at >= 33kV pk, 920A rms capacitor voltage and current. Innovative features to be tested include the modified RDL circuit, flanges which allow capacitor replacement without antenna removal, a low characteristic impedance vacuum feed line, and integral matching transformer.

  11. A new radiation stripline ICRF antenna design for EAST Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, C. M.; Zhao, Y. P.; Wan, B. N.; Li, J.; Zhang, X. J.; Yang, Q. X.; Yuan, S.; Braun, F.; Notedame, J.-M.; Kasahara, H.; Collaboration: ICRF Team on EAST

    2014-02-12

    A new type of toroidal long Radiation Stripline Antenna (RSA) is presented, which can effectively improve antenna radiation, leading in reduction of max voltage on transmission line and decrease of the sensitivity to ELM's of the ICRF system at some frequencies. Based on the new concept, a 4-straps RSA is proposed for EAST device. Using 3-D computing simulator code (HFSS), RF current distribution, S-parameters and electromagnetic field distribution on and near the RSA ICRF antenna are analyzed and compared with present ICRF antenna on EAST.

  12. Automated Antenna Design with Evolutionary Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linden, Derek; Hornby, Greg; Lohn, Jason; Globus, Al; Krishunkumor, K.

    2006-01-01

    Current methods of designing and optimizing antennas by hand are time and labor intensive, and limit complexity. Evolutionary design techniques can overcome these limitations by searching the design space and automatically finding effective solutions. In recent years, evolutionary algorithms have shown great promise in finding practical solutions in large, poorly understood design spaces. In particular, spacecraft antenna design has proven tractable to evolutionary design techniques. Researchers have been investigating evolutionary antenna design and optimization since the early 1990s, and the field has grown in recent years as computer speed has increased and electromagnetic simulators have improved. Two requirements-compliant antennas, one for ST5 and another for TDRS-C, have been automatically designed by evolutionary algorithms. The ST5 antenna is slated to fly this year, and a TDRS-C phased array element has been fabricated and tested. Such automated evolutionary design is enabled by medium-to-high quality simulators and fast modern computers to evaluate computer-generated designs. Evolutionary algorithms automate cut-and-try engineering, substituting automated search though millions of potential designs for intelligent search by engineers through a much smaller number of designs. For evolutionary design, the engineer chooses the evolutionary technique, parameters and the basic form of the antenna, e.g., single wire for ST5 and crossed-element Yagi for TDRS-C. Evolutionary algorithms then search for optimal configurations in the space defined by the engineer. NASA's Space Technology 5 (ST5) mission will launch three small spacecraft to test innovative concepts and technologies. Advanced evolutionary algorithms were used to automatically design antennas for ST5. The combination of wide beamwidth for a circularly-polarized wave and wide impedance bandwidth made for a challenging antenna design problem. From past experience in designing wire antennas, we chose to

  13. Design of broadband single polarized antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Phoo Kho; Aziz, Mohamad Zoinol Abidin Abd.; Ahmad, Badrul Hisham; Ramli, Mohamad Hafize Bin; Fauzi, Noor Azamiah Md; Malek, Mohd Fareq Abd

    2015-05-01

    In practical wireless communication application, bandwidth enhancement becomes one of the major design considerations. At the same time, circular polarized (CP) antenna received much attention for the applications of modern wireless communication system when compared to linear polarized (LP) antenna. This is because CP antenna can reduce the multipath effect. Hence, broadband antenna with operating frequency at 2.4GHz for WLAN application is proposed. The proposed antenna is done by using L-probe amendment with rectangular patch. The rectangular patch and copper ground plane is separated with 10mm air gap. This approach is used to enhance the bandwidth and the gain of the proposed antenna. The bandwidth of the designed antenna is more than 200MHz which meet broadband application. The return loss for the antenna is below -10dB to achieved 90% matching efficiency. The position of L-probe feed is altered in order to obtained different polarizations. The broadband antenna had been designed and simulated by using Computer Simulation Technology (CST) software. In this paper, the comparison for single polarized antenna with the design of non-inverted patch and inverted patch is discussed. The characteristics of the S-parameter, axial ratio, gain, surface current for each designed antenna are analyzed.

  14. Microfluidic serpentine antennas with designed mechanical tunability.

    PubMed

    Huang, YongAn; Wang, Yezhou; Xiao, Lin; Liu, Huimin; Dong, Wentao; Yin, Zhouping

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes the design and characterization of microfluidic serpentine antennas with reversible stretchability and designed mechanical frequency modulation (FM). The microfluidic antennas are designed based on the Poisson's ratio of the elastomer in which the liquid alloy antenna is embedded, to controllably decrease, stabilize or increase its resonance frequency when being stretched. Finite element modelling was used in combination with experimental verification to investigate the effects of substrate dimensions and antenna aspect ratios on the FM sensitivity to uniaxial stretching. It could be designed within the range of -1.2 to 0.6 GHz per 100% stretch. When the aspect ratio of the serpentine antenna is between 1.0 and 1.5, the resonance frequency is stable under stretching, bending, and twisting. The presented microfluidic serpentine antenna design could be utilized in the field of wireless mobile communication for the design of wearable electronics, with a stable resonance frequency under dynamic applied strain up to 50%. PMID:25144304

  15. Integrated reflector antenna design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, M. L.; Lee, S. W.; Ni, S.; Christensen, M.; Wang, Y. M.

    1993-01-01

    Reflector antenna design is a mature field and most aspects were studied. However, of that most previous work is distinguished by the fact that it is narrow in scope, analyzing only a particular problem under certain conditions. Methods of analysis of this type are not useful for working on real-life problems since they can not handle the many and various types of perturbations of basic antenna design. The idea of an integrated design and analysis is proposed. By broadening the scope of the analysis, it becomes possible to deal with the intricacies attendant with modem reflector antenna design problems. The concept of integrated reflector antenna design is put forward. A number of electromagnetic problems related to reflector antenna design are investigated. Some of these show how tools for reflector antenna design are created. In particular, a method for estimating spillover loss for open-ended waveguide feeds is examined. The problem of calculating and optimizing beam efficiency (an important figure of merit in radiometry applications) is also solved. Other chapters deal with applications of this general analysis. The wide angle scan abilities of reflector antennas is examined and a design is proposed for the ATDRSS triband reflector antenna. The development of a general phased-array pattern computation program is discussed and how the concept of integrated design can be extended to other types of antennas is shown. The conclusions are contained in the final chapter.

  16. Lower Hybrid Antenna Design for MST

    SciTech Connect

    Goetz, J.A.; Thomas, M.A.; Kaufman, M.C.; Oliva, S.P.

    2005-09-26

    Inter-digital line antennas are being used to test the feasibility of lower hybrid current drive in MST. The antennas use {lambda}/4 resonators and launch slow waves at 800 MHz with n parallel {approx} 7.5. Routine operation has been achieved with a good impedance match between antenna and plasma. High power antenna design improvements include larger vacuum feed-throughs, better impedance matching, and rf instrumentation on all resonators. The antenna and feed-through modeling was performed with CST Microwave Studio{sup TM}. The pulse-forming network that powers the klystron is being upgraded to a 50 kV - 30 ms pulse. The goal for the LHCD system on MST is a modular design that can handle 300 kW per antenna.

  17. Efficient Thermally Conductive Strap Design for Cryogenic Propellant Tank Supports and Plumbing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elchert, J. P.; Christie, R.; Kashani, A.; Opalach, C.

    2012-01-01

    After evaluating NASA space architecture goals, the Office of Chief Technologist identified the need for developing enabling technology for long term loiters in space with cryogenic fluids. One such technology is structural heat interception. In this prototype, heat interception at the tank support strut was accomplished using a thermally conductive link to the broad area cooled shield. The design methodology for both locating the heat intercept and predicting the reduction in boil-off heat leak is discussed in detail. Results from the chosen design are presented. It was found that contact resistance resulting from different mechanical attachment techniques played a significant role in the form and functionality of a successful design.

  18. Baseline antenna design for space exploration initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. L.; Nasir, M. A.; Lee, S. W.; Zaman, Afroz

    1993-01-01

    A key element of the future NASA Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) mission is the lunar and Mars telecommunication system. This system will provide voice, image, and data transmission to monitor unmanned missions to conduct experiments, and to provide radiometric data for navigation. In the later half of 1991, a study was conducted on antennas for the Mars Exploration Communication. Six antenna configurations were examined: three reflector and three phased array. The conclusion was that due to wide-angle scan requirement, and multiple simultaneous tracking beams, phased arrays are more suitable. For most part, this report studies phased array antenna designs for two different applications for Space Exploration Initiative. It also studies one design for a tri-reflector type antenna. These antennas will be based on a Mars orbiting satellite.

  19. Efficient Thermally Conductive Strap Design for Cryogenic Propellant Tank Supports and Plumbing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elchert, J. P.; Christie, R.; Gebby, P.; Kashani, A.

    2012-01-01

    After evalu1ating NASA space architecture goals, the Office of Chief Technologist identified the need for developing enabling technology for long term loiters in space with cryogenic fluids. One such technology is structural heat interception. In this prototype, heat interception at the tank support strut was accomplished using a thermally conductive link to the broad area cooled shield. The design methodology for both locating the heat intercept and predicting the reduction in boil-off heat leak is discussed in detail. Results from the chosen design are presented. It was found that contact resistance resulting from different mechanical attachment techniques played a significant role in the form and functionality of a successful design.

  20. MRF study. Part 2: Antenna design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    An assessment of the practical feasibility of the design and construction of an antenna to meet the requirements of a conceptual radar system is studied. Both the subscale antenna, nominally 5 by 4 meters in dimensions, and the full scale antenna, taken as nominally 18 by 4 meters in size, were considered. The examination of feasibility was from electrical, mechanical, and thermal standpoints. Fundamental, electrical, microwave design questions applying to both the subscale and the full scale antennas were considered in greater detail than questions of mechanical configuration and thermal design. Layouts were made in the development of preliminary configurations, along with a deployment method, for the subscale antenna in conjunction with an antenna cluster for alternate arrangements of the three pallet configuration. Implementation of the array and support structure and attachment of the array to the support and thermal provision was considered. Results show that a microwave design of antennas that incorporate traveling wave arrays can be effected with the beam scanned to 45 degrees in elevation without occurrence of higher order beams.

  1. Study of wrap-rib antenna design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, W. D.; Sinha, A.; Singh, R.

    1979-01-01

    The results of a parametric design study conducted to develop the significant characteristics and technology limitations of space deployable antenna systems with aperture sizes ranging from 50 up to 300 m and F/D ratios between 0.5 and 3.0 are presented. Wrap/rib type reflectors of both the prime and offset fed geometry and associated feed support structures were considered. The significant constraints investigated as limitations on achievable aperture were inherent manufacturability, orbit dynamic and thermal stability, antenna weight, and antenna stowed volume. A data base, resulting in the defined maximum achievable aperture size as a function of diameter, frequency and estimated cost, was formed.

  2. Antenna design and characterization based on the elementary antenna concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligthart, L. P.

    An antenna-design technique based on an elementary-antenna model (an infinitesimal pillbox structure carrying electric and magnetic currents and containing propagating TEM fields) is developed and demonstrated. An EM description of a waveguide aperture is obtained by applying approximate boundary conditions at specific points; the transmitted field is developed locally into a set of TEM field components to compute the radiation pattern; and aperture matching is achieved by calculating the aperture reflection as well. Parallel-plate, circular, and rectangular waveguides; two single-polarization TEM waveguide radiators (with and without dielectric filling); a dielectric-filled dual-polarization TE(01) waveguide radiator; and a hybrid reflector array with limited beam switching based on the TE(01) radiator are presented.

  3. Design considerations for MST radar antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowhill, S. A.

    1983-01-01

    The design of antenna systems for radar capable of probing the mesosphere are discussed. The spatial wavelength dependency of turbulent advected ionization are cut off rapidly below wavelengths of about 3 m, imply frequencies of 100 MHz and below. The frequency and aperture requirements point to an array antenna of some kind as the most economical solution. Such an array could consist of dipoles or more directive elements; these elements can be either active or passive.

  4. Design of microstrip disk antenna arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, M. C.; Parks, F. G.

    1978-01-01

    The radio frequency characteristics and design parameters for microstrip disk antenna elements and planar arrays are presented. Two C-band model arrays (an 8 element linear and an 8 by 8 planar) were designed, fabricated, and tested to demonstrate the technique of using microstrip elements for array applications. These arrays were designed with a cosine amplitude distribution.

  5. 47 CFR 17.9 - Designated antenna farm areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Designated antenna farm areas. 17.9 Section 17... ANTENNA STRUCTURES Federal Aviation Administration Notification Criteria § 17.9 Designated antenna farm areas. The areas described in the following paragraphs of this section are established as antenna...

  6. 47 CFR 17.9 - Designated antenna farm areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Designated antenna farm areas. 17.9 Section 17... ANTENNA STRUCTURES Federal Aviation Administration Notification Criteria § 17.9 Designated antenna farm areas. The areas described in the following paragraphs of this section are established as antenna...

  7. 47 CFR 17.9 - Designated antenna farm areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Designated antenna farm areas. 17.9 Section 17... ANTENNA STRUCTURES Federal Aviation Administration Notification Criteria § 17.9 Designated antenna farm areas. The areas described in the following paragraphs of this section are established as antenna...

  8. 47 CFR 17.9 - Designated antenna farm areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Designated antenna farm areas. 17.9 Section 17... ANTENNA STRUCTURES Federal Aviation Administration Notification Criteria § 17.9 Designated antenna farm areas. The areas described in the following paragraphs of this section are established as antenna...

  9. 47 CFR 17.9 - Designated antenna farm areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Designated antenna farm areas. 17.9 Section 17... ANTENNA STRUCTURES Federal Aviation Administration Notification Criteria § 17.9 Designated antenna farm areas. The areas described in the following paragraphs of this section are established as antenna...

  10. Microwave Antennas: Design. (Latest citations from the Aerospace Database)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the design of microwave antennas. Topics include a discussion of the recent developments in microwave antennas, and in design techniques such as computer-aided design (CAD). Various types of antenna configurations are covered, including rectangular, elliptical, and reflectarray microstrip antennas, multibeam, circular-disc, Yagi-Uda, and horn reflectors. Applications include microwave antennas for satellite communication systems, telemetry links, and solid state microwave power transmission systems.

  11. Compact acoustic antenna design using labyrinthine metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Chunyu

    2015-05-01

    We present an effective design and architecture for a class of acoustic antennas in air. The work begins with a conformal transformation method that yields the preliminary design, which is constructed using an isotropic but inhomogeneous material. However, the desired material parameters have been unavailable until now. Here we show that by scaling up the refractive index and optimizing the geometry in the preliminary design, a series of square antennas can be achieved to exhibit an excellent beam-collimating effect. An important part of our strategy is that the device's thickness and material properties can be tailored easily to greatly facilitate its realization. It is also demonstrated that the proposed antenna can be made very thin and readily implemented using labyrinthine acoustic metamaterials.

  12. Optimization of the ITER Ion Cyclotron Heating Antenna Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, P. M.; Swain, D. W.; Carter, M. D.; Taylor, D. J.; Bosia, G.; D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.

    1996-11-01

    The present design of the ITER ICH antenna array comprises two poloidal by four toroidal current elements in each of four ports. Each current element forms a resonant double loop (RDL) with power fed to a pretuned matchpoint on the strap; the matching is accomplished using slow-wave transmission lines as adjustable shorted-stub tuners on either end of the current strap. The power requirement is 12.5 MW per port over the frequency range of 40--70 MHz, with extended operation to 80 MHz desirable. The antenna design optimization process includes strap shaping to minimize strap voltages and rf E-fields along B-field lines, (2) frame/Faraday shield geometry design to improve plasma coupling, wave spectrum directivity, and phase control, and (3) Faraday shield/bumper geometry to minimize rf sheath-induced structure heating and impurity generation.

  13. FORTE antenna element and release mechanism design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohweller, David J.; Butler, Thomas A.

    1995-01-01

    The Fast On-Orbit Recording of Transient Events (FORTE) satellite being built by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has as its most prominent feature a large deployable (11 m by 5 m) log periodic antenna to monitor emissions from electrical storms on the Earth. This paper describes the antenna and the design for the long elements and explains the dynamics of their deployment and the damping system employed. It also describes the unique paraffin-actuated reusable tie-down and release mechanism employed in the system.

  14. FORTE antenna element and release mechanism design

    SciTech Connect

    Rohweller, D.J.; Butler, T.Af.

    1995-02-01

    The Fast On-Orbit Recording of Transient Events (FORTE) satellite being built by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has as its most prominent feature a large deployable (11 m by 5 m) log periodic antenna to monitor emissions from electrical storms on the Earth. This paper describes the antenna and the design for the long elements and explains the dynamics of their deployment and the damping system employed. It also describes the unique paraffin-actuated reusable tie-down and release mechanism employed in the system.

  15. Deployable antenna kinematics using tensegrity structure design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Byron Franklin

    With vast changes in spacecraft development over the last decade, a new, cheaper approach was needed for deployable kinematic systems such as parabolic antenna reflectors. Historically, these mesh-surface reflectors have resembled folded umbrellas, with incremental redesigns utilized to save packaging size. These systems are typically over-constrained designs, the assumption being that high reliability necessary for space operations requires this level of conservatism. But with the rapid commercialization of space, smaller launch platforms and satellite buses have demanded much higher efficiency from all space equipment than can be achieved through this incremental approach. This work applies an approach called tensegrity to deployable antenna development. Kenneth Snelson, a student of R. Buckminster Fuller, invented Tensegrity structures in 1948. Such structures use a minimum number of compression members (struts); stability is maintain using tension members (ties). The novelty introduced in this work is that the ties are elastic, allowing the struts to extend or contract, and in this way changing the surface of the antenna. Previously, the University of Florida developed an approach to quantify the stability and motion of parallel manipulators. This approach was applied to deployable, tensegrity, antenna structures. Based on the kinematic analyses for the 3-3 (octahedron) and 4-4 (square anti-prism) structures, the 6-6 (hexagonal anti-prism) analysis was completed which establishes usable structural parameters. The primary objective for this work was to prove the stability of this class of deployable structures, and their potential application to space structures. The secondary objective is to define special motions for tensegrity antennas, to meet the subsystem design requirements, such as addressing multiple antenna-feed locations. This work combines the historical experiences of the artist (Snelson), the mathematician (Ball), and the space systems engineer

  16. OCH Strap Model Test

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, K.; /Fermilab

    1987-08-26

    The OCH Model was stacked using the appropriate spacers between each absorber plate. Steel bars measuring 3-inch wide by 1/4-inch thick were welded, using 1/8-inch fillet weld, along all the corner edges, except the outer radius edges. On the outer radius, the straps were bolted to the end plates and to plates 9 and 17. The straps on the outer radius were also set in towards the center by approximately 3-inches. The spacers were then knocked out. Twelve strain gauges were mounted on the model. See figure 1 and the OCH strap Model log book for locations. Each rosette was centered in the gap between two absorber plates. The finite element plate model can predict the primary deformations of the OH module in both the cantilever and crushing modes to within 11% of the measured values. The primary stresses away from the support plate for the cantilever mode can be predicted to within 13% by this model. Near the support plate where large shear stresses exists, ANSYS will overpredict the measured stresses substantially. This is probably due to the models inherent inability to allow for shear stress concentrations at the welds. The same over-prediction was seen in the side straps during the OH crush test comparison and is probably attributable to the high shear force in this mode. The simple finite element plate model will provide suitable model of OH module stiffness for use in the analysis of the module assembly. The calculation of shear stresses can be improved by applying the ANSYS calculated inter-element forces to traditional weld strength calculations

  17. Millimeter-wave antenna design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leighton, R. B.

    1977-01-01

    Problems and opportunities are discussed for adapting certain design features and construction techniques, developed for producing high accuracy ground based radio dishes, to producing milimeter wave dishes for space use. Specifically considered is a foldable telescope of 24 m aperture and 9.6 m focal length, composed of 37 rigid hexagonal panels, which will fit within the 4.5 m diameter x 18 m long payload limits of space shuttle. As here conceived, the telescope would be a free flyer with its own power and pointing systems. Some of the structural design features and construction procedures are considered.

  18. Evolutionary design of corrugated horn antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoorfar, F.; Manshadi, V.; Jamnejad, A.

    2002-01-01

    An evolutionary progranirnitzg (EP) algorithm is used to optimize pattern of a corrugated circularhorn subject to various constraints on return loss and antenna beamwidth and pattern circularity and low crosspolarization. The EP algorithm uses a Gaussian mutation operator. Examples on design synthesis of a 45 section corrugated horn, with a total of 90 optimization parameters, are presented. The results show excellent and efficient optimization of the desired horn parameters.

  19. Using EIGER for Antenna Design and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Champagne, Nathan J.; Khayat, Michael; Kennedy, Timothy F.; Fink, Patrick W.

    2007-01-01

    EIGER (Electromagnetic Interactions GenERalized) is a frequency-domain electromagnetics software package that is built upon a flexible framework, designed using object-oriented techniques. The analysis methods used include moment method solutions of integral equations, finite element solutions of partial differential equations, and combinations thereof. The framework design permits new analysis techniques (boundary conditions, Green#s functions, etc.) to be added to the software suite with a sensible effort. The code has been designed to execute (in serial or parallel) on a wide variety of platforms from Intel-based PCs and Unix-based workstations. Recently, new potential integration scheme s that avoid singularity extraction techniques have been added for integral equation analysis. These new integration schemes are required for facilitating the use of higher-order elements and basis functions. Higher-order elements are better able to model geometrical curvature using fewer elements than when using linear elements. Higher-order basis functions are beneficial for simulating structures with rapidly varying fields or currents. Results presented here will demonstrate curren t and future capabilities of EIGER with respect to analysis of installed antenna system performance in support of NASA#s mission of exploration. Examples include antenna coupling within an enclosed environment and antenna analysis on electrically large manned space vehicles.

  20. Advanced ICRF antenna design for R-TOKAMAK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kako, E.; Ando, R.; Ichimura, M.; Ogawa, Y.; Amano, T.; Watari, T.

    1986-01-01

    The advanced ICRF antennas designed for the R-TOKAMAK (a proposal in the Institute of Plasma Physics, Nagoya University) are described. They are a standard loop antenna and a panel heater antenna for fast wave heating, and a waveguide antenna for ion Bernstein wave heating. The standard loop antenna is made of Al-alloy and has a simple structure to install because of radioactivation by D-T neutrons. For high power heating, a new type antenna called Panel heater antenna is proposed. It has a wide radiation area and is able to select a parallel wave number k. The field pattern of the panel heater antenna is measured. The feasibility of the waveguide antenna is discussed for ion Bernstein wave heating. The radiation from the aperture of the double ridge waveguide is experimentally estimated with a load simulating the plasma.

  1. Design of a new broadband monopole optical nano-antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Rongguo; Ding, Jun; Arigong, Bayaner; Lin, Yuankun; Zhang, Hualiang

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel design of broadband monopole optical nano-antennas. It is consisted of a corrugated half elliptical patch inside an elliptical aperture. By adjusting the dimensions of the elliptical patch and the elliptical aperture, the overall performance of the proposed monopole nano-antenna can be made remarkable broadband. Full wave electromagnetic simulations have been used to investigate the effects of different parameters on the nano-antenna performance. Moreover, the proposed broadband nano-antenna can support light waves with different polarizations. It is expected that the new optical antenna will pave the way towards the development of high performance optical antennas and optical systems.

  2. Two-Arm Flexible Thermal Strap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urquiza, Eugenio; Vasquez, Cristal; Rodriquez, Jose I.; Leland, Robert S.; VanGorp, Byron E.

    2011-01-01

    Airborne and space infrared cameras require highly flexible direct cooling of mechanically-sensitive focal planes. A thermal electric cooler is often used together with a thermal strap as a means to transport the thermal energy removed from the infrared detector. While effective, traditional thermal straps are only truly flexible in one direction. In this scenario, a cooling solution must be highly conductive, lightweight, able to operate within a vacuum, and highly flexible in all axes to accommodate adjustment of the focal plane while transmitting minimal force. A two-armed thermal strap using three end pieces and a twisted section offers enhanced elastic movement, significantly beyond the motion permitted by existing thermal straps. This design innovation allows for large elastic displacements in two planes and moderate elasticity in the third plane. By contrast, a more conventional strap of the same conductance offers less flexibility and asymmetrical elasticity. The two-arm configuration reduces the bending moment of inertia for a given conductance by creating the same cross-sectional area for thermal conduction, but with only half the thickness. This reduction in the thickness has a significant effect on the flexibility since there is a cubic relationship between the thickness and the rigidity or bending moment of inertia. The novelty of the technology lies in the mechanical design and manufacturing of the thermal strap. The enhanced flexibility will facilitate cooling of mechanically sensitive components (example: optical focal planes). This development is a significant contribution to the thermal cooling of optics. It is known to be especially important in the thermal control of optical focal planes due to their highly sensitive alignment requirements and mechanical sensitivity; however, many other applications exist including the cooling of gimbal-mounted components.

  3. Factors in the design of adaptive antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, P.

    A brief review of adaptive antenna technology is given, and two topic areas are addressed. The first is concerned with the general difficulties encountered in design, in particular the avoidance of nulling wanted signals, the provision of an adequate rate of convergence towards a desired characteristic, and the degradation of null depths caused by the proximity of the platform and by dispersion in the array and receiving channels. The second topic concerns specific design approaches. Closed loop processors, in which the array output is sensed in order to provide a drive to the weight networks, are exemplified by a feedback loop correlator design and a weight perturbation technique. An example of open-loop control of weight values is also included, and its lack of self-correction is shown to be disadvantageous compared to the closed loop approach. Advanced methods, associated with sample matrix inversion, are also summarized.

  4. Evolutionary Design of a Phased Array Antenna Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Al; Linden, Derek; Lohn, Jason

    2006-01-01

    We present an evolved S-band phased array antenna element design that meets the requirements of NASA's TDRS-C communications satellite scheduled for launch early next decade. The original specification called for two types of elements, one for receive only and one for transmit/receive. We were able to evolve a single element design that meets both specifications thereby simplifying the antenna and reducing testing and integration costs. The highest performance antenna found using a genetic algorithm and stochastic hill-climbing has been fabricated and tested. Laboratory results are largely consistent with simulation. Researchers have been investigating evolutionary antenna design and optimization since the early 1990s, and the field has grown in recent years its computer speed has increased and electromagnetic simulators have improved. Many antenna types have been investigated, including wire antennas, antenna arrays and quadrifilar helical antennas. In particular, our laboratory evolved a wire antenna design for NASA's Space Technology 5 (ST5) spacecraft. This antenna has been fabricated, tested, and is scheduled for launch on the three spacecraft in 2006.

  5. Electromagnetic design of a microwave radiometer antenna system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, P. K.; Cockrell, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    A preliminary electromagnetic (EM) design of a radiometric antenna system was developed for the microwave radiometer spacecraft mission. The antenna system consists of a large spherical reflector and an array of feed horns along a concentric circular arc in front of the reflector. The reflector antenna was sized to simultaneously produce 200 contiguous 1 km diameter footprints with an overall beam efficiency of 90 percent, and the feed horns and feed horn array were designed to monitor the radiation from the footprints.

  6. Progress in integrated-circuit horn antennas for receiver applications. Part 1: Antenna design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eleftheriades, George V.; Ali-Ahmad, Walid Y.; Rebeiz, Gabriel M.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to present a systematic method for the design of multimode quasi-integrated horn antennas. The design methodology is based on the Gaussian beam approach and the structures are optimized for achieving maximum fundamental Gaussian coupling efficiency. For this purpose, a hybrid technique is employed in which the integrated part of the antennas is treated using full-wave analysis, whereas the machined part is treated using an approximate method. This results in a simple and efficient design process. The developed design procedure has been applied for the design of a 20, a 23, and a 25 dB quasi-integrated horn antennas, all with a Gaussian coupling efficiency exceeding 97 percent. The designed antennas have been tested and characterized using both full-wave analysis and 90 GHz/370 GHz measurements.

  7. TOPICA: an accurate and efficient numerical tool for analysis and design of ICRF antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancellotti, V.; Milanesio, D.; Maggiora, R.; Vecchi, G.; Kyrytsya, V.

    2006-07-01

    The demand for a predictive tool to help in designing ion-cyclotron radio frequency (ICRF) antenna systems for today's fusion experiments has driven the development of codes such as ICANT, RANT3D, and the early development of TOPICA (TOrino Polytechnic Ion Cyclotron Antenna) code. This paper describes the substantive evolution of TOPICA formulation and implementation that presently allow it to handle the actual geometry of ICRF antennas (with curved, solid straps, a general-shape housing, Faraday screen, etc) as well as an accurate plasma description, accounting for density and temperature profiles and finite Larmor radius effects. The antenna is assumed to be housed in a recess-like enclosure. Both goals have been attained by formally separating the problem into two parts: the vacuum region around the antenna and the plasma region inside the toroidal chamber. Field continuity and boundary conditions allow formulating of a set of two coupled integral equations for the unknown equivalent (current) sources; then the equations are reduced to a linear system by a method of moments solution scheme employing 2D finite elements defined over a 3D non-planar surface triangular-cell mesh. In the vacuum region calculations are done in the spatial (configuration) domain, whereas in the plasma region a spectral (wavenumber) representation of fields and currents is adopted, thus permitting a description of the plasma by a surface impedance matrix. Owing to this approach, any plasma model can be used in principle, and at present the FELICE code has been employed. The natural outcomes of TOPICA are the induced currents on the conductors (antenna, housing, etc) and the electric field in front of the plasma, whence the antenna circuit parameters (impedance/scattering matrices), the radiated power and the fields (at locations other than the chamber aperture) are then obtained. An accurate model of the feeding coaxial lines is also included. The theoretical model and its TOPICA

  8. Design and verification of mechanisms for a large foldable antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhmann, Hans Jurgen; Etzler, Carl Christian; Wagner, Rudolf

    1989-01-01

    The characteristics of the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) antenna aboard the ESA Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS-1) are presented. The antenna is folded into a dense package for launch and is deployed in orbit. The design requirements and constraints, their impact on the design, and the resulting features of the mechanisms are discussed.

  9. Modern Design of Resonant Edge-Slot Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosselin, R. B.

    2006-01-01

    Resonant edge-slot (slotted-waveguide) array antennas can now be designed very accurately following a modern computational approach like that followed for some other microwave components. This modern approach makes it possible to design superior antennas at lower cost than was previously possible. Heretofore, the physical and engineering knowledge of resonant edge-slot array antennas had remained immature since they were introduced during World War II. This is because despite their mechanical simplicity, high reliability, and potential for operation with high efficiency, the electromagnetic behavior of resonant edge-slot antennas is very complex. Because engineering design formulas and curves for such antennas are not available in the open literature, designers have been forced to implement iterative processes of fabricating and testing multiple prototypes to derive design databases, each unique for a specific combination of operating frequency and set of waveguide tube dimensions. The expensive, time-consuming nature of these processes has inhibited the use of resonant edge-slot antennas. The present modern approach reduces costs by making it unnecessary to build and test multiple prototypes. As an additional benefit, this approach affords a capability to design an array of slots having different dimensions to taper the antenna illumination to reduce the amplitudes of unwanted side lobes. The heart of the modern approach is the use of the latest commercially available microwave-design software, which implements finite-element models of electromagnetic fields in and around waveguides, antenna elements, and similar components. Instead of building and testing prototypes, one builds a database and constructs design curves from the results of computational simulations for sets of design parameters. The figure shows a resonant edge-slot antenna designed following this approach. Intended for use as part of a radiometer operating at a frequency of 10.7 GHz, this antenna

  10. Antenna Designs for the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) Spacecraft, Lander, and Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vacchione, Joseph; Thelen, Michael; Brown, Paula; Huang, John; Kelly, Ken; Krishnan, Satish

    2001-01-01

    This presentation focuses on the design of antennas for the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER). Specific topics covered include: MER spacecraft architecture, the evolution of an antenna system, MER cruise stage antennas, antenna stacks, the heat-shield/back shell antenna, and lander and rover antennas. Additionally, the mission's science objectives are reviewed.

  11. Whip antenna design for portable rf systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponnapalli, Saila; Canora, Frank J.

    1995-12-01

    Whip type antennas are probably the most commonly used antennas in portable rf systems, such as cordless and cellular phones, rf enabled laptop computers, personal digital assistants (PDAs), and handheld computers. Whip antennas are almost always mounted on the chassis which contains the radio and other electronics. The chassis is usually a molded plastic which is coated with a conducting paint for EMI purposes. The chassis which appears as a lossy conductor to the antenna, has several effects -- detuning, altering the gain of the antenna, and shadowing its radiation pattern. Extensive modeling and measurements must be performed in order to fully characterize the affects of the chassis on the whip antenna, and to optimize antenna type, orientation and position. In many instances, modeling plays a more important role in prediction of the performance of whip antennas, since measurements become difficult due to the presence of common mode current on feed cables. In this paper models and measurements are used to discuss the optimum choice of whip antennas and the impact of the chassis on radiation characteristics. A modeling tool which has been previously described and has been successfully used to predict radiated field patterns is used for simulations, and measured and modeled results are shown.

  12. ORNL compact loop antenna design for TFTR and Tore Supra

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.J.; Baity, F.W.; Bryan, W.E.; Hoffman, D.J.; McIlwain, R.L. ); Ray, J.M. )

    1987-01-01

    The goal supplemental ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) of fusion plasma is to deliver power at high efficiencies deep within the plasma. The technology for fast-wave ICRH has reached the point of requiring proof-of-performance'' demonstration of specific antenna configurations of specific antenna configurations and their mechanical adequacy for operating in a fusion environment. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed the compact loop antenna concept based on a resonant double loop (RDL) configuration for use in both Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and the Tore Supra ICRH programs. A description and a comparison of the technologies developed in the two designs are presented. The electrical circuit and the mechanical philosophy employed are the same for both antennas, but different operating environments result in substantial differences in the design of specific components. The ORNL TFTR antenna is designed to deliver 4 MW over a 2-s pulse, and the ORNL Tore Supra antenna is designed for 4 MW and essentially steady-state conditions. The TFTR design embodies the first operations compact RDL antenna, and the Tore Supra antenna extends the technology to an operational duty cycle consistent with reactor-relevant applications. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Preliminary design of a redundant strapped down inertial navigation unit using two-degree-of-freedom tuned-gimbal gyroscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    This redundant strapdown INS preliminary design study demonstrates the practicality of a skewed sensor system configuration by means of: (1) devising a practical system mechanization utilizing proven strapdown instruments, (2) thoroughly analyzing the skewed sensor redundancy management concept to determine optimum geometry, data processing requirements, and realistic reliability estimates, and (3) implementing the redundant computers into a low-cost, maintainable configuration.

  14. The CS-2 satellite antenna design and characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misawa, M.; Watanabe, M.; Kumazawa, H.; Ueno, K.

    A satellite antenna has been studied for use in the Japanese domestic satellite communication system. In the electrical design, various design parameters were evaluated to estimate their effects on electrical performance in order to establish a shaped beam antenna covering the 4 GHz to 30 GHz band. In thermal and structural aspects, the design method based on analyses was verified by confirming the mechanical properties in enviromental tests. After a series of tests, it was confirmed that the antenna satisfied all the characteristics required for space use.

  15. Inductive antenna stent: design, fabrication and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidi Mohammadi, Abdolreza; Ali, Mohamed Sultan Mohamed; Lappin, Derry; Schlosser, Colin; Takahata, Kenichi

    2013-02-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication, and electromechanical characteristics of inductive stents developed for intelligent stent applications. The stents, fabricated out of 316L stainless-steel tubes using laser machining, are patterned to have zigzag loops without bridge struts, and when expanded, become a helix-like structure. Highly conductive metals such as copper and gold are coated on the stents to improve their inductive/antenna function. The Q-factor of the stent is shown to increase by a factor of 7 at 150 MHz with copper coating. The expansion of the stent from 2 to 4 mm diameter results in a 3.2× increase in the inductance, obtaining ˜1 µH at a similar frequency. The stent passivated by Parylene-C film is used to characterize its resonance in different media including saline. The copper-coated inductive stent exhibits a 2.4× radial stiffness for 1 mm strain as well as a 16× bending compliance compared with a commercial stent, each of which is potentially beneficial in preventing/mitigating stent failures such as recoil as well as enabling easier navigation through intricate blood vessels. The mechanical stiffness may be tailored by adjusting stent-wire thickness while maintaining necessary coating thickness to achieve particular mechanical requirements and high inductive performance simultaneously.

  16. Electrical optimization of the ICH antenna array for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, P. M.; Swain, D. W.; Carter, M. D.; Taylor, D. J.; Bosia, G.

    1997-04-01

    The present design of the ITER ICH antenna array comprises two poloidal by four toroidal current elements in each of four ports. Each current element forms a resonant double loop (RDL) with power fed to a pretuned matchpoint on the strap; the matching is accomplished using slow-wave transmission lines as adjustable shorted-stub tuners on other end of the current strap. The power requirement is 12.5 MW per port over the frequency range of 40-70 MHz, with extended operation to 80 MHz desirable. The antenna design optimization process includes (1) strap shaping to minimize strap voltages and rf E-fields along B-field lines and (2) frame/Faraday shield geometry design to improve plasma coupling, wave spectrum directivity, and phase control. For the ignited plasma parameters, the optimized array design delivers full power over the ranges of 40-80 MHz in frequency and 0° to 180° in phase. The maximum strap voltage is 41 kV and the maximum parallel E-field is 16 kV/cm for the worst case over these ranges. The array directivity for current drive operation is calculated to be close to 80%.

  17. Antenna design for the Inmarsat second generation communication satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C. C.; McDonach, C. A.

    1990-02-01

    The Inmarsat satellite system provides international marine communications. This paper presents the RF design of a family of three antennas giving global coverage for the second generation of Inmarsat spacecraft. The antennas are direct radiating arrays operating at L-band and C-band with circular polarization. A very stringent low profile requirement is achieved by the use of cup-dipole radiators and integrated feed technology. The design of the cup-dipole is presented in detail together with the trade-offs leading to its selection as the radiating element. The measured antenna performance for all three arrays is presented showing good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  18. Tri-band microstrip antenna design for wireless communication applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sami, Gehan; Mohanna, Mahmoud; Rabeh, Mohamed L.

    2013-06-01

    This paper introduces a novel rectangular tri-band patch antenna that is fabricated and measured for wireless communication systems. The introduced antenna is designed for WLAN and WiMAX applications. The desired tri-band operation was obtained by proper loading for a rectangular patch antenna using slots and shorting pins. The optimal location and dimension for the loaded elements were obtained with the aid of interfacing a Genetic Algorithm (GA) model with an Ansoft High Frequency Structural Simulator (HFSS). The results obtained from our simulated antenna show 5.8% impedance matching band width at 2.4 GHz, 3.7% at 3.5 GHz and 1.57% at 5.7 GHz. In addition, an equivalent circuit of the proposed antenna is introduced using the least square curve fitting optimization technique.

  19. Design, performance, and grounding aspects of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor ion cyclotron range of frequencies antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Durodié, F. Dumortier, P.; Vrancken, M.; Messiaen, A.; Huygen, S.; Louche, F.; Van Schoor, M.; Vervier, M.; Winkler, K.

    2014-06-15

    ITER's Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) system [Lamalle et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 88, 517–520 (2013)] comprises two antenna launchers designed by CYCLE (a consortium of European associations listed in the author affiliations above) on behalf of ITER Organisation (IO), each inserted as a Port Plug (PP) into one of ITER's Vacuum Vessel (VV) ports. Each launcher is an array of 4 toroidal by 6 poloidal RF current straps specified to couple up to 20 MW in total to the plasma in the frequency range of 40 to 55 MHz but limited to a maximum system voltage of 45 kV and limits on RF electric fields depending on their location and direction with respect to, respectively, the torus vacuum and the toroidal magnetic field. A crucial aspect of coupling ICRF power to plasmas is the knowledge of the plasma density profiles in the Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) and the location of the RF current straps with respect to the SOL. The launcher layout and details were optimized and its performance estimated for a worst case SOL provided by the IO. The paper summarizes the estimated performance obtained within the operational parameter space specified by IO. Aspects of the RF grounding of the whole antenna PP to the VV port and the effect of the voids between the PP and the Blanket Shielding Modules (BSM) surrounding the antenna front are discussed. These blanket modules, whose dimensions are of the order of the ICRF wavelengths, together with the clearance gaps between them will constitute a corrugated structure which will interact with the electromagnetic waves launched by ICRF antennas. The conditions in which the grooves constituted by the clearance gaps between the blanket modules can become resonant are studied. Simple analytical models and numerical simulations show that mushroom type structures (with larger gaps at the back than at the front) can bring down the resonance frequencies, which could lead to large voltages in the gaps between the blanket modules and perturb the

  20. Design, performance, and grounding aspects of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor ion cyclotron range of frequencies antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durodié, F.; Dumortier, P.; Vrancken, M.; Messiaen, A.; Bamber, R.; Hancock, D.; Huygen, S.; Lockley, D.; Louche, F.; Maggiora, R.; Milanesio, D.; Nightingale, M. P. S.; Shannon, M.; Tigwell, P.; Van Schoor, M.; Vervier, M.; Wilson, D.; Winkler, K.

    2014-06-01

    ITER's Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) system [Lamalle et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 88, 517-520 (2013)] comprises two antenna launchers designed by CYCLE (a consortium of European associations listed in the author affiliations above) on behalf of ITER Organisation (IO), each inserted as a Port Plug (PP) into one of ITER's Vacuum Vessel (VV) ports. Each launcher is an array of 4 toroidal by 6 poloidal RF current straps specified to couple up to 20 MW in total to the plasma in the frequency range of 40 to 55 MHz but limited to a maximum system voltage of 45 kV and limits on RF electric fields depending on their location and direction with respect to, respectively, the torus vacuum and the toroidal magnetic field. A crucial aspect of coupling ICRF power to plasmas is the knowledge of the plasma density profiles in the Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) and the location of the RF current straps with respect to the SOL. The launcher layout and details were optimized and its performance estimated for a worst case SOL provided by the IO. The paper summarizes the estimated performance obtained within the operational parameter space specified by IO. Aspects of the RF grounding of the whole antenna PP to the VV port and the effect of the voids between the PP and the Blanket Shielding Modules (BSM) surrounding the antenna front are discussed. These blanket modules, whose dimensions are of the order of the ICRF wavelengths, together with the clearance gaps between them will constitute a corrugated structure which will interact with the electromagnetic waves launched by ICRF antennas. The conditions in which the grooves constituted by the clearance gaps between the blanket modules can become resonant are studied. Simple analytical models and numerical simulations show that mushroom type structures (with larger gaps at the back than at the front) can bring down the resonance frequencies, which could lead to large voltages in the gaps between the blanket modules and perturb the RF

  1. A finite difference approach to microstrip antenna design

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, M.J.; Bevensee, R.M.; Pennock, S.T.

    1986-12-01

    Microstrip antennas have received increased attention in recent years, due to their size and cost advantages. Analysis of the microstrip structure has proved difficult due to the presence of the dielectric substrate, particularly for complex geometries. One possible approach to a solution is the use of a finite difference computer code to model a proposed microstrip antenna design. The models are easily constructed and altered, and code versions are available which allow input impedance or far-field patterns to be calculated. Results for some simple antenna geometries will be presented.

  2. Advanced design methodologies and novel applications of reflectarray antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayeri, Payam

    Reflectarray antennas combine the numerous advantages of printed antenna arrays and reflector antennas and create a hybrid high-gain antenna with a low-profile, low-mass, and diversified radiation performance. Reflectarrays are now emerging as the new generation of high-gain antennas for long-distance communications. In this dissertation, some advanced concepts demonstrating novel features of reflectarray antennas are presented. • First, various approaches for radiation analysis of reflectarray antennas are described and implemented. Numerical results are then presented for a variety of systems and the advantages, limitations, and accuracy of these approaches are discussed and compared with each other. • A broadband technique by using sub-wavelength elements is proposed and prototypes are fabricated and tested. This technique enables the reflectarray to achieve a significant bandwidth improvement with no additional cost. • Infrared reflectarrays antennas are studied for possible applications in concentrating solar power systems. Material losses, an important design issue at infrared frequencies, are investigated and reflectarrays consisted of dielectric resonant elements are proposed with low-loss features at infrared. • Multi-beam reflectarray antennas are studied and it is demonstrated that by optimizing the phase of the elements, a desirable multi-beam performance can be achieved using a single-feed. Local and global phase-only optimization techniques have been implemented. Two Ka-band quad-beam prototypes with symmetric and asymmetric beams have been fabricated and tested. • Different approaches for beam-scanning with reflectarray antennas are also reviewed and it is shown that for moderately wide angle beam-scanning, utilizing a feed displacement technique is more suitable than an aperture phase tuning approach. A feed displacement beam-scanning design with novel aperture phase distribution is proposed for the reflectarray antenna, and is further

  3. Study and design of the ion cyclotron resonance heating system for the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongena, J.; Messiaen, A.; Van Eester, D.; Schweer, B.; Dumortier, P.; Durodie, F.; Kazakov, Ye. O.; Louche, F.; Vervier, M.; Koch, R.; Krivska, A.; Lyssoivan, A.; Van Schoor, M.; Wauters, T.; Borsuk, V.; Neubauer, O.; Schmitz, O.; Offermans, G.; Altenburg, Y.; Baylard, C.; Birus, D.; Bozhenkov, S.; Hartmann, D. A.; Kallmeyer, J. P.; Renard, S.; Wolf, R. C.; Fülöp, T.

    2014-06-01

    The current status of the mechanical and electromagnetic design for the ICRF antenna system for W7-X is presented. Two antenna plugins are discussed: one consisting of a pair of straps with pre-matching to cover the first frequency band, 25-38 MHz, and a second one consisting of two short strap triplets to cover a frequency band around 76 MHz. This paper focusses on the two strap antenna for the lower frequency band. Power coupling of the antenna to a reference plasma profile is studied with the help of the codes TOPICA and Microwave Studio that deliver the scattering matrix needed for the optimization of the geometric parameters of the straps and antenna box. Radiation power spectra for different phasings of the two straps are obtained using the code ANTITER II and different heating scenario are discussed. The potential for heating, fast particle generation, and current drive is discussed. The problem of RF coupling through the plasma edge and of edge power deposition is summarized. Important elements of the complete ion cyclotron resonance heating system are discussed: a resonator circuit with tap feed to limit the maximum voltage in the system, and a decoupler to counterbalance the large mutual coupling between the 2 straps. The mechanical design highlights the challenges encountered with this antenna: adaptation to a large variety of plasma configurations, the limited space within the port to accommodate the necessary matching components and the watercooling needed for long pulse operation.

  4. Study and design of the ion cyclotron resonance heating system for the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X

    SciTech Connect

    Ongena, J.; Messiaen, A.; Van Eester, D.; Schweer, B.; Dumortier, P.; Durodie, F.; Kazakov, Ye. O.; Louche, F.; Vervier, M.; Koch, R.; Krivska, A.; Lyssoivan, A.; Van Schoor, M.; Wauters, T.; Borsuk, V.; Neubauer, O.; Schmitz, O.; Altenburg, Y.; Baylard, C.; and others

    2014-06-15

    The current status of the mechanical and electromagnetic design for the ICRF antenna system for W7-X is presented. Two antenna plugins are discussed: one consisting of a pair of straps with pre-matching to cover the first frequency band, 25–38 MHz, and a second one consisting of two short strap triplets to cover a frequency band around 76 MHz. This paper focusses on the two strap antenna for the lower frequency band. Power coupling of the antenna to a reference plasma profile is studied with the help of the codes TOPICA and Microwave Studio that deliver the scattering matrix needed for the optimization of the geometric parameters of the straps and antenna box. Radiation power spectra for different phasings of the two straps are obtained using the code ANTITER II and different heating scenario are discussed. The potential for heating, fast particle generation, and current drive is discussed. The problem of RF coupling through the plasma edge and of edge power deposition is summarized. Important elements of the complete ion cyclotron resonance heating system are discussed: a resonator circuit with tap feed to limit the maximum voltage in the system, and a decoupler to counterbalance the large mutual coupling between the 2 straps. The mechanical design highlights the challenges encountered with this antenna: adaptation to a large variety of plasma configurations, the limited space within the port to accommodate the necessary matching components and the watercooling needed for long pulse operation.

  5. Interdisciplinary design analysis of a precision spacecraft antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinbach, R. E.; Winegar, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) will operate in the 20/30 GHz range (Ka Band), and will include a multi-beam antenna (MBA) capable of 0.3 degree scanning spot beams with very high beam-to-beam isolation. The antenna Radio Frequency (RF) performance requirements lead to stringent requirements on the antenna reflector surface shape. A prediction of RF performance of a potential flight model antenna reflector operating under space environmental conditions is made using a radiant heat input model (TRASYS), a thermal analyzer (SINDA), a structural model (NASTRAN), and RF far field pattern simulation. Interfacing software has been written to pass thermal model temperature results to the structural model, and structural model thermal deformation results to the RF far field pattern simulation. A complete analysis can be performed in a single computer run, and potential changes in design can be quickly and easily evaluated using this interdisciplinary design analysis tool.

  6. Design considerations for an archimedean slot spiral antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nurnberger, Michael W.; Volakis, John L.

    1995-01-01

    The design goal is to develop a 118-157 MHz, vertically polarized, low-profile (or conformal) antenna as a replacement for VHF AM blade antennas on aircraft. This design is to be arrived at by scaling the dimensions of an antenna designed for a center frequency of 1.1 GHz. The design prior to scaling may have the following maximum dimensions: diameter less than 3.70 in. and thickness less than 0.50 in. Although a four-arm spiral design was originally suggested, a two-arm spiral may also be used, as both mode-1 and mode-2 (sum and difference) radiation patterns aren't required. While a four-arm spiral can easily be designed should both sum and difference patterns be required, the two-arm design will provide the required sum pattern and simplify the design problem somewhat: only one feed is required, and the feed area geometry is more straightforward. Polarization requirements dictate that a slot spiral be used, as opposed to a wire spiral. Two similar radiating structures were considered. The first is the standard archimedean spiral antenna. The second is a hollow archimedean spiral antenna, essentially a standard archimedean spiral with the inner portion removed.

  7. Textile materials for the design of wearable antennas: a survey.

    PubMed

    Salvado, Rita; Loss, Caroline; Gonçalves, Ricardo; Pinho, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    In the broad context of Wireless Body Sensor Networks for healthcare and pervasive applications, the design of wearable antennas offers the possibility of ubiquitous monitoring, communication and energy harvesting and storage. Specific requirements for wearable antennas are a planar structure and flexible construction materials. Several properties of the materials influence the behaviour of the antenna. For instance, the bandwidth and the efficiency of a planar microstrip antenna are mainly determined by the permittivity and the thickness of the substrate. The use of textiles in wearable antennas requires the characterization of their properties. Specific electrical conductive textiles are available on the market and have been successfully used. Ordinary textile fabrics have been used as substrates. However, little information can be found on the electromagnetic properties of regular textiles. Therefore this paper is mainly focused on the analysis of the dielectric properties of normal fabrics. In general, textiles present a very low dielectric constant that reduces the surface wave losses and increases the impedance bandwidth of the antenna. However, textile materials are constantly exchanging water molecules with the surroundings, which affects their electromagnetic properties. In addition, textile fabrics are porous, anisotropic and compressible materials whose thickness and density might change with low pressures. Therefore it is important to know how these characteristics influence the behaviour of the antenna in order to minimize unwanted effects. This paper presents a survey of the key points for the design and development of textile antennas, from the choice of the textile materials to the framing of the antenna. An analysis of the textile materials that have been used is also presented. PMID:23202235

  8. Textile Materials for the Design of Wearable Antennas: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Salvado, Rita; Loss, Caroline; Gonçalves, Ricardo; Pinho, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    In the broad context of Wireless Body Sensor Networks for healthcare and pervasive applications, the design of wearable antennas offers the possibility of ubiquitous monitoring, communication and energy harvesting and storage. Specific requirements for wearable antennas are a planar structure and flexible construction materials. Several properties of the materials influence the behaviour of the antenna. For instance, the bandwidth and the efficiency of a planar microstrip antenna are mainly determined by the permittivity and the thickness of the substrate. The use of textiles in wearable antennas requires the characterization of their properties. Specific electrical conductive textiles are available on the market and have been successfully used. Ordinary textile fabrics have been used as substrates. However, little information can be found on the electromagnetic properties of regular textiles. Therefore this paper is mainly focused on the analysis of the dielectric properties of normal fabrics. In general, textiles present a very low dielectric constant that reduces the surface wave losses and increases the impedance bandwidth of the antenna. However, textile materials are constantly exchanging water molecules with the surroundings, which affects their electromagnetic properties. In addition, textile fabrics are porous, anisotropic and compressible materials whose thickness and density might change with low pressures. Therefore it is important to know how these characteristics influence the behaviour of the antenna in order to minimize unwanted effects. This paper presents a survey of the key points for the design and development of textile antennas, from the choice of the textile materials to the framing of the antenna. An analysis of the textile materials that have been used is also presented. PMID:23202235

  9. RHCP- DESIGNING RECTANGULAR RIGHT-HANDED CIRCULARLY POLARIZED MICROSTRIP ANTENNAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, S. E.

    1994-01-01

    RHCP, the Right-Handed, Circularly Polarized Microstrip Antenna program, aids in the design of a rectangular antenna element, given the desired frequency of operation and substrate characteristics. RHCP begins the design calculations based on a square element with linear polarization. The effective dielectric constant and changes in electrical length due to fringing at the radiating element edges are taken into account. A coaxial feed is inset with 50 ohms input impedance. By placing the feed such that two orthonormal modes are produced in the antenna cavity, right- or left-handed circular polarization is obtained. Input to RHCP consists of desired frequency, dielectric constant, and substrate thickness. Output consists of the final rectangular geometry, the proposed feed inset placement, and actual input impedance. RHCP has been used successfully for frequencies between 2 and 15 GHz for thin substrates. This program was used to fabricate antenna elements for the S-band quad antennas on board the Space Shuttle, and is a part of the design project for the S-band phased array antenna radiating aperture. RHCP is written in FORTRAN 77 for interactive execution and has been implemented on a DEC VAX series computer operating under VMS. This program was developed in 1985.

  10. Benchmark simulations of ICRF antenna coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louche, F.; Lamalle, P. U.; Messiaen, A. M.; Van Compernolle, B.; Milanesio, D.; Maggiora, R.

    2007-09-01

    The paper reports on ongoing benchmark numerical simulations of antenna input impedance parameters in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies with different coupling codes: CST Microwave Studio, TOPICA and ANTITER 2. In particular we study the validity of the approximation of a magnetized plasma slab by a dielectric medium of suitably chosen permittivity. Different antenna models are considered: a single-strap antenna, a 4-strap antenna and the 24-strap ITER antenna array. Whilst the diagonal impedances are mostly in good agreement, some differences between the mutual terms predicted by Microwave Studio and TOPICA have yet to be resolved.

  11. Benchmark simulations of ICRF antenna coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Louche, F.; Lamalle, P. U.; Messiaen, A. M.; Compernolle, B. van; Milanesio, D.; Maggiora, R.

    2007-09-28

    The paper reports on ongoing benchmark numerical simulations of antenna input impedance parameters in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies with different coupling codes: CST Microwave Studio, TOPICA and ANTITER 2. In particular we study the validity of the approximation of a magnetized plasma slab by a dielectric medium of suitably chosen permittivity. Different antenna models are considered: a single-strap antenna, a 4-strap antenna and the 24-strap ITER antenna array. Whilst the diagonal impedances are mostly in good agreement, some differences between the mutual terms predicted by Microwave Studio and TOPICA have yet to be resolved.

  12. Design and Fabrication of Carbon Nano-structured Flexible Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamba, V. K.; Kumar, A.; Verma, M.; Dhariwal, S.; Sharma, K.; Anand, S.; Engles, D.

    2012-10-01

    With a development and an increasing interest in flexible electronics, for civil, medical, space, and military domains, we present a design of a patch antenna using CNT-polymer ink on fabrics. We have prepared CNT ink, and measured its properties to use as a conducting material for making patches. The antenna is designed on cotton and Songket fabric that resonates at 2.3GHz on a 1.23 mm, and 1.06 mm thick fabric substrate with ɛr ≍ 1.7, and ɛr ≍ 1.9 for cotton and Songket respectively. Measured and simulation results shows that band width depends on thickness and type of fabrics we used. All antenna parameters such as VSWR, return loss, gain and radiation pattern meet the design criteria.

  13. Antenna Design Considerations for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakula, Casey J.; Theofylaktos, Onoufrios

    2015-01-01

    NASA is designing an Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU)to support future manned missions beyond low-Earth orbit (LEO). A key component of the AEMU is the communications assembly that allows for the wireless transfer of voice, video, and suit telemetry. The Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) currently used on the International Space Station (ISS) contains a radio system with a single omni-directional resonant cavity antenna operating slightly above 400 MHz capable of transmitting and receiving data at a rate of about 125 kbps. Recent wireless communications architectures are calling for the inclusion of commercial wireless standards such as 802.11 that operate in higher frequency bands at much higher data rates. The current AEMU radio design supports a 400 MHz band for low-rate mission-critical data and a high-rate band based on commercial wireless local area network (WLAN) technology to support video, communication with non-extravehicular activity (EVA) assets such as wireless sensors and robotic assistants, and a redundant path for mission-critical EVA data. This paper recommends the replacement of the existing EMU antenna with a new antenna that maintains the performance characteristics of the current antenna but with lower weight and volume footprints. NASA has funded several firms to develop such an antenna over the past few years, and the most promising designs are variations on the basic patch antenna. This antenna technology at UHF is considered by the authors to be mature and ready for infusion into NASA AEMU technology development programs.

  14. Antenna servo design for tracking low-earth-orbiting satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawronski, W.; Mellstrom, J. A.

    1994-11-01

    The upcoming NASA missions will require tracking of low-orbit satellites. As a consequence, NASA antennas will be required to track satellites at higher rates than for the current deep-space missions. This paper investigates servo design issues for the 34-m beam-waveguide antennas that track low-orbit satellites. This includes upgrading the servo with a feedforward loop, monopulse controller design, and tracking error reduction either through proper choice of elevation pinion location or through application of a notch filter or adjustment of the elevation drive amplifier gain. Finally, improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio through averaging of the oversampled monopulse signal is described.

  15. Design of a Foldable Low-loss Microstrip Array Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christodoulou, C. G.; Wahid, P. F.; Haque, M. M.; Bailey, M. C.

    1999-01-01

    The design and analysis of a series-fed, foldable microstrip array antenna for radiometer applications is presented. The array antenna is composed of two equal sub arrays. Each sub array consists of a series of patches connected together through segments of microstrip lines. The sub arrays are fed 180 degree out of phase to ensure a symmetric radiation pattern. The design approach, is accomplished using the IE3D code that utilizes the method of moments. All experimental and simulated data are presented and discussed.

  16. ICRF antenna matching system with ferrite tuners for the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Binus, A.; Wukitch, S. J.; Koert, P.; Murray, R.; Pfeiffer, A.

    2015-12-01

    Real-time fast ferrite tuning (FFT) has been successfully implemented on the ICRF antennas on Alcator C-Mod. The former prototypical FFT system on the E-port 2-strap antenna has been upgraded using new ferrite tuners that have been designed specifically for the operational parameters of the Alcator C-Mod ICRF system (˜ 80 MHz). Another similar FFT system, with two ferrite tuners and one fixed-length stub, has been installed on the transmission line of the D-port 2-strap antenna. These two systems share a Linux-server-based real-time controller. These FFT systems are able to achieve and maintain the reflected power to the transmitters to less than 1% in real time during the plasma discharges under almost all plasma conditions, and help ensure reliable high power operation of the antennas. The innovative field-aligned (FA) 4-strap antenna on J-port has been found to have an interesting feature of loading insensitivity vs. plasma conditions. This feature allows us to significantly improve the matching for the FA J-port antenna by installing carefully designed stubs on the two transmission lines. The reduction of the RF voltages in the transmission lines has enabled the FA J-port antenna to deliver 3.7 MW RF power to plasmas out of the 4 MW source power in high performance I-mode plasmas.

  17. Design and analysis of annular antenna arrays with different reflectors.

    PubMed

    Shi, G; Joines, W T

    2004-09-01

    The design and performance of annular antenna arrays with reflectors is presented. Arrays with three shapes of reflectors are analysed and simulated. These include the corner reflector, the circular reflector and the elliptical reflector. Power-density distributions within the annular arrays with and without reflectors are obtained by using the FDTD method. Also, the image theory method is used to verify the FDTD results in one case. By comparing the power-density distribution pattern of all four of the array designs (three with different reflectors, one without reflector), it is readily seen in each case that the array with reflectors yields better power-efficiency than the array without reflectors and the elliptical reflector yields the best performance. Comparisons of each array are made using 4, 6 and 8 antennae in the annular array. By using the optimized results of the elliptical reflector, the requirement for the input-power level to each antenna is greatly reduced. PMID:15370818

  18. Magneto-Dielectric Wire Antennas Theory and Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, Tom

    supported by the magneto-dielectric structure and leads to useful design rules connecting the permeability of the material to the cross sectional area of the antenna in relation to the desired frequency of operation. The Green function problem of the permeable prolate spheroidal antenna is also solved as a good approximation to a finite cylinder.

  19. Design of compact electromagnetic impulse radiating antenna for melanoma treatment.

    PubMed

    Arockiasamy, Petrishia; Mohan, Sasikala

    2016-01-01

    Cancer therapy is one of the several new applications which use nanosecond and subnanosecond high voltage pulses. New treatment based on electromagnetic (EM) fields have been developed as non-surgical and minimally invasive treatments of tumors. In particular, subnanosecond pulses can introduce important non-thermal changes in cell biology, especially the permeabilization of the cell membrane. The motivation behind this work is to launch intense subnanosecond pulses to the target (tumors) non-invasively. This works focuses on the design of a compact intense pulsed EM radiating antenna. In tense EM waves radiated at the first focal point of the Prolate Spheroidal Reflector (PSR) are focused at the second focal point where the target (tumor) is present. Two antennas with PSR but fed with different compact wave radiator are designed to focus pulsed field at the second focal point. The PSR with modified bicone antenna feed and PSR with elliptically tapered horn antenna feed are designed. The design parameters and radiation performance are discussed. PMID:25651405

  20. Mechanical design and evaluation of a slotted CFRP waveguide antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knutsson, L.; Brunzell, S.; Magnusson, H.

    A development program for a slotted waveguide array antenna made of metallized CFRP was carried out. The main objective was to minimize the weight of the structure without degrading the electrical and mechanical performance. This paper focuses on mechanical design aspects and manufacturing methods of metallized CFRP waveguides and assembly of an antenna array. A weight saving of approximately 40 percent was accomplished by the CFRP structure compared to a corresponding aluminum structure. Electrical properties and cost were essentially equal for the two concepts.

  1. TOPLHA: an accurate and efficient numerical tool for analysis and design of LH antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanesio, D.; Lancellotti, V.; Meneghini, O.; Maggiora, R.; Vecchi, G.; Bilato, R.

    2007-09-01

    Auxiliary ICRF heating systems in tokamaks often involve large complex antennas, made up of several conducting straps hosted in distinct cavities that open towards the plasma. The same holds especially true in the LH regime, wherein the antennas are comprised of arrays of many phased waveguides. Upon observing that the various cavities or waveguides couple to each other only through the EM fields existing over the plasma-facing apertures, we self-consistently formulated the EM problem by a convenient set of multiple coupled integral equations. Subsequent application of the Method of Moments yields a highly sparse algebraic system; therefore formal inversion of the system matrix happens to be not so memory demanding, despite the number of unknowns may be quite large (typically 105 or so). The overall strategy has been implemented in an enhanced version of TOPICA (Torino Polytechnic Ion Cyclotron Antenna) and in a newly developed code named TOPLHA (Torino Polytechnic Lower Hybrid Antenna). Both are simulation and prediction tools for plasma facing antennas that incorporate commercial-grade 3D graphic interfaces along with an accurate description of the plasma. In this work we present the new proposed formulation along with examples of application to real life large LH antenna systems.

  2. Array antennas design in dependence of element-phasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zichner, R.; Chandra, M.

    2009-05-01

    Array antennas are used in science as well as for commercial and military purposes. The used element antennas act in accordance to their desired uses, for example radars or stationer GPS satellites. Typical components are for example slotted waveguides, patches, yagi-antennas and helix-antennas. All these elements do stand out with their own characteristics based on their special applications. If these elements are formed into an array configuration, the effectiveness can be improved immensely. There is a relation between the array functions and the physical array properties like the element alignment (linear, planar, circular), distances between the elements and so on. Among the physical properties there are other attributes like phase or amplitude coefficients, which are of great significance. The aim of this study was to provide an insight into the problem of array design, as far as the antenna element phase is concerned. Along with this, array radiation characteristics effects are presented. With the help of the extracted cognitions beam forming behaviour can be shown and the array phase behaviour can be analysed. One of the main applications is to simulate the array characteristics, like the radiation characteristic or the gain, for displacements of the array feeding point. A software solution that simulates the phase shift of a given array pattern is sought to adjust the feeding point.

  3. Miniaturization design and implementation of magnetic field coupled RFID antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Tiling

    2013-03-01

    The development of internet of things has brought new opportunities and challenges to the application of RFID tags. Moreover, the Miniaturization application trend of tags at present has become the mainstream of development. In this paper, the double-layer design is to reduce the size of HF antenna, and the magnetic null point of magnetic reconnection region between the RLC resonant circuit and the reader provides sufficient energy to the miniaturization of antenna. The calculated and experimental results show that the miniaturization of HF antennas can meet the reading and writing requirement of the international standard ISO/IEC14443 standard. The results of this paper may make a positive contribution to the applications of RFID technology.

  4. Conceptual design for scaled truss antenna flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, W. H.

    1984-01-01

    The conceptual design for a scaled truss antenna structures experiment program (STASEP) is presented. The hardware analysis of the scaled truss antenna structure (STAS) was performed by interactive design and evaluation of advanced spacecraft (IDEAS) computer aided, interactive, design and analysis program. Four STAS's were designed to be launched by the Shuttle, tested by using the space technology experiments platform (STEP) and space transportation system (STS), and then free flown in short lifetime orbits. Data were gathered on deployment, structural characteristics, geometric accuracies, thermal performance, and drag and lifetime as an orbiting spacecraft. Structural and thermal properties were determined for the STAS, including mass properties, thermal loading, structural natural frequencies, and mode shapes. The necessary analysis, scaling, and ground testing are discussed.

  5. An alternative feed design for the MRO antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbriale, William A.

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), scheduled for launch in 2005, will study the history of water on Mars. The current feed design for the 3-meter reflector antenna uses a dielectrically supported disk-on-rod Kaband (32 GHz) feed in the center of an X-band (7.2, 8.4 GHz) corrugated horn. As a potential backup design in case of problems, an alternate feed design for the MRO antenna that does not use any dielectric materials or a disc-on-rod was developed. The design uses a Ka-band Potter Horn in the center of the current Xband MRO corrugated horn. Using the same High-gain reflector assembly, the new feed provides virtually the same X-band gain (within 0.1 db) and more than 1 dB improvement at Ka-band.

  6. Design of an ICRF plasma thruster antenna by TOPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecchi, Giuseppe; Lancellotti, Vito; Maggiora, Riccardo

    2006-10-01

    A typical RF plasma thruster is comprised of an RF plasma source, an open-ended magnetic confinement device, an RF acceleration unit and a magnetic nozzle. The usual choice for the acceleration is to employ the Ion-Cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF), a well established technology in fusion experiments for transferring large RF powers to magnetized plasmas. To help design RF thruster ICRF antennas, TOPICA (Torino Polytechnic Ion Cyclotron Antenna) code [1] has been recently extended to handle cylindrically symmetric plasmas. The latter entailed developing a wholly new module of TOPICA charged with the task of solving Maxwell's equations in cylindrical magnetized warm plasmas and yielding the Green's functionY (m,kz), i.e. the relationship at the air-plasma interface between the transverse magnetic and electric fields in the spectral (wavenumber) domain. The approach to the problem of determining the antenna input impedance relies on an integral-equation formulation for the self-consistent evaluation of the current distribution on the conductors. This work reports on TOPICA evolution and presents the design of an RF thruster ICRF antenna. *V. Lancellotti et al., Nucl. Fusion, 46 (2006) S476-S499

  7. An experimental and analytical evaluation of the tapered tension-torsion strap concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Louie, Alexander

    1988-01-01

    A new free-tip rotor moment controller designed to increase torque output (a restoring moment) was proposed. The controller would be used as a retention device for the freely pitching tip of a helicopter rotor. The new design featured a tapered tension-torsion strap instead of the previously used parellel strap. A tapered strap has a larger separation between the tension wires at the retention end than at the oscillating end; separation is equal at both ends for a parallel strap. A simple dynamic analysis was developed and an experiment performed to evaluate this tapered strap concept. The test results indicated that the torsional spring stiffness of the strap, represented by a torsional pendulum, increased with the amount of taper. The predicted dynamic characteristics of the pendulum also confirmed this observation and correlated reasonably well with the experimental results. It could be concluded from the experimental and analytical results that the tapered strap accomplished increased torque output when compared to the parellel strap.

  8. Method of making steel strapping and strip

    SciTech Connect

    Robert D. Reilly

    2000-02-16

    The technical progress obtained for this time frame consisted of the awarding of two contracts for determination of metallurgical parameters for heat treatment of strapping and strip which are unavailable from current technology and/or published data in this field. The two contractors were Bricmont, Inc. and the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the Technological Institute of Northwestern University, Evanston, IL. Phase 1 of the two stage contract with Bricmont, Inc. which provided a computer analysis of the cooling rates of a typical range of thickness' of strapping was completed. This study was developed for the purpose of determining the time parameters for quenching low carbon steels to a martensitic microstructure within the time frame of the design of the proposed process. It also provides design criteria for cooling to ambient for the total process. This data is required for Phase 2 of the Bricmont proposal which completes the design and specifications of the total heat treating and cooling system for the process. This becomes the basis for developing the cost and space requirements for this component of the production line. The authors do not intend to award Phase 2 until the work done at Northwestern University discussed hereafter is completed. On or about May 1, 1999 a contract for a project entitled ``Effects of Steel Composition and Quench Rate on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Strapping'' to be performed at the Department of Materials Science and Engineering was awarded. The delay in initiating this project was due to the legal interpretation and final agreement of the intellectual provisions of the award by the author's attorneys, Northwestern's attorneys and the legal representative in the Chicago office of the DOE. The work to date includes rapid quenching of a number of different steel compositions and microstructure on an existing drop quench test apparatus. It was initially assumed that this procedure would simulate

  9. Design and fabrication of microstrip antenna arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A microstrip array project was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of designing and fabricating simple, low cost, low sidelobe phased arrays with circular disk microstrip radiating elements. Design data were presented for microstrip elements and arrays including the effects of the protective covers, the mutual interaction between elements, and stripline feed network design. Low cost multilayer laminate fabrication techniques were also investigated. Utilizing this design data two C-band low sidelobe arrays were fabricated and tested: an eight-element linear and a sixty-four element planar array. These arrays incorporated stripline Butler matrix feed networks to produce a low sidelobe broadside beam.

  10. Shaped cassegrain reflector antenna. [design equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Design equations are developed to compute the reflector surfaces required to produce uniform illumination on the main reflector of a cassegrain system when the feed pattern is specified. The final equations are somewhat simple and straightforward to solve (using a computer) compared to the ones which exist already in the literature. Step by step procedure for solving the design equations is discussed in detail.

  11. Shuttle antenna radome technology test program. Volume 2: Development of S-band antenna interface design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, E. A.; Baranowski, L. C.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of the Thermal Protection Subsystem (TPS) contamination on the space shuttle orbiter S band quad antenna due to multiple mission buildup are discussed. A test fixture was designed, fabricated and exposed to ten cycles of simulated ground and flight environments. Radiation pattern and impedance tests were performed to measure the effects of the contaminates. The degradation in antenna performance was attributed to the silicone waterproofing in the TPS tiles rather than exposure to the contaminating sources used in the test program. Validation of the accuracy of an analytical thermal model is discussed. Thermal vacuum tests with a test fixture and a representative S band quad antenna were conducted to evaluate the predictions of the analytical thermal model for two orbital heating conditions and entry from each orbit. The results show that the accuracy of predicting the test fixture thermal responses is largely dependent on the ability to define the boundary and ambient conditions. When the test conditions were accurately included in the analytical model, the predictions were in excellent agreement with measurements.

  12. Thermal Strap And Cushion For Thermoelectric Cooler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.; Petrick, S. Walter; Bard, Steven

    1991-01-01

    Inexpensive cushioning strap proposed for use as thermal contact between thermoelectric cooler and device to be cooled, such as laser diode, infrared detector, or charge-coupled device for imaging. Provides high thermal conductance while minimizing thermal and mechanical stresses on thermoelectric cooler. Used as alternative to flexible thermal strap made of silver.

  13. Heavy-Duty Rescue Straps For Coveralls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waddell, Henry M.

    1988-01-01

    New type of strap on coveralls helps rescuers lift victims of industrial accidents. Made of heavy twill. New material, 1 in. wide and has breaking strength of 600 lb, sewn to coveralls with polyester thread in box "X" stitching. Reinforcing nylon webbing, 1 3/4 in. wide sewn with strap at attachment points.

  14. New trends in antenna design: transformation optics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichit, P. H.; Burokur, S. N.; de Lustrac, A.

    2013-04-01

    Transformation optics is an emerging field offering a powerful and unprecedented ability to manipulate and control electromagnetic waves. Using this tool, we demonstrate the design of novel antenna concepts by tailoring their radiation properties. The wave manipulation is enabled through the use of engineered dispersive composite metamaterials that realize a space coordinate transformation. Numerical simulations together with experimental measurements are performed in order to validate the coordinate transformation concept. Near-field cartography and far-field pattern measurements performed on fabricated prototypes agree qualitatively with Finite Element Method (FEM) simulations. It is shown that a particular radiation pattern can be tailored at ease into a desired one by modifying the electromagnetic properties of the space around the radiating element. This idea opens the way to novel antenna design techniques for various application domains such as aeronautical and transport fields.

  15. On the design and analysis of ultrabroadband antenna windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara Prasad, R. V.; Lakshminarayana, D.

    1993-09-01

    Accounts are given of the design principles, analytical results, and experimental performance of two ultrawideband antenna windows operating in the 2-18 GHz range; the windows are of A-sandwich and C-sandwich construction. Curves are obtained for the theoretical and the practically obtainable power-transmission characteristics; while maximum A-sandwich transmission loss is below 1 dB, that of the C-sandwich is below 1.5 dB, over the complete band.

  16. 3D electromagnetic optimization of the front face of the ITER ICRF antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louche, F.; Dumortier, P.; Messiaen, A.; Durodié, F.

    2011-10-01

    In the framework of the ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antenna development for ITER, a design based on an external matching concept has been proposed [1]. We present in this work a series of electromagnetic simulations of this design performed with the commercial code CST Microwave Studio [2]. On the one hand, we explore how various geometrical modifications of some parts of the antenna (the straps and the four-port junction) can practically double the RF power coupled to the plasma. This optimization is supported by transmission line analysis. On the other hand, we treat the important question of the opportunity to tilt the straps in the toroidal direction to follow the plasma curvature as close as possible. We show that a configuration with two toroidal segments is sufficient and that further segmentation is not necessary. This work also underlines significant progress in the realism of ICRH antenna modelling and the importance of considering realistic load shaping in the models.

  17. [Microstrip antenna design and system research of radio frequency identification temperature sensor].

    PubMed

    Yang, Hao; Yang, Xiaohe; Chen, Yuquan; Pan, Min

    2008-12-01

    Radio frequency identification sensor network, which is a product of integrating radio frequency identification (RFID) with wireless sensor network (WSN), is introduced in this paper. The principle of radio frequency identification sensor is analyzed, and the importance of the antenna is emphasized. Then three kinds of common antennae, namely coil antenna, dipole antenna and microstrip antenna, are discussed. Subsequently, according to requirement, we have designed a microstrip antenna in a wireless temperature-monitoring and controlling system. The measurement of factual effect showed the requirement was fulfilled. PMID:19166222

  18. The design and simulation test of wireless antenna protection network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zipeng; Dai, Yawen; Li, Peng; Li, Zhuoqiu

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, a wireless antenna protection program has been designed. In the program, the TVS diode was used as the first lever for protection, and the π-type high pass filtering network as the second lever. As a result, the program not only has the traditional function of ESD protection, which can avoid the high voltage damage to the internal circuit, but also achieves the purpose of load matching, ensuring the signal source not to distort. The ADS simulation software was used to test the ability of this program for filtering and impedance matching, which proved the feasibility of this program. The wireless antenna protection network has been practically used, and its' performance of anti-electromagnetic interference has been validated.

  19. Computer-aided design of antenna structures and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, R.

    1976-01-01

    This paper discusses computer-aided design procedures for antenna reflector structures and related components. The primary design aid is a computer program that establishes cross sectional sizes of the structural members by an optimality criterion. Alternative types of deflection-dependent objectives can be selected for designs subject to constraints on structure weight. The computer program has a special-purpose formulation to design structures of the type frequently used for antenna construction. These structures, in common with many in other areas of application, are represented by analytical models that employ only the three translational degrees of freedom at each node. The special-purpose construction of the program, however, permits coding and data management simplifications that provide advantages in problem size and execution speed. Size and speed are essentially governed by the requirements of structural analysis and are relatively unaffected by the added requirements of design. Computation times to execute several design/analysis cycles are comparable to the times required by general-purpose programs for a single analysis cycle. Examples in the paper illustrate effective design improvement for structures with several thousand degrees of freedom and within reasonable computing times.

  20. Multiple Antenna Implementation System (MAntIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, M.D.; Batchelor, D.B.; Jaeger, E.F.

    1993-01-01

    The MAntIS code was developed as an aid to the design of radio frequency (RF) antennas for fusion applications. The code solves for the electromagnetic fields in three dimensions near the antenna structure with a realistic plasma load. Fourier analysis is used in the two dimensions that are tangential to the plasma surface and backwall. The third dimension is handled analytically in a vacuum region with a general impedance match at the plasma-vacuum interface. The impedance tensor is calculated for a slab plasma using the ORION-lD code with all three electric field components included and warm plasma corrections. The code permits the modeling of complicated antenna structures by superposing currents that flow on the surfaces of rectangular parallelepipeds. Specified current elements have feeders that continuously connect the current flowing from the ends of the strap to the feeders. The elements may have an arbitrary orientation with respect to the static magnetic field. Currents are permitted to vary along the length of the current strap and feeders. Parameters that describe this current variation can be adjusted to approximately satisfy boundary conditions on the current elements. The methods used in MAntIS and results for a primary loop antenna design are presented.

  1. JPL-IDEAS - ITERATIVE DESIGN OF ANTENNA STRUCTURES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, R.

    1994-01-01

    The Iterative DEsign of Antenna Structures (IDEAS) program is a finite element analysis and design optimization program with special features for the analysis and design of microwave antennas and associated sub-structures. As the principal structure analysis and design tool for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Ground Antenna and Facilities Engineering section of NASA's Deep Space Network, IDEAS combines flexibility with easy use. The relatively small bending stiffness of the components of large, steerable reflector antennas allows IDEAS to use pinjointed (three translational degrees of freedom per joint) models for modeling the gross behavior of these antennas when subjected to static and dynamic loading. This facilitates the formulation of the redesign algorithm which has only one design variable per structural element. Input data deck preparation has been simplified by the use of NAMELIST inputs to promote clarity of data input for problem defining parameters, user selection of execution and design options and output requests, and by the use of many attractive and familiar features of the NASTRAN program (in many cases, NASTRAN and IDEAS formatted bulk data cards are interchangeable). Features such as simulation of a full symmetric structure based on analyses of only half the structure make IDEAS a handy and efficient analysis tool, with many features unavailable in any other finite element analysis program. IDEAS can choose design variables such as areas of rods and thicknesses of plates to minimize total structure weight, constrain the structure weight to a specified value while maximizing a natural frequency or minimizing compliance measures, and can use a stress ratio algorithm to size each structural member so that it is at maximum or minimum stress level for at least one of the applied loads. Calculations of total structure weight can be broken down according to material. Center of gravity weight balance, static first and second moments about the center of

  2. L-band slot antenna design for gigawatt-level single-pulse microwave sources

    SciTech Connect

    Haworth, M.D.; Calico, S.E.; Hendricks, K.J.; McGrath, D.T.; Spencer, T.A.; Clark, M.C.; Coleman, P.D.; Sedillo, R.C.

    1996-12-31

    One significant problem with the evacuated Vlasov antenna used in the present-day gigawatt-level, 1.2-Ghz magnetically insulated line oscillator (MILO) experiments is rf breakdown in the antenna aperture. In order to reduce the field stress inherent in a single-aperture antenna at gigawatt power levels, an 81-slot non-resonant (traveling wave) antenna has been constructed. The intent of this design is to reduce the rf electric field in any one aperture below the vacuum breakdown threshold, and yet maintain a desirable far-field pattern having a localized and intense power density profile. Here the authors report on cold testing results from the slot antenna as well as on theoretical analysis of the antenna using a transmission line model aided by computer simulations. In addition, experimental data obtained using this antenna on MILO are presented. Finally, improvements to the slot antenna design are given.

  3. Design of scanning spherical trireflector antennas with high aperture efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Bing; Stutzman, Warren L.

    1993-01-01

    It is frequently desirable to scan the main beam of a large antenna system without moving the main aperture structure. Spherical reflectors have excellent potential in this application. However, they are not commonly used because of poor aperture efficiency and high side lobes in traditional implementations. This paper introduces a new dual-subreflector feed system design which does not require oversizing the spherical main reflector to accommodate scan and yet permits a controlled aperture illumination. The design yields high aperture efficiency, low cross-polarization, and low side lobes.

  4. Development of S-band antenna interface design, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, E. A.

    1976-01-01

    The construction of an analytical thermal model of an S-band antenna in a typical Space Shuttle Orbiter installation is discussed. The selection and modeling of orbital and entry thermal environment inputs for the thermal analyses are discussed. The results of analyses for a variety of orbital thermal environments and entry initial conditions are given. Design and fabrication details of a thermal test fixture which physically approximates the Orbiter installation are discussed. The design and fabrication of two electrical test fixtures which electrically simulate the Orbiter surface shape and thermal protection system are discussed.

  5. GPS Antenna Characterization Experiment (ACE): Receiver Design and Initial Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martzen, Phillip; Highsmith, Dolan E.; Valdez, Jennifer E.; Parker, Joel J. K.; Moreau, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    The GPS Antenna Characterization Experiment (ACE) is a research collaboration between Aerospace and NASA Goddard to characterize the gain patterns of the GPS L1 transmit antennas. High altitude GPS observations are collected at a ground station through a transponder-based or "bent-pipe" architecture where the GPS L1 RF spectrum is received at a platform in geosynchronous orbit and relayed to the ground for processing. The focus of this paper is the unique receiver algorithm design and implementation. The high-sensitivity GPS C/A-code receiver uses high fidelity code and carrier estimates and externally supplied GPS message bit data in a batch algorithm with settings for a 0 dB-Hz threshold. The resulting carrier-to-noise measurements are used in a GPS L1 transmit antenna pattern reconstruction. This paper shows initial transmit gain patterns averaged over each block of GPS satellites, including comparisons to available pre-flight gain measurements from the GPS vehicle contractors. These results provide never-before-seen assessments of the full, in-flight transmit gain patterns.

  6. Optics Design for the U.S. SKA Technology Development Project Design Verification Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbriale, W. A.; Baker, L.; Cortes-Medellin, G.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. design concept for the Square Kilometer Array (SKA) program is based on utilizing a large number of 15 meter dish antennas. The Technology Development Project (TDP) is planning to design and build the first of these antennas to provide a demonstration of the technology and a solid base on which to estimate costs. This paper describes the performance of the selected optics design. It is a dual-shaped offset Gregorian design with a feed indexer that can accommodate corrugated horns, wide band single pixel feeds or phased array feeds.

  7. On-glass automotive diversity antenna and LNA design for S-band satellite digital radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeğin, Korkut

    2015-11-01

    Selection combining diversity system with antennas mounted on windshield and backlite of a vehicle is proposed for satellite digital audio radio applications. Standalone exterior mount antennas on metallic vehicles perform well for satellite digital audio radio applications, but for composite body vehicles or interior mount antennas, antenna performance becomes a real issue. Proposed on-glass two-antenna diversity is one solution for such applications. The antenna correlation is calculated using the S-parameters of the antennas and found to be very low due to many wavelengths separation between the antennas. Design of low noise amplifier, which has sub 1 dB noise figure and good P1dB due to strong cellular signals, is also detailed. A diversity receiver is described and ride tests are performed to assess the performance of the diversity system in real-time, under weak satellite signal environment which is regarded as the most challenging reception condition.

  8. Design and construction of prototype radio antenna for shortest radio wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leighton, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    A paraboloid radio antenna of 10.4 meters diameter, 0.41 meter focal length was constructed and its successful completion is described. The surface accuracy of the antenna is at least four times better than any existing antenna in its class size (50 micrometers rms). Antenna design specifications (i.e., for mounting, drive motors, honeycomb structures) are discussed and engineering drawings and photographs of antenna components are shown. The antenna will be used for millimeter-wave interferometry and sub-millimeter wave radiometry over a full frequency range (up to approximately 860 GHz). The antenna will also be moveable (for interferometric use) between reinforced concrete pads by rail. The effects of the weather and gravity on antenna performance are briefly discussed.

  9. The design of the fine antenna pointing system for Italsat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galaurchi, A.; Losquadro, G.; Perrotta, G.

    Italsat's baseline design employs communications antennae-integrated RF sensors, in order to satisfy beam-pointing accuracy requirements of 0.03 deg at 3-sigma. These RF sensors are of the lobe-switching types. The system enters its autotracking mode only upon the receipt of a command sent from the ground station; it then goes through various submodes autonomously, performing verifications and making decisions. Tracking accuracy depends on the law of signal combination and the noise sensitivity of the measurements made.

  10. Orbit design for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yan; Li, Guangyu; Heinzel, Gerhard; Rüdiger, Albrecht; Luo, Yongjie

    2010-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a joint ESA-NASA mission for detecting low-frequency gravitational waves in the frequency range from 0.1 mHz to 1 Hz, by using accurate laser interferometry between three spacecrafts, which will be launched around 2018 and one year later reach their operational orbits around the Sun. In order to operate successfully, it is crucial for the constellation of the three spacecrafts to have extremely high stability. Based on the study of operational orbits for a 2015 launch, we design the operational orbits of beginning epoch on 2019-03-01, and introduce the method of orbit design and optimization. We design the orbits of the transfer from Earth to the operational orbits, including launch phase and separation phase; furthermore, the relationship between energy requirement and flight time of these two orbit phases is investigated. Finally, an example of the whole orbit design is presented.

  11. Optical design of a synthetic aperture ladar antenna system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Changqing; Zeng, Xiaodong; Zhao, Xiaoyan; Liu, Huanhuan; Man, Xiangkun

    2008-03-01

    The spatial resolution of a conventional imaging LADAR system is constrained by the diffraction limit of the telescope aperture. The purpose of this work is to investigate Synthetic Aperture Imaging LADAR (SAIL), which employs aperture synthesis with coherent laser radar to overcome the diffraction limit and achieve fine-resolution, long range, two-dimensional imaging with modest aperture diameters. According to the demands of the Synthetic Aperture LADAR (SAL), the key techniques are analyzed briefly. The preliminary design of the optical antenna is also introduced in this paper. We investigate the design method and relevant problems of efficient optical antenna that are required in SAL. The design is pursued on the basis of the same method as is used at microwave frequency. The method is based on numerical analysis and the error values obtained by present manufacturing technology. According to the requirement to SAL with the trial of little size, light mass, low cost and high image quality, the result by ZEMAX will result.

  12. Microstrip-antenna design for hyperthermia treatment of superficial tumors.

    PubMed

    Montecchia, F

    1992-06-01

    Microstrip antennas have many different advantages over other RF/MW radiative applicators employed for superficial hyperthermia treatment. This is mainly due to their compact and body-conformable structure as well as to printed circuit board techniques, both of which allow a wide design flexibility for superficial tumor heating. Among the wide variety of radiator configurations, three microstrip antennas of increasing complexity with electromagnetic and heating characteristics potentially suitable as applicators for superficial hyperthermia have been designed, developed, and tested in different radiative conditions: a microstrip disk, a microstrip annular-slot, and a microstrip spiral. Electromagnetic design criteria are presented together with the determinations of the applicator return loss versus frequency and thermograms of the near-field heating pattern in muscle-like phantom. The results are in good agreement with theory and indicate that: i) the operating frequency is either single or multiple according to the applicator-mode, "resonant" or "traveling-wave," and can be chosen in the useful frequency range for hyperthermia (200-1000 MHz) according to the tumor cross-section and depth; ii) the heating pattern flexibility increases going from the simple geometry disk to the annular-slot and spiral applicators; iii) a distilled-water bolus is required; iv) the annular-slot applicator exhibits the highest efficiency, while the spiral applicator provides the best performance. PMID:1601439

  13. Microstrip-antenna design for hyperthermia treatment of superficial tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Montecchia, F. )

    1992-01-01

    Microstrip antennas have many different advantages over other RF/MW radiative applicators employed for superficial hyperthermia treatment. This is mainly due to their compact and body-conformable structure as well as to printed circuit board techniques, both of which allow a wide design flexibility for superficial tumor heating. Among the wide variety of radiator configurations, three microstrip antennas of increasing complexity with electromagnetic and heating characteristics potentially suitable as applicators for superficial hyperthermia have been designed, developed, and tested in different radiative condition: a microstrip disk, a microstrip annular-slot, and a microstrip spiral. Electromagnetic design criteria are presented together with the determinations of the applicator return loss versus frequency and thermograms of the near-field heating pattern in muscle-like phantom. The results are in good agreement with theory and indicated that: the operating frequency is either single or multiple according to the applicator-mode, 'resonant' or 'traveling-wave', and can be chosen in the useful frequency range for hyperthermia according to the tumor cross-section and depth; the heating pattern flexibility increases going form the simple geometry disk to the annular-slot and spiral applicators; a distilled-water bolus is required; the annular-slot applicator exhibits the highest efficiency, while the spiral applicator provides the best performance.

  14. Thermo-structural development of the ITER ICRF strap housing module

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, K.; Shannon, M.; Lockley, D.

    2014-02-12

    Since March 2010 the preliminary design of the ITER ICRF Antennas have been developed by CYCLE, a consortium consisting of IPP (Garching), CCFE (Culham), CEA (Cadarache), Politecnico di Torino (Torino) and LPPERM/KMS (Brussels). This paper describes the steps taken to develop the present geometry of the triplet pair Strap Housing Module from a thermal and structural perspective, and shows the critical areas of the structure. Key issues are the manufacturability, (achieved by HIPing - Hot Isostatic Pressing), the ability to handle the radiating plasma thermal flux of 0.35 MW/m{sup 2}, the RF losses and the neutronic radiation. HIPing is necessary to achieve the complicated system of cooling channels inside the structure, which divides the coolant equally in order to supply each strap in the triplet with 1 l/s of water. The components have also to withstand the strong mechanical forces generated by plasma disruptions affecting all internal structures and the elevated design cooling water pressure of 5MPa. In order to maximise reliability, joints between different materials in the cooling water system have been kept to a minimum. Therefore, in the interests of fabricability and availability, the whole structure is manufactured out of stainless steel (316L(N)IG). The low conductivity of 316L(N)IG demands small wall thicknesses to avoid hot spots; however this reduces the mechanical strength. Consequently an in depth FEM analysis is presented, which was used to find and to improve the critical aspects of this important component and was the best means of finding the optimum between thermal and mechanical performance.

  15. Thermo-structural development of the ITER ICRF strap housing module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, K.; Shannon, M.; Lockley, D.

    2014-02-01

    Since March 2010 the preliminary design of the ITER ICRF Antennas have been developed by CYCLE, a consortium consisting of IPP (Garching), CCFE (Culham), CEA (Cadarache), Politecnico di Torino (Torino) and LPPERM/KMS (Brussels). This paper describes the steps taken to develop the present geometry of the triplet pair Strap Housing Module from a thermal and structural perspective, and shows the critical areas of the structure. Key issues are the manufacturability, (achieved by HIPing - Hot Isostatic Pressing), the ability to handle the radiating plasma thermal flux of 0.35 MW/m2, the RF losses and the neutronic radiation. HIPing is necessary to achieve the complicated system of cooling channels inside the structure, which divides the coolant equally in order to supply each strap in the triplet with 1 l/s of water. The components have also to withstand the strong mechanical forces generated by plasma disruptions affecting all internal structures and the elevated design cooling water pressure of 5MPa. In order to maximise reliability, joints between different materials in the cooling water system have been kept to a minimum. Therefore, in the interests of fabricability and availability, the whole structure is manufactured out of stainless steel (316L(N)IG). The low conductivity of 316L(N)IG demands small wall thicknesses to avoid hot spots; however this reduces the mechanical strength. Consequently an in depth FEM analysis is presented, which was used to find and to improve the critical aspects of this important component and was the best means of finding the optimum between thermal and mechanical performance.

  16. Design study of TDRS antenna gimbal system for LANDSAT-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, J.

    1977-01-01

    The conceptual design studies of a two axis antenna drive assembly for the TDRSS link communications subsystem for LANDSAT D are presented. The recommended antenna drive assembly is a simple and reliable design substantially similar to the antenna and solar array drives developed and space qualified for programs such as DSCS 2 and FltSatCom. The gimbal design tradeoff is presented, along with drive electronics.

  17. Antennae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Atlas Image mosaic, covering 7' x 7' on the sky of the interacting galaxies NGC 4038 and NGC 4039, better known as the Antennae, or Ring Tail galaxies. The two galaxies are engaged in a tug-of-war as they collide. The mutual gravitation between them is working to distort each spiral galaxy's appearance as the two merge. The interaction is evidently impetus for an intense burst of new star formation, as can be seen from the many infrared-bright knots and bright galactic nuclei. Compare the 2MASS view of this system with that obtained by the Hubble Space Telescope in the optical. Many of the same features are seen, although 2MASS is able to peer through much of the dust seen in the galaxies' disks. The galaxy light looks smoother. Also, in the near-infrared the bright knots of star formation are likely highlighted by the light of massive red supergiant stars. The much more extended 'tidal tails,' which give the Antennae their name, are quite faint in the 2MASS image mosaic.

  18. Evolutionary Design of an X-Band Antenna for NASA's Space Technology 5 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohn, Jason D.; Hornby, Gregory S.; Rodriguez-Arroyo, Adan; Linden, Derek S.; Kraus, William F.; Seufert, Stephen E.

    2003-01-01

    We present an evolved X-band antenna design and flight prototype currently on schedule to be deployed on NASA s Space Technology 5 spacecraft in 2004. The mission consists of three small satellites that wall take science measurements in Earth s magnetosphere. The antenna was evolved to meet a challenging set of mission requirements, most notably the combination of wide beamwidth for a circularly-polarized wave and wide bandwidth. Two genetic algorithms were used: one allowed branching an the antenna arms and the other did not. The highest performance antennas from both algorithms were fabricated and tested. A handdesigned antenna was produced by the contractor responsible for the design and build of the mission antennas. The hand-designed antenna is a quadrifilar helix, and we present performance data for comparison to the evolved antennas. As of this writing, one of our evolved antenna prototypes is undergoing flight qualification testing. If successful, the resulting antenna would represent the first evolved hardware in space, and the first deployed evolved antenna.

  19. Application Of High Conductivity Carbon Fibre Materials For Flexible Thermal Straps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usinger, R.; Delouard, P.; Miller, G.

    2012-07-01

    In a recently completed ESA GSTP project RUAG Space successfully demonstrated that thermal straps made from high conductivity carbon fibres can provide larger heat transport capability than conventional metallic designs at reduced mass. To prove the feasibility of the concept, breadboard models of flexible carbon fibre straps were manufactured and tested in laboratory environment. The end- to-end conductance measured in a thermal vacuum test correlated well with the prediction made with a simple thermal mathematical model. Mechanical tests were performed on the straps to check whether and to which extent the thermal performance is degraded by mechanical loads. The results from these tests indicate that the selected strap design is surprisingly tolerant against mechanical damage.

  20. Study and design of a broadband coplanar waveguide-fed modified folded slot antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, M.; Usaha, R.; Hu, Y.

    2004-08-01

    This paper presents the study and design of a coplanar waveguide-fed broadband modified folded slot antenna, including new techniques to achieve broad impedance bandwidth when the antenna size is small. Antenna impedance and bandwidth are investigated as functions of slot parameters, substrate dielectric constant, and substrate thickness. Prototypes of broadband antennas are fabricated on RO4003 (ɛr = 3.38) and are measured. Two types of antennas are proposed with respective bandwidths of 44.4 and 80% with less than 2:1 VSWR.

  1. Design and optimization of LTE 1800 MIMO antenna.

    PubMed

    Wong, Huey Shin; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul; Kibria, Salehin

    2014-01-01

    A multiple input and multiple output (MIMO) antenna that comprises a printed microstrip antenna and a printed double-L sleeve monopole antenna for LTE 1800 wireless application is presented. The printed double-L sleeve monopole antenna is fed by a 50 ohm coplanar waveguide (CPW). A novel T-shaped microstrip feedline printed on the other side of the PCB is used to excite the waveguide's outer shell. Isolation characteristics better than -15 dB can be obtained for the proposed MIMO antenna. The proposed antenna can operate in LTE 1800 (1710 MHz-1880 MHz). This antenna exhibits omnidirectional characteristics. The efficiency of the antenna is greater than 70% and has high gain of 2.18 dBi. PMID:24967440

  2. Design and analysis of coupled-resonator reconfigurable antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, M. I.; Faruque, M. R. I.; Islam, M. T.; Ali, M. T.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a coupled resonator with the microstrip patch antenna is proposed as a frequency reconfigurable antenna. The ground plane of the proposed microstrip patch antenna is modified with the proposed resonator structure to obtain reconfigurable characteristics. The resonator structure consists of two square split rings. The incorporation of proposed resonator structure with antenna makes it single-band antenna. The characteristics of proposed resonator structure can effectively deactivate by closing the splits of rings using switches, and hence, the dual-band characteristics of the antenna are recovered. The finite integration technique of computer simulation technology microwave studio is used throughout the investigation. The measurement of antenna performances is taken in an anechoic chamber. The measured and simulated performances of proposed reconfigurable antenna show very good agreement.

  3. Design and Optimization of LTE 1800 MIMO Antenna

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Huey Shin; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul

    2014-01-01

    A multiple input and multiple output (MIMO) antenna that comprises a printed microstrip antenna and a printed double-L sleeve monopole antenna for LTE 1800 wireless application is presented. The printed double-L sleeve monopole antenna is fed by a 50 ohm coplanar waveguide (CPW). A novel T-shaped microstrip feedline printed on the other side of the PCB is used to excite the waveguide's outer shell. Isolation characteristics better than −15 dB can be obtained for the proposed MIMO antenna. The proposed antenna can operate in LTE 1800 (1710 MHz–1880 MHz). This antenna exhibits omnidirectional characteristics. The efficiency of the antenna is greater than 70% and has high gain of 2.18 dBi. PMID:24967440

  4. Multiple-Feed Design For DSN/SETI Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slobin, S. D.; Bathker, D. A.

    1988-01-01

    Frequency bands changed with little interruption of operation. Modification of feedhorn mounting on existing 34-m-diameter antenna in Deep Space Network (DSN) enables antenna to be shared by Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence (SET) program with minimal interruption of DSN spacecraft tracking. Modified antenna useful in terrestrial communication systems requiring frequent changes of operating frequencies.

  5. New ultrawide-bandwidth horn-fed dipole GPR antenna design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chi-Chih; Higgins, Matthew B.

    2000-04-01

    A novel broad bandwidth dual-polarization GPR antenna was also developed for collecting fully polarimetric data over a wide frequency range (20 MHz to approximately 800 MHz). This new design was improved from its single-polarization version introduced by Chen (1997). The new design features improved stability and directivity over conventional surface-based GPR antennas. Such antenna is currently applied to discriminate buried UXO's from other false alarm reduction.

  6. Design and Measurement of Self-Matched, Dual-Frequency Coplanar-Waveguide-Fed Slot Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omar, Amjad A.; Scardelletti, Maxmilian C.; Hejazi, Zuhair M.; Dib, Nihad

    2007-01-01

    This report presents two new designs of dual-frequency, coplanar-waveguide-fed, double-folded slot antennas. An important advantage of these antennas is that, because they are self-matched to the feeding coplanar waveguide, they do not need an external matching circuit. This reduces the antenna size and simplifies its design. To verify the designs, the authors measured and compared the return loss and radiation patterns with those obtained using available commercial software with good agreement. Dual-frequency slot antennas;

  7. Conceptual Design of the Aluminum Reflector Antenna for DATE5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Yuan; Kan, Frank W.; Sarawit, Andrew T.; Lou, Zheng; Cheng, Jing-Quan; Wang, Hai-Ren; Zuo, Ying-Xi; Yang, Ji

    2016-08-01

    DATE5, a 5 m telescope for terahertz exploration, was proposed for acquiring observations at Dome A, Antarctica. In order to observe the terahertz spectrum, it is necessary to maintain high surface accuracy in the the antenna when it is exposed to Antarctic weather conditions. Structural analysis shows that both machined aluminum and carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) panels can meet surface accuracy requirements. In this paper, one design concept based on aluminum panels is introduced. This includes panel layout, details on panel support, design of a CFRP backup structure, and detailed finite element analysis. Modal, gravity and thermal analysis are all performed and surface deformations of the main reflector are evaluated for all load cases. At the end of the paper, the manufacture of a prototype panel is also described. Based on these results, we found that using smaller aluminum reflector panels has the potential to meet the surface requirements in the harsh Dome A environment.

  8. Design of miniaturized printed monopole antennas through phase-compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scorrano, Luca; Bilotti, Filiberto; Vegni, Lucio

    2009-05-01

    In this paper, the guidelines for the design of compact transmission-line (TL) metamaterial inspired monopole antennas are presented. The main difference between the proposed setup and the ones already present in the literature, based on phase-compensation phenomena enabled by TL-metamaterials, is that the present structure can be realized in fully planar technology. This peculiar feature allows minimizing the non-idealities introduced by vias and parallel plate capacitors used in conventional setups, which need to be soldered on the board. On the other hand, the proposed radiating devices are characterized by relatively low production costs, due to their planar configuration. The operation principles of the proposed radiators are detailed in the paper, giving the reader the necessary information to perform the design. Some examples are finally presented and tested through proper full-wave simulations performed with CST Studio Suite 2009.

  9. Design features of the Orion satellite antenna subsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waterfield, T. R.

    The ORION satellites (first launch 1994) will provide flexible, high capacity Ku-band communications between and within North America and Europe. Four-fold frequency re-use allows the provision of thirty-four transponders per spacecraft, with two-way networking traffic to 1.2 meter rooftop Very Small Aperture Terminals (VSAT). This paper provides an overview of the communications antenna subsystem and highlights some of the novel and sophisticated design features. These include the following: numerically shaped, gridded reflectors; computer optimized multi-horn feed geometry; feed coefficients optimized under mutual coupling; reconfigurable beams via on-board switching; very low thermal-distortion reflectors; novel sunshield design; and two-axis boresight trimming. Selected analyses and measurement results available at the time of writing are presented.

  10. The Study and Implementation of Electrically Small Printed Antennas for an Integrated Transceiver Design

    SciTech Connect

    Speer, Pete

    2009-04-28

    This work focuses on the design and evaluation of the inverted-F, meandering-monopole, and loop antenna geometries. These printed antennas are studied with the goal of identifying which is suitable for use in a miniaturized transceiver design and which has the ability to provide superior performance using minimal Printed Circuit Board (PCB) space. As a result, the main objective is to characterize tradeoffs and identify which antenna provides the best compromise among volume, bandwidth and efficiency. For experimentation purposes, three types of meandering-monopole antenna are examined resulting in five total antennas for the study. The performance of each antenna under study is evaluated based upon return loss, operational bandwidth, and radiation pattern characteristics. For our purposes, return loss is measured using the S11-port reflection coefficient which helps to characterize how well the small antenna is able to be efficiently fed. Operational bandwidth is measured as the frequency range over which the antenna maintains 2:1 Voltage Standing Wave Ratio (VSWR) or equivalently has 10-dB return loss. Ansoft High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS) is used to simulate expected resonant frequency, bandwidth, VSWR, and radiation pattern characteristics. Ansoft HFSS simulation is used to provide a good starting point for antenna design before actual prototype are built using an LPKF automated router. Simulated results are compared with actual measurements to highlight any differences and help demonstrate the effects of antenna miniaturization. Radiation characteristics are measured illustrating how each antenna is affected by the influence of a non-ideal ground plane. The antenna with outstanding performance is further evaluated to determine its maximum range of communication. Each designs range performance is evaluated using a pair of transceivers to demonstrate round-trip communication. This research is intended to provide a knowledge base which will help

  11. Automatic antenna switching design for Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randhawa, Manjit S.

    1987-01-01

    An Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) crewmember had two-way communications with the space station in the Ku-band frequency (12 to 18 GHz). The maximum range of the EVA communications link with the space station is approximately one kilometer for nominal values for transmitter power, antenna gains, and receiver noise figure. The EVA Communications System, that will continue to function regardless of the astronaut's position and orientation, requires an antenna system that has full spherical coverage. Three or more antennas that can be flush mounted on the astronaut's space suit (EMU) and/or his propulsive backpack (MMU), will be needed to provide the desired coverage. As the astronaut moves in the space station, the signal received by a given EVA antenna changes. An automatic antenna switching system is needed that will switch the communication system to the antenna with the largest signal strength. A design for automatic antenna switching is presented and discussed.

  12. Design and Performance of the H_infinity Controller for the Beam-Waveguide Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawronski, W.

    2011-02-01

    The linear-quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) controllers are currently implemented at the beam-waveguide (BWG) antennas. Each BWG antenna has a different set of LQG coefficients, obtained by tuning and testing each controller individually. Individual coefficients for each antenna are necessary, since the antenna dynamics are not identical and the derivation of the LQG coefficients is a labor-intensive process. Hence, the process could be simplified by using single set of coefficients for all BWG antennas. The purpose of the work reported here is to develop a single set of servo coefficients for all BWG antennas. This is achieved by using the H_infinity controller approach and a robust design technique. In this article, the analysis of the H_infinity controller was performed, and the results obtained (by executing over 10,000 Monte Carlo simulations) showed that it is feasible to use a single set of the H_infinity controller coefficients at all BWG antennas, and that the H_infinity controller performance is similar to or exceeds the "standard" LQG controller performance, i.e., except for the DSS-25 antenna controller performance. Note that the latter controller was derived exceptionally strong. At the remaining antennas, the controller coefficients are weaker, and they represent the "standard" LQG performance. This approach simplifies the development of the controller coefficients for BWG antennas, and simplifies the servo performance evaluation, since the performance should be similar for all six BWG antennas.

  13. Design of Miniaturized Dual-Band Microstrip Antenna for WLAN Application

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiachen; Wang, Huanling; Lv, Zhihan; Wang, Huihui

    2016-01-01

    Wireless local area network (WLAN) is a technology that combines computer network with wireless communication technology. The 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz frequency bands in the Industrial Scientific Medical (ISM) band can be used in the WLAN environment. Because of the development of wireless communication technology and the use of the frequency bands without the need for authorization, the application of WLAN is becoming more and more extensive. As the key part of the WLAN system, the antenna must also be adapted to the development of WLAN communication technology. This paper designs two new dual-frequency microstrip antennas with the use of electromagnetic simulation software—High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS). The two antennas adopt ordinary FR4 material as a dielectric substrate, with the advantages of low cost and small size. The first antenna adopts microstrip line feeding, and the antenna radiation patch is composed of a folded T-shaped radiating dipole which reduces the antenna size, and two symmetrical rectangular patches located on both sides of the T-shaped radiating patch. The second antenna is a microstrip patch antenna fed by coaxial line, and the size of the antenna is diminished by opening a stepped groove on the two edges of the patch and a folded slot inside the patch. Simulation experiments prove that the two designed antennas have a higher gain and a favourable transmission characteristic in the working frequency range, which is in accordance with the requirements of WLAN communication. PMID:27355954

  14. Design of Miniaturized Dual-Band Microstrip Antenna for WLAN Application.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiachen; Wang, Huanling; Lv, Zhihan; Wang, Huihui

    2016-01-01

    Wireless local area network (WLAN) is a technology that combines computer network with wireless communication technology. The 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz frequency bands in the Industrial Scientific Medical (ISM) band can be used in the WLAN environment. Because of the development of wireless communication technology and the use of the frequency bands without the need for authorization, the application of WLAN is becoming more and more extensive. As the key part of the WLAN system, the antenna must also be adapted to the development of WLAN communication technology. This paper designs two new dual-frequency microstrip antennas with the use of electromagnetic simulation software-High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS). The two antennas adopt ordinary FR4 material as a dielectric substrate, with the advantages of low cost and small size. The first antenna adopts microstrip line feeding, and the antenna radiation patch is composed of a folded T-shaped radiating dipole which reduces the antenna size, and two symmetrical rectangular patches located on both sides of the T-shaped radiating patch. The second antenna is a microstrip patch antenna fed by coaxial line, and the size of the antenna is diminished by opening a stepped groove on the two edges of the patch and a folded slot inside the patch. Simulation experiments prove that the two designed antennas have a higher gain and a favourable transmission characteristic in the working frequency range, which is in accordance with the requirements of WLAN communication. PMID:27355954

  15. Large Antenna Multifrequency Microwave Radiometer (LAMMR) system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    The large Antenna Multifrequency Microwave Radiometer (LAMMR) is a high resolution 4 meter aperture scanning radiometer system designed to determine sea surface temperature and wind speed, atmospheric water vapor and liquid water, precipitation, and various sea ice parameters by interpreting brightness temperature images from low Earth orbiting satellites. The LAMMR with dual linear horizontal and vertical polarization radiometer channels from 1.4 to 91 GHZ can provide multidiscipline data with resolutions from 105 to 7 km. The LAMMR baseline radiometer system uses total power radiometers to achieve delta T's in the 0.5 to 1.7 K range and system calibration accuracies in the 1 to 2 deg range. A cold sky horn/ambient load two point calibration technique is used in this baseline concept and the second detector output uses an integrated and dump circuit to sample the scanning cross-tract resolution cells.

  16. Electromagnetic simulations of the ASDEX Upgrade ICRF Antenna with the TOPICA code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivska, A.; Milanesio, D.; Bobkov, V.; Braun, F.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    2009-11-01

    Accurate and efficient simulation tools are necessary to optimize the ICRF antenna design for a set of operational conditions. The TOPICA code was developed for performance prediction and for the analysis of ICRF antenna systems in the presence of plasma, given realistic antenna geometries. Fully 3D antenna geometries can be adopted in TOPICA, just as in available commercial codes. But while those commercial codes cannot operate with a plasma loading, the TOPICA code correctly accounts for realistic plasma loading conditions, by means of the coupling with 1D FELICE code. This paper presents the evaluation of the electric current distribution on the structure, of the parallel electric field in the region between the straps and the plasma and the computation of sheaths driving RF potentials. Results of TOPICA simulations will help to optimize and re-design the ICRF ASDEX Upgrade antenna in order to reduce tungsten (W) sputtering attributed to the rectified sheath effect during ICRF operation.

  17. Transformation of design formulae for feed line of triangular microstrip antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, Monika; Singh, Ghanshyam; Bhatnagar, S. K.; Swami, Swati; Vats, Abhijat

    2016-03-01

    In wireless communication system microstrip antenna is the key component. Popular shapes of patch for microstrip are rectangular, triangular and circular. A new transformation design formulae for feed line of rectangular microstrip antenna by using equivalent design concept were presented by the authors. That says one designed antenna for a given frequency on any substrate can be transformed into another substrate material for the same design frequency by simply multiply a factor ψ to the all dimensions of patch, length of feed line and some power of ψ for feed line width (where ψ is the square root of the ratio of dielectric constants of those two designs). This paper presents that the same formulae of that rectangular transformation feed line can also be applicable for triangular shape microstrip antenna transformation. The process was repeated for the triangular shape patch microstrip antenna as applied for rectangular shape and the simulation results were surprisingly the same for it by applying the same transformation formulae.

  18. Miniaturized Multi-Band Antenna Design via Element Collocation and Inductive Feed Loading

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R. P.

    2012-09-12

    In a FY09 SDRD project, four separate antennas were designed to receive signals of interest covering a broad range of frequencies. While the elements exceeded specifications, the array footprint is substantial. Research performed by the CU Microwave Active Antenna Group in collaboration with RSL, showed promise in realizing a reduced structure. This work will expand upon this previous research. This project will result in a prototype quad-band antenna.

  19. Dual reflector antenna design software - Application to offset-fed shaped elliptical aperture systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossiavas, Isabelle

    1992-04-01

    To facilitate the design of dual reflector antennas, the interactive, graphic CA2R software package handles centrally or offset-fed structures with quadric or shaped reflectors. Surface shaping, based on geometrical optics, improves the antenna's efficiency and the sidelobe level. Existing techniques are applied to an offset-fed antenna with an elliptical projected aperture. An original numerical method to minimize crosspolar components is also presented.

  20. Prototype 10-meter radio telescope antenna and mount design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leighton, R. B.

    1976-01-01

    A prototype radio antenna of 10.4 meters diameter and 0.41 meter focal length, intended for use at the shortest radio wavelengths transmitted by the atmosphere, was successfully completed. The surface accuracy is at least four times better than that of any existing antenna in this size class: 50 micrometer rms. A prototype mount is being constructed and will be ready by early 1976. The development of an improved antenna of identical size, but heavier weight has been continued.

  1. Performance assessment of the ITER ICRF antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durodié, F.; Vrancken, M.; Bamber, R.; Colas, L.; Dumortier, P.; Hancock, D.; Huygen, S.; Lockley, D.; Louche, F.; Maggiora, R.; Milanesio, D.; Messiaen, A.; Nightingale, M. P. S.; Shannon, M.; Tigwell, P.; van Schoor, M.; Wilson, D.; Winkler, K.; Cycle Team

    2014-02-01

    ITER's Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) system [1] comprises two antenna launchers designed by CYCLE (a consortium of European associations listed in the author affiliations above) on behalf F4E for the ITER Organisation (IO), each inserted as a Port Plug (PP) into one of ITER's Vacuum Vessel (VV) ports. Each launcher is an array of 4 toroidal by 6 poloidal RF current straps specified to couple up to 20 MW in total to the plasma in the frequency range of 40 to 55 MHz but limited to a maximum system voltage of 45 kV and limits on RF electric fields depending on their location and direction with respect to respectively the torus vacuum and the toroidal magnetic field. A crucial aspect of coupling ICRF power to plasmas is the knowledge of the plasma density profiles in the Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) and the location of the RF current straps with respect to the SOL. The launcher layout and details were optimized and its performance estimated for a worst case SOL provided by the IO. The paper summarizes the estimated performance obtained within the operational parameter space specified by IO. Aspects of the RF grounding of the whole antenna PP to the VV port and the effect of the voids between the PP and the Blanket Shielding Modules (BSM) surrounding the antenna front are discussed.

  2. Efficient global optimization of a limited parameter antenna design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donnell, Teresa H.; Southall, Hugh L.; Kaanta, Bryan

    2008-04-01

    Efficient Global Optimization (EGO) is a competent evolutionary algorithm suited for problems with limited design parameters and expensive cost functions. Many electromagnetics problems, including some antenna designs, fall into this class, as complex electromagnetics simulations can take substantial computational effort. This makes simple evolutionary algorithms such as genetic algorithms or particle swarms very time-consuming for design optimization, as many iterations of large populations are usually required. When physical experiments are necessary to perform tradeoffs or determine effects which may not be simulated, use of these algorithms is simply not practical at all due to the large numbers of measurements required. In this paper we first present a brief introduction to the EGO algorithm. We then present the parasitic superdirective two-element array design problem and results obtained by applying EGO to obtain the optimal element separation and operating frequency to maximize the array directivity. We compare these results to both the optimal solution and results obtained by performing a similar optimization using the Nelder-Mead downhill simplex method. Our results indicate that, unlike the Nelder-Mead algorithm, the EGO algorithm did not become stuck in local minima but rather found the area of the correct global minimum. However, our implementation did not always drill down into the precise minimum and the addition of a local search technique seems to be indicated.

  3. Implanted Miniaturized Antenna for Brain Computer Interface Applications: Analysis and Design

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yujuan; Rennaker, Robert L.; Hutchens, Chris; Ibrahim, Tamer S.

    2014-01-01

    Implantable Brain Computer Interfaces (BCIs) are designed to provide real-time control signals for prosthetic devices, study brain function, and/or restore sensory information lost as a result of injury or disease. Using Radio Frequency (RF) to wirelessly power a BCI could widely extend the number of applications and increase chronic in-vivo viability. However, due to the limited size and the electromagnetic loss of human brain tissues, implanted miniaturized antennas suffer low radiation efficiency. This work presents simulations, analysis and designs of implanted antennas for a wireless implantable RF-powered brain computer interface application. The results show that thin (on the order of 100 micrometers thickness) biocompatible insulating layers can significantly impact the antenna performance. The proper selection of the dielectric properties of the biocompatible insulating layers and the implantation position inside human brain tissues can facilitate efficient RF power reception by the implanted antenna. While the results show that the effects of the human head shape on implanted antenna performance is somewhat negligible, the constitutive properties of the brain tissues surrounding the implanted antenna can significantly impact the electrical characteristics (input impedance, and operational frequency) of the implanted antenna. Three miniaturized antenna designs are simulated and demonstrate that maximum RF power of up to 1.8 milli-Watts can be received at 2 GHz when the antenna implanted around the dura, without violating the Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) limits. PMID:25079941

  4. Design, development and testing of the x-ray timing explorer High Gain Antenna System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lecha, Javier; Woods, Claudia; Phan, Minh

    1995-01-01

    The High Gain Antenna System (HGAS), consisting of two High Gain Antenna Deployment Systems (HGADS) and two Antenna Pointing Systems (APS), is used to position two High Gain Antennas (HGA) on the X-Ray Timing Explorer (XTE). A similar APS will be used on the upcoming Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). Both XTE and TRMM are NASA in-house satellites. The salient features of the system include the two-axis gimbal and control electronics of the APS and the spring deployment and latch/release mechanisms of the HGADS. This paper describes some of the challenges faced in the design and testing of this system and their resolutions.

  5. Design of a Compact Hexagonal Monopole Antenna for Ultra—Wideband Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaalan, Abdo Abdelmonem; Ramadan, M. I.

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents two design compact hexagonal monopole antennas for ultra-wideband applications. The two antennas are fed by a single microstrip line . The Zeland IE3D version 12 is employed for analysis at the frequency band of 4 to 14 GHz which has approved as a commercial UWB band. The experimental and simulation results exhibit good agreement together for antenna 1. The proposed antenna1 is able to achieve an impedance bandwidth about 111%. The proposed antenna2 is able to achieve an impedance bandwidth about (31.58%) for lower frequency and (62.54%) for upper frequency bandwidth. A simulated frequency notched band ranging from 6.05 GHz to 7.33 GHz and a measured frequency notched band ranging from 6.22 GHz to 8.99 GHz are achieved and gives one narrow band of axial ratio (1.43%). The proposed antennas can be used in wireless ultra-wideband (UWB) communications.

  6. Design of a broadband hexagonal-shaped zeroth-order resonance antenna with metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Dong Sik; Kim, Kang Wook; Choi, Hyun-Chul

    2014-11-01

    A broadband hexagonal-shaped metamaterials (MTMs)-based zeroth-order resonant (ZOR) antenna was designed and fabricated. The hexagonal shape of a top patch on a mushroom structure makes not only direct-current paths between the two ends of the patch but also round-current paths along the outside of the patch, thereby widening the resonance frequency of the mushroom MTM antenna. According to the shape of the hexagon patch, the presented antenna achieved impedance bandwidth of 58.6% corresponding to ultra-wideband technology. The proposed ZOR antenna was modeled by utilizing a composite right- and left-handed (CRLH) transmission line and provided 4 to 9.3 dBi of the antenna gain with reduced size as compared to conventional microstrip antennas at Ku- to K-band frequencies.

  7. The design and fabrication of microstrip omnidirectional array antennas for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, T. G.; Appleton, M. W.; Lusby, T. K.

    1976-01-01

    A microstrip antenna design concept was developed that will provide quasi-omnidirectional radiation pattern characteristics about cylindrical and conical aerospace structures. L-band and S-band antenna arrays were designed, fabricated, and, in some cases, flight tested for rocket, satellite, and aircraft drone applications. Each type of array design is discussed along with a thermal cover design that was required for the sounding rocket applications.

  8. High-gain backup antenna design for Pioneer Venus Orbiter spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, J. I.

    1986-01-01

    The development and performance is described of a high-gain antenna designed to serve on the Pioneer Venus Orbiter spacecraft as a backup to the principal high-gain antenna unit in the unlikely event the mechanically despun antenna mechanism malfunctioned. The final design, a center-fed standing wave array of six sleeve dipoles enclosed in a fiber glass radome, performed successfully, as did all the antennas, on the Pioneer Orbiter spacecraft which was launched on May 20, 1978, as part of the Pioneer Venus mission. Photographs of experimental models giving details of design and construction are included, as well as graphs showing measured pattern and impedance matching characteristics of the subject antenna.

  9. Quasi-optical antenna-mixer-array design for terahertz frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Yong; Potter, Kent A.; Rutledge, David B.

    1992-01-01

    A new quasi-optical antenna-mixer-array design for terahertz frequencies is presented. In the design, antenna and mixer are combined into an entity, based on the technology in which millimeter-wave horn antenna arrays have been fabricated in silicon wafers. It consists of a set of forward- and backward-looking horns made with a set of silicon wafers. The front side is used to receive incoming signal, and the back side is used to feed local oscillator signal. Intermediate frequency is led out from the side of the array. Signal received by the horn array is picked up by antenna probes suspended on thin silicon-oxynitride membranes inside the horns. Mixer diodes will be located on the membranes inside the horns. Modeling of such an antenna-mixer-array design is done on a scaled model at microwave frequencies. The impedance matching, RF and LO isolation, and patterns of the array have been tested and analyzed.

  10. Performance and operational considerations in the design of vehicle antennas for mobile satellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milne, R.

    1995-01-01

    This paper examines the vehicle antenna requirements for mobile satellite systems. The antenna parameters are discussed in the light of the requirements and the limitations in performance imposed by the physical constraints of antenna and by vehicle geometries. Measurements of diffraction and antenna noise temperature in an operational environment are examined, as well as their effects on system margins. Mechanical versus electronic designs are compared with regards to performance, cost, reliability, and design complexity. Comparisons between open-loop and close-loop tracking systems are made and the effects of bandwidth, sidelobe levels, operational constraints, vehicle angular velocity, and acceleration are discussed. Some consideration is given to the use of hybrid systems employing both open and closed-loop tracking. Changes to antenna/terminal specifications are recommended which will provide greater design flexibility and increase the likelihood of meeting the performance and operational requirements.

  11. System and antenna design considerations for highly elliptical orbits as applied to the proposed Archimedes Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paynter, C.; Cuchanski, M.

    1995-01-01

    The paper discusses various aspects of the system design for a satellite in a highly elliptical inclined orbit, and presents a number of antenna design options for the proposed Archimedes mission. A satellite constellation was studied for the provision of multi media communication services in the L and S Band for northern latitudes. The inclined elliptical orbit would allow coverage of Europe, America, and East Asia. Using Canada and North America as the baseline coverage area, this paper addresses system considerations such as the satellite configuration and pointing, beam configuration, and requirements for antennas. A trade-off is performed among several antenna candidates including a direct radiating array, a focal-fed reflector, and a single reflector imaging system. Antenna geometry, performance, and beam forming methods are described. The impact of the designs on the antenna deployment is discussed.

  12. Quasi-isotropic VHF antenna array design study for the International Ultraviolet Explorer satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raines, J. K.

    1975-01-01

    Results of a study to design a quasi-isotropic VHF antenna array for the IUE satellite are presented. A free space configuration was obtained that has no nulls deeper than -6.4 dbi in each of two orthogonal polarizations. A computer program named SOAP that analyzes the electromagnetic interaction between antennas and complicated conducting bodies, such as satellites was developed.

  13. Computer-based designing of waveguide radiators of arbitrary cross section for antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voskresenskii, D. I.; Grinev, A. Iu.; Ilinskii, A. S.; Kotov, Iu. V.

    1980-02-01

    A multistep method is proposed for designing waveguide radiators for use in antenna arrays. A rigorous electrodynamic method for structure analysis is developed, along with a computer program and a numerical algorithm. The aperture performance of a quadruple-ridge rectangular waveguide in a phased array is examined, along with the directivity patterns of H-shaped, square, and circular radiators in antenna arrays.

  14. Aircraft antennas/conformal antennas missile antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solbach, Klaus

    1987-04-01

    Three major areas of airborne microwave antennas are examined. The basic system environment for missile telemetry/telecommand and fuze functions is sketched and the basic antenna design together with practical examples are discussed. The principle requirements of modern nose radar flat plate antennas are shown to result from missile/aircraft system requirements. Basic principles of slotted waveguide antenna arrays are sketched and practical antenna designs are discussed. The present early warning system designs are sketched to point out requirements and performance of practical radar warning and jamming antennas (broadband spiral antennas and horn radiators). With respect to newer developments in the ECM scenario, some demonstrated and proposed antenna systems (lens fed arrays, phased array, active array) are discussed.

  15. 21 CFR 868.5560 - Gas mask head strap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gas mask head strap. 868.5560 Section 868.5560...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5560 Gas mask head strap. (a) Identification. A gas mask head strap is a device used to hold an anesthetic gas mask in position on a...

  16. 49 CFR 236.532 - Strap iron inductor; use restricted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Strap iron inductor; use restricted. 236.532... Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Rules and Instructions; Roadway § 236.532 Strap iron inductor; use restricted. No railroad shall use strap iron inductor or other roadway element...

  17. 49 CFR 236.532 - Strap iron inductor; use restricted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Strap iron inductor; use restricted. 236.532... Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Rules and Instructions; Roadway § 236.532 Strap iron inductor; use restricted. No railroad shall use strap iron inductor or other roadway element...

  18. 49 CFR 236.532 - Strap iron inductor; use restricted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Strap iron inductor; use restricted. 236.532... Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Rules and Instructions; Roadway § 236.532 Strap iron inductor; use restricted. No railroad shall use strap iron inductor or other roadway element...

  19. 49 CFR 236.532 - Strap iron inductor; use restricted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Strap iron inductor; use restricted. 236.532... Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Rules and Instructions; Roadway § 236.532 Strap iron inductor; use restricted. No railroad shall use strap iron inductor or other roadway element...

  20. 49 CFR 236.532 - Strap iron inductor; use restricted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Strap iron inductor; use restricted. 236.532... Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Rules and Instructions; Roadway § 236.532 Strap iron inductor; use restricted. No railroad shall use strap iron inductor or other roadway element...

  1. Design of dual band wearable antenna using metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Afridi, Adeel; Ullah, Sadiq; Khan, Shahbaz; Ahmed, Aziz; Khalil, Akhtar Hussain; Tarar, Munir Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents two types of dual band (2.4 and 5.8 GHz) wearable planar dipole antennas, one printed on a conventional substrate and the other on a two-dimensional metamaterial surface (Electromagnetic Bandgap (EBG) structure). The operation of both antennas is investigated and compared under different bending conditions (in E and H-planes) around human arm and leg of different radii. A dual band, Electromagnetic Band Gap (EBG) structure on a wearable substrate is used as a high impedance surface to control the Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) as well as to improve the antenna gain up to 4.45 dBi. The EBG inspired antenna has reduced the SAR effects on human body to a safe level (< 2W/Kg). I.e. the SAR is reduced by 83.3% for lower band and 92.8% for higher band as compared to the conventional antenna. The proposed antenna can be used for wearable applications with least health hazard to human body in Industrial, Scientific and Medical (ISM) band (2.4 GHz, 5.2 GHz) applications. The antennas on human body are simulated and analyzed in CST Microwave Studio (CST MWS). PMID:24779146

  2. Design and implementation of dual-band antennas based on a complementary split ring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Noelia; Iriarte, Juan Carlos; Crespo, Gonzalo; Falcone, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    A simple dual-band antenna design and implementation method is proposed in this work, based on the equivalent media properties inspired by resonant metamaterial elements. The equivalent circuit model of dual-band patch antennas based on a complementary split ring resonator (CSRR) is presented and validated. The dual-band patch antenna is designed etching a CSRR in the patch of a conventional rectangular microstrip patch antenna. The first resonance is governed by the quasi-static resonance of the CSRR while the second resonance is originated by the rectangular patch. The fact of etching a CSRR on a rectangular patch antenna also produces a miniaturization of a conventional patch antenna. The equivalent circuit model proposed in this letter is sound in order to understand the functionality of dual-band patch antennas based on a CSRR. Good agreement between simulation, equivalent circuit model and experimental results is shown and discussed. These results lead the equivalent circuit model to become a simple and straightforward tool for the design of this type of multiband antennas, of low cost and versatile operation for a broad range of wireless communication systems.

  3. Development and design of dual-band, multi-function remote sensing antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creticos, Justin P.

    This dissertation details the theoretical development, design, fabrication, and testing of two remote sensing antennas. The antennas operate in Ku and Ka bands and must support multiple beams, polarizations, and frequencies with a single aperture. The first antenna, developed for NASA's High-Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler, is a single, offset-fed reflector that supports dual-band beams incident at 30° and 40° off-nadir. The antenna uses two compact, dual-band feeds moved away from the reflector's focal point to meet the dual beam requirement. The radar is to be flown on the Global Hawk Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle which has a small payload bay requiring the feeds to be both rugged and compact. The second antenna, developed for Remote Sensing Solutions' Dual-Wavelength Precipitation Radar, is a dual-offset Gregorian reflector. The antenna supports a single, dual-band, beam with dual-polarization at each band. Additionally, the antenna has high polarization purity and matched half power beamwidths at Ku and Ka bands. The strict requirements of the antenna are met by precisely controlling feed radiation characteristics. The two antennas necessitated several advances in feed design. A foam sleeve is demonstrated as an effective method to reduce the beamwidth of a tapered dielectric rod antenna. The foam sleeve is an attractive design because it allows dual-band feeds where a corrugated horn is used to control radiation at lower frequencies and the sleeve corrected rod is used to control the upper band. By judiciously choosing sleeve material, independent control of the radiation pattern and phase center at each band is achieved allowing higher performance feeds. This dissertation also focuses on new developments in the backend design of feeds. Specifically, the use of tuning arms in the feed backend and double ridged waveguide to couple the signal into the feed allow more compact designs with greater bandwidth.

  4. Consequences of antenna design in telemetry studies of small passerines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dougill, Steve J.; Johnson, Luanne; Banko, Paul C.; Goltz, Dan M.; Wiley, Michael R.; Semones, John D.

    2000-01-01

    Entanglement and mortality of Palila (Loxioides bailleui), an endangered Hawaiian honeycreeper, occurred when birds were radio-tagged with transmitters equipped with a long, limp, solder-tipped antenna. Birds were found suspended in trees by their transmitter antenna on eight occasions. Although these birds eventually freed themselves or were freed by us, at least one bird died afterwards. For radio telemetry studies of small passerine species we recommend avoiding transmitters equipped with an antenna that is bulbous at the tip, >16 cm in length, limp, and shiny.

  5. Design of a Five-Band Internal Antenna for Handsets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Anfu; Li, Jianxing; Zhang, Anxue; Jiang, Yansheng

    2012-06-01

    A novel compact five-band internal handset antenna covering LTE (746-806 MHz), GSM850 (824-894 MHz), GSM900 (890-960 MHz), DCS (1710-1880 MHz) and PCS (1850-1990 MHz) bands is presented. To enhance the bandwidths of the proposed antenna both at the low frequency band and high frequency band, a rectangular slot with a proper size is removed in the ground plane at an appropriate location. Both the simulated results and measured results show that reasonable radiation patterns and antenna gains for each frequency band are achieved.

  6. Design and Sizing of a 40M2 Deployable Membrane SAR Space Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straubel, Marco; Huhne, Christian; Arlt, Christine; Langlois, Stephane; Sinapius, Michael

    2012-07-01

    As there is still a demand for large SAR apertures for L and P-band, DLR and ESA decide in 2007 to start a collaborative study on VERY LARGE STABLE MEMBRANE ANTENNA ARCHITECTURES that is focussed on gossamer structures. The results of this study are shown in the paper. It contains a brief discussion on available conventional and gossamer antenna designs and introduces the elaborated design of our study. In addition, the sizing of the antenna parts is presented in extracts. An automated sizing approach involving routines in MATLAB and ANSYS is introduces that performs an autonomous sizing of such antenna structure for launch and operation loads within a time frame of about 8 minutes. Finally, this automatic sizing approach is used to do a parameter study and show the consequence of changed requirements or antenna membrane specification on the over all mass and mass spreading.

  7. Project Report: Design and Analysis for the Deep Space Network BWG Type 2 Antenna Feed Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The following report explains in detail the solid modeling design process and structural analysis of the LNA (Low Noise Amplifier) feed platform to be constructed and installed on the new BWG (Beam Wave Guide) Type-2 tracking antenna in Canberra, Australia, as well as all future similar BWG Type-2 antennas builds. The Deep Space Networks new BWG Type-2 antennas use beam waveguides to funnel and 'extract' the desired signals received from spacecraft, and the feed platform supports and houses the LNA(Low Noise Amplifier) feed-cone and cryogenic cooling equipment used in the signal transmission and receiving process. The mandated design and construction of this platform to be installed on the new tracking antenna will be used and incorporated on all future similar antenna builds.

  8. Design of a Miniaturized Meandered Line Antenna for UHF RFID Tags.

    PubMed

    Rokunuzzaman, Md; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul; Rowe, Wayne S T; Kibria, Salehin; Jit Singh, Mandeep; Misran, Norbahiah

    2016-01-01

    A semi-circle looped vertically omnidirectional radiation (VOR) patterned tag antenna for UHF (919-923 MHz for Malaysia) frequency is designed to overcome the impedance mismatch issue in this paper. Two impedance matching feeding strips are used in the antenna structure to tune the input impedance of the antenna. Two dipole shaped meandered lines are used to achieve a VOR pattern. The proposed antenna is designed for 23-j224 Ω chip impedance. The antenna is suitable for 'place and tag' application. A small size of 77.68×35.5 mm2 is achieved for a read range performance of 8.3 meters using Malaysia regulated maximum power transfer of 2.0 W effective radiated power (ERP). PMID:27533470

  9. Design of a Miniaturized Meandered Line Antenna for UHF RFID Tags

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Mohammad Tariqul; Rowe, Wayne S. T.; Kibria, Salehin; Jit Singh, Mandeep; Misran, Norbahiah

    2016-01-01

    A semi-circle looped vertically omnidirectional radiation (VOR) patterned tag antenna for UHF (919–923 MHz for Malaysia) frequency is designed to overcome the impedance mismatch issue in this paper. Two impedance matching feeding strips are used in the antenna structure to tune the input impedance of the antenna. Two dipole shaped meandered lines are used to achieve a VOR pattern. The proposed antenna is designed for 23-j224 Ω chip impedance. The antenna is suitable for ‘place and tag’ application. A small size of 77.68×35.5 mm2 is achieved for a read range performance of 8.3 meters using Malaysia regulated maximum power transfer of 2.0 W effective radiated power (ERP). PMID:27533470

  10. Design and synthesis of flexible switching 1 × 2 antenna array on Kapton substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georges Rabobason, Yvon; Rigas, Grigorios; Swaisaenyakorn, Srijittar; Mirkhaydarov, Bobur; Ravelo, Blaise; Shkunov, Maxim; Young, Paul; Benjelloun, Nabil

    2016-06-01

    Flexible front- and back-end RF/analogue system antennas were recently emerged. However, little flexible antenna system design is available so far, in planar hybrid technology with surface mounted components. This paper describes the design feasibility of flexible switching 1 × 2 antenna array system. It acts as a switching antenna implemented in hexapole configuration. The system is comprised of a key element RF switch terminated by two identical patch antennas associated to half-wave elementary transmission lines (TLs). A detailed theory illustrating the global S-parameter model determination in function of the given RF-switch return and insertion losses is established. In difference to the conventional microwave circuit theory, the proposed equivalent S-parameter model is originally built with the non-standard optimized antenna load. Thus, the synthesis method of the terminal antenna input impedance and the output access line characteristic impedance is formulated in function of the specified return and optimal transmission losses. The design method and theoretical approach feasibility is verified with the demonstrator of flexible switching 1 × 2 antenna array printed on Kapton substrate. The circuit prototype is implemented in hybrid planar technology integrating patch antenna operating at about 6 GHz and a packaged GaAs RF switch associated to the RF/DC signal decoupling accessory mounted surface components. Simulations of the designed circuit transmission and isolation losses from 5.5 GHz to 7 GHz were carried out by using the commercial RF switch S-parameter touchstone model provided by the manufacturer. The simulated and measured return losses are compared and discussed. Then, the measured radiation patterns confirm the proposed switched antenna concept feasibility.

  11. Plasmonic antennas as design elements for coherent ultrafast nanophotonics

    PubMed Central

    Brinks, Daan; Castro-Lopez, Marta; Hildner, Richard; van Hulst, Niek F.

    2013-01-01

    Broadband excitation of plasmons allows control of light-matter interaction with nanometric precision at femtosecond timescales. Research in the field has spiked in the past decade in an effort to turn ultrafast plasmonics into a diagnostic, microscopy, computational, and engineering tool for this novel nanometric–femtosecond regime. Despite great developments, this goal has yet to materialize. Previous work failed to provide the ability to engineer and control the ultrafast response of a plasmonic system at will, needed to fully realize the potential of ultrafast nanophotonics in physical, biological, and chemical applications. Here, we perform systematic measurements of the coherent response of plasmonic nanoantennas at femtosecond timescales and use them as building blocks in ultrafast plasmonic structures. We determine the coherent response of individual nanoantennas to femtosecond excitation. By mixing localized resonances of characterized antennas, we design coupled plasmonic structures to achieve well-defined ultrafast and phase-stable field dynamics in a predetermined nanoscale hotspot. We present two examples of the application of such structures: control of the spectral amplitude and phase of a pulse in the near field, and ultrafast switching of mutually coherent hotspots. This simple, reproducible and scalable approach transforms ultrafast plasmonics into a straightforward tool for use in fields as diverse as room temperature quantum optics, nanoscale solid-state physics, and quantum biology. PMID:24163355

  12. Design of a 60 GHz beam waveguide antenna positioner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emerick, Kenneth S.

    1989-01-01

    A development model antenna positioner mechanism with an integral 60 GHz radio frequency beam waveguide is discussed. The system features a 2-ft diameter carbon-fiber reinforced epoxy antenna reflector and support structure, and a 2-degree-of-freedom elevation over azimuth mechanism providing hemispherical field of view. Emphasis is placed on the constraints imposed on the mechanism by the radio frequency subsystems and how they impacted the mechanical configuration.

  13. Antenna design for microwave hepatic ablation using an axisymmetric electromagnetic model

    PubMed Central

    Bertram, John M; Yang, Deshan; Converse, Mark C; Webster, John G; Mahvi, David M

    2006-01-01

    Background An axisymmetric finite element method (FEM) model was employed to demonstrate important techniques used in the design of antennas for hepatic microwave ablation (MWA). To effectively treat deep-seated hepatic tumors, these antennas should produce a highly localized specific absorption rate (SAR) pattern and be efficient radiators at approved generator frequencies. Methods and results As an example, a double slot choked antenna for hepatic MWA was designed and implemented using FEMLAB™ 3.0. Discussion This paper emphasizes the importance of factors that can affect simulation accuracy, which include boundary conditions, the dielectric properties of liver tissue, and mesh resolution. PMID:16504153

  14. Preliminary design of a 15 m diameter mechanically scanned deployable offset antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The preliminary design of a 15 meter diameter mechanically scanned, offset rotating, fed parabolic reflector antenna system is reported and the results of preliminary performance, structural and thermal analyses are presented.

  15. Structural design of a vertical antenna boresight 18.3 by 18.3-m planar near-field antenna measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, G. R.; Trimarchi, P. A.; Wanhainen, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    A large very precise near-field planar scanner was proposed for NASA Lewis Research Center. This scanner would permit near-field measurements over a horizontal scan plane measuring 18.3 m by 18.3 m. Large aperture antennas mounted with antenna boresight vertical could be tested up to 60 GHz. When such a large near field scanner is used for pattern testing, the antenna or antenna system under test does not have to be moved. Hence, such antennas and antenna systems can be positioned and supported to simulate configuration in zero g. Thus, very large and heavy machinery that would be needed to accurately move the antennas are avoided. A preliminary investigation was undertaken to address the mechanical design of such a challenging near-field antenna scanner. The configuration, structural design and results of a parametric NASTRAN structural optimization analysis are contained. Further, the resulting design was dynamically analyzed in order to provide resonant frequency information to the scanner mechanical drive system designers. If other large near field scanners of comparable dimensions are to be constructed, the information can be used for design optimization of these also.

  16. Testing a Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial of Therapeutic versus Placebo Shoulder Strapping as an Adjuvant Intervention Early after Stroke.

    PubMed

    Appel, Caroline; Perry, Lin; Jones, Fiona

    2015-06-01

    This study tested a protocol for a randomized controlled trial of therapeutic versus placebo shoulder strapping as an adjuvant intervention early after stroke. Despite widespread use, there is little evidence of the efficacy or acceptability of shoulder strapping to improve arm function in patients with shoulder paresis following stroke. This study tested a protocol designed to trial shoulder strapping as an adjuvant therapy in patients with shoulder paresis after stroke and tested its acceptability for patients and clinical staff. A multiple-method design comprised one quantitative randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study and two qualitative exploratory investigations entailing patient interviews and staff surveys. Seventeen sub-acute stroke patients with shoulder paresis were recruited in London stroke service settings between November 2007 and December 2009. Outcomes from a 4-week therapeutic strapping protocol were compared with those of placebo strapping as an adjunct to conventional rehabilitation. Minimal adverse events and greater improvement in arm function (Action Research Arm Test) were seen with therapeutic compared with placebo strapping (effect size 0.34). Patients and staff found the strapping acceptable with minimal adverse effects. This study provided data for sample size calculation and demonstrated a workable research protocol to investigate the efficacy of shoulder strapping as an adjuvant intervention to routine rehabilitation for stroke patients. Small-scale findings continue to flag the importance of investigating this topic. The protocol is recommended for a definitive trial of shoulder strapping as an adjuvant intervention. PMID:25664993

  17. A Novel Design of Circular Edge Bow-Tie Nano Antenna for Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, Ahasanul; Reza, Ahmed Wasif; Kumar, Narendra

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a novel nano antenna is designed in order to convert the high frequency solar energy, thermal energy or earth re-emitted sun's energy into electricity. The proposed antenna is gold printed on a SiO2 layer, designed as a circular edge bow-tie with a ground plane at the bottom of the substrate. The Lorentz-Drude model is used to analyze the behavior of gold at the infrared band of frequencies. The proposed antenna is designed by 3D-electromagnetic solver, and analyzed for optimization of metal thickness, gap size, and antenna's geometrical length. Simulations are conducted in order to investigate the behavior of the antenna illuminated by the circularly polarized plane wave. The numerical simulations are studied for improving the harvesting E-field of the antenna within 5 THz-40 THz frequency range. The proposed antenna offers multiple resonance frequency and better return loss within the frequency bands of 23.2 THz to 27 THz (bandwidth 3.8 THz) and 31 THz to 35.9 THz (bandwidth 4.9 THz). An output electric field of 0.656 V/µm is simulated at 25.3 THz. The best fitted gap size at the feed point is achieved as 50 nm with the substrate thickness of 1.2 µm.

  18. Ultra-wideband miniaturized microstrip patch antennas for wireless communications: Design guidelines and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandu, Varun Kumar

    The number of wireless communication applications continue to increase steadily, leading to competition for currently allocated frequency bands. Capacity issues in form of data rate and latency have always been a bottleneck for broadband wireless-communication usage. New communication systems like ultra-wideband (UWB) require larger bandwidth than what is normally utilized with traditional antenna techniques. The interest for compact consumer electronics is growing in the meantime, creating a demand on efficient and low profile antennas which can be integrated on a printed circuit board. The main objective of this thesis is to study, design, analyze and implement UWB low profile microstrip patch antenna that satisfy UWB technology requirements. Some methods to extend the bandwidth and other antenna parameters associated with wideband usages are studied. Several techniques are used for optimal UWB bandwidth performance of the UWB microstrip patch antenna. The performance parameters such as VSWR, Gain and radiation pattern of the UWB microstrip patch antenna is extensively investigated with simulations using FEKO. A set of simple design guidelines is proposed to provide approximate rules that result in optimum "first-pass" designs of probe-fed, miniaturized, low profile, microstrip UWB antennas using different bandwidth-enhancement techniques to satisfy UWB bandwidth that require minimal tuning.

  19. Status of the ITER ICRF system design - 'Externally Matched' approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lamalle, P. U.; Dumortier, P.; Durodie, F.; Evrard, M.; Louche, F.; Messiaen, A.; Vervier, M.; Shannon, M.; Borthwick, A.; Chuilon, B.; Nightingale, M.; Goulding, R.; Swain, D.

    2007-09-28

    The design of the ITER ICRF system has been under revision for several years. The paper presents the status of the design proposal based on a 24 strap antenna plug (6 poloidal by 4 toroidal short radiating conductors) in which the straps are passively combined in 8 poloidal triplets by means of 4-port junctions. These triplets are connected in parallel pairwise through matching elements to form 4 load-resilient conjugate-T circuits. All adjustable matching elements are located outside the plug, i.e. in the ITER port cell and in the generator area.

  20. Manufacturing error sensitivity analysis and optimal design method of cable-network antenna structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Yali; Hu, Naigang; Duan, Baoyan; Yang, Guigeng; Cao, Hongjun; Xu, Wanye

    2016-03-01

    Inevitable manufacturing errors and inconsistency between assumed and actual boundary conditions can affect the shape precision and cable tensions of a cable-network antenna, and even result in failure of the structure in service. In this paper, an analytical sensitivity analysis method of the shape precision and cable tensions with respect to the parameters carrying uncertainty was studied. Based on the sensitivity analysis, an optimal design procedure was proposed to alleviate the effects of the parameters that carry uncertainty. The validity of the calculated sensitivities is examined by those computed by a finite difference method. Comparison with a traditional design method shows that the presented design procedure can remarkably reduce the influence of the uncertainties on the antenna performance. Moreover, the results suggest that especially slender front net cables, thick tension ties, relatively slender boundary cables and high tension level can improve the ability of cable-network antenna structures to resist the effects of the uncertainties on the antenna performance.

  1. Design of 45-degree Linearly Polarized Substrate Integrated Waveguide-fed Slot Array Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qingfeng; Lu, Yilong

    2008-11-01

    This paper presents a method of designing substrate integrated waveguide-fed (SIW-fed) slot array antennas. The design theory is based on the circuit model of slot and via as well as the reflection canceling. To prove the feasibility of this method, a 10-element K-band SIW-fed 45-degree linearly polarized slot array antenna with uniform power distribution is designed. By full-wave simulation, the antenna has a good impedance bandwidth of 7.5% and uniform power distribution. Besides, a maximum gain of 15.3dBi is obtained in the broadside and the cross polarization is suppressed below -23.5dB in the boresight. This type of SIW-fed slot array antennas can be a good candidate for microwave and millimeter-wave applications, especially for auto-motive collision-avoidance radar systems.

  2. System and method of designing a load bearing layer that interfaces to a structural pass-through of an inflatable vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spexarth, Gary R. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method for determining a design of an inflatable module including a rigid member disposed in a restraint layer, wherein the restraint layer includes orthogonal straps, includes modeling a strap adjacent to the rigid member and a strap connected to the rigid member. The adjacent strap and the member strap extend in a first direction. The method further includes selecting a first length of the member strap such that the adjacent strap carries load before the member strap during pressurization of the inflatable module, modeling tensions in the member strap with the first length and the adjacent strap during pressurization of the inflatable model, and outputting the modeled tensions in the member strap with the first length and the adjacent strap. An inflatable module includes a member strap having a length such that an adjacent strap carries load before the member strap during pressurization of the inflatable module.

  3. Antennas Designed for Advanced Communications for Air Traffic Management (AC/ATM) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakrajsek, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    The goal of the Advanced Communications for Air Traffic Management (AC/ATM) Project at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field is to enable a communications infrastructure that provides the capacity, efficiency, and flexibility necessary to realize a mature free-flight environment. The technical thrust of the AC/ATM Project is targeted at the design, development, integration, test, and demonstration of enabling technologies for global broadband aeronautical communications. Since Ku-band facilities and equipment are readily available, one of the near-term demonstrations involves a link through a Kuband communications satellite. Two conformally mounted antennas will support the initial AC/ATM communications links. Both of these are steered electronically through monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplifiers and phase shifters. This link will be asymmetrical with the downlink to the aircraft (mobile vehicle) at a throughput rate of greater than 1.5 megabits per second (Mbps), whereas the throughput rate of the uplink from the aircraft will be greater than 100 kilobits per second (kbps). The data on the downlink can be narrow-band, wide-band, or a combination of both, depending on the requirements of the experiment. The AC/ATM project is purchasing a phased-array Ku-band transmitting antenna for the uplink from the test vehicle. Many Ku-band receiving antennas have been built, and one will be borrowed for a short time to perform the initial experiments at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field. The Ku-band transmitting antenna is a 254-element MMIC phased-array antenna being built by Boeing Phantom Works. Each element can radiate 100 mW. The antenna is approximately 43-cm high by 24-cm wide by 3.3-cm thick. It can be steered beyond 60 from broadside. The beamwidth varies from 6 at broadside to 12 degrees at 60 degrees, which is typical of phased-array antennas. When the antenna is steered to 60 degrees, the beamwidth will illuminate

  4. Concepted design of a surface measurement system for large deployable space antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neiswander, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    The sensor system is in essence a point design, specifically interfacing with the Harris, Inc., 1000 meter deployable mesh communication antenna. The design can, without large modification, be adapted to other large deployable antennas such as the Lockheed Wrap-rib, the General Dynamics Precision Erectable Truss and the TRW Advanced Sunflower antennas. Measurements are optical displacements. The elements of the system are a central cluster of receivers near the apex of the antenna and active bright targets at the antenna. The cluster defines a single coordinate frame from which all surface positions are referenced. The receivers continuously observe an extended array of sample points located throughout the reflecting surface and its supporting structure. For the Harris antenna, the surface samples are at the mesh gore lines and at the supporting hoop. Output data is in real-time, compatible with on-board processing and active control of antenna figure. Lifetime of the system is at least 10 years continuous operation in space.

  5. Design and performance of a 4.5GHz circularly polarized YBa 2Cu 3O 7 microstrip antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, M. H.; Cao, B. S.; Zhang, X. X.; Li, W. H.; Yuan, H. J.; Wang, Y. J.; Zhang, L. W.; Dong, D. J.; Liu, M. L.; Cui, D. F.; He, M.; Zhou, Y. L.; Liu, T. J.

    1997-08-01

    A 4.5GHz circularly polarized YBCO microstrip antenna was designed and fabricated. Measurements showed that at 77K the superconducting antenna had about 3dB gain improvement over the comparable silver antenna, in agreement with the calculated results using the modified Green function method.

  6. Design optical antenna and fiber coupling system based on the vector theory of reflection and refraction.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ping; Yang, Huajun; Mao, Shengqian

    2015-10-01

    A Cassegrain antenna system and an optical fiber coupling system which consists of a plano-concave lens and a plano-convex lens are designed based on the vector theory of reflection and refraction, so as to improve the transmission performance of the optical antenna and fiber coupling system. Three-dimensional ray tracing simulation are performed and results of the optical aberrations calculation and the experimental test show that the aberrations caused by on-axial defocusing, off-axial defocusing and deflection of receiving antenna can be well corrected by the optical fiber coupling system. PMID:26480125

  7. Designing Ground Antennas for Maximum G/T: Cassegrain or Gregorian?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbriale, William A.

    2005-01-01

    For optimum performance, a ground antenna system must maximize the ratio of received signal to the receiving system noise power, defined as the ratio of antenna gain to system-noise temperature (G/T). The total system noise temperature is the linear combination of the receiver noise temperature (including the feed system losses) and the antenna noise contribution. Hence, for very low noise cryogenic receiver systems, antenna noise-temperature properties are very significant contributors to G/T.It is well known that, for dual reflector systems designed for maximum gain, the gain performance of the antenna system is the same for both Cassegrain and Gregorian configurations. For a12-meter antenna designed to be part of the large array based Deep Space Network, a Cassegrain configuration designed for maximum G/T at X-band was 0.7 dB higher than the equivalent Gregorian configuration. This study demonstrates that, for maximum GIT, the dual shaped Cassegrain design is always better than the Gregorian.

  8. On the Practical Design of Small Terminal Antennas for Mobile Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrivervik, Anja K.; Martínez-Vázquez, Marta; Mosig, Juan R.

    Mobile communication have become an important part of telecommunications. Original applications like paging, mobile phones or GPS have shown a tremendous growth, and new applications are emerging every day: tagging, wireless computer links, wireless microphones, remote control, wireless multimedia links, satellite mobile phones, wireless internet. Mobile means light, small, with low energy consumption and appealing designs. Technology has evolved very fast to satisfy these needs in rapidly growing markeds: chips are becoming smaller, consume less current, are more efficient and perform more complex operations. The antennas however have not experienced the same evolution, as the size of an antenna is mainly dictated by the frequency band it has to transmit or receive. Thus, the art of antenna miniaturization is an art of compromise: one has to design the smallest possible antenna, which is still suitable for a given application regarding its radiation characteristics. Or in other words, one looks for the best compromise between volume, bandwidth and efficiency. In this paper, we will go through classical design techniques, starting from ultra small antennas and going UWB antennas over multiband designs.

  9. Computer simulations for rf design of a Spallation Neutron Source external antenna H ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sung-Woo; Goulding, Richard Howell; Kang, Yoon W; Shin, Ki; Welton, Robert F

    2010-01-01

    Electromagnetic modeling of the multicusp external antenna H ion source for the Spallation Neutron Source SNS has been performed in order to optimize high-power performance. During development of the SNS external antenna ion source, antenna failures due to high voltage and multicusp magnet holder rf heating concerns under stressful operating conditions led to rf characteristics analysis. In rf simulations, the plasma was modeled as an equivalent lossy metal by defining conductivity as . Insulation designs along with material selections such as ferrite and Teflon could be included in the computer simulations to compare antenna gap potentials, surface power dissipations, and input impedance at the operating frequencies, 2 and 13.56 MHz. Further modeling and design improvements are outlined in the conclusion.

  10. User Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamnejad, Vahraz; Cramer, Paul

    1990-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) impact of frequency change of user and spacecraft antenna gain and size; (2) basic personal terminal antennas (impact of 20/30 GHz frequency separation; parametric studies - gain, size, weight; gain and figure of merit (G/T); design data for selected antenna concepts; critical technologies and development goals; and recommendations); and (3) user antenna radiation safety concerns.

  11. DESIGN AND PERFORMANCE OF A LOW-FREQUENCY CROSS-POLARIZED LOG-PERIODIC DIPOLE ANTENNA

    SciTech Connect

    Raja, K. Sasikumar; Kathiravan, C.; Ramesh, R.; Rajalingam, M.; Barve, Indrajit V.

    2013-07-01

    We report the design and performance of a cross-polarized log-periodic dipole (CLPD) antenna for observations of polarized radio emission from the solar corona at low frequencies. The measured isolation between the two mutually orthogonal log-periodic dipole antennas was as low as Almost-Equal-To - 43 dBm in the 65-95 MHz range. We carried out observations of the solar corona at 80 MHz with the above CLPD and successfully recorded circularly polarized emission.

  12. Design of a compact tuning fork-shaped notched ultrawideband antenna for wireless communication application.

    PubMed

    Shakib, M N; Moghavvemi, M; Mahadi, W N L

    2014-01-01

    A new compact planar notched ultrawideband (UWB) antenna is designed for wireless communication application. The proposed antenna has a compact size of 0.182λ × 0.228λ × 0.018λ where λ is the wavelength of the lowest operating frequency. The antenna is comprised of rectangular radiating patch, ground plane, and an arc-shaped strip in between radiating patch and feed line. By introducing a new Tuning Fork-shaped notch in the radiating plane, a stopband is obtained. The antenna is tested and measured. The measured result indicated that fabricated antenna has achieved a wide bandwidth of 4.33-13.8 GHz (at -10 dB return loss) with a rejection frequency band of 5.28-6.97 GHz (WiMAX, WLAN, and C-band). The effects of the parameters of the antenna are discussed. The experiment results demonstrate that the proposed antenna can well meet the requirement for the UWB communication in spite of its compactness and small size. PMID:24723835

  13. Design of a Compact Tuning Fork-Shaped Notched Ultrawideband Antenna for Wireless Communication Application

    PubMed Central

    Shakib, M. N.; Moghavvemi, M.; Mahadi, W. N. L.

    2014-01-01

    A new compact planar notched ultrawideband (UWB) antenna is designed for wireless communication application. The proposed antenna has a compact size of 0.182λ × 0.228λ × 0.018λ where λ is the wavelength of the lowest operating frequency. The antenna is comprised of rectangular radiating patch, ground plane, and an arc-shaped strip in between radiating patch and feed line. By introducing a new Tuning Fork-shaped notch in the radiating plane, a stopband is obtained. The antenna is tested and measured. The measured result indicated that fabricated antenna has achieved a wide bandwidth of 4.33–13.8 GHz (at −10 dB return loss) with a rejection frequency band of 5.28–6.97 GHz (WiMAX, WLAN, and C-band). The effects of the parameters of the antenna are discussed. The experiment results demonstrate that the proposed antenna can well meet the requirement for the UWB communication in spite of its compactness and small size. PMID:24723835

  14. Design of Compact Penta-Band and Hexa-Band Microstrip Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Kunal; Kumar, Ashwani; Kanaujia, Binod K.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents the design of two multi-band microstrip antennas. The antenna-1 gives Penta-Band and antenna-2 gives Hexa-band in the WLAN band. The frequency bands of the antenna-1 are Bluetooth 2.47 GHz (2.43 GHz-2.54 GHz), WiMax band 3.73 GHz (3.71 GHz-3.77 GHz), WLAN 5.1 GHz (4.99 GHz-5.13 GHz), upper WLAN 6.36 GHz (6.29 GHz-6.43 GHz), C band band 7.42 GHz (7.32 GHz-7.50 GHz) and the antenna-2 are WLAN band 2.6 GHz (2.56 GHz-2.63 GHz), 3.0 GHz (2.94 GHz-3.05 GHz), WiMax band 3.4 GHz (3.34 GHz-3.55 GHz), 4.85 GHz (4.81 GHz-4.92 GHz), WLAN 5.3 GHz (5.27 GHz-5.34 GHz) and upper WLAN 6.88 GHz. Both the antennas are fabricated and their measured results are presented to validate the simulated results. Proposed antennas have compact sizes and good radiation performances.

  15. Design and Optimization of Passive UHF RFID Tag Antenna for Mounting on or inside Material Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Shuai

    There is great desire to employ passive UHF RFID tags for inventory tracking and sensing in a diversity of applications and environments. Owing to its battery-free operation, non-line-of sight detection, low cost, long read range and small form factor, each year billions of RFID tags are being deployed in retail, logistics, manufacturing, biomedical inventories, among many other applications. However, the performance of these RFID systems has not met expectations. This is because a tag's performance deteriorates significantly when mounted on or inside arbitrary materials. The tag antenna is optimized only for a given type of material at a certain location of placement, and detuning takes place when attached to or embedded in materials with dielectric properties outside the design range. Thereby, different customized tags may be needed for identifying objects even within the same class of products. This increases the overall cost of the system. Furthermore, conventional copper foil-based RFID tag antennas are prone to metal fatigue and wear, and cannot survive hostile environments where antennas could be deformed by external forces and failures occur. Therefore, it is essential to understand the interaction between the antenna and the material in the vicinity of the tag, and design general purpose RFID tag antennas possessing excellent electrical performance as well as robust mechanical structure. A particularly challenging application addressed here is designing passive RFID tag antennas for automotive tires. Tires are composed of multiple layers of rubber with different dielectric properties and thicknesses. Furthermore, metallic plies are embedded in the sidewalls and steel belts lie beneath the tread to enforce mechanical integrity. To complicate matters even more, a typical tire experiences a 10% stretching during the construction process. This dissertation focuses on intuitively understanding the interaction between the antenna and the material in the

  16. Design and investigation of planar technology based ultra-wideband antenna with directional radiation patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meena, M. L.; Parmar, Girish; Kumar, Mithilesh

    2016-03-01

    A novel design technique based on planar technology for ultra-wideband (UWB) antennas with different ground shape having directional radiation pattern is being presented here. Firstly, the L-shape corner reflector ground plane antenna is designed with microstrip feed line in order to achieve large bandwidth and directivity. Thereafter, for the further improvement in the directivity as well as for better impedance matching the parabolic-shape ground plane has been introduced. The coaxial feed line is given for the proposed directional antenna in order to achieve better impedance matching with 50 ohm transmission line. The simulation analysis of the antenna is done on CST Microwave Studio software using FR-4 substrate having thickness of 1.6 mm and dielectric constant of 4.4. The simulated result shows a good return loss (S11) with respect to -10 dB. The radiation pattern characteristic, angular width, directivity and bandwidth performance of the antenna have also been compared at different resonant frequencies. The designed antennas exhibit low cost, low reflection coefficient and better directivity in the UWB frequency band.

  17. Status of the JET ITER-Like Antenna High-Power Prototype Test Program

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, R.H.; Baity, F.W.; Fadnek, A.; Freudenberg, K.D.; Nelson, B.E.; Rasmussen, D.A.; Sparks, D.O.; Durodie, F.; Nightingale, M.; Walton, R.

    2005-09-26

    Previous tests of a High Power Prototype (HPP) comprising one quadrant of the JET ITER-Like ICRF Antenna have indicated the need for some design modifications in order to achieve 10 s pulses coupling the full design power (7.1 MW) into the reference plasma load (R' = 4 {omega}/m). These modifications have now been made to the HPP, as well as to the design of the ITER-Like Antenna itself. In particular, maximum current densities have been reduced or otherwise accommodated in key areas. New current straps for the HPP have been fabricated from stereo-lithography-based investment castings. Design modifications to the antenna enclosure have also been implemented. This work has been materially assisted through the use of CST Microwave Studio (MWS), a commercially available 3-D electromagnetic modeling package. Essentially the full engineering CAD model of the HPP current straps and antenna enclosure has been ex-ported from ProE to MWS. Computed current density profiles have been introduced into an ANSYS thermal model. These activities will be discussed, as well as the current status of the HPP test program.

  18. On the JET ITER-Like ICRF antenna and implications for the ICRF system for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durodie, Frederic; Nightingale, Mark

    2009-11-01

    A new ``ITER-Like'' Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) antenna was installed on the JET tokamak in 2007 and extensively operated on plasma since May 2008 for a wide range of conditions (frequencies: 33, 42 and 47 MHz, L- and ELMy H-mode plasmas, antenna strap - plasma separatrix distances from 9 to 17 cm). Aspects relating to the potential performance and design of the ITER system, will be discussed: (i) the wave coupling performance and validation of the TOPICA modelling code used to predict the coupled power in ITER; (ii) the operation at high coupled power density (up to 6.2 MW/m^2 in L-mode, 4.1 MW/m^2 in H-mode) and high RF voltage on the antenna structure (up to 42 kV); (iii) the coupling of ICRF power during fast variations (ms) in coupling occurring during ELMs and (iv) antenna control in the presence of high mutual coupling between antenna straps.

  19. Design and Characterization of Planar Traveling Wave Dipole Antennas Using Resistive and Reactive Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzybowski, Richard Robert

    1992-01-01

    It is well known that the current distribution on dipole antennas exists primarily as standing waves. For this reason, the input impedance of a dipole antenna is a strong function of frequency. In contrast, a traveling wave antenna possesses an input impedance that is comparatively frequency independent. An important result of this reduced frequency dependence is the decrease in VSWR and an increase in bandwidth for a given antenna. In the past, free standing, traveling wave dipoles have been realized by the incorporation of distributed resistive loading along the length of the antenna. This type of loading permits the rapid attenuation of a traveling wave current as it proceeds toward the feed point. These experiments were performed at frequencies of several hundred megahertz. Resistive loading, however, reduces the radiation efficiency of the antennas by dissipating some of the input power as heat. This dissipative power loss may be overcome by utilizing reactive loading. This work discusses the design and characterization of planar traveling wave dipole antennas in the frequency range of X-through Ku-band. All of the dipole antennas treated were characterized with the aid of a small loop magnetic field probe constructed for that purpose. The magnetic field probe was used to quantitatively measure the surface current magnitude and phase distributions along the lengths of the dipoles. The planar antennas considered include printed microstrip dipoles that incorporate either resistive or reactive loading schemes along their lengths. These printed metal dipoles range in length from one quarter of a wavelength to over five wavelengths at 20 GHz. In addition, silicon traveling wave dipoles obtained via conductivity modulation are also evaluated.

  20. Scattering from thin dielectric straps surrounding a perfectly conducting structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Al-Hekail, Zeyad; Gupta, Inder J.

    1989-01-01

    A method to calculate the electromagnetic scattered fields from a dielectric strap wrapped around convex, conducting structure is presented. A moment method technique is used to find the current excited within the strap by the incident plane wave. Then, Uniform Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (UTD) is used to compute the fields scattered by the strap. Reasonable agreement was obtained between the computed and the measured results. The results found in this study are useful in evaluating straps as a target support structure for scattering measurements.

  1. roof truss detail, historic strap hinge detail Chopawamsic Recreational ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    roof truss detail, historic strap hinge detail - Chopawamsic Recreational Demonstration Area - Cabin Camp 1, Main Arts and Crafts Lodge, Prince William Forest Park, Triangle, Prince William County, VA

  2. Design, dynamic modelling and experimental validation of a 2DOF flexible antenna sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Claudia F.; Naci Engin, Seref; Feliu Batlle, Vicente

    2014-04-01

    A two-degree-of-freedom flexible antenna sensor platform was designed to physically simulate the ability of a robotic arm, which rapidly reorients and targets itself towards specific surfaces from different approachable angles. An accurate antenna model involves non-linear expressions that represent the system dynamics. Therefore, a comprehensive study along with experimental work has been carried out in order to achieve accurate system identification and validate the dynamic model. The model developed has proven useful in controlling the antenna tip, minimising the effects of the non-linear flexural dynamics and the Coulomb friction. The system was driven by servo motors. Algebraic controllers were developed for the antenna tip to track the reference trajectory. The platform system used encoders to measure the joint angles and a loadcell sensor to obtain the flexible link tip position. To validate the sensory information, the results obtained by the integrated sensors were compared to that of an external camera system.

  3. On the design and optimisation of new fractal antenna using PSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, Shweta; Singh, A. P.

    2013-10-01

    An optimisation technique for newly shaped fractal structure using particle swarm optimisation with curve fitting is presented in this article. The aim of particle swarm optimisation is to find the geometry of the antenna for the required user-defined frequency. To assess the effectiveness of the presented method, a set of representative numerical simulations have been done and the results are compared with the measurements from experimental prototypes built according to the design specifications coming from the optimisation procedure. The proposed fractal antenna resonates at the 5.8 GHz industrial, scientific and medical band which is suitable for wireless telemedicine applications. The antenna characteristics have been studied using extensive numerical simulations and are experimentally verified. The antenna exhibits well-defined radiation patterns over the band.

  4. Antennas for the array-based Deep Space Network: current status and future designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbriale, William A.; Gama, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Development of very large arrays1,2 of small antennas has been proposed as a way to increase the downlink capability of the NASA Deep Space Network DSN) by two or three orders of magnitude thereby enabling greatly increased science data from currently configured missions or enabling new mission concepts. The current concept is for an array of 400 x 12-m antennas at each of three longitudes. The DSN array will utilize radio astronomy sources for phase calibration and will have wide bandwidth correlation processing for this purpose. NASA has undertaken a technology program to prove the performance and cost of a very large DSN array. Central to that program is a 3-element interferometer to be completed in 2005. This paper describes current status of the low cost 6-meter breadboard antenna to be used as part of the interferometer and the RF design of the 12-meter antenna.

  5. Design of CPW fed printed slot antenna with circular polarization for UWB application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, N.; Tiwari, A.; Jangid, K. G.; Sharma, B. R.; Saini, J. S.; Kulhar, V. S.; Bhatnagar, D.

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports the design and performance of a CPW-fed circularized polarized elliptical slot antenna for UWB (ultra wide band) applications. The circular polarization is achieved by applying triangular stubs in the ground plane. The overall volume of this antenna is 40mm × 40 mm × 1.59 mm. The proposed antenna is simulated by applying CST Microwave Studio simulator. This elliptical patch slot antenna provides broad impedance bandwidth (3.1GHz to 10.6 GHz) with maximum gain 4.31dB at 4.45GHz. The simulated 3-dB axial ratio bandwidth is close to 2.51GHz (from 4.76GHz to 7.27GHz) which is 41.76% with respect to the central frequency 6.01GHz.

  6. Design and analysis of inverted H shape dual band patch antenna for microwave application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, M. Habib; Islam, M. T.; Mandeep, J. S.; Misran, N.; Reaz, M. B. I.

    2013-04-01

    Design and analysis of an inverted H shape printed dual band patch antenna has been presented in this paper. The proposed antenna has designed by 3-D full wave high frequency electromagnetic simulator HFSS and printed in low cost, durable epoxy polymer resin composite material substrate. The printed antenna prototype has been measured in a standard far field anechoic electromagnetic field measurement chamber. The measured results have analyzed by using computer aided plotting tool OriginPro 8.5. Measured -10 dB return loss bandwidth 3.25 GHz from 9.75 GHz to 13 GHz with peak gain 8.5 dBi have been achieved. The proposed antenna has obtained 0.63 dBi gain with 96% efficiency at lower band 10.3 GHz and 6.03 dBi gain with 84.2% efficiency at upper band 12.5 GHz. The almost steady radiation pattern makes the proposed antenna appropriate for part of X and Ku band applications. Moreover, the input impedance and current distribution along the radiating patch of the proposed antenna have also been analyzed in this paper.

  7. Analysis and design of a wideband dual-polarized antenna based on the principle of Huygens' source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Hyukjun

    Analysis and designs of wideband dual-polarized antennas for mobile wireless communication systems are presented. The concept for Huygens' sources, which are combinations of electric and magnetic dipoles, is used. As a result a wideband unidirectional antenna, which consists of a planar dipole and a slot, is selected for the antenna element. This study aims at designing a dually polarized antenna with wideband performance. The first part of the study discusses the performance of the linearly polarized antenna element at 2.5 GHz. Several design parameters associated with the antenna element are addressed. To improve the performance and increase the bandwidth, a twin-fed hook-shaped probe feeding technique is applied. Prototype antennas are fabricated and tested, and good agreement between the simulated and measured results is obtained. The second part of this study is extended to design the wideband dual-polarized patch antenna. Problems associated with the practical implementation of the dual-polarized antenna in printed form are discussed. The wideband performance of the present antenna is examined by shielding the dielectric substrate from the radiating region. The proposed antenna is fabricated and tested. In addition, a metallic side wall is adopted for suppressing the back radiation. The study for designing a possible candidate for a novel dual-polarized antenna by embedding an electromagnetic bandgap (EBG) structure is investigated. Analysis for unit-cells of mushroom-like and wideband uniplanar EBG structures is performed, and simple monopoles are used for exciting the EBG embedded antenna. The presented antennas find many possible applications in many recent wireless communication systems like 3G, 3GPP Long Term Evolution (LTE), 4G, Wi-MAX, and Wi-Bro.

  8. Design and analysis of a conformal patch antenna for a wearable breast hyperthermia treatment system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curto, Sergio; Ramasamy, Manoshika; Suh, Minyoung; Prakash, Punit

    2015-03-01

    To overcome the limitations of currently available clinical hyperthermia systems which are based on rigid waveguide antennas, a wearable microwave hyperthermia system is presented. A light wearable system can improve patient comfort and be located in close proximity to the breast, thereby enhancing energy deposition and reducing power requirements. The objective of this work was to design and assess the feasibility of a conformal patch antenna element of an array system to be integrated into a wearable hyperthermia bra. The feasibility of implementing antennas with silver printed ink technology on flexible substrates was evaluated. A coupled electromagnetic-bioheat transfer solver and a hemispheric heterogeneous numerical breast phantom were used to design and optimize a 915 MHz patch antenna. The optimization goals were device miniaturization, operating bandwidth, enhanced energy deposition pattern in targets, and reduced Efield back radiation. The antenna performance was evaluated for devices incorporating a hemispheric conformal groundplane and a rectangular groundplane configuration. Simulated results indicated a stable -10 dB return loss bandwidth of 88 MHz for both the conformal and rectangular groundplane configurations. Considering applied power levels restricted to 15 W, treatment volumes (T>410C) and depth from the skin surface were 11.32 cm3 and 27.94 mm, respectively, for the conformal groundplane configuration, and 2.79 cm3 and 19.72 mm, respectively, for the rectangular groundplane configuration. E-field back-radiation reduced by 85.06% for the conformal groundplane compared to the rectangular groundplane configuration. A prototype antenna with rectangular groundplane was fabricatd and experimentally evaluated. The groundplane was created by printing silver ink (Metalon JS-B25P) on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film surface. Experiments revealed stable antenna performance for power levels up to 15.3 W. In conclusion, the proposed patch antenna with

  9. Design of Dual band Modified Inverted F-Antenna for Military and Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) Applications by Numerical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Robiul; Karmokar, Debabrata Kumar

    2012-11-01

    A design of single feed Dual Band Modified Inverted F-Antenna (IFA) operating at 4.45 GHz (4.4-4.7GHz) and 5.9 GHz (5.850-5.925 GHz) has been proposed in this paper. The design is initiated by trial and error method of Numerical Analysis and method of moments (MoMís) in Numerical Electromagnetic code (NEC) is used to design, simulate and analyze this antenna. The results exhibit a proper operation of the antenna in terms of return loss, bandwidth, efficiency, VSWR, and gain at both bands. Proposed antenna is designed to achieve multi-serving purposes. Military applications and applications in the Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) are the most important applications within the above mentioned frequency bands respectively. The simulated results including performance parameters of antenna are presented and all are acceptable for the standard antennas.

  10. Design & Performance of Wearable Ultra Wide Band Textile Antenna for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nikhil; Singh, Ashutosh Kumar; Singh, Vinod Kumar

    2015-02-01

    The concept of wearable products such as textile antenna are being developed which are capable of monitoring, alerting and demanding attention whenever hospital emergency is needed, hence minimizing labour and resource. In the proposed work by using textile material as a substrate the ultra wideband antenna is designed especially for medical applications.Simulated and measured results here shows that the proposed antenna design meets the requirements of wide working bandwidth and provides 13.08 GHz bandwidth with very small size, washable (if using conductive thread for conductive parts) and flexible materials. Results in terms of bandwidth, radiation pattern, return loss as well as gain and efficiency are presented to validate the usefulness of the current proposed design. The work done here has many implications for future research and it could help patients with such flexible and comfortable medical monitoring techniques.

  11. Design and Experimental Investigation of a Compact Circularly Polarized Integrated Filtering Antenna for Wearable Biotelemetric Devices.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhi Hao; Gregory, Micah D; Werner, Douglas H

    2016-04-01

    A compact circularly polarized (CP) integrated filtering antenna is reported for wearable biotelemetric devices in the 2.4 GHz ISM band. The design is based on a mutual synthesis of a CP patch antenna connected to a bandpass filter composed of coupled stripline open-loop resonators, which provides an integrated low-profile radiating and filtering module with a compact form factor of 0.44λ(0)×0.44λ(0)×0.04λ(0). The optimized filtering antenna is fabricated and measured, achieving an S11 < -14 dB, an axial ratio of less than 3 dB and gain higher than 3.5 dBi in the targeted ISM band. With the integrated filtering functionality, the antenna exhibits good out-of-band rejection over an ultra-wide frequency range of 1-6 GHz. Further full-wave simulations and experiments were carried out, verifying that the proposed filtering antenna maintains these desirable properties even when mounted in close proximity to the human body at different positions. The stable impedance performance and the simultaneous wide axial ratio and radiated power beam widths make it an ideal candidate as a wearable antenna for off-body communications. The additional integrated filtering functionality further improves utility by greatly reducing interference and crosstalk with other existing wireless systems. PMID:26186795

  12. 21 CFR 868.5560 - Gas mask head strap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gas mask head strap. 868.5560 Section 868.5560 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5560 Gas mask head strap....

  13. 21 CFR 868.5560 - Gas mask head strap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gas mask head strap. 868.5560 Section 868.5560 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5560 Gas mask head strap....

  14. 21 CFR 868.5560 - Gas mask head strap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gas mask head strap. 868.5560 Section 868.5560 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5560 Gas mask head strap....

  15. 21 CFR 868.5560 - Gas mask head strap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gas mask head strap. 868.5560 Section 868.5560 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5560 Gas mask head strap....

  16. "A 'one-piece' gutter orthosis/strapping alternative".

    PubMed

    Schoell, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    Patients often have difficulty securing and positioning finger orthoses (splints). Using standard strapping materials molded directly into the orthotic device, this author describes an alternative strapping system for these small finger orthoses. -Victoria Priganc, PhD, OTR, CHT, CLT, Practice Forum Editor. PMID:22959536

  17. The design of a microstrip antenna array for a UHF space telemetry link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, R. E.; Stephenson, D. T.

    1981-01-01

    An array of microstrip antenna panels was designed for use on a small instrumented satellite as part of a 400-MHz telemetry link between that satellite and NASA's shuttle spacecraft. A roughly omnidirectional phi-plane pattern was desired. The 1.4-wavelength diameter of the satellite and the various ports and structures on its surface presented strong constraints on the antenna array design. Eight antennas, each one a quarter-wavelength panel with one radiating and one shorted edge, were chosen. A phi-plane pattern ripple of 4.4 dB and a gain of at least 0.1 dB relative to a half-wavelength dipole were realized. The design technique used for the individual antenna panels included the study of feed-point location for impedance matching and the effect of losses in the dielectric. A superposition method was used to synthesize the radiation patterns for different numbers and different excitations of antennas on the satellite.

  18. A strap-on monitoring system for rail car applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, J.; Rey, D.; Mitchell, J.; Breeding, R.; McKeen, R.G.; Brogan, J.

    1996-12-01

    A joint Sandia National Laboratories, University of New Mexico, and New Mexico Engineering Research Institute project to investigate an architecture implementing real-time monitoring and tracking technologies in the railroad industry is presented. The work examines a strap-on sensor package, designed as a value-added component, integrated into existing industry systems and standards. As applied to freight trains, the sensors` primary purpose is to minimize operating costs by decreasing losses due to theft, and by reducing the number, severity, and a consequence of hazardous materials incidents. Product requirements are based on a cost-benefit analysis of operating losses. Results of a concept validation experiment conducted on a revenue generating train are reported.

  19. Beam-waveguide antenna servo design issues for tracking low earth-orbiting satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawronski, W. K.; Mellstrom, J. A.

    1993-11-01

    Upcoming NASA missions will require tracking of low-orbit satellites. As a consequence, NASA antennas will be required to track satellites at higher rates than for the current deep space missions. This article investigates servo design issues for the 34-m beam-waveguide antennas that track low-orbit satellites. This includes upgrading the servo with a feedforward loop, using a monopulse controller design, and reducing tracking errors through either proper choice of elevation pinion location, application of a notch filter, or adjustment of the elevation drive amplifier gain. Finally, improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio through averaging of the over-sampled monopulse signal is described.

  20. Beam-Waveguide Antenna Servo Design Issues for Tracking Low-Earth-Orbiting Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawronski, W. K.; Mellstrom, J. A.

    1993-07-01

    Upcoming NASA missions will require tracking of low-orbit satellites. As a consequence, NASA antennas will be required to track satellites at higher rates than for the current deep space missions. This article investigates servo design issues for the 34-m beam-waveguide antennas that track low-orbit satellites. This includes upgrading the servo with a feedforward loop, using a monopulse controller design, and treducing tracking errors through either proper choice of elevation pinion location, application of a notch filter, or adjustment of the elevation drive amplifier gain. Finally, improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio through averaging of the oversampled monopulse signal is described.

  1. Design of a low-loss series-fed microstrip array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahbub, M. R.; Christodoulou. C. G.; Bailey, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    The design and analysis of a series-fed, low-loss, inverted microstrip array antenna, operating at 1.413 GHz is presented. The array antenna is composed of two sub arrays. Each sub array consists of an equal number of microstrip patches all connected together through a series microstrip line. The first element of each sub array is coaxially fed but 180 degree out of phase. This approach ensures a symmetric radiation pattern. The design approach, is accomplished using the IE3D code that utilizes the method of moments. All experimental and simulated data are presented and discussed.

  2. Conceptual design and analysis of a large antenna utilizing electrostatic membrane management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, A. L.; Coyner, J. V.; Gardner, W. J.; Mihora, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    Conceptual designs and associated technologies for deployment 100 m class radiometer antennas were developed. An electrostatically suspended and controlled membrane mirror and the supporting structure are discussed. The integrated spacecraft including STS cargo bay stowage and development were analyzed. An antenna performance evaluation was performed as a measure of the quality of the membrane/spacecraft when used as a radiometer in the 1 GHz to 5 GHz region. Several related LSS structural dynamic models differing by their stiffness property (and therefore, lowest modal frequencies) are reported. Control system whose complexity varies inversely with increasing modal frequency regimes are also reported. Interactive computer-aided-design software is discussed.

  3. Beam-waveguide antenna servo design issues for tracking low earth-orbiting satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawronski, W. K.; Mellstrom, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    Upcoming NASA missions will require tracking of low-orbit satellites. As a consequence, NASA antennas will be required to track satellites at higher rates than for the current deep space missions. This article investigates servo design issues for the 34-m beam-waveguide antennas that track low-orbit satellites. This includes upgrading the servo with a feedforward loop, using a monopulse controller design, and reducing tracking errors through either proper choice of elevation pinion location, application of a notch filter, or adjustment of the elevation drive amplifier gain. Finally, improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio through averaging of the over-sampled monopulse signal is described.

  4. Design of 4x1 microstrip patch antenna array for 5.8 GHz ISM band applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valjibhai, Gohil Jayesh; Bhatia, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the new design of four element antenna array using corporate feed technique. The proposed antenna array is developed on the Rogers 5880 dielectric material. The antenna array works on 5.8 GHz ISM band. The industrial, scientific and medical (ISM) radio bands are radio bands (portions of the radio spectrum) reserved internationally for the use of radio frequency (RF) energy for industrial, scientific and medical purposes other than communications. The array antennas have VSWR < 1.6 from 5.725 - 5.875 GHz. The simulated return loss characteristic of the antenna array is - 39.3 dB at 5.8 GHz. The gain of the antenna array is 12.3 dB achieved. The directivity of the broadside radiation pattern is 12.7 dBi at the 5.8 GHz operating frequency. The antenna array is simulated using High frequency structure simulation software.

  5. Design and Performance of the WISDOM Antenna System aboard the ExoMars Rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plettemeier, D.; Ciarletti, V.; Hamran, S.; Corbel, C.; Linke, S.; Benedix, W.

    2009-04-01

    A full polarimetric antenna system on board the ExoMars rover is part of the Experiment "Water Ice and Subsurface Deposit Observations on Mars" (WISDOM). The WISDOM-Experiment is a Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) selected to be part of the Pasteur payload aboard the rover of the ExoMars mission. The Pasteur Panoramic Instruments (wide angle camera PANCAM, infrared spectrometer MIMA and WISDOM) will perform large-scale scientific investigations at the sites the Rover will visit. Among these instruments, WISDOM is the only one that can provide a view of the subsurface structure prior to drilling. WISDOM is the first space borne GPR aboard a rover and has been designed to characterize the shallow subsurface structure of Mars. WISDOM will give for the first time access to the geological structure, electromagnetic nature, and, possibly, of hydrological state of the shallow subsurface by retrieving the layering and properties of the buried reflectors. It will address some important related science questions regarding the planet present state and past evolution. The measured data will also be used to determine the most promising locations at which to obtain underground samples with the drilling system mounted on board the rover. The instrument objective for WISDOM is to get high-resolution measurements down to 2-meters depth in the Martian crust. The radar is a gated step frequency system covering the frequency range from 500 MHz to 3 GHz. The radar is fully polarimetric and makes use of four ultra wideband Vivaldi antennas. This poster describes the requirements, the design and the realization of the WISDOM antenna system accommodated on the ExoMars rover. Simulated antenna performance and measured antenna parameters as well as preliminary antenna test measurements performed in the lab and in permafrost regions on earth will be discussed in this poster presentation. The main design requirements of the WISDOM antenna system are driven one hand by the required science

  6. Design and fabrication of low-cost reconfigurable microstrip antenna using photodiode as optical switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusumawati, E. R.; Pramono, Y. H.; Rubiyanto, A.

    2014-09-01

    Design, fabrication, and characterization prototype of reconfigurable dipole microstrip antenna using photodiode as optical switching have been conducted in the Laboratory for Optical and Microwave Physics Department Faculty of ITS. This paper presents a new reconfigurable antenna design using photodiode as optical switching. In order to be optical switching, photodiode must be illuminated by optical source. The optical source used is Infrared with power 8 mW. Antenna is fabricated in FR-4 substrate which has 1.6 mm thick and 4.8 relative permittivity value. The dimension of the substrate is 131 mm × 21.5 mm × 1.6 mm. The structure of antenna is Coplanar Stripline (CPS) dipole. Measurement is conducted in two state. First state is photodiodes unilluminated Infrared and the second state is illuminated. The measurement result indicate that if condition is not illuminated by Infrared (OFF-state) antenna has resonance frequency of 2010 MHz and 2120 MHz. At frequency 2010 MHz, S11 value -35.7 dB and bandwidth 57 MHz, meanwhile at frequency 2120 MHz, S11 value -17.3 dB and bandwidth 42 MHz. Then if photodiode was illuminated by infrared (ON-state), antenna work at frequency 2007 MHz with S11 value -41.8 dB and bandwidth 61 MHz and 2113 MHz with S11 value -19.4 and bandwidth 47 MHz. There was frequency shifting from 2010 MHz to 2007 MHz and 2120 MHz to 2113 MHz of 5 MHz. At ON state, S11 value also was shifting. There was 6.1 dB and 2.1 dB. Bandwidth at ON-state is wider than OFF state. Microstrip antenna with a reconfigurable optical switching photodiode has several advantages. The advantages are more easily fabricated and the cost is relatively cheaper than the other techniques of optical switching.

  7. Design and analysis of a lightweight prestressed antenna back-up structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zengxiang; Yang, Dehua; Cheng, Jingquan

    2010-07-01

    The planned Square Kilometer Array (SKA) includes three thousand 15m antennas. The radio flux density from the sun is stronger, so that a solar array, such as Frequency-Agile Solar Radiotelescope (FASR) with hundreds of dishes can have smaller dish size. Therefore, light weight, low cost dish design is of vital importance. The reflecting surface supported by an antenna back-up structure, generally, should have an RMS surface error less than λ/20 (λ. is the operating wavelength). For resisting gravitational, wind, and ice-snow loadings, an antenna dish also requires reasonable mode frequencies. In this paper, different low cost small or medium back-up structure designs are discussed, including double-layer truss design and prestressed dish design. Based on discussion, an innovative light weight, prestressed back-up structure is proposed for small or medium aperture antennas. Example of a small 4.5m aperture dish design working below 3GHz is presented. This design is a one-layer prestressed truss structure with low weight, ease installation, and low manufacture cost. Structural analysis and modal extraction results show the structure is much stiffer than the same structure without prestressed loading.

  8. Design and Development of Aerogel-Based Antennas for Aerospace Applications: A Final Report to the NARI Seedling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2014-01-01

    As highly porous solids possessing low density and low dielectric permittivity combined with good mechanical properties, polyimide (PI) aerogels offer great promise as an enabling technology for lightweight aircraft antenna systems. While they have been aggressively explored for thermal insulation, barely any effort has been made to leverage these materials for antennas or other applications that take advantage of their aforementioned attributes. In Phase I of the NARI Seedling Project, we fabricated PI aerogels with properties tailored to enable new antenna concepts with performance characteristics (wide bandwidth and high gain) and material properties (low density, environmental stability, and robustness) superior to the state of practice (SOP). We characterized electromagnetic properties, including permittivity, reflectivity, and propagation losses for the aerogels. Simple, prototype planar printed circuit patch antennas from down-selected aerogel formulations were fabricated by molding the aerogels to net shapes and by gold-metalizing the pattern onto the templates via electron beam evaporation in a clean room environment. These aerogel based antennas were benchmarked against current antenna SOP, and exhibited both broader bandwidth and comparable or higher gain performance at appreciably lower mass. Phase II focused on the success of the Phase I results pushing the PI aerogel based antenna technology further by exploring alternative antenna design (i.e., slot coupled antennas) and by examining other techniques for fabricating the antennas including ink jet printing with the goal of optimizing antenna performance and simplifying production. We also examined new aerogel formulations with better moisture and solvent resistance to survive processing conditions. In addition, we investigated more complex antenna designs including passive phased arrays such as 2x4 and 4x8 element arrays to assess the scalability of the aerogel antenna concept. Furthermore, we

  9. Analysis And Design Of Antennas Facing Cylindrical Plasma Columns With TOPCYL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guadamuz, S.; Graswinckel, M. F.; Koch, R.; Maggiora, R.; Van De Pol, M.; Vietti, G.; Van Rooij, G.

    2011-12-01

    On recent years TOPICA[1] has shown its capabilities as a designing tool for ICRF antennas on tokamaks, handling both the realistic geometrical detail of the structure as well as a complete description of the plasma region behavior. Now, expanding these capabilities, the TOrino Polythecnic CYLindrical code (TOPCYL) has been added in order to simulate antennas facing cylindrical plasma columns. This feature allows the analysis and design of RF heating systems for applications as VASIMR-like plasma thrusters and plasma-surface-interaction (PSI) experiments. In the present work, the theoretical basis and implementation of TOPCYL is presented, as well as the results obtained on simulating antennas for the ICRF and 2,45 GHz regimes.

  10. BROADBAND ANTENNA MATCHING NETWORK DESIGN AND APPLICATION FOR RF PLASMA ION SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Ki; Kang, Yoon W; Piller, Chip; Fathy, Aly

    2011-01-01

    The RF ion source at Spallation Neutron Source has been upgraded to meet higher beam power requirement. One important subsystem for efficient operation of the ion source is the 2MHz RF impedance matching network. The real part of the antenna impedance is very small and is affected by plasma density for 2MHz operating frequency. Previous impedance matching network for the antenna has limited tuning capability to cover this potential variation of the antenna impedance since it employed a single tuning element and an impedance transformer. A new matching network with two tunable capacitors has been built and tested. This network can allow precision matching and increase the tunable range without using a transformer. A 5-element broadband matching network also has been designed, built and tested. The 5-element network allows wide band matching up to 50 kHz bandwidth from the resonance center of 2 MHz. The design procedure, simulation and test results are presented.

  11. Design and realization of a planar ultrawideband antenna with notch band at 3.5 GHz.

    PubMed

    Azim, Rezaul; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul; Misran, Norbahiah; Yatim, Baharudin; Arshad, Haslina

    2014-01-01

    A small antenna with single notch band at 3.5 GHz is designed for ultrawideband (UWB) communication applications. The fabricated antenna comprises a radiating monopole element and a perfectly conducting ground plane with a wide slot. To achieve a notch band at 3.5 GHz, a parasitic element has been inserted in the same plane of the substrate along with the radiating patch. Experimental results shows that, by properly adjusting the position of the parasitic element, the designed antenna can achieve an ultrawide operating band of 3.04 to 11 GHz with a notched band operating at 3.31-3.84 GHz. Moreover, the proposed antenna achieved a good gain except at the notched band and exhibits symmetric radiation patterns throughout the operating band. The prototype of the proposed antenna possesses a very compact size and uses simple structures to attain the stop band characteristic with an aim to lessen the interference between UWB and worldwide interoperability for microwave access (WiMAX) band. PMID:25133245

  12. A new design of an S/X dual band circular slot antenna for radar applications.

    PubMed

    Ghnimi, Said; Wali, Rawia; Gharsallh, Ali; Razban, Tchanguiz

    2013-01-01

    A novel design of dual-band slot antenna with a circular patch for radar applications is presented and studied. It is fed by a micro-strip line and built on a FR-4 substrate with a whole size of 18 x 30 mm2. A dual band printed antenna is created by introducing slots on the radiating element. By this, two bandwidth, covering C and X band, are achieved. In order to obtain a good fundamental antenna design, the initial studies were carried out theoretically, using CST Microwave Studio simulation software. In this case, the frequency range at return loss < 10 dB is 5.24 - 6.16 GHz for low frequency and is 7.9 -11.7 GHz for high frequency. In addition, the proposed antenna has good radiation characteristics and stable gains over the whole operating bands. A prototype of antenna is fabricated and tested. Experimental data show good agreement between simulated and measured results. PMID:24779147

  13. Study of shuttle imaging microwave system antenna. Volume 1: Conceptual design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesley, R. W.; Waineo, D. K.; Barton, C. R.; Love, A. W.

    1975-01-01

    A detailed preliminary design and complete performance evaluation are presented of an 11-channel large aperture scanning radiometer antenna for the shuttle imaging microwave system (SIMS) program. Provisions for interfacing the antenna with the space shuttle orbiter are presented and discussed. A program plan for hardware development and a rough order of magnitude (ROM) cost are also included. The conceptual design of the antenna is presented. It consists of a four-meter diameter parabolic torus main reflector, which is a graphite/epoxy shell supported by a graphite/epoxy truss. A rotating feed wheel assembly supports six Gregorian subreflectors covering the upper eight frequency channels from 6.6 GHz through 118.7 GHz, and two three-channel prime forms feed assemblies for 0.6, 1.4, and 2.7 GHz. The feed wheel assembly also holds the radiometers and power supplies, and a drive system using a 400 Hz synchronous motor is described. The RF analysis of the antenna is performed using physical optics procedures for both the dual reflector Gregorian concept and the single reflector prime focus concept. A unique aberration correcting feed for 2.7 GHz is analyzed. A structural analysis is also included. The analyses indicate that the antenna will meet system requirements.

  14. Hybrid reflection type metasurface of nano-antennas designed for optical needle field generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiyi; Zhan, Qiwen

    2015-03-01

    We propose a reflection type metal-insulator-metal (MIM) metasurface composed of hybrid optical antennas for comprehensive spatial engineering the properties of optical fields. Its capability is illustrated with an example to create a radially polarized vectorial beam for optical needle field generation. Functioning as local quarter-wave-plates (QWP), the MIM metasurface is designed to convert circularly polarized incident into local linear polarization to create an overall radial polarization with corresponding binary phases and desired normalized amplitude modulation ranged from 0.07 to 1. To obtain enough degrees of freedom, the optical-antenna layer comprises periodic arrangements of double metallic nano-bars with perpendicular placement and single nano-bars respectively for different amplitude modulation requirements. Both of the antennas enable to introduce π/2 retardation while reaching the desired modulation range both for phase and amplitude. Through adjusting the antennas' geometry and array carefully, we shift the gap-surface plasmon resonances facilitated by optical antennas to realize the manipulation of vectorial properties. Designed at 1064 nm wavelength, the particularly generated vectorial light output can be further tightly focused by a high numerical aperture objective to obtain longitudinally polarized flat-top focal field. The so-called optical needle field is a promising candidate for novel applications that transcend disciplinary boundaries. The proposed metasurface establishes a new class of compact optical components based on nano-scale structures, leading to compound functions for vectorial light generation.

  15. Taming the ICRF Antenna - Plasma Edge Interaction using Novel Field-Aligned ICRF Antenna on Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yijun

    2014-10-01

    For ICRF antenna utilization in future fusion reactors, taming the antenna-plasma edge interaction while robustly coupling RF power is a critical challenge. Using a novel field-aligned (FA) ICRF antenna where the antenna straps are perpendicular to the total magnetic field, we have shown dramatically improved ICRF antenna performance. The FA antenna has significantly reduced antenna impurity sources, core impurity contamination and radiated power compared to conventional toroidally aligned antennas. The FA antenna also has load tolerance to plasma transients and significantly reduced RF-enhanced heat flux. The emerging physics picture is that the FA antenna minimizes generation of slow wave fields (E//B polarization). This reduction in slow wave lowers the local RF sheath around the ICRF antenna, and thus lowers the impurity source at local antenna structure. Simplified antenna simulations show a strong reduction in slow wave fields. The reduction of the slow wave field also impacts the antenna load tolerance. With the slow wave present, the antenna impedance is strongly modified by the slow wave coupling between antenna straps and this coupling is dependent upon the local density. With reduced slow wave coupling, the antenna reactive impedance is defined by the strap geometry and independent of the plasma whereas the real impedance is determined by the fast wave coupling. Experimentally we have found that the FA antenna loading has similar trends versus plasma current and densities to TA antennas, but the FA antenna reflection coefficient has significantly reduced variation, particularly during L-H and H-L transitions, and ELMs. Further comparisons of the FA and TA antennas are underway with an extensive array of diagnostics to characterize the RF plasma edge interaction and the latest results will be presented. Supported by US DoE awards DE-FC02-99ER54512 at MIT.

  16. Dual-slot antennas for microwave tissue heating: Parametric design analysis and experimental validation

    PubMed Central

    Brace, Christopher L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Design and validate an efficient dual-slot coaxial microwave ablation antenna that produces an approximately spherical heating pattern to match the shape of most abdominal and pulmonary tumor targets.Methods: A dual-slot antenna geometry was utilized for this study. Permutations of the antenna geometry using proximal and distal slot widths from 1 to 10 mm separated by 1–20 mm were analyzed using finite-element electromagnetic simulations. From this series, the most optimal antenna geometry was selected using a two-term sigmoidal objective function to minimize antenna reflection coefficient and maximize the diameter-to-length aspect ratio of heat generation. Sensitivities to variations in tissue properties and insertion depth were also evaluated in numerical models. The most optimal dual-slot geometry of the parametric analysis was then fabricated from semirigid coaxial cable. Antenna reflection coefficients at various insertion depths were recorded in ex vivo bovine livers and compared to numerical results. Ablation zones were then created by applying 50 W for 2–10 min in simulations and ex vivo livers. Mean zone diameter, length, aspect ratio, and reflection coefficients before and after heating were then compared to a conventional monopole antenna using ANOVA with post-hoc t-tests. Statistical significance was indicated for P < 0.05.Results: Antenna performance was highly sensitive to dual-slot geometry. The best-performing designs utilized a proximal slot width of 1 mm, distal slot width of 4 mm ± 1 mm and separation of 8 mm ± 1 mm. These designs were characterized by an active choking mechanism that focused heating to the distal tip of the antenna. A dual-band resonance was observed in the most optimal design, with a minimum reflection coefficient of −20.9 dB at 2.45 and 1.25 GHz. Total operating bandwidth was greater than 1 GHz, but the desired heating pattern was achieved only near 2.45 GHz. As a result, antenna performance was

  17. Metasurface Reflector (MSR) Loading for High Performance Small Microstrip Antenna Design.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, Md Rezwanul; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul; Ullah, Mohammad Habib; Singh, Mandeep Jit; Ali, Mohd Tarmizi

    2015-01-01

    A meander stripline feed multiband microstrip antenna loaded with metasurface reflector (MSR) structure has been designed, analyzed and constructed that offers the wireless communication services for UHF/microwave RFID and WLAN/WiMAX applications. The proposed MSR assimilated antenna comprises planar straight forward design of circular shaped radiator with horizontal slots on it and 2D metasurface formed by the periodic square metallic element that resembles the behavior of metamaterials. A custom made high dielectric bio-plastic substrate (εr = 15) is used for fabricating the prototype of the MSR embedded planar monopole antenna. The details of the design progress through numerical simulations and experimental results are presented and discussed accordingly. The measured impedance bandwidth, radiation patterns and gain of the proposed MSR integrated antenna are compared with the obtained results from numerical simulation, and a good compliance can be observed between them. The investigation shows that utilization of MSR structure has significantly broadened the -10 dB impedance bandwidth than the conventional patch antenna: from 540 to 632 MHz (17%), 467 to 606 MHz (29%) and 758 MHz to 1062 MHz (40%) for three distinct operating bands centered at 0.9, 3.5 and 5.5 GHz. Additionally, due to the assimilation of MSR, the overall realized gains have been upgraded to a higher value of 3.62 dBi, 6.09 dBi and 8.6 dBi for lower, middle and upper frequency band respectively. The measured radiation patterns, impedance bandwidths (S11<-10 dB) and gains from the MSR loaded antenna prototype exhibit reasonable characteristics that can satisfy the requirements of UHF/microwave (5.8 GHz) RFID, WiMAX (3.5/5.5 GHz) and WLAN (5.2/5.8 GHz) applications. PMID:26018795

  18. Metasurface Reflector (MSR) Loading for High Performance Small Microstrip Antenna Design

    PubMed Central

    Ahsan, Md Rezwanul; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul; Ullah, Mohammad Habib; Singh, Mandeep Jit; Ali, Mohd Tarmizi

    2015-01-01

    A meander stripline feed multiband microstrip antenna loaded with metasurface reflector (MSR) structure has been designed, analyzed and constructed that offers the wireless communication services for UHF/microwave RFID and WLAN/WiMAX applications. The proposed MSR assimilated antenna comprises planar straight forward design of circular shaped radiator with horizontal slots on it and 2D metasurface formed by the periodic square metallic element that resembles the behavior of metamaterials. A custom made high dielectric bio-plastic substrate (εr = 15) is used for fabricating the prototype of the MSR embedded planar monopole antenna. The details of the design progress through numerical simulations and experimental results are presented and discussed accordingly. The measured impedance bandwidth, radiation patterns and gain of the proposed MSR integrated antenna are compared with the obtained results from numerical simulation, and a good compliance can be observed between them. The investigation shows that utilization of MSR structure has significantly broadened the -10dB impedance bandwidth than the conventional patch antenna: from 540 to 632 MHz (17%), 467 to 606 MHz (29%) and 758 MHz to 1062 MHz (40%) for three distinct operating bands centered at 0.9, 3.5 and 5.5 GHz. Additionally, due to the assimilation of MSR, the overall realized gains have been upgraded to a higher value of 3.62 dBi, 6.09 dBi and 8.6 dBi for lower, middle and upper frequency band respectively. The measured radiation patterns, impedance bandwidths (S11<-10 dB) and gains from the MSR loaded antenna prototype exhibit reasonable characteristics that can satisfy the requirements of UHF/microwave (5.8 GHz) RFID, WiMAX (3.5/5.5 GHz) and WLAN (5.2/5.8 GHz) applications. PMID:26018795

  19. Miniaturized differentially fed dual-band implantable antenna: Design, realization, and in vitro test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Wen; Guo, Yong-Xin

    2015-10-01

    A differentially fed dual-band implantable antenna is designed in this paper, with an additional shorting strip to achieve a size reduction. The antenna has been simulated by using one-layer and multilayer tissue models and a human anatomical model. The prototype model is fabricated and in vitro demonstrated with skin-mimicking phantoms, which experimentally achieves impedance bandwidths of 32 MHz at 401-406 MHz Medical Device Radiocommunications Service band and 151 MHz at 2.4-2.48 GHz Industrial, Scientific, and Medical band. Radiation characteristic has been evaluated in Computer Simulation Technology (CST) human voxel model.

  20. Mitigation of RF potentials by an appropriate antenna design using TOPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanesio, Daniele; Maggiora, Riccardo

    2010-11-01

    The final goal of this work is to set a list of rules to design a new Ion Cyclotron (IC) launcher with the aim to mitigate the RF potential generated by the antenna and its surroundings; to achieve this challenging task, we will adopt as our main tool the TOPICA code [1]. One peculiarity of the code is the capability to compute the accurate electric field map everywhere inside the antenna and the plasma regions; in fact, in this specific task, we are interested in finding a geometrical solution that mitigates the RF potentials and the precise knowledge of the electric field distribution close to conductors is essential to properly optimize the antenna geometry. The tasks of this work consist of the analysis of alternative innovative solutions taking advantage of all the crucial features of the TOPICA analysis tool namely the possibility to simulate the full 3D antenna geometry and the possibility to account for an accurate plasma model in front of the antenna. These solutions will exploit all the possible features in order to minimize the generated RF potentials.[4pt] [1] Nucl. Fusion, 46 (2006) S476.

  1. Low-Cost Dielectric Substrate for Designing Low Profile Multiband Monopole Microstrip Antenna

    PubMed Central

    Ahsan, M. R.; Islam, M. T.; Habib Ullah, M.; Arshad, H.; Mansor, M. F.

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a small sized, low-cost multiband monopole antenna which can cover the WiMAX bands and C-band. The proposed antenna of 20 × 20 mm2 radiating patch is printed on cost effective 1.6 mm thick fiberglass polymer resin dielectric material substrate and fed by 4 mm long microstrip line. The finite element method based, full wave electromagnetic simulator HFSS is efficiently utilized for designing and analyzing the proposed antenna and the antenna parameters are measured in a standard far-field anechoic chamber. The experimental results show that the prototype of the antenna has achieved operating bandwidths (voltage stand wave ratio (VSWR) less than 2) 360 MHz (2.53–2.89 GHz) and 440 MHz (3.47–3.91 GHz) for WiMAX and 1550 MHz (6.28–7.83 GHz) for C-band. The simulated and measured results for VSWR, radiation patterns, and gain are well matched. Nearly omnidirectional radiation patterns are achieved and the peak gains are of 3.62 dBi, 3.67 dBi, and 5.7 dBi at 2.66 GHz, 3.65 GHz, and 6.58 GHz, respectively. PMID:25136648

  2. Low-cost dielectric substrate for designing low profile multiband monopole microstrip antenna.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, M R; Islam, M T; Habib Ullah, M; Arshad, H; Mansor, M F

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a small sized, low-cost multiband monopole antenna which can cover the WiMAX bands and C-band. The proposed antenna of 20 × 20 mm(2) radiating patch is printed on cost effective 1.6 mm thick fiberglass polymer resin dielectric material substrate and fed by 4 mm long microstrip line. The finite element method based, full wave electromagnetic simulator HFSS is efficiently utilized for designing and analyzing the proposed antenna and the antenna parameters are measured in a standard far-field anechoic chamber. The experimental results show that the prototype of the antenna has achieved operating bandwidths (voltage stand wave ratio (VSWR) less than 2) 360 MHz (2.53-2.89 GHz) and 440 MHz (3.47-3.91 GHz) for WiMAX and 1550 MHz (6.28-7.83 GHz) for C-band. The simulated and measured results for VSWR, radiation patterns, and gain are well matched. Nearly omnidirectional radiation patterns are achieved and the peak gains are of 3.62 dBi, 3.67 dBi, and 5.7 dBi at 2.66 GHz, 3.65 GHz, and 6.58 GHz, respectively. PMID:25136648

  3. A hybrid antenna array design for 3-d direction of arrival estimation.

    PubMed

    Saqib, Najam-Us; Khan, Imdad

    2015-01-01

    A 3-D beam scanning antenna array design is proposed that gives a whole 3-D spherical coverage and also suitable for various radar and body-worn devices in the Body Area Networks applications. The Array Factor (AF) of the proposed antenna is derived and its various parameters like directivity, Half Power Beam Width (HPBW) and Side Lobe Level (SLL) are calculated by varying the size of the proposed antenna array. Simulations were carried out in MATLAB 2012b. The radiators are considered isotropic and hence mutual coupling effects are ignored. The proposed array shows a considerable improvement against the existing cylindrical and coaxial cylindrical arrays in terms of 3-D scanning, size, directivity, HPBW and SLL. PMID:25790103

  4. Design of modified pentagonal patch antenna on defective ground for Wi-Max/WLAN application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, Sanyog; Sharma, K. K.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the design and performance of a modified pentagonal patch antenna with defective ground plane. A pentagonal slot is inserted in the pentagonal patch and slot loaded ground through optimized dimensions is used in the antenna to resonate it at dual frequency. The geometry operates at two resonant frequencies (2.5 GHz and 5.58 GHz) and offers impedance bandwidth of 864 MHz and 554 MHz in the two bands of interest. The proposed antenna covers the lower band (2.45 to 2.484/2.495 to 2.695 GHz) and upper band (5.15 to 5.825 GHz/5.25 to 5.85 GHz) allocated for Wi-Max and WLAN communication systems.

  5. Computer-aided design of reflector antennas - The Green Bank Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Marco A. B.; Stutzman, Warren L.

    1998-03-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of the electrical performance of the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) reflector antenna, operating as single- and dual-offset configurations, as well as a general overview of the GBT system. The GBT dual-offset Gregorian configuration is designed for low cross polarization (XPOL) using the dual-offset reflector antenna (DORA) synthesis package code. The procedure implemented in DORA to upgrade an existing main reflector to a low cross-polarized dual-offset Gregorian reflector antenna is also described. All computed patterns were obtained with the parabolic reflector analysis code (PRAC) program, and with the commercial code GRASP7. The GBT radiation patterns and performance values indicate that low XPOL performance can be achieved with a dual-offset configuration, provided that a low XPOL feed is used. The GBT configuration is employed as a case example for the aforementioned procedure.

  6. Wideband On-ground Monostatic Radar Antenna for Water Content Soil Evaluation: Modeling, Design and Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale, Q.; Rejiba, F.; Guérin, R.

    2012-12-01

    The knowledge of soil's hydraulic properties spatial distribution is important in agricultural practice optimization and hydrological studies. Non-invasive methods of measurement of the dielectric permittivity such as time domain reflectometry (TDR) and ground penetrating radar (GPR) are increasingly used in order to asses soil water content at the field scale. In order to acquire radar data over a wide frequency range, we designed a simple on-ground radar antenna operating on the frequency range 350 MHz - 2GHz. The antenna was designed using a powerful commercial three dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) electromagnetic field solver. A prototype of the frequency type radar transmission link was constructed and laboratory measurements were first performed with calibration purpose (the antenna was placed on a 13 cm-thick sand layer of known dielectric permittivity). The antenna is used in monostatic configuration and associated with a vector network analyzer to perform measurements of the antenna-soil reflection coefficients (S11) in the frequency domain. Those measurements are compared to FDTD simulations using the root mean square criterion in order to assess the sand dielectric properties. The use of full-wave FDTD software allows simulation of the whole antenna components, thus all potential influence on the reflection coefficient are recorded. The estimated permittivity with this procedure was close to the real one. In order to test the prototype in real field conditions measurements were performed on a single profile characterized by several agricultural practices (wheat crop, vegetative buffer strip and corn crop). Reflection coefficient (S11) measurements acquired with the prototype are compared to TDR measurements and DC electrical soundings in order to validate the soil apparent dielectric permittivity as well as its apparent electrical conductivity.

  7. Operating the Upgraded NSTX HHFW Antenna Array in an Environment with Li-coated Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Philip Michael; Ellis, R.; Hosea, J.; Kung, C. C.; LeBlanc, B; Pinsker, R.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J. R.; NSTX Team,

    2011-01-01

    The single-feed, end-grounded straps of the NSTX 12-strap HHFW antenna array have been replaced with double-feed, center-grounded straps to reduce the voltages in the vicinity of the Faraday shield (FS) for a given strap current. The strap spacings to the FS and to the back plate were increased by 3 mm to decrease the electric fields for a given voltage. The electric fields near the FS have been roughly halved for the same strap currents, permitting a direct examination of the roles that internal fields play in determining antenna power limits in plasmas. Extensive RF/plasma conditioning of the antenna was required to remove enough of the evaporated Li deposits from prior wall conditioning to permit coupling in excess of 4 MW to L- and H-mode plasmas in 2009. Most arcs were associated with expulsion of Li from the FS/antenna frame surfaces. The center-grounded straps were less susceptible to arcing during ELMing Hmode plasmas. Reliable operation above 2 MW was difficult after the installation of the Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) in 2010. Li-compound dust was found in the antennas after this run and is believed to have contributed to the reduced power limit.

  8. Operating The Upgraded NSTX HHFW Antenna Array In An Environment With Li-coated Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, P. M.; Ellis, R.; Hosea, J. C.; Kung, C. C.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J. R.; Pinsker, R. I.

    2011-12-23

    The single-feed, end-grounded straps of the NSTX 12-strap HHFW antenna array have been replaced with double-feed, center-grounded straps to reduce the voltages in the vicinity of the Faraday shield (FS) for a given strap current. The strap spacings to the FS and to the back plate were increased by 3 mm to decrease the electric fields for a given voltage. The electric fields near the FS have been roughly halved for the same strap currents, permitting a direct examination of the roles that internal fields play in determining antenna power limits in plasmas. Extensive RF/plasma conditioning of the antenna was required to remove enough of the evaporated Li deposits from prior wall conditioning to permit coupling in excess of 4 MW to L- and H-mode plasmas in 2009. Most arcs were associated with expulsion of Li from the FS/antenna frame surfaces. The center-grounded straps were less susceptible to arcing during ELMing H-mode plasmas. Reliable operation above 2 MW was difficult after the installation of the Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) in 2010. Li-compound 'dust' was found in the antennas after this run and is believed to have contributed to the reduced power limit.

  9. The design and development of two-failure tolerant mechanisms for the Spaceborne Imaging Radar (SIR-B) antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Presas, S. J.

    1984-01-01

    The performance requirements, design constraints, and design qualification status of the mechanisms necessary to restrain, deploy, and stow the Spaceborne Imaging Radar (SIR) B antenna experiment on the Shuttle Orbiters are described.

  10. Design of a CPW-feed circularly polarized slot antenna with triangle embedded in half circular disc for UWB applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, Ram; Kumar, Raj

    2013-01-01

    A compact (40 mm x 35 mm) coplanar waveguide (CPW) fed slot antenna for circular polarization is presented in this paper. The antenna is designed and fabricated for applications in the ultra-wideband domain of wireless communications where circular polarization is also required. The axial ratio (AR) bandwidth of the proposed antenna is 35.46% (5.8 GHz- 8.3 GHz), while the experimental impedance bandwidth is from 2.8 GHz - 8.6 GHz. The experimental results are very close to the simulated results. The antenna displays a stable radiation pattern and a moderately high gain of around 5 - 6 dB in the useful band.

  11. Exact mesh shape design of large cable-network antenna reflectors with flexible ring truss supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wang; Li, Dong-Xu; Yu, Xin-Zhan; Jiang, Jian-Ping

    2014-04-01

    An exact-designed mesh shape with favorable surface accuracy is of practical significance to the performance of large cable-network antenna reflectors. In this study, a novel design approach that could guide the generation of exact spatial parabolic mesh configurations of such reflector was proposed. By incorporating the traditional force density method with the standard finite element method, this proposed approach had taken the deformation effects of flexible ring truss supports into consideration, and searched for the desired mesh shapes that can satisfy the requirement that all the free nodes are exactly located on the objective paraboloid. Compared with the conventional design method, a remarkable improvement of surface accuracy in the obtained mesh shapes had been demonstrated by numerical examples. The present work would provide a helpful technical reference for the mesh shape design of such cable-network antenna reflector in engineering practice. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. Mitigation of Parallel RF Potentials by an Appropriate Antenna Design Using TOPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggiora, R.; Milanesio, D.

    2011-12-01

    A substantial effort has been devoted in recent years to the optimization of the ITER Ion Cyclotron (IC) launcher [1], above all with the aim of maximizing the coupling performances of the antenna; good improvements have been documented by using TOPICA code [2], a predictive tool for the design and optimization of RF launchers in front of a plasma region. Despite the progresses in the mentioned topic, this is not the only issue related to the design of IC antennas: a second crucial aspect is the impurities production, which is driven by the parallel RF potentials generated by the antenna itself and by the surrounding structures. The goal of this work is to analyze a set of innovative solutions that could be implemented in the next generation of IC antennas in order to mitigate the parallel RF potentials without reducing the power delivered to plasma. To achieve this challenging task, the TOPICA code has been adopted, taking advantage of recently introduced features. In particular, the code permits to compute the electric field distribution everywhere inside the antenna enclosure and in the plasma column, allowing to determine not only the magnitude and shape of the fields in front of the antenna, but also to evaluate their radial decay. Provided the electric field map, it is then possible to determine the parallel RF potentials and, even more important, to directly verify the impact of geometrical modifications of the front elements of the antenna on the RF potentials themselves. Furthermore, the capability to simulate the full 3D antenna with a high geometrical accuracy (as the one provided by commercial codes) and to account for an accurate plasma model indicates in TOPICA code a perfect candidate for this specific task. To lower the parallel RF potentials, two complementary approaches are outlined in the paper: the first one acts on the reduction of the electric field values, the second works on the minimization of the geometrical asymmetries. Pros and cons of

  13. Integrated design and simulation for millimeter-wave antenna systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, T.; Katz, D. S.; Villegas, F. J.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper the development and application of MODTool (Millimeter-wave Optics Design), a design tool that efficiently integrates existing millimeter-wave optics design software with a solid body modeler and thermal/structural analysis packages, will be discussed.

  14. Design of On-Chip N-Fold Orbital Angular Momentum Multicasting Using V-Shaped Antenna Array

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jing; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    We design a V-shaped antenna array to realize on-chip multicasting from a single Gaussian beam to four orbital angular momentum (OAM) beams. A pattern search assisted iterative (PSI) algorithm is used to design an optimized continuous phase pattern which is further discretized to generate collinearly superimposed multiple OAM beams. Replacing the designed discrete phase pattern with corresponding V-shaped antennas, on-chip N-fold OAM multicasting is achieved. The designed on-chip 4-fold OAM multicasting exploiting V-shaped antenna array shows favorable operation performance with low crosstalk less than -15 dB. PMID:25951325

  15. The design, development and qualification of a lightweight antenna pointing mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shmulevitz, M.; Halsband, A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the design, development, and qualification of a new lightweight and compact Antenna Pointing Mechanism (APM). The APM was specially designed to meet the stringent mass, envelope, and environmental requirements of OFFEQ experimental satellite. During the development phase, some problems were encountered with the brushless DC motors, slip ring contact resistance, and bearing drag torque. All of these problems were resolved, and two APM units have been operating successfully in orbit since April, 1995.

  16. Design And Simulation Of Microstrip Antenna Of 2.4 GHz Using CST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, O. P.; Kushwaha, Alok K.

    2011-12-01

    This article describes the design, fabrication and testing of micro strip patch antennas operating at 2.4 GHz. Consideration is given on practical design technique, including substrate selection and antenna measurements. It is emphasised to the radiation properties of the antennas—the radiation pattern and polarization purity. A micro strip patch antenna consists of a very thin metallic patch placed a small fraction of a wavelength above a conducting ground-plane. The patch and ground-plane are separated by a dielectric. The patch conductor is normally copper and can assume any shape, but simple geometries generally are used, and this simplifies the analysis and performance prediction. The patches are usually photo etched on the dielectric substrate. The substrate is usually non-magnetic. The relative permittivity of the substrate is normally in the region between 1 and 4, which enhances the fringing fields that account for radiation, but higher values may be used in special circumstances. Due to its simple geometry, the half wave rectangular patch is the most commonly used micro strip antenna. It is characterized by its length L, width w and thickness h. The simplest method of feeding the patch is by a coplanar micro strip line, also photo etched on the substrate. Coaxial feeds are also widely used.

  17. Lock 6 Detail of hinge stone with iron straps ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Lock 6 - Detail of hinge stone with iron straps and carved completion date (1830) located on ground at southeast corner of lock - Savannah & Ogeechee Barge Canal, Between Ogeechee & Savannah Rivers, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  18. Design of a monopole-antenna-based resonant nanocavity for detection of optical power from hybrid plasmonic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Kelvin J A; Bai, Ping; Gu, Ming Xia; Ang, Lay Kee

    2011-08-29

    A novel plasmonic waveguide-coupled nanocavity with a monopole antenna is proposed to localize the optical power from a hybrid plasmonic waveguide and subsequently convert it into electrical current. The nanocavity is designed as a Fabry-Pérot waveguide resonator, while the monopole antenna is made of a metallic nanorod directly mounted onto the metallic part of the waveguide terminal which acts as the conducting ground. The nanocavity coincides with the antenna feed sandwiched in between the antenna and the ground. Maximum power from the waveguide can be coupled into, and absorbed in the nanocavity by means of the field resonance in the antenna as well as in the nanocavity. Simulation results show that 42% optical power from the waveguide can be absorbed in a germanium filled nanocavity with a nanoscale volume of 220 × 150 × 60 nm3. The design may find applications in nanoscale photo-detection, subwavelength light focusing and manipulating, as well as sensing. PMID:21935068

  19. Design and analysis of slotted waveguide antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Phillip N.; Yee, Hung Yuet

    1988-06-01

    The typical design of a waveguide slot array begins with an examination of the requirements connected with the definition of the size of the array, the types of slots, and feed methods; this is followed by analysis to determine the dimensions and positions of each slot, and a prediction of array performance; the final step is fabrication and test of a breadboard model to validate the analytical design. These design and analysis aspects are considered in connection with the types of waveguide slots, slot-array architecture, equivalent circuit models, pattern calculations, and analysis techniques. Attention is also given to the use of available design data, experimental techniques, tests using subarrays, experimental measurements of radiating slots, and near-field and far-field measurements.

  20. Design of an optically controlled Ka-band GaAs MMIC phased-array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunath, Richard R.; Claspy, Paul C.; Richard, Mark A.; Bhasin, Kul B.

    1990-01-01

    Phased array antennas long were investigated to support the agile, multibeam radiating apertures with rapid reconfigurability needs of radar and communications. With the development of the Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC), phased array antennas having the stated characteristics are becoming realizable. However, at K-band frequencies (20 to 40 GHz) and higher, the problem of controlling the MMICs using conventional techniques either severely limits the array size or becomes insurmountable due to the close spacing of the radiating elements necessary to achieve the desired antenna performance. Investigations were made that indicate using fiber optics as a transmission line for control information for the MMICs provides a potential solution. By adding an optical interface circuit to pre-existing MMIC designs, it is possible to take advantage of the small size, lightweight, mechanical flexibility and RFI/EMI resistant characteristics of fiber optics to distribute MMIC control signals. The architecture, circuit development, testing and integration of optically controlled K-band MMIC phased array antennas are described.

  1. Experimental evaluation of shape memory alloy actuation technique in adaptive antenna design concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kefauver, W. Neill; Carpenter, Bernie F.

    1994-01-01

    Creation of an antenna system that could autonomously adapt contours of reflecting surfaces to compensate for structural loads induced by a variable environment would maximize performance of space-based communication systems. Design of such a system requires the comprehensive development and integration of advanced actuator, sensor, and control technologies. As an initial step in this process, a test has been performed to assess the use of a shape memory alloy as a potential actuation technique. For this test, an existing, offset, cassegrain antenna system was retrofit with a subreflector equipped with shape memory alloy actuators for surface contour control. The impacts that the actuators had on both the subreflector contour and the antenna system patterns were measured. The results of this study indicate the potential for using shape memory alloy actuation techniques to adaptively control antenna performance; both variations in gain and beam steering capabilities were demonstrated. Future development effort is required to evolve this potential into a useful technology for satellite applications.

  2. Design and Development of VHF Antennas for Space Borne Signal of Opportunity Receivers for Cubesat Platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, Manohar; Piepmeier, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Design and Development of VHF Antennas for Space Borne Signal of Opportunity Receivers for Cubesat Platforms. Space borne microwave remote sensors at VHF/UHF frequencies are important instruments to observe reflective properties of land surfaces through thick and heavy forestation on a global scale. One of the most cost effective ways of measuring land reflectivity at VHF/UHF frequencies is to use signals transmitted by existing communication satellites (operating at VHF/UHF band) as a signal of opportunity (SoOp) signal and passive receivers integrated with airborne/space borne platforms operating in the Low Earth Orbit (LEO). One of the critical components of the passive receiver is two antennas (one to receive only direct signal and other to receive only reflected signal) which need to have ideally high (>30dB) isolation. However, because of small size of host platforms and broad beam width of dipole antennas, achieving adequate isolation between two channels is a challenging problem and need to be solved for successful implementation of space borne SoOp technology for remote sensing. In this presentation a novel enabling VHF antenna technology for Cubesat platforms is presented to receive direct as well as reflected signal with needed isolation. The novel scheme also allows enhancing the gain of individual channels by factor of 2 without use of reflecting ground plane

  3. Energy harvesting from a backpack instrumented with piezoelectric shoulder straps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granstrom, Jonathan; Feenstra, Joel; Sodano, Henry A.; Farinholt, Kevin

    2007-10-01

    Over the past few decades the use of portable and wearable electronics has grown steadily. These devices are becoming increasingly more powerful. However, the gains that have been made in the device performance have resulted in the need for significantly higher power to operate the electronics. This issue has been further complicated due to the stagnant growth of battery technology over the past decade. In order to increase the life of these electronics, researchers have begun investigating methods of generating energy from ambient sources such that the life of the electronics can be prolonged. Recent developments in the field have led to the design of a number of mechanisms that can be used to generate electrical energy, from a variety of sources including thermal, solar, strain, inertia, etc. Many of these energy sources are available for use with humans, but their use must be carefully considered such that parasitic effects that could disrupt the user's gait or endurance are avoided. These issues have arisen from previous attempts to integrate power harvesting mechanisms into a shoe such that the energy released during a heal strike could be harvested. This study develops a novel energy harvesting backpack that can generate electrical energy from the differential forces between the wearer and the pack. The goal of this system is to make the energy harvesting device transparent to the wearer such that his or her endurance and dexterity is not compromised. This will be accomplished by replacing the traditional strap of the backpack with one made of the piezoelectric polymer polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF). Piezoelectric materials have a structure such that an applied electrical potential results in a mechanical strain. Conversely, an applied stress results in the generation of an electrical charge, which makes the material useful for power harvesting applications. PVDF is highly flexible and has a high strength, allowing it to effectively act as the load bearing

  4. A MAGICTRAC (Microwave Antenna for Whispering-Gallery-Mode Conversion using a Twist Reflector Antenna Converter) design for the MTX (Microwave Tokamak Experiment) transport system

    SciTech Connect

    Makowski, M.A. ); Stallard, B.W.; Byers, J.A. )

    1990-09-01

    A design of a MAGICTRAC (Microwave Antenna for Whispering-Gallery-Mode Conversion using a Twist Reflector Antenna Converter) device is presented for use on the MTX (Microwave Tokamak Experiment) transport system. The MAGICTRAC device, consisting of a mode converting waveguide taper and three metal reflectors, transforms the TE{sub 15,2} circular waveguide mode output of a VARIAN Associates 140 GHz gyrotron into a free-space Gaussian-like beam with >95% efficiency. Dimensions of the MAGICTRAC are chosen to produce a beam matched to the MTX quasi-optical transport system.

  5. Design of broadband antenna elements for a low-frequency radio telescope using Pareto genetic algorithm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerkhoff, A.; Ling, H.

    2009-12-01

    We apply Pareto genetic algorithm (GA) optimization to the design of antenna elements for use in the Long Wavelength Array (LWA), a large, low-frequency radio telescope currently under development. By manipulating antenna geometry, the Pareto GA simultaneously optimizes the received Galactic background or “sky” noise level and radiation patterns of the antenna over all frequencies. Geometrical constraints are handled explicitly in the GA in order to guarantee the realizability, and to impart control over the monetary cost of the generated designs. The antenna elements considered are broadband planar dipoles arranged horizontally over the ground. It is demonstrated that the Pareto GA approach generates a set of designs, which exhibit a wide range of trade-offs between the two design objectives, and satisfy all constraints. Multiple GA executions are performed to determine how antenna performance trade-offs are affected by different geometrical constraint values, feed impedance values, radiating element shapes and orientations, and ground conditions. Two different planar dipole antenna designs are constructed, and antenna input impedance and sky noise drift scan measurements are performed to validate the results of the GA.

  6. Design tradeoff study for reflector antenna systems for the shuttle imaging microwave system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    A general tradeoff is made of the symmetric Cassegrain antenna with regard to the possibility of meeting a 90% beam efficiency. The effects of aperture taper and blockage are calculated using an adjustable sidelobe circular distribution. Numerical integration is used. For the feed spillover calculation, a low sidelobe symmetric feed pattern is used with the equivalent parabola and numerical integration. Reflector cross polarization is calculated using double numerical integration. Reflector back lobes are estimated from radiation pattern envelopes of commercial common carrier dish antennas. The curves allow a range of f/D to be determined for a specified edge taper and blockage diameter ratio, and with a table of Cassegrain parameters, a range of possible designs that meet the 90% beam efficiency is obtained. It is shown that the feed and reflector design and implementation must be carefully done.

  7. Analysis and design of ICRF antennas for cylindrical plasmas with TOPCYL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guadamuz, Saul; Maggiora, Riccardo

    2010-11-01

    On recent years TOPICA[1] has shown its capabilities as a designing and predicting tool for ICRF antennas on tokamaks, handling at the same time realistic geometrical detail of the structure as well as a complete description of the plasma region. Now, expanding these capabilities, the TOrino POlitecnico CYLindrical (TOPCYL) code has been released in order to give a full wave simulation of ICRF antennas in front of cylindrical plasma columns, thus inheriting from TOPICA the geometrical accuracy and keeping the completeness of the specific plasma model. This feature allows the analysis and design of RF heating systems for specific applications as plasma thrusters and plasma-surface-interaction experiments; nevertheless in general the only requirement is for the plasma to be cylindrical. In the present work, the theoretical basis, the implementation and validation of TOPCYL is presented.[4pt] [1] Nucl. Fusion, 46 (2006) S476.

  8. Hybrid booster strap-ons for the next generation launch system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flittie, K. J.; McKinney, B.

    1993-06-01

    Currently, national planners are involved with the analysis and design of the Next Generation Launch Vehicle. During the latest studies of the proposed Spacelifter launch vehicle, a core vehicle was proposed that would utilize strap-on boosters to provide a wide range of payload capability into low Earth orbit. In such a scenario, a hybrid rocket motor provides a premier design option for the strap-on booster due to the hybrid's inherent safety, operational flexibility and low-cost. This paper describes the features of the hybrid motor that make it the choice for the next generation space boosters. Strap-on booster designs are presented that meet the mission goals of 20,000 to 50,000 pounds to low Earth orbit. A development plan is presented that provides a flight demonstration of a high-thrust large scale hybrid and allows scaling from the present state-of-the-art 250,000 pound thrust boosters to those needed for the next generation systems. A program schedule and rough order of magnitude cost data are presented.

  9. HRMS sky survey wideband feed system design for DSS 24 beam waveguide antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanton, P. H.; Lee, P. R.; Reilly, H. F.

    1993-01-01

    The High-Resolution Microwave Survey (HRMS) Sky Survey project will be implemented on the DSS 24 beam waveguide (BWG) antenna over the frequency range of 2.86 to 10 GHz. Two wideband, ring-loaded, corrugated feed horns were designed to cover this range. The horns match the frequency-dependent gain requirements for the DSS 24 BWG system. The performance of the feed horns and the calculated system performance of DSS 24 are presented.

  10. The optical antenna system design research on earth integrative network laser link in the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianzhu; Fu, Qiang; He, Jingyi

    2014-11-01

    Earth integrated information network can be real-time acquisition, transmission and processing the spatial information with the carrier based on space platforms, such as geostationary satellites or in low-orbit satellites, stratospheric balloons or unmanned and manned aircraft, etc. It is an essential infrastructure for China to constructed earth integrated information network. Earth integrated information network can not only support the highly dynamic and the real-time transmission of broadband down to earth observation, but the reliable transmission of the ultra remote and the large delay up to the deep space exploration, as well as provide services for the significant application of the ocean voyage, emergency rescue, navigation and positioning, air transportation, aerospace measurement or control and other fields.Thus the earth integrated information network can expand the human science, culture and productive activities to the space, ocean and even deep space, so it is the global research focus. The network of the laser communication link is an important component and the mean of communication in the earth integrated information network. Optimize the structure and design the system of the optical antenna is considered one of the difficulty key technologies for the space laser communication link network. Therefore, this paper presents an optical antenna system that it can be used in space laser communication link network.The antenna system was consisted by the plurality mirrors stitched with the rotational paraboloid as a substrate. The optical system structure of the multi-mirror stitched was simulated and emulated by the light tools software. Cassegrain form to be used in a relay optical system. The structural parameters of the relay optical system was optimized and designed by the optical design software of zemax. The results of the optimal design and simulation or emulation indicated that the antenna system had a good optical performance and a certain

  11. The design and analysis of a phased array microstrip antenna for a low earth orbit communication satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barfield, William L.

    1994-06-01

    A Naval Postgraduate School spacecraft design class proposed a multiple beam, phased array, microstrip antenna as part of the preliminary design of a low earth orbit communication satellite. The antenna must provide coverage over the satellite's entire field of view while both uplink and down-link operate simultaneously on the same 1-band frequency. This thesis assesses the feasibility of the antenna proposed in that preliminary design. Design tradeoffs for a microstrip array constrained by both available surface area and a limited mass budget are examined. Two different substrate materials are considered in terms of weight and performance. Microstrip patch theory is applied to array element design and layout and antenna array theory is applied to determine phase and amplitude coefficients. The focus of the design is on obtaining the desired beam shape and orientation, given antenna size constraints. A corporate feed method is discussed and a general design presented. Antenna performance is predicted through the use of a computer model based on Modal Expansion theory and results are plotted in a series of graphs which demonstrate the limitations of the proposed design.

  12. Design of the 0.5 - 1 GHz Planar Recycler Pickup and Kicker Antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Deibele, C.; /Fermilab

    1999-01-01

    The stochastic cooling system in the Recycler ring at Fermilab required the addition of a 0.5-1 GHz cooling system. This requirement dictated the design of a new antenna for this band of the system. The design problem is defined, method of design is illustrated, and the measurement data are reported. The Recycler is a storage ring comprised of mostly permanent magnets located in the tunnel of the Main Injector at Fermilab. The goal for the construction of the Recycler is to collect and store unused antiprotons from collisions in the Tevatron for use in future collisions in the Tevatron. It will both stochastically and electron cool these unused antiprotons before another collision experiment is possible in the Tevatron. By reusing the antiprotons the luminosity of the experiment can be increased faster. The Recycler will use three bands for its stochastic cooling system. It will reuse the existing designs from the Antiproton Source for the 1-2 GHz and 2-4 GHz systems, and it requires a new design for an additional lower frequency band for the 0.5-1 GHz system. Since the existing designs were fabricated using a microstrip topology it was desired that the new design use a similar topology so that the vacuum tank designs and supporting hardware be identical for all three bands. A primary difference between the design of the pickups/kickers of the Antiproton Source and the Recycler is a different aperture in the machine itself. The Recycler has a bigger aperture and consequently reusing the designs for the existing Antiproton Source pickups/kickers is not electrically optimal but is cost efficient. Measurements will be shown later in this paper for the design of the 0.5-1 GHz system showing the effect of the aperture on the antenna performance. A mockup of the Recycler tank was manufactured for designing and testing the 0.5-1 GHz pickups/kickers. The design procedure was an iterative process and required both a constant dialogue and also a strong relationship with a

  13. Design and Optimization of a Compact Wideband Hat-Fed Reflector Antenna for Satellite Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geterud, Erik G.; Yang, Jian; Ostling, Tomas; Bergmark, Pontus

    2013-01-01

    We present a new design of the hat-fed reflector antenna for satellite communications, where a low reflection coefficient, high gain, low sidelobes and low cross-polar level are required over a wide frequency band. The hat feed has been optimized by using the Genetic Algorithm through a commercial FDTD solver, QuickWave-V2D, together with an own developed optimization code. The Gaussian vertex plate has been applied at the center of the reflector in order to improve the reflection coefficient and reduce the far-out sidelobes. A parabolic reflector with a ring-shaped focus has been designed for obtaining nearly 100% phase efficiency. The antenna's reflection coefficient is below -17 dB and the radiation patterns satisfy the M-x standard co- and cross-polar sidelobe envelopes for satellite ground stations over a bandwidth of 30%. A low-cost monolayer radome has been designed for the antenna with satisfactory performance. The simulations have been verified by measurements; both of them are presented in the paper.

  14. Ariane 3 European launcher strap-on booster development, qualification and flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mura, M.; Vari, E.

    1985-07-01

    Ariane 3 is an improved version of the European Ariane launcher System obtained by adding two solid propellant Strap-on boosters. This modification increases the payload from 2175 Kg placed into geostationary transfer orbit. The Strap-on booster, loaded with 7,3 metric tons of solid propellant each and providing a maximum thrust of 730 KN, has been developed and qualified at SNIA BPD, Defence and Space Division, Colleferro, Italy. The program started in late 1979 and the first flight of the new Ariane 3 version took place successfully on 4 August 1984. This paper presents the configuration of the motor and describes the main steps of the design, development and qualification program. The first flight data are then compared with the qualification data.

  15. Computer Aided Design of Microwave Front-End Components and Antennas for Ultrawideband Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almalkawi, Mohammad J.

    This dissertation contributes to the development of novel designs, and implementation techniques for microwave front-end components and packaging employing both transmission line theory and classical circuit theory. For compact realization, all the presented components have been implemented using planar microstrip technology. Recently, there has been an increase in the demand for compact microwave front-ends which exhibit advanced functions. Under this trend, the development of multiband front-end components such as antennas with multiple band-notches, dual-band microwave filters, and high-Q reconfigurable filters play a pivotal role for more convenient and compact products. Therefore, the content of this dissertation is composed of three parts. The first part focuses on packaging as an essential process in RF/microwave integration that is used to mitigate unwanted radiations or crosstalk due to the connection traces. In printed circuit board (PCB) interconnects, crosstalk reduction has been achieved by adding a guard trace with/without vias or stitching capacitors that control the coupling between the traces. In this research, a new signal trace configuration to reduce crosstalk without adding additional components or guard traces is introduced. The second part of this dissertation considers the inherent challenges in the design of multiple-band notched ultrawideband antennas that include the integration of multilayer antennas with RF front-ends and the realization of compact size antennas. In this work, a compact UWB antenna with quad band-notched frequency characteristics was designed, fabricated, and tested demonstrating the desired performance. The third part discusses the design of single- and dual-band dual-mode filters exhibiting both symmetric and asymmetric transfer characteristics. In dual-mode filters, the numbers of resonators that determine the order of a filter are reduced by half while maintaining the performance of the actual filter order. Here, in

  16. The mechanical design and electrical characteristics of a 32 m satellite ground station antenna with beam waveguide feed system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leupelt, U.; Thiere, H.

    1980-11-01

    A 32 m Cassegrain antenna with a new beam waveguide feed system is discussed, which handles the increased demands on the electrical characteristics of ground station antennas resulting from the introduction of frequency reuse operation in Intelsat satellites. The design of the antenna and feed system is examined along with the problems associated with polarization discrimination. The antenna operates in the frequency range 3.7 to 4.2 GHz (receiver) and 5925 to 6425 GHz (sender) by opposing circular polarization. In addition to optical adjustment of the antenna and feed system, the electrical fine tuning of the parabolic surface mirror and the collecting reflector is investigated. A flow diagram illustrates measurements using a satellite.

  17. Notch Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.

    2004-01-01

    Notch antennas, also known as the tapered slot antenna (TSA), have been the topics of research for decades. TSA has demonstrated multi-octave bandwidth, moderate gain (7 to 10 dB), and symmetric E- and H- plane beam patterns and can be used for many different applications. This chapter summarizes the research activities on notch antennas over the past decade with emphasis on their most recent advances and applications. This chapter begins with some discussions on the designs of single TSA; then follows with detailed discussions of issues associated with TSA designs and performance characteristics. To conclude the chapter, some recent developments in TSA arrays and their applications are highlighted.

  18. Design of UWB monopole antenna with dual notched bands using one modified electromagnetic-bandgap structure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Xu, Ziqiang

    2013-01-01

    A modified electromagnetic-bandgap (M-EBG) structure and its application to planar monopole ultra-wideband (UWB) antenna are presented. The proposed M-EBG which comprises two strip patch and an edge-located via can perform dual notched bands. By properly designing and placing strip patch near the feedline, the proposed M-EBG not only possesses a simple structure and compact size but also exhibits good band rejection. Moreover, it is easy to tune the dual notched bands by altering the dimensions of the M-EBG. A demonstration antenna with dual band-notched characteristics is designed and fabricated to validate the proposed method. The results show that the proposed antenna can satisfy the requirements of VSWR < 2 over UWB 3.1-10.6 GHz, except for the rejected bands of the world interoperability for microwave access (WiMAX) and the wireless local area network (WLAN) at 3.5 GHz and 5.5 GHz, respectively. PMID:24170984

  19. Design of high-gain, wideband antenna using microwave hyperbolic metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yan

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we apply hyperbolic metasurfaces (HMSs) to design high-gain and wideband antennas. It is shown that HMSs formed by a single layer of split-ring resonators (SRRs) can be excited to generate highly directive beams. In particular, we suggest two types of the SRR-HMS: a capacitively loaded SRR (CLSRR)-HMS and a substrate-backed double SRR (DSRR)-HMS. Both configurations ensure that the periodicity of the structures is sufficiently small for satisfying the effective medium theory. For the antenna design, we propose a two-layer-stacked configuration for the 2.4 GHz frequency band based on the DSRR-HMS excited by a folded monopole. Measurement results confirm numerical simulations and demonstrate that an antenna gain of more than 5 dBi can be obtained for the frequency range of 2.1 - 2.6 GHz, with a maximum gain of 7.8 dBi at 2.4 GHz.

  20. Design of UWB Monopole Antenna with Dual Notched Bands Using One Modified Electromagnetic-Bandgap Structure

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ziqiang

    2013-01-01

    A modified electromagnetic-bandgap (M-EBG) structure and its application to planar monopole ultra-wideband (UWB) antenna are presented. The proposed M-EBG which comprises two strip patch and an edge-located via can perform dual notched bands. By properly designing and placing strip patch near the feedline, the proposed M-EBG not only possesses a simple structure and compact size but also exhibits good band rejection. Moreover, it is easy to tune the dual notched bands by altering the dimensions of the M-EBG. A demonstration antenna with dual band-notched characteristics is designed and fabricated to validate the proposed method. The results show that the proposed antenna can satisfy the requirements of VSWR < 2 over UWB 3.1–10.6 GHz, except for the rejected bands of the world interoperability for microwave access (WiMAX) and the wireless local area network (WLAN) at 3.5 GHz and 5.5 GHz, respectively. PMID:24170984

  1. Thermal Resistance Measurements for Flexible Straps at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nellis, G. F.; Lachner, B. F.; Lokken, O. D.; Stahl, B. L.; Crawford, L. D.

    2004-06-01

    An experimental test facility is described that is capable of accurately measuring the total thermal resistance of a flexible strap and decomposing this total resistance into components that correspond to heat transfer through each bolted interface and heat transfer by conduction through the strap. The experimental procedure, data reduction technique, and an estimate of the uncertainty in the measurements are described. The thermal resistance values of conductive straps fabricated by joining many, thin copper laminations were measured. A test matrix was used to investigate several potentially important factors, including: total strap thickness, individual foil thickness, metal foil alloy, interface clamping force, interface surface finish, and the presence of indium foil in the interface. Each test was run at nominal temperatures of 35 K, 60 K, 77 K, and 110 K. The results of the testing indicate that the two most important factors that determine the thermal resistance of the flexible strap are its thickness and the presence of indium in the interface. Clamping force and surface finish are also found to be important, although less so when indium is used in the interface.

  2. Validation of space/ground antenna control algorithms using a computer-aided design tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gantenbein, Rex E.

    1995-01-01

    The validation of the algorithms for controlling the space-to-ground antenna subsystem for Space Station Alpha is an important step in assuring reliable communications. These algorithms have been developed and tested using a simulation environment based on a computer-aided design tool that can provide a time-based execution framework with variable environmental parameters. Our work this summer has involved the exploration of this environment and the documentation of the procedures used to validate these algorithms. We have installed a variety of tools in a laboratory of the Tracking and Communications division for reproducing the simulation experiments carried out on these algorithms to verify that they do meet their requirements for controlling the antenna systems. In this report, we describe the processes used in these simulations and our work in validating the tests used.

  3. Novel Dual-band Slot Antenna Design for Bluetooth and UWB Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hai-Yan; Shao, Wei; Wang, Bing-Zhong; Ma, Xiao-Liang

    2014-05-01

    A novel technique to introduce an additional low frequency band to compact ultra wideband (UWB) slot antennas is proposed in this paper. To get an additional Bluetooth band, a parasitic strip is mounted on the back side of the slot edge. Because of the interaction of the strip and the slot edge, the Bluetooth band can be obtained while a notch band between the Bluetooth band and UWB band also appears. Two types of feeding, coplanar waveguide and microstrip line, are investigated. The proposed antennas are both fabricated on a low-cost FR4 substrate and have compact size (24 mm × 28 mm × 1 mm). The good agreement between measured and simulated results verifies our design.

  4. Effect of antenna geometry and plasma surface impedance on the directivity of fast wave antenna radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Heikkinen, J.A.; Pavlov, I.P.

    1996-02-01

    The fairly large poloidal directivity of a radiated fast wave spectrum related to the wave polarization relative to the ion gyration can be further enhanced by the nonperpendicular angle between the antenna current strap and the magnetic field. The latter is shown to be responsible also for the asymmetry in the parallel wavenumber spectrum of an unphased antenna, and can lead to deviations of order {le}30{percent} in the corresponding spectrum of a phased antenna array. The consequences of the observed effects to the antenna performance in the current drive applications as well as in excitation of poloidally asymmetric spectra are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Analysis and Design of Multiple-Antenna Cognitive Radios With Multiple Primary User Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Jimenez, David; Louie, Raymond H. Y.; McKay, Matthew R.; Chen, Yang

    2015-09-01

    We consider multiple-antenna signal detection of primary user transmission signals by a secondary user receiver in cognitive radio networks. The optimal detector is analyzed for the scenario where the number of primary user signals is no less than the number of receive antennas at the secondary user. We first derive exact expressions for the moments of the generalized likelihood ratio test (GLRT) statistic, yielding approximations for the false alarm and detection probabilities. We then show that the normalized GLRT statistic converges in distribution to a Gaussian random variable when the number of antennas and observations grow large at the same rate. Further, using results from large random matrix theory, we derive expressions to compute the detection probability without explicit knowledge of the channel, and then particularize these expressions for two scenarios of practical interest: 1) a single primary user sending spatially multiplexed signals, and 2) multiple spatially distributed primary users. Our analytical results are finally used to obtain simple design rules for the signal detection threshold.

  6. Antenna design for fast ion collective Thomson scattering diagnostic for the international thermonuclear experimental reactor.

    PubMed

    Leipold, F; Furtula, V; Salewski, M; Bindslev, H; Korsholm, S B; Meo, F; Michelsen, P K; Moseev, D; Nielsen, S K; Stejner, M

    2009-09-01

    Fast ion physics will play an important role for the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER), where confined alpha particles will affect and be affected by plasma dynamics and thereby have impacts on the overall confinement. A fast ion collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic using gyrotrons operated at 60 GHz will meet the requirements for spatially and temporally resolved measurements of the velocity distributions of confined fast alphas in ITER by evaluating the scattered radiation (CTS signal). While a receiver antenna on the low field side of the tokamak, resolving near perpendicular (to the magnetic field) velocity components, has been enabled, an additional antenna on the high field side (HFS) would enable measurements of near parallel (to the magnetic field) velocity components. A compact design solution for the proposed mirror system on the HFS is presented. The HFS CTS antenna is located behind the blankets and views the plasma through the gap between two blanket modules. The viewing gap has been modified to dimensions 30x500 mm(2) to optimize the CTS signal. A 1:1 mock-up of the HFS mirror system was built. Measurements of the beam characteristics for millimeter-waves at 60 GHz used in the mock-up agree well with the modeling. PMID:19791936

  7. A comparison of reflector antenna designs for wide-angle scanning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, M.; Lee, S. W.; Houshmand, B.; Rahmat-Samii, Y.; Acosta, R.

    1989-01-01

    Conventional reflector antennas are typically designed for up to + or - 20 beamwidths scan. An attempt was made to stretch this scan range to some + or - 300 beamwidths. Six single and dual reflector antennas were compared. It is found that a symmetrical parabolic reflector with f/D = 2 and a single circular waveguide feed has the minimum scan loss (only 0.6 dB at Theta sub 0 = 8 deg, or a 114 beamwidths scan). The scan is achieved by tilting the parabolic reflector by an angle equal to the half-scan angle. The f/D may be shortened if a cluster 7 to 19 elements instead of one element is used for the feed. The cluster excitation is adjusted for each new beam scan direction to compensate for the imperfect field distribution over the reflector aperture. The antenna can be folded into a Cassegrain configuration except that, due to spillover and blockage considerations, the amount of folding achievable is small.

  8. Antenna engineering handbook /2nd edition/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. C.; Jasik, H.

    Essential principles, methods, and data for solving a wide range of problems in antenna design and application are presented. The basic concepts and fundamentals of antennas are reviewed, followed by a discussion of arrays of discrete elements. Then all primary types of antennas currently in use are considered, providing concise descriptions of operating principles, design methods, and performance data. Small antennas, microstrip antennas, frequency-scan antennas, conformal and low-profile arrays, adaptive antennas, and phased arrays are covered. The major applications of antennas and the design methods peculiar to those applications are discussed in detail. The employment of antennas to meet the requirements of today's complex electronic systems is emphasized, including earth station antennas, satellite antennas, seeker antennas, microwave-relay antennas, tracking antennas, radiometer antennas, and ECM and ESM antennas. Finally, significant topics related to antenna engineering, such as transmission lines and waveguides, radomes, microwave propagation, and impedance matching and broadbanding, are addressed.

  9. Computer simulations for rf design of a Spallation Neutron Source external antenna H{sup -} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. W.; Kang, Y. W.; Shin, K.; Welton, R. F.; Goulding, R. H.

    2010-02-15

    Electromagnetic modeling of the multicusp external antenna H{sup -} ion source for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has been performed in order to optimize high-power performance. During development of the SNS external antenna ion source, antenna failures due to high voltage and multicusp magnet holder rf heating concerns under stressful operating conditions led to rf characteristics analysis. In rf simulations, the plasma was modeled as an equivalent lossy metal by defining conductivity as {sigma}. Insulation designs along with material selections such as ferrite and Teflon could be included in the computer simulations to compare antenna gap potentials, surface power dissipations, and input impedance at the operating frequencies, 2 and 13.56 MHz. Further modeling and design improvements are outlined in the conclusion.

  10. Design of an RF Antenna for a Large0Bore, High Power, Steady State Plasma Processing Chamber for Material Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, D.A.; Freeman, R.L.

    2001-11-07

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC, (Contractor), and Archimedes Technology Group, (Participant) is to evaluate the design of an RF antenna for a large-bore, high power, steady state plasma processing chamber for material separation. Criteria for optimization will be to maximize the power deposition in the plasma while operating at acceptable voltages and currents in the antenna structure. The project objectives are to evaluate the design of an RF antenna for a large-bore, high power, steady state plasma processing chamber for material separation. Criteria for optimization will be to maximize the power deposition in the plasma while operating at acceptable voltages and currents in the antenna structure.

  11. ITER ICRF antenna analysis and optimization using the TOPICA code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanesio, D.; Maggiora, R.

    2010-02-01

    This paper documents the complete analysis and optimization of the ITER ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) launcher using the TOPICA code, carried out in the frame of EFDA design activities. The possibility to simulate the detailed geometry of an ICRF antenna in front of a realistic plasma description and to obtain the antenna input parameters and the radiated near electric field distribution is of paramount importance to evaluate and predict the overall system performances. Upon starting from a reference geometry, we pursued a detailed electrical optimization of the IC launcher and we came out with a final geometry showing a remarkable increase in terms of power coupled to plasma. The optimization procedure involved the modification of different parts of the antenna, such as the horizontal septa, the coaxial cables, the coax-to-feeder transitions, the feeders, the strap and the grounding. Eventually, the optimized geometry has been the object of a comprehensive analysis, varying the working frequency, the plasma conditions and the poloidal and toroidal phasings between the feeding cables. The performances of the antenna have been appreciated not only in terms of input parameters or power coupled to plasma, but also by means of power spectra and with the evaluation of the RF potentials.

  12. Spacecraft Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamnejad, Vahraz; Manshadi, Farzin; Rahmat-Samii, Yahya; Cramer, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Some of the various categories of issues that must be considered in the selection and design of spacecraft antennas for a Personal Access Satellite System (PASS) are addressed, and parametric studies for some of the antenna concepts to help the system designer in making the most appropriate antenna choice with regards to weight, size, and complexity, etc. are provided. The question of appropriate polarization for the spacecraft as well as for the User Terminal Antenna required particular attention and was studied in some depth. Circular polarization seems to be the favored outcome of this study. Another problem that has generally been a complicating factor in designing the multiple beam reflector antennas, is the type of feeds (single vs. multiple element and overlapping vs. non-overlapping clusters) needed for generating the beams. This choice is dependent on certain system design factors, such as the required frequency reuse, acceptable interbeam isolation, antenna efficiency, number of beams scanned, and beam-forming network (BFN) complexity. This issue is partially addressed, but is not completely resolved. Indications are that it may be possible to use relatively simple non-overlapping clusters of only a few elements, unless a large frequency reuse and very stringent isolation levels are required.

  13. The effect of realistic antenna geometries on plasma loading predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, P.M.; Baity, F.W.; Batchelor, D.B.; Goulding, R.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Tolliver, J.S.

    1991-01-01

    Plasma loading resistances for Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) antennas are often calculated with sophisticated plasma models and only rudimentary antenna geometries. This paper presents techniques for modifying loading calculations for cavity antennas to account for such realities as return currents in the antenna sidewalls and backplane, the transmission and reflection properties of the Faraday shield, the end effects due to a finite length antenna, the reduction in phase velocity due to strap interaction with the Faraday shield, and the effect of slots in the cavity sidewalls and dividing septa. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  14. STRAP regulates c-Jun ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis and cellular proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Reiner, Jennifer; Ye, Fei; Kashikar, Nilesh D.; Datta, Pran K.

    2011-04-08

    Highlights: {yields} STRAP is specifically correlated with c-Jun expression and activation in fibroblasts. {yields} STRAP inhibits c-Jun ubiquitylation in vivo and prolongs the half-life of c-Jun. {yields} STRAP expression increases expression of the AP-1 target gene, cyclin D1, and promotes cell autonomous growth. -- Abstract: STRAP is a ubiquitous WD40 protein that has been implicated in tumorigenesis. Previous studies suggest that STRAP imparts oncogenic characteristics to cells by promoting ERK and pRb phosphorylation. While these findings suggest that STRAP can activate mitogenic signaling pathways, the effects of STRAP on other MAPK pathways have not been investigated. Herein, we report that STRAP regulates the expression of the c-Jun proto-oncogene in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Loss of STRAP expression results in reduced phospho-c-Jun and total c-Jun but does not significantly reduce the level of two other early response genes, c-Myc and c-Fos. STRAP knockout also decreases expression of the AP-1 target gene, cyclin D1, which is accompanied by a reduction in cell growth. No significant differences in JNK activity or basal c-Jun mRNA levels were observed between wild type and STRAP null fibroblasts. However, proteasomal inhibition markedly increases c-Jun expression in STRAP knockout MEFs and STRAP over-expression decreases the ubiquitylation of c-Jun in 293T cells. Loss of STRAP accelerates c-Jun turnover in fibroblasts and ectopic over-expression of STRAP in STRAP null fibroblasts increases c-Jun expression. Collectively, our findings indicate that STRAP regulates c-Jun stability by decreasing the ubiquitylation and proteosomal degradation of c-Jun.

  15. Design and Near-Field Measurement Performance Evaluation of the Sea Winds Dual- Beam Reflector Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussein, Z.; Rahmat-Samii, Y.; Kellogg, K.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the design and performance evaluation of a lightweight, composite material, elliptical-aperture, parabolic-reflector antenna. The performance characterization is obtained using the cylindrical near-field measurement facility at JPL as shown. The reflector has been designed and calibrated for the SeaWinds spaceborne scatterometer instrument. The instrument operates at Ku-band and is designed to accurately measure wind speed and direction over Earth's ocean surface. The SeaWinds antenna design requires two linearly polarized independent beams pointed at 40 deg.and 46 deg. from nadir as shown. The inner beam, pointed at 40 deg. from nadir, is horizontally polarized with 1.6 in x 1.8 in required beamwidths in the elevation and azimuth planes, respectively. The outer beam, pointed at 46 deg. from nadir, is vertically polarized with 1.4 in x 1.7 in required beamwidths. Noteworthy, the reflector boresight axis is pointed at 43 deg. from nadir. Both beams are required to have the first sidelobe level below -15 dB relative to the peak of the beam.

  16. Structural design and static analysis of a double-ring deployable truss for mesh antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan; Guan, Fuling; Chen, Jianjun; Zheng, Yao

    2012-12-01

    This paper addresses the structural design, the deployment control design, the static analysis and the model testing of a new double-ring deployable truss that is intended for large mesh antennas. This deployable truss is a multi-DOF (degree-of-freedom), over-constrained mechanism. Two kinds of deployable basic elements were introduced, as well as a process to synthesise the structure of the deployable truss. The geometric equations were formulated to determine the length of each strut, including the effects of the joint size. A DOF evaluation showed that the mechanism requires two active cables and requires deployment control. An open-loop control system was designed to control the rotational velocities of two motors. The structural stiffness of the truss was assessed by static analysis that considered the effects of the constraint condition and the pre-stress of the passive cables. A 4.2-metre demonstration model of an antenna was designed and fabricated. The geometry and the deployment behaviour of the double-ring truss were validated by the experiments using this model.

  17. Characterization of transceive surface element designs for 7 tesla magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate: radiative antenna and microstrip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipek, Ö.; Raaijmakers, A. J. E.; Klomp, D. W. J.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Luijten, P. R.; van den Berg, C. A. T.

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-high field magnetic resonance (⩾7 tesla) imaging (MRI) faces challenges with respect to efficient spin excitation and signal reception from deeply situated organs. Traditional radio frequency surface coil designs relying on near-field coupling are suboptimal at high field strengths. Better signal penetration can be obtained by designing a radiative antenna in which the energy flux is directed to the target location. In this paper, two different radiative antenna designs are investigated to be used as transceive elements, which employ different dielectric permittivities for the antenna substrate. Their transmit and receive performances in terms of B+1, local SAR (specific absorption rate) and SNR (signal-to-noise ratio) were compared using extensive electromagnetic simulations and MRI measurements with traditional surface microstrip coils. Both simulations and measurements demonstrated that the radiative element shows twofold gain in B+1 and SNR at 10 cm depth, and additionally a comparable SAR peak value. In terms of transmit performance, the radiative antenna with a dielectric permittivity of 37 showed a 24% more favorable local SAR10g avg/(B+1)2 ratio than the radiative antenna with a dielectric permittivity of 90. In receive, the radiative element with a dielectric permittivity of 90 resulted in a 20% higher SNR for shallow depths, but for larger depths this difference diminished compared to the radiative element with a dielectric permittivity of 37. Therefore, to image deep anatomical regions effectively, the radiative antenna with a dielectric permittivity of 37 is favorable.

  18. Characterization of transceive surface element designs for 7 tesla magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate: radiative antenna and microstrip.

    PubMed

    Ipek, O; Raaijmakers, A J E; Klomp, D W J; Lagendijk, J J W; Luijten, P R; van den Berg, C A T

    2012-01-21

    Ultra-high field magnetic resonance (≥7 tesla) imaging (MRI) faces challenges with respect to efficient spin excitation and signal reception from deeply situated organs. Traditional radio frequency surface coil designs relying on near-field coupling are suboptimal at high field strengths. Better signal penetration can be obtained by designing a radiative antenna in which the energy flux is directed to the target location. In this paper, two different radiative antenna designs are investigated to be used as transceive elements, which employ different dielectric permittivities for the antenna substrate. Their transmit and receive performances in terms of B(+)(1), local SAR (specific absorption rate) and SNR (signal-to-noise ratio) were compared using extensive electromagnetic simulations and MRI measurements with traditional surface microstrip coils. Both simulations and measurements demonstrated that the radiative element shows twofold gain in B(+)(1) and SNR at 10 cm depth, and additionally a comparable SAR peak value. In terms of transmit performance, the radiative antenna with a dielectric permittivity of 37 showed a 24% more favorable local SAR(10g avg)/(B(+)(1))(2) ratio than the radiative antenna with a dielectric permittivity of 90. In receive, the radiative element with a dielectric permittivity of 90 resulted in a 20% higher SNR for shallow depths, but for larger depths this difference diminished compared to the radiative element with a dielectric permittivity of 37. Therefore, to image deep anatomical regions effectively, the radiative antenna with a dielectric permittivity of 37 is favorable. PMID:22170777

  19. Design and optimization of an ultra-wideband and compact microwave antenna for radiometric monitoring of brain temperature

    PubMed Central

    Maccarini, Paolo F.; Salahi, Sara; Oliveira, Tiago R.; Pereira, Pedro J. S.; Limão-Vieira, Paulo; Snow, Brent W.; Reudink, Doug; Stauffer, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    We present the modeling efforts on antenna design and frequency selection to monitor brain temperature during prolonged surgery using non-invasive microwave radiometry. A tapered log-spiral antenna design is chosen for its wideband characteristics that allow higher power collection from deep brain. Parametric analysis with HFSS is used to optimize antenna performance for deep brain temperature sensing. Radiometric antenna efficiency (η) is evaluated in terms of the ratio of power collected from brain to total power received by the antenna. Anatomical information extracted from several adult computed tomography (CT) scans is used to establish design parameters for constructing an accurate layered 3D tissue phantom. This head phantom includes separate brain and scalp regions, with tissue equivalent liquids circulating at independent temperatures on either side of an intact skull. The optimized frequency band is 1.1–1.6 GHz producing an average antenna efficiency of 50.3% from a 2 turn log-spiral antenna. The entire sensor package is contained in a lightweight and low profile 2.8 cm diameter by 1.5 cm high assembly that can be held in place over the skin with an electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding adhesive patch. The calculated radiometric equivalent brain temperature tracks within 0.4°C of measured brain phantom temperature when the brain phantom is lowered 10°C and then returned to original temperature (37°C) over a 4.6-hour experiment. The numerical and experimental results demonstrate that the optimized 2.5 cm log-spiral antenna is well suited for the non-invasive radiometric sensing of deep brain temperature. PMID:24759979

  20. An antenna for limited scan in one plane - Design criteria and numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borgiotti, G. V.

    1977-01-01

    Aperture illumination is synthesized through the use of overlapping subarrays with independently controlled excitations. Detailed analysis and design criteria are provided for a specific limited-scan antenna configuration scanning in one plane. The number of phase shifts is the theoretical minimum corresponding to specified aperture size and field of view. Beam pointing and width are approximately constant for moderate frequency variation, and ultralow sidelobes outside the field of view can be produced at the cost of a slight loss of illumination efficiency. Accurate aperture illumination control makes for excellent independently specified sum and difference patterns in beamforming.

  1. Design of an 8-40 GHz Antenna for the Wideband Instrument for Snow Measurements (WISM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, Timothy E.; Vanhille, Kenneth J.; Trent, Christopher R.; Lambert, Kevin M.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2015-01-01

    This poster describes the implementation of a 6x6 element, dual linear polarized array with beamformer that operates from about 8-40 GHz. It is implemented using a relatively new multi-layer microfabrication process. The beamformer includes baluns that feed dual-polarized differential antenna elements and reactive splitters that cover the full frequency range of operation. This fixed beam array (FBA) serves as the feed for a multi-band instrument designed to measure snow water equivalent (SWE) from an airborne platform known as the Wideband Instrument for Snow Measurements (WISM).

  2. SKALA, a log-periodic array antenna for the SKA-low instrument: design, simulations, tests and system considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lera Acedo, E.; Razavi-Ghods, N.; Troop, N.; Drought, N.; Faulkner, A. J.

    2015-10-01

    The very demanding requirements of the SKA-low instrument call for a challenging antenna design capable of delivering excellent performance in radiation patterns, impedance matching, polarization purity, cost, longevity, etc. This paper is devoted to the development (design and test of the first prototypes) of an active ultra-wideband antenna element for the low-frequency instrument of the SKA radio telescope. The antenna element and differential low noise amplifier described here were originally designed to cover the former SKA-low band (70-450 MHz) but it is now aimed to cover the re-defined SKA-low band (50-350 MHz) and furthermore the antenna is capable of performing up to 650 MHz with the current design. The design is focused on maximum sensitivity in a wide field of view (+/- 45° from zenith) and low cross-polarization ratios. Furthermore, the size and cost of the element has to be kept to a minimum as millions of these antennas will need to be deployed for the full SKA in very compact configurations. The primary focus of this paper is therefore to discuss various design implications for the SKA-low telescope.

  3. Numerical modelling of the TFTR ICRH antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, M.; Ho, Y.L.; Grossmann, W.; Drobot, A. ); Batchelor, D.B.; Ryan, P.M.; Carter, M. )

    1991-01-01

    A general purpose 3D electromagnetic field solver code, ARGUS, is being used to analyze the TFTR Antennas. To date, the vacuum radiation patterns produced by the bay M and L antennas have been obtained and reported. Recent work has concentrated on antenna performance comparison and understanding the role of geometry on performance (e.g., the impact of end-effects on current 2D models). Additional diagnostics such as evaluation of phase velocity and strap inductance are being implemented to enhance our understanding and to better compare with measurements. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  4. 15. DETAIL OF IRON STRAP AT JUNCTURE OF CENTRAL ROOF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. DETAIL OF IRON STRAP AT JUNCTURE OF CENTRAL ROOF SUPPORT TRUSS LOWER CHORD AND INCLINED END POST. BOLTING FOR LAMINATED WOODED TRUSS ELEMENTS ALSO VISIBLE. - Saratoga Gas Light Company, Gasholder No. 2, Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation Substation Facility, intersection of Excelsior & East Avenues, Saratoga Springs, NY

  5. Design and Performance of the Monopulse Pointing System of the DSN 34-Meter Beam-Waveguide Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudim, M. A.; Gawronski, W.; Hurd, W. J.; Brown, P. R.; Strain, D. M.

    1999-04-01

    This article describes the design, analysis, and performance prediction of a monopulse pointing system in a 34-m beam-waveguide antenna of the Deep Space Network (DSN). While the basic concept of monopulse pointing is not new, its application in the DSN is novel in two ways: first, the large antenna structure made necessary by the extremely weak signal environment; and second, the use of the single monopulse feed at 31.8 to 32.3 GHz (Ka-band) frequencies. The conventional aircraft radar application has a higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) with a fast, hostile tracking scenario. The DSN application requires precise antenna pointing to minimize pointing loss, maximize amplitude stability, and track very low-SNR signals from a very distant spacecraft with a well-predicted trajectory. The combination of the large antenna size, the low SNR, and the precise pointing requirements makes the monopulse implementation in the DSN a challenging task.

  6. The design and application of an antenna positioner mechanism for Intelsat-5 series communication satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szeto, B.

    1980-01-01

    In opertion, the East/West spot beam reflectors on the Intelsat-5 series communication satellite are required to satisfy initial precise-pointing to particular Earth locations; and repositioning and pointing to different Earth locations as traffic changes dictate during the seven year mission. Two 2 axis antenna positioner mechanisms (APM) are utilized in fulfilling these requirements. Each APM is comprised of three components which consist of one center pivot and two linear actuators rather than an integral two axis gimbal design. The step resolution of the APM can be adjusted as required with the present design, at a step resolution of 0.002865 degrees. The design philosophy and considerations, test program, and test results are discussed as well as some major problems encountered during the course of testing and their resolution.

  7. Architectural design of a ground-based deep-space optical reception antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, E. L.

    1989-01-01

    An architectural design of a ground-based antenna (telescope) for receiving optical communications from deep space is presented. Physical and optical parameters, and their effect on the performance and cost considerations, are described. The channel capacity of the antenna is 100 kbits/s from Saturn and 5 Mbits/s from Mars. A novel sunshade is designed to permit optical communication even when the deep-space laser source is as close to the sun as 12 deg. Inserts in the tubes of the sunshade permit operations at solar elongations as small as 6 or 3 deg. The Nd:YAG source laser and the Fraunhofer filter (a narrow-band predetection optical filter) are tuned to match the Doppler shifts of the source and background. A typical Saturn-to-earth data link can reduce its source power requirement from 8.2 W to 2 W of laser output by employing a Fraunhofer filter instead of a conventional multilayer dielectric filter.

  8. Printed Wide-Slot Antenna Design with Bandwidth and Gain Enhancement on Low-Cost Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Samsuzzaman, M.; Islam, M. T.; Mandeep, J. S.; Misran, N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a printed wide-slot antenna design and prototyping on available low-cost polymer resin composite material fed by a microstrip line with a rotated square slot for bandwidth enhancement and defected ground structure for gain enhancement. An I-shaped microstrip line is used to excite the square slot. The rotated square slot is embedded in the middle of the ground plane, and its diagonal points are implanted in the middle of the strip line and ground plane. To increase the gain, four L-shaped slots are etched in the ground plane. The measured results show that the proposed structure retains a wide impedance bandwidth of 88.07%, which is 20% better than the reference antenna. The average gain is also increased, which is about 4.17 dBi with a stable radiation pattern in the entire operating band. Moreover, radiation efficiency, input impedance, current distribution, axial ratio, and parametric studies of S11 for different design parameters are also investigated using the finite element method-based simulation software HFSS. PMID:24696661

  9. Printed wide-slot antenna design with bandwidth and gain enhancement on low-cost substrate.

    PubMed

    Samsuzzaman, M; Islam, M T; Mandeep, J S; Misran, N

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a printed wide-slot antenna design and prototyping on available low-cost polymer resin composite material fed by a microstrip line with a rotated square slot for bandwidth enhancement and defected ground structure for gain enhancement. An I-shaped microstrip line is used to excite the square slot. The rotated square slot is embedded in the middle of the ground plane, and its diagonal points are implanted in the middle of the strip line and ground plane. To increase the gain, four L-shaped slots are etched in the ground plane. The measured results show that the proposed structure retains a wide impedance bandwidth of 88.07%, which is 20% better than the reference antenna. The average gain is also increased, which is about 4.17 dBi with a stable radiation pattern in the entire operating band. Moreover, radiation efficiency, input impedance, current distribution, axial ratio, and parametric studies of S11 for different design parameters are also investigated using the finite element method-based simulation software HFSS. PMID:24696661

  10. Preparing ITER ICRF: development and analysis of the load resilient matching systems based on antenna mock-up measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messiaen, A.; Vervier, M.; Dumortier, P.; Grine, D.; Lamalle, P. U.; Durodié, F.; Koch, R.; Louche, F.; Weynants, R.

    2009-05-01

    The reference design for the ICRF antenna of ITER is constituted by a tight array of 24 straps grouped in eight triplets. The matching network must be load resilient for operation in ELMy discharges and must have antenna spectrum control for heating or current drive operation. The load resilience is based on the use of either hybrid couplers or conjugate-T circuits. However, the mutual coupling between the triplets at the low expected loading strongly counteracts the load resilience and the spectrum control. Using a mock-up of the ITER antenna array with adjustable water load matching solutions are designed. These solutions are derived from transmission line modelling based on the measured scattering matrix and are finally tested. We show that the array current spectrum can be controlled by the anti-node voltage distribution and that suitable decoupler circuits can not only neutralize the adverse mutual coupling effects but also monitor this anti-node voltage distribution. A matching solution using four 3 dB hybrids and the antenna current spectrum feedback control by the decouplers provides outstanding performance if each pair of poloidal triplets undergoes a same load variation. Finally, it is verified by modelling that this matching scenario has the same antenna spectrum and load resilience performances as the antenna array loaded by plasma as described by the TOPICA simulation. This is true for any phasing and frequency in the ITER frequency band. The conjugate-T solution is presently considered as a back-up option.

  11. On the cross-polarization characteristics of crooked wire antennas designed by genetic-algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rengarajan, S. R.; Rahmat-Samii, Y.

    2002-01-01

    In many modern communication applications there is a need for simple circularly polarized antennas for hemispherical coverage with good axial ratio or low value of cross polarization. We revisited the crooked wire antenna because of its simplicity. This paper presents results of our investigation on the crooked wire antennas and other elements.

  12. Application of the moment method to the design of slotted waveguide array antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, A. H. I.

    1988-12-01

    Slotted waveguide array antennas, which are widely used in radar systems, are becoming increasingly more amenable to computer aided design/synthesis procedures, since the scattering characteristics of a slot in a waveguide can be predicted to a high degree of accuracy. An improved theoretical CAD package is presented to design arrays of this type. It differs from earlier such packages in that the reliance on measured data was avoided with a theoretical technique termed the moment method being used to provide the self admittance data for the slots. The efficient implementation of this package and in particular the incorporation of the moment method into it was aided considerably by using this method to make a prior study of nature of certain critical slot characteristics. Most of the more significant waveguide slot relationships were discussed in literature in one form or another except for those relating to slot width. A study employing the moment method was performed to eliminate this oversight and the functional relationship between this parameter and the slot resonance was determined. The moment method solution was also extended to permit the examination of round end slots, which are commonly used in practice, by developing a novel axis sectioning procedure. The evolution of the computer aided array design package is described in detail. The package was subsequently employed to design array examples, one of which was constructed. The experimental and theoretical results for this antenna were presented to demonstrate the plausibility of this technique. Some less conventional array configurations were also synthesized to demonstrate design flexibility.

  13. On the Design and Analysis of Modified Koch Curve Fractal Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, S.; Singh, A. P.

    2013-12-01

    A comparative study of the conventional and modified Koch curve antennas has been analyzed. The geometries of the antennas are obtained by an iterative function system algorithm for fractal curve generation. It has been observed that by keeping height and width of curve constant the modified Koch curve antenna provide more resonant frequencies with better return loss in comparison with conventional Koch curve antenna. The presented analysis quantifies the advantages provided by the modified Koch curve antenna and is validated by simulations and experimental results.

  14. Accurate design of ICRF antennas for RF plasma thruster acceleration units with TOPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancellotti, V.; Maggiora, R.; Vecchi, G.; Milanesio, D.; Meneghini, O.

    2007-09-01

    In recent years electromagnetic (RF) plasma generation and acceleration concepts for plasma-based propulsion systems have received growing interest, inasmuch as they can yield continuous thrust as well as highly controllable and wide-ranging exhaust velocities. The acceleration units mostly adopt the Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF)—a proven technology in fusion experiments for transferring large RF powers into magnetized plasmas, and also used by the VASIMR propulsion system. In this work we propose and demonstrate the use of TOPICA code to design and optimize the ICRF antenna of a typical acceleration stage. To this end, TOPICA was extended to cope with magnetized cylindricaily-symmetric radially-inhomogeneous warm plasmas, which required coding a new module charged with solving Maxwell's equations within the plasma to obtain the relevant Green's function Ỹ(m,kz) in the Fourier domain, i.e. the relation between the transverse magnetic and electric fields at the air-plasma interface. Then, calculating the antenna input impedance—and hence the loading—relies on an integral-equation formulation and subsequent finite-element weighted-residual solution scheme for the self-consistent evaluation of the current density distribution on the conducting bodies and at the air-plasma interface.

  15. Design of a 4-element Antenna Array for BDS Anti-jamming Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianxing; Shi, Hongyu; Li, Hang; Zhang, Anxue

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a compact 4-element antenna array with the dimension of 150 mm × 150 mm is proposed for BeiDou navigation satellite system (BDS) anti-jamming applications. The proposed antenna array comprises of four identical microstrip right-handed circularly polarized (RHCP) antenna elements. The four microstrip antenna elements are placed in the same polarity with a distance of 80 mm between adjacent elements. The antenna element which employs dual probe-fed structure has a relatively small volume of 45 mm × 45 mm × 5 mm. The antenna array has been fabricated and measured. The experimental results show that the proposed antenna array is quite suitable for BDS anti-jamming application.

  16. Design of Large-Area Surface Wave Plasma Excited by Slotted Waveguide Antennas with Novel Power Divider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishijima, Tatsuo; Toyoda, Hirotaka; Takanishi, Yudai; Sugai, Hideo

    2011-03-01

    Microwave discharge enables the production of high-density (≥1017 m-3) large-area (≥5 m2) flat plasma, owing to its efficient absorption of surface waves. To irradiate microwaves over an entire plasma surface uniformly, an array of slotted waveguide antennas combined with a novel compact power divider is developed. A general guideline for designing the slot antenna array for desired plasma dimensions is presented. Furthermore, in accordance with the antenna design optimized by finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulation, a 915 MHz microwave plasma of 1.3 ×1.1 m2 area was successfully produced, verifying the plasma uniformity with two-dimensional Langmuir probe measurements.

  17. Design and Realization of a Planar Ultrawideband Antenna with Notch Band at 3.5 GHz

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A small antenna with single notch band at 3.5 GHz is designed for ultrawideband (UWB) communication applications. The fabricated antenna comprises a radiating monopole element and a perfectly conducting ground plane with a wide slot. To achieve a notch band at 3.5 GHz, a parasitic element has been inserted in the same plane of the substrate along with the radiating patch. Experimental results shows that, by properly adjusting the position of the parasitic element, the designed antenna can achieve an ultrawide operating band of 3.04 to 11 GHz with a notched band operating at 3.31–3.84 GHz. Moreover, the proposed antenna achieved a good gain except at the notched band and exhibits symmetric radiation patterns throughout the operating band. The prototype of the proposed antenna possesses a very compact size and uses simple structures to attain the stop band characteristic with an aim to lessen the interference between UWB and worldwide interoperability for microwave access (WiMAX) band. PMID:25133245

  18. A Simple Tool for the Design and Analysis of Multiple-Reflector Antennas in a Multi-Disciplinary Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Daniel S.; Cwik, Tom; Fu, Chuigang; Imbriale, William A.; Jamnejad, Vahraz; Springer, Paul L.; Borgioli, Andrea

    2000-01-01

    The process of designing and analyzing a multiple-reflector system has traditionally been time-intensive, requiring large amounts of both computational and human time. At many frequencies, a discrete approximation of the radiation integral may be used to model the system. The code which implements this physical optics (PO) algorithm was developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. It analyzes systems of antennas in pairs, and for each pair, the analysis can be computationally time-consuming. Additionally, the antennas must be described using a local coordinate system for each antenna, which makes it difficult to integrate the design into a multi-disciplinary framework in which there is traditionally one global coordinate system, even before considering deforming the antenna as prescribed by external structural and/or thermal factors. Finally, setting up the code to correctly analyze all the antenna pairs in the system can take a fair amount of time, and introduces possible human error. The use of parallel computing to reduce the computational time required for the analysis of a given pair of antennas has been previously discussed. This paper focuses on the other problems mentioned above. It will present a methodology and examples of use of an automated tool that performs the analysis of a complete multiple-reflector system in an integrated multi-disciplinary environment (including CAD modeling, and structural and thermal analysis) at the click of a button. This tool, named MOD Tool (Millimeter-wave Optics Design Tool), has been designed and implemented as a distributed tool, with a client that runs almost identically on Unix, Mac, and Windows platforms, and a server that runs primarily on a Unix workstation and can interact with parallel supercomputers with simple instruction from the user interacting with the client.

  19. Theory and Practice in ICRF Antennas for Long Pulse Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Colas, L.; Bremond, S.; Mitteau, R.; Chantant, M.; Goniche, M.; Basiuk, V.; Bosia, G.; Gunn, J.P.

    2005-09-26

    Long plasma discharges on the Tore Supra (TS) tokamak were extended in 2004 towards higher powers and plasma densities by combined Lower Hybrid (LH) and Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) waves. RF pulses of 20sx8MW and 60sx4MW were produced. TS is equipped with 3 ICRF antennas, whose front faces are ready for CW operation. This paper reports on their behaviour over high power long pulses, as observed with infrared (IR) thermography and calorimetric measurements. Edge parasitic losses, although modest, are concentrated on a small surface and can raise surface temperatures close to operational limits. A complex hot spot pattern was revealed with at least 3 physical processes involved : convected power, electron acceleration in the LH near field, and a RF-specific phenomenon compatible with RF sheaths. LH coupling was also perturbed in the antenna shadow. This was attributed to RF-induced DC ExB0 convection. This motivated sheath modelling in two directions. First, the 2D topology of RF potentials was investigated in relation with the RF current distribution over the antenna, via a Green's function formalism and full-wave calculation using the ICANT code. In front of phased arrays of straps, convective cells were interpreted using the RF current profiles of strip line theory. Another class of convective cells, specific to antenna box corners, was evidenced for the first time. Within 1D sheath models assuming independent flux tubes, RF and rectified DC potentials are proportional. 2D fluid models couple nearby flux tubes via transverse polarisation currents. Unexpectedly this does not necessarily smooth RF potential maps. Peak DC potentials can even be enhanced. The experience gained on TS and the numerical tools are valuable for designing steady state high power antennas for next step devices. General rules to reduce RF potentials as well as concrete design options are discussed.

  20. Astronaut Joseph Kerwin strapped into sleep restraint in crew quarters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Scientist-Astronaut Joseph P. Kerwin, Skylab 2 science pilot, is photographed strapped into the sleep restraint in the crew quarters of the Orbital Workshop of the Skylab 1 and 2 space station cluster in Earth orbit. Kerwin is wearing the special cap which contains biomedical instrumentation for the M133 Sleep Monitoring Experiment. The purpose of the M133 experiment is to evaluate quantity and quality of sleep during prolonged space flight by the analysis of electroencephalographic (EEG) and electrooculographic (EOG) activity.

  1. Space-communications antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyrev, Nikolai D.

    This textbook examines the design principles, requirements, and technical characteristics of earth-station and space-station antennas. Methods for realizing high gain and low noise temperature are examined along with ways to enhance antenna performance. Particular attention is given to the antenna-feed sections of earth stations.

  2. Real-time strap pressure sensor system for powered exoskeletons.

    PubMed

    Tamez-Duque, Jesús; Cobian-Ugalde, Rebeca; Kilicarslan, Atilla; Venkatakrishnan, Anusha; Soto, Rogelio; Contreras-Vidal, Jose Luis

    2015-01-01

    Assistive and rehabilitative powered exoskeletons for spinal cord injury (SCI) and stroke subjects have recently reached the clinic. Proper tension and joint alignment are critical to ensuring safety. Challenges still exist in adjustment and fitting, with most current systems depending on personnel experience for appropriate individual fastening. Paraplegia and tetraplegia patients using these devices have impaired sensation and cannot signal if straps are uncomfortable or painful. Excessive pressure and blood-flow restriction can lead to skin ulcers, necrotic tissue and infections. Tension must be just enough to prevent slipping and maintain posture. Research in pressure dynamics is extensive for wheelchairs and mattresses, but little research has been done on exoskeleton straps. We present a system to monitor pressure exerted by physical human-machine interfaces and provide data about levels of skin/body pressure in fastening straps. The system consists of sensing arrays, signal processing hardware with wireless transmission, and an interactive GUI. For validation, a lower-body powered exoskeleton carrying the full weight of users was used. Experimental trials were conducted with one SCI and one able-bodied subject. The system can help prevent skin injuries related to excessive pressure in mobility-impaired patients using powered exoskeletons, supporting functionality, independence and better overall quality of life. PMID:25690551

  3. Design of an 8-40 GHz Antenna for the Wideband Instrument for Snow Measurements (WISM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, Timothy E.; Vanhille, Kenneth J.; Trent, Christopher; Lambert, Kevin M.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of land surface snow remains a significant challenge in the remote sensing arena. Developing the tools needed to remotely measure Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) is an important priority. The Wideband Instrument for Snow Measurements (WISM) is being developed to address this need. WISM is an airborne instrument comprised of a dual-frequency (X- and Ku-bands) Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and dual-frequency (K- and Ka-bands) radiometer. A unique feature of this instrument is that all measurement bands share a common antenna aperture consisting of an array feed reflector that covers the entire bandwidth. This paper covers the design and fabrication of the wideband array feed which is based on tightly coupled dipole arrays. Implementation using a relatively new multi-layer microfabrication process results in a small, 6x6 element, dual-linear polarized array with beamformer that operates from 8 to 40 gigahertz.

  4. Special features of the CLUSTER antenna and radial booms design, development and verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gianfiglio, G.; Yorck, M.; Luhmann, H. J.

    1995-01-01

    CLUSTER is a scientific space mission to in-situ investigate the Earth's plasma environment by means of four identical spin-stabilized spacecraft. Each spacecraft is provided with a set of four rigid booms: two Antenna Booms and two Radial Booms. This paper presents a summary of the boom development and verification phases addressing the key aspects of the Radial Boom design. In particular, it concentrates on the difficulties encountered in fulfilling simultaneously the requirements of minimum torque ratio and maximum allowed shock loads at boom latching for this two degree of freedom boom. The paper also provides an overview of the analysis campaign and testing program performed to achieve sufficient confidence in the boom performance and operation.

  5. Controller design and parameter identifiability studies for a large space antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of control systems synthesis and parameter identifiability are considered for a large, space-based antenna. Two methods are considered for control system synthesis, the first of which uses torque actuators and collocated attitude and rate sensors, and the second method is based on the linear-quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) control theory. The predicted performance obtained by computing variances of pointing, surface and feed misalignment errors in the presence of sensor noise indicates that the LQG-based controller yields superior results. Since controller design requires the knowledge of the system parameters, the identifiability of the structural parameters is investigated by obtaining Cramer-Rao lower bounds. The modal frequencies are found to have the best identifiability, followed by damping ratios, and mode-slopes.

  6. Conceptual Design and Prototype Performance of Phased-array Antenna for EBWH/CD Experiments in QUEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idei, Hiroshi; Sakaguchi, Masatsugu; Nagata, Kazuya; Hanada, Kazuaki; Zushi, Hideki; Nakamura, Kazuo; Hasegawa, Makoto; Sato, Kohnosuke; Sakamoto, Mizuki; Kawasaki, Shoji; Nakashima, Hisatoshi; Higashijima, Aki

    Electron Bernstein Wave Heating and Current Drive (EBWH/CD) experiments have been conducted to sustain a spherical tokamak configuration in a steady state in QUEST. In the EBWH/CD experiments on QUEST, the O-X-B mode conversion scenario was selected for plasma current sustainment in rather low-density plasmas. A new phased-array antenna system was proposed to launch a pure elliptically-polarized O-mode in the oblique injection. The prototype antenna system was designed and its performance was checked at low power test facilities. Good focusing and steering properties were confirmed in the low power test.

  7. Lightning tests and analyses of tunnel bond straps and shielded cables on the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Druen, William M.

    1993-01-01

    The purposes of the tests and analyses described in this report are as follows: (1) determine the lightning current survivability of five alternative changed designs of the bond straps which electrically bond the solid rocket booster (SRB) systems tunnel to the solid rocket motor (SRM) case; (2) determine the amount of reduction in induced voltages on operational flight (OF) tunnel cables obtained by a modified design of tunnel bond straps (both tunnel cover-to-cover and cover-to-motor case); (3) determine the contribution of coupling to the OF tunnel cables by ground electrical and instrumentation (GEI) cables which enter the systems tunnel from unshielded areas on the surfaces of the motor case; and (4) develop a model (based on test data) and calculate the voltage levels at electronic 'black boxes' connected to the OF cables that run in the systems tunnel.

  8. Analysis and design of terahertz antennas based on plasmonic resonant graphene sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Tamagnone, M.; Gomez-Diaz, J. S.; Perruisseau-Carrier, J.

    2012-12-01

    Resonant graphene antennas used as true interfaces between terahertz (THz) space waves and a source/detector are presented. It is shown that in addition to the high miniaturization related to the plasmonic nature of the resonance, graphene-based THz antenna favorably compare with typical metal implementations in terms of return loss and radiation efficiency. Graphene antennas will contribute to the development of miniature, efficient, and potentially transparent all-graphene THz transceivers for emerging communication and sensing application.

  9. Design of smoothed multi-flared antenna for multi-frequency reception of direct transmission from meteorological satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasodha, Polisetti; Jayaraman, Achuthan; Kesarkar, Amit P.; Thawait, Prateek

    2016-07-01

    The direct radiance data assimilation is found to be advantageous for the numerical weather prediction over short and medium range. Therefore reception of satellite radiance in real time is important. Satellite earth station is the preferred choice for direct reception of this data, which is voluminous. High Rate Information being transmitted from these satellites operating in L, S, C and X bands needs to be received. A commercial wide band antenna is not preferred for such application, as it operates uniformly over the entire frequency range in these bands and may create interference over the unwanted frequencies. As the frequencies of interest occupy only a small portion of these bands, it is essential to design a horn antenna, which receives only specified frequencies and filter other frequencies. In this work, we have designed a multi-flare multi-frequency cylindrical horn antenna for reception of direct transmission from meteorological satellites. This earth station antenna tracks selected satellites working over specified frequency ranges, which are 1.694-1.703 GHz, 2.0-2.06 GHz, 4.5-4.6 GHz and 7.8-7.9 GHz in L, S, C and X bands respectively. Cylindrical waveguides for the frequencies, 1.6, 2, 4.5 and 8 GHz are designed and they are joined in the increasing order of radius with suitable conical shapes. The slope of the cones is adjusted experimentally. With this design, the return loss is simulated and found to be better than 20 dB upto 4.5 GHz and later it became poor. To overcome this difficulty, the abrupt transitions at the joints of the conical and cylindrical waveguides are made smoothen by increasing the diameter of one mouth of the cylinder and reducing the other mouth to match with the cylinders corresponding to next higher and lower frequency respectively. As a result, a smooth flared antenna is obtained and the simulated results are satisfactory. A parabolic reflector of 4 m diameter is designed and the smooth multi-flared antenna is kept at the

  10. Novel Antenna Coupler Design for Production of Meter-Scale High-Density Planar Surface Wave Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishijima, Tatsuo; Nojiri, Yasunori; Toyoda, Hirotaka; Sugai, Hideo

    2010-08-01

    A vacuum-sealed antenna coupler was newly developed for excitation of meter-scale high-density surface wave plasma for manufacturing giant microelectronics devices such as liquid crystal displays and thin-film solar cells. To produce large-area uniform plasma, various multislot antenna designs at 2.45 GHz were investigated by slot antenna analysis and simulation using the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. Optical emission images of the plasma observed using a wide-angle charge-coupled device (CCD) camera and Langmuir probe measurements revealed the production of a very uniform and high-density plasma of 1 m length and 0.3 m width whose dimensions can easily be expanded to a much larger scale. Furthermore, the production of a large-area sheetlike plasma of 2 cm thickness and 1 m length has been demonstrated to reduce the discharge power, heat load, gas consumption, and pumping load.

  11. Design of highly directive cavity type terahertz antenna for wireless communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Kumud Ranjan; Singh, G.

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, a cavity type dipole antenna at the terahertz frequency regime of the electromagnetic spectrum is investigated. To improve the directivity of the proposed dipole antenna at this frequency, an effective medium approach along with the ray-tracing technique have been used to investigate a unit-cell of the frequency-selective-surface (FSS) and its effect on the directivity of the antenna is presented. The predicted value of the directivity of the proposed antenna at 610 GHz has been compared with the simulation results. The simulation has been performed by using the two different commercially available simulators: a) CST Microwave Studio based on the finite integral method and b) Ansoft HFSS based on the finite element method. Further, to improve the directivity of the proposed antenna, two lateral side-walls have been placed at boundaries and its effect on the antenna directivity has been analyzed. On this way, the directivity of the antenna has been increased up to 19 dBi at the proposed frequency. Further, the structure has been scaled down by a factor of 20 and performance of the antenna at 30.6 GHz has been re-examined and it shows the similar results as obtained at 610 GHz. Finally, the method discussed in the manuscript and the directivity of the proposed antenna has been compared with various reported literatures.

  12. Hyperband Bi-Conical Antenna Design Using 3D Printing Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriambeloson, J. A.; Wiid, P. G.

    2016-03-01

    We combined a 3D printing technique with conductive paint for an antenna manufacturing methodology. The performance of the approach is evaluated through a 3D- printed and coated bi-cone antenna. The antenna far-field pattern and efficiency are measured using near-field spherical scan and reverberation chamber techniques. Good agreement is seen between measurements and simulations and an impedance bandwidth of at least 34:1 is achieved. An extruded bi-conical antenna geometry is also studied for bandwidth extension to lower frequency and an impedance bandwidth of 58:1 is realised.

  13. The Enhanced Performance Launcher Design For The ITER Upper Port ECH Antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, M. A.; Chavan, R.; Bertizzolo, R.; Duron, J.; Landis, J.-D.; Sauter, O.; Sanchez, F.; Shidara, H.; Udintsev, V. S.; Zucca, C.; Bruschi, A.; Criant, S.; Farina, D.; Ramponi, G.; Heidinger, R.; Poli, E.; Zohm, H.; Saibene, G.

    2007-09-28

    The ITER ECH heating and current drive system delivers 24 MW (170 GHz), which can be directed to either the equatorial (EL) or upper (UL) port launching antennas depending on the desired physics application. The UL design uses two front steering (FS) mirrors that sweep eight beams in a poloidal plane providing co-ECCD over the outer half of the plasma cross section. A novel frictionless, backlash-free steering mechanism has been developed for an increased reliability and providing a steering mirror rotation of up to {+-}7 deg. ({+-}14 deg. for RF beam). The principle aim of the UL is to stabilize the neoclassical tearing modes (NTM) and (by extending the steering range) access the q = 1 flux surface for control of the sawtooth oscillation. Increasing the range of the UL can relax the EL steering range, and optimize the EL for enhanced performance with an optimized central deposition and potential for counter ECCD. This paper will summarize the present UL design status along with the proposed design modifications to the UL for enhanced performance and increased reliability.

  14. Horn antenna design studies. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstract data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, M. K.

    1980-01-01

    These citations from the international literature describe the antenna radiation patterns, polarization characteristics, wave propagation, noise temperature, wave diffraction, and wideband communication of various horn antennas. This updated bibliography contains 217 citations, 63 of which are new entries to the previous edition.

  15. Design of a New Built-in UHF Multi-Frequency Antenna Sensor for Partial Discharge Detection in High-Voltage Switchgears.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Cheng, Zheng; Gui, Yingang

    2016-01-01

    In this study a new built-in ultrahigh frequency (UHF) antenna sensor was designed and applied in a high-voltage switchgear for partial discharge (PD) detection. The casing of the switchgear was initially used as the ground plane of the antenna sensor, which integrated the sensor into the high-voltage switchgear. The Koch snowflake patch was adopted as the radiation patch of the antenna to overcome the disadvantages of common microstrip antennas, and the feed position and the dielectric layer thickness were simulated in detail. Simulation results show that the antenna sensor possessed four resonant points with good impedance matching from 300 MHz to 1000 MHz, and it also presented good multi-frequency performance in the entire working frequency band. PD detection experiments were conducted in the high-voltage switchgear, and the fabricated antenna sensor was effectively built into the high-voltage switchgear. In order to reflect the advantages of the built-in antenna sensor, another external UHF antenna sensor was used as a comparison to simultaneously detect PD. Experimental results demonstrated that the built-in antenna sensor possessed high detection sensitivity and strong anti-interference capacity, which ensured the practicability of the design. In addition, it had more high-voltage switchgear PD detection advantages than the external sensor. PMID:27472331

  16. Design considerations for rectangular microstrip patch antenna on electromagnetic crystal substrate at terahertz frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, G.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of 2-D electromagnetic crystal substrate on the performance of a rectangular microstrip patch antennas at THz frequencies is simulated. Electromagnetic crystal substrate is used to obtain extremely broad-bandwidth with multi-frequency band operation of the proposed microstrip antennas. Multi-frequency band microstrip patch antennas are used in modern communication systems in order to enhance their capacity through frequency reuse. The simulated 10 dB impedance bandwidth of the rectangular patch microstrip antenna is 34.3% at THz frequency (0.6-0.95 THz). The radiation efficiency, gain and directivity of the proposed antenna are presented at different THz frequencies. The simulation has been performed using CST Microwave Studio, which is a commercially available electromagnetic simulator based on finite integral technique.

  17. JPL antenna technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeland, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Plans for evaluating, designing, fabricating, transporting and deploying cost effective and STS compatible offset wrap rib antennas up to 300 meters in diameter for mobile communications, Earth resources observation, and for the orbiting VLBI are reviewed. The JPL surface measurement system, intended for large mesh deployable antenna applications will be demonstrated and validated as part of the antenna ground based demonstration program. Results of the offset wrap rib deployable antenna technology development will include: (1) high confidence structural designs for antennas up to 100 meters in diameter; (2) high confidence estimates of functional performance and fabrication cost for a wide range of antenna sizes (up to 300 meters in diameter); (3) risk assessment for fabricating the large size antennas; and (4) 55 meter diameter flight quality hardware that can be cost effectively completed toto accommodate a flight experiment and/or application.

  18. Cofactor Strap regulates oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial p53 activity through ATP synthase

    PubMed Central

    Maniam, S; Coutts, A S; Stratford, M R; McGouran, J; Kessler, B; La Thangue, N B

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic reprogramming is a hallmark of cancer cells. Strap (stress-responsive activator of p300) is a novel TPR motif OB-fold protein that contributes to p53 transcriptional activation. We show here that, in addition to its established transcriptional role, Strap is localised at mitochondria where one of its key interaction partners is ATP synthase. Significantly, the interaction between Strap and ATP synthase downregulates mitochondrial ATP production. Under glucose-limiting conditions, cancer cells are sensitised by mitochondrial Strap to apoptosis, which is rescued by supplementing cells with an extracellular source of ATP. Furthermore, Strap augments the apoptotic effects of mitochondrial p53. These findings define Strap as a dual regulator of cellular reprogramming: first as a nuclear transcription cofactor and second in the direct regulation of mitochondrial respiration. PMID:25168243

  19. Design and analysis of low frequency strut-straddling feed arrays for EVLA reflector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harun, M.; Ellingson, S. W.

    2011-06-01

    A new feed system is designed for operation below 100 MHz. The only existing system on the EVLA operating below 100 MHz is the "4 m" (74 MHz) system which uses crossed half-wave dipoles located in front of the Cassegrain subreflector as the feed. However, the dipole feeds of this system introduce blockage, and a reduction in system sensitivity (estimated to be ˜6% at 1.4 GHz) is observed at higher frequency bands; hence the dipoles are removed most of the time. An alternative feed concept is therefore proposed in this paper. The proposed system appears to reduce sensitivity degradation at 1.4 GHz by 3% and thus might be permanently mounted. Moreover, the new system has sensitivity comparable to the existing system at frequencies below 100 MHz. The feed for this system consists of dipoles mounted between the adjacent struts of the reflector and is thus referred to as a strut-straddling feed array. This design and the analysis methodology used in this paper should be applicable in meeting the contiguous frequency coverage requirement (50-470 MHz) of the new low frequency system proposed for the EVLA. Also, it may be applied in the modification of other existing large reflector antennas for low frequency operation.

  20. Surge current and electron swarm tunnel tests of thermal blanket and ground strap materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmaster, D. K.; Inouye, G. T.; Sellen, J. M., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The results are described of a series of current conduction tests with a thermal control blanket to which grounding straps have been attached. The material and the ground strap attachment procedure are described. The current conduction tests consisted of a surge current examination of the ground strap and a dilute flow, energetic electron deposition and transport through the bulk of the insulating film of this thermal blanket material. Both of these test procedures were used previously with thermal control blanket materials.

  1. Design and analysis of an electronically steerable microstrip patch and a novel Coplanar Waveguide (CPW) fed slot antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldossary, Hamad

    Conformal Phased Array Antennas (CPAAs) are very attractive for their high gain, low profile, and beam scanning ability while being conformal to their mounting surface. Among them are microstrip patch phased arrays and wideband slot phased arrays which are of particular significance. In this work, first the study, design, and implementation of a conformal microstrip patch phased array is presented which consists of a high gain beam scanning array implemented using microstrip delay lines controlled using GaAs SPDT switches. Then the study and design of a wideband Coplanar Waveguide (CPW)-fed slot phased array antenna is presented. In both cases the array beam scanning properties are elucidated by incorporating the measured delay line scattering parameters inside Ansys Designer simulation models and then computing and presenting their full-wave radiation characteristics.

  2. Analysis and design of ring-resonator integrated hemi-elliptical lens antenna at terahertz frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Kumud Ranjan; Singh, G.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, a novel lens integrated ring-resonator microstrip antenna is analyzed and simulated at 600 GHz. A mathematical model to compute the directivity of this kind of the antenna has been developed and the directivity of the antenna has been computed which is 18 dBi. The proposed model has been simulated by using CST Microwave Studio a commercially available simulator based on finite integral technique and similar result has been obtained. Further, the directivity of the antenna has also been computed by using the techniques reported in the literature and in this case also we have obtained the similar result. Later, a probe-fed patch integrated lens antenna has also been investigated to validate the correctness of the numerical method. To find the potential advantages of this kind of the structure, the - 10 dB impedance bandwidth of the antenna has been compared to a lens-integrated probe-fed microstrip patch antenna and a significant enhancement in the bandwidth has been observed.

  3. The design of RFID convey or belt gate systems using an antenna control unit.

    PubMed

    Park, Chong Ryol; Lee, Seung Joon; Eom, Ki Hwan

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes an efficient management system utilizing a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) antenna control unit which is moving along with the path of boxes of materials on the conveyor belt by manipulating a motor. The proposed antenna control unit, which is driven by a motor and is located on top of the gate, has an array structure of two antennas with parallel connection. The array structure helps improve the directivity of antenna beam pattern and the readable RFID distance due to its configuration. In the experiments, as the control unit follows moving materials, the reading time has been improved by almost three-fold compared to an RFID system employing conventional fixed antennas. The proposed system also has a recognition rate of over 99% without additional antennas for detecting the sides of a box of materials. The recognition rate meets the conditions recommended by the Electronic Product Code glbal network (EPC)global for commercializing the system, with three antennas at a 20 dBm power of reader and a conveyor belt speed of 3.17 m/s. This will enable a host of new RFID conveyor belt gate systems with increased performance. PMID:22164119

  4. Design and Performance Evaluation of a Dual Antenna Joint Carrier Tracking Loop

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wenfei; Lin, Tao; Niu, Xiaoji; Shi, Chuang; Zhang, Hongping

    2015-01-01

    In order to track the carrier phases of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) signals in signal degraded environments, a dual antenna joint carrier tracking loop is proposed and evaluated. This proposed tracking loop processes inputs from two antennas, namely the master antenna and the slave antenna. The master antenna captures signals in open-sky environments, while the slave antenna capture signals in degraded environments. In this architecture, a Phase Lock Loop (PLL) is adopted as a master loop to track the carrier phase of the open-sky signals. The Doppler frequency estimated by this master loop is utilized to assist weak carrier tracking in the slave loop. As both antennas experience similar signal dynamics due to satellite motion and clock frequency variations, a much narrower loop bandwidth and possibly a longer coherent integration can be adopted to track the weak signals in slave channels, by utilizing the Doppler aid from master channels. PLL tracking performance is affected by the satellite/user dynamics, clock instability, and thermal noise. In this paper, their impacts on the proposed phase tracking loop are analyzed and verified by both simulation and field data. Theoretical analysis and experimental results show that the proposed loop structure can track degraded signals (i.e., 18 dB-Hz) with a very narrow loop bandwidth (i.e., 0.5 Hz) and a TCXO clock. PMID:26437415

  5. The Design of RFID Convey or Belt Gate Systems Using an Antenna Control Unit

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chong Ryol; Lee, Seung Joon; Eom, Ki Hwan

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes an efficient management system utilizing a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) antenna control unit which is moving along with the path of boxes of materials on the conveyor belt by manipulating a motor. The proposed antenna control unit, which is driven by a motor and is located on top of the gate, has an array structure of two antennas with parallel connection. The array structure helps improve the directivity of antenna beam pattern and the readable RFID distance due to its configuration. In the experiments, as the control unit follows moving materials, the reading time has been improved by almost three-fold compared to an RFID system employing conventional fixed antennas. The proposed system also has a recognition rate of over 99% without additional antennas for detecting the sides of a box of materials. The recognition rate meets the conditions recommended by the Electronic Product Code glbal network (EPC)global for commercializing the system, with three antennas at a 20 dBm power of reader and a conveyor belt speed of 3.17 m/s. This will enable a host of new RFID conveyor belt gate systems with increased performance. PMID:22164119

  6. Design and Performance Evaluation of a Dual Antenna Joint Carrier Tracking Loop.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wenfei; Lin, Tao; Niu, Xiaoji; Shi, Chuang; Zhang, Hongping

    2015-01-01

    In order to track the carrier phases of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) signals in signal degraded environments, a dual antenna joint carrier tracking loop is proposed and evaluated. This proposed tracking loop processes inputs from two antennas, namely the master antenna and the slave antenna. The master antenna captures signals in open-sky environments, while the slave antenna capture signals in degraded environments. In this architecture, a Phase Lock Loop (PLL) is adopted as a master loop to track the carrier phase of the open-sky signals. The Doppler frequency estimated by this master loop is utilized to assist weak carrier tracking in the slave loop. As both antennas experience similar signal dynamics due to satellite motion and clock frequency variations, a much narrower loop bandwidth and possibly a longer coherent integration can be adopted to track the weak signals in slave channels, by utilizing the Doppler aid from master channels. PLL tracking performance is affected by the satellite/user dynamics, clock instability, and thermal noise. In this paper, their impacts on the proposed phase tracking loop are analyzed and verified by both simulation and field data. Theoretical analysis and experimental results show that the proposed loop structure can track degraded signals (i.e., 18 dB-Hz) with a very narrow loop bandwidth (i.e., 0.5 Hz) and a TCXO clock. PMID:26437415

  7. Design of reflectarray antennas to achieve an optimum near-field radiation for RFID applications via the implementation of SDM procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Hsi-Tseng; Liu, Yu-Xi; Dong, Xiao-Ying; You, Bai-Qiang; Kuo, Li-Ruei

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the design of reflectarray antennas to radiate an optimum near-field distribution by using the procedure of steepest decent method to synthesize the impressed phases of reflectarray elements. In particular, the closed-form formulations used in the electromagnetic modeling were developed for an efficient design. The design was further implemented to realize a reflectarray of microstrip patch elements, which is illuminated by the radiation of a feed antenna at the 2.4 GHz band in the radio frequency identification applications. Numerical investigations as well as experimental measurements over a prototype are presented to validate the feasibility of the developed models and the implemented antenna structure.

  8. Antenna Measurement and Design for the CanX-7 Nanosatellite and the Development of a Global Navigation Satellite System Based Attitude Determination System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, Paris Yen-Jun

    This thesis describes and presents solutions to various challenges small satellites may encounter during design and operation, particularly in the areas of communications and attitude determination. The first section of this thesis presents simulation and measurement of communications antennas on a nanosatellite to verify that the antennas have sufficient gain and polarization to enable near-omnidirectional operation. Near-omnidirectional antennas are essential to ensure reliable communication with the spacecraft regardless of its attitude, especially when fine pointing ability is unavailable or inadequate. Next, the following section covers the design of a circularly polarized patch antenna for use on an aircraft tracking payload. Lastly, the final section of this thesis presents the development and analysis of a technique for augmenting a single GPS antenna on a spacecraft to estimate attitude. It is possible for GPS measurements to partially supplement an existing attitude sensor that has been denied operation.

  9. Shuttle orbiter Ku-band radar/communications system design evaluation: High gain antenna/widebeam horn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwasaki, R.; Dodds, J. G.; Broad, P.

    1979-01-01

    The physical characteristics of the high gain antenna reflector and feed elements are described. Deficiencies in the sum feed are discussed, and lack of atmospheric venting is posed as a potential problem area. The measured RF performance of the high gain antenna is examined and the high sidelobe levels measured are related to the physical characteristics of the antenna. An examination of the attributes of the feed which might be influenced by temperature extremes shows that the antenna should be insensitive to temperature variations. Because the feed support bipod structure is considered a significant contributor to the high sidelobe levels measured in the azimuth plane, pod relocation, material changes, and shaping are suggested as improvements. Alternate feed designs are presented to further improve system performance. The widebeam horn and potential temperature effects due to the polarizer are discussed as well as in the effects of linear polarization on TDRS acquisition, and the effects of circular polarization on radar sidelobe avoidance. The radar detection probability is analyzed as a function of scan overlap and target range.

  10. Design of plasmonic nano-antenna for total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Khwang; Song, Jung-Hwan; Jeong, Kwang-Yong; Seo, Min-Kyo

    2013-10-01

    We propose a gold modified bow-tie plasmonic nano-antenna, which can be suitably used in combination with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. The plasmonic nano-antenna, supporting well-separated multiple resonances, not only concentrates the total internal reflection evanescent field at the deep subwavelength scale, but also enhances fluorescence emission by the Purcell effect. Finite-difference time-domain computations show that the enhancement of the excitation light strongly correlates with the far-field radiation pattern radiated from the antenna. Depending on the antenna geometry, the resonant modes are widely tuned and their wavelengths can be easily matched to the diverse emission or excitation wavelengths of fluorophores. PMID:24104219

  11. Antenna and coil design for wireless signal detection and charging of embedded power active contact lens.

    PubMed

    Ng, Benny; Heckler, Paul; Do, Alex; Azar, Phillip; Leon, Errol; Smilkstein, Tina

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a screen printed 2.4 GHz antenna and induction charging coil for an active contact lens with a single large pixel user display and on-board 3.8 V 5 uAh rechargeable battery. The antenna traces are printed using silver conductive paste on a 25 um polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate. The incoming signal from the antenna feeds into an IC that amplifies and rectifies the signal. The coil provides wireless energy transfer to inductively charge a thin film battery [1] located on the contact lens. The printed antenna achieved a S11 of -4 dB at 2.4 GHz and a gain of -13 dB. PMID:25571353

  12. Antenna design and tissue parameters considerations for an improved modelling of microwave ablation in the liver.

    PubMed

    Karampatzakis, Andreas; Kühn, Sven; Tsanidis, George; Neufeld, Esra; Samaras, Theodoros; Kuster, Niels

    2013-05-21

    Microwave ablation is a technique used in treating hepatocellular carcinoma, especially in cases where surgical removal is impossible. In the present study we are investigating the effects of design characteristics of a coaxial slot antenna (single- versus double-slot, slot-to-tip distance and slot size) on the ablation zone characteristics (dimensions and shape). The specific absorption rate field and the temperature rises are calculated for a variety of application times and powers. A plateau in the ablation zone dimensions in healthy and cirrhotic liver models is predicted, but not in malignant ones. It is found that the value of the perfusion rate (which is different for each clinical case) is of crucial importance in order to correctly estimate the ablation zone. An underestimation of dimensions is expected, if higher perfusion rates are used (i.e., values for healthy tissue rather than malignant). In contrast, an exact determination of the values of relative permittivity and conductivity is less significant for predicting the ablation zone. PMID:23603829

  13. Analysis and Uniform Design of a Single-Layer Slotted Waveguide Array Antenna with Baffles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Takehito; Hirokawa, Jiro; Ando, Makoto

    This paper presents the formulation for the evaluation of external coupling in the alternating-phase feed single-layer slotted waveguide array antenna with baffles by using the Spectrum of Two-Dimensional Solutions (S2DS) method. A one-dimensional slot array is extracted from the array by assuming the periodicity in transversal direction and introducing the perfect electric conductors in the external region. The uniform excitation over the finite array is synthesized iteratively to demonstrate the fast and accurate results by S2DS. A unit design model with the baffles is introduced to determine the initial parameters of the slot pair which accelerate the iteration. Experiment at 25.3GHz demonstrates good uniformity of the aperture field distribution as well as the effects of the baffles. The directivity is 32.7dB which corresponds to the aperture efficiency 90.5% and the reflection is below -15.0dB over 1.3GHz.

  14. Design and implementation of a beam-waveguide mirror control system for vernier pointing of the DSS-13 antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, L. S.; Moore, M.; Veruttipong, W.; Andres, E.

    1994-01-01

    The design and implementation of an antenna beam-waveguide (BWG) mirror position control system at the DSS-13 34-m antenna is presented. While it has several potential applications, a positioner on the last flat-plate BWG mirror (M6) at DSS 13 is installed to demonstrate the conical scan (conscan) angle-tracking technique at the Ka-band (32-GHz) operating frequency. Radio frequency (RF) beam-scanning predictions for the M6 mirror, computed from a diffraction analysis, are presented. From these predictions, position control system requirements are then derived. The final mechanical positioner and servo system designs, as implemented at DSS 13, are illustrated with detailed design descriptions given in the appendices. Preliminary measurements of antenna Ka-band beam scan versus M6 mirror tilt made at DSS 13 in December 1993 are presented. After reduction, the initial measurements are shown to be in agreement with the RF predicts. Plans for preliminary conscan experimentation at DSS 13 are summarized.

  15. Cellular Reflectarray Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    The cellular reflectarray antenna is intended to replace conventional parabolic reflectors that must be physically aligned with a particular satellite in geostationary orbit. These arrays are designed for specified geographical locations, defined by latitude and longitude, each called a "cell." A particular cell occupies nominally 1,500 square miles (3,885 sq. km), but this varies according to latitude and longitude. The cellular reflectarray antenna designed for a particular cell is simply positioned to align with magnetic North, and the antenna surface is level (parallel to the ground). A given cellular reflectarray antenna will not operate in any other cell.

  16. A folded waveguide ICRF antenna for PBX-M and TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, T.S.; Carter, M.D.; Fogelman, C.H.

    1995-09-01

    The folded waveguide (FWG) antenna is an advanced ICRF launcher under development at ORNL that offers many significant advantages over current-strap type antennas. These features are particularly beneficial for reactor-relevant applications such as ITER and TPX. Previous tests of a development folded waveguide with a low density plasma load have shown a factor of 5 increase in power capability over loop antennas into similar plasma conditions. The performance and reliability of a FWG with an actual tokamak plasma load must now be verified for further acceptance of this concept. A 58 MHz, 4 MW folded waveguide is being designed and built for the PBX-M and TFTR tokamaks at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. This design has a square cross-section that can be installed as either a fast wave (FW) or ion-Bernstein wave (IBW) launcher by 90{degree} rotation. Two new features of the design are: a shorter quarter-wavelength resonator configuration and a rear-feed input power coupling loop. Loading calculations with a standard shorting plate indicate that a launched power level of 4 MW is possible on either machine. Mechanical and disruption force analysis indicates that bolted construction will withstand the disruption loads. An experimental program is planned to characterize the plasma loading, heating effectiveness, power capability, impurity generation and other factors for both FW and IBW cases. High power tests of the new configuration are being performed with a development FWG unit on RFTF at ORNL.

  17. VLF/LF transmitting antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belrose, John S.

    1993-05-01

    Very Low Frequency (VLF) transmitting antenna design is a specialized field of engineering that requires the combined skill of radio, civil, and mechanical engineers. The antenna systems used for this band (15-30 kHz) are enormous structures. Vertical radiators with very extensive top-loading (non-radiating top-hats) are necessary because the electrical height of practical towers is small. For tower heights of 300-450 meters (1000-1500 feet) the electrical heights are only fifteen to forty-five one thousandths of a wavelength. This presentation discusses the following topics: antenna design concepts, antenna fundamentals, tools for antenna modeling, a mini-study of conventional antennas, multiple tuned antenna systems, and a comparison between performance (measured and predicted) for multiple tuned antennas vs. single tuned antennas.

  18. Quadrature transmit array design using single-feed circularly polarized patch antenna for parallel transmission in MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yong; Yu, Baiying; Vigneron, Daniel B; Zhang, Xiaoliang

    2014-02-01

    Quadrature coils are often desired in MR applications because they can improve MR sensitivity and also reduce excitation power. In this work, we propose, for the first time, a quadrature array design strategy for parallel transmission at 298 MHz using single-feed circularly polarized (CP) patch antenna technique. Each array element is a nearly square ring microstrip antenna and is fed at a point on the diagonal of the antenna to generate quadrature magnetic fields. Compared with conventional quadrature coils, the single-feed structure is much simple and compact, making the quadrature coil array design practical. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the decoupling between elements is better than -35 dB for all the elements and the RF fields are homogeneous with deep penetration and quadrature behavior in the area of interest. Bloch equation simulation is also performed to simulate the excitation procedure by using an 8-element quadrature planar patch array to demonstrate its feasibility in parallel transmission at the ultrahigh field of 7 Tesla. PMID:24649430

  19. Quadrature transmit array design using single-feed circularly polarized patch antenna for parallel transmission in MR imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yong; Yu, Baiying; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2014-01-01

    Quadrature coils are often desired in MR applications because they can improve MR sensitivity and also reduce excitation power. In this work, we propose, for the first time, a quadrature array design strategy for parallel transmission at 298 MHz using single-feed circularly polarized (CP) patch antenna technique. Each array element is a nearly square ring microstrip antenna and is fed at a point on the diagonal of the antenna to generate quadrature magnetic fields. Compared with conventional quadrature coils, the single-feed structure is much simple and compact, making the quadrature coil array design practical. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the decoupling between elements is better than –35 dB for all the elements and the RF fields are homogeneous with deep penetration and quadrature behavior in the area of interest. Bloch equation simulation is also performed to simulate the excitation procedure by using an 8-element quadrature planar patch array to demonstrate its feasibility in parallel transmission at the ultrahigh field of 7 Tesla. PMID:24649430

  20. A design study for the use of a multiple aperture deployable antenna for soil moisture remote sensing satellite applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foldes, P.

    1986-01-01

    The instrumentation problems associated with the measurement of soil moisture with a meaningful spatial and temperature resolution at a global scale are addressed. For this goal only medium term available affordable technology will be considered. The study while limited in scope, will utilize a large scale antenna structure, which is being developed presently as an experimental model. The interface constraints presented by a singel Space Transportation System (STS) flight will be assumed. Methodology consists of the following steps: review of science requirements; analyze effects of these requirements; present basic system engineering considerations and trade-offs related to orbit parameters, number of spacecraft and their lifetime, observation angles, beamwidth, crossover and swath, coverage percentage, beam quality and resolution, instrument quantities, and integration time; bracket the key system characteristics and develop an electromagnetic design of the antenna-passive radiometer system. Several aperture division combinations and feed array concepts are investigated to achieve maximum feasible performacne within the stated STS constraints.

  1. Design of a planar multiband Sierpinski E-shaped carpet antenna with CPW fed for multi standard wireless terminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, K. Satyabrat; Panda, Asit K.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper Sierpinski E-Carpet antenna based on the implementation of fractal technique is proposed for multiband applications in 2-10 GHz band. There appeared 5 resonant frequencies at 2.35 GHz, 3.5 GHz, 5.503 GHz, 7.248GHz, and 8.79GHz for 2nd iteration. From the return loss plot it is seen that antenna achieved the IEEE Bluetooth/WLAN (2.4-2.484 GHz), WiMAX (3.4-3.69 GHz) and WIFI (5.1-5.825 GHz) frequency band with -10dB return loss. Also nearly omni-directional radiation pattern is observed. A prototype of the design is successfully implemented with close agreement between measurement and simulation result.

  2. Preventing Proximal Adjacent Level Kyphosis With Strap Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Zaghloul, Khaled M; Matoian, Brett J; Denardin, Nicholas B; Patel, Vikas V

    2016-07-01

    A substantial proportion of patients develop proximal junctional kyphosis following spinal surgery. To combat this postoperative change, several techniques have focused on maintaining the structural integrity of adjacent spinal levels and adapting the proximal end of the fusion construct to accommodate the increased mechanical stressors produced by long spinal fusion. The use of Mersilene tape (Ethicon, Somerville, New Jersey) for spine and orthopedic surgery is well documented, although considerably less is known about its use for preventing proximal junctional kyphosis. This article describes a proposed technique using Mersilene tape to provide a check-rein strap stabilization at the proximal end of fusion constructs. Initial data suggest that use of this technique may prevent formation of proximal junctional kyphosis. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):e794-e799.]. PMID:27158827

  3. Overexpression of p49/STRAP alters cellular cytoskeletal structure and gross anatomy in mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The protein p49/STRAP (SRFBP1) is a transcription cofactor of serum response factor (SRF) which regulates cytoskeletal and muscle-specific genes. Results Two conserved domains were found in the p49/STRAP protein. The SRF-binding domain was at its N-terminus and was highly conserved among mammalian species, xenopus and zebrafish. A BUD22 domain was found at its C-terminus in three sequence databases. The BUD22 domain was conserved among mammalian p49/STRAP proteins, and yeast cellular morphogenesis proteins, which is involved in ribosome biogenesis that affects growth rate and cell size. The endogenous p49/SRAP protein was localized mainly in the nucleus but also widely distributed in the cytoplasm, and was in close proximity to the actin. Transfected GFP-p49/STRAP protein co-localized with nucleolin within the nucleolus. Overexpression of p49/STRAP reduced actin content in cultured cells and resulted in smaller cell size versus control cells. Increased expression of p49/STRAP in transgenic mice resulted in newborns with malformations, which included asymmetric abdominal and thoracic cavities, and substantial changes in cardiac morphology. p49/STRAP altered the expression of certain muscle-specific genes, including that of the SRF gene, which is a key regulator of cardiac genes at the developmental, structural and maintenance level and has two SRE binding sites. Conclusions Since p49/STRAP is a co-factor of SRF, our data suggest that p49/STRAP likely regulates cell size and morphology through SRF target genes. The function of its BUD22 domain warrants further investigation. The observed increase in p49/STRAP expression during cellular aging may contribute to observed morphological changes in senescence. PMID:25183317

  4. Dual-mode antenna design for microwave heating and noninvasive thermometry of superficial tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, S; Stauffer, P R; Neuman, D G

    2000-11-01

    Hyperthermia therapy of superficial skin disease has proven clinically useful, but current heating equipment is somewhat clumsy and technically inadequate for many patients. The present effort describes a dual-purpose, conformal microwave applicator that is fabricated from thin, flexible, multilayer printed circuit board (PCB) material to facilitate heating of surface areas overlaying contoured anatomy. Preliminary studies document the feasibility of combining Archimedean spiral microstrip antennas, located concentrically within the central region of square dual concentric conductor (DCC) annular slot antennas. The motivation is to achieve homogeneous tissue heating simultaneously with noninvasive thermometry by radiometric sensing of blackbody radiation from the target tissue under the applicator. Results demonstrate that the two antennas have complimentary regions of influence. The DCC ring antenna structure produces a peripherally enhanced power deposition pattern with peaks in the outer corners of the aperture and a broad minimum around 50% of maximum centrally. In contrast, the Archimedean spiral radiates (or receives) energy predominantly along the boresight axis of the spiral, thus confining the region of influence to tissue located within the central broad minimum of the DCC pattern. Analysis of the temperature-dependent radiometer signal (brightness temperature) showed linear correlation of radiometer output with test load temperature using either the spiral or DCC structure as the receive antenna. The radiometric performance of the broadband Archimedean antenna was superior compared to the DCC, providing improved temperature resolution (0.1 degree C-0.2 degree C) and signal sensitivity (0.3 degree C-0.8 degree C/degree C) at all four 500 MHz integration bandwidths tested within the frequency range from 1.2 to 3.0 GHz. PMID:11077744

  5. An experimental 20/30 GHz communications satellite conceptual design employing multiple-beam paraboloid reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A. M., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    An experimental 20/30 GHz communications satellite conceptual design is described which employs multiple-beam paraboloid reflector antennas coupled to a TDMA transponder. It is shown that the satellite employs solid state GaAs FET power amplifiers and low noise amplifiers while signal processing and switching takes place on-board the spacecraft. The proposed areas to be served by this satellite would be the continental U.S. plus Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands, as well as southern Canada and Mexico City. Finally, attention is given to the earth stations which are designed to be low cost.

  6. 24 CFR 3285.403 - Sidewall, over-the-roof, mate-line, and shear wall straps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., and shear wall straps. 3285.403 Section 3285.403 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to... Anchorage Against Wind § 3285.403 Sidewall, over-the-roof, mate-line, and shear wall straps. If sidewall, over-the-roof, mate-line, or shear wall straps are installed on the home, they must be connected to...

  7. Antennas for diverse requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukamp, Joachim

    An account is given of a major German aerospace manufacturer's state-of-the-art methods for development, design, construction, testing and certification of a wide variety of civilian and military communications and radar antennas. Attention is given to reflector antennas for very large aperture/wavelength ratios, slotted waveguide arrays in which the radiating aperture is synthesized by guided structures, and both microstrip arrays and active arrays, for the creation of very large area antennas. Antenna tests and measurements are conducted in an anechoic chamber.

  8. A True Metasurface Antenna

    PubMed Central

    Badawe, Mohamed El; Almoneef, Thamer S.; Ramahi, Omar M.

    2016-01-01

    We present a true metasurface antenna based on electrically-small resonators. The resonators are placed on a flat surface and connected to one feed point using corporate feed. Unlike conventional array antennas where the distance between adjacent antennas is half wavelength to reduce mutual coupling between adjacent antennas, here the distance between the radiating elements is electrically very small to affect good impedance matching of each resonator to its feed. A metasurface antenna measuring 1.2λ × 1.2λ and designed to operate at 3 GHz achieved a gain of 12 dBi. A prototype was fabricated and tested showing good agreement between numerical simulations and experimental results. Through numerical simulation, we show that the metasurface antenna has the ability to provide beam steering by phasing all the resonators appropriately. PMID:26759177

  9. A True Metasurface Antenna.

    PubMed

    El Badawe, Mohamed; Almoneef, Thamer S; Ramahi, Omar M

    2016-01-01

    We present a true metasurface antenna based on electrically-small resonators. The resonators are placed on a flat surface and connected to one feed point using corporate feed. Unlike conventional array antennas where the distance between adjacent antennas is half wavelength to reduce mutual coupling between adjacent antennas, here the distance between the radiating elements is electrically very small to affect good impedance matching of each resonator to its feed. A metasurface antenna measuring 1.2λ × 1.2λ and designed to operate at 3 GHz achieved a gain of 12 dBi. A prototype was fabricated and tested showing good agreement between numerical simulations and experimental results. Through numerical simulation, we show that the metasurface antenna has the ability to provide beam steering by phasing all the resonators appropriately. PMID:26759177

  10. A True Metasurface Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawe, Mohamed El; Almoneef, Thamer S.; Ramahi, Omar M.

    2016-01-01

    We present a true metasurface antenna based on electrically-small resonators. The resonators are placed on a flat surface and connected to one feed point using corporate feed. Unlike conventional array antennas where the distance between adjacent antennas is half wavelength to reduce mutual coupling between adjacent antennas, here the distance between the radiating elements is electrically very small to affect good impedance matching of each resonator to its feed. A metasurface antenna measuring 1.2λ × 1.2λ and designed to operate at 3 GHz achieved a gain of 12 dBi. A prototype was fabricated and tested showing good agreement between numerical simulations and experimental results. Through numerical simulation, we show that the metasurface antenna has the ability to provide beam steering by phasing all the resonators appropriately.

  11. A design analysis of imaging radiometer with antenna-coupled transition-edge sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shitov, Sergey V.; Vystavkin, Alexander N.

    2006-04-01

    A transition-edge sensor multi-layer film absorber (Mo/Cu, Tc=0.3-0.4 K) is assumed to connect the leads of the antenna made from Nb. The RF current from antenna is the source of hot electrons within the absorber; the heat escape to the substrate is limited by the low electron-phonon interaction at low temperature. The Andreev electron-reflection effect can prevent the heat leak to the antenna terminals. To build an imaging array, the multiplexing procedure via method of projections allows for readout from columns or rows, not from individual pixels, so the number of leads can be reduced to N+M for N×M double-polarized array. The full-time signal accumulation is effective for all pixels employing a polarization separating cross-slot antenna. Microstrip and coplanar waveguides are used in the matching circuit of the 9-pixel array. Wide-band signal coupling is simulated for a 5- Ω absorber at 600 GHz.

  12. Modeling of compact loop antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Baity, F.W.

    1987-01-01

    A general compact loop antenna model which treats all elements of the antenna as lossy transmission lines has been developed. In addition to capacitively-tuned resonant double loop (RDL) antennas the model treats stub-tuned resonant double loop antennas. Calculations using the model have been compared with measurements on full-scale mockups of resonant double loop antennas for ATF and TFTR in order to refine the transmission line parameters. Results from the model are presented for RDL antenna designs for ATF, TFTR, Tore Supra, and for the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT).

  13. Modeling of compact loop antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baity, F. W.

    A general compact loop antenna model which treats all elements of the antenna as lossy transmission lines has been developed. In addition to capacitively-tuned resonant double loop (RDL) antennas the model treats stub-tuned resonant double loop antennas. Calculations using the model have been compared with measurements on full-scale mockups of resonant double loop antennas for ATF and TFTR in order to refine the transmission line parameters. Results from the model are presented for RDL antenna designs for ATF, TFTR, Tore Supra, and for the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT).

  14. Modeling of compact loop antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baity, F. W.

    1987-09-01

    A general compact loop antenna model which treats all elements of the antenna as lossy transmission lines has been developed. In addition to capacitively tuned resonant double loop (RDL) antennas, the model treats sub-tuned RDL antennas. Calculations using the model have been compared with measurements on full-scale mock-ups of RDL antennas for ATF and TFTR in order to refine the transmission line parameters. Results from the model are presented for RDL antenna designs for ATF, TFTR, Tore Supra, and the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT).

  15. Design and analysis of an implantable CPW-fed X-monopole antenna for 2.45-GHz ISM band applications.

    PubMed

    Ashok Kumar, Srinivasan; Shanmuganantham, Thangavelu

    2014-03-01

    A novel antenna design that effectively covers the industrial, scientific, and medical (ISM) band at 2.45 GHz using an X-shaped structure with a coplanar waveguide (CPW) feed is described. The antenna has a compact size of 67.6 mm(3). The proposed design is effective for ISM band biotelemetry with a wakeup controller (2.45 GHz). An experimental prototype of the compact implantable CPW-fed X-shaped monopole antenna was fabricated on a biocompatible alumina Al2O3 ceramic substrate. The optimal antenna was fabricated and tested in minced tissue from the front leg of a pig and on a human body phantom liquid. The simulated and measured bandwidths are 180 MHz and 210 MHz in the ISM band, respectively. PMID:24404821

  16. Integrated design and analysis of rf heating and current drive systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, P.M.; Carter, M.D.; Goulding, R.H.

    1995-09-01

    The design, analysis, and performance evaluation of rf power systems ultimately requires accurate modeling of a chain of subsystems starting with the rf transmitter and ending with the power absorption in the plasma. A collection of computer codes is used at ORNL to calculate the plasma loading and wave spectrum for a three-dimensional rf antenna, the transmission/reflection properties of the Faraday shield and its effect on the electrical characteristics and phase velocity of the antenna, the internal coupling among antenna array components and the incorporation of the antenna array into a transmission line model of the phase control, tuning, matching, and power distribution system. Some codes and techniques are more suited for the rapid evaluation of system design progressions, while others are more applicable to the detailed analysis of final designs or existing hardware. The interaction of codes and the accuracy of calculations will be illustrated by the process of determining the plasma loading as a function of phasing and density profiles for the TFTR ICRH antennas and comparing the results to measurements. An example of modeling a complex antenna geometry will be the comparison of calculations with the measured electrical response of a four-strap mockup of the JET A2 antenna array which was loaned to ORNL by the JET ICRH team.

  17. 3D modeling and optimization of the ITER ICRH antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louche, F.; Dumortier, P.; Durodié, F.; Messiaen, A.; Maggiora, R.; Milanesio, D.

    2011-12-01

    The prediction of the coupling properties of the ITER ICRH antenna necessitates the accurate evaluation of the resistance and reactance matrices. The latter are mostly dependent on the geometry of the array and therefore a model as accurate as possible is needed to precisely compute these matrices. Furthermore simulations have so far neglected the poloidal and toroidal profile of the plasma, and it is expected that the loading by individual straps will vary significantly due to varying strap-plasma distance. To take this curvature into account, some modifications of the alignment of the straps with respect to the toroidal direction are proposed. It is shown with CST Microwave Studio® [1] that considering two segments in the toroidal direction, i.e. a "V-shaped" toroidal antenna, is sufficient. A new CATIA model including this segmentation has been drawn and imported into both MWS and TOPICA [2] codes. Simulations show a good agreement of the impedance matrices in vacuum. Various modifications of the geometry are proposed in order to further optimize the coupling. In particular we study the effect of the strap box parameters and the recess of the vertical septa.

  18. Airborne antenna pattern calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagherian, A. B.; Mielke, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    Use of calculation program START and modeling program P 3D to produce radiation patterns of antennas mounted on a space station is discussed. Basic components of two space stations in the early design stage are simulated and radiation patterns for antennas mounted on the modules are presented.

  19. Role of STRAP in regulating GSK3β function and Notch3 stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Kashikar, Nilesh D; Zhang, Wanguang; Massion, Pierre P; Gonzalez, Adriana L

    2011-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) can regulate a broad range of cellular processes in a variety of cell types and tissues through its ability to phosphorylate its substrates in a cell- and time-specific manner. Although it is known that Axin and presenilin help to recruit β-catenin/Smad3 and tau protein to GSK3β, respectively, it is not clear how many of the other GSK3β substrates are recruited to it. Here, we have established the binding of GSK3β with a novel scaffold protein, STRAP, through its WD40 domains. In a new finding, we have observed that STRAP, GSK3β and Axin form a ternary complex together. We show for the first time that intracellular fragment of Notch3 (ICN3) binds with GSK3β through the ankyrin repeat domain. This binding between STRAP and GSK3β is reduced by small-molecule inhibitors of GSK3β. Further studies revealed that STRAP also binds ICN3 through the ankyrin repeat region, and this binding is enhanced in a proteasomal inhibition-dependent manner. In vivo ubiquitination studies indicate that STRAP reduces ubiquitination of ICN3, suggesting a role of STRAP in stabilizing ICN3. This is supported by the fact that STRAP and Notch3 are co-upregulated and co-localized in 59% of non-small cell lung cancers, as observed in an immunohistochemical staining of tissue microarrays. These results provide a potential mechanism by which STRAP regulates GSK3β function and Notch3 stabilization and further support the oncogenic functions of STRAP. PMID:21502811

  20. A century of antenna development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olver, A. D.

    The paper describes a century of antenna development as part of a century of radio communications. This historical review examines, chronologically, the pre-Hertz period, Hertz antennas, the microwave optics period, the Marconi era, short waves, theoretical design before and after computers, and radar. Consideration is also given to mobile antennas, microwave comunications, radio astronomy, and satellite comunications.

  1. The JPL mechanically steered antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berner, Jeff B.; Bell, David J.

    1988-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has designed and developed a mechanically steered antenna for tracking satellites in a mobile environment. This antenna was used to track an L-band beacon on the MARISAT satellite. A description of the antenna and the results of the satellite experiment are given.

  2. RF Voltage Measurements on ICRF Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, G. L.; Goulding, R. H.; Hoffman, D. J.; Wilgen, J. B.; Zhang, H. M.; Ryan, P. M.; Syed, G. M. S.; Kaye, A. S.

    1996-11-01

    Particle and heat flux on the plasma facing surfaces of high-power RF antennas used in fusion devices can result in damage to the antenna structures. High impedance capacitive probe measurements of the RF voltages on Faraday shields of several loop antennas indicate that voltages as high as 30% of the drive voltage can exist for 0/0 phasing (D.J. Hoffman, et al., AIP Conf. Proc. 355), 368 (Palm Spgs., CA, 1995).. These voltages can contribute to increased energy deposition on the antenna owing to increased RF sheath voltages. We report on continued efforts to understand the source and to control these RF voltages. E and B field distributions have been measured on the mock-up of the JET A2 antenna using standard B-dot probes and novel E-field probes positioned with a new automated scanning system. These data are compared with calculated fields from 3-D antenna models. The measurements demonstrate the dependency of the surface E-fields on the phasing of the strap currents and show the charge accumulation at the antenna top and bottom predicted by the models.

  3. RF Measurements and Modeling from the JET-ITER Like Antenna Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrancken, M.; Argouarch, A.; Blackman, T.; Dumortier, P.; Durodié, F.; Goulding, R.; Graham, M.; Huygen, S.; Lamalle, P. U.; Messiaen, A. M.; Nicholls, K.; Nightingale, M.; Vervier, M.

    2007-09-01

    The RF characteristics of the JET-ITER Like (JET-IL) antenna relevant for operation on plasma have been assessed using full wave three Dimensional (3D) electromagnetic CST® Microwave Studio (MWS) simulations, measurements of the full 8-port antenna strap array S/Z-matrix, and RF circuit modeling. These efforts are made in parallel with the high voltage testing of the antenna inside a vacuum tank and the hardware implementation of a RF (Radio Frequency) matching feedback control system prior to installation of the antenna on the JET tokamak.

  4. RF Measurements and Modeling from the JET-ITER Like Antenna Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Vrancken, M.; Dumortier, P.; Durodie, F.; Huygen, S.; Lamalle, P. U.; Messiaen, A. M.; Vervier, M.; Argouarch, A.; Blackman, T.; Graham, M.; Nicholls, K.; Nightingale, M.

    2007-09-28

    The RF characteristics of the JET-ITER Like (JET-IL) antenna relevant for operation on plasma have been assessed using full wave three Dimensional (3D) electromagnetic CST registered Microwave Studio (MWS) simulations, measurements of the full 8-port antenna strap array S/Z-matrix, and RF circuit modeling. These efforts are made in parallel with the high voltage testing of the antenna inside a vacuum tank and the hardware implementation of a RF (Radio Frequency) matching feedback control system prior to installation of the antenna on the JET tokamak.

  5. Assessment of a field-aligned ICRF antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Wukitch, S. J.; Brunner, D.; Ennever, P.; Garrett, M. L.; Hubbard, A.; Labombard, B.; Lau, C.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Miller, D.; Ochoukov, R.; Porkolab, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Terry, J. L.

    2014-02-12

    Impurity contamination and localized heat loads associated with ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antenna operation are among the most challenging issues for ICRF utilization.. Another challenge is maintaining maximum coupled power through plasma variations including edge localized modes (ELMs) and confinement transitions. Here, we report on an experimental assessment of a field aligned (FA) antenna with respect to impurity contamination, impurity sources, RF enhanced heat flux and load tolerance. In addition, we compare the modification of the scrape of layer (SOL) plasma potential of the FA antenna to a conventional, toroidally aligned (TA) antenna, in order to explore the underlying physics governing impurity contamination linked to ICRF heating. The FA antenna is a 4-strap ICRF antenna where the current straps and antenna enclosure sides are perpendicular to and the Faraday screen rods are parallel to the total magnetic field. In principle, alignment with respect to the total magnetic field minimizes integrated E∥ (electric field along a magnetic field line) via symmetry. Consistent with expectations, we observed that the impurity contamination and impurity source at the FA antenna are reduced compared to the TA antenna. In both L and H-mode discharges, the radiated power is 20–30% lower for a FA-antenna heated discharge than a discharge heated with the TA-antennas. Further we observe that the fraction of RF energy deposited upon the antenna is less than 0.4 % of the total injected RF energy in dipole phasing. The total deposited energy increases significantly when the FA antenna is operated in monopole phasing. The FA antenna also exhibits an unexpected load tolerance for ELMs and confinement transitions compared to the TA antennas. However, inconsistent with expectations, we observe RF induced plasma potentials to be nearly identical for FA and TA antennas when operated in dipole phasing. In monopole phasing, the FA antenna has the highest plasma

  6. Rectangular Microstirp Patch Antenna Design at THz Frequency for Short Distance Wireless Communication Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Aditi; Singh, G.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we have presented the simulation results of a rectangular microstrip patch antenna at terahertz (THz) frequency ranging from 0.7 to 0.85 THz. THz electromagnetic wave can permit more densely packed communication links with increased security of communication transmission. The simulated results such as gain, radiation efficiency and 10 dB impedance bandwidth of rectangular microstrip patch antenna at THz frequencies without shorting post configuration are 3.497 dB, 55.71% and 17.76%, respectively, whereas with shorting post configuration, corresponding parameters are 3.502 dB, 55.88% and 17.27%. The simulation has been performed by using CST Microwave Studio, which is a commercially available electromagnetic simulator based on the method of finite difference time domain technique.

  7. Design, fabrication, test and delivery of a K-band antenna breadboard model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The results of a research effort to develop a Ku-Band single channel monopulse antenna with significant improvements in efficiency and bandwidth are reported. A single aperture, multimode horn, utilized in a near field Cassegrainian configuration, was the technique selected for achieving the desired efficiency and bandwidth performance. In order to provide wide polarization flexibility, a wire grid, space filter polarizer was developed. A solid state switching network with appropriate driving electronics provides the receive channel sum and difference signal interface with an existing Apollo type tracking electronics subsystem. A full scale breadboard model of the antenna was fabricated and tested. Performance of the model was well within the requirements and goals of the contract.

  8. A design of Si-based nanoplasmonic structure as an antenna and reception amplifier for visible light communication

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, J. H.; Lin, Z. Y.; Liu, P.; Yang, G. W.

    2014-10-21

    Visible light communication has been widely investigated due to its larger bandwidth and higher bit rate, and it can combine with the indoor illumination system that makes it more convenient to carry out. Receiving and processing the visible light signal on chip request for nanophotonics devices performing well. However, conventional optical device cannot be used for light-on-chip integration at subwavelength dimensions due to the diffraction limit. Herein, we propose a design of Si-based nanoplasmonic structure as an antenna and reception amplifier for visible light communication based on the interaction between Si nanoparticle and Au nanorod. This device integrates the unique scattering property of high-refractive index dielectric Si nanoparticles, whose scattering spectrum is dependent on the particle size, with the localized surface plasmon resonance of Au nanorod. We calculated the spectra collected by plane detector and near field distribution of nanostructure, and theoretically demonstrate that the proposed device can act as good receiver, amplifier and superlens during the visible light signal receiving and processing. Besides, unlike some other designs of nanoantenna devices focused less on how to detect the signals, our hybrid nanoantenna can realize the transfer between the scattering source and the detector effectively by Au nanorod waveguides. These findings suggest that the designed nanoplasmonic structure is expected to be used in on-chip nanophotonics as antenna, spectral splitter and demultiplexer for visible light communication.

  9. Effects of the L- to H-Mode Transition in BPX on a Recessed Coil Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, N. T.; Scharer, J. E.; Bettenhausen, M.

    1992-01-01

    We study the effects of a simulated L- to H-mode transition for the Proposed BPX (Burning Plasma Experiment) device on the coupling of a recessed coil antenna in the Ion Cylotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF). We use two computer codes: ANTIMP, a code we have developed which uses a Runge-Kutta method of solution, and a finite-element code developed by Brambilla, which we have modified to examine four-feed antenna coils. The radiation resistance is calculated for antenna parameters consistent with a design proposed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Both finite cavity size and finite phase velocity along the current straps are modelled. The plasma density is simulated using both piece-wise linear and parabolic profiles. For anticipated BPX values of the density gradient at the separatrix, the radiation resistance decreases by a factor of 2 to 3 during an L- to H-mode transition. A reduction in the value of the radiation resistance due to finite phase velocity can be minimized by using a four-feeder scheme.

  10. Electromagnetic approaches to wall characterization, wall mitigation, and antenna design for through-the-wall radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thajudeen, Christopher

    of ground reflections, and situations where they may be applied to the estimation of the parameters associated with an interior wall. It is demonstrated through extensive computer simulations and laboratory experiments that, by proper exploitation of the electromagnetic characteristics of walls, one can efficiently extract the constitutive parameters associated with unknown wall(s) as well as to characterize and image the intra-wall region. Additionally, it is possible, to a large extent, to remove the negative wall effects, such as shadowing and incorrect target localization, as well as to enhance the imaging and classification of targets behind walls. In addition to the discussion of post processing the radar data to account for wall effects, the design of antenna elements used for transmit (Tx) and receive (Rx) operations in TWR radars is also discussed but limited to antennas for mobile, handheld, or UAV TWR systems which impose design requirements such as low profiles, wide operational bands, and in most cases lend themselves to fabrication using surface printing techniques. A new class of wideband antennas, formed though the use of printed metallic paths in the form of Peano and Hilbert space-filling curves (SFC) to provide top-loading properties that miniaturize monopole antenna elements, has been developed for applications in conformal and/or low profile antennas systems, such as mobile platforms for TWRI and communication systems. Additionally, boresight gain enhancements of a stair-like antenna geometry, through the addition of parasitic self-similar patches and gate like ground plane structures, are presented.

  11. Apparatus and methods for packaging integrated circuit chips with antenna modules providing closed electromagnetic environment for integrated antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaucher, Brian P. (Inventor); Grzyb, Janusz (Inventor); Liu, Duixian (Inventor); Pfeiffer, Ullrich R. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Apparatus and methods are provided for packaging IC chips together with integrated antenna modules designed to provide a closed EM (electromagnetic) environment for antenna radiators, thereby allowing antennas to be designed independent from the packaging technology.

  12. 47 CFR 73.753 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.753 Section 73.753... International Broadcast Stations § 73.753 Antenna systems. All international broadcasting stations shall operate with directional antennas. Such antennas shall be designed and operated so that the radiated power...

  13. 47 CFR 73.753 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.753 Section 73.753... International Broadcast Stations § 73.753 Antenna systems. All international broadcasting stations shall operate with directional antennas. Such antennas shall be designed and operated so that the radiated power...

  14. 47 CFR 73.753 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.753 Section 73.753... International Broadcast Stations § 73.753 Antenna systems. All international broadcasting stations shall operate with directional antennas. Such antennas shall be designed and operated so that the radiated power...

  15. 47 CFR 73.753 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.753 Section 73.753... International Broadcast Stations § 73.753 Antenna systems. All international broadcasting stations shall operate with directional antennas. Such antennas shall be designed and operated so that the radiated power...

  16. 47 CFR 73.753 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.753 Section 73.753... International Broadcast Stations § 73.753 Antenna systems. All international broadcasting stations shall operate with directional antennas. Such antennas shall be designed and operated so that the radiated power...

  17. Strapping rowers to their sliding seat improves performance during the start of single-scull rowing.

    PubMed

    van Soest, A J Knoek; de Koning, H; Hofmijster, M J

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the effect of strapping rowers to their sliding seat on performance during 75 m on-water starting trials was investigated. Well-trained rowers performed 75 m maximum-effort starts using an instrumented single scull equipped with a redesigned sliding seat system, both under normal conditions and while strapped to the sliding seat. Strapping rowers to their sliding seat resulted in a 0.45 s lead after 75 m, corresponding to an increase in average boat velocity of about 2.5%. Corresponding effect sizes were large. No significant changes were observed in general stroke cycle characteristics. No indications of additional boat heaving and pitching under strapped conditions were found. The increase in boat velocity is estimated to correspond to an increase in average mechanical power output during the start of on-water rowing between 5% and 10%, which is substantial but smaller than the 12% increase found in a previous study on ergometer starting. We conclude that, after a very short period of adaptation to the strapped condition, single-scull starting performance is substantially improved when the rower is strapped to the sliding seat. PMID:26758804

  18. Satellite Antenna Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Through the Technology Affiliates Program at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the ACTS antenna system was transferred from experimental testing status to commercial development with KVH Industries, Inc. The ACTS design enables mobile satellite antennas to remain pointed at the satellite, regardless of the motion or vibration on which it is mounted. KVH's first product based on the ACTS design is a land-mobile satellite antenna system that will enable direct broadcast satellite television aboard moving trucks, recreational vehicles, trains, and buses. Future products could include use in broadcasting, emergency medical and military vehicles.

  19. A crucial role for the phosphorylation of STRAP at Ser(188) by MPK38 in STRAP-dependent cell death through ASK1, TGF-β, p53, and PI3K/PDK1 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Seong, Hyun-A; Manoharan, Ravi; Ha, Hyunjung

    2014-01-01

    Serine-threonine kinase receptor-associated protein (STRAP) is a TGF-β receptor-interacting protein that participates in the regulation of cell proliferation and cell death in response to various stresses. Here, we demonstrate that STRAP phosphorylation plays an important role in determining the pro- or anti-apoptotic function of STRAP. Murine protein serine/threonine kinase 38 (MPK38) phosphorylates STRAP at Ser(188) via direct interaction. Complex formation between STRAP and MPK38 is mediated by Cys(152) and Cys(270) of STRAP and Cys(339) and Cys(377) of MPK38, suggesting the redox dependency of this interaction. MPK38-mediated STRAP Ser(188) phosphorylation contributes to the pro-apoptotic function of STRAP by modulating key steps in STRAP-dependent ASK1, TGF-β, p53, and PI3K/PDK1 signaling pathways. Moreover, knockdown of endogenous MPK38 using an inducible MPK38 shRNA system and in vivo activation of MPK38 by treatment of HEK293 and STRAP-null MEF cells with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNCB), a specific inhibitor of Trx reductase, provide evidence that STRAP Ser(188) phosphorylation plays a key role in STRAP-dependent cell death. Adenoviral delivery of MPK38 in mice also demonstrates that STRAP Ser(188) phosphorylation in the liver is tightly associated with cell death and proliferation through ASK1, TGF-β, p53, and PI3K/PDK1 pathways, resulting in apoptotic cell death. PMID:25485581

  20. Deployable antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Dobbins, Justin A. (Inventor); Lin, Greg Y. (Inventor); Chu, Andrew W. (Inventor); Scully, Robert C. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A deployable antenna and method for using wherein the deployable antenna comprises a collapsible membrane having at least one radiating element for transmitting electromagnetic waves, receiving electromagnetic waves, or both.

  1. Design of antenna-coupled lumped-element titanium nitride KIDs for long-wavelength multi-band continuum imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, C.; Beyer, A.; Golwala, S.; Sayers, J.

    2014-07-01

    Many applications in cosmology and astrophysics at millimeter wavelengths — CMB polarization, studies of galaxy clusters using the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect, studies of star formation at high redshift and in our local universe and our galaxy— require large-format arrays of millimeter-wave detectors. Feedhorn, lens-coupled twinslot antenna, and phased-array antenna architectures for receiving mm-wave light present numerous advantages for control of systematics and for simultaneous coverage of both polarizations and/or multiple spectral bands. Simultaneously, kinetic inductance detectors using high-resistivity materials like titanium nitride are an attractive sensor option for large-format arrays because they are highly multiplexable and because their high responsivity can render two-level-system noise subdominant to photon and recombination noise. However, coupling the two is a challenge because of the impedance mismatch between the microstrip exiting these architectures and the high resistivity of titanium nitride. Mitigating direct absorption in the KID is also a challenge. We present a detailed titanium nitride KID design that addresses these challenges. The KID inductor is capacitively coupled to the microstrip in such a way as to form a lossy termination without creating an impedance mismatch. A parallelplate capacitor design mitigates direct absorption, uses hydrogenated amorphous silicon, and yields acceptable two-level-system noise. We show that an optimized design can yield expected sensitivities very close to the fundamental limit from photon and recombination noises for two relevant examples: single spectral band designs appropriate for 90 and 150 GHz for CMB polarization and a multi-spectral-band design that covers 90 GHz to 405 GHz in six bands for SZ effect studies.

  2. An optical nano-antenna system design for radio therapeutic use.

    PubMed

    Thammawongsa, N; Mitatha, S; Yupapin, P P

    2013-02-01

    This paper proposes a nano-antenna system using the optical spins generated by a PANDA ring resonator for radio therapeutic applications. Initially, the magnetic field is induced by the coupling effects between aluminium plate (Al) and TE and TM light modes. The generated electromagnetic wave radiation is controlled by a soliton power, coupling coefficients, and ring radii within the system, where finally the near field radio wave is transmitted to the required therapeutic target (neural cells). Simulation results have shown that the temperature within the range from 40°C to about 46°C can be controlled and achieved. PMID:22992006

  3. DSN 100-meter X and S band microwave antenna design and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, W. F.

    1978-01-01

    The RF performance is studied for large reflector antenna systems (100 meters) when using the high efficiency dual shaped reflector approach. An altered phase was considered so that the scattered field from a shaped surface could be used in the JPL efficiency program. A new dual band (X-S) microwave feed horn was used in the shaping calculations. A great many shaping calculations were made for various horn sizes and locations and final RF efficiencies are reported. A conclusion is reached that when using the new dual band horn, shaping should probably be performed using the pattern of the lower frequency

  4. Development and Testing of an Innovative Two-Arm Focal-Plane Thermal Strap (TAFTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urquiza, E.; Vasquez, C.; Rodriguez, J.; Van Gorp, B.

    2011-01-01

    Maintaining temperature stability in optical focal planes comes with the intrinsic challenge of creating a pathway that is both extremely flexible mechanically and highly conductive thermally. The task is further complicated because science-caliber optical focal planes are extremely delicate, yet their mechanical resiliency is rarely tested and documented. The mechanical engineer tasked with the thermo-mechanical design must then create a highly conductive thermal link that minimizes the tensile and shear stresses transmitted to the focal plane without design parameters on an acceptable stiffness. This paper will describe the development and testing of the thermal link developed for the Portable Remote Imaging Spectrometer (PRISM) instrument. It will provide experimentally determined mechanical stiffness plots in the three axes of interest. Analytical and experimental thermal conductance results for the two-arm focal-plane thermal strap (TAFTS), from cryogenic to room temperatures, are also presented. The paper also briefly describes some elements of the fabrication process followed in developing a novel design solution, which provides high conductance and symmetrical mechanical loading, while providing enhanced flexibility in all three degrees of freedom.

  5. Intelsat VI antenna system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, M. F.; Lane, S. O.; Taormina, F. A.

    The antenna system design of a series of five new communications satellites known as Intelsat VI is described in detail. Each satellite will utilize 50 transponders operating in the C and K band portions of the frequency spectrum. The transponders are interconnectible using either static switch matrices or a network which provides satellite switched time division multiple access capability. The antenna coverages, characteristics, and special design features are shown and discussed.

  6. Gimbals Drive and Control Electronics Design, Development and Testing of the LRO High Gain Antenna and Solar Array Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernyakov, Boris; Thakore, Kamal

    2010-01-01

    Launched June 18, 2009 on an Atlas V rocket, NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) is the first step in NASA's Vision for Space Exploration program and for a human return to the Moon. The spacecraft (SC) carries a wide variety of scientific instruments and provides an extraordinary opportunity to study the lunar landscape at resolutions and over time scales never achieved before. The spacecraft systems are designed to enable achievement of LRO's mission requirements. To that end, LRO's mechanical system employed two two-axis gimbal assemblies used to drive the deployment and articulation of the Solar Array System (SAS) and the High Gain Antenna System (HGAS). This paper describes the design, development, integration, and testing of Gimbal Control Electronics (GCE) and Actuators for both the HGAS and SAS systems, as well as flight testing during the on-orbit commissioning phase and lessons learned.

  7. Harvesting of electrical energy from a backpack using piezoelectric shoulder straps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodano, Henry A.; Granstrom, Jonathan; Feenstra, Joel; Farinholt, Kevin

    2007-04-01

    Over the past few decades the use of portable and wearable electronics has grown steadily. These devices are becoming increasingly more powerful, however, the gains that have been made in the device performance has resulted in the need for significantly higher power to operate the electronics. This issue has been further complicated due to the stagnate growth of battery technology over the past decade. In order to increase the life of these electronics, researchers have begun investigating methods of generating energy from ambient sources such that the life of the electronics can be prolonged. Recent developments in the field have led to the design of a number of mechanisms that can be used to generate electrical energy, from a variety of sources including thermal, solar, strain, inertia, etc. Many of these energy sources are available for use with humans, but their use must be carefully considered such that parasitic effects that could disrupt the user's gait or endurance are avoided. These issues have arisen from previous attempts to integrate power harvesting mechanisms into a shoe such that the energy released during a heal strike could be harvested. This study develops a novel energy harvesting backpack that can generate electrical energy from the differential forces between the wearer and the pack. The goal of this system is to make the energy harvesting device transparent to the wearer such that his or her endurance and dexterity is not compromised. This will be accomplished by replacing the traditional strap of the backpack with one made of the piezoelectric polymer polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF). Piezoelectric materials have a structure such that an applied electrical potential results in a mechanical strain. Conversely, an applied stress results in the generation of an electrical charge, which makes the material useful for power harvesting applications. PVDF is highly flexible and has a high strength allowing it to effectively act as the load bearing

  8. Wrap-rib antenna concept development overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, A. A., Jr.; Garcia, N. F.

    1983-01-01

    The wrap rib antenna design of a parabolic reflector large space antenna is discussed. Cost estimates, design/mission compatibility, deployment sequence, ground based tests, and fabrication are discussed.

  9. Analytic Model of Antenna Sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2008-11-01

    RF sheaths are generated on ICRF antennas whenever the launched fast wave also drives a slow wave, e.g. when the magnetic field is tilted (not perpendicular to the current straps). A new approach to sheath modeling was recently proposed in which the RF waves are computed using a modified boundary condition at the sheath surface to describe the plasma-sheath coupling. Here, we illustrate the use of the sheath BC for antenna sheaths by a model electromagnetic perturbation calculation, treating the B field tilt as a small parameter. Analytic expressions are obtained for the sheath voltage and the rf electric field parallel to B in both sheath and plasma regions, including the Child-Langmuir (self-consistency) constraint. It is shown that the plasma corrections to the sheath voltage (which screen the rf field) can be important. The simple vacuum-field sheath-voltage estimate is obtained as a limiting case. Implications for antenna codes such as TOPICA will be discussed. D.A. D'Ippolito and J.R. Myra, Phys. Plasmas 13, 102508 (2006). V. Lancellotti et al., Nucl. Fusion 46, S476 (2006).

  10. Full scale LANDSAT-D antenna pattern measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The design verification of the LANDSAT-D antenna subsystem is addressed. In particular, the analysis of the antenna radiation patterns utilizing a full scale mockup of the LANDSAT-D satellite is discussed. Test antennas included two S-Band shaped beam antennas, two S-Band omni unit radiators (to operate in array), a GPS antenna, an X-Band shaped beam antenna, and one S-Band high-gain parabolic antenna.

  11. Reconfigurable antenna pattern verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drexler, Jerome P. (Inventor); Becker, Robert C. (Inventor); Meyers, David W. (Inventor); Muldoon, Kelly P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of verifying programmable antenna configurations is disclosed. The method comprises selecting a desired antenna configuration from a plurality of antenna configuration patterns, with the selected antenna configuration forming at least one reconfigurable antenna from reconfigurable antenna array elements. The method validates the formation of the selected antenna configuration to determine antenna performance of the at least one reconfigurable antenna.

  12. A dual-band antenna feed design using a fundamental-mode coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Earl

    1992-03-01

    By means of a feed system that uses 0-dB directional couplers to inject 11- and 14 GHz fundamental mode signals into a 54-mm diameter circular waveguide, the present dual-feed system allows an earth station antenna to simultaneously operate in the 4/6 GHz and 11/14 GHz Intelsat bands. Since the 4/6 GHz signals can propagate through the Ku-band couplers with only minor perturbations, this approach permits the use of a simple C-band diplexing and polarization network that is low cost and compact, as well as adaptable for various applications. Attention is given to measured performance levels for this system; compatibility with Intelsat is demonstrated.

  13. Anatomical and Molecular Design of the Drosophila Antenna as a Flagellar Auditory Organ

    PubMed Central

    TODI, SOKOL V.; SHARMA, YASHODA; EBERL, DANIEL F.

    2007-01-01

    The molecular basis of hearing is less well understood than many other senses. However, recent studies in Drosophila have provided some important steps towards a molecular understanding of hearing. In this report, we summarize these findings and their implications on the relationship between hearing and touch. In Drosophila, hearing is accomplished by Johnston’s Organ, a chordotonal organ containing over 150 scolopidia within the second antennal segment. We will discuss anatomical features of the antenna and how they contribute to the function of this flagellar auditory receptor. The effects of several mutants, identified through mutagenesis screens or as homologues of vertebrate auditory genes, will be summarized. Based on evidence gathered from these studies, we propose a speculative model for how the chordotonal organ might function. PMID:15252880

  14. The design and synthesis of artificial photosynthetic antennas, reaction centres and membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, T A; Moore, A L; Gust, D

    2002-01-01

    Artificial antenna systems and reaction centres synthesized in our laboratory are used to illustrate that structural and thermodynamic factors controlling energy and electron transfer in these constructs can be modified to optimize performance. Artificial reaction centres have been incorporated into liposomal membranes where they convert light energy to vectorial redox potential. This redox potential drives a Mitchellian, quinone-based, proton-transporting redox loop that generates a Deltamu H(+) of ca. 4.4 kcal mol(-1) comprising DeltapH ca. 2.1 and Deltapsi ca. 70 mV. In liposomes containing CF(0)F(1)-ATP synthase, this system drives ATP synthesis against an ATP chemical potential similar to that observed in natural systems. PMID:12437888

  15. Deployable antenna phase A study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, J.; Bernstein, J.; Fischer, G.; Jacobson, G.; Kadar, I.; Marshall, R.; Pflugel, G.; Valentine, J.

    1979-01-01

    Applications for large deployable antennas were re-examined, flight demonstration objectives were defined, the flight article (antenna) was preliminarily designed, and the flight program and ground development program, including the support equipment, were defined for a proposed space transportation system flight experiment to demonstrate a large (50 to 200 meter) deployable antenna system. Tasks described include: (1) performance requirements analysis; (2) system design and definition; (3) orbital operations analysis; and (4) programmatic analysis.

  16. Antenna system for MSAT mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlsson, Ingmar; Patenaude, Yves; Stipelman, Leora

    1988-01-01

    Spar has evaluated and compared several antenna concepts for the North American Mobile Satellite. The paper describes some of the requirements and design considerations for the antennas and demonstrates the performance of antenna concepts that can meet them. Multiple beam reflector antennas are found to give best performance and much of the design effort has gone into the design of the primary feed radiators and beam forming networks to achieve efficient beams with good overlap and flexibility. Helices and cup dipole radiators have been breadboarded as feed element candidates and meausured results are presented. The studies and breadboard activities have made it possible to proceed with a flight program.

  17. Antenna pattern study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Warren

    1988-01-01

    Prediction of antenna radiation patterns has long been an important function in the design of command, communication, and tracking systems for rocket vehicles and spacecraft. An acceptable degree of assurance that a radio link will provide the required quality of data or certainty of correct command execution must be acquired by some means if the system is to be certified as reliable. Two methods have been used to perform this function: (1) Theoretical analysis, based on the known properties of basic antenna element types and their behavior in the presence of conductive structures of simple shape, and (2) Measurement of the patterns on scale models of the spacecraft or rocket vehicle on which the antenna is located. Both of these methods are ordinarily employed in the antenna design process.

  18. 47 CFR 73.316 - FM antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false FM antenna systems. 73.316 Section 73.316... Broadcast Stations § 73.316 FM antenna systems. (a) It shall be standard to employ horizontal polarization...) Directional antennas. A directional antenna is an antenna that is designed or altered for the purpose...

  19. Design, development and microwave inter-comparison of dual slot antenna configurations for localized hepatic tumor management.

    PubMed

    Zafa, J; Zafa, T; Zafa, H; Sharif, F

    2015-12-01

    Slot antennas are generally preferred for localized liver cancer treatment modalities due to desired radiation characteristics. An iterative thermal/microwave numerical routine is used to analyze regular and miniature slot antenna configurations at 5.8 GHz. A thermal/microwave solver determines the specific absorption rate to malignant tissues as a pre- processing step to compute microwave solution in terms of propagation wave number, return loss and insertion loss. The regular and miniature dual slots antenna geometries were then developed to estimate the return loss characteristics against antennas slot lengths at a constant frequency of 5.8 GHz. Results reveal that the regular geometry has return loss less than -5 dB as compared to <-25 dB return loss for miniature slot antenna configuration. Furthermore, 5.8 GHz antenna geometry provides physical size reduction up to 50 %, lower fabrication cost and is a better minimally invasive choice due to further packed thermal ablation spots. PMID:26467919

  20. A Mars Riometer: Antenna Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, Craig D.

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report on NASA Grant NAG5-9706. This project explored riometer (relative ionospheric opacity meter) antenna designs that would be practical for a Mars surface or balloon mission. The riometer is an important radio science instrument for terrestrial aeronomy investigations. The riometer measures absorption of cosmic radio waves by the overhead ionosphere. Studies have shown the instrument should work well on Mars, which has an appreciable daytime ionosphere. There has been concern that the required radio receiver antenna (with possibly a 10 meter scale size) would be too large or too difficult to deploy on Mars. This study addresses those concerns and presents several antenna designs and deployment options. It is found that a Mars balloon would provide an excellent platform for the riometer antenna. The antenna can be incorporated into the envelope design, allowing self-deployment of the antenna as the balloon inflates.

  1. Airway hyperresponsiveness with chest strapping: A matter of heterogeneity or reduced lung volume?

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, Riccardo; Pompilio, Pasquale P; Bruni, Giulia Innocenti; Scano, Giorgio; Crimi, Claudia; Biasco, Luigi; Coletta, Giuseppe; Cornara, Giuseppe; Torchio, Roberto; Brusasco, Vito; Dellacà, Raffaele L

    2009-03-31

    Chest wall strapping has been recently shown to be associated with an increase in airway responsiveness to methacholine. To investigate whether this is the result of the decreased lung volume or an increased heterogeneity due to chest wall distortion, ten healthy volunteers underwent a methacholine challenge at control conditions and after selective strapping of the rib cage, the abdomen or the whole chest wall resulting in similar decrements of functional residual capacity and total lung capacity but causing different distribution of the bronchoconstrictor. Methacholine during strapping reduced forced expiratory flow, dynamic compliance, and reactance at 5Hz and increased pulmonary resistance and respiratory resistance at 5Hz that were significantly greater than at control and associated with a blunted bronchodilator effect of the deep breath. However, no significant differences were observed between selective and total chest wall strapping, suggesting that the major mechanism for increasing airway responsiveness with chest wall strapping is the breathing at low lung volume rather than regional heterogeneities. PMID:19429518

  2. Design of a Deformed Flat Plate to Compensate the Gain Loss Due to the Gravity-Induced Surface Distortion of Large Reflector Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbriale, W.; Rengarajan, S.; Cramer, P., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a novel design of a deformed flat plate, wherein known amounts of distortion are introduced in a compensating flat plate, to recover the gain-loss due to the gravity-induced surface deformations of a large reflector antenna.

  3. The Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna ultra-high energy neutrino detector: Design, performance, and sensitivity for 2006-2007 balloon flight

    SciTech Connect

    Gorham, P. W.; Allison, P.; Barwick, S. W.; Beatty, J. J.; Besson, D. Z.; Binns, W. R.; Chen, C.; Chen, P.; Clem, J. M.; Connolly, A.; Dowkontt, P. F.; DuVernois, M. A.; Field, R. C.; Goldstein, D.; Goodhue, A.; Hast, C.; Hebert, C. L.; Hoover, S.; Israel, M. H.; Learned, J. G.

    2009-05-23

    In this article, we present a comprehensive report on the experimental details of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) long-duration balloon payload, including the design philosophy and realization, physics simulations, performance of the instrument during its first Antarctic flight completed in January of 2007, and expectations for the limiting neutrino detection sensitivity.

  4. System consideration, design approach and test of a low gain spherical coverage antenna for large space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, R. E.; Patterson, T. D.; Moreno, M. R.

    1975-01-01

    A fixed beam array antenna approach is proposed to meet the omnidirectional receiving and transmitting requirements of LST (Large Space Telescope). The proposed method uses an antenna of known performance and scales the size and frequency to conform with the LST 1/5-th scale model. The simplification that the approach provides over switching antenna elements on board the LST or switching from the ground by frequency diversity makes it worthy of consideration against the factors of performance, cost, reliability, and operations complexity. For LST applications, the system capabilities, requirements, and margins are summarized. The areas to be covered by further investigations into the proposed LST antenna are noted.

  5. E-Textile Antennas for Space Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Timothy F.; Fink, Patrick W.; Chu, Andrew W.

    2007-01-01

    The ability to integrate antennas and other radio frequency (RF) devices into wearable systems is increasingly important as wireless voice, video, and data sources become ubiquitous. Consumer applications including mobile computing, communications, and entertainment, as well as military and space applications for integration of biotelemetry, detailed tracking information and status of handheld tools, devices and on-body inventories are driving forces for research into wearable antennas and other e-textile devices. Operational conditions for military and space applications of wireless systems are often such that antennas are a limiting factor in wireless performance. The changing antenna platform, i.e. the dynamic wearer, can detune and alter the radiation characteristics of e-textile antennas, making antenna element selection and design challenging. Antenna designs and systems that offer moderate bandwidth, perform well with flexure, and are electronically reconfigurable are ideally suited to wearable applications. Several antennas, shown in Figure 1, have been created using a NASA-developed process for e-textiles that show promise in being integrated into a robust wireless system for space-based applications. Preliminary characterization of the antennas with flexure indicates that antenna performance can be maintained, and that a combination of antenna design and placement are useful in creating robust designs. Additionally, through utilization of modern smart antenna techniques, even greater flexibility can be achieved since antenna performance can be adjusted in real-time to compensate for the antenna s changing environment.

  6. Performance Enhancement of Space-Time Adaptive Processing for GPS and Microstrip Antenna Design Using Ferrite Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera-Albino, Alix

    Global Positioning System (GPS) is a navigation system widely used in civilian and military application, but its accuracy is highly impacted with consequential fading, and possible loss of communication due to multipath propagation and high power interferences. This dissertation proposes alternatives to improve the performance of the GPS receivers to obtain a system that can be reliable in critical situations. The basic performance of the GPS receiver consists of receiving the signal with an antenna array, delaying the signal at each antenna element, weighting the delayed replicas, and finally, combining the weighted replicas to estimate the desired signal. Based on these, three modifications are proposed to improve the performance of the system. The first proposed modification is the use of the Least Mean Squares (LMS) algorithm with two variations to decrease the convergence time of the classic LMS while achieving good system stability. The results obtained by the proposed LMS demonstrate that the algorithm can achieve the same stability as the classic LMS using a small step size, and its convergence rate is better than the classic LMS using a large step size. The second proposed modification is to replace the uniform distribution of the time delays (or taps) by an exponential distribution that decreases the bit-error rate (BER) of the system without impacting the computational efficiency of the uniform taps. The results show that, for a BER of 0.001, the system can operate with a 1 to 2 dB lower signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) when an exponential distribution is used rather than a uniform distribution. Finally, the third modification is implemented in the design of the antenna array. In this case, the gain of each microstrip element is enhanced by embedding ferrite rings in the substrate, creating a hybrid substrate. The ferrite rings generates constructive interference between the incident and reflected fields; consequently, the gain of a single microstrip element

  7. Pilot study of strap-based custom wheelchair seating system in persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, John E; Wittig, Becky L; Payette, Mark; Goldish, Gary D; Hansen, Andrew H

    2014-01-01

    Custom wheelchair seats can be used to help prevent pressure ulcers in individuals with spinal cord injury. In this study, a strap-based system was evaluated in three Veterans with spinal cord injury. Interface pressure distributions were measured after transfers, wheeling, and pressure relief maneuvers and after fittings by three different therapists. We found that pressure distribution measures were not generally affected after transfers and wheeling using the strap-based wheelchair and that pressure relief maneuvers were able to be performed. Additionally, all therapists were able to customize the wheelchair seat to clinically acceptable levels in 4 to 40 min for the three subjects. Future studies can test the long-term effects of using the strap-based wheelchair seat and identifying individuals that would most benefit from a rapidly customizable wheelchair seat. PMID:25626113

  8. Electronic switching spherical array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockton, R.

    1978-01-01

    This work was conducted to demonstrate the performance levels attainable with an ESSA (Electronic Switching Spherical Array) antenna by designing and testing an engineering model. The antenna was designed to satisfy general spacecraft environmental requirements and built to provide electronically commandable beam pointing capability throughout a hemisphere. Constant gain and beam shape throughout large volumetric coverage regions are the principle characteristics. The model is intended to be a prototype of a standard communications and data handling antenna for user scientific spacecraft with the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). Some additional testing was conducted to determine the feasibility of an integrated TDRSS and GPS (Global Positioning System) antenna system.

  9. Effect of antenna orientation and plasma anisotropy on the directivity of fast wave antenna radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlov, I.P.; Heikkinen, J.A.

    1995-10-01

    Asymmetry in the transverse wave number spectrum of the radiated power of a screenless fast wave antenna at an ion cyclotron range of frequencies is calculated with a model that takes into account the nonsymmetry of the plasma surface impedance matrix for an inhomogeneous tokamak plasma in front of the antenna. The directivity of the wave number spectrum transverse to the ambient magnetic field caused by the asymmetry in the surface impedance is found to be strongly asymmetric with respect to the parallel wave number by the effect of the nonperpendicular angle between the antenna current strap and the magnetic field. The latter is shown to be responsible also for the asymmetry in the parallel wave number spectrum of an undirected antenna, and can lead to deviations of order {le}30% in the corresponding spectrum of a phased antenna array with directivity. The consequences of the observed effects to the antenna performance in the current drive applications as well as in excitation of poloidally asymmetric spectra are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  10. Vehicle antenna development for mobile satellite applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, K.

    1988-01-01

    The paper summarizes results of a vehicle antenna program at JPL in support of a developing U.S. mobile satellite services (MSS) designed to provide telephone and data services for the continental United States. Two classes of circularly polarized vehicle antennas have been considered for the MSS: medium-gain, satellite-tracking antennas with 10-12-dBic gain; and low-gain, azimuthally omnidirectional antennas with 3-5-dBic gain. The design and performance of these antennas are described, and the two antennas are shown to have peculiar advantages and disadvantages.

  11. Measurement of rf voltages on the plasma-touching surfaces of ICRF antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.J.; Baity, F.W.; Bell, G.L.; Bigelow, T.S.; Caughman, J.B.O.; Goulding, R.H.; Haste, G.R.; Ryan, P.M.; Zhang, H.

    1995-09-01

    Measurements of the rf voltages on Faraday shields and protection bumpers have been made for several loop antennas, including the mock-up antenna and Al for JET, the original antenna for Tore Supra, the present ASDEX-U antenna, and the folded waveguide. The loop antennas show voltages that scale to {approx}12 kV for a maximum input voltage of 30 kV with 0/0 phasing. The voltages are dramatically reduced for 0/{pi} phasing. These voltages are significant in that they can substantially increase the rf sheath potential beyond the levels associated with the simple electromagnetic field linkage from the current straps that results in plasma heating. In this paper, we investigate and measure the source of these voltages, their scaling with antenna impedance, and the differences between the loop arrays.

  12. Measurement of rf voltages on the plasma-touching surfaces of ICRF antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.J.; Baity, F.W.; Bell, G.L.; Bigelow, T.S.; Caughman, J.B.; Goulding, R.H.; Haste, G.R.; Ryan, P.M.; Zhang, H.

    1996-02-01

    Measurements of the rf voltages on Faraday shields and protection bumpers have been made for several loop antennas, including the mock-up antenna and A1 for JET, the original antenna for Tore Supra, the present ASDEX-U antenna, and the folded waveguide. The loop antennas show voltages that scale to {approx_equal}12 kV for a maximum input voltage of 30 kV with 0/0 phasing. The voltages are dramatically reduced for 0/{pi} phasing. These voltages are significant in that they can substantially increase the rf sheath potential beyond the levels associated with the simple electromagnetic field linkage from the current straps that results in plasma heating. In this paper, we investigate and measure the source of these voltages, their scaling with antenna impedance, and the differences between the loop arrays. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Measurement of rf voltages on the plasma-touching surfaces of ICRF antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, D. J.; Baity, F. W.; Bell, G. L.; Bigelow, T. S.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Goulding, R. H.; Haste, G. R.; Ryan, P. M.; Zhang, H.

    1996-02-01

    Measurements of the rf voltages on Faraday shields and protection bumpers have been made for several loop antennas, including the mock-up antenna and A1 for JET, the original antenna for Tore Supra, the present ASDEX-U antenna, and the folded waveguide. The loop antennas show voltages that scale to ≊12 kV for a maximum input voltage of 30 kV with 0/0 phasing. The voltages are dramatically reduced for 0/π phasing. These voltages are significant in that they can substantially increase the rf sheath potential beyond the levels associated with the simple electromagnetic field linkage from the current straps that results in plasma heating. In this paper, we investigate and measure the source of these voltages, their scaling with antenna impedance, and the differences between the loop arrays.

  14. The Tore Supra ITER like ICRF antenna prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Vulliez, K.; Agarici, G.; Argouarch, A.; Beaumont, B.; Becoulet, A.; Berger-by, G.; Bosia, G.; Bremond, S.; Colas, L.; Lombard, G.; Millon, L.; Mollard, P.; Hoang, G. T.; Volpe, D.

    2007-09-28

    In the framework of the ICRH development led at CEA Cadarache, a project of a prototype antenna based on the electrical layout foreseen for the ITER IC launcher has been initiated. First experiments have been performed on Tore Supra in 2004. Pulses of 500 kW lasting up to 6s have been achieved. The importance of the coupling effect between straps has been revealed during these experiments, and thus the need for an active control system of the current phasing between them. Despite the short experimental campaign terminated by the failure of the matching components due to undetected arcs, the load tolerant properties of such a circuit have been observed.Since, the prototype antenna has been repaired, reassembled and enhanced accordingly to the fruitful lessons harvested. The RF circuit was improved, corona rings were added on the capacitor poles and localized 'sharp' edges were rounded to increase the voltage standoff capability. To reduce the toroidal coupling between adjacent straps, a thick poloidal septum was added on the Faraday screen, thus easing the tuning of the launcher. Another major improvement was the development and the integration of current probes on each of the four straps. This paper reports on: the launcher mechanical enhancements, the recent results obtained in 2007 and the experimental program planned on Tore Supra.

  15. Inflatable antenna for earth observing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong-Jian; Guan, Fu-ling; Xu, Yan; Yi, Min

    2010-09-01

    This paper describe mechanical design, dynamic analysis, and deployment demonstration of the antenna , and the photogrammetry detecting RMS of inflatable antenna surface, the possible errors results form the measurement are also analysed. Ticra's Grasp software are used to predict the inflatable antenna pattern based on the coordinates of the 460 points on the parabolic surface, the final results verified the whole design process.

  16. Electrically driven optical antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Johannes; Kullock, René; Prangsma, Jord; Emmerling, Monika; Kamp, Martin; Hecht, Bert

    2015-09-01

    Unlike radiowave antennas, so far optical nanoantennas cannot be fed by electrical generators. Instead, they are driven by light or indirectly via excited discrete states in active materials in their vicinity. Here we demonstrate the direct electrical driving of an in-plane optical antenna by the broadband quantum-shot noise of electrons tunnelling across its feed gap. The spectrum of the emitted photons is determined by the antenna geometry and can be tuned via the applied voltage. Moreover, the direction and polarization of the light emission are controlled by the antenna resonance, which also improves the external quantum efficiency by up to two orders of magnitude. The one-material planar design offers facile integration of electrical and optical circuits and thus represents a new paradigm for interfacing electrons and photons at the nanometre scale, for example for on-chip wireless communication and highly configurable electrically driven subwavelength photon sources.

  17. Using Shoulder Straps Decreases Heart Rate Variability and Salivary Cortisol Concentration in Swedish Ambulance Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Kåre J.; Niemelä, Patrik H.; Jonsson, Anders R.; Törnhage, Carl-Johan A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous research has shown that paramedics are exposed to risks in the form of injuries to the musculoskeletal system. In addition, there are studies showing that they are also at increased risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and psychiatric diseases, which can partly be explained by their constant exposure to stress. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether the use of shoulder straps decreases physical effort in the form of decreased heart rate and cortisol concentration. Methods A stretcher with a dummy was carried by 20 participants for 400 m on two occasions, one with and one without the shoulder straps. Heart rate was monitored continuously and cortisol samples were taken at intervals of 0 minutes, 15 minutes, 30 minutes, 45 minutes, and 60 minutes. Each participant was her or his own control. Results A significant decrease in heart rate and cortisol concentration was seen when shoulder straps were used. The median values for men (with shoulder straps) at 0 minutes was 78 bpm/21.1 nmol/L (heart rate/cortisol concentration), at 15 minutes was 85 bpm/16.9 nmol/L, and at 60 minutes was 76 bpm/15.7 nmol/L; for men without shoulder straps, these values were 78 bpm/21.9 nmol/L, 93 bpm/21.9 nmol/L, and 73 bpm/20.5 nmol/L. For women, the values were 85 bpm/23.3 nmol/L, 92 bpm/20.8 nmol/L, and 70 bpm/18.4 nmol/L and 84 bpm/32.4 nmol/L, 100 bpm/32.5 nmol/L, and 75 bpm/25.2 nmol/L, respectively. Conclusion The use of shoulder straps decreases measurable physical stress and should therefore be implemented when heavy equipment or a stretcher needs to be carried. An easy way to ensure that staff use these or similar lifting aids is to provide them with personalized, well-adapted shoulder straps. Another better option would be to routinely sewn these straps into the staff's personal alarm jackets so they are always in place and ready to be used. PMID:27014488

  18. Analysis of the phase control of the ITER ICRH antenna array. Influence on the load resilience and radiated power spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messiaen, A.; Swain, D.; Ongena, J.; Vervier, M.

    2015-12-01

    The paper analyses how the phasing of the ITER ICRH 24 strap array evolves from the power sources up to the strap currents of the antenna. The study of the phasing control and coherence through the feeding circuits with prematching and automatic matching and decoupling network is made by modeling starting from the TOPICA matrix of the antenna array for a low coupling plasma profile and for current drive phasing (worst case for mutual coupling effects). The main results of the analysis are: (i) the strap current amplitude is well controlled by the antinode Vmax amplitude of the feeding lines, (ii) the best toroidal phasing control is done by the adjustment of the mean phase of Vmax of each poloidal straps column, (iii) with well adjusted system the largest strap current phasing error is ±20°, (iv) the effect on load resilience remains well below the maximum affordable VSWR of the generators, (v) the effect on the radiated power spectrum versus k// computed by means of the coupling code ANTITER II remains small for the considered cases.

  19. Analysis of the phase control of the ITER ICRH antenna array. Influence on the load resilience and radiated power spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Messiaen, A. Ongena, J.; Vervier, M.; Swain, D.

    2015-12-10

    The paper analyses how the phasing of the ITER ICRH 24 strap array evolves from the power sources up to the strap currents of the antenna. The study of the phasing control and coherence through the feeding circuits with prematching and automatic matching and decoupling network is made by modeling starting from the TOPICA matrix of the antenna array for a low coupling plasma profile and for current drive phasing (worst case for mutual coupling effects). The main results of the analysis are: (i) the strap current amplitude is well controlled by the antinode V{sub max} amplitude of the feeding lines, (ii) the best toroidal phasing control is done by the adjustment of the mean phase of V{sub max} of each poloidal straps column, (iii) with well adjusted system the largest strap current phasing error is ±20°, (iv) the effect on load resilience remains well below the maximum affordable VSWR of the generators, (v) the effect on the radiated power spectrum versus k{sub //} computed by means of the coupling code ANTITER II remains small for the considered cases.

  20. Analysis of rectangular microstrip antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, M. C.; Deshpande, M. D.

    1984-01-01

    The problem of microstrip antennas covered by a dielectric substrate is formulated in terms of coupled integro-differential equations with the current distribution on the conducting patch as an unknown quantity. The Galerkin method is used to solve for the unknown patch current. Using the present formulation, the radiation pattern, the resonant frequency, and the bandwidth of a rectangular microstrip antenna are computed. Design data for a rectangular microstrip antenna are also presented.

  1. Co-Design Method and Wafer-Level Packaging Technique of Thin-Film Flexible Antenna and Silicon CMOS Rectifier Chips for Wireless-Powered Neural Interface Systems.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Kenji; Jeewan, Horagodage Prabhath; Yamagiwa, Shota; Kawano, Takeshi; Ishida, Makoto; Akita, Ippei

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a co-design method and a wafer-level packaging technique of a flexible antenna and a CMOS rectifier chip for use in a small-sized implantable system on the brain surface are proposed. The proposed co-design method optimizes the system architecture, and can help avoid the use of external matching components, resulting in the realization of a small-size system. In addition, the technique employed to assemble a silicon large-scale integration (LSI) chip on the very thin parylene film (5 μm) enables the integration of the rectifier circuits and the flexible antenna (rectenna). In the demonstration of wireless power transmission (WPT), the fabricated flexible rectenna achieved a maximum efficiency of 0.497% with a distance of 3 cm between antennas. In addition, WPT with radio waves allows a misalignment of 185% against antenna size, implying that the misalignment has a less effect on the WPT characteristics compared with electromagnetic induction. PMID:26694407

  2. Co-Design Method and Wafer-Level Packaging Technique of Thin-Film Flexible Antenna and Silicon CMOS Rectifier Chips for Wireless-Powered Neural Interface Systems

    PubMed Central

    Okabe, Kenji; Jeewan, Horagodage Prabhath; Yamagiwa, Shota; Kawano, Takeshi; Ishida, Makoto; Akita, Ippei

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a co-design method and a wafer-level packaging technique of a flexible antenna and a CMOS rectifier chip for use in a small-sized implantable system on the brain surface are proposed. The proposed co-design method optimizes the system architecture, and can help avoid the use of external matching components, resulting in the realization of a small-size system. In addition, the technique employed to assemble a silicon large-scale integration (LSI) chip on the very thin parylene film (5 μm) enables the integration of the rectifier circuits and the flexible antenna (rectenna). In the demonstration of wireless power transmission (WPT), the fabricated flexible rectenna achieved a maximum efficiency of 0.497% with a distance of 3 cm between antennas. In addition, WPT with radio waves allows a misalignment of 185% against antenna size, implying that the misalignment has a less effect on the WPT characteristics compared with electromagnetic induction. PMID:26694407

  3. Active antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, John F.

    1994-05-01

    An antenna, which may be a search coil, is connected to an operational amplifier circuit which provides negative impedances, each of which is in the order of magnitude of the positive impedances which characterize the antenna. The antenna is connected to the inverting input of the operational amplifier; a resistor is connected between the inverting input and the output of the operational amplifier; a capacitor-resistor network, in parallel, is connected between the output and the noninverting input of the operational amplifier; and a resistor is connected from the noninverting input and the circuit common. While this circuit provides a negative resistance and a negative inductance, in series, which appear, looking into the noninverting input of the operational amplifier, in parallel with the antenna, these negative impedances appear in a series loop with the antenna positive impedances, so as to algebraically add. This circuit is tuned by varying the various circuit components so that the negative impedances are very close, but somewhat less, in magnitude, to the antenna impedances. The result is to increase the sensitivity of the antenna by lowering its effective impedance. This, in turn, increases the effective area of the antenna, which may be broadband.

  4. Active antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, John F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An antenna, which may be a search coil, is connected to an operational amplifier circuit which provides negative impedances, each of which is in the order of magnitude of the positive impedances which characterize the antenna. The antenna is connected to the inverting input of the operational amplifier; a resistor is connected between the inverting input and the output of the operational amplifier; a capacitor-resistor network, in parallel, is connected between the output and the noninverting input of the operational amplifier; and a resistor is connected from the noninverting input and the circuit common. While this circuit provides a negative resistance and a negative inductance, in series, which appear, looking into the noninverting input of the operational amplifier, in parallel with the antenna, these negative impedances appear in a series loop with the antenna positive impedances, so as to algebraically add. This circuit is tuned by varying the various circuit components so that the negative impedances are very close, but somewhat less, in magnitude, to the antenna impedances. The result is to increase the sensitivity of the antenna by lowering its effective impedance. This, in turn, increases the effective area of the antenna, which may be broadband.

  5. A printed circuit cylindrical array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Ashok K.; Powell, Walter E.

    1986-11-01

    The design and performance of a Ku-band cylindrical antenna are described. The antenna is designed to provide a 360-deg azimuth coverage with 20-dB sidelobes and an operating bandwidth of 1 GHz (16.0-17.0 GHz). The antenna consists of 16 facets of 2 x 4 dipole arrays. The 360-deg coverage is obtained with a switch matrix network. The antenna elements and the feeding switch matrix network are printed on a single printed circuit board.

  6. Reduction of RF sheaths potentials by compensation or suppression of parallel RF currents on ICRF antennae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, A.; Colas, L.; Vulliez, K.; Argouarch, A.; Milanesio, D.

    2009-11-01

    Radio Frequency (RF) sheaths are suspected to limit the performance of present-day Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) antennae over long pulses and should be minimized in future Fusion devices. Within the simplest models, RF sheath effects are quantified by the integral VRF = ∫E//ṡdl where the parallel RF field E// is linked with the slow wave. On "long open field lines" with large toroidal extension on both sides of the antenna it was shown that VRF is excited by parallel RF currents j// flowing on the antenna structure. We thus propose two ways to reduce |VRF| by acting on j// on the antenna front face. The first method, more adapted for protruding antennae, consists in avoiding the j// circulation on the antenna structure, by slotting the antenna frame on its horizontal edges and by cutting partially the Faraday screen rods. The second method, well suited for recessed antennae, consists in compensating j// of opposite signs along long flux tubes, with parallelepiped antennae aligned with tilted flux tubes. The different concepts are assessed numerically on a 2-strap Tore Supra antenna phased [0, π] using near RF fields from the antenna code TOPICA. Simulations stress the need to suppress all current paths for j// to reduce substantially |VRF| over the whole antenna height.

  7. NASA technology for large space antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, R. A.; Campbell, T. G.; Freeland, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Technology developed by NASA in conjunction with industry for potential large, deployable space antennas with applications in communication, radio astronomy and earth observation is reviewed. Concepts for deployable antennas that have been developed to the point of detail design are summarized, including the advanced sunflower precision antenna, the radial rib antenna, the maypole (hoop/column) antenna and the parabolic erectable truss antenna. The assessment of state-of-the-art deployable antenna technology is discussed, and the approach taken by the NASA Large Space Systems Technology (LSST) Program to the development of technology for large space antenna systems is outlined. Finally, the further development of the wrap-rib antenna and the maypole (hoop/column) concept, which meet mission model requirements, to satisfy LSST size and frequency requirements is discussed.

  8. Microstrip antenna technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carver, K. R.; Mink, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    A survey of microstrip antenna elements is presented, with emphasis on theoretical and practical design techniques. Available substrate materials are reviewed along with the relation between dielectric constant tolerance and resonant frequency of microstrip patches. Several theoretical analysis techniques are summarized, including transmission-line and modal-expansion (cavity) techniques as well as numerical methods such as the method of moments and finite-element techniques. Practical procedures are given for both standard rectangular and circular patches, as well as variations on those designs including circularly polarized microstrip patches. The quality, bandwidth, and efficiency factors of typical patch designs are discussed. Microstrip dipole and conformal antennas are summarized. Finally, critical needs for further research and development for this antenna are identified.

  9. Large Deployable Reflectarray Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Houfei; Huang, John; Lou, Michael

    2006-01-01

    A report discusses a 7-meter-diameter reflectarray antenna that has been conceived in a continuing effort to develop large reflectarray antennas to be deployed in outer space. Major underlying concepts were reported in three prior NASA Tech Briefs articles: "Inflatable Reflectarray Antennas" (NPO-20433), Vol. 23, No. 10 (October 1999), page 50; "Tape-Spring Reinforcements for Inflatable Structural Tubes" (NPO-20615), Vol. 24, No. 7 (July 2000), page 58; and "Self-Inflatable/Self-Rigidizable Reflectarray Antenna" (NPO-30662), Vol. 28, No. 1 (January 2004), page 61. Like previous antennas in the series, the antenna now proposed would include a reflectarray membrane stretched flat on a frame of multiple inflatable booms. The membrane and booms would be rolled up and folded for compact stowage during transport. Deployment in outer space would be effected by inflating the booms to unroll and then to unfold the membrane, thereby stretching the membrane out flat to its full size. The membrane would achieve the flatness for a Ka-band application. The report gives considerable emphasis to designing the booms to rigidify themselves upon deployment: for this purpose, the booms could be made as spring-tape-reinforced aluminum laminate tubes like those described in two of the cited prior articles.

  10. Antenna Calibration and Measurement Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochblatt, David J.; Cortes, Manuel Vazquez

    2012-01-01

    A document describes the Antenna Calibration & Measurement Equipment (ACME) system that will provide the Deep Space Network (DSN) with instrumentation enabling a trained RF engineer at each complex to perform antenna calibration measurements and to generate antenna calibration data. This data includes continuous-scan auto-bore-based data acquisition with all-sky data gathering in support of 4th order pointing model generation requirements. Other data includes antenna subreflector focus, system noise temperature and tipping curves, antenna efficiency, reports system linearity, and instrument calibration. The ACME system design is based on the on-the-fly (OTF) mapping technique and architecture. ACME has contributed to the improved RF performance of the DSN by approximately a factor of two. It improved the pointing performances of the DSN antennas and productivity of its personnel and calibration engineers.

  11. Systems analysis for DSN microwave antenna holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochblatt, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    Proposed systems for Deep Space Network (DSN) microwave antenna holography are analyzed. Microwave holography, as applied to antennas, is a technique which utilizes the Fourier Transform relation between the complex far-field radiation pattern of an antenna and the complex aperture field distribution to provide a methodology for the analysis and evaluation of antenna performance. Resulting aperture phase and amplitude distribution data are used to precisely characterize various crucial performance parameters, including panel alignment, subreflector position, antenna aperture illumination, directivity at various frequencies, and gravity deformation. Microwave holographic analysis provides diagnostic capacity as well as being a powerful tool for evaluating antenna design specifications and their corresponding theoretical models.

  12. Broadband monopole optical nano-antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Rongguo; Ding, Jun; Arigong, Bayaner; Lin, Yuankun; Zhang, Hualiang

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, a novel design of broadband monopole optical nano-antennas is proposed. It consists of a corrugated halfelliptical patch inside an elliptical aperture. Full-wave electromagnetic simulations have been used to investigate the performance of the nano-antenna. The predicted performance of the proposed monopole nano-antenna is remarkably broadband. Moreover, the proposed broadband nano-antenna can respond to light waves with different polarizations. The proposed optical antenna will pave the way towards the development of high performance optical antennas and optical systems.

  13. Electromyographic Control of a Hands-Free Electrolarynx Using Neck Strap Muscles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubert, Heather L.; Stepp, Cara E.; Zeitels, Steven M.; Gooey, John E.; Walsh, Michael J.; Prakash, S. R.; Hillman, Robert E.; Heaton, James T.

    2009-01-01

    Three individuals with total laryngectomy were studied for their ability to control a hands-free electrolarynx (EL) using neck surface electromyography (EMG) for on/off and pitch modulation. The laryngectomy surgery of participants was modified to preserve neck strap musculature for EMG-based EL control (EMG-EL), with muscles on one side…

  14. Kinematics and Kinetics of Multiple Sets Using Lifting Straps During Deadlift Training.

    PubMed

    Coswig, Victor S; Machado Freitas, Diogo Felipe; Gentil, Paulo; Fukuda, David H; Del Vecchio, Fabrício Boscolo

    2015-12-01

    The deadlift is a fundamental exercise used in the development of whole body strength and a common element in resistance training programs for all levels. However, many practitioners report the fatigue of forearm muscles and possibly a lack of grip strength as obstacles to exercise performance, which may lead to the use of ergogenic aids, such as lifting straps. The objective of this study was to evaluate kinematic variables during the execution of multiple sets of deadlift with (WS) and without (NS) lifting straps. Eleven subjects (25 ± 3.3 years) with an average of 4 ± 2.6 years of resistance training experience were enrolled in the study. After the 1 repetition maximum (1RM) test WS and NS, subjects performed separate trials of 3 sets to failure at 90% of 1RM in a counterbalanced fashion. With straps resulted in lower speed (0 to -25%) (-3 to -10%) and greater force (20-28%) and duration (concentric phase: 0-13%) when compared with NS. Therefore, it is concluded that the use of straps directly influences exercise performance that requires manual grip strength, increasing the amount of work performed by the target muscles. PMID:26595133

  15. 29 CFR 1926.959 - Lineman's body belts, safety straps, and lanyards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lineman's body belts, safety straps, and lanyards. 1926.959 Section 1926.959 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Power Transmission and Distribution § 1926.959...

  16. Satellite communication antenna technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittra, R. (Editor); Imbriale, W. A. (Editor); Maanders, E. J. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    A general overview of current technology in the field of communication satellite antennas is presented. Among the topics discussed are: the design of multiple beam systems; frequency reuse; and polarization control of antenna measurements. Consideration is also given to: contour beam synthesis; dual shaped reflector synthesis; beam shaping; and offset reflector design. The applications of the above technologies to present and future generations of communications satellites is considered, with emphasis given to such systems as: the Intelsats; the Defense Satellite Communications System, (DSCS-III); Satellite Business System (SBS), and Comstar.

  17. Design and Application of Wuhan Ionospheric Oblique Backscattering Sounding System with the Addition of an Antenna Array (WIOBSS-AA)

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiao; Chen, Gang; Wang, Jin; Song, Huan; Gong, Wanlin

    2016-01-01

    The Wuhan Ionospheric Oblique Backscattering Sounding System with the addition of an antenna array (WIOBSS-AA) is the newest member of the WIOBSS family. It is a multi-channel radio system using phased-array antenna technology. The transmitting part of this radio system applies an array composed of five log-periodic antennas to form five beams that span an area to the northwest of the radar site. The hardware and the antenna array of the first multi-channel ionosonde in the WIOBSS family are introduced in detail in this paper. An ionospheric detection experiment was carried out in Chongyang, Hubei province, China on 16 March 2015 to examine the performance of WIOBSS-AA. The radio system demonstrated its ability to obtain ionospheric electron density information over a wide area. The observations indicate that during the experiment, the monitored large-area ionospheric F2-layer was calm and electron density increased with decreasing latitude. PMID:27314360

  18. Design and Application of Wuhan Ionospheric Oblique Backscattering Sounding System with the Addition of an Antenna Array (WIOBSS-AA).

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiao; Chen, Gang; Wang, Jin; Song, Huan; Gong, Wanlin

    2016-01-01

    The Wuhan Ionospheric Oblique Backscattering Sounding System with the addition of an antenna array (WIOBSS-AA) is the newest member of the WIOBSS family. It is a multi-channel radio system using phased-array antenna technology. The transmitting part of this radio system applies an array composed of five log-periodic antennas to form five beams that span an area to the northwest of the radar site. The hardware and the antenna array of the first multi-channel ionosonde in the WIOBSS family are introduced in detail in this paper. An ionospheric detection experiment was carried out in Chongyang, Hubei province, China on 16 March 2015 to examine the performance of WIOBSS-AA. The radio system demonstrated its ability to obtain ionospheric electron density information over a wide area. The observations indicate that during the experiment, the monitored large-area ionospheric F2-layer was calm and electron density increased with decreasing latitude. PMID:27314360

  19. Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System user impact and network compatibility study. [antenna design and telecommunication links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The report contains data on antenna configurations for the low data rate users of the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). It treats the coverage and mutual visibility considerations between the user satellites and the relay satellites and relates these considerations to requirements of antenna beamwidth and fractional user orbital coverage. A final section includes user/TDRS telecommunication link budgets and forward and return link data rate tradeoffs.

  20. 47 CFR 15.203 - Antenna requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna requirement. 15.203 Section 15.203... Antenna requirement. An intentional radiator shall be designed to ensure that no antenna other than that furnished by the responsible party shall be used with the device. The use of a permanently attached...

  1. 47 CFR 15.203 - Antenna requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna requirement. 15.203 Section 15.203... Antenna requirement. An intentional radiator shall be designed to ensure that no antenna other than that furnished by the responsible party shall be used with the device. The use of a permanently attached...

  2. 47 CFR 15.203 - Antenna requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna requirement. 15.203 Section 15.203... Antenna requirement. An intentional radiator shall be designed to ensure that no antenna other than that furnished by the responsible party shall be used with the device. The use of a permanently attached...

  3. 47 CFR 15.203 - Antenna requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna requirement. 15.203 Section 15.203... Antenna requirement. An intentional radiator shall be designed to ensure that no antenna other than that furnished by the responsible party shall be used with the device. The use of a permanently attached...

  4. 47 CFR 15.203 - Antenna requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna requirement. 15.203 Section 15.203... Antenna requirement. An intentional radiator shall be designed to ensure that no antenna other than that furnished by the responsible party shall be used with the device. The use of a permanently attached...

  5. Antenna Construction and Propagation of Radio Waves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    Developed as part of the Marine Corps Institute (MCI) correspondence training program, this course on antenna construction and propagation of radio waves is designed to provide communicators with instructions in the selection and/or construction of the proper antenna(s) for use with current field radio equipment. Introductory materials include…

  6. Launching large antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandli, H. W.

    1983-09-01

    Large antennas will provide communication to rural and remote areas in times of need. This is seen as facilitating the work of law enforcement agencies. All mobile radio communications will enjoy advantages in distances covered and information relayed owing to the large number of beams possible from super radio transmitters in space. If the antennas are placed in low-earth orbit, advantages will be realized in the remote sensing of the earth's resources. It is pointed out that with umbrella or bicyclelike antennas turned outward toward space, the universe could be scouted for signals from intelligent life. Various concepts that have been put forward by U.S. companies are described. These include the radial rib, wrap rib, and parabolic erectable truss designs. Others are the mesh hoop column collapsable umbrella made of gold and molybdenum and the maypole design.

  7. Computer aided modelling/compensator design for a flexible space antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, J. S.; Mingori, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    Controller design algorithms are developed to produce simultaneously both a model of the plant and a compensator. The size of the model and properties of the compensator are driven by the performance requirements, the disturbance environment, and the location, number and type of sensors and actuators. The procedure is based on linear optimal control theory for distributed systems, and balanced realization theory is used to guide the development of the model and reduce the order of the compensator.

  8. Preliminary design of 19-element feed cluster for a large F/D reflector antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    The design of a low sidelobe 19 element microstrip cluster and its distribution network is described. The problem of spillover illumination of an adjacent reflector in a multiple aperture reflector system is addressed. A practical implementation of the array is presented which requires only one printed circuit board for the distribution network with the potential for being easily tailored to a wide range of excitation distributions.

  9. The mechanical design of a high-power, dual frequency, millimeter-wave antenna feed system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldovan, N.

    1984-03-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design and fabrication of a high power, dual-frequency, millimeter-wave feed system. The feed system consists of a 35 GHz circularly polarized monopulse subsystem and a 95 GHz circularly polarized feed. The 35 GHz feed is designed to handle 5.0 kW average and 50 kW peak power and the 95 GHz 1.2 kW average and 12 kW peak power. A Frequency Selective Surface (FSS) is incorporated to provide dual frequency capability. Each feed is liquid cooled to provide suitable cooling during high power operation. The two feeds and FSS assembly are mounted in a supporting space frame to provide an optically integral assembly ready to be mounted at the vertex of a reflector. The paper addresses three main areas: the general feed design, which includes the manufacturing processes, flange considerations and waveguide cooling; the FSS fabrication; and beam alignment for both the primary and secondary field.

  10. Does p49/STRAP, a SRF-binding protein (SRFBP1), modulate cardiac mitochondrial function in aging?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Williams, Emmanuel D; Azhar, Gohar; Rogers, Steven C; Wei, Jeanne Y

    2016-09-01

    p49/STRAP (SRFBP1) is a transcriptional regulator that has been implicated in cardiac aging. p49/STRAP has a SRF binding domain and a BUD22 domain (which modulates cellular growth rate and cell size). We have observed that p49/STRAP alters the intracellular NAD/NADH ratio and induces protein deacetylation. Here we report that p49/STRAP overexpression caused the deacetylation of histone H4 on lysine 16 (H4K16) and suppressed the expression of PGC-1α as well as mitofusin-1 and mitofusin-2 at both the mRNA and protein levels. P49/STRAP also reduced mitochondrial size, mitochondrial membrane potential and the mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate. We noted that P49/STRAP expression was increased in the old versus young adult mouse hearts and also increased with advancing population doubling levels in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). It is therefore very plausible that increased expression of p49/STRAP in late life may alter the status of histone acetylation and impact mitochondrial dynamics and thereby reduce mitochondrial function and cardiac performance during mammalian senescence. PMID:27337995

  11. Novel role of STRAP in progression and metastasis of colorectal cancer through Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Guandou; Zhang, Bixiang; Yang, Shanzhong; Jin, Lin; Datta, Arunima; Bae, Sejong; Chen, Xiaoping; Datta, Pran K

    2016-01-01

    Serine-Threonine Kinase Receptor-Associated Protein (STRAP) interacts with a variety of proteins and influences a wide range of cellular processes. Aberrant activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been implicated in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). Here, we show the molecular mechanism by which STRAP induces CRC metastasis by promoting β-catenin signaling through its stabilization. We have genetically engineered a series of murine and human CRC and lung cancer cell lines to investigate the effects of STRAP on cell migration and invasion in vitro, and on tumorigenicity and metastasis in vivo. Downregulation of STRAP inhibits invasion, tumorigenicity, and metastasis of CRC cells. Mechanistically, STRAP binds with GSK-3β and reduces the phosphorylation, ubiquitylation, and degradation of β-catenin through preventing its binding to the destruction complex. This leads to an inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and reduction in the expression of downstream targets, such as Cyclin D1, matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9, and ß-TrCP. In human CRC specimens, higher STRAP expression correlates significantly with β-catenin expression with increased nuclear levels (R =0.696, p < .0001, n =128). Together, these results suggest that STRAP increases invasion and metastasis of CRC partly through inhibiting ubiquitin-dependent degradation of β-catenin and promoting Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:26910283

  12. Effect of Upper Strap Downward Displacement on N95 Filtering Facepiece Respirator Fit Factors: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Roberge, Raymond J.; Palmiero, Andrew J.; Liu, Yuewei; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Zhuang, Ziqing

    2015-01-01

    Fifteen subjects underwent three replicates of quantitative respirator fit-testing with N95 filtering facepiece respirators that were donned with the upper strap high on the occiput, as per the manufacturers’ donning instructions. Each fit-test was immediately followed by repeat fit-testing with the upper strap downwardly displaced to the level of the ear sulcus to determine any change in fit factors that might occur with upper strap downward slippage. A total of 35/45 (78%) initial fit-tests had a passing score (fit factor ≥100) with the top strap high on the occiput and 33/35 (94%) of these passed subsequent fit-testing after the top strap was displaced downward to the ear sulcus. Geometric mean fit factors for the initial passed fit-tests, and following downward strap displacement, were 217±1.6 and 207±1.9, respectively (p = 0.64). Downward displacement of the top strap did not significantly impact fit factors of N95 FFRs that had previously passed fit-testing. PMID:24274974

  13. Telecommunications Antennas for the Juno Mission to Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vacchione, Joseph D.; Kruid, Ronald C.; Prata, Aluizio, Jr.; Amaro, Luis R.; Mittskus, Anthony P.

    2012-01-01

    The Juno Mission to Jupiter requires a full sphere of coverage throughout its cruise to and mission at Jupiter. This coverage is accommodated through the use of five (5) antennas; forward facing low gain, medium gain, and high gain antennas, and an aft facing low gain antenna along with an aft mounted low gain antenna with a torus shaped antenna pattern. Three of the antennas (the forward low and medium gain antennas) are classical designs that have been employed on several prior NASA missions. Two of the antennas employ new technology developed to meet the Juno mission requirements. The new technology developed for the low gain with torus shaped radiation pattern represents a significant evolution of the bicone antenna. The high gain antenna employs a specialized surface shaping designed to broaden the antenna's main beam at Ka-band to ease the requirements on the spacecraft's attitude control system.

  14. An Overview of NASA Glenn Research Center's Antenna R&D and Technology Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of antenna research and design efforts being performed at NASA's Glenn Research Center. The following type of antenna research projects are discussed: phased array antennas, thin film ferroelectric reflectarray antenna, microelectromechanical systems (MEMs) based antennas and multi-beam antennas. Project overviews, design issues and research problems for each type of antenna system are covered. Additional topics reviewed included: communication systems of the future and a facility description.

  15. Low profile antennas for MSAT applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafai, L.; Moheb, H.; Chamma, W.; Barakat, M.

    1995-01-01

    For MSAT applications, a number of different antennas have been designed and investigated. They include low gain omnidirectional antennas and medium gain to high gain directional antennas. The latter include both portable and vehicular antennas. While portable units are desirable to be low profile and low cost, the vehicular antennas have proved to be the most challenging antenna types for the mobile satellite application. The results of our efforts in design of such antennas are described briefly. Low profile designs are emphasized in most cases, and microstrip type radiators are therefore selected. The single radiator provides low gain omnidirectional patterns and is optimized for low cost applications. It provides low gains around 2-6 dBic and is useful mostly for the data transmission. Medium to high gain antennas are developed as arrays of omnidirectional elements. Again, different designs are optimized to meet the needs of different applications. For portable units, the array configuration can be flexible and is optimized for maximum broadside gains. For vehicular units, however the configurations are desirable to be low profile, or compact, and have means for scanning the antenna beam. For simplicity, fixed beam antennas with mechanical beam scan are selected. For these antennas, as well, different designs, having low profile or compact size, are selected and optimized to meet the MSAT gain and G/T requirements.

  16. Initial Testing of Optical Arc Detector Inside 285/300 Fast Wave Antenna Box on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Diem, Stephanie J; Fehling, Dan T; Hillis, Donald Lee; Horton, Anthony R; Unterberg, E. A.; Nagy, A.; Pinsker, R.

    2013-01-01

    Locating arcs within the fast wave current drive system is necessary to improve antenna performance and coupling to the plasma. Previously, there had been no way to observe arcs inside the vacuum vessel in an ICRF antenna on DIII-D. A new diagnostic that uses photomultiplier tubes has been installed for the 2012 run campaign on the 285/300 antenna of the fast wave system. The diagnostic has top and bottom views of the back of the four antenna straps and uses narrow-bandpass visible filters to isolate emission lines of copper (577 nm) and deuterium (656.1 nm). This diagnostic is based on the ORNL filterscope system currently in use on multiple devices. The system will be used to guide fast wave antenna conditioning, plasma operation and provide insight into future antenna upgrades on DIII-D.

  17. Imaging antenna arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, D. B.; Muha, M. S.

    1982-01-01

    Many millimeter and far-infrared imaging systems are limited in sensitivity and speed because they depend on a single scanned element. Because of recent advances in planar detectors such as Schottky diodes, superconducting tunnel junctions, and microbolometers, an attractive approach to this problem is a planar antenna array with integrated detectors. A planar line antenna array and optical system for imaging has been developed. The significant advances are a 'reverse-microscope' optical configuration and a modified bow-tie antenna design. In the 'reverse-microscope' configuration, a lens is attached to the bottom of the substrate containing the antennas. Imaging is done through the substrate. This configuration eliminates the troublesome effects of substrate surface waves. The substrate lens has only a single refracting surface, making possible a virtually aplanatic system, with little spherical aberration or coma. The array is characterized by an optical transfer function that is easily measured. An array with 19 dB crosstalk levels between adjacent antennas has been tested and it was found that the array captured 50 percent of the available power. This imaging system was diffraction limited.

  18. Cup Cylindrical Waveguide Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.; Darby, William G.; Kory, Carol L.; Lambert, Kevin M.; Breen, Daniel P.

    2008-01-01

    The cup cylindrical waveguide antenna (CCWA) is a short backfire microwave antenna capable of simultaneously supporting the transmission or reception of two distinct signals having opposite circular polarizations. Short backfire antennas are widely used in mobile/satellite communications, tracking, telemetry, and wireless local area networks because of their compactness and excellent radiation characteristics. A typical prior short backfire antenna contains a half-wavelength dipole excitation element for linear polarization or crossed half-wavelength dipole elements for circular polarization. In order to achieve simultaneous dual circular polarization, it would be necessary to integrate, into the antenna feed structure, a network of hybrid components, which would introduce significant losses. The CCWA embodies an alternate approach that entails relatively low losses and affords the additional advantage of compactness. The CCWA includes a circular cylindrical cup, a circular disk subreflector, and a circular waveguide that serves as the excitation element. The components that make it possible to obtain simultaneous dual circular polarization are integrated into the circular waveguide. These components are a sixpost polarizer and an orthomode transducer (OMT) with two orthogonal coaxial ports. The overall length of the OMT and polarizer (for the nominal middle design frequency of 2.25 GHz) is about 11 in. (approximately equal to 28 cm), whereas the length of a commercially available OMT and polarizer for the same frequency is about 32 in. (approximately equal to 81 cm).

  19. Novel Design of a High-gain and Wideband Fabry-Pérot Cavity Antenna Using a Tapered AMC Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Junho; Kim, Dongho

    2009-03-01

    A high-gain and wideband electromagnetic bandgap (EBG) resonator antenna with a tapered artificial magnetic conductor (AMC) ground plane is presented. The proposed EBG resonator antenna is comprised of a frequency selective surface (FSS) superstrate with a strip dipole array and an AMC ground plane with tapered rectangular patches. The realized gain and the bandwidth of the antenna can be improved simultaneously by using the tapered AMC where the phase difference of the reflected waves from the patches with different length is within 180° and the destructive interference among them can be considerably reduced. The maximum gain is increased about 2˜3 dB and the bandwidth is improved about 2.5 times compared to when the uniform AMC is used.

  20. Aerogel-Based Antennas for Aerospace and Terrestrial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann (Inventor); Miranda, Felix (Inventor); Van Keuls, Frederick (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Systems and methods for lightweight, customizable antenna with improved performance and mechanical properties are disclosed. In some aspects, aerogels can be used, for example, as a substrate for antenna fabrication. The reduced weight and expense, as well as the increased ability to adapt antenna designs, permits a systems to mitigate a variety of burdens associated with antennas while providing added benefits.