Science.gov

Sample records for antenna theory

  1. Antenna theory and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzman, W. L.; Thiele, G. A.

    Antenna fundamentals and definitions are examined, taking into account electromagnetic fundamentals, the solution of Maxwell's equations for radiation problems, the ideal dipole, the radiation pattern, directivity and gain, reciprocity and antenna pattern measurements, antenna impedance and radiation efficiency, antenna polarization, antennas in communication links and radar, and the receiving properties of antennas. Some simple radiating systems are considered along with arrays, line sources, wire antennas, broadband antennas, moment methods, and aperture antennas. High-frequency methods and aspects of antenna synthesis are discussed, giving attention to geometrical optics, physical optics, wedge diffraction theory, the ray-fixed coordinate system, the cylindrical parabolic antenna, and linear array methods.

  2. Microstrip antenna theory and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, J. R.; Hall, P. S.; Wood, C.

    Microstrip is the name given to a type of open waveguiding structure which is now commonly used in present-day electronics, not only as a transmission line but for circuit components such as filters, couplers, and resonators. The idea of using microstrip to construct antennas is a much more recent development. The purpose of this monograph is to present the reader with an appreciation of useful antenna design approaches and the overall state-of-the art situation. Flat-plate antenna techniques and constraints on performance are considered along with microstrip design equations and data, the radiation mechanism of an open-circuit microstrip termination and the resulting design implications, the basic methods of calculation and design of patch antennas, and linear array techniques. Attention is also given to techniques and design limitations in two-dimensional arrays, circular polarization techniques, manufacturing and operational problems of microstrip antennas, recent advances in microstrip antenna analysis, and possible future developments.

  3. Plasmas as Antennas - Theory, Experiment and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borg, Gerard

    1999-11-01

    A variety of antennas are employed in telecommunications and radar systems. Some applications pose special problems. Large structures are easily detected by hostile radar. The performance of multi-element HF-VHF arrays is complicated by mutual coupling between large radiating elements. High speed data communications and radar can be limited by signal decay and ringing. A novel solution is an antenna made of plasma that can be made to disappear on microsecond time scales. Recent experiments at the Australian National University (G.G. Borg et. al. App. Phys. Letts. Vol. 74, 3272-3274 [1999]), have shown that highly efficient (25 - 50radiating elements for the range 3 - 300 MHz can be formed using low power (10 - 50 W average) plasma surface waves launched at one end of a tube containing a suitable gas. Only a single capacitive coupler is needed to launch the waves - there is no electrical connection to the other end of the tube. The regimes of wave propagation correlate with expectations from plasma surface wave theory. Actual communications experiments have shown that these plasma antennas can have surprisingly low noise provided they are excited by the rf surface waves and not by a low frequency or DC ohmic current. Applications to HF-VHF communications and radar are being developed. These include both single ruggedised plasma elements and multi-element arrays.

  4. Theory and Practice in ICRF Antennas for Long Pulse Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Colas, L.; Bremond, S.; Mitteau, R.; Chantant, M.; Goniche, M.; Basiuk, V.; Bosia, G.; Gunn, J.P.

    2005-09-26

    Long plasma discharges on the Tore Supra (TS) tokamak were extended in 2004 towards higher powers and plasma densities by combined Lower Hybrid (LH) and Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) waves. RF pulses of 20sx8MW and 60sx4MW were produced. TS is equipped with 3 ICRF antennas, whose front faces are ready for CW operation. This paper reports on their behaviour over high power long pulses, as observed with infrared (IR) thermography and calorimetric measurements. Edge parasitic losses, although modest, are concentrated on a small surface and can raise surface temperatures close to operational limits. A complex hot spot pattern was revealed with at least 3 physical processes involved : convected power, electron acceleration in the LH near field, and a RF-specific phenomenon compatible with RF sheaths. LH coupling was also perturbed in the antenna shadow. This was attributed to RF-induced DC ExB0 convection. This motivated sheath modelling in two directions. First, the 2D topology of RF potentials was investigated in relation with the RF current distribution over the antenna, via a Green's function formalism and full-wave calculation using the ICANT code. In front of phased arrays of straps, convective cells were interpreted using the RF current profiles of strip line theory. Another class of convective cells, specific to antenna box corners, was evidenced for the first time. Within 1D sheath models assuming independent flux tubes, RF and rectified DC potentials are proportional. 2D fluid models couple nearby flux tubes via transverse polarisation currents. Unexpectedly this does not necessarily smooth RF potential maps. Peak DC potentials can even be enhanced. The experience gained on TS and the numerical tools are valuable for designing steady state high power antennas for next step devices. General rules to reduce RF potentials as well as concrete design options are discussed.

  5. Printed antennas: from theory to praxis, challenges and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zichner, R.; Baumann, R. R.

    2013-07-01

    Miniaturized, highly integrated wireless communication systems are used in many fields like logistics and mobile communications. Often multiple antenna structures are integrated in a single product. To achieve such a high level of integration the antenna structures are manufactured e.g. from flexible boards or via LDS (laser direct structuring) which allows the production of complex monopole or dipole antennas with three-dimensionally curved shapes. Main drawbacks are the sophisticated production process steps and their costs. The additive deposition of metallic inks or pastes by a printing process is an alternative manufacturing method with reduced cost. To implement such printed antennas we investigated in the fields of antenna design, simulation, printing technology and characterization. The chosen example of use was a customized dipole antenna for a Radio Frequency Identification application. The results prove the intended functionality of the printed dipole in regard to a highly cost efficient printing manufacturing.

  6. Multi-functional Chassis-based Antennas Using Characteristic Mode Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishor, Krishna Kumar

    Designing antennas for handheld devices is quite challenging primarily due to the limited real-estate available, and the fact that internal antennas occupy a large volume. With the need to support a variety of radio systems such as GSM, LTE and WiFi that operate in a wide range of frequency bands, multi-band, wideband and frequency reconfigurable antenna designs have been explored in the literature. Moreover, to support higher data rates, the Long Term Evolution Advanced (LTE-A) standard has been introduced, which requires supporting multiple input multiple output (MIMO) antenna technology and carrier aggregation (CA) on a handheld device. Both of these benefit from the use of multiple antennas or multi-port antennas, but with the limited space available, adding more internal antennas may not be easily possible. Additionally, to realize the benefits of these technologies the multiple antenna ports have to be well isolated from each other. This thesis explores the utilization of the ground plane (or chassis) of a handheld device as an antenna to meet some of these challenges. To achieve this, the theory of characteristic modes (TCM) for conducting bodies is relied upon, to determine the eigen-currents supported on the chassis. The orthogonality properties of these eigencurrents, and their corresponding far-field eigenfields (electric and magnetic) makes TCM a good tool to design multiple antennas with high isolation. This is demonstrated in this thesis via the design of four chassis-based antennas that have different functionalities. The first design is a two port MIMO antenna utilizing a combination of eigenmodes to achieve port isolation. The second design is a pattern reconfigurable MIMO antenna that can operate in two states at 2.28 GHz. The third design is a four port antenna that operates in three frequency bands, with two bands below 1 GHz for CA and the remaining two ports for MIMO communication. The final design is a five port antenna that supports MIMO

  7. Magneto-Dielectric Wire Antennas Theory and Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, Tom

    There is a pervasive need in the defense industry for conformal, low-profile, efficient and broadband (HF-UHF) antennas. Broadband capabilities enable shared aperture multi-function radiators, while conformal antenna profiles minimize physical damage in army applications, reduce drag and weight penalties in airborne applications and reduce the visual and RF signatures of the communication node. This dissertation is concerned with a new class of antennas called Magneto-Dielectric wire antennas (MDWA) that provide an ideal solution to this ever-present and growing need. Magneto-dielectric structures (mur > 1; epsilon r > 1) can partially guide electromagnetic waves and radiate them by leaking off the structure or by scattering from any discontinuities, much like a metal antenna of the same shape. They are attractive alternatives to conventional whip and blade antennas because they can be placed conformal to a metallic ground plane without any performance penalty. A two pronged approach is taken to analyze MDWAs. In the first, antenna circuit models are derived for the prototypical dipole and loop elements that include the effects of realistic dispersive magneto-dielectric materials of construction. A material selection law results, showing that: (a) The maximum attainable efficiency is determined by a single magnetic material parameter that we term the hesitivity: Closely related to Snoek's product, it measures the maximum magnetic conductivity of the material. (b) The maximum bandwidth is obtained by placing the highest amount of mu" loss in the frequency range of operation. As a result, high radiation efficiency antennas can be obtained not only from the conventional low loss (low mu") materials but also with highly lossy materials (tan(deltam) >> 1). The second approach used to analyze MDWAs is through solving the Green function problem of the infinite magneto-dielectric cylinder fed by a current loop. This solution sheds light on the leaky and guided waves

  8. Design optical antenna and fiber coupling system based on the vector theory of reflection and refraction.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ping; Yang, Huajun; Mao, Shengqian

    2015-10-01

    A Cassegrain antenna system and an optical fiber coupling system which consists of a plano-concave lens and a plano-convex lens are designed based on the vector theory of reflection and refraction, so as to improve the transmission performance of the optical antenna and fiber coupling system. Three-dimensional ray tracing simulation are performed and results of the optical aberrations calculation and the experimental test show that the aberrations caused by on-axial defocusing, off-axial defocusing and deflection of receiving antenna can be well corrected by the optical fiber coupling system. PMID:26480125

  9. Antennae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Atlas Image mosaic, covering 7' x 7' on the sky of the interacting galaxies NGC 4038 and NGC 4039, better known as the Antennae, or Ring Tail galaxies. The two galaxies are engaged in a tug-of-war as they collide. The mutual gravitation between them is working to distort each spiral galaxy's appearance as the two merge. The interaction is evidently impetus for an intense burst of new star formation, as can be seen from the many infrared-bright knots and bright galactic nuclei. Compare the 2MASS view of this system with that obtained by the Hubble Space Telescope in the optical. Many of the same features are seen, although 2MASS is able to peer through much of the dust seen in the galaxies' disks. The galaxy light looks smoother. Also, in the near-infrared the bright knots of star formation are likely highlighted by the light of massive red supergiant stars. The much more extended 'tidal tails,' which give the Antennae their name, are quite faint in the 2MASS image mosaic.

  10. Bow-tie antennas on a dielectric half-space - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, Richard C.; Mcphedran, Ross C.; Popovic, Zorana; Rebeiz, Gabriel M.; Tong, Peter P.

    1987-01-01

    A new formulation is discussed for the rigous calculation of the radiation pattern of a bow-tie antenna of finite length and infinitesimal thickness, placed on a lossless dielectric substrate. The analysis is based on a representation of the current density on the metal surface of the antenna as a sum of an imposed (quasistatic) term and a set of current modes with unknown amplitudes. Free-space fields that are expressed in terms of continuous spectra of symmetrized plane waves are matched to the current modes using the method of moments. The resulting set of equations are solved for the unknown current amplitudes. The calculations show that for increasing bow length the antenna impedance spirals rapidly to a value predicted by transmission line theory. The theory also shows that the E-plane pattern of a two-wavelength, 60-deg bow-tie antenna is dominated by low-loss current modes propagating at the dielectric wavenumber. As the bow tie narrows, the loss of the modes increases, and the dominant wavenumber tends to the quasi-static value. Pattern measurements made at 94 GHz are shown to agree well with theoretical predictions. Measurements for a long-wire antenna, a linear array of bow-tie elements, and a log-periodic antenna are also presented.

  11. Theory of nanorod antenna resonances including end-reflection phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Wei; Li, Xiangyin; Bornemann, Jens; Gordon, Reuven

    2015-04-01

    We present a fully analytic theory for nanorod resonances including the phase of reflection from the rounded ends using a transmission line approach. It combines the circuit theory response of spherical nanoparticles with standard transmission line theory using the Sommerfeld wave dispersion. The approach agrees well with comprehensive numerical calculations.

  12. Theory of patch-antenna metamaterial perfect absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, Patrick T.; Baron, Alexandre; Smith, David R.

    2016-06-01

    A metasurface that absorbs waves from all directions of incidence can be achieved if the surface impedance is made to vary as a function of incidence angle in a specific manner. Here we show that a periodic array of planar nanoparticles coupled to a metal film can act as an absorbing metasurface with an angle-dependent impedance. Through a semi-analytical calculation based on coupled-mode theory, we find the perfect absorbing condition is equivalent to balancing the Ohmic and radiative losses of the nanoparticles at normal incidence. Absorption over a wide range of incidence angles can then be obtained by tailoring the scattered far-field pattern of the individual planar nanoparticles such that their radiative losses remain constant. The theory provides a means of understanding the behavior of perfect absorbing structures that have been observed experimentally or numerically, reconciling previously published theories and enabling the optimization of absorbing surfaces.

  13. Multiconductor Transmission-Line Theory That Includes an Antenna Process with a Lumped-Parameter Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toki, Hiroshi; Abe, Masayuki

    2016-03-01

    Electromagnetic noise was studied theoretically by developing a multiconductor transmission-line (MTL) theory derived from Maxwell’s equations without any approximations. The MTL theory naturally contains the antenna process, and for the case of three lines it is written in terms of normal, common, and antenna modes. Here we develop a theoretical method to solve the MTL equations by introducing boundary conditions consisting of a lumped-parameter circuit in order to describe the performance of any electric circuit for good performance without noise. The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is a powerful algorithm to solve time-dependent coupled differential equations for a combined distributed- and lumped-parameter circuit.

  14. Development of the theory and algorithms for synthesis of reflector antenna systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliker, Vladimir

    1995-01-01

    The main objective of this work was research and development of the theory and constructive computational algorithms for synthesis of single and dual reflector antenna systems in geometrical optics approximation. During the contracting period a variety of new analytic techniques and computational algorithms have been developed. In particular, for single and dual reflector antenna systems conditions for solvability of the synthesis equations have been established. Numerical algorithms for computing surface data of the reflectors have been developed and successfully tested. In addition, efficient techniques have been developed for computing radiation patterns produced by reflections/refractions off surfaces with arbitrary geometry. These techniques can be used for geometrical optics analysis of complex geometric structures such as aircrafts. They can also be applied to determine effectively the aperture excitations required to produce specified fields at given observation points. The results have a variety of applications in military, civilian, and commercial sectors.

  15. Analysis of airborne antenna systems using geometrical theory of diffraction and moment method computer codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartenstein, Richard G., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Computer codes have been developed to analyze antennas on aircraft and in the presence of scatterers. The purpose of this study is to use these codes to develop accurate computer models of various aircraft and antenna systems. The antenna systems analyzed are a P-3B L-Band antenna, an A-7E UHF relay pod antenna, and traffic advisory antenna system installed on a Bell Long Ranger helicopter. Computer results are compared to measured ones with good agreement. These codes can be used in the design stage of an antenna system to determine the optimum antenna location and save valuable time and costly flight hours.

  16. Analysis of airborne antenna systems using geometrical theory of diffraction and moment method computer codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartenstein, Richard G., Jr.

    1985-08-01

    Computer codes have been developed to analyze antennas on aircraft and in the presence of scatterers. The purpose of this study is to use these codes to develop accurate computer models of various aircraft and antenna systems. The antenna systems analyzed are a P-3B L-Band antenna, an A-7E UHF relay pod antenna, and traffic advisory antenna system installed on a Bell Long Ranger helicopter. Computer results are compared to measured ones with good agreement. These codes can be used in the design stage of an antenna system to determine the optimum antenna location and save valuable time and costly flight hours.

  17. Theory and Manufacturing Processes of Solar NanoAntenna Electromagnetic Collectors

    SciTech Connect

    Dale K. Kotter; Steven D. Novack

    2010-02-01

    DRAFT For Submittal to Journal of Solar Energy - Rev 10.1 ---SOL-08-1091 SOLAR Nantenna Electromagnetic Collectors Dale K. Kotter Idaho National Laboratory Steven D. Novack Idaho National Laboratory W. Dennis Slafer MicroContinuum, Inc. Patrick Pinhero University of Missouri ABSTRACT The research described in this paper explores a new and efficient approach for producing electricity from the abundant energy of the sun, using nanoantenna (nantenna) electromagnetic collectors (NECs). NEC devices target mid-infrared wavelengths, where conventional photovoltaic (PV) solar cells are inefficient and where there is an abundance of solar energy. The initial concept of designing NECs was based on scaling of radio frequency antenna theory to the infrared and visible regions. This approach initially proved unsuccessful because the optical behavior of materials in the terahertz (THz) region was overlooked and, in addition, economical nanofabrication methods were not previously available to produce the optical antenna elements. This paper demonstrates progress in addressing significant technological barriers, including: 1) development of frequency-dependent modeling of double-feedpoint square spiral nantenna elements; 2) selection of materials with proper THz properties; and 3) development of novel manufacturing methods that could potentially enable economical large-scale manufacturing. We have shown that nantennas can collect infrared energy and induce THz currents, and we have also developed cost-effective proof-of-concept fabrication techniques for the large-scale manufacture of simple square loop nantenna arrays. Future work is planned to embed rectifiers into the double-feedpoint antenna structures. This work represents an important first step toward the ultimate realization of a low-cost device that will collect as well as convert this radiation into electricity. This could lead to a broadband, high conversion efficiency low-cost solution to complement conventional PV

  18. Theoretical analysis of the EAST 4-strap ion cyclotron range of frequency antenna with variational theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jia-Hui; Zhang, Xin-Jun; Zhao, Yan-Ping; Qin, Cheng-Ming; Chen, Zhao; Yang, Lei; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2016-08-01

    A variational principle code which can calculate self-consistently currents on the conductors is used to assess the coupling characteristic of the EAST 4-strap ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antenna. Taking into account two layers of antenna conductors without lateral frame but with slab geometry, the antenna impedances as a function of frequency and the structure of RF field excited inside the plasma in various phasing cases are discussed in this paper. Project supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program, China (Grant No. 2015GB101001) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11375236 and 11375235).

  19. Subreflector extension for improved efficiencies in Cassegrain antennas - GTD/PO analysis. [Geometrical Theory of Diffraction/Physical Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahmat-Samii, Yahya

    1986-01-01

    Both offset and symmetric Cassegrain reflector antennas are used in satellite and ground communication systems. It is known that the subreflector diffraction can degrade the performance of these reflectors. A geometrical theory of diffraction/physical optics analysis technique is used to investigate the effects of the extended subreflector, beyond its optical rim, on the reflector efficiency and far-field patterns. Representative numerical results are shown for an offset Cassegrain reflector antenna with different feed illumination tapers and subreflector extensions. It is observed that for subreflector extensions as small as one wavelength, noticeable improvements in the overall efficiencies can be expected. Useful design data are generated for the efficiency curves and far-field patterns.

  20. Application of Modern Aperture Integration (AI) and Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD) Techniques for Analysis of Large Reflector Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudduck, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    The application of aperture integration (AI) and geometrical theory of diffraction (GTO) techniques to analyze large reflector antennas is outlined. The following techniques were used: computer modeling, validation of analysis and computer codes, computer aided design modifications, limitation on the conventional aperture integration (AIC) method, extended aperture integration (AIE) method, the AIE method for feed scattering calculations, near field probing predictions for 15 meter model, limitation on AIC for surface tolerance effects, aperture integration on the surface (AIS) method, and AIC and GTD calculations for compact range reflector.

  1. Radiation and scattering by thin-wire structures in the complex frequency domain. [electromagnetic theory for thin-wire antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    Piecewise-sinusoidal expansion functions and Galerkin's method are employed to formulate a solution for an arbitrary thin-wire configuration in a homogeneous conducting medium. The analysis is performed in the real or complex frequency domain. In antenna problems, the solution determines the current distribution, impedance, radiation efficiency, gain and far-field patterns. In scattering problems, the solution determines the absorption cross section, scattering cross section and the polarization scattering matrix. The electromagnetic theory is presented for thin wires and the forward-scattering theorem is developed for an arbitrary target in a homogeneous conducting medium.

  2. Ionospheric effects to antenna impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bethke, K. H.

    1986-01-01

    The reciprocity between high power satellite antennas and the surrounding plasma are examined. The relevant plasma states for antenna impedance calculations are presented and plasma models, and hydrodynamic and kinetic theory, are discussed. A theory from which a variation in antenna impedance with regard to the radiated power can be calculated for a frequency range well above the plasma resonance frequency is give. The theory can include photo and secondary emission effects in antenna impedance calculations.

  3. Theory of light scattering in subwavelength metallic slot antenna array fabricated on subwavelength thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S. B.; Park, D. J.

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate an analytic model that describes the near-field electromagnetic field profile near a subwavelength-sized metallic slot antenna fabricated on a thin dielectric substrate having a subwavelength thickness reaching λ/1000 in the terahertz frequency region. We found two-dimensional light diffraction induced by the two-dimensional nature of the slot antenna, and back-reflected waves interfered with each other in a complicated manner, resulting in a coupling of the Fourierdecomposed field amplitudes between the diffraction orders along the x and the y directions. We applied these findings to our model by modifying a previously developed model [D. J. Park et al., J. Korean Phys. Soc. 65, 1390 (2014)], and we monitor the effect on far-field transmission. This coupling effect was found to contribute to removal of physically-meaningless spikes or divergences in the transmission spectra, especially for relatively thick substrates.

  4. Millimeter-wave integrated-horn antennas. I - Theory. II - Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eleftheriades, George V.; Ali-Ahmad, Walid Y.; Katehi, Linda P. B.; Rebeiz, Gabriel M.

    1991-01-01

    Full-wave analysis is employed to determine the far-field pattern and input impedance of a dipole-fed horn antenna in a ground plane, and the theoretical results are compared with mm-wave and microwave data. The theoretical work exploits the Green's function corresponding to the horn structure and the method of moments. It is determined that the horn should have 70 sections/wavelength and 50 secondary modes for optimized accuracy, and certain dipole positions can reduce the resonance to zero. The experimentally derived impedance and radiation patterns agree with the constraints developed theoretically. The 70-degree flare-angle horn with selected dipole positions and horn apertures yields good radiation patterns, cross-polarization levels, and resonant dipole impedances. The conclusions are of interest to the development of the horn antennas etched in Si/GaAs for applications to zero-visibility tracking, radio astronomy, plasma diagnostics, and remote sensing.

  5. Theory of the pulse response from a small antenna in a magnetized plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grabbe, Crockett L.

    1989-01-01

    The electrostatic plasma response to a small pulsed antenna in a magnetic field is analyzed. The ringing of the plasma at three discrete frequencies--the upper-hybrid frequency and two resonance cone branch frequencies--is evidenced, and the amplitudes of these frequency responses is determined as a function of the characteristic plasma frequencies, the angle of observation with respect to the magnetic field, and the pulse length. Applications to plasma diagnostics are discussed. It is shown that the upper hybrid response and the response at either of the resonance cone branch frequencies is adequate information to determine the plasma density, and the magnetic field magnitude and angle.

  6. Experiments with Dipole Antennas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2009-01-01

    Employment of a data-acquisition system for data collection and calculations makes experiments with antennas more convenient and less time consuming. The determined directional patterns of the dipole antennas of different lengths are in reasonable agreement with theory. The enhancement of the signal by using a reflector is demonstrated, and a…

  7. An E-plane analysis of aperture-matched horn antennas using the moment method and the uniform geometrical theory of diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heedy, D. J.; Burnside, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    The moment method and the uniform geometrical theory of diffraction are utilized to obtain two separate solutions for the E-plane field pattern of an aperture-matched horn antenna. This particular horn antenna consists of a standard pyramidal horn with the following modifications: a rolled edge section attached to the aperture edges and a curved throat section. The resulting geometry provides significantly better performance in terms of the pattern, impedance, and frequency characteristics than normally obtainable. The moment method is used to calculate the E-plane pattern and BSWR of the antenna. However, at higher frequencies, large amounts of computation time are required. The uniform geometrical theory of diffraction provides a quick and efficient high frequency solution for the E-plane field pattern. In fact, the uniform geometrical theory of diffraction may be used to initially design the antenna; then, the moment method may be applied to fine tune the design. This procedure has been successfully applied to a compact range feed design.

  8. Spectra and dynamics in the B800 antenna: comparing hierarchical equations, Redfield and Förster theories.

    PubMed

    Novoderezhkin, Vladimir; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2013-09-26

    We model the spectra (absorption and circular dichroism) and excitation dynamics in the B800 ring of the LH2 antenna complex from Rs. molischianum using different theoretical approaches, i.e., Förster theory, standard and modified versions of the Redfield theory, and the more versatile nonperturbative approach based on hierarchically coupled equations for the reduced density operator. We demonstrate that, although excitations in the B800 ring are localized due to disorder, thermal effects, and phonons, there are still sizable excitonic effects producing shift, narrowing, and asymmetry of the spectra. Moreover, the excitation dynamics reveals the presence of long-lived (up to 1 ps) non-oscillatory coherences between the exciton states maintained due to nonsecular population-to-coherence transfers. The sub-ps decay of the coherences is followed by slow motion of the excitation around the ring, producing equilibration of the site populations with a time constant of about 3-4 ps, which is slower than the B800 → B850 transfer. The exact solution obtained with the hierarchical equations is compared with other approaches, thus illustrating limitations of the Förster and Redfield pictures. PMID:23531197

  9. Aircraft antennas/conformal antennas missile antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solbach, Klaus

    1987-04-01

    Three major areas of airborne microwave antennas are examined. The basic system environment for missile telemetry/telecommand and fuze functions is sketched and the basic antenna design together with practical examples are discussed. The principle requirements of modern nose radar flat plate antennas are shown to result from missile/aircraft system requirements. Basic principles of slotted waveguide antenna arrays are sketched and practical antenna designs are discussed. The present early warning system designs are sketched to point out requirements and performance of practical radar warning and jamming antennas (broadband spiral antennas and horn radiators). With respect to newer developments in the ECM scenario, some demonstrated and proposed antenna systems (lens fed arrays, phased array, active array) are discussed.

  10. Control of a Flexible Space Antenna: A Finite Dimensional Perspective Based on Distributed Parameter Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mingori, D. L.; Gibson, J. S.; Blelloch, P.; Adamian, A.

    1985-01-01

    The methods presented are based on results from infinite dimensional control theory, but they can be described and used in a finite dimensional context. This blend leads to an approach which employs powerful ideas on convergence, and is also quite practical for systems of realistic complexity. Appropriate reduced order models are generated simultaneously with the development of the compensator. The required models change as a function of changes in the performance demanded, sensor and actuator location, inherent damping, disturbances, etc. Thus they are driven by the control and estimation problems at hand. The compensators which emerge are very close to the ideal compensators which would be obtained with a very large order model. However, some simplification is frequently possible. The method of balanced realizations was found to be effective for this purpose.

  11. MLS airborne antenna research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, C. L.; Burnside, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    The geometrical theory of diffraction was used to analyze the elevation plane pattern of on-aircraft antennas. The radiation patterns for basic elements (infinitesimal dipole, circumferential and axial slot) mounted on fuselage of various aircrafts with or without radome included were calculated and compared well with experimental results. Error phase plots were also presented. The effects of radiation patterns and error phase plots on the polarization selection for the MLS airborne antenna are discussed.

  12. Adaptive antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, P.

    1987-04-01

    The basic principles of adaptive antennas are outlined in terms of the Wiener-Hopf expression for maximizing signal to noise ratio in an arbitrary noise environment; the analogy with generalized matched filter theory provides a useful aid to understanding. For many applications, there is insufficient information to achieve the above solution and thus non-optimum constrained null steering algorithms are also described, together with a summary of methods for preventing wanted signals being nulled by the adaptive system. The three generic approaches to adaptive weight control are discussed; correlation steepest descent, weight perturbation and direct solutions based on sample matrix conversion. The tradeoffs between hardware complexity and performance in terms of null depth and convergence rate are outlined. The sidelobe cancellor technique is described. Performance variation with jammer power and angular distribution is summarized and the key performance limitations identified. The configuration and performance characteristics of both multiple beam and phase scan array antennas are covered, with a brief discussion of performance factors.

  13. Deployable antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Dobbins, Justin A. (Inventor); Lin, Greg Y. (Inventor); Chu, Andrew W. (Inventor); Scully, Robert C. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A deployable antenna and method for using wherein the deployable antenna comprises a collapsible membrane having at least one radiating element for transmitting electromagnetic waves, receiving electromagnetic waves, or both.

  14. User Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamnejad, Vahraz; Cramer, Paul

    1990-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) impact of frequency change of user and spacecraft antenna gain and size; (2) basic personal terminal antennas (impact of 20/30 GHz frequency separation; parametric studies - gain, size, weight; gain and figure of merit (G/T); design data for selected antenna concepts; critical technologies and development goals; and recommendations); and (3) user antenna radiation safety concerns.

  15. A Modern Control Theory Based Algorithm for Control of the NASA/JPL 70-Meter Antenna Axis Servos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, R. E.

    1987-09-01

    A digital computer-based state variable controller has been designed and applied to the 70-m antenna azis servos. The general equations and structure of the algorithm and provisions for alternate position error feedback modes to accomodate intertarget slew, encoder references tracking, and precision tracking modes are described. Development of the discrete time domain control model and computation of estimator and control gain parameters based on closed loop pole placement criteria are discussed. The new algorithm has been successfully implemented and tested in the 70-m antenna at Deep Space Station (DSS) 63 in Spain.

  16. A modern control theory based algorithm for control of the NASA/JPL 70-meter antenna axis servos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, R. E.

    1987-01-01

    A digital computer-based state variable controller was designed and applied to the 70-m antenna axis servos. The general equations and structure of the algorithm and provisions for alternate position error feedback modes to accommodate intertarget slew, encoder referenced tracking, and precision tracking modes are descibed. Development of the discrete time domain control model and computation of estimator and control gain parameters based on closed loop pole placement criteria are discussed. The new algorithm was successfully implemented and tested in the 70-m antenna at Deep Space Network station 63 in Spain.

  17. Reconfigurable antenna pattern verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drexler, Jerome P. (Inventor); Becker, Robert C. (Inventor); Meyers, David W. (Inventor); Muldoon, Kelly P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of verifying programmable antenna configurations is disclosed. The method comprises selecting a desired antenna configuration from a plurality of antenna configuration patterns, with the selected antenna configuration forming at least one reconfigurable antenna from reconfigurable antenna array elements. The method validates the formation of the selected antenna configuration to determine antenna performance of the at least one reconfigurable antenna.

  18. A general approach of the active concept of microstrip antennas and arrays based on the loaded scatterer theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillard, Raphael; Legay, Herve; Floch, Jean-Marie; Citerne, Jacques

    1991-06-01

    A quantitative and general approach of the active antenna concept concretized in planar type microstrip technologies is proposed using integral equation techniques associated with the multiport representation of loaded scatterers. Two configurations based on this concept, involving an electromagnetically fed microstrip dipole combined with either passive loads simulating a monolithic switch or active loads simulating a monolithic amplifier, are computed to illustrate the extended capacities of this new approach. Theoretical results on matching characteristics are compared to measurements achieved in X band.

  19. Active antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, John F.

    1994-05-01

    An antenna, which may be a search coil, is connected to an operational amplifier circuit which provides negative impedances, each of which is in the order of magnitude of the positive impedances which characterize the antenna. The antenna is connected to the inverting input of the operational amplifier; a resistor is connected between the inverting input and the output of the operational amplifier; a capacitor-resistor network, in parallel, is connected between the output and the noninverting input of the operational amplifier; and a resistor is connected from the noninverting input and the circuit common. While this circuit provides a negative resistance and a negative inductance, in series, which appear, looking into the noninverting input of the operational amplifier, in parallel with the antenna, these negative impedances appear in a series loop with the antenna positive impedances, so as to algebraically add. This circuit is tuned by varying the various circuit components so that the negative impedances are very close, but somewhat less, in magnitude, to the antenna impedances. The result is to increase the sensitivity of the antenna by lowering its effective impedance. This, in turn, increases the effective area of the antenna, which may be broadband.

  20. Active antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, John F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An antenna, which may be a search coil, is connected to an operational amplifier circuit which provides negative impedances, each of which is in the order of magnitude of the positive impedances which characterize the antenna. The antenna is connected to the inverting input of the operational amplifier; a resistor is connected between the inverting input and the output of the operational amplifier; a capacitor-resistor network, in parallel, is connected between the output and the noninverting input of the operational amplifier; and a resistor is connected from the noninverting input and the circuit common. While this circuit provides a negative resistance and a negative inductance, in series, which appear, looking into the noninverting input of the operational amplifier, in parallel with the antenna, these negative impedances appear in a series loop with the antenna positive impedances, so as to algebraically add. This circuit is tuned by varying the various circuit components so that the negative impedances are very close, but somewhat less, in magnitude, to the antenna impedances. The result is to increase the sensitivity of the antenna by lowering its effective impedance. This, in turn, increases the effective area of the antenna, which may be broadband.

  1. Rim loaded reflector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucci, O. M.; Franceschetti, G.

    1980-05-01

    A general theory of reflector antennas loaded by surface impedances is presented. Spatial variation of primary illumination is taken into account using a generalized slope diffraction coefficient. The theory is experimentally checked on surface loaded square plate scatterers and then used for computing the radiation diagram of parabolic and hyperbolic dishes. Computer programs and computed diagrams refer to the case of focal illumination and negligible tapering of primary illumination.

  2. Optical antenna enhanced spontaneous emission.

    PubMed

    Eggleston, Michael S; Messer, Kevin; Zhang, Liming; Yablonovitch, Eli; Wu, Ming C

    2015-02-10

    Atoms and molecules are too small to act as efficient antennas for their own emission wavelengths. By providing an external optical antenna, the balance can be shifted; spontaneous emission could become faster than stimulated emission, which is handicapped by practically achievable pump intensities. In our experiments, InGaAsP nanorods emitting at ∼ 200 THz optical frequency show a spontaneous emission intensity enhancement of 35 × corresponding to a spontaneous emission rate speedup ∼ 115 ×, for antenna gap spacing, d = 40 nm. Classical antenna theory predicts ∼ 2,500 × spontaneous emission speedup at d ∼ 10 nm, proportional to 1/d(2). Unfortunately, at d < 10 nm, antenna efficiency drops below 50%, owing to optical spreading resistance, exacerbated by the anomalous skin effect (electron surface collisions). Quantum dipole oscillations in the emitter excited state produce an optical ac equivalent circuit current, I(o) = qω|x(o)|/d, feeding the antenna-enhanced spontaneous emission, where q|x(o)| is the dipole matrix element. Despite the quantum-mechanical origin of the drive current, antenna theory makes no reference to the Purcell effect nor to local density of states models. Moreover, plasmonic effects are minor at 200 THz, producing only a small shift of antenna resonance frequency. PMID:25624503

  3. Optical antenna enhanced spontaneous emission

    PubMed Central

    Eggleston, Michael S.; Messer, Kevin; Zhang, Liming; Yablonovitch, Eli; Wu, Ming C.

    2015-01-01

    Atoms and molecules are too small to act as efficient antennas for their own emission wavelengths. By providing an external optical antenna, the balance can be shifted; spontaneous emission could become faster than stimulated emission, which is handicapped by practically achievable pump intensities. In our experiments, InGaAsP nanorods emitting at ∼200 THz optical frequency show a spontaneous emission intensity enhancement of 35× corresponding to a spontaneous emission rate speedup ∼115×, for antenna gap spacing, d = 40 nm. Classical antenna theory predicts ∼2,500× spontaneous emission speedup at d ∼ 10 nm, proportional to 1/d2. Unfortunately, at d < 10 nm, antenna efficiency drops below 50%, owing to optical spreading resistance, exacerbated by the anomalous skin effect (electron surface collisions). Quantum dipole oscillations in the emitter excited state produce an optical ac equivalent circuit current, Io = qω|xo|/d, feeding the antenna-enhanced spontaneous emission, where q|xo| is the dipole matrix element. Despite the quantum-mechanical origin of the drive current, antenna theory makes no reference to the Purcell effect nor to local density of states models. Moreover, plasmonic effects are minor at 200 THz, producing only a small shift of antenna resonance frequency. PMID:25624503

  4. Dielectric coated wire antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, J. H.; Newman, E. H.

    1976-01-01

    An electrically thin dielectric insulating shell on an antenna composed of electrically thin circular cylindrical wires is examined. A moment method solution is obtained, and the insulating shell is modeled by equivalent volume polarization currents. These polarization currents are related in a simple manner to the surface charge density on the wire antenna. In this way the insulating shell causes no new unknowns to be introduced, and the size of the impedance matrix is the same as for the uninsulated wires. The insulation is accounted for entirely through a modification of the symmetric impedance matrix. This modification influences the current distribution, impedance, efficiency, field patterns, and scattering properties. The theory is compared with measurement for dielectric coated antennas in air.

  5. Notch Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.

    2004-01-01

    Notch antennas, also known as the tapered slot antenna (TSA), have been the topics of research for decades. TSA has demonstrated multi-octave bandwidth, moderate gain (7 to 10 dB), and symmetric E- and H- plane beam patterns and can be used for many different applications. This chapter summarizes the research activities on notch antennas over the past decade with emphasis on their most recent advances and applications. This chapter begins with some discussions on the designs of single TSA; then follows with detailed discussions of issues associated with TSA designs and performance characteristics. To conclude the chapter, some recent developments in TSA arrays and their applications are highlighted.

  6. Measurement of Antenna Bore-Sight Gain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortinberry, Jarrod; Shumpert, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The absolute or free-field gain of a simple antenna can be approximated using standard antenna theory formulae or for a more accurate prediction, numerical methods may be employed to solve for antenna parameters including gain. Both of these methods will result in relatively reasonable estimates but in practice antenna gain is usually verified and documented via measurements and calibration. In this paper, a relatively simple and low-cost, yet effective means of determining the bore-sight free-field gain of a VHF/UHF antenna is proposed by using the Brewster angle relationship.

  7. Endfire tapered slot antennas on dielectric substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yngvesson, K. S.; Schaubert, D. H.; Korzeniowski, T. L.; Kollberg, E. L.; Thungren, T.

    1985-01-01

    Endfire-tapered slot antennas are suitable for many integrated circuit applications, imaging and phased arrays. An investigation of single elements of such antennas, including slots which are exponentially tapered (Vivaldi), linearly tapered, and constant width. For antennas of all types, a good general agreement is obtained for curves of beamwidth-versus-length, normalized to wavelength, when one compares the data with that for traveling-wave antennas published by Zucker (1961). An important condition for this agreement is that the effective dielectric thickness, defined in the text, is in a certain optimum range. This condition is qualitatively explained in terms of the theory for traveling-wave antennas.

  8. Endfire tapered slot antennas on dielectric substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yngvesson, K. S.; Schaubert, D. H.; Korzeniowski, T. L.; Kollberg, E. L.; Thungren, T.

    1985-12-01

    Endfire-tapered slot antennas are suitable for many integrated circuit applications, imaging and phased arrays. An investigation of single elements of such antennas, including slots which are exponentially tapered (Vivaldi), linearly tapered, and constant width. For antennas of all types, a good general agreement is obtained for curves of beamwidth-versus-length, normalized to wavelength, when one compares the data with that for traveling-wave antennas published by Zucker (1961). An important condition for this agreement is that the effective dielectric thickness, defined in the text, is in a certain optimum range. This condition is qualitatively explained in terms of the theory for traveling-wave antennas.

  9. Spacecraft Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamnejad, Vahraz; Manshadi, Farzin; Rahmat-Samii, Yahya; Cramer, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Some of the various categories of issues that must be considered in the selection and design of spacecraft antennas for a Personal Access Satellite System (PASS) are addressed, and parametric studies for some of the antenna concepts to help the system designer in making the most appropriate antenna choice with regards to weight, size, and complexity, etc. are provided. The question of appropriate polarization for the spacecraft as well as for the User Terminal Antenna required particular attention and was studied in some depth. Circular polarization seems to be the favored outcome of this study. Another problem that has generally been a complicating factor in designing the multiple beam reflector antennas, is the type of feeds (single vs. multiple element and overlapping vs. non-overlapping clusters) needed for generating the beams. This choice is dependent on certain system design factors, such as the required frequency reuse, acceptable interbeam isolation, antenna efficiency, number of beams scanned, and beam-forming network (BFN) complexity. This issue is partially addressed, but is not completely resolved. Indications are that it may be possible to use relatively simple non-overlapping clusters of only a few elements, unless a large frequency reuse and very stringent isolation levels are required.

  10. Modeling of the EAST ICRF antenna with ICANT Code

    SciTech Connect

    Qin Chengming; Zhao Yanping; Colas, L.; Heuraux, S.

    2007-09-28

    A Resonant Double Loop (RDL) antenna for ion-cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) on Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) is under construction. The new antenna is analyzed using the antenna coupling code ICANT which self-consistently determines the surface currents on all antenna parts. In this work, the modeling of the new ICRF antenna using this code is to assess the near-fields in front of the antenna and analysis its coupling capabilities. Moreover, the antenna reactive radiated power computed by ICANT and shows a good agreement with deduced from Transmission Line (TL) theory.

  11. Modeling of the EAST ICRF antenna with ICANT Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Chengming; Zhao, Yanping; Colas, L.; Heuraux, S.

    2007-09-01

    A Resonant Double Loop (RDL) antenna for ion-cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) on Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) is under construction. The new antenna is analyzed using the antenna coupling code ICANT which self-consistently determines the surface currents on all antenna parts. In this work, the modeling of the new ICRF antenna using this code is to assess the near-fields in front of the antenna and analysis its coupling capabilities. Moreover, the antenna reactive radiated power computed by ICANT and shows a good agreement with deduced from Transmission Line (TL) theory.

  12. Application of optimal control theory to the design of the NASA/JPL 70-meter antenna servos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, L. S.; Nickerson, J.

    1989-01-01

    The application of Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) techniques to the design of the 70-m axis servos is described. Linear quadratic optimal control and Kalman filter theory are reviewed, and model development and verification are discussed. Families of optimal controller and Kalman filter gain vectors were generated by varying weight parameters. Performance specifications were used to select final gain vectors.

  13. DIRECTIONAL ANTENNA

    DOEpatents

    Bittner, B.J.

    1958-05-20

    A high-frequency directional antenna of the 360 d scaring type is described. The antenna has for its desirable features the reduction in both size and complexity of the mechanism for rotating the antenna through its scanning movement. These advantages result from the rotation of only the driven element, the reflector remaining stationary. The particular antenna structure comprises a refiector formed by a plurality of metallic slats arranged in the configuration of an annular cage having the shape of a zone of revolution. The slats are parallel to each other and are disposed at an angle of 45 d to the axis of the cage. A directional radiator is disposed inside the cage at an angle of 45 d to the axis of the cage in the same direction as the reflecting slats which it faces. As the radiator is rotated, the electromagnetic wave is reflected from the slats facing the radiator and thereafter passes through the cage on the opposite side, since these slats are not parallel with the E vector of the wave.

  14. Radiation Characteristics of Cavity Backed Aperture Antennas in Finite Ground Plane Using the Hybrid FEM/MoM Technique and Geometrical Theory of Diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. J.; Deshpande, M. D.; Cockrell, C. R.; Beck, F. B.

    1996-01-01

    A technique using hybrid Finite Element Method (FEM)/Method of Moments (MoM), and Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD) is presented to analyze the radiation characteristics of cavity fed aperture antennas in a finite ground plane. The cavity which excites the aperture is assumed to be fed by a cylindrical transmission line. The electromagnetic (EM) fields inside the cavity are obtained using FEM. The EM fields and their normal derivatives required for FEM solution are obtained using (1) the modal expansion in the feed region and (2) the MoM for the radiating aperture region(assuming an infinite ground plane). The finiteness of the ground plane is taken into account using GTD. The input admittance of open ended circular, rectangular, and coaxial line radiating into free space through an infinite ground plane are computed and compared with earlier published results. Radiation characteristics of a coaxial cavity fed circular aperture in a finite rectangular ground plane are verified with experimental results.

  15. A two-dimensional theory of coupled electro-magneto-mechanical plates as an application to load-bearing antenna structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santapuri, S.; Bechtel, S. E.

    2011-04-01

    Multifunctional materials and structures possess the ability to perform multiple tasks by combining structural integrity with sensing and actuating capabilities. Recent progress in the development of such materials/structures has made concepts like load-bearing antennas or load-bearing batteries feasible and formed new research possibilities. Load-bearing antenna structures are multifunctional sensing and actuating devices integrated with a load-bearing structure, i.e. they can simultaneously function as a mechanical structure and an electromagnetic antenna. Such an antenna structure is subjected to mechanical forces, temperature gradients, and electromagnetic fields, giving rise to highly-coupled nonlinear thermo-electro-magneto-mechanical (TEMM) behavior. The current research focuses on modeling and characterizing the nonlinear 3-D coupled behavior of TEMM materials, consistent with first principles. This theoretical framework is specifically aimed at modeling and analysis of load-bearing antenna structures. In this paper we demonstrate the development of analytical techniques and computational tools for multiscale, multi-physics modeling of load-bearing antenna structures. The mathematical model, based predominantly on first principles, employs the thermomechanical governing equations coupled with Maxwell's equations. Our modeling has identified 92 nondimensional numbers which quantify the competition between physical effects in the operation of load-bearing antenna. A fixed relative ordering of all competing effects determines a regime of antenna/environment interaction. In this work, we demonstrate a comprehensive framework to derive the 3-D governing equations for a given regime. For thin geometries, these equations are further reduced to 2-D model, using series expansion and perturbation techniques. Mathematical modeling of thin electro-magneto-mechanical plates can have applications like design and optimization of load-bearing antennas structures. This

  16. Astigmatism in reflector antennas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogdell, J. R.; Davis, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    Astigmatic phase error in large parabolic reflector antennas is discussed. A procedure for focusing an antenna and diagnosing the presence and degree of astigmatism is described. Theoretical analysis is conducted to determine the nature of this error in such antennas.

  17. Microstrip antenna developments at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, John

    1991-01-01

    The in-house development of microstrip antennas, initiated in 1981, when a spaceborne lightweight and low-profile planar array was needed for a satellite communication system, is described. The work described covers the prediction of finite-ground-plane effects by the geometric theory of diffraction, higher-order-mode circularly polarized circular patch antennas, circularly polarized microstrip arrays with linearly polarized elements, an impedance-matching teardrop-shaped probe feed, a dual-polarized microstrip array with high isolation and low cross-polarization, a planar microstrip Yagi array, a microstrip reflectarray, a Ka-band MMIC array, and a series-fed linear arrays.

  18. Magnetic antenna excitation of whistler modes. II. Antenna arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2014-12-15

    The excitation of whistler modes from magnetic loop antennas has been investigated experimentally. The field topology of the excited wave driven by a single loop antenna has been measured for different loop orientations with respect to the uniform background field. The fields from two or more antennas at different locations are then created by superposition of the single-loop data. It is shown that an antenna array can produce nearly plane waves which cannot be achieved with single antennas. By applying a phase shift along the array, oblique wave propagation is obtained. This allows a meaningful comparison with plane wave theory. The Gendrin mode and oblique cyclotron resonance are demonstrated. Wave helicity and polarization in space and time are demonstrated and distinguished from the magnetic helicity of the wave field. The superposition of two oblique plane whistler modes produces in a “whistler waveguide” mode whose polarization and helicity properties are explained. The results show that single point measurements cannot properly establish the wave character of wave packets. The laboratory observations are relevant for excitation and detection of whistler modes in space plasmas.

  19. Computer controlled antenna system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raumann, N. A.

    1972-01-01

    The application of small computers using digital techniques for operating the servo and control system of large antennas is discussed. The advantages of the system are described. The techniques were evaluated with a forty foot antenna and the Sigma V computer. Programs have been completed which drive the antenna directly without the need for a servo amplifier, antenna position programmer or a scan generator.

  20. ARISE antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewski, Arthur B.; Noca, Muriel; Ulvestad, James

    2000-03-01

    Supermassive black holes are among the most spectacular objects in the Universe, and are laboratories for physics in extreme conditions. Understanding the physics of massive black holes and related phenomena is a primary goal of the ARISE mission. The scientific goals of the mission are described in detail on the ARISE web site http://arise.ipl.nasa.gov and in the ARISE Science Goals document. The following paper, as the title suggests, is not intended to be a comprehensive description of ARISE, but deals only with one aspect of the ARISE mission-the inflatable antenna which is the key element of the ARISE spacecraft. This spacecraft,due to the extensive reliance on inflatables, may be considered as the first generation Gossamer spacecraft

  1. A reconfigurable plasma antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rajneesh; Bora, Dhiraj

    2010-03-15

    An experiment aimed at investigating the antenna properties of different plasma structures of a plasma column as a reconfigurable plasma antenna, is reported. A 30 cm long plasma column is excited by surface wave, which acts as a plasma antenna. By changing the operating parameters, e.g., working pressure, drive frequency, input power, radius of glass tube, length of plasma column, and argon gas, single plasma antenna (plasma column) can be transformed to multiple small antenna elements (plasma blobs). It is also reported that number, length, and separation between two antenna elements can be controlled by operating parameters. Moreover, experiments are also carried out to study current profile, potential profile, conductivity profile, phase relations, radiation power patterns, etc. of the antenna elements. The effect on directivity with the number of antenna elements is also studied. Findings of the study indicate that entire structure of antenna elements can be treated as a phased array broadside vertical plasma antenna, which produces more directive radiation pattern than the single plasma antenna as well as physical properties and directivity of such antenna can be controlled by operating parameters. The study reveals the advantages of a plasma antenna over the conventional antenna in the sense that different antennas can be formed by tuning the operating parameters.

  2. Transmit versus receive gains for microwave dish antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, J. L.

    1983-06-01

    For the microwave dish antennas, the antenna gain when transmitting can be different, and is usually less, than that of the same antenna when receiving. The theory of the far field transmit and receive antenna gains is developed for the classical dish as well as for the general case. Aperture functions are derived for use in the integral form of the Fraunhofer diffraction equation. Both the aberration effects of the dish and the angular distribution of the feed are taken into account. Calculations of transmit and receive antenna patterns and gains are compared for the f/1 classical dish for various amounts of feed spillover.

  3. JPL antenna technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeland, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    Systems-level technology for evolving cost-effective, STS compatible antennas that will be automatically deployed in orbit to perform a variety of missions in the 1985 to 2000 time period is discussed. For large space-based antenna systems, the LSST program has selected deployable antennas for development. The maturity of this class of antenna, demonstrated by the success of smaller size apertures, provides a potential capability for satisfying a significant number of near-term, space-based applications. The offset wrap-rib concept development is the basis of the JPL LSST antenna technology development program. Supporting technology to the antenna concept development include analytical performance prediction, the capability for measuring and evaluating mechanical antenna performance in the intended service environment, and the development of candidate system-level configurations for potential applications utilizing the offset wrap-rib antenna concept.

  4. Antenna factorization in strongly ordered limits

    SciTech Connect

    Kosower, David A.

    2005-02-15

    When energies or angles of gluons emitted in a gauge-theory process are small and strongly ordered, the emission factorizes in a simple way to all orders in perturbation theory. I show how to unify the various strongly ordered soft, mixed soft-collinear, and collinear limits using antenna factorization amplitudes, which are generalizations of the Catani-Seymour dipole factorization function.

  5. Electrically small, mixed modal antenna (MMA) array for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong-Hwoon; Grimes, Dale M.; Crimes, Craig A.

    Based on the modal antenna analysis due to Grimes (1986) near-field interaction between elements of an antenna ensemble wave used to produce resonant, directed radiation from a small antenna. By previous theory, mixed TE and TM modes are found to be orthogonal and, therefore, a small resonant and/or directional antenna is not possible. The authors recount the analysis showing that time-average power is orthogonal and reactive power is not. Nonorthogonal reactive power suggests that a small, resonant, directive antenna may be possible. Such an antenna is potentially useful for aerospace applications. This paper reports experimental progress to date. In agreement with the theory, it was found that the resonant frequency depends on the relative values of driving currents; the resonant frequency of the magnetic dipole decreased more than 30 percent when a 50-ohm resistive pad loaded the electric dipole.

  6. Coherently combining antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dybdal, Robert B. (Inventor); Curry, Samuel J. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An apparatus includes antenna elements configured to receive a signal including pseudo-random code, and electronics configured to use the pseudo-random code to determine time delays of signals incident upon the antenna elements and to compensate the signals to coherently combine the antenna elements.

  7. Antenna development at DARPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corey, Larry; Jaska, Esko

    2004-09-01

    This paper reviews recent and ongoing antenna technology and systems development in the Special Projects Office of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA/SPO). These programs fall into two categories: development and application of antenna component technologies and development of transportable phased-array radar antennas. These development programs are presented in a chronological order.

  8. Space-communications antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyrev, Nikolai D.

    This textbook examines the design principles, requirements, and technical characteristics of earth-station and space-station antennas. Methods for realizing high gain and low noise temperature are examined along with ways to enhance antenna performance. Particular attention is given to the antenna-feed sections of earth stations.

  9. Combined ICR heating antenna for ion separation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Timofeev, A. V.

    2011-01-15

    A combination of one- and two-wave antennas (one and two turns of conductors around a plasma cylinder, respectively) is proposed. This combined antenna localizes an RF field within itself. It is shown that spent nuclear fuel processing systems based on ICR heating of nuclear ash by such a combined antenna have high productivity. A theory of the RF field excitation in ICR ion separation systems is presented in a simple and compact form.

  10. JPL antenna technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeland, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Plans for evaluating, designing, fabricating, transporting and deploying cost effective and STS compatible offset wrap rib antennas up to 300 meters in diameter for mobile communications, Earth resources observation, and for the orbiting VLBI are reviewed. The JPL surface measurement system, intended for large mesh deployable antenna applications will be demonstrated and validated as part of the antenna ground based demonstration program. Results of the offset wrap rib deployable antenna technology development will include: (1) high confidence structural designs for antennas up to 100 meters in diameter; (2) high confidence estimates of functional performance and fabrication cost for a wide range of antenna sizes (up to 300 meters in diameter); (3) risk assessment for fabricating the large size antennas; and (4) 55 meter diameter flight quality hardware that can be cost effectively completed toto accommodate a flight experiment and/or application.

  11. Periscope antenna radiation - Sidelobes and diffuse lobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magne, P.; Bui-Hai, N.

    1980-06-01

    The radiation pattern of the periscope antenna, which consists of a parabolic dish on the ground and a passive tower-mounted reflector, is investigated in its entirety in order to facilitate the application of the configuration, which can eliminate the 5-10-dB losses associated with a waveguide connection in microwave systems. The radiation diagram is calculated based on the geometrical theory of diffraction, and measured for a periscope Cassegrain antenna with a gain of 47 dB and passive reflectors of various heights, dimensions and shapes in the millimeter wave range. Based on the results of the study, the design of an optimized periscope antenna with a classical tower is presented, and it is concluded that the periscope antenna can provide a radiation pattern compatible with intensive carrier frequency reuse

  12. General properties of dielectric optical antennas.

    PubMed

    Schuller, Jon A; Brongersma, Mark L

    2009-12-21

    Using Mie theory we derive a number of general results concerning the resonances of spherical and cylindrical dielectric antennas. Specifically, we prove that the peak scattering cross-section of radiation-limited antennas depends only on the resonance frequency and thus is independent of refractive index and size, a result which is valid even when the resonator is atomic-scale. Furthermore, we derive scaling limits for the bandwidth of dielectric antennas and describe a cylindrical mode which is unique in its ability to support extremely large bandwidths even when the particle size is deeply subwavelength. Finally, we show that higher Q antennas may couple more efficiently to an external load, but the optimal absorption cross-section depends only on the resonance frequency. PMID:20052120

  13. Antenna Controller Replacement Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Roger Y.; Morgan, Scott C.; Strain, Martha M.; Rockwell, Stephen T.; Shimizu, Kenneth J.; Tehrani, Barzia J.; Kwok, Jaclyn H.; Tuazon-Wong, Michelle; Valtier, Henry; Nalbandi, Reza; Wert, Michael; Leung, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    The Antenna Controller Replacement (ACR) software accurately points and monitors the Deep Space Network (DSN) 70-m and 34-m high-efficiency (HEF) ground-based antennas that are used to track primarily spacecraft and, periodically, celestial targets. To track a spacecraft, or other targets, the antenna must be accurately pointed at the spacecraft, which can be very far away with very weak signals. ACR s conical scanning capability collects the signal in a circular pattern around the target, calculates the location of the strongest signal, and adjusts the antenna pointing to point directly at the spacecraft. A real-time, closed-loop servo control algorithm performed every 0.02 second allows accurate positioning of the antenna in order to track these distant spacecraft. Additionally, this advanced servo control algorithm provides better antenna pointing performance in windy conditions. The ACR software provides high-level commands that provide a very easy user interface for the DSN operator. The operator only needs to enter two commands to start the antenna and subreflector, and Master Equatorial tracking. The most accurate antenna pointing is accomplished by aligning the antenna to the Master Equatorial, which because of its small size and sheltered location, has the most stable pointing. The antenna has hundreds of digital and analog monitor points. The ACR software provides compact displays to summarize the status of the antenna, subreflector, and the Master Equatorial. The ACR software has two major functions. First, it performs all of the steps required to accurately point the antenna (and subreflector and Master Equatorial) at the spacecraft (or celestial target). This involves controlling the antenna/ subreflector/Master-Equatorial hardware, initiating and monitoring the correct sequence of operations, calculating the position of the spacecraft relative to the antenna, executing the real-time servo control algorithm to maintain the correct position, and

  14. Mechanically-steered disk antenna for mobile satellite service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarrick, Charles D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a low-profile disk antenna for vehicular mounting that accommodates L-Band (1525-1660.5 MHz) mobile satellite service requirements. The antenna uses a rotatable printed circuit array mechanically-steered in azimuth via an external tracking system. A shaped elevation beam inherent to the antenna design provides continuous coverage with a minimum gain of 9 dBic between elevation angles of 25-degrees and 60-degrees measured above the horizon. A brief background on the theory, design, and performance for this antenna is discussed.

  15. Hyperbola-parabola primary mirror in Cassegrain optical antenna to improve transmission efficiency.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Chen, Lu; Yang, HuaJun; Jiang, Ping; Mao, Shengqian; Caiyang, Weinan

    2015-08-20

    An optical model with a hyperbola-parabola primary mirror added in the Cassegrain optical antenna, which can effectively improve the transmission efficiency, is proposed in this paper. The optimum parameters of a hyperbola-parabola primary mirror and a secondary mirror for the optical antenna system have been designed and analyzed in detail. The parabola-hyperbola primary structure optical antenna is obtained to improve the transmission efficiency of 10.60% in theory, and the simulation efficiency changed 9.359%. For different deflection angles to the receiving antenna with the emit antenna, the coupling efficiency curve of the optical antenna has been obtained. PMID:26368746

  16. A True Metasurface Antenna

    PubMed Central

    Badawe, Mohamed El; Almoneef, Thamer S.; Ramahi, Omar M.

    2016-01-01

    We present a true metasurface antenna based on electrically-small resonators. The resonators are placed on a flat surface and connected to one feed point using corporate feed. Unlike conventional array antennas where the distance between adjacent antennas is half wavelength to reduce mutual coupling between adjacent antennas, here the distance between the radiating elements is electrically very small to affect good impedance matching of each resonator to its feed. A metasurface antenna measuring 1.2λ × 1.2λ and designed to operate at 3 GHz achieved a gain of 12 dBi. A prototype was fabricated and tested showing good agreement between numerical simulations and experimental results. Through numerical simulation, we show that the metasurface antenna has the ability to provide beam steering by phasing all the resonators appropriately. PMID:26759177

  17. A True Metasurface Antenna.

    PubMed

    El Badawe, Mohamed; Almoneef, Thamer S; Ramahi, Omar M

    2016-01-01

    We present a true metasurface antenna based on electrically-small resonators. The resonators are placed on a flat surface and connected to one feed point using corporate feed. Unlike conventional array antennas where the distance between adjacent antennas is half wavelength to reduce mutual coupling between adjacent antennas, here the distance between the radiating elements is electrically very small to affect good impedance matching of each resonator to its feed. A metasurface antenna measuring 1.2λ × 1.2λ and designed to operate at 3 GHz achieved a gain of 12 dBi. A prototype was fabricated and tested showing good agreement between numerical simulations and experimental results. Through numerical simulation, we show that the metasurface antenna has the ability to provide beam steering by phasing all the resonators appropriately. PMID:26759177

  18. A True Metasurface Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawe, Mohamed El; Almoneef, Thamer S.; Ramahi, Omar M.

    2016-01-01

    We present a true metasurface antenna based on electrically-small resonators. The resonators are placed on a flat surface and connected to one feed point using corporate feed. Unlike conventional array antennas where the distance between adjacent antennas is half wavelength to reduce mutual coupling between adjacent antennas, here the distance between the radiating elements is electrically very small to affect good impedance matching of each resonator to its feed. A metasurface antenna measuring 1.2λ × 1.2λ and designed to operate at 3 GHz achieved a gain of 12 dBi. A prototype was fabricated and tested showing good agreement between numerical simulations and experimental results. Through numerical simulation, we show that the metasurface antenna has the ability to provide beam steering by phasing all the resonators appropriately.

  19. Microstrip patch antennas - Basic properties and some recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kai-Fong

    1989-10-01

    For high-speed moving vehicles, it is desirable for the antenna to be 'low profile'. One of the early low profile antennas is the slot antenna, the theory of which was developed by Professor Henry G. Booker in a classic paper published in 1946. During the last decade and a half, a relatively new class of radiators known as microstrip patch antennas has received much attention. In addition to being low profile and conformable to a shaped surface, these antennas offer the potential advantages of light weight, low cost, ruggedness, and compatibility with integrated circuit technology. The main disadvantages are narrow bandwidth and the problems associated with copper loss and spurious radiation when the elements form an array. This paper begins with a description of the basic features of microstrip patch antennas, followed by a presentation of some of the research aimed at improving the frequency response and gain, particularly those to which the author and his collaborators have made contributions.

  20. Phased array antenna control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doland, G. D. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Several new and useful improvements in steering and control of phased array antennas having a small number of elements, typically on the order of 5 to 17 elements are provided. Among the improvements are increasing the number of beam steering positions, reducing the possibility of phase transients in signals received or transmitted with the antennas, and increasing control and testing capacity with respect to the antennas.

  1. Tunable circular patch antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, G.-L.; Sengupta, D. L.

    1985-10-01

    A method to control the resonant or operating frequencies of circular patch antennas has been investigated experimentally and theoretically. It consists of the placement of passive metallic or tuning posts at approximate locations within the input region of the antenna. Comparison of measured and analytical results seems to establish the validity of a theoretical model proposed to determine the input performance of such circular patch antennas.

  2. Turnstile slot antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munson, R. E. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A turnstile slot antenna is disclosed, the antenna being for and integral with a spacecraft having a substantially cylindrical body portion. The antenna comprises a circumferential slot about the periphery of the spacecraft body portion with an annular wave guide cavity defining a radial transmission line disposed within the spacecraft body portion behind and in communication with the circumferential slot. Feed stubs and associated transmission apparatus are provided to excite the annular cavity in quadrature phase such that an omnidirectional, circularly polarized, rotating radiation pattern is generated. The antenna of the instant invention has utility both as a transmitting and receiving device, and ensures continuous telemetry and command coverage with the spacecraft.

  3. Antennas for diverse requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukamp, Joachim

    An account is given of a major German aerospace manufacturer's state-of-the-art methods for development, design, construction, testing and certification of a wide variety of civilian and military communications and radar antennas. Attention is given to reflector antennas for very large aperture/wavelength ratios, slotted waveguide arrays in which the radiating aperture is synthesized by guided structures, and both microstrip arrays and active arrays, for the creation of very large area antennas. Antenna tests and measurements are conducted in an anechoic chamber.

  4. The single antenna interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Fitch, J.P.

    1990-01-15

    Air and space borne platforms using synthetic aperture radars (SAR) have made interferometric measurements by using either two physical antennas mounted on one air-frame or two passes of one antenna over a scene. In this paper, a new interferometric technique using one pass of a single-antenna SAR system is proposed and demonstrated on data collected by the NASA-JPL AirSAR. Remotely sensed L-band microwave data are used to show the sensitivity of this technique to ocean surface features as well as a baseline for comparison with work by others using two-antenna systems. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  5. MSU Antenna Pattern Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, Tsan; Kleespies, Thomas J.; Green, J. Philip

    2000-01-01

    The Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) antenna pattern data for nine MSU Flight Models (FMs) have been successfully rescued from 22-year old 7-track and 9-track magnetic tapes and cartridges. These antenna pattern data were unpacked into user-friendly ASCII format, and are potentially useful for making antenna pattern corrections to MSU antenna temperatures in retrieving the true brightness temperatures. We also properly interpreted the contents of the data and show how to convert the measured antenna signal amplitude in volts into relative antenna power in dB with proper normalization. It is found that the data are of high quality with a 60-dB drop in the co-polarized antenna patterns from the central peak value to its side-lobe regions at scan angles beyond 30 deg. The unpacked antenna pattern data produced in this study provide a useful database for data users to correct the antenna side-lobe contribution to MSU measurements. All of the data are available to the scientific community on a single CD-ROM.

  6. MASTER TELEVISION ANTENNA SYSTEM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island State Dept. of Education, Providence.

    SPECIFICATIONS FOR THE FURNISHING AND INSTALLATION OF TELEVISION MASTER ANTENNA SYSTEMS FOR SECONDARY AND ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS ARE GIVEN. CONTRACTOR REQUIREMENTS, EQUIPMENT, PERFORMANCE STANDARDS, AND FUNCTIONS ARE DESCRIBED. (MS)

  7. Cellular Reflectarray Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    The cellular reflectarray antenna is intended to replace conventional parabolic reflectors that must be physically aligned with a particular satellite in geostationary orbit. These arrays are designed for specified geographical locations, defined by latitude and longitude, each called a "cell." A particular cell occupies nominally 1,500 square miles (3,885 sq. km), but this varies according to latitude and longitude. The cellular reflectarray antenna designed for a particular cell is simply positioned to align with magnetic North, and the antenna surface is level (parallel to the ground). A given cellular reflectarray antenna will not operate in any other cell.

  8. Antenna impedance measurements in a magnetized plasma. II. Dipole antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, David D.; Walker, David N.; Messer, Sarah J.; Amatucci, William E.

    2007-09-15

    This paper presents experimental impedance measurements of a dipole antenna immersed in a magnetized plasma. The impedance was derived from the magnitude and phase of the reflected power using a network analyzer over a frequency range of 1 MHz-1 GHz. The plasma density was varied between 10{sup 7} and 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3} in weakly ({omega}{sub ce}<{omega}{sub pe}) and strongly ({omega}{sub ce}>{omega}{sub pe}) magnetized plasmas in the Space Physics Simulation Chamber at the Naval Research Laboratory. Over this range of plasma conditions the wavelength in the plasma varies from the short dipole limit ({lambda}>>L) to the long dipole limit ({lambda}{approx}L). As with previous impedance measurements, there are two resonant frequencies observed as frequencies where the impedance of the antenna is real. Measurements have indicated that in the short dipole limit the majority of the power deposition takes place at the lower resonance frequency which lies between the cyclotron frequency and the upper hybrid frequency. These measured curves agree very well with the analytic theory for a short dipole in a magnetoplasma. In the long dipole regime, in addition to the short dipole effects still being present, there is resonant energy deposition which peaks at much higher frequencies and correlates to 1/2 and 3/2 wavelength dipole resonances. The wavelengths in the plasma predicted by these resonances are consistent with the antenna radiating R and L-waves.

  9. Electric field distribution characteristics of photoconductive antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Sheng-Wu; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2012-10-01

    Photoexcitation of biased semiconductor photoconductive antennas by femtosecond pulses is the most common and convenient technique for generating strong terahertz (THz) pulses. In this paper, we use the three-dimensional (3D) finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) to analyze electric field distribution of THz pulses in the near-field from a photoconductive antenna. The simulation is based on solving Maxwell's equations and the carrier rate equations simultaneously on realistic dipole antenna structures. The 3D FDTD simulation gives detailed features of THz electric field distribution in and out of the antenna. It is found that the difference of near-field distribution between the substrate and free space is considerably large. The fields of the alternating-current dipole exhibit an unsymmetrical distribution and a large deviation from those calculated using the simple Hertzian dipole theory. The magnitude of THz field in and out of the substrate attenuates rapidly while it holds the line in the gap center. The high-frequency components of THz radiation emission come only from the dipole antenna, while the low-frequency components are from both the center electrodes and coplanar stripline waveguide. This work can be used to optimize the design of antenna geometry and raise the radiation field power.

  10. Recent results for plasma antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Alexeff, Igor; Anderson, Ted; Farshi, Esmaeil; Karnam, Naresh; Pulasani, Nanditha Reddy

    2008-05-15

    Plasma antennas are just as effective as metal antennas. They can transmit, receive, and reflect radio waves just as well as metal antennas. In addition, plasma generated noise does not appear to be a problem.

  11. Scanning means for Cassegrainian antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giandomenico, A.; Rusch, W. V. T.

    1967-01-01

    Mechanical antenna beam switching device detects weak signals over atmospheric and equipment noise sources in microwave antennas. It periodically nutates the paraboloidal subdish in a Cassegrainian reflector system.

  12. Quantum nondemolition measurements. [by gravitational wave antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braginskii, V. B.; Vorontsov, Iu. I.; Thorne, K. S.

    1980-01-01

    The article describes new electronic techniques required for quantum nondemolition measurements and the theory underlying them. Consideration is given to resonant-bar gravitational-wave antennas. Position measurements are discussed along with energy measurements and back-action-evading measurements. Thermal noise in oscillators and amplifiers is outlined. Prospects for stroboscopic measurements are emphasized.

  13. Airborne antenna pattern calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagherian, A. B.; Mielke, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    Use of calculation program START and modeling program P 3D to produce radiation patterns of antennas mounted on a space station is discussed. Basic components of two space stations in the early design stage are simulated and radiation patterns for antennas mounted on the modules are presented.

  14. mm-wave antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhs, H. P.

    1985-07-01

    The present low profile seeker front end's slotted waveguide antenna was primarily developed to investigate the feasibility of the application of standard manufacturing techniques to mm-wave hardware. A dual plane monopulse comparator was constructed to mate with the antenna via integrated packaging techniques. The comparator was fabricated by CAD/CAM milling operations.

  15. Deformations in VLBI antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, T. A.; Thomsen, P.

    1988-01-01

    A study is presented of deformations in antennas with the emphasis on their influence on VLBI measurements. The GIFTS structural analysis program has been used to model the VLBI antenna in Fairbanks (Alaska). The report identifies key deformations and studies the effect of gravity, wind, and temperature. Estimates of expected deformations are given.

  16. Milestones in Broadcasting: Antennas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Media in Education and Development, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Briefly describes the development of antennas in the prebroadcast era (elevated antenna, selectivity to prevent interference between stations, birth of diplex, directional properties, support structures), as well as technological developments used in long-, medium-, and short-wave broadcasting, VHF/FM and television broadcasting, and satellite…

  17. GPS antenna designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laube, Samuel J. P.

    1987-05-01

    Application of the current GPS NAVSTAR system to civilian service requires that a right hand, circularly polarized, -160 dBW spread spectrum signal be received from an orbiting satellite, where the antenna environment is also moving. This presents a design challenge when inexpensive antennas are desired. The intent of this survey is to provide information on the antennas mentioned and to construct and test prototypes to determine whether the choice made by the industry, the quadrifilar helix, is the best. The helix antenna is currently the low cost standard for GPS. Prototype versions were constructed using 12 gauge wire and subminiature coaxial hardline. The constructed antennas were tested using a signal generator and a reference turnstile. A spectrum analyzer was used to measure the level of the received signal.

  18. Parabolic torus transreflector antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, L. M.; Smith, M. S.

    1984-12-01

    The possible scan rate of conventional radar antennas using parabolic dishes is limited to about 60 rev/min. This limitation is related to mechanical rotation requirements. Many radar applications require high data renewal rates, including short-range defense systems and systems for reduction of sea clutter. Faster scan rates can be obtained by using phased arrays and electronic scanning. However, the use of the required equipment introduces considerable complexity and cost. The present investigation is concerned with a novel form of antenna permitting high scan rates, taking into account a parabolic torus transreflector antenna. The feed horn illuminates one side of the radome with polarization parallel to the wires, which therefore reflect the radiation like a dish antenna. In the antenna considered, rotation of the beam is effected by mechanical rotation of the horn feed only, and this provides the potential for high scanning rates.

  19. GPS antenna designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laube, Samuel J. P.

    1987-01-01

    Application of the current GPS NAVSTAR system to civilian service requires that a right hand, circularly polarized, -160 dBW spread spectrum signal be received from an orbiting satellite, where the antenna environment is also moving. This presents a design challenge when inexpensive antennas are desired. The intent of this survey is to provide information on the antennas mentioned and to construct and test prototypes to determine whether the choice made by the industry, the quadrifilar helix, is the best. The helix antenna is currently the low cost standard for GPS. Prototype versions were constructed using 12 gauge wire and subminiature coaxial hardline. The constructed antennas were tested using a signal generator and a reference turnstile. A spectrum analyzer was used to measure the level of the received signal.

  20. Application of Ruze Equation for Inflatable Aperture Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Bryan W.

    2008-01-01

    Inflatable aperture reflector antennas are an emerging technology that NASA is investigating for potential uses in science and exploration missions. As inflatable aperture antennas have not been proven fully qualified for space missions, they must be characterized properly so that the behavior of the antennas can be known in advance. To properly characterize the inflatable aperture antenna, testing must be performed in a relevant environment, such as a vacuum chamber. Since the capability of having a radiofrequency (RF) test facility inside a vacuum chamber did not exist at NASA Glenn Research Center, a different methodology had to be utilized. The proposal to test an inflatable aperture antenna in a vacuum chamber entailed performing a photogrammetry study of the antenna surface by using laser ranging measurements. A root-mean-square (rms) error term was derived from the photogrammetry study to calculate the antenna surface loss as described by the Ruze equation. However, initial testing showed that problems existed in using the Ruze equation to calculate the loss due to errors on the antenna surface. This study utilized RF measurements obtained in a near-field antenna range and photogrammetry data taken from a laser range scanner to compare the expected performance of the test antenna (via the Ruze equation) with the actual RF patterns and directivity measurements. Results showed that the Ruze equation overstated the degradation in the directivity calculation. Therefore, when the photogrammetry study is performed on the test antennas in the vacuum chamber, a more complex equation must be used in light of the fact that the Ruze theory overstates the loss in directivity for inflatable aperture reflector antennas.

  1. Autonomous omnidirectional spacecraft antenna system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, T. H.

    1983-01-01

    The development of a low gain Electronically Switchable Spherical Array Antenna is discussed. This antenna provides roughly 7 dBic gain for receive/transmit operation between user satellites and the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System. When used as a pair, the antenna provides spherical coverage. The antenna was tested in its primary operating modes: directed beam, retrodirective, and Omnidirectional.

  2. RF MEMS Based Reconfigurable Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.

    2004-01-01

    The presentation will first of all address the advantages of RF MEMS circuit in antenna applications and also the need for electronically reconfigurable antennas. Next, discuss some of the recent examples of RF MEMS based reconfigurable microstrip antennas. Finally, conclude the talk with a summary of MEMS antenna performance.

  3. Antenna Technologies for NASA Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2006-01-01

    This presentation addresses the efforts being performed at GRC to develop antenna technology in support of NASA s Exploration Vision. In particular, the presentation discusses the communications architecture asset-specific data services, as well as wide area coverage, high gain, low mass deployable antennas. Phased array antennas as well as electrically small, lightweight, low power, multifunctional antennas will be also discussed.

  4. Antenna Technologies for NASA Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix

    2007-01-01

    This presentation addresses the efforts being performed at GRC to develop antenna technology in support of NASA s Exploration Vision. In particular, the presentation discusses the communications architecture asset-specific data services, as well as wide area coverage, high gain, low mass deployable antennas. Phased array antennas as well as electrically small, lightweight, low power, multifunctional antennas will be also discussed.

  5. Pulsed energy storage antennas for ionospheric modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuerker, R. F.; Chen, J.; Beam, W.; Nichols, E.

    2005-01-01

    Interesting, "new", very high peak-power pulsed radio frequency (RF) antennas have been assembled at the HIPAS Observatory (Alaska, USA) and also at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA, USA); namely, a pair of quarter wavelength (λ/4) long cylindrical conductors separated by a high voltage spark gap. Such a combination can radiate multi-megawatt RF pulses whenever the spark gap fires. The antenna at HIPAS is 53m long (λ/2) with a central pressurized SF6 spark gap. It is mounted 5 meters (λ/21) above a ground plane. It radiates at 2.85MHz. The two antenna halves are charged to ± high voltages by a Tesla coil. Spark gap voltages of 0.4 MV (at the instant of spark gap closure) give peak RF currents of ~1200A which correspond to ~14 MW peak total radiated power, or ~56 MW of Effective Radiated Power (ERP). The RF pulse train is initially square, decaying exponentially in time with Qs of ~50. Two similar but smaller 80-MHz antennas were assembled at UCLA to demonstrate their synchronization with a pulsed laser which fired the spark gaps in the two antennas simultanoeously. These experiments show that one can anticipate a pulsed array of laser synchronized antennas having a coherent Effective Radiated Power (ERP)>10GW. One can even reconsider a pulse array radiating at 1.43MHz which corresponds to the electron gyrofrequency in the Earth's magnetic field at ~200km altitude. These "new" pulsed high power antennas are hauntingly similar to the ones used originally by Hertz (1857-1894) during his (1886-1889) seminal verifications of Maxwell's (1864) theory of electrodynamics.

  6. X-Antenna: A graphical interface for antenna analysis codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, B. L.; Newman, E. H.; Shamansky, H. T.

    1995-01-01

    This report serves as the user's manual for the X-Antenna code. X-Antenna is intended to simplify the analysis of antennas by giving the user graphical interfaces in which to enter all relevant antenna and analysis code data. Essentially, X-Antenna creates a Motif interface to the user's antenna analysis codes. A command-file allows new antennas and codes to be added to the application. The menu system and graphical interface screens are created dynamically to conform to the data in the command-file. Antenna data can be saved and retrieved from disk. X-Antenna checks all antenna and code values to ensure they are of the correct type, writes an output file, and runs the appropriate antenna analysis code. Volumetric pattern data may be viewed in 3D space with an external viewer run directly from the application. Currently, X-Antenna includes analysis codes for thin wire antennas (dipoles, loops, and helices), rectangular microstrip antennas, and thin slot antennas.

  7. Antenna-coupled microcavities for terahertz emission

    SciTech Connect

    Madéo, J. Todorov, Y.; Sirtori, C.

    2014-01-20

    We have investigated the capacitive coupling between dipolar antennas and metal-dielectric-metal wire microcavities with strong sub-wavelength confinement in the terahertz region. The coupling appears in reflectivity measurements performed on arrays of antenna-coupled elements, which display asymmetric Fano lineshapes. The experimental data are compared to a temporal coupled-mode theory and finite elements electromagnetic simulations. We show that the Fano interferences correspond to coupling between a subradiant mode (microcavity) and a superradiant mode (antennas). This phenomenon allows one to enhance and control the radiative coupling of the strongly confined mode with the vacuum. These concepts are very useful for terahertz optoelectronic devices based on deep-sub-wavelength active regions.

  8. Satellite Antenna Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Through the Technology Affiliates Program at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the ACTS antenna system was transferred from experimental testing status to commercial development with KVH Industries, Inc. The ACTS design enables mobile satellite antennas to remain pointed at the satellite, regardless of the motion or vibration on which it is mounted. KVH's first product based on the ACTS design is a land-mobile satellite antenna system that will enable direct broadcast satellite television aboard moving trucks, recreational vehicles, trains, and buses. Future products could include use in broadcasting, emergency medical and military vehicles.

  9. SAR antenna calibration techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carver, K. R.; Newell, A. C.

    1978-01-01

    Calibration of SAR antennas requires a measurement of gain, elevation and azimuth pattern shape, boresight error, cross-polarization levels, and phase vs. angle and frequency. For spaceborne SAR antennas of SEASAT size operating at C-band or higher, some of these measurements can become extremely difficult using conventional far-field antenna test ranges. Near-field scanning techniques offer an alternative approach and for C-band or X-band SARs, give much improved accuracy and precision as compared to that obtainable with a far-field approach.

  10. Deep space antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Three 26-m tracking antennas operated by the NASA Deep Space Network at Goldstone, Calif.; Madrid, Spain; and near Canberra, Australia, will cease operations on Dec. 1, 1981. The stations will continue to operate 64-m and 34-m deep space tracking antennas. Ending operation of the 26-m antennas will cause a reduction of about 30%; of the Deep Space Network tracking and data acquisition capability. This means less support for NASA planetary spacecraft. Currently, the Deep Space Network is supporting Voyagers 1 and 2, Helios 1, the Mars Viking 1 Lander and Pioneers 6 through 12.

  11. Antenna pattern control using impedence surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Liu, Kefeng

    1991-01-01

    During this research period, September 16, 1990 to March 15, 1991, a design method for selecting a low-loss impedance material coating for a horn antenna pattern control has been developed. This method and the stepped waveguide technique can be employed to accurately compute the electromagnetic wave phenomenon inside the transition region of the horn antenna, with or without the impedance surfaces, from the feed to the radiating aperture. For moment method solutions of the electric and magnetic current distributions on the radiating aperture and the outer surface of the horn antenna, triangular surface-patch modes are introduced to replace the sinusoidal surface-patch modes as expansion and testing functions to provide a more physical expansion of the current distributions. In the synthesis problem, a numerical optimization process is formulated to minimize the error function between the desired waveguide modes and the modes provided by the horn transition with impedance surfaces. Since the modes generated by the horn transition with impedance surface are computed by analytical techniques, the computational error involved in the synthesis of the antenna pattern is minimum. Therefore, the instability problem can be avoided. A preliminary implementation of the techniques has demonstrated that the developed theory of the horn antenna pattern control using the impedance surfaces is realizable.

  12. Experimental Results of Schlicher's Thrusting Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Niedra, Janis M.

    2001-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to test the claims by Rex L. Schlicher, et al., (Patent 5,142,86 1) that a certain antenna geometry produces thrust greatly exceeding radiation reaction, when driven by repetitive, fast rise, and relatively slower decay current pulses. In order to test this hypothesis, the antenna was suspended by strings as a 3 in pendulum. Current pulses were fed to the antenna along the suspension path by a very flexible coaxial line constructed from loudspeaker cable and copper braid sheath. When driving the antenna via this cabling, our pulser was capable of sustaining 1200 A pulses at a rate of 30 per second up to a minute. In this way, bursts of pulses could be delivered in synch with the pendulum period in order to build up any motion. However, when using a laser beam passing through a lens attached to the antenna to amplify linear displacement by a factor of at least 25, no correlated motion of the beam spot could be detected on a distant wall. We conclude, in agreement with the momentum theorem of classical electromagnetic theory, that any thrust produced is far below practically useful levels. Hence, within classical electrodynamics, there is little hope of detecting any low level motion that cannot be explained by interactions with surrounding structural steel and the Earth's magnetic field.

  13. NASA technology for large space antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, R. A.; Campbell, T. G.; Freeland, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    Some leading concepts for deployable antennas are described and an assessment of the state of the art in deployable antennas is presented. The advanced sunflower precision antenna, the radial rib antenna and the maypole (hoop/column) antenna, the wrap rib antenna and the parabolic erectable truss antenna are covered. In addition, a discussion on the technology development program for two deployable antenna concepts that are responsive to the antenna mission requirements as defined in the NASA mission model is presented.

  14. RFID Tag Helix Antenna Sensors for Wireless Drug Dosage Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haiyu; Zhao, Peisen; Chen, Pai-Yen; Ren, Yong; Liu, Xuewu; Ferrari, Mauro; Hu, Ye; Akinwande, Deji

    2014-01-01

    Miniaturized helix antennas are integrated with drug reservoirs to function as RFID wireless tag sensors for real-time drug dosage monitoring. The general design procedure of this type of biomedical antenna sensors is proposed based on electromagnetic theory and finite element simulation. A cost effective fabrication process is utilized to encapsulate the antenna sensor within a biocompatible package layer using PDMS material, and at the same time form a drug storage or drug delivery unit inside the sensor. The in vitro experiment on two prototypes of antenna sensor-drug reservoir assembly have shown the ability to monitor the drug dosage by tracking antenna resonant frequency shift from 2.4-2.5-GHz ISM band with realized sensitivity of 1.27 [Formula: see text] for transdermal drug delivery monitoring and 2.76-[Formula: see text] sensitivity for implanted drug delivery monitoring. PMID:27170865

  15. Coaxial phased array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, H., Jr. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A coaxial antenna array for communicating circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation is disclosed. A pair of open ended antenna cavities is coaxially constructed and operates by excitation of linear radiation elements arranged within each of the cavities. A pair of crossed dipole radiation devices is centered within the inner cavity and operated by means of a phase shifting network circuit to transmit as well as receive circularly polarized radiation. Four monopole radiation devices are symmetrically arranged to operate in the outer cavity in phase quadrature by means of the phase shifting network circuit to both transmit and receive circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation. Combined operation of the two antenna cavities with a 180 deg phase differential between the fields related to the two antenna cavities provides a broad beam, relatively wide frequency bandwidth communication capability. Particular embodiments disclosed feature a generally square cavity array as well as a circular cavity array.

  16. Rotary antenna attenuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, R. M.; Hardy, J. C.

    1969-01-01

    Radio frequency attenuator, having negligible insertion loss at minimum attenuation, can be used for making precise antenna gain measurements. It is small in size compared to a rotary-vane attenuator.

  17. Electrically driven optical antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Johannes; Kullock, René; Prangsma, Jord; Emmerling, Monika; Kamp, Martin; Hecht, Bert

    2015-09-01

    Unlike radiowave antennas, so far optical nanoantennas cannot be fed by electrical generators. Instead, they are driven by light or indirectly via excited discrete states in active materials in their vicinity. Here we demonstrate the direct electrical driving of an in-plane optical antenna by the broadband quantum-shot noise of electrons tunnelling across its feed gap. The spectrum of the emitted photons is determined by the antenna geometry and can be tuned via the applied voltage. Moreover, the direction and polarization of the light emission are controlled by the antenna resonance, which also improves the external quantum efficiency by up to two orders of magnitude. The one-material planar design offers facile integration of electrical and optical circuits and thus represents a new paradigm for interfacing electrons and photons at the nanometre scale, for example for on-chip wireless communication and highly configurable electrically driven subwavelength photon sources.

  18. Antenna pattern study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Warren

    1988-01-01

    Prediction of antenna radiation patterns has long been an important function in the design of command, communication, and tracking systems for rocket vehicles and spacecraft. An acceptable degree of assurance that a radio link will provide the required quality of data or certainty of correct command execution must be acquired by some means if the system is to be certified as reliable. Two methods have been used to perform this function: (1) Theoretical analysis, based on the known properties of basic antenna element types and their behavior in the presence of conductive structures of simple shape, and (2) Measurement of the patterns on scale models of the spacecraft or rocket vehicle on which the antenna is located. Both of these methods are ordinarily employed in the antenna design process.

  19. Coaxial phased array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, H., Jr.

    1980-08-01

    A coaxial antenna array for communicating circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation is disclosed. A pair of open ended antenna cavities is coaxially constructed and operates by excitation of linear radiation elements arranged within each of the cavities. A pair of crossed dipole radiation devices is centered within the inner cavity and operated by means of a phase shifting network circuit to transmit as well as receive circularly polarized radiation. Four monopole radiation devices are symmetrically arranged to operate in the outer cavity in phase quadrature by means of the phase shifting network circuit to both transmit and receive circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation. Combined operation of the two antenna cavities with a 180 deg phase differential between the fields related to the two antenna cavities provides a broad beam, relatively wide frequency bandwidth communication capability. Particular embodiments disclosed feature a generally square cavity array as well as a circular cavity array.

  20. Microwave antenna holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochblatt, David J.; Seidel, Boris L.

    1992-01-01

    This microwave holography technique utilizes the Fourier transform relation between the complex far field radiation pattern of an antenna and the complex aperture field distribution. Resulting aperture phase and amplitude distribution data can be used to precisely characterize various crucial performance parameters, including panel alignment, panel shaping, subreflector position, antenna aperture illumination, directivity at various frequencies, and gravity deformation effects. The methodology of data processing presented here was successfully applied to the Deep Space Network (DSN) 34-m beam waveguide antennas. The antenna performance was improved at all operating frequencies by reducing the main reflector mechanical surface rms error to 0.43 mm. At Ka-band (32 GHz), the estimated improvement is 4.1 dB, resulting in an aperture efficiency of 52 percent. The performance improvement was verified by efficiency measurements and additional holographic measurements.

  1. CIRCULAR CAVITY SLOT ANTENNA

    DOEpatents

    Kerley, P.L.

    1959-01-01

    A small-size antenna having a doughnut-shaped field pattern and which can act both as an antenna and a resonant circuit is described. The antenna is of the slotted type and comprises a resonant cavity with a center hole. A circular slot is provided in one wall of the cavity concentric with the hole and a radio frequency source is connected across the slot. The pattern and loading of the antenna are adjusted by varying the position and shape of a center element slidably disposed within the hole and projecting from the slotted side of the resonant cavity. The disclosed structure may also be used to propagate the oscillator signal down a transniission line by replacing the center element with one leg of the transmission line in a spaced relation from the walls of the cavity.

  2. Dielectric Covered Planar Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Llombart Juan, Nuria (Inventor); Lee, Choonsup (Inventor); Chattopadhyay, Goutam (Inventor); Gill, John J. (Inventor); Skalare, Anders J. (Inventor); Siegel, Peter H. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An antenna element suitable for integrated arrays at terahertz frequencies is disclosed. The antenna element comprises an extended spherical (e.g. hemispherical) semiconductor lens, e.g. silicon, antenna fed by a leaky wave waveguide feed. The extended spherical lens comprises a substantially spherical lens adjacent a substantially planar lens extension. A couple of TE/TM leaky wave modes are excited in a resonant cavity formed between a ground plane and the substantially planar lens extension by a waveguide block coupled to the ground plane. Due to these modes, the primary feed radiates inside the lens with a directive pattern that illuminates a small sector of the lens. The antenna structure is compatible with known semiconductor fabrication technology and enables production of large format imaging arrays.

  3. A resonant scanning dipole-antenna probe for enhanced nanoscale imaging.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Lars; van 't Oever, Jorick; van Hulst, Niek F

    2013-11-13

    We present a scanning antenna probe that provides 35 nm optical hotspots with a 16-fold excitation enhancement. A resonant optical antenna, tuned to operation in the visible, is carved into the aluminum-coated scanning probe. The antenna resonances, field localization, excitation, and polarization response are probed in the near-field by scanning over single fluorescent nanobeads. At the same time, the distance-dependent coupling of the emission to the antenna mode is mapped. Good agreement with theory is obtained. The presented scanning antenna approach is useful for both nanoscale plasmonic mode imaging and (bio)imaging. PMID:24124987

  4. Polarized Antenna Splitting Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Peskin, Michael E.; /SLAC

    2009-10-17

    We consider parton showers based on radiation from QCD dipoles or 'antennae'. These showers are built from 2 {yields} 3 parton splitting processes. The question then arises of what functions replace the Altarelli-Parisi splitting functions in this approach. We give a detailed answer to this question, applicable to antenna showers in which partons carry definite helicity, and to both initial- and final-state emissions.

  5. Intelsat VI antenna system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, M. F.; Lane, S. O.; Taormina, F. A.

    The antenna system design of a series of five new communications satellites known as Intelsat VI is described in detail. Each satellite will utilize 50 transponders operating in the C and K band portions of the frequency spectrum. The transponders are interconnectible using either static switch matrices or a network which provides satellite switched time division multiple access capability. The antenna coverages, characteristics, and special design features are shown and discussed.

  6. A generalized method for determining radiation patterns of aperture antennas and its application to reflector antennas. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paknys, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    The reflector antenna may be thought of as an aperture antenna. The classical solution for the radiation pattern of such an antenna is found by the aperture integration (AI) method. Success with this method depends on how accurately the aperture currents are known beforehand. In the past, geometrical optics (GO) has been employed to find the aperture currents. This approximation is suitable for calculating the main beam and possibly the first few sidelobes. A better approximation is to use aperture currents calculated from the geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD). Integration of the GTD currents over and extended aperture yields more accurate results for the radiation pattern. This approach is useful when conventional AI and GTD solutions have no common region of validity. This problem arises in reflector antennas. Two dimensional models of parabolic reflectors are studied; however, the techniques discussed can be applied to any aperture antenna.

  7. Antenna engineering handbook /2nd edition/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. C.; Jasik, H.

    Essential principles, methods, and data for solving a wide range of problems in antenna design and application are presented. The basic concepts and fundamentals of antennas are reviewed, followed by a discussion of arrays of discrete elements. Then all primary types of antennas currently in use are considered, providing concise descriptions of operating principles, design methods, and performance data. Small antennas, microstrip antennas, frequency-scan antennas, conformal and low-profile arrays, adaptive antennas, and phased arrays are covered. The major applications of antennas and the design methods peculiar to those applications are discussed in detail. The employment of antennas to meet the requirements of today's complex electronic systems is emphasized, including earth station antennas, satellite antennas, seeker antennas, microwave-relay antennas, tracking antennas, radiometer antennas, and ECM and ESM antennas. Finally, significant topics related to antenna engineering, such as transmission lines and waveguides, radomes, microwave propagation, and impedance matching and broadbanding, are addressed.

  8. Large Deployable Reflectarray Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Houfei; Huang, John; Lou, Michael

    2006-01-01

    A report discusses a 7-meter-diameter reflectarray antenna that has been conceived in a continuing effort to develop large reflectarray antennas to be deployed in outer space. Major underlying concepts were reported in three prior NASA Tech Briefs articles: "Inflatable Reflectarray Antennas" (NPO-20433), Vol. 23, No. 10 (October 1999), page 50; "Tape-Spring Reinforcements for Inflatable Structural Tubes" (NPO-20615), Vol. 24, No. 7 (July 2000), page 58; and "Self-Inflatable/Self-Rigidizable Reflectarray Antenna" (NPO-30662), Vol. 28, No. 1 (January 2004), page 61. Like previous antennas in the series, the antenna now proposed would include a reflectarray membrane stretched flat on a frame of multiple inflatable booms. The membrane and booms would be rolled up and folded for compact stowage during transport. Deployment in outer space would be effected by inflating the booms to unroll and then to unfold the membrane, thereby stretching the membrane out flat to its full size. The membrane would achieve the flatness for a Ka-band application. The report gives considerable emphasis to designing the booms to rigidify themselves upon deployment: for this purpose, the booms could be made as spring-tape-reinforced aluminum laminate tubes like those described in two of the cited prior articles.

  9. VLF/LF transmitting antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belrose, John S.

    1993-05-01

    Very Low Frequency (VLF) transmitting antenna design is a specialized field of engineering that requires the combined skill of radio, civil, and mechanical engineers. The antenna systems used for this band (15-30 kHz) are enormous structures. Vertical radiators with very extensive top-loading (non-radiating top-hats) are necessary because the electrical height of practical towers is small. For tower heights of 300-450 meters (1000-1500 feet) the electrical heights are only fifteen to forty-five one thousandths of a wavelength. This presentation discusses the following topics: antenna design concepts, antenna fundamentals, tools for antenna modeling, a mini-study of conventional antennas, multiple tuned antenna systems, and a comparison between performance (measured and predicted) for multiple tuned antennas vs. single tuned antennas.

  10. Multibeam antenna study, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellamy, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    A multibeam antenna concept was developed for providing spot beam coverage of the contiguous 48 states. The selection of a suitable antenna concept for the multibeam application and an experimental evaluation of the antenna concept selected are described. The final analysis indicates that the preferred concept is a dual-antenna, circular artificial dielectric lens. A description of the analytical methods is provided, as well as a discussion of the absolute requirements placed on the antenna concepts. Finally, a comparative analysis of reflector antenna off-axis beam performance is presented.

  11. Modeling of compact loop antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Baity, F.W.

    1987-01-01

    A general compact loop antenna model which treats all elements of the antenna as lossy transmission lines has been developed. In addition to capacitively-tuned resonant double loop (RDL) antennas the model treats stub-tuned resonant double loop antennas. Calculations using the model have been compared with measurements on full-scale mockups of resonant double loop antennas for ATF and TFTR in order to refine the transmission line parameters. Results from the model are presented for RDL antenna designs for ATF, TFTR, Tore Supra, and for the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT).

  12. Modeling of compact loop antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baity, F. W.

    A general compact loop antenna model which treats all elements of the antenna as lossy transmission lines has been developed. In addition to capacitively-tuned resonant double loop (RDL) antennas the model treats stub-tuned resonant double loop antennas. Calculations using the model have been compared with measurements on full-scale mockups of resonant double loop antennas for ATF and TFTR in order to refine the transmission line parameters. Results from the model are presented for RDL antenna designs for ATF, TFTR, Tore Supra, and for the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT).

  13. Modeling of compact loop antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baity, F. W.

    1987-09-01

    A general compact loop antenna model which treats all elements of the antenna as lossy transmission lines has been developed. In addition to capacitively tuned resonant double loop (RDL) antennas, the model treats sub-tuned RDL antennas. Calculations using the model have been compared with measurements on full-scale mock-ups of RDL antennas for ATF and TFTR in order to refine the transmission line parameters. Results from the model are presented for RDL antenna designs for ATF, TFTR, Tore Supra, and the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT).

  14. Analysis of three-dimensional-cavity-backed aperture antennas using a Combined Finite Element Method/Method of Moments/Geometrical Theory of Diffraction technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. J.; Deshpande, M. D.; Cockrell, C. R.; Beck, F. B.

    1995-01-01

    A combined finite element method (FEM) and method of moments (MoM) technique is presented to analyze the radiation characteristics of a cavity-fed aperture in three dimensions. Generalized feed modeling has been done using the modal expansion of fields in the feed structure. Numerical results for some feeding structures such as a rectangular waveguide, circular waveguide, and coaxial line are presented. The method also uses the geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD) to predict the effect of a finite ground plane on radiation characteristics. Input admittance calculations for open radiating structures such as a rectangular waveguide, a circular waveguide, and a coaxial line are shown. Numerical data for a coaxial-fed cavity with finite ground plane are verified with experimental data.

  15. Adaptive antenna design considerations for satellite communication antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayhan, J. T.

    1983-02-01

    The present investigation is concerned with some general considerations inherent in designing an adaptive antenna system for use on a geosynchronous satellite illuminating the earth field of view. The problem has been addressed from the viewpoint of the system designer who has to determine the required antenna characteristics and the antenna aperture size. Concerning the choice of the antenna type, it usually has to be decided whether to use a phased array (PA) or a multiple-beam antenna (MBA). Attention is given to nulling resolution and MBA/PA configuration, taking into account the phased array and multiple-beam antennas. The choice of which antenna type to use depends on the nulling bandwidth, the number of weighted channels in the adaptive processor, and the overall coverage area to be served by the antenna system.

  16. Antenna cab interior showing equipment rack and fiberglass antenna panels, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Antenna cab interior showing equipment rack and fiberglass antenna panels, looking southeast. - Western Union Telegraph Company, Jennerstown Relay, Laurel Summit Road off U.S. 30, Laughlintown, Westmoreland County, PA

  17. Antenna cab interior showing equipment rack and fiberglass antenna panels, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Antenna cab interior showing equipment rack and fiberglass antenna panels, looking west. - Western Union Telegraph Company, Jennerstown Relay, Laurel Summit Road off U.S. 30, Laughlintown, Westmoreland County, PA

  18. Antenna cab interior showing waveguide from external parabolic antenna (later ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Antenna cab interior showing waveguide from external parabolic antenna (later addition), looking north. - Western Union Telegraph Company, Jennerstown Relay, Laurel Summit Road off U.S. 30, Laughlintown, Westmoreland County, PA

  19. View of Antenna #1 (foreground), and Antenna #2 surface doors. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Antenna #1 (foreground), and Antenna #2 surface doors. Image looking northeast - Titan One Missile Complex 2A, .3 miles west of 129 Road and 1.5 miles north of County Line Road, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  20. Antenna testing for the Inmarsat 2 ground control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashton, C.

    1992-02-01

    This article describes how the antennas of the Inmarsat 2 TT&C and IOT ground stations were tested and calibrated. It explains the main test methods used, giving the theory behind the tests and indicates some of the practical difficulties encountered during testing. Techniques described include the use of radio stars, boresight antennas and satellite verification testing using Intelsat and Inmarsat satellites. Parameters tested include gain, G/T (figure of merit), sidelobe patterns, cross polar discrimination and isolation.

  1. Wireless transmission by plasmonic antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlo, Juan M.; Calm, Yitzi M.; Rose, Aaron H.; Burns, Michael J.; Naughton, Michael J.

    Radio frequency (RF) communication is fundamental to many modern technologies. The idea of a simple rescaling of RF theory to the visible frequency range is not a direct issue, due in part to the finite conductivity in the optical range of commonly-used metals (e.g. Ag, Au). In this context, wireless communication using plasmonic antennas is a very recent concept with potential importance in an on-chip technology application. Here, we propose a plasmonic antenna system capable of wireless transmission-at-a-distance equivalent to at least four free-space wavelengths from the emitter. We demonstrate that it is possible to transmit information with maximum signal strength of -6.9 dB at three free-space wavelengths with a signal-to-noise ratio of -13 dB, good enough to be considered as an efficient wireless system. Theoretical calculations agree with our experimental results and open the possibility to future optimizations of the proposed plasmonic wireless system.

  2. Satellite dual antenna pointing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keigler, John E. (Inventor); Hartshorne, Frank A. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A satellite antenna pointing system for separately pointing separated transmit and receive high gain antenna systems includes means for separately and sequentially applying a beacon signal to the transmit and receive antenna systems and a broad beam width antenna which has a coverage area greater than the overall coverage region of the spot beam antenna systems. The system includes ground stations located at or near the periphery of the overall coverage region adapted to receive these beacon signals. At a central control station these beacon signals are compared to provide first signals proportional to the ratio of said beacon signals received from said transmit antenna system and said broad beam width antenna and second signals proportional to the ratio of said beacon signals received from said satellite receive antenna system and said broad beam width antenna. The central station generates from said first signals transmit antenna control signals which are sent to the satellite to control the orientation of said transmit antenna system. Likewise, the central control station generates from the second signals receiver antenna control signals which are applied to the satellite to control the orientation of the satellite receive antenna system.

  3. Industrial Plasma Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeff, Igor

    2007-11-01

    This presentation summarizes an extensive program on plasma antennas. Plasma antennas are just as effective as metal antennas. In addition, they can transmit, receive and reflect lower frequency signals while being transparent to higher frequency signals. When de-energized, they electrically disappear. Plasma noise does not appear to be a problem. New technology that has been developed include a method of operating at high plasma density at minimal power consumption, a novel technique of noise reduction, and a method of opening a plasma window in a plasma microwave barrier on a time scale of microseconds rather than the usual time scale of milliseconds due to plasma decay. We are at present testing an intelligent plasma antenna in which a plasma ``window'' in a circular plasma barrier surrounding an antenna rotates azimuthally, seeking a radio transmitter. When located, a computer locks onto the transmitter. When the transmitter is de-energized, the plasma window recommences scanning. Commercial interest is strong, with invited papers being presented for 4 years in succession at the SMi Stealth Conference in London, UK, an operating model on permanent exhibition at the Booze-Allen headquarters in Alexandria, VA, and strong interest from Lockheed-Martin. In collaboration with Ted Anderson, Haleakala R&D Corp.; Esmaeil Farshi, Fred Dyer, Jeffrey Peck, Eric Pradeep, Nanditha Pulasani, and Naresh Karnam, University of Tennessee.

  4. Imaging antenna arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, D. B.; Muha, M. S.

    1982-01-01

    Many millimeter and far-infrared imaging systems are limited in sensitivity and speed because they depend on a single scanned element. Because of recent advances in planar detectors such as Schottky diodes, superconducting tunnel junctions, and microbolometers, an attractive approach to this problem is a planar antenna array with integrated detectors. A planar line antenna array and optical system for imaging has been developed. The significant advances are a 'reverse-microscope' optical configuration and a modified bow-tie antenna design. In the 'reverse-microscope' configuration, a lens is attached to the bottom of the substrate containing the antennas. Imaging is done through the substrate. This configuration eliminates the troublesome effects of substrate surface waves. The substrate lens has only a single refracting surface, making possible a virtually aplanatic system, with little spherical aberration or coma. The array is characterized by an optical transfer function that is easily measured. An array with 19 dB crosstalk levels between adjacent antennas has been tested and it was found that the array captured 50 percent of the available power. This imaging system was diffraction limited.

  5. Aperture excited dielectric antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosswell, W. F.; Chatterjee, J. S.; Mason, V. B.; Tai, C. T.

    1974-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the effect of placing dielectric objects over the aperture of waveguide antennas are presented. Experimental measurements of the radiation patterns, gain, impedance, near-field amplitude, and pattern and impedance coupling between pairs of antennas are given for various Plexiglas shapes, including the sphere and the cube, excited by rectangular, circular, and square waveguide feed apertures. The waveguide excitation of a dielectric sphere is modeled using the Huygens' source, and expressions for the resulting electric fields, directivity, and efficiency are derived. Calculations using this model show good overall agreement with experimental patterns and directivity measurements. The waveguide under an infinite dielectric slab is used as an impedance model. Calculations using this model agree qualitatively with the measured impedance data. It is concluded that dielectric loaded antennas such as the waveguide excited sphere, cube, or sphere-cylinder can produce directivities in excess of that obtained by a uniformly illuminated aperture of the same cross section, particularly for dielectric objects with dimensions of 2 wavelengths or less. It is also shown that for certain configurations coupling between two antennas of this type is less than that for the same antennas without dielectric loading.

  6. Electrochemically Programmable Plasmonic Antennas.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shi; Zhang, Kai; Yu, Zhiping; Fan, Jonathan A

    2016-07-26

    Plasmonic antennas are building blocks in advanced nano-optical systems due to their ability to tailor optical response based on their geometry. We propose an electrochemical approach to program the optical properties of dipole antennas in a scalable, fast, and energy-efficient manner. These antennas comprise two arms, one serving as an anode and the other a cathode, separated by a solid electrolyte. As a voltage is applied between the antenna arms, a conductive filament either grows or dissolves within the electrolyte, modifying the antenna load. We probe the dynamics of stochastic filament formation and their effects on plasmonic mode programming using a combination of three-dimensional optical and electronic simulations. In particular, we identify device operation regimes in which the charge-transfer plasmon mode can be programmed to be "on" or "off." We also identify, unexpectedly, a strong correlation between DC filament resistance and charge-transfer plasmon mode frequency that is insensitive to the detailed filament morphology. We envision that the scalability of our electrochemical platform can generalize to large-area reconfigurable metamaterials and metasurfaces for on-chip and free-space applications. PMID:27328022

  7. Cup Cylindrical Waveguide Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.; Darby, William G.; Kory, Carol L.; Lambert, Kevin M.; Breen, Daniel P.

    2008-01-01

    The cup cylindrical waveguide antenna (CCWA) is a short backfire microwave antenna capable of simultaneously supporting the transmission or reception of two distinct signals having opposite circular polarizations. Short backfire antennas are widely used in mobile/satellite communications, tracking, telemetry, and wireless local area networks because of their compactness and excellent radiation characteristics. A typical prior short backfire antenna contains a half-wavelength dipole excitation element for linear polarization or crossed half-wavelength dipole elements for circular polarization. In order to achieve simultaneous dual circular polarization, it would be necessary to integrate, into the antenna feed structure, a network of hybrid components, which would introduce significant losses. The CCWA embodies an alternate approach that entails relatively low losses and affords the additional advantage of compactness. The CCWA includes a circular cylindrical cup, a circular disk subreflector, and a circular waveguide that serves as the excitation element. The components that make it possible to obtain simultaneous dual circular polarization are integrated into the circular waveguide. These components are a sixpost polarizer and an orthomode transducer (OMT) with two orthogonal coaxial ports. The overall length of the OMT and polarizer (for the nominal middle design frequency of 2.25 GHz) is about 11 in. (approximately equal to 28 cm), whereas the length of a commercially available OMT and polarizer for the same frequency is about 32 in. (approximately equal to 81 cm).

  8. View north of the antenna array, note the communications antenna ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View north of the antenna array, note the communications antenna in the middleground - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Christmas Valley Radar Site Transmit Sector Four Antenna Array, On unnamed road west of Lost Forest Road, Christmas Valley, Lake County, OR

  9. View of antenna tunnel end. Right to Antenna Silo #1, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of antenna tunnel end. Right to Antenna Silo #1, left to Antenna Silo #2 - Titan One Missile Complex 2A, .3 miles west of 129 Road and 1.5 miles north of County Line Road, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  10. Dual polarization flat plate antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Kenneth C.

    Rectangular waveguides with radiating slots are used in groups to form planar array microwave antennas with large apertures and small depth. Such flat plate antennas are widely used on spacecraft and aircraft. Typically, flat plate antennas provide fixed linear polarization. The present paper describes a new flat plate antenna which produces two coincident beams that are distinguished by their orthogonal linear polarizations. The antenna has two ports, one for each of the coicident beams. Completely external to the antenna, connecting a simple network to those terminal ports enables the antenna to provide right circular polarization from one port and left from the other. A different external network enables the antenna to have arbitrarily adjustable polarizations.

  11. Hemispheric ultra-wideband antenna.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2006-04-01

    This report begins with a review of reduced size ultra-wideband (UWB) antennas and the peculiar problems that arise when building a UWB antenna. It then gives a description of a new type of UWB antenna that resolves these problems. This antenna, dubbed the hemispheric conical antenna, is similar to a conventional conical antenna in that it uses the same inverted conical conductor over a ground plane, but it also uses a hemispheric dielectric fill in between the conductive cone and the ground plane. The dielectric material creates a fundamentally new antenna which is reduced in size and much more rugged than a standard UWB conical antenna. The creation of finite-difference time domain (FDTD) software tools in spherical coordinates, as described in SAND2004-6577, enabled this technological advance.

  12. Effective wavelength scaling of rectangular aperture antennas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuanyuan; Yu, Li; Zhang, Jiasen; Gordon, Reuven

    2015-04-20

    We investigate the resonances of aperture antennas from the visible to the terahertz regime, with comparison to comprehensive simulations. Simple piecewise analytic behavior is found for the wavelength scaling over the entire spectrum, with a linear regime through the visible and near-IR. This theory will serve as a useful and simple design tool for applications including biosensors, nonlinear plasmonics and surface enhanced spectroscopies. PMID:25969079

  13. Dual-band reactively loaded microstrip antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, W. F.; Long, S. A.; Davidson, S. E.

    1985-01-01

    A previously derived theory is applied to a microstrip antenna with a reactive load to produce a dual-band radiator. A model consisting of a rectangular patch radiator loaded with a variable length short-circuited coaxial stub was investigated experimentally. Comparisons of theoretical predictions and experimental data are made for the impedance and resonant frequencies as a function of the position of the load, the length of the stub, and the characteristic impedance of the stub.

  14. The ACTS multibeam antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regier, Frank A.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) to be launched in 1993 is briefly introduced. Its multibeam antenna, consisting of electrically similar 30 GHz receive and 20 GHz transmit offset Cassegrain systems, both utilizing orthogonal polarizations, is described. Dual polarization is achieved by using one feed assembly for each polarization in conjunction with nested front and back subreflectors, the gridded front subreflector acting as a window for one polarization and a reflector for the other. The antennas produce spot beams with approximately 0.3 degree beamwidth and gains of approximately 50 dbi. High surface accuracy and high edge taper produce low sidelobe levels and high cross-polarization isolation. A brief description is given of several Ka-band components fabricated for ACTS. These include multiflare antenna feedhorns, beam-forming networks utilizing latching ferrite waveguide switches, a 30 GHz HEMT low-noise amplifier and a 20 GHz TWT power amplifier.

  15. Microstrip antenna technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carver, K. R.; Mink, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    A survey of microstrip antenna elements is presented, with emphasis on theoretical and practical design techniques. Available substrate materials are reviewed along with the relation between dielectric constant tolerance and resonant frequency of microstrip patches. Several theoretical analysis techniques are summarized, including transmission-line and modal-expansion (cavity) techniques as well as numerical methods such as the method of moments and finite-element techniques. Practical procedures are given for both standard rectangular and circular patches, as well as variations on those designs including circularly polarized microstrip patches. The quality, bandwidth, and efficiency factors of typical patch designs are discussed. Microstrip dipole and conformal antennas are summarized. Finally, critical needs for further research and development for this antenna are identified.

  16. The ACTS multibeam antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regier, Frank A.

    1992-06-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) to be launched in 1993 is briefly introduced. Its multibeam antenna, consisting of electrically similar 30 GHz receive and 20 GHz transmit offset Cassegrain systems, both utilizing orthogonal polarizations, is described. Dual polarization is achieved by using one feed assembly for each polarization in conjunction with nested front and back subreflectors, the gridded front subreflector acting as a window for one polarization and a reflector for the other. The antennas produce spot beams with approximately 0.3 degree beamwidth and gains of approximately 50 dbi. High surface accuracy and high edge taper produce low sidelobe levels and high cross-polarization isolation. A brief description is given of several Ka-band components fabricated for ACTS. These include multiflare antenna feedhorns, beam-forming networks utilizing latching ferrite waveguide switches, a 30 GHz HEMT low-noise amplifier and a 20 GHz TWT power amplifier.

  17. Launching large antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandli, H. W.

    1983-09-01

    Large antennas will provide communication to rural and remote areas in times of need. This is seen as facilitating the work of law enforcement agencies. All mobile radio communications will enjoy advantages in distances covered and information relayed owing to the large number of beams possible from super radio transmitters in space. If the antennas are placed in low-earth orbit, advantages will be realized in the remote sensing of the earth's resources. It is pointed out that with umbrella or bicyclelike antennas turned outward toward space, the universe could be scouted for signals from intelligent life. Various concepts that have been put forward by U.S. companies are described. These include the radial rib, wrap rib, and parabolic erectable truss designs. Others are the mesh hoop column collapsable umbrella made of gold and molybdenum and the maypole design.

  18. Galileo satellite antenna modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigenberger, Peter; Dach, Rolf; Prange, Lars; Montenbruck, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    The space segment of the European satellite navigation system Galileo currently consists of six satellites. Four of them belong to the first generation of In-Orbit Validation (IOV) satellites whereas the other two are Full Operational Capability (FOC) satellites. High-precision geodetic applications require detailed knowledge about the actual phase center of the satellite and receiver antenna. The deviation of this actual phase center from a well-defined reference point is described by phase center offsets (PCOs) and phase center variations (PCVs). Unfortunately, no public information is available about the Galileo satellite antenna PCOs and PCVs, neither for the IOV, nor the FOC satellites. Therefore, conventional values for the IOV satellite antenna PCOs have been adopted for the Multi-GNSS experiment (MGEX) of the International GNSS Service (IGS). The effect of the PCVs is currently neglected and no PCOs for the FOC satellites are available yet. To overcome this deficiency in GNSS observation modeling, satellite antenna PCOs and PCVs are estimated for the Galileo IOV satellites based on global GNSS tracking data of the MGEX network and additional stations of the legacy IGS network. Two completely independent solutions are computed with the Bernese and Napeos software packages. The PCO and PCV values of the individual satellites are analyzed and the availability of two different solutions allows for an accuracy assessment. The FOC satellites are built by a different manufacturer and are also equipped with another type of antenna panel compared to the IOV satellites. Signal transmission of the first FOC satellite has started in December 2014 and activation of the second satellite is expected for early 2015. Based on the available observations PCO estimates and, optionally PCVs of the FOC satellites will be presented as well. Finally, the impact of the new antenna model on the precision and accuracy of the Galileo orbit determination is analyzed.

  19. Satellite communication antenna technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittra, R. (Editor); Imbriale, W. A. (Editor); Maanders, E. J. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    A general overview of current technology in the field of communication satellite antennas is presented. Among the topics discussed are: the design of multiple beam systems; frequency reuse; and polarization control of antenna measurements. Consideration is also given to: contour beam synthesis; dual shaped reflector synthesis; beam shaping; and offset reflector design. The applications of the above technologies to present and future generations of communications satellites is considered, with emphasis given to such systems as: the Intelsats; the Defense Satellite Communications System, (DSCS-III); Satellite Business System (SBS), and Comstar.

  20. Spaced antenna drift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royrvik, O.

    1983-01-01

    It has been suggested that the spaced antenna drift (SAD) technique could be successfully used by VHF radars and that it would be superior to a Doppler-beam-swinging (DBS) technique because it would take advantage of the aspect sensitivity of the scattered signal, and might also benefit from returns from single meteors. It appears, however, that the technique suffers from several limitations. On the basis of one SAD experiment performed at the very large Jicamarca radar, it is concluded that the SAD technique can be compared in accuracy to the DBS technique only if small antenna dimensions are used.

  1. DSN Microwave Antenna Holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochblatt, D. J.; Seidel, B. L.

    1984-01-01

    The DSN microwave antenna holography project will obtain three-dimensional pictures of the large DSN antenna surfaces. These pictures must be of suffi icient resolution to allow adjustment of the reflector panels to an rms surface of 0.5 mm (0.25 mm, goal). The major parameters and equations needed to define a holographic measurement system are outlined and then the proof of concept demonstration measurement that was made at DSS-43 (Australia) that resulted in contour maps with spatial resolution of 7 m in the aperture plane and resolution orthogonal to the aperture plane of 0.7 mm was discussed.

  2. Furlable spacecraft antenna development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, R. E.; Wilson, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    The development of large furlable spacecraft antennas using conical main reflectors is described. Two basic antenna configurations which utilize conical main reflectors have been conceived and are under development. In the conical-Gregorian configuration each ray experiences two reflections in traveling from the feed center to the aperture plane. In the Quadreflex (four reflection) configuration, each ray experiences four reflections, one at each of two subreflector surfaces and two at the main conical reflector surface. The RF gain measurements obtained from 6-ft and 30-in. models of the conical-Gregorian and Quadreflex concepts respectively were sufficiently encouraging to warrant further development of the concepts.

  3. Collapsible high gain antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cribb, H. E. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A lightweight small high gain antenna which is capable of being packaged in a collapsed form and automatically expanded when in use is described. The antenna includes a cylindrical housing having a rod with a piston adjacent to one end extending through it. Attached to the outer end of the rod in a normally collapsed state is a helical wire coil. When the gas producing means is activated the piston and rod are shifted outwardly to expand the wire coil. A latch is provided for holding the helical coil in the expanded position.

  4. A century of antenna development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olver, A. D.

    The paper describes a century of antenna development as part of a century of radio communications. This historical review examines, chronologically, the pre-Hertz period, Hertz antennas, the microwave optics period, the Marconi era, short waves, theoretical design before and after computers, and radar. Consideration is also given to mobile antennas, microwave comunications, radio astronomy, and satellite comunications.

  5. The JPL mechanically steered antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berner, Jeff B.; Bell, David J.

    1988-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has designed and developed a mechanically steered antenna for tracking satellites in a mobile environment. This antenna was used to track an L-band beacon on the MARISAT satellite. A description of the antenna and the results of the satellite experiment are given.

  6. Collection efficiency for millimeter and submillimeter wave antenna-coupled detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yuancheng; Lail, Brian A.

    2015-05-01

    The goal in the design of an efficient and low-noise antenna coupled receiver is to achieve a maximal capture cross section for the incident electromagnetic radiation compared to the dimensions of the sub-wavelength sized sensor loading the antenna. Collection efficiency captures this concept of power output/input and is made up of several subefficiencies. In the ideal case all of the available, incident power is collected and transferred to the load. However, many of the fundamental limits of antennas are based on theory describing the transmitting mode, whereas certain questions remain open for receiving antennas. Textbook antenna theory predicts that only 50% of available incident power can be absorbed by an antenna, yet under specific conditions this limitation can be surpassed. Two considerations are presented; (1) fundamental limits on antenna absorption, and (2) practical participation of dissipative media in achieving impedance matching between antenna and load, and the associated performance compromise. Specifically we seek to determine whether antenna-coupled detectors can approach unity absorption efficiency under matched conditions. Further, we identify practical conditions that must be met in order to overcome fundamental limitations that inhibit total absorption. Then antenna loss is split into radiative and dissipative terms in order to identify trade-offs between impedance matching and radiation efficiency.

  7. Quartz antenna with hollow conductor

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Benabou, Elie

    2002-01-01

    A radio frequency (RF) antenna for plasma ion sources is formed of a hollow metal conductor tube disposed within a glass tube. The hollow metal tubular conductor has an internal flow channel so that there will be no coolant leakage if the outer glass tube of the antenna breaks. A portion of the RF antenna is formed into a coil; the antenna is used for inductively coupling RF power to a plasma in an ion source chamber. The antenna is made by first inserting the metal tube inside the glass tube, and then forming the glass/metal composite tube into the desired coil shape.

  8. Airborne antenna pattern calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knerr, T. J.; Schaffner, P. R.; Mielke, R. R.; Gilreath, M. C.

    1980-01-01

    A procedure for numerically calculating radiation patterns of fuselage-mounted airborne antennas using the Volumetric Pattern Analysis Program is presented. Special attention is given to aircraft modeling. An actual case study involving a large commercial aircraft is included to illustrate the analysis procedure.

  9. Antenna array research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, C.

    1973-01-01

    Antenna array research on electromagnetic field problems in inhomogeneous media is presented along with characteristics of the Eaton lens. Comparisons are given of the radiation pattern and directivity of small Luneburg lens with a homogeneous lens. References and figure captions on radiation patterns are included.

  10. Community Antenna Television (CATV).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    The number of households hooked up to cable television or community antenna television (CATV) is expanding rapidly, and Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has been developing regulations since 1962 to guide the growth of the industry. By 1965 the FCC had claimed jurisdiction over all CATV systems in the U. S. This jurisdiction was challenged…

  11. Algorithm For Control Of Large Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Robert E.

    1990-01-01

    Alternative position-error feedback modes provided. Modern control theory basis for computer algorithm used to control two-axis positioning of large antenna. Algorithm - incorporated into software of real-time control computer - enables rapid intertarget positioning as well as precise tracking (using one of two optional position-feedback modes) without need of human operator intervention. Control system for one axis of two-axis azimuth/elevation control system embodied mostly in software based on advanced control theory. System has linear properties of classical linear feedback controller. Performance described by bandwidth and linear error coefficients.

  12. Microstrip reflectarray antenna for the SCANSCAT radar application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, John

    1990-01-01

    This publication presents an antenna system that has been proposed as one of the candidates for the SCANSCAT (Scanned Scatterometer) radar application. It is the mechanically steered planar microstrip reflectarray. Due to its thin, lightweight structure, the antenna's mechanical rotation will impose minimum angular momentum for the spacecraft. Since no power-dividing circuitry is needed for its many radiating microstrip patches, this electrically large array antenna demonstrates excellent power efficiency. In addition, this fairly new antenna concept can provide many significant advantages over a conventional parabolic reflector. The basic formulation for the radiation fields of the microstrip reflectarray is presented. This formulation is based on the array theory augmented by the Uniform Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (UTD). A computer code for analyzing the microstrip reflectarray's performances, such as far-field patterns, efficiency, etc., is also listed in this report. It is proposed here that a breadboard unit of this microstrip reflectarray should be constructed and tested in the future to validate the calculated performance. The antenna concept presented here can also be applied in many other types of radars where a large array antenna is needed.

  13. Analysis of the transverse electromagnetic mode linearly tapered slot antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janaswamy, R.; Schaubert, D. H.; Pozar, D. M.

    1986-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the radiation characteristics of the transverse electromagnetic mode linearly tapered slot antenna is presented. The theory presented is valid for antennas with air dielectric and forms the basis for analysis of the more popular dielectric-supported antennas. The method of analysis involves two steps. In the first step, the aperture distribution in the flared slot is determined. In the second step, the equivalent magnetic current in the slot is treated as radiating in the presence of a conducting half-plane, and the far-field components are obtained. Design curves for the variation of the 3-dB and 10-dB beamwidths as a function of the antenna length, with the flare angle as a parameter, are presented.

  14. An antenna can be used for terahertz scanning imaging instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hanqi; Liu, Xin; Guo, Lantao; Deng, Chao; Zhang, Cunlin

    2015-08-01

    In order to satisfy needs which are efficient detection and miniaturization of terahertz scanning imaging instrument, a rectangular wave-guide antenna with lengthwise slits on the broad face is designed. The antenna has the advantages which are high aperture efficiency, compact structure, small volume, light weight, low cost, low side-lobe performance, narrow beam scanning and so on. At first, these parameters include slit length, slit distance, slit width and slit offset along the central axial of the broad face are calculated with the aid of related theory, then the antenna is modeled and optimized in the software. The simulation results show that the antenna can directly transmit and receive the terahertz wave at 0.1THz, the gain of the main lobe is higher, the gain of the side lobe is lower and main lobe presents the pencil beam. The results can provide reference for the revised design of terahertz scanning imaging instrument.

  15. Analysis of the Tem Mode Linearly Tapered Slot Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janaswamy, R.; Schaubert, D. H.; Pozar, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    The theoretical analysis of the radiation characteristics of the TEM mode Linearly Tapered Slot Antenna (LTSA) is presented. The theory presented is valid for antennas with air dielectric and forms the basis for analysis of the more popular dielectric-supported antennas. The method of analysis involves two steps. In the first step, the aperture distribution in the flared slot is determined. In the second step, the equivalent magnetic current in the slot is treated as radiating in the presence of a conducting half-plane and the far-field components are obtained. Detailed comparison with experiment is made and excellent agreement is obtained. Design curves for the variation of the 3 dB and 10 dB beamwidths as a function of the antenna length, with the flare angle as a parameter, are presented.

  16. Mobile terminal antennas for helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Te-Kao; Farazian, K.; Golshan, N.; Divsalar, D.; Hinedi, S.; Woo, K.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of using an L-band low gain antenna (LGA) as a mobile terminal antenna for helicopters is described. The objective is to select the lowest cost antenna system which can be easily mounted on a helicopter and capable of communicating with a geosynchronous satellite. To ensure that all the antenna options are being considered, the steerable high gain reflector and medium gain array antennas as well as LGA are studied and compared in an exhaustive survey. The high gain reflector antenna in L-band is usually very large in size and heavy in weight. In addition, a bulky and expensive tracking system is needed to steer the antenna beam to the satellite direction. The medium gain antennas (including mechanically and electronically steered arrays) are also more expensive and less reliable than an LGA due to the addition of a beam steering system to track the satellite. The omni-directional LGA is simple, reliable, and inexpensive. It is typically ten times smaller than the medium gain antenna. This makes the position, selection, and mounting on the helicopter relatively easier. Therefore, the LGA is selected as a mobile terminal antenna for helicopters. Among the many LGA's (cross-dipole, helix, spiral, and slot antennas), the helix antenna is the most inexpensive. One can also change the size, shape, or pitch angle of the helix to optimize the gain in the desired direction. Therefore, the helix antenna is selected for further study. Both 2-arm and 4-arm helices are studied theoretically and experimentally to determine the antenna's performance and the scattering effects from the helicopter body and the blades. The multipath, Doppler, and Doppler rate issues as well as the periodic fading effects caused by the helicopter rotor blades will be briefly discussed in the paper.

  17. Deployable antenna kinematics using tensegrity structure design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Byron Franklin

    (Wertz) to develop a new, practical design approach. This kinematic analysis of tensegrity structures blends these differences to provide the design community with a new approach to lightweight, robust, adaptive structures with the high reliability that space demands. Additionally, by applying Screw Theory, a tensegrity structure antenna can be commanded to move along a screw axis, and therefore meeting the requirement to address multiple feed locations.

  18. Prediction of heating patterns of a microwave interstitial antenna array at various insertion depths.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Joines, W T; Oleson, J R

    1991-01-01

    Measurements made on the interstitial microwave antennas used for hyperthermia cancer therapy indicate that the heating patterns vary with the insertion depths (defined as the distance from the antenna tip to air-tissue interface). The antennas are made of thin coaxial cables with a radiation gap or gaps on the outer conductor. The antennas are inserted into small polypropylene catheters implanted in the tumour volume. This type of antenna may be simulated as an asymmetric dipole with one arm being the tip section consisting of the expanded extension of the inner conductor, and the other arm being the section of the outer conductor from the gap to the insertion point (air-tissue interface). We use four of the antennas to form a 2 cm x 2 cm array. The antennas are positioned on the corners of a 2 cm square. Measurements on both single antennas and multi-antenna arrays show that the maximum heating is not stationary with position along the antenna when the depth of insertion is changed. This paper investigates the theoretical prediction of the changes in heating patterns of interstitial microwave antennas at different insertion depths. Each of the antennas in the array is simulated as an asymmetric dipole. The SAR (specific absorption rate) is computed by using the insulated dipole theory. The temperature distribution in absence of perfusion is obtained through a thermal simulation routine to convert the SAR pattern into the temperature pattern. Excellent qualitative agreement is found between the theoretical heating pattern and the measured pattern in a non-perfused phantom on a 2 cm x 2 antenna array. Since the insertion depths of the interstitial antennas are different from patient to patient, it is recommended that simulation of the heating be done before treatments, to confirm the delivery of power to the target region. PMID:2051073

  19. JPL Large Advanced Antenna Station Array Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    In accordance with study requirements, two antennas are described: a 30 meter standard antenna and a 34 meter modified antenna, along with a candidate array configuration for each. Modified antenna trade analyses are summarized, risks analyzed, costs presented, and a final antenna array configuration recommendation made.

  20. 47 CFR 80.863 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.863 Section 80.863... Antenna system. (a) An antenna system must be installed which is as nondirectional and as efficient as is... construction of the required antenna must insure operation in time of emergency. (b) If the required antenna...

  1. 47 CFR 80.863 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.863 Section 80.863... Antenna system. (a) An antenna system must be installed which is as nondirectional and as efficient as is... construction of the required antenna must insure operation in time of emergency. (b) If the required antenna...

  2. 47 CFR 80.866 - Spare antenna.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Spare antenna. 80.866 Section 80.866... Spare antenna. A spare transmitting antenna completely assembled for immediate erection must be provided. If the installed transmitting antenna is suspended between supports, this spare antenna must be...

  3. 47 CFR 80.863 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.863 Section 80.863... Antenna system. (a) An antenna system must be installed which is as nondirectional and as efficient as is... construction of the required antenna must insure operation in time of emergency. (b) If the required antenna...

  4. 47 CFR 80.866 - Spare antenna.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Spare antenna. 80.866 Section 80.866... Spare antenna. A spare transmitting antenna completely assembled for immediate erection must be provided. If the installed transmitting antenna is suspended between supports, this spare antenna must be...

  5. 47 CFR 80.866 - Spare antenna.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Spare antenna. 80.866 Section 80.866... Spare antenna. A spare transmitting antenna completely assembled for immediate erection must be provided. If the installed transmitting antenna is suspended between supports, this spare antenna must be...

  6. 47 CFR 80.866 - Spare antenna.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Spare antenna. 80.866 Section 80.866... Spare antenna. A spare transmitting antenna completely assembled for immediate erection must be provided. If the installed transmitting antenna is suspended between supports, this spare antenna must be...

  7. 47 CFR 80.863 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.863 Section 80.863... Antenna system. (a) An antenna system must be installed which is as nondirectional and as efficient as is... construction of the required antenna must insure operation in time of emergency. (b) If the required antenna...

  8. 47 CFR 80.863 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.863 Section 80.863... Antenna system. (a) An antenna system must be installed which is as nondirectional and as efficient as is... construction of the required antenna must insure operation in time of emergency. (b) If the required antenna...

  9. 47 CFR 80.866 - Spare antenna.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Spare antenna. 80.866 Section 80.866... Spare antenna. A spare transmitting antenna completely assembled for immediate erection must be provided. If the installed transmitting antenna is suspended between supports, this spare antenna must be...

  10. Microsecond switchable thermal antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Abdallah, Philippe Benisty, Henri; Besbes, Mondher

    2014-07-21

    We propose a thermal antenna that can be actively switched on and off at the microsecond scale by means of a phase transition of a metal-insulator material, the vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}). This thermal source is made of a periodically patterned tunable VO{sub 2} nanolayer, which support a surface phonon-polariton in the infrared range in their crystalline phase. Using electrodes properly registered with respect to the pattern, the VO{sub 2} phase transition can be locally triggered by ohmic heating so that the surface phonon-polariton can be diffracted by the induced grating, producing a highly directional thermal emission. Conversely, when heating less, the VO{sub 2} layers cool down below the transition temperature, the surface phonon-polariton cannot be diffracted anymore so that thermal emission is inhibited. This switchable antenna could find broad applications in the domain of active thermal coatings or in those of infrared spectroscopy and sensing.

  11. Helicopter Rotor Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pogorzelski, Ronald J.; Cable, Vaughn P.

    2001-01-01

    This effort was directed toward demonstration of the efficacy of a concept for mitigation of the rotor blade modulation problem in helicopter communications. An antenna is envisioned with radiating elements mounted on the rotor and rotating with it. The rf signals are coupled to the radio stationary with respect to the airframe via a coupler of unique design. The coupler has an rf cavity within which a mode is established and the field distribution of this mode is sampled by probes rotating with the radiating elements. In this manner the radiated pattern is "despun" with respect to the rotor. Theoretical analysis has indicated that this arrangement will be less susceptible to rotor blade modulation that would be a conventional fixed mounted antenna. A small coupler operating at S-band was designed, fabricated, and mounted on a mockup representative of a helicopter body. A small electric motor was installed to rotate the rotor portion of the coupler along with a set of radiating elements during testing. This test article was be evaluated using the JPL Mesa Antenna Measurement Facility to establish its ability to mitigate rotor blade modulation. It was found that indeed such a coupler will result in a despun pattern and that such a pattern can be effective in mitigation of rotor blade modulation.

  12. Modular antenna design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribble, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanical design of a modular antenna concept was developed sufficiently to allow manufacture of a working demonstration model of a module, to predict mass properties, and to make performance estimates for antenna reflectors composed of these modules. The primary features of this concept are: (1) each module is an autonomous structural element which can be attached to adjacent modules through a three point connection; (2) the upper surface is a folding hexagonal truss plate mechanism which serves as the supporting structure for a reflective surface; and (3) the entire truss and surface can be folded into a cylindrical envelope in which all truss elements are essentially parallel. The kinematic studies and engineering demonstration model fully verified the deployment kinematics, stowing philosophy, and deployment sequencing for large antenna modules. It was established that such modules can be stowed in packages as small as 25 cm in diameter, using 1.27 cm diameter structural tubes. The development activity indicates that this deployable modular approach towards building large structures in space will support erection of 450 m apertures for operation up to 3 GHz with a single space shuttle flight.

  13. The ACTS multibeam antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regier, Frank A.

    1992-04-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) to be launched in 1993 introduces several new technologies including a multibeam antenna (MBA) operating at Ka-band. The satellite is introduced briefly, and then the MBA, consisting of electrically similar 30 GHz received and 20 GHz transmit offset Cassegrain systems utilizing orthogonal linear polarizations, is described. Dual polarization is achieved by using one feed assembly for each polarization in conjunction with nested front and back subreflectors, the gridded front subreflector acting as a window for one polarization and a reflector for the other. The antennas produce spot beams with approximately 0.3 deg beamwidth and gains of approximately 50 dbi. High surface accuracy and high edge taper produce low sidelobe levels and high cross-polarization isolation. A brief description is given of several Ka-band components fabricated for ACTS. These include multiflare antenna feedhorns, beam-forming networks utilizing latching ferrite waveguide switches, a 30 GHz high mobility electron transmitter (HEMT) low-noise amplifier and a 20 GHz TWT power amplifier.

  14. SPS antenna element evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunden, C. D.; Lund, W. W.; Nalos, E. J.

    1980-01-01

    The SPS transmitting array requires an architecture which will provide a low weight, high efficiency and high structural rigidity. Waveguide slot arrays constitute the most desirable option. Consequently, such an array was chosen for the SPS. Waveguide slot arrays offer high efficiency, uniform illumination, and are fairly lightweight. Bandwidths of such arrays are narrow, typically 1/2-2%. Although this does not directly impact the SPS, which transmits power at a single frequency of 2.45 GHz, the narrow bandwidth does constrain the thermal and mechanical tolerances of the antenna. The purpose of this program is to better define the electronic aspects of an SPS specific waveguide slot array. The specific aims of the program are as follows: (1) To build a full-scale half-module, 10 stick, array, the design parameters for which are to be determined analytical considerations tempered by experimental data on a single slotted radiating stick, (2) To experimentally evaluate the completed array with respect to antenna pattern, impedance and return loss; and (3) To measure swept transmission amplitude and phase to provide a data base for design of a receiving antenna.

  15. The ACTS multibeam antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regier, Frank A.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) to be launched in 1993 introduces several new technologies including a multibeam antenna (MBA) operating at Ka-band. The satellite is introduced briefly, and then the MBA, consisting of electrically similar 30 GHz received and 20 GHz transmit offset Cassegrain systems utilizing orthogonal linear polarizations, is described. Dual polarization is achieved by using one feed assembly for each polarization in conjunction with nested front and back subreflectors, the gridded front subreflector acting as a window for one polarization and a reflector for the other. The antennas produce spot beams with approximately 0.3 deg beamwidth and gains of approximately 50 dbi. High surface accuracy and high edge taper produce low sidelobe levels and high cross-polarization isolation. A brief description is given of several Ka-band components fabricated for ACTS. These include multiflare antenna feedhorns, beam-forming networks utilizing latching ferrite waveguide switches, a 30 GHz high mobility electron transmitter (HEMT) low-noise amplifier and a 20 GHz TWT power amplifier.

  16. Large furlable antenna study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, G. K. C.

    1975-01-01

    The parametric study of the performance of large furlable antennas is described and the availability of various size antennas is discussed. Three types of unfurlable reflector designs are considered: the wrapped rib, the polyconic, and the maypole. On the basis of these approaches, a space shuttle launch capability, and state-of-the-art materials, it is possible to design unfurlable reflectors as large as 130 feet (40 meters) in diameter to operate at 10 GHz and 600 feet (183 meters) in diameter at 0.5 GHz. These figures can be increased if very low thermal coefficient of expansion materials can be developed over the next 2-5 years. It is recommended that a special effort be made to develop light weight materials that would provide nearly zero thermal coefficient of expansion and good thermal conductivity within the next 10 years. A conservative prediction of the kinds of unfurlable spacecraft antennas that will be available by 1985 with orbital performance predicted on the basis of test data and with developed manufacturing processes is summarized.

  17. A Mars Riometer: Antenna Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, Craig D.

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report on NASA Grant NAG5-9706. This project explored riometer (relative ionospheric opacity meter) antenna designs that would be practical for a Mars surface or balloon mission. The riometer is an important radio science instrument for terrestrial aeronomy investigations. The riometer measures absorption of cosmic radio waves by the overhead ionosphere. Studies have shown the instrument should work well on Mars, which has an appreciable daytime ionosphere. There has been concern that the required radio receiver antenna (with possibly a 10 meter scale size) would be too large or too difficult to deploy on Mars. This study addresses those concerns and presents several antenna designs and deployment options. It is found that a Mars balloon would provide an excellent platform for the riometer antenna. The antenna can be incorporated into the envelope design, allowing self-deployment of the antenna as the balloon inflates.

  18. Antenna Calibration and Measurement Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochblatt, David J.; Cortes, Manuel Vazquez

    2012-01-01

    A document describes the Antenna Calibration & Measurement Equipment (ACME) system that will provide the Deep Space Network (DSN) with instrumentation enabling a trained RF engineer at each complex to perform antenna calibration measurements and to generate antenna calibration data. This data includes continuous-scan auto-bore-based data acquisition with all-sky data gathering in support of 4th order pointing model generation requirements. Other data includes antenna subreflector focus, system noise temperature and tipping curves, antenna efficiency, reports system linearity, and instrument calibration. The ACME system design is based on the on-the-fly (OTF) mapping technique and architecture. ACME has contributed to the improved RF performance of the DSN by approximately a factor of two. It improved the pointing performances of the DSN antennas and productivity of its personnel and calibration engineers.

  19. Efficient Placement of Directional Antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Feng; Kasiviswanathan, Shiva

    2010-09-20

    Directional antenna is an technology for the proliferation of wireless networks. In centralized wireless network, wireless devices communicate through base stations. Directed antennas are placed on base stations and form a backbone of communication. The communication between base stations and wireless devices can be interfered due to a large number of wireless device. Methodically positioning and orienting directed antennas can help to reduce the interference while saving energy. An integer linear programming is developed for siting and directing antennas on multiple base stations, and this formulation can be extended to model non-overlapping channels. Through the integer programming formulation, optimal antenna positions can be used to analyze the performance of directed antennas with different parameters like the number base stations and the number of non-overlapping channels.

  20. Antenna structure with distributed strip

    SciTech Connect

    Rodenbeck, Christopher T.

    2008-10-21

    An antenna comprises electrical conductors arranged to form a radiating element including a folded line configuration and a distributed strip configuration, where the radiating element is in proximity to a ground conductor. The folded line and the distributed strip can be electrically interconnected and substantially coplanar. The ground conductor can be spaced from, and coplanar to, the radiating element, or can alternatively lie in a plane set at an angle to the radiating element. Embodiments of the antenna include conductor patterns formed on a printed wiring board, having a ground plane, spacedly adjacent to and coplanar with the radiating element. Other embodiments of the antenna comprise a ground plane and radiating element on opposed sides of a printed wiring board. Other embodiments of the antenna comprise conductors that can be arranged as free standing "foils". Other embodiments include antennas that are encapsulated into a package containing the antenna.

  1. Antenna structure with distributed strip

    SciTech Connect

    Rodenbeck, Christopher T.

    2008-03-18

    An antenna comprises electrical conductors arranged to form a radiating element including a folded line configuration and a distributed strip configuration, where the radiating element is in proximity to a ground conductor. The folded line and the distributed strip can be electrically interconnected and substantially coplanar. The ground conductor can be spaced from, and coplanar to, the radiating element, or can alternatively lie in a plane set at an angle to the radiating element. Embodiments of the antenna include conductor patterns formed on a printed wiring board, having a ground plane, spacedly adjacent to and coplanar with the radiating element. Other embodiments of the antenna comprise a ground plane and radiating element on opposed sides of a printed wiring board. Other embodiments of the antenna comprise conductors that can be arranged as free standing "foils". Other embodiments include antennas that are encapsulated into a package containing the antenna.

  2. 915 MHz microwave interstitial hyperthermia. Part II: Array of phase-monitored antennas.

    PubMed

    Camart, J C; Dubois, L; Fabre, J J; Vanloot, D; Chive, M

    1993-01-01

    In order to heat the whole volume of a tumour by microwave interstitial hyperthermia it is necessary to use an antenna array. The antenna modelization and the numerical solution of the bidimensional bioheat transfer equation allow determination of temperature evolution during a heating session. The calculations are taken for four antennas fed in phase and the theory is then proven by experiments on gel and on patients. Results are presented on cross-section heating patterns and their time evolution. Temperature distribution is calculated when feeding one antenna by a feeding current out of phase with the other currents. The phase difference value is optimized and it is then demonstrated that the heated volume is increased by successively feeding each antenna with an out-of-phase current. The time taken to feed each antenna one after the other is optimized. PMID:8515146

  3. Analysis of rectangular microstrip antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, M. C.; Deshpande, M. D.

    1984-01-01

    The problem of microstrip antennas covered by a dielectric substrate is formulated in terms of coupled integro-differential equations with the current distribution on the conducting patch as an unknown quantity. The Galerkin method is used to solve for the unknown patch current. Using the present formulation, the radiation pattern, the resonant frequency, and the bandwidth of a rectangular microstrip antenna are computed. Design data for a rectangular microstrip antenna are also presented.

  4. Deployable antenna phase A study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, J.; Bernstein, J.; Fischer, G.; Jacobson, G.; Kadar, I.; Marshall, R.; Pflugel, G.; Valentine, J.

    1979-01-01

    Applications for large deployable antennas were re-examined, flight demonstration objectives were defined, the flight article (antenna) was preliminarily designed, and the flight program and ground development program, including the support equipment, were defined for a proposed space transportation system flight experiment to demonstrate a large (50 to 200 meter) deployable antenna system. Tasks described include: (1) performance requirements analysis; (2) system design and definition; (3) orbital operations analysis; and (4) programmatic analysis.

  5. Electronic switching spherical array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockton, R.

    1978-01-01

    This work was conducted to demonstrate the performance levels attainable with an ESSA (Electronic Switching Spherical Array) antenna by designing and testing an engineering model. The antenna was designed to satisfy general spacecraft environmental requirements and built to provide electronically commandable beam pointing capability throughout a hemisphere. Constant gain and beam shape throughout large volumetric coverage regions are the principle characteristics. The model is intended to be a prototype of a standard communications and data handling antenna for user scientific spacecraft with the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). Some additional testing was conducted to determine the feasibility of an integrated TDRSS and GPS (Global Positioning System) antenna system.

  6. Antenna system for MSAT mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlsson, Ingmar; Patenaude, Yves; Stipelman, Leora

    1988-01-01

    Spar has evaluated and compared several antenna concepts for the North American Mobile Satellite. The paper describes some of the requirements and design considerations for the antennas and demonstrates the performance of antenna concepts that can meet them. Multiple beam reflector antennas are found to give best performance and much of the design effort has gone into the design of the primary feed radiators and beam forming networks to achieve efficient beams with good overlap and flexibility. Helices and cup dipole radiators have been breadboarded as feed element candidates and meausured results are presented. The studies and breadboard activities have made it possible to proceed with a flight program.

  7. Spiral Microstrip Antenna with Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shively, David G. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A spiral microstrip antenna having resistor elements embedded in each of the spiral arms is provided. The antenna is constructed using a conductive back plane as a base. The back plane supports a dielectric slab having a thickness between one-sixteenth and one-quarter of an inch. A square spiral, having either two or four arms, is attached to the dielectric slab. Each arm of the spiral has resistor elements thereby dissipating an excess energy not already emitted through radiation. The entire configuration provides a thin, flat, high gain, wide bandwidth antenna which requires no underlying cavity. The configuration allows the antenna to be mounted conformably on an aircraft surface.

  8. Radar transponder antenna pattern analysis for the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radcliff, Roger

    1989-01-01

    In order to improve tracking capability, radar transponder antennas will soon be mounted on the Shuttle solid rocket boosters (SRB). These four antennas, each being identical cavity-backed helices operating at 5.765 GHz, will be mounted near the top of the SRB's, adjacent to the intertank portion of the external tank. The purpose is to calculate the roll-plane pattern (the plane perpendicular to the SRB axes and containing the antennas) in the presence of this complex electromagnetic environment. The large electrical size of this problem mandates an optical (asymptotic) approach. Development of a specific code for this application is beyond the scope of a summer fellowship; thus a general purpose code, the Numerical Electromagnetics Code - Basic Scattering Code, was chosen as the computational tool. This code is based on the modern Geometrical Theory of Diffraction, and allows computation of scattering of bodies composed of canonical problems such as plates and elliptic cylinders. Apertures mounted on a curved surface (the SRB) cannot be accomplished by the code, so an antenna model consisting of wires excited by a method of moments current input was devised that approximated the actual performance of the antennas. The improvised antenna model matched well with measurements taken at the MSFC range. The SRB's, the external tank, and the shuttle nose were modeled as circular cylinders, and the code was able to produce what is thought to be a reasonable roll-plane pattern.

  9. Analysis of radiation performances of plasma sheet antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Bo; Zhang, Zu-Fan; Wang, Ping

    2015-12-01

    A novel concept of plasma sheet antennas is presented in this paper, and the radiation performances of plasma sheet antennas are investigated in detail. Firstly, a model of planar plasma antenna (PPA) fed by a microstrip line is developed, and its reflection coefficient is computed by the JE convolution finite-difference time-domain method and compared with that of the metallic patch antenna. It is found that the design of PPA can learn from the theory of the metallic patch antenna, and the impedance matching and reconstruction of resonant frequency can be expediently realized by adjusting the parameters of plasma. Then the PPA is mounted on a metallic cylindrical surface, and the reflection coefficient of the conformal plasma antenna (CPA) is also computed. At the same time, the influence of conformal cylinder radius on the reflection coefficient is also analyzed. Finally, the radiation pattern of a CPA is given, the results show that the pattern agrees well with the one of PPA in the main radiation direction, but its side lobe level has deteriorated significantly.

  10. Large Space Antenna Systems Technology, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, W. J. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    Mission applications for large space antenna systems; large space antenna structural systems; materials and structures technology; structural dynamics and control technology, electromagnetics technology, large space antenna systems and the Space Station; and flight test and evaluation were examined.

  11. Ferrite attenuator modulation improves antenna performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooks, J. C.; Larson, S. G.; Shorkley, F. H.; Williams, B. T.

    1970-01-01

    Ferrite attenuator inserted into appropriate waveguide reduces the gain of the antenna element which is causing interference. Modulating the ferrite attenuator to change the antenna gain at the receive frequency permits ground tracking until the antenna is no longer needed.

  12. Microelectromechanical Systems Actuator Based Reconfigurable Printed Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A polarization reconfigurable patch antenna is disclosed. The antenna includes a feed element, a patch antenna element electrically connected to the feed element, and at least one microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) actuator, with a partial connection to the patch antenna element along an edge of the patch antenna element. The polarization of the antenna can be switched between circular polarization and linear polarization through action of the at least one MEMS actuator.

  13. Design aspects of commercial satellite antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, K. C.; Taormina, F. A.

    General design considerations for commercial satellite antennas are reviewed, and design factors of shaped beam reflector antennas are described, including shaped beam efficiency, flat-topping and boundary matching, and analysis by Fourier transforms. Attention is then given to the design of the Telesat Anik 17/Westar/Palapa communications antenna, the Comstar I communications antenna, the SBS communications antenna, and Intelsat IV A communications antenna.

  14. View of Antenna #2 (foreground), and Antenna #1 surface doors. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Antenna #2 (foreground), and Antenna #1 surface doors. Orientation Target #1 in background. Image looking northwest - Titan One Missile Complex 2A, .3 miles west of 129 Road and 1.5 miles north of County Line Road, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  15. View of Antenna #1 (foreground), and Antenna #2 surface doors. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Antenna #1 (foreground), and Antenna #2 surface doors. Orientation Target #2 in background. Image looking northeast - Titan One Missile Complex 2A, .3 miles west of 129 Road and 1.5 miles north of County Line Road, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  16. COBRA meteor radar antenna designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zainuddin, Mohamad

    A meteor radar system is one of the effective remote sensing techniques in measuring atmospheric parameters such as wind velocities, temperature, pressure and density which are essential in understanding the atmospheric dynamics in the Mesosphere Lower Thermosphere (MLT) region. Previous studies of very high frequency (VHF) meteors radar systems suggest that the minimum error for the estimation of the horizontal wind velocity from a radar interferometry algorithm should occur when the main beams of the transmit and receive antennas are pointing to between 30° to 50° elevation angles. Therefore, an ideal antenna design for VHF meteor radar systems would produce a pencil beam radiation pattern at a 45° elevation angle. However, both the transmit and receive antenna of the COBRA meteor radar system have major beams are pointing to between 60° to 65° degree elevation angles above a perfect ground plane. Besides transmitting maximum power at low elevation angles, the current antennas of the COBRA meteor radar are highly dependent on the ground plane to radiate maximum gains to between 60° to 65° degree elevation angles. Typically, the earth ground is considered as a common ground plane for many VHF antenna with acceptable performance. However, the earth ground could not effectively reflect most of the power at all time. Because the antennas are dependent on ground to radiate power at certain direction, an artificial ground plane or ground screen has to be built for the COBRA antenna system at the South Pole station, which is located on top of more than 2000 meter thick of ice sheet. This dissertation focuses on the analysis of the performance of the individual current antenna design with four different conditions namely in free space, above an infinite ground, lossy ground and finite ground. In the analysis of finite ground, the effects of varying wire spacing and the size of finite ground to the radiation pattern of a cross folded dipole antenna are investigated

  17. Antenna research and development at Ericsson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlsjo, Olof

    1992-04-01

    This article gives an overview of the antenna research and development activities at Ericsson Radar Electronics AB, in Molndal, Sweden. The article covers different types of microwave antennas, such as twist-Cassegrain antennas, shaped-reflector antennas, microstrip antennas, dichroic surfaces, slotted-waveguide-array antennas, omnidirectional antennas, and electronically-steered-array antennas. Measurement methods, such as near-field and diagnostic techniques, are also discussed. The applications are for radar and microwave communication systems, for use in ground, naval, airborne, and space environments.

  18. Antennas - Our electronic eyes and ears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, John D.

    1989-01-01

    Although the number of antenna types is vast, all antenna properties may be characterized in terms of the same basic parameters of radiation pattern, impedance, radar cross-section, and temperature. A comprehensive introduction is presented to antenna configurations; these encompass, among antennas constructed of wire or tubing, such wideband and circularly polarized types as helices, linear conductors, and loops. Sheet-conductor antenna families include reflectors, waveguides, and slotted antennas. Nonconducting dielectric antennas are lenses, polyrods, and slabs. Antenna array types range over 'driven', parasitic, and adaptive configurations. 'Two half-wavelength' and 'four half-wavelength' element arrays are also discussed.

  19. Theoretical and experimental investigation of plasma antenna characteristics on the basis of gaseous collisionality and electron density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, Teruki; Yamaura, Shingo; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Tanaka, Tai; Chiba, Hidetoshi; Ogino, Hayato; Takahagi, Kazuhiro; Kitagawa, Shinya; Taniguchi, Daiki

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports plasma antenna characteristics investigated theoretically and experimentally, on the basis of the plasma parameters: gaseous collisionality and electron density. The antenna structure is a basic quarter-wavelength monopole antenna in the UHF band. The dependence of the antenna gain on the plasma parameters is obtained by analytical equations from plasma and antenna theory, and by numerical simulations. In the plasma antenna, the ratio of the electron elastic collision frequency to the total number of electrons at the plasma cross section determines the antenna’s internal loss and the electrical equivalent antenna length, whereas the ratio of the radio wave frequency to the total number of electrons at the plasma cross section determines the antenna’s resonant frequency. These results are confirmed by experimental results of the antenna’s impedance and radiation patterns.

  20. Airborne antenna pattern calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knerr, T. J.; Mielke, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    Progress on the development of modeling software, testing software against caclulated data from program VPAP and measured patterns, and calculating roll plane patterns for general aviation aircraft is reported. Major objectives are the continued development of computer software for aircraft modeling and use of this software and program OSUVOL to calculate principal plane and volumetric radiation patterns. The determination of proper placement of antennas on aircraft to meet the requirements of the Microwave Landing System is discussed. An overview of the performed work, and an example of a roll plane model for the Piper PA-31T Cheyenne aircraft and the resulting calculated roll plane radiation pattern are included.

  1. Antenna feedhorn software upgrade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, P. D.

    1979-01-01

    The HYBRIDHORN computer program was developed to serve as an item of general purpose antenna feedhorn design and analysis software. The formulation contains a small flare angle approximation which is subject to question for designs such as the S- and X-band feedhorn. Additionally, the original formulation did not allow azimuthal variation indexes other than unity. The HYBRIDHORN program was upgraded to correct both of these deficiencies. A large flare angle formulation was found. In the upgrade, all of the major program elements were converted to Univac 1108 compatible structured FORTRAN (SFTRAN) for ease of software maintenance. The small and large angle formulations are described and sample numerical results are presented.

  2. Patch antenna terahertz photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Palaferri, D.; Todorov, Y. Chen, Y. N.; Madeo, J.; Vasanelli, A.; Sirtori, C.; Li, L. H.; Davies, A. G.; Linfield, E. H.

    2015-04-20

    We report on the implementation of 5 THz quantum well photodetector exploiting a patch antenna cavity array. The benefit of our plasmonic architecture on the detector performance is assessed by comparing it with detectors made using the same quantum well absorbing region, but processed into a standard 45° polished facet mesa. Our results demonstrate a clear improvement in responsivity, polarization insensitivity, and background limited performance. Peak detectivities in excess of 5 × 10{sup 12} cmHz{sup 1/2}/W have been obtained, a value comparable with that of the best cryogenic cooled bolometers.

  3. Astronaut space suit communication antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, J. F., III; Nason, G. H.

    1968-01-01

    Astronaut space suit communication antenna consists of a spring steel monopole in a blade-type configuration. This antenna is mounted in a copper cup filled with a potting compound that is recessed in the center to facilitate bending the blade flat for stowing when not in use.

  4. Emergency-vehicle VHF antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. E.; Carlson, A. W.; Lewis, J.

    1977-01-01

    Helical VHF antenna mounts on roof of moving vehicle to communicate with distant stations via earth satellites. Antenna requires no pointing and can provide two-way communication while vehicle moves at high speed. Device has proved extremely successful in electrocardiogram transmission tests between medical services vehicle and hospital emergency room.

  5. Reflector antennas for ultrawideband usage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, P. R.

    1993-01-01

    The provision of high gain antennas for ultrawideband systems is limited not only by the electromagnetic problems but also by the mechanical aspects such as the volume required. Single antenna elements such as TEM horns can provide gains of 20.0 dBi at the highest operating frequencies but any additional gain requires the use of other techniques. The simplest techniques are to use an array of elements or to use a reflector antenna. This paper deals with the design of reflector antennas. The transforming effect of the reflector surface is such that a constant aperture feed results in a constant gain reflector while a constant gain feed results in a constant aperture reflector. However this elegant postulate is somewhat degraded in practice by the presence of blockage, spillover and diffraction from the rim in a reflector antenna.

  6. Graphene-antenna sandwich photodetector.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zheyu; Liu, Zheng; Wang, Yumin; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2012-07-11

    Nanoscale antennas sandwiched between two graphene monolayers yield a photodetector that efficiently converts visible and near-infrared photons into electrons with an 800% enhancement of the photocurrent relative to the antennaless graphene device. The antenna contributes to the photocurrent in two ways: by the transfer of hot electrons generated in the antenna structure upon plasmon decay, as well as by direct plasmon-enhanced excitation of intrinsic graphene electrons due to the antenna near field. This results in a graphene-based photodetector achieving up to 20% internal quantum efficiency in the visible and near-infrared regions of the spectrum. This device can serve as a model for merging the light-harvesting characteristics of optical frequency antennas with the highly attractive transport properties of graphene in new optoelectronic devices. PMID:22703522

  7. Small high directivity ferrite antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, T. M. B.

    A centimeter-wavelength antenna of millimetric dimensions, which uses the intrinsic angular sensitivity of ferrites, is described, with an emphasis on the modification of the material's permeability. The construction of both the ferrite film lens antenna and the ferrite film cassegrain antenna are detailed; both can be devised in a number of configurations for appropriate beam positioning and rf filtering. The antenna design, discussed primarily in the context of smart missiles, electronic warfare, and satellite systems, presents the possibility of magnetically switching between the transmit and receive modes within the antenna structure itself. Finally, it is noted that for a simple 2-dipole array the angular resolution can be two orders of magnitude higher than with the conventional techniques.

  8. Transcatheter Microwave Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, Dickey G. (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor); Ngo, Phong (Inventor); Raffoul, George W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A method, simulation, and apparatus are provided that are highly suitable for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). A catheter is disclosed that includes a small diameter disk loaded monopole antenna surrounded by fusion material having a high heat of fusion and a melting point preferably at or near body temperature. Microwaves from the antenna heat prostatic tissue to promote necrosing of the prostatic tissue that relieves the pressure of the prostatic tissue against the urethra as the body reabsorbs the necrosed or dead tissue. The fusion material keeps the urethra cool by means of the heat of fusion of the fusion material. This prevents damage to the urethra while the prostatic tissue is necrosed. A computer simulation is provided that can be used to predict the resulting temperature profile produced in the prostatic tissue. By changing the various control features of the catheter and method of applying microwave energy a temperature profile can be predicted and produced that is similar to the temperature profile desired for the particular patient.

  9. Soret Fishnet Metalens Antenna

    PubMed Central

    Orazbayev, Bakhtiyar; Beruete, Miguel; Pacheco-Peña, Víctor; Crespo, Gonzalo; Teniente, Jorge; Navarro-Cía, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    At the expense of frequency narrowing, binary amplitude-only diffractive optical elements emulate refractive lenses without the need of large profiles. Unfortunately, they also present larger Fresnel reflection loss than conventional lenses. This is usually tackled by implementing unattractive cumbersome designs. Here we demonstrate that simplicity is not at odds with performance and we show how the fishnet metamaterial can improve the radiation pattern of a Soret lens. The building block of this advanced Soret lens is the fishnet metamaterial operating in the near-zero refractive index regime with one of the edge layers designed with alternating opaque and transparent concentric rings made of subwavelength holes. The hybrid Soret fishnet metalens retains all the merits of classical Soret lenses such as low profile, low cost and ease of manufacturing. It is designed for the W-band of the millimeter-waves range with a subwavelength focal length FL = 1.58 mm (0.5λ0) aiming at a compact antenna or radar systems. The focal properties of the lens along with its radiation characteristics in a lens antenna configuration have been studied numerically and confirmed experimentally, showing a gain improvement of ~2 dB with respect to a fishnet Soret lens without the fishnet metamaterial. PMID:25950243

  10. Soret fishnet metalens antenna.

    PubMed

    Orazbayev, Bakhtiyar; Beruete, Miguel; Pacheco-Peña, Víctor; Crespo, Gonzalo; Teniente, Jorge; Navarro-Cía, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    At the expense of frequency narrowing, binary amplitude-only diffractive optical elements emulate refractive lenses without the need of large profiles. Unfortunately, they also present larger Fresnel reflection loss than conventional lenses. This is usually tackled by implementing unattractive cumbersome designs. Here we demonstrate that simplicity is not at odds with performance and we show how the fishnet metamaterial can improve the radiation pattern of a Soret lens. The building block of this advanced Soret lens is the fishnet metamaterial operating in the near-zero refractive index regime with one of the edge layers designed with alternating opaque and transparent concentric rings made of subwavelength holes. The hybrid Soret fishnet metalens retains all the merits of classical Soret lenses such as low profile, low cost and ease of manufacturing. It is designed for the W-band of the millimeter-waves range with a subwavelength focal length FL = 1.58 mm (0.5λ0) aiming at a compact antenna or radar systems. The focal properties of the lens along with its radiation characteristics in a lens antenna configuration have been studied numerically and confirmed experimentally, showing a gain improvement of ~2 dB with respect to a fishnet Soret lens without the fishnet metamaterial. PMID:25950243

  11. Implantable multilayer microstrip antenna for retinal prosthesis: antenna testing.

    PubMed

    Permana, Hans; Fang, Qiang; Rowe, Wayne S T

    2012-01-01

    Retinal prosthesis has come to a more mature stage and become a very strategic answer to Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) and Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) diseases. In a retinal prosthesis system, wireless link holds a great importance for the continuity of the system. In this paper, an implantable multilayer microstrip antenna was proposed for the retinal prosthesis system. Simulations were performed in High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS) with the surrounding material of air and Vitreous Humor fluid. The fabricated antenna was measured for characteristic validation in free space. The results showed that the real antenna possessed similar return loss and radiation pattern, while there was discrepancy with the gain values. PMID:23366231

  12. L-band orthogonal-mode crossed-slot antenna and VHF crossed-loop antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsson, T.

    1972-01-01

    A low gain, circularly polarized, L-band antenna; a low gain, linealy polarized, L-band antenna; and a low gain, circularly polarized, upper hemisphere, VHF satellite communications antenna intended for airborne applications are described. The text includes impedance and antenna radiation pattern data, along with physical description of the construction of the antennas.

  13. 47 CFR 73.1675 - Auxiliary antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Auxiliary antennas. 73.1675 Section 73.1675... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1675 Auxiliary antennas. (a)(1) An auxiliary antenna is one that is permanently installed and available for use when the main antenna is out of service...

  14. 47 CFR 95.1013 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1013 Section 95.1013... SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1013 Antennas. (a) The maximum allowable... this chapter, at the band edges. (b) AMTS stations must employ directional antennas. (c) Antennas...

  15. 47 CFR 95.51 - Antenna height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna height. 95.51 Section 95.51... SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.51 Antenna height. (a) Certain antenna structures used in... this chapter. (b) The antenna for a small base station or for a small control station must not be...

  16. 47 CFR 95.51 - Antenna height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna height. 95.51 Section 95.51... SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.51 Antenna height. (a) Certain antenna structures used in... this chapter. (b) The antenna for a small base station or for a small control station must not be...

  17. 47 CFR 73.753 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.753 Section 73.753... International Broadcast Stations § 73.753 Antenna systems. All international broadcasting stations shall operate with directional antennas. Such antennas shall be designed and operated so that the radiated power...

  18. 47 CFR 73.510 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.510 Section 73.510... Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.510 Antenna systems. (a) All noncommercial educational... § 73.316 concerning antenna systems contained in subpart B of this part. (b) Directional antenna....

  19. 47 CFR 95.1013 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1013 Section 95.1013... SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1013 Antennas. (a) The maximum allowable... this chapter, at the band edges. (b) AMTS stations must employ directional antennas. (c) Antennas...

  20. 47 CFR 95.1213 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1213 Section 95.1213... SERVICES Medical Device Radiocommunication Service (MedRadio) § 95.1213 Antennas. No antenna for a MedRadio transmitter shall be configured for permanent outdoor use. In addition, any MedRadio antenna used...

  1. 47 CFR 73.510 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.510 Section 73.510... Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.510 Antenna systems. (a) All noncommercial educational... § 73.316 concerning antenna systems contained in subpart B of this part. (b) Directional antenna....

  2. 47 CFR 73.1675 - Auxiliary antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Auxiliary antennas. 73.1675 Section 73.1675... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1675 Auxiliary antennas. (a)(1) An auxiliary antenna is one that is permanently installed and available for use when the main antenna is out of service...

  3. 47 CFR 95.51 - Antenna height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna height. 95.51 Section 95.51... SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.51 Antenna height. (a) Certain antenna structures used in... this chapter. (b) The antenna for a small base station or for a small control station must not be...

  4. 47 CFR 95.51 - Antenna height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna height. 95.51 Section 95.51... SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.51 Antenna height. (a) Certain antenna structures used in... this chapter. (b) The antenna for a small base station or for a small control station must not be...

  5. 47 CFR 73.1675 - Auxiliary antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Auxiliary antennas. 73.1675 Section 73.1675... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1675 Auxiliary antennas. (a)(1) An auxiliary antenna is one that is permanently installed and available for use when the main antenna is out of service...

  6. 47 CFR 73.510 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.510 Section 73.510... Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.510 Antenna systems. (a) All noncommercial educational... § 73.316 concerning antenna systems contained in subpart B of this part. (b) Directional antenna....

  7. 47 CFR 73.1675 - Auxiliary antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Auxiliary antennas. 73.1675 Section 73.1675... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1675 Auxiliary antennas. (a)(1) An auxiliary antenna is one that is permanently installed and available for use when the main antenna is out of service...

  8. 47 CFR 73.1680 - Emergency antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Emergency antennas. 73.1680 Section 73.1680... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1680 Emergency antennas. (a) An emergency antenna is one that is erected for temporary use after the authorized main and auxiliary antennas are damaged...

  9. 47 CFR 95.1013 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1013 Section 95.1013... SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1013 Antennas. (a) The maximum allowable... this chapter, at the band edges. (b) AMTS stations must employ directional antennas. (c) Antennas...

  10. 47 CFR 73.1680 - Emergency antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Emergency antennas. 73.1680 Section 73.1680... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1680 Emergency antennas. (a) An emergency antenna is one that is erected for temporary use after the authorized main and auxiliary antennas are damaged...