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Sample records for anthropogenic lead distribution

  1. Anthropogenic lead distribution in rodent-affected and undisturbed soils in southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, J.E.; Graham, R.C.; Amrhein, C.

    1997-01-01

    Anthropogenic Pb is the world`s largest and most widespread heavy metal contamination. Inspired by recent evidence suggesting a faster redistribution of Pb through the mineral soil profile than was previously expected, we investigated the effects of rodent activity on Pb redistribution. Total Pb was analyzed at the 0-1, 1-4, and 4-7-cm depths in a rodent-affected soil and in an undisturbed soil, in the same proximity and with the same parent material, in the Box Springs Mountains near Riverside, California. Six replicate sites of each condition were sampled. Lead was recovered by a digest in 4 M HNO{sub 3} and measured using a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Anthropotenic Pb content to a 7-cm depth averaged 19 mg kg{sup -1} in undisturbed soils and 10 mg kg{sup -1} in rodent-affected soils. In both soils, the highest concentrations of Pb were located in the top 4 cm of the profile. After accounting for an estimated native Pb ({approximately}3.3 mg kg{sup -1}), we determined that 20 to 38 kg ha{sup -1} Pb has been deposited on these soils, through air pollution. Our findings suggest rodents significantly modify the distribution of anthropogenic Pb in the rodent-affected soils of the box Springs Mountains primarily in two ways: (i) by reducing Pb concentration in surface soils, thereby decreasing the potential for erosional redistribution of Pb, and (ii) by decreasing Pb transport time through the soil profile as a result of physical mixing. This redistribution mechanism is likely applicable to other surface deposited anthropogenic contaminants that have similarly low soil mobility. 18 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  2. Distribution and sources of pre-anthropogenic lead isotopes in deep ocean water from Fe-Mn crusts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Von Blanckenburg, F.; O'Nions, R. K.; Hein, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    The lead isotope composition of ocean water is not well constrained due to contamination by anthropogenic lead. Here the global distribution of lead isotopes in deep ocean water is presented as derived from dated (ca. 100 ka) surface layers of hydrogenetic Fe-Mn crusts. The results indicate that the radiogenic lead in North Atlantic deep water is probably supplied from the continents by river particulates, and that lead in Pacific deep water is similar to that characteristic of island and continental volcanic arcs. Despite a short residence time in deep water (80-100 a), the isotopes of lead appear to be exceedingly well mixed in the Pacific basin. There is no evidence for the import of North Atlantic deep water-derived lead into the Pacific ocean, nor into the North Indian Ocean. This implies that the short residence time of lead in deep water prohibits advection over such long distances. Consequently, any climate-induced changes in deep-water flow are not expected to result in major changes in the seawater Pb-isotope record of the Pacific Ocean.

  3. Distribution and sources of pre-anthropogenic lead isotopes in deep ocean water from Fesbnd Mn crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Blanckenburg, F.; O'nions, R. K.; Heinz, J. R.

    1996-12-01

    The lead isotope composition of ocean water is not well constrained due to contamination by anthropogenic lead. Here the global distribution of lead isotopes in deep ocean water is presented as derived from dated (ca. 100 ka) surface layers of hydrogenetic Fe-Mn crusts. The results indicate that the radiogenic lead in North Atlantic deep water is probably supplied from the continents by river particulates, and that lead in Pacific deep water is similar to that characteristic of island and continental volcanic arcs. Despite a short residence time in deep water (80-100 a), the isotopes of lead appear to be exceedingly well mixed in the Pacific basin. There is no evidence for the import of North Atlantic deep water-derived lead into the Pacific ocean, nor into the North Indian Ocean. This implies that the short residence time of lead in deep water prohibits advection over such long distances. Consequently, any climate-induced changes in deep-water flow are not expected to result in major changes in the seawater Pb-isotope record of the Pacific Ocean.

  4. The urban environmental gradient: Anthropogenic influences on the spatial and temporal distributions of lead and zinc in sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Callender, E.; Rice, K.C.

    2000-01-01

    Urban settings are a focal point for environmental contamination due to emissions from industrial and municipal activities and the widespread use of motor vehicles. As part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program of the U.S. Geological Survey, streambed-sediment and dated reservoir-sediment samples were collected from the Chattahoochee River Basin and analyzed for total lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) concentrations. The sampling transect extends from northern Georgia, through Atlanta, to the Gulf of Mexico and reflects a steep gradient in population density from nearly 1000 people/km2 in the Atlanta Metropolitan Area to fewer than 50 people/km2 in rural areas of southern Georgia and northern Florida. Correlations among population density, traffic density, and total and anthropogenic Pb and Zn concentrations indicate that population density is strongly related to traffic density and is a predictor of Pb and Zn concentrations in the environment derived from anthropogenic activities. Differences in the distributions of total Pb and Zn concentrations along the urban-suburban-rural gradient from Atlanta to the Florida Panhandle are related to temporal and spatial processes. That is, with the removal of leaded gasoline starting in the late 1970s, peak Pb concentrations have decreased to the present. Conversely, increased vehicular usage has kept Zn concentrations elevated in runoff from population centers, which is reflected in the continued enrichment of Zn in aquatic sediments. Sediments from rural areas also contain elevated concentrations of Zn, possibly in response to substantial power plant emissions for the region, as well as vehicular traffic.

  5. The urban environmental gradient: Anthropogenic influences on the spatial and temporal distributions of lead and zinc in sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Callender, E.; Rice, K.C.

    2000-01-15

    Urban settings are a focal point for environmental contamination due to emissions from industrial and municipal activities and the widespread use of motor vehicles. As part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program of the US Geological Survey, streamed-sediment and dated reservoir-sediment samples were collected from the Chattahoochee River Basin and analyzed for total lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) concentrations. The sampling transect extends from northern Georgia, through Atlanta, to the Gulf of Mexico and reflects a steep gradient in population density from nearly 1,000 people/km{sup 2} in the Atlanta Metropolitan Area to fewer than 50 people/km{sup 2} in rural areas of southern Georgia and northern Florida. Correlations among population density, traffic density, and total and anthropogenic Pb and Zn concentrations indicate that population density is strongly related to traffic density and is a predictor o Pb and Zn concentrations in the environment derived from anthropogenic activities. Differences in the distributions of total Pb and Zn concentrations along the urban-suburban-rural gradient from Atlanta to the Florida Panhandle are related to temporal and spatial processes. That is, with the removal of leaded gasoline starting in the late 1970s, peak Pb concentrations have decreased to the present. Conversely, increased vehicular usage has kept Zn concentrations elevated in runoff from populated centers, which is reflected in the continued enrichment of Zn in aquatic sediments. Sediments from rural areas also contain elevated concentrations of Zn, possibly in response to substantial power plant emissions for the region, as well as vehicular traffic.

  6. Anthropogenic lead dynamics in the terrestrial and marine environment.

    PubMed

    Reuer, Matthew K; Weiss, Dominik J

    2002-12-15

    Human activities have greatly altered the natural geochemical cycles of several heavy metals, most notably lead derived from leaded-petrol and metal-smelting emissions. This inadvertent geochemical tracer experiment poses two challenges: understanding how anthropogenic lead affects human health and the environment, and quantifying its time-dependent distribution within terrestrial and marine systems. Accurate assessment of the latter relies on well-constrained historical and modern lead fluxes from proxy records and direct observations, lead source estimates from stable lead isotopes, and transport rate estimates from radionuclides. Numerous studies support the global-scale atmospheric lead fluxes principally derived from anthropogenic activities, the short lead residence time in the atmosphere and surface ocean, and the predominance of North American and European lead emissions. Emerging observations and models are currently addressing the time-dependent evolution of this reactive tracer in the atmosphere and oceans. PMID:12626272

  7. Inadvertent Climate Modification Due to Anthropogenic Lead

    SciTech Connect

    Cziczo, Daniel J.; Stetzer, Olaf; Worringen, Annette; Ebert, Martin; Weinbruch, Stephan; Kamphus, M.; Gallavardin, S. J.; Curtius, J.; Borrmann, S.; Froyd, Karl D.; Mertes, S.; Mohler, Ottmar; Lohmann, U.

    2009-05-01

    The relationship between atmospheric particulate matter and the formation of clouds is among the most uncertain aspects of our current understanding of climate change1. One specific question that remains unanswered is how anthropogenic particulate emissions are affecting the nucleation of ice crystals. Satellites show ice clouds cover more than a third of the globe2 and models suggest that ice nucleation initiates the majority of terrestrial precipitation3. It is therefore not possible to adequately understand either climate change or the global water cycle without understanding ice nucleation. Here we show that lead-containing particles are among the most efficient ice nucleating substances commonly found in the atmosphere. Field observations were conducted with mass spectrometry and electron microscopy at two remote stations on different continents, far removed from local emissions. Laboratory studies within two cloud chambers using controlled experimental conditions support the field data. Because the dominate sources of particulate lead are anthropogenic emissions such as aviation fuel, power generation, smelting, and the re-suspension of residue from tetra-ethyl leaded gasoline4, it is likely that cloud formation and precipitation have been affected when compared to pre-industrial times. A global climate model comparing pre-industrial and anthropogenically perturbed conditions shows that lead-containing particles may be increasing the outgoing longwave radiation by 0.2 to 0.8 W m-2, thereby offsetting a portion of the warming attributed to greenhouse gases1.

  8. Tracing the transport of anthropogenic lead in the atmosphere and in soils using isotopic ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erel, Yigal; Veron, Alain; Halicz, Ludwik

    1997-11-01

    The isotopic composition of lead in aerosols and soils in Israel is used to characterize the sources of anthropogenic lead in the region, to ascertain the isotopic composition of natural, rock-derived lead in specific areas, and to determine rates of anthropogenic lead migration in soils. The isotopic composition of lead currently emitted from cars in Israel ( 206Pb /207Pb = 1.115 ± 2 ) is controlled by alkyl-lead produced in France and Germany. In addition to petrol-lead, two more sources of anthropogenic lead can be detected in sampled aerosols: the first one has low concentrations of lead (˜4 ng/m 3) and 206Pb /207Pb ˜ 1.157 , and is most likely lead, emitted in Turkey, that traveled across the eastern Mediterranean basin; the second type of aerosols contains a mixture of lead emitted in several countries including Turkey, Greece, and Ukraine ( 206Pb /207Pb value of 1.155-1.160; [Pb] ˜ 20-30 ng/m 3). Anthropogenic lead is more accessible for acid leaching than natural lead, therefore, it is more labile in the soil. The isotopic composition of lead in the acid-leached fraction of near-road soil profiles record the histor of alkyl-lead emission in the country. Based on changes in the isotopic composition of lead with soil depth, it is estimated that anthropogenic lead migrates into the soil at approximately 0.5 cm/y. A soil profile from a relatively remote area is less contaminated by anthropogenic lead and displays a different distribution of lead isotopic values with depth. The isotopic composition of lead suggests that natural lead in soils developed on carbonate bedrock is derived from clays, either from the rock-esidue (the clay fraction in the carbonate bedrock), or from airborne clay, but not from lead released from the carbonate fraction in the rock.

  9. Tracing the transport of anthropogenic lead in the atmosphere and in soils using isotopic ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Erel, Y.; Veron, A.; Halicz, L.

    1997-11-01

    The isotopic composition of lead in aerosols and soils in Israel is used to characterize the sources of anthropogenic lead in the region, to ascertain the isotopic composition of natural, rock-derived lead in specific areas, and to determine rates of anthropogenic lead migration in soils. The isotopic composition of lead currently emitted from cars in Israel ({sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb = 1.115 {+-} 2) is controlled by alkyl-lead produced in France and Germany. In addition to petrol-lead, two more sources of anthropogenic lead can be detected in sampled aerosols; the first one has low concentrations of lead ({approximately} ng/m{sup 3}) and {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb {approximately} 1.157, and is most likely lead, emitted in Turkey, that traveled across the eastern Mediterranean basin; the second type of aerosols contains a mixture of lead emitted in several countries including Turkey, Greece, and Ukraine ({sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb value of 1.155-1.160; [Pb] {approximately}20-30 ng/m{sup 3}). Anthropogenic lead is more accessible for acid leaching than natural lead, therefore, it is more labile in the soil. The isotopic composition of lead in the acid-leached fraction of near-road soil profiles records the history of alkyl-lead emission in the country. Based on changes in the isotopic composition of lead with soil depth, it is estimated that anthropogenic lead migrates into the soil at approximately 0.5 cm/y. A soil profile from a relatively remote area is less contaminated by anthropogenic lead and displays a different distribution of lead isotopic values with depth. The isotopic composition of lead suggests that natural lead in soils developed on carbonate bedrock is derived from clays, either from the rock-residue (the clay fraction in the carbonate bedrock), or from airborne clay, but not from lead released from the carbonate fraction in the rock. 44 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Stable lead isotopes evidence anthropogenic contamination in Alaskan sea otters

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.R.; Estes, J.A.; Flegal, A.R. ); Niemeyer, S. )

    1990-10-01

    Lead concentrations and stable isotopic compositions were measured in teeth of preindustrial and contemporary sea otters (Enhydra lutris) from Amchitka Island, AK, to determine if changes had occurred in the magnitude and source of assimilated lead. Although there was no significant difference in lead concentrations between the two groups of otters ({bar x} {plus minus} {sigma}Pb/Ca atomic = 3.6 {plus minus} 2.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}8}), differences in stable lead isotopic compositions revealed a pronounced change in the source of accumulated lead. Lead {bar x} {plus minus} 2{sigma}{sub {bar x}} in the preindustrial otters ({sup 207}Pb/{sup 206}Pb = 0.828 {plus minus} 0.006) was derived from natural deposits in the Aleutian arc, while lead in the contemporary animals ({sup 207}Pb/{sup 206}Pb = 0.856 {plus minus} 0.003) was primarily industrial lead from Asia and western Canada. The isotopic ratios demonstrate anthropogenic perturbations of the lead cycle in present-day coastal food webs and indicate that lead concentration measurements alone are inadequate in assessing the introduction and transport of contaminant lead in the environment.

  11. [Quantitative analysis on the changes in anthropogenic lead flows of China].

    PubMed

    Ma, Lan; Mao, Jian-Su

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, a series of measures have been taken to improve the lead anthropogenic flow. Knowledge of the changes that happened to anthropogenic lead flows can not only examine the effectiveness of these measures, but also help us to understand the current status of lead flows in China, which can provide us quantitative fundamental reference for further improvement in source utilization and environment quality. In this study, the material flow analysis method based on stock and flow (STAF) was employed to analyze the current anthropogenic lead flows in 2010. Based on that, some indices such as lead ore consumption, environmental lead emission, resource efficiency, environmental efficiency, recycling rate, and so on, were taken to evaluate the changes occurred to anthropogenic lead flows during the last decade by comparing their values in 2010 to those in 2000. The results showed that the lead resource efficiency and environmental efficiency in 2010 were 1.3 times and 1.07 times respectively as high as those of 2000, while the lead recycling rate was also increased by 29.57%. However, the quantity of lead ore consumption and environmental lead emissions continued increasing, and were increased by 1.97 and 2.57 times respectively as compared to those of 2000 due to the scale expansion of China in lead production and consumption, which indicates a future heavy task in the improvement of anthropogenic lead flows of China. PMID:25244875

  12. Anthropogenic Lead Deposition over the last 15,000 years in Northern New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisneros-Dozal, L.; Fessenden, J.; Ray, C.

    2006-12-01

    Analyses of stable isotopes of lead (206Pb/207Pb) as well as lead concentrations in soil sediments provide a method to discern anthropogenic from natural sources of lead deposition. In order to distinguish natural from anthropogenic aerosol deposition over the Holocene in Northern New Mexico, isotopic analyses and total lead measurements were performed on bog sediments spanning 15,000 years before present. The bog core was collected in the Santa Fe National Forest at an elevation of 2925 m and comprises a depth of ~400 cm of sediments. Dry and homogenized sediments from depth intervals varying from 2 to 20 cm were extracted in a microwave-assisted digestion with nitric acid at 170 Celsius degree. The accuracy and precision of our method were determined by analyses of standard reference materials (National Institute of Standards and Technology 981, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)-SL-1 and IAEA-soil-7) and replicated measurements respectively. The preliminary results from this study have shown influences from regional anthropogenic sources as well as environmental forcing on the lead concentrations and isotopic signatures. The dominant signals in this environment are believed to be the result of local conditions of the sediments through the Holocene (e.g. dry versus wet/bog environments). This will have a significant impact on lead concentration and isotope modeling as local environmental condition is the dominant control of these proxies.

  13. Lead isotopic composition of insoluble particles from widespread mountain glaciers in western China: Natural vs. anthropogenic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Guangming; Xu, Jianzhong; Kang, Shichang; Zhang, Qianggong; Huang, Jie; Ren, Qian; Ren, Jiawen; Qin, Dahe

    2013-08-01

    Stable lead (Pb) isotopic fingerprints provide opportunities to trace natural and anthropogenic Pb sources in the environment. In order to evaluate Pb deposition from different sources over mountainous areas of western China, Pb isotopic compositions were characterized from modern aeolian dust in 15 snowpit samples collected from 13 typical mountain glaciers between 2008 and 2010. Most of the snowpits sampled cover more than a whole year of accumulation and overlap with each other on deposition date. Pb isotopic variability among all the samples is small, varying in the range of 18.1399-18.9199 for 206Pb/204Pb, 15.5979-15.8743 for 207Pb/204Pb, 38.2272-39.9453 for 208Pb/204Pb, 1.1605-1.2009 for 206Pb/207Pb and 2.4433-2.5182 for 208Pb/207Pb. Three isotopic plots of the different Pb isotope ratios (207Pb/204Pb vs. 206Pb/204Pb, 208Pb/204Pb vs. 206Pb/204Pb, and 208Pb/207Pb vs. 206Pb/207Pb) in all the samples show identical geographic trends, with more radiogenic in the south and less in the north. This trend is consistent with the distribution of natural dust sources and supports the interpretation of a regional/local source for insoluble particles (IP) to snow/glaciers in this region. Comparison with the Pb isotope results from potential dust sources, however, it shows that the Pb isotopic compositions of IP samples in snow samples are relatively less radiogenic. Parts of these less-radiogenic Pb isotopes are comparable with the ice core results during recent decades, which are shown to be influenced by anthropogenic sources. At sites located along the periphery of western China, the Pb isotopic compositions are much closer to anthropogenic results. Natural and anthropogenic Pb sources are roughly assessed using a simple binary model. The sites with a high anthropogenic fraction are at lower elevations and are relatively close to population centers.

  14. Isotope Record of Anthropogenic Lead Pollution in Lake Sediments of Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, J.; Whitmore, T.; Kamenov, G. D.; Riedinger-Whitmore, M.

    2013-05-01

    We looked at the anthropogenic lead (Pb) burden that accumulated in sediment of lakes in the southeastern USA during the last century. Few studies have examined Pb in lakes of the southeastern USA, which is subject to less continental atmospheric influence than other regions of the eastern USA. The sediment records from Little Lake Jackson and Little Lake Bonnet showed that changes in Pb concentration and isotope ratios correspond temporally with gasoline consumption in the USA, as well as with changes in lead ores used to produce leaded gasoline. Lead concentrations in the study lakes showed temporal variations that were similar to those found in peat records from east-central Florida. Isotope trends were similar to the mean USA atmospheric Pb deposition record, and to Pb isotope records from Bermuda and Atlantic corals. We modeled the isotopic composition of the anthropogenic Pb in lake sediments and found that the overall trend is controlled by Pb that was released during leaded gasoline combustion. There is, however, additional Pb at each site that comes from sources that are not fully represented by the natural, background Pb.

  15. Dispersal of natural and anthropogenic lead through submarine canyons at the Portuguese margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, T. O.; de Stigter, H. C.; Boer, W.; Jesus, C. C.; van Weering, T. C. E.

    2009-02-01

    Submarine canyons represent natural conduits for preferential transport of particulate material, including anthropogenic contaminants, from coastal zones directly to the deep sea. To assess related dispersal of natural and anthropogenic lead (Pb), we analyzed Pb concentrations and stable isotope ratios in surface sediments and sediment trap particulate material from the Portuguese margin Nazaré and Setúbal/Lisbon canyons. Geochemical data are integrated with previously obtained data on near-bottom hydrodynamics and processes and pathways of sediment transport. The two canyon systems are located in close geographic proximity to each other, but represent contrasting settings in terms of sediment input and down-canyon sediment transport processes. Concentration-isotope diagrams and three-isotope plots ( 206Pb/ 207Pb vs. 208Pb/ 206Pb) suggest binary mixing between natural and anthropogenic end members. The inferred isotopic signature of pollutant Pb ( 206Pb/ 207Pb=1.143 [1.134-1.149, 95% confidence interval]) is most consistent with industrial Pb; ongoing influence from gasoline Pb additives is at most of minor importance. Two proposed natural end members most likely bracket the isotopic signature of natural Pb. Accordingly, binary mixing calculations indicate that on average 20-45% vs. 35-55% of total Pb is derived from anthropogenic sources in the Nazaré and Setúbal-Lisbon canyon systems, respectively. Enhanced anthropogenic influence in the latter area is consistent with its proximity to heavily populated and industrialized areas and with sediment input from the Tagus and Sado rivers, potential major carriers of pollutant particles. In both canyon systems, the anthropogenic component generally decreases with increasing water depth. Isotopic signatures of sediment trap particulate material are generally consistent with surface sediment data at similar water depth, but show large variability in the upper Nazaré canyon and major deviations from surface sediments

  16. Lead Isotopic Tracing of Coal-Based Anthropogenic Pollution in Agricultural Soils in Jianghan Plain, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, J. N.; Ying, S.; Zhao, R.; Bu, J.; Gan, Y.; Wang, Y.; Weiss, D. J.; Fendorf, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    The Chinese demand for energy is one of the greatest in the world, and the vast majority of it is generated through coal combustion - a process by which diverse pollutants are released into the atmosphere. Due to the relative proximity of croplands to power plants in much of China, these pollutants can be deposited onto agricultural soils via atmospheric transport. Relative amounts of lead (Pb) isotopes in airborne anthropogenic coal-based contaminants (fly ash) are currently understood. However, contaminants' effects on agricultural soil composition are less clear. We investigate the prevalence of anthropogenic contaminants in cropland soils using lead (Pb) isotope ratios as a tracer. Surface soil samples and deep core samples, taken from Chinese field sites in proximity to a coal combustion plant, undergo an acid extraction process and lead (Pb) isotope concentrations are measured. The results of this study illustrate the extent to which airborne contaminants have entered cropland soils and integrated themselves into the chemical processes at work. They further expand our understanding of the impacts of human coal combustion activities on the biogeochemistry of agricultural soils.

  17. Asian anthropogenic lead contamination in the North Pacific Ocean as evidenced by stable lead isotopic compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurbrick, Cheryl M.

    This dissertation work determined the changing scope of lead (Pb) contamination in the North Pacific Ocean since the phase-out of leaded gasoline in most of the world. Chapters 1 and 2 consisted of validating our method for determining Pb concentrations and isotopic compositions in seawater. Chapter 3 established a baseline of Pb isotopic compositions (PbICs) in the western and central North Pacific in 2002. This was an ideal time to establish such a baseline because China had recently (mid-2000) ceased their use of leaded gasoline and simultaneously began consuming increasingly large amounts of coal, known to have relatively high Pb concentrations. We found subsurface waters were contaminated with Asian industrial Pb, predominantly Chinese coal emissions. In contrast, the abyssal waters were a mix of Asian industrial Pb and background (i.e., natural) Pb. Chapter 4 revisited the western and central North Pacific in 2009 -- 2011 to determine what, if any, changes had occurred in this short time period. We found that Pb in subsurface and abyssal waters of the western North Pacific were similar to Chinese aerosols. Such a large change in the PbICs of abyssal water in 9 years was unanticipated and attributed to the relatively large flux of particle-bound Pb from the euphotic zone to the deep ocean, which was in isotopic equilibrium with the reservoir of dissolved Pb. In contrast, the central North Pacific abyssal water PbICs were similar to values previously reported because of the relatively lower particulate export. Based on comparisons to baseline PbIC data, we determined that abyssal waters in the western and central North Pacific would be isotopically indistinguishable from surface waters in the next three decades. Sources of Pb to coastal California waters were reevaluated in Chapter 5. Prior studies had found that surface waters of the California Current System (CCS) were isotopically consistent with both Asian industrial Pb and US leaded gasoline, still in use

  18. Relative levels of natural and anthropogenic lead in recent Antarctic snow

    SciTech Connect

    Boutron, C.F.; Patterson, C.C.

    1987-07-20

    Concentrations of lead have been measured by ultraclean isotope dilution mass spectrometry in large blocks of surface snow collected along a 433-km coast-interior axis in East Antarctica and near the geographic south pole. Slight contamination existed on the outside of the blocks, but concentration profiles from their exteriors to their interiors indicate that lead concentrations in the innermost parts of the blocks do represent the original concentrations in present-day Antarctic snow. Geographical variations of lead concentrations appear to be mainly due to local emissions from Dumont d'Urville and Amundsen Scott stations. The globally signifcant lead concentration in present-day Antarctic snow is found to be about 2 pg Pb/g. The corresponding value in Antarctic air is estimated to be about 7 pg Pb/mT STP, which is approximately fivefold larger than total natural lead contributed by soil dusts, volcanoes and sea salts. A tentative temporal curve of globally significant lead concentrations in Antarctic ice and snow for the last 13,000 years is given. It shows concentrations of about 0.4 pg Pb/g throughout most of the Holocene, with recent fivefold increases to about 2 pg Pb/g today. The general picture is then that four-fifths of total lead in the Antarctic troposphere today is anthropogenic. copyright American Geophysical Union 1987

  19. Stable lead isotope ratios from distinct anthropogenic sources in fish otoliths: a potential nursery ground stock marker.

    PubMed

    Spencer, K; Shafer, D J; Gauldie, R W; DeCarlo, E H

    2000-11-01

    Variations measured in the lead (Pb) stable isotope ratios in otoliths of juvenile tropical reef fish Scarus perspiculatus, Abudefduf abdominalis and Dascyllus albisella reflect mixing of anthropogenic lead from the Kaneohe Bay watershed and 'background' lead characteristic of the adjacent ocean. The otoliths and water samples collected in a transect across the bay demonstrated nearly identical Pb isotopic trends. The Pb isotopic composition of the watershed has a low 206Pb/204Pb signature primarily reflecting past combustion of tetra-ethyl Pb additive in fuels. Ocean water not contaminated by this watershed signature has a different, high 206Pb/204Pb isotopic composition, similar to previously measured Asian anthropogenic aerosols and natural eolian dusts, where the anthropogenic signal dominates. Where a history of past anthropogenic Pb contamination exists, it may be possible to use the ratios of Pb stable isotopes in fish otoliths to reconstruct the nursery grounds of fish. PMID:11118937

  20. Use of stable lead isotopes to characterize the sources of anthropogenic lead in North Atlantic surface waters

    SciTech Connect

    Veron, A.J. Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE ); Church, T.M. ); Patterson, C.C. ); Flegal, A.R. Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA )

    1994-08-01

    Stable lead isotopes are used to illustrate the impact of surface water circulation on dissolved lead distribution in North Atlantic surface waters during oligotrophic conditions. Using stable lead isotopic signatures from (1) the Sargasso Sea and (2) direct tropospheric deposition to the North Atlantic, the authors estimate that 10-40% of the lead accumulated in surface waters of the European Basin is transported from the western North Atlantic by the North Atlantic Current. South of 50[degrees]N, lead appears to be primarily distributed by the Subtropical North Atlantic Gyre that extends well beyond the western basins to 30[degrees]W in the North African Basin (at 30-40[degrees]N). There are different lead isotopic signatures between the subtropical gyre of the Guiana and western Guinea Basins, which suggests that the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone acts as an efficient barrier limiting chemical exchanges between the gyre and the equatorial currents.

  1. Anthropogenic litter in urban freshwater ecosystems: distribution and microbial interactions.

    PubMed

    Hoellein, Timothy; Rojas, Miguel; Pink, Adam; Gasior, Joseph; Kelly, John

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of anthropogenic litter (i.e. garbage; AL) and its ecosystem effects in marine environments are well documented. Rivers receive AL from terrestrial habitats and represent a major source of AL to marine environments, but AL is rarely studied within freshwater ecosystems. Our objectives were to 1) quantify AL density in urban freshwaters, 2) compare AL abundance among freshwater, terrestrial, and marine ecosystems, and 3) characterize the activity and composition of AL biofilms in freshwater habitats. We quantified AL from the Chicago River and Chicago's Lake Michigan shoreline, and found that AL abundance in Chicago freshwater ecosystems was comparable to previously reported data for marine and terrestrial ecosystems, although AL density and composition differed among habitats. To assess microbial interactions with AL, we incubated AL and natural substrates in 3 freshwater ecosystems, quantified biofilm metabolism as gross primary production (GPP) and community respiration (CR), and characterized biofilm bacterial community composition via high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. The main driver of biofilm community composition was incubation location (e.g., river vs pond), but there were some significant differences in biofilm composition and metabolism among substrates. For example, biofilms on organic substrates (cardboard and leaves) had lower GPP than hard substrates (glass, plastic, aluminum and tiles). In addition, bacterial communities on organic substrates were distinct in composition from those on hard substrates, with higher relative abundances of bacteria associated with cellulose decomposition. Finally, we used our results to develop a conceptual diagram designed to unite the study of AL in terrestrial and freshwater environments with the well-established field of marine debris research. We suggest this broad perspective will be useful for future studies which synthesize AL sources, ecosystem effects, and fate across multiple ecosystem

  2. Anthropogenic Litter in Urban Freshwater Ecosystems: Distribution and Microbial Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hoellein, Timothy; Rojas, Miguel; Pink, Adam; Gasior, Joseph; Kelly, John

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of anthropogenic litter (i.e. garbage; AL) and its ecosystem effects in marine environments are well documented. Rivers receive AL from terrestrial habitats and represent a major source of AL to marine environments, but AL is rarely studied within freshwater ecosystems. Our objectives were to 1) quantify AL density in urban freshwaters, 2) compare AL abundance among freshwater, terrestrial, and marine ecosystems, and 3) characterize the activity and composition of AL biofilms in freshwater habitats. We quantified AL from the Chicago River and Chicago's Lake Michigan shoreline, and found that AL abundance in Chicago freshwater ecosystems was comparable to previously reported data for marine and terrestrial ecosystems, although AL density and composition differed among habitats. To assess microbial interactions with AL, we incubated AL and natural substrates in 3 freshwater ecosystems, quantified biofilm metabolism as gross primary production (GPP) and community respiration (CR), and characterized biofilm bacterial community composition via high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. The main driver of biofilm community composition was incubation location (e.g., river vs pond), but there were some significant differences in biofilm composition and metabolism among substrates. For example, biofilms on organic substrates (cardboard and leaves) had lower GPP than hard substrates (glass, plastic, aluminum and tiles). In addition, bacterial communities on organic substrates were distinct in composition from those on hard substrates, with higher relative abundances of bacteria associated with cellulose decomposition. Finally, we used our results to develop a conceptual diagram designed to unite the study of AL in terrestrial and freshwater environments with the well-established field of marine debris research. We suggest this broad perspective will be useful for future studies which synthesize AL sources, ecosystem effects, and fate across multiple ecosystem

  3. Distributed electrical leads for thermionic converter

    DOEpatents

    Fitzpatrick, Gary O.; Britt, Edward J.

    1979-01-01

    In a thermionic converter, means are provided for coupling an electrical lead to at least one of the electrodes thereof. The means include a bus bar and a plurality of distributed leads coupled to the bus bar each of which penetrates through one electrode and are then coupled to the other electrode of the converter in spaced apart relation.

  4. Recent transient tracer distributions in the Fram Strait: estimation of anthropogenic carbon content and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stöven, T.; Tanhua, T.; Hoppema, M.; von Appen, W.-J.

    2015-09-01

    The storage of anthropogenic carbon in the ocean's interior is an important process which modulates the increasing carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere. The polar regions are expected to be net sinks for anthropogenic carbon. Transport estimates of dissolved inorganic carbon and the anthropogenic offset can thus provide information about the magnitude of the corresponding storage processes. Here we present a transient tracer, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA) data set along 78°50' N sampled in the Fram Strait in 2012. A theory on tracer relationships is introduced which allows for an application of the Inverse Gaussian - Transit Time Distribution (IG-TTD) at high latitudes and the estimation of anthropogenic carbon concentrations. Current velocity measurements along the same section were used to estimate the net flux of DIC and anthropogenic carbon through the Fram Strait. The new theory explains the differences between the theoretical (IG-TTD based) tracer age relationship and the specific tracer age relationship of the field data by saturation effects during water mass formation and/or the deliberate release experiment of SF6 in the Greenland Sea in 1996 rather than by different mixing or ventilation processes. Based on this assumption, a maximum SF6 excess of 0.5-0.8 fmol kg-1 was determined in the Fram Strait at intermediate depths (500-1600 m). The anthropogenic carbon concentrations are 50-55 μmol kg-1 in the Atlantic Water/Recirculating Atlantic Water, 40-45 μmol kg-1 in the Polar Surface Water/warm Polar Surface Water and between 10-35 μmol kg-1 in the deeper water layers, with lowest concentrations in the bottom layer. The net DIC and anthropogenic carbon fluxes through the Fram Strait indicate a balanced exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the North Atlantic, although with high uncertainties.

  5. Mapping the spatial distribution of global anthropogenic mercury atmospheric emission inventories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Simon J.; Steenhuisen, Frits; Pacyna, Jozef M.; Pacyna, Elisabeth G.

    This paper describes the procedures employed to spatially distribute global inventories of anthropogenic emissions of mercury to the atmosphere, prepared by Pacyna, E.G., Pacyna, J.M., Steenhuisen, F., Wilson, S. [2006. Global anthropogenic mercury emission inventory for 2000. Atmospheric Environment, this issue, doi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2006.03.041], and briefly discusses the results of this work. A new spatially distributed global emission inventory for the (nominal) year 2000, and a revised version of the 1995 inventory are presented. Emissions estimates for total mercury and major species groups are distributed within latitude/longitude-based grids with a resolution of 1×1 and 0.5×0.5°. A key component in the spatial distribution procedure is the use of population distribution as a surrogate parameter to distribute emissions from sources that cannot be accurately geographically located. In this connection, new gridded population datasets were prepared, based on the CEISIN GPW3 datasets (CIESIN, 2004. Gridded Population of the World (GPW), Version 3. Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN), Columbia University and Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT). GPW3 data are available at http://beta.sedac.ciesin.columbia.edu/gpw/index.jsp). The spatially distributed emissions inventories and population datasets prepared in the course of this work are available on the Internet at www.amap.no/Resources/HgEmissions/

  6. Aerosol Size Distribution Response to Anthropogenically Driven Historical Changes in Biogenic Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, J. R.; D'Andrea, S.; Acosta Navarro, J. C.; Farina, S.; Scott, C.; Farmer, D. K.; Spracklen, D. V.; Riipinen, I.

    2014-12-01

    Emissions of biological volatile organic compounds (BVOC) have changed in the past millennium due to changes in land use, temperature and CO2 concentrations. A recent model reconstruction of BVOC emissions over the past millennium predicted the changes in the three dominant secondary organic aerosol (SOA) producing BVOC classes (isoprene, monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes). The reconstruction predicted that in global averages isoprene emissions have decreased (land-use changes to crop/grazing land dominate the reduction), while monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions have increased (temperature increases dominate the increases); however, all three show both increases and decreases in certain regions due to competition between the various influencing factors. These BVOC changes have largely been anthropogenic in nature, and land-use change was shown to have the most dramatic effect by decreasing isoprene emissions. We use these modeled estimates of these three dominant BVOC classes' emissions from the years 1000 to 2000 to test the effect of anthropogenic changes to BVOC emissions on SOA formation and global aerosol size distributions using the GEOS-Chem-TOMAS global aerosol microphysics model. With anthropogenic emissions (e.g. SO2, NOx, primary aerosols) held at present day values and BVOC emissions changed from year 1000 to year 2000 values, decreases in the number concentration of particles of size Dp > 80 nm (N80) of >25% in year 2000 relative to year 1000 were predicted in regions with extensive land-use changes since year 1000. This change in N80 was predominantly driven by a shift towards crop/grazing land that produces less BVOC than the natural vegetation. Similar sensitivities to year 1000 vs. year 2000 BVOC emissions exist when anthropogenic emissions are turned off. This large decrease in N80 could be a largely overlooked and important anthropogenic aerosol effect on regional climates.

  7. Transient tracer distributions in the Fram Strait in 2012 and inferred anthropogenic carbon content and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stöven, Tim; Tanhua, Toste; Hoppema, Mario; von Appen, Wilken-Jon

    2016-02-01

    The storage of anthropogenic carbon in the ocean's interior is an important process which modulates the increasing carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere. The polar regions are expected to be net sinks for anthropogenic carbon. Transport estimates of dissolved inorganic carbon and the anthropogenic offset can thus provide information about the magnitude of the corresponding storage processes. Here we present a transient tracer, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA) data set along 78°50' N sampled in the Fram Strait in 2012. A theory on tracer relationships is introduced, which allows for an application of the inverse-Gaussian-transit-time distribution (IG-TTD) at high latitudes and the estimation of anthropogenic carbon concentrations. Mean current velocity measurements along the same section from 2002-2010 were used to estimate the net flux of DIC and anthropogenic carbon by the boundary currents above 840 m through the Fram Strait. The new theory explains the differences between the theoretical (IG-TTD-based) tracer age relationship and the specific tracer age relationship of the field data, by saturation effects during water mass formation and/or the deliberate release experiment of SF6 in the Greenland Sea in 1996, rather than by different mixing or ventilation processes. Based on this assumption, a maximum SF6 excess of 0.5-0.8 fmol kg-1 was determined in the Fram Strait at intermediate depths (500-1600 m). The anthropogenic carbon concentrations are 50-55 µmol kg-1 in the Atlantic Water/Recirculating Atlantic Water, 40-45 µmol kg-1 in the Polar Surface Water/warm Polar Surface Water and between 10 and 35 µmol kg-1 in the deeper water layers, with lowest concentrations in the bottom layer. The net fluxes through the Fram Strait indicate a net outflow of ˜ 0.4 DIC and ˜ 0.01 PgC yr-1 anthropogenic carbon from the Arctic Ocean into the North Atlantic, albeit with high uncertainties.

  8. Application of lead isotopic methods to the study of the anthropogenic lead provenance in Spanish overbank floodplain deposits.

    PubMed

    Adánez Sanjuán, Paula; Flem, Belinda; Llamas Borrajo, Juan F; Locutura Rupérez, Juan; Garcia Cortés, Angel

    2016-04-01

    Changes in the principal sources of Pb in overbank sediment profiles have been documented for two Spanish areas by using Pb isotopes and Pb concentrations. These locations (Madrid and Tinto-Odiel basin) represent two of the most contaminated regions in Spain. The Community of Madrid is characterized by heavy industrial and urban activity, focused mainly in Madrid City. The Tinto-Odiel basin drains the Iberian Pyrite Belt, which hosts many polymetallic massive sulphides and is heavily affected by mining activities in their headwaters. It has been proven that the influence of anthropogenic activity is reflected in these overbank deposits by variations in Pb concentrations that, in general, correlate with shifts in the (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratio. Rivas profile (downstream of Madrid) was found to be the most anthropogenically influenced site. The sediments within this profile which were recently deposited (170 ± 40 years BP) have the least radiogenic signatures. (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratios ranged between 1.1763 and 1.1876 indicating significant contributions of anthropogenic Pb. In contrast, profiles upstream of Madrid possess an average (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratio of 1.2272. It is difficult to clearly identify the most prominent source as the sediments appear to be characterized by an input from several sources. The floodplain profiles in the Tinto-Odiel basin exhibit uniform (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratios ranging from 1.1627 (Odiel river) to 1.1665 (Tinto river). These ratios are similar to the ones possessed by sulphide ores in the area and differ from the ratios of other nonmineralized formations in the basin, indicating that mining activities are the primary, if not sole, source of Pb to the sediments. PMID:26100323

  9. Anthropogenic {sup 129}I in western New York: Distribution, sources and pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Fehn, U.; Rao, U.; Teng, R.T.D.

    1995-12-01

    The present {sup 129}I concentration at the surface of the earth is dominated by releases from anthropogenic sources such as atmospheric weapons tests and nuclear facilities. We report here {sup 129}I concentrations in waters, plants and soils from Western New York and the surrounding areas. Values found in waters and plants outside Western New York are approximately three orders of magnitude above natural levels. Concentrations in Western New York are another order of magnitude higher with a distinct pattern of concentration pointing to the source at West Valley, a former reprocessing facility, which continues to add significantly to the {sup 129}I budget in this region. Transport of anthropogenic {sup 129}I is clearly detectable in waters draining the West Valley area but the overall distribution of this isotope indicates also a significant component of aerial transport. The continued presence of bomb-related {sup 129}I demonstrates a long residence time of this isotope in biosphere and hydrosphere.

  10. Spatial Distribution of Lead in Sacramento, California, USA

    PubMed Central

    Solt, Michael J.; Deocampo, Daniel M.; Norris, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Chronic exposure to lead remains a health concern in many urban areas; Sacramento, California is one example, with state surveillance data showing nearly 3% of screened children reported with blood lead levels over 4.5 μg/dL in 2009. To investigate the environmental exposure, 91 soil samples were collected and analyzed by ICP-AES and ICP-MS for 14 elements. An additional 28 samples were collected from areas of focus and analyzed by hand-held X-ray fluorescence spectrometry for Pb and Zn. Analysis of the metals data revealed non-normal distributions and positive skewness, consistent with anthropogenic input. In addition, high correlation coefficients (≥0.75) of metal concentrations in Cd-Pb, Cd-Zn, Pb-Zn, and Sb-Sn pairs suggest similarities in the input mechanisms. Semivariograms generated from Pb and associated metals reveal these metals to exhibit spatial correlation. A prediction map of lead concentrations in soil was generated by ordinary kriging, showing elevated concentrations in soil located in the central, older area of Sacramento where historic traffic density and industrial activity have been historically concentrated. XRF analysis of Pb and Zn from additional samples verifies elevated concentrations in the central areas of Sacramento as predicted. PMID:25789455

  11. RELATIVE CONTRIBUTION OF LEAD FROM ANTHROPOGENIC SOURCES TO THE TOTAL HUMAN LEAD EXPOSURE IN THE U.S.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper evaluates human exposure to lead at a baseline level for persons living in non-urban communities away from stationary or mobile sources of lead, eating typical diets, and engaging in no lead-related occupational or avocational activities. Relative contributions of atmos...

  12. Role of regression model selection and station distribution on the estimation of oceanic anthropogenic carbon change by eMLR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plancherel, Y.; Rodgers, K. B.; Key, R. M.; Jacobson, A. R.; Sarmiento, J. L.

    2013-07-01

    Quantifying oceanic anthropogenic carbon uptake by monitoring interior dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentrations is complicated by the influence of natural variability. The "eMLR method" aims to address this issue by using empirical regression fits of the data instead of the data themselves, inferring the change in anthropogenic carbon in time by difference between predictions generated by the regressions at each time. The advantages of the method are that it provides in principle a means to filter out natural variability, which theoretically becomes the regression residuals, and a way to deal with sparsely and unevenly distributed data. The degree to which these advantages are realized in practice is unclear, however. The ability of the eMLR method to recover the anthropogenic carbon signal is tested here using a global circulation and biogeochemistry model in which the true signal is known. Results show that regression model selection is particularly important when the observational network changes in time. When the observational network is fixed, the likelihood that co-located systematic misfits between the empirical model and the underlying, yet unknown, true model cancel is greater, improving eMLR results. Changing the observational network modifies how the spatio-temporal variance pattern is captured by the respective datasets, resulting in empirical models that are dynamically or regionally inconsistent, leading to systematic errors. In consequence, the use of regression formulae that change in time to represent systematically best-fit models at all times does not guarantee the best estimates of anthropogenic carbon change if the spatial distributions of the stations emphasize hydrographic features differently in time. Other factors, such as a balanced and representative station coverage, vertical continuity of the regression formulae consistent with the hydrographic context and resiliency of the spatial distribution of the residual field can be used

  13. Relative contribution of lead from anthropogenic sources to the total human lead exposure in the United States. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, R.W.

    1986-08-01

    The paper evaluates human exposure to lead at a baseline level for persons living in non-urban communities away from stationary or mobile sources of lead, eating typical diets, and engaging in no lead-related occupational or avocational activities. Relative contributions of atmospheric and metallic lead are evaluated for each exposure pathway. For this baseline situation, perhaps 40 to 55% of the total human exposure to lead is of atmospheric origin. Beyond the baseline level, additional exposure factors can be determined for other environments (e.g. urban, occupational, smelter communities) and for certain habits and activities (e.g., pica, smoking, drinking, and various hobbies), with variations for age, sex, or socioeconomic status. Although quantification of these factors is uncertain, they provide guidelines in determining relative exposures under differing environmental conditions. The added exposure factors can also be partitioned into atmospheric, metallic, and pigment lead.

  14. Anthropogenic aerosols and the distribution of past large‐scale precipitation change

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The climate response of precipitation to the effects of anthropogenic aerosols is a critical while not yet fully understood aspect in climate science. Results of selected models that participated the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 and the data from the Twentieth Century Reanalysis Project suggest that, throughout the tropics and also in the extratropical Northern Hemisphere, aerosols have largely dominated the distribution of precipitation changes in reference to the preindustrial era in the second half of the last century. Aerosol‐induced cooling has offset some of the warming caused by the greenhouse gases from the tropics to the Arctic and thus formed the gradients of surface temperature anomaly that enable the revealed precipitation change patterns to occur. Improved representation of aerosol‐cloud interaction has been demonstrated as the key factor for models to reproduce consistent distributions of past precipitation change with the reanalysis data. PMID:27134319

  15. Anthropogenic aerosols and the distribution of past large-scale precipitation change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chien

    2015-12-01

    The climate response of precipitation to the effects of anthropogenic aerosols is a critical while not yet fully understood aspect in climate science. Results of selected models that participated the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 and the data from the Twentieth Century Reanalysis Project suggest that, throughout the tropics and also in the extratropical Northern Hemisphere, aerosols have largely dominated the distribution of precipitation changes in reference to the preindustrial era in the second half of the last century. Aerosol-induced cooling has offset some of the warming caused by the greenhouse gases from the tropics to the Arctic and thus formed the gradients of surface temperature anomaly that enable the revealed precipitation change patterns to occur. Improved representation of aerosol-cloud interaction has been demonstrated as the key factor for models to reproduce consistent distributions of past precipitation change with the reanalysis data.

  16. Landscape-scale distribution and density of raptor populations wintering in anthropogenic-dominated desert landscapes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duerr, Adam E.; Miller, Tricia A.; Cornell Duerr, Kerri L; Lanzone, Michael J; Fesnock, Amy; Katzner, Todd Eli

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic development has great potential to affect fragile desert environments. Large-scale development of renewable energy infrastructure is planned for many desert ecosystems. Development plans should account for anthropogenic effects to distributions and abundance of rare or sensitive wildlife; however, baseline data on abundance and distribution of such wildlife are often lacking. We surveyed for predatory birds in the Sonoran and Mojave Deserts of southern California, USA, in an area designated for protection under the “Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan”, to determine how these birds are distributed across the landscape and how this distribution is affected by existing development. We developed species-specific models of resight probability to adjust estimates of abundance and density of each individual common species. Second, we developed combined-species models of resight probability for common and rare species so that we could make use of sparse data on the latter. We determined that many common species, such as red-tailed hawks, loggerhead shrikes, and especially common ravens, are associated with human development and likely subsidized by human activity. Species-specific and combined-species models of resight probability performed similarly, although the former model type provided higher quality information. Comparing abundance estimates with past surveys in the Mojave Desert suggests numbers of predatory birds associated with human development have increased while other sensitive species not associated with development have decreased. This approach gave us information beyond what we would have collected by focusing either on common or rare species, thus it provides a low-cost framework for others conducting surveys in similar desert environments outside of California.

  17. The influence of natural and anthropogenic secondary sources on the glyoxal global distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myriokefalitakis, S.; Vrekoussis, M.; Tsigaridis, K.; Wittrock, F.; Richter, A.; Brühl, C.; Volkamer, R.; Burrows, J. P.; Kanakidou, M.

    2008-08-01

    (equal to the global burden seen by SCIAMACHY over land for the year 2005) and about 3 h, respectively. The model results are compared with satellite observations of CHOCHO columns. When accounting only for the secondary sources of CHOCHO in the model, the model underestimates CHOCHO columns observed by satellites. This is attributed to an overestimate of CHOCHO sinks or a missing global source of about 20 Tg y-1. Using the current primary emissions of CHOCHO from biomass burning together with the anthropogenic combustion sources of about 7 Tg y-1 leads to an overestimate by the model over hot spot areas.

  18. Ecological consequences of human niche construction: Examining long-term anthropogenic shaping of global species distributions.

    PubMed

    Boivin, Nicole L; Zeder, Melinda A; Fuller, Dorian Q; Crowther, Alison; Larson, Greger; Erlandson, Jon M; Denham, Tim; Petraglia, Michael D

    2016-06-01

    The exhibition of increasingly intensive and complex niche construction behaviors through time is a key feature of human evolution, culminating in the advanced capacity for ecosystem engineering exhibited by Homo sapiens A crucial outcome of such behaviors has been the dramatic reshaping of the global biosphere, a transformation whose early origins are increasingly apparent from cumulative archaeological and paleoecological datasets. Such data suggest that, by the Late Pleistocene, humans had begun to engage in activities that have led to alterations in the distributions of a vast array of species across most, if not all, taxonomic groups. Changes to biodiversity have included extinctions, extirpations, and shifts in species composition, diversity, and community structure. We outline key examples of these changes, highlighting findings from the study of new datasets, like ancient DNA (aDNA), stable isotopes, and microfossils, as well as the application of new statistical and computational methods to datasets that have accumulated significantly in recent decades. We focus on four major phases that witnessed broad anthropogenic alterations to biodiversity-the Late Pleistocene global human expansion, the Neolithic spread of agriculture, the era of island colonization, and the emergence of early urbanized societies and commercial networks. Archaeological evidence documents millennia of anthropogenic transformations that have created novel ecosystems around the world. This record has implications for ecological and evolutionary research, conservation strategies, and the maintenance of ecosystem services, pointing to a significant need for broader cross-disciplinary engagement between archaeology and the biological and environmental sciences. PMID:27274046

  19. Vertical distribution of anthropogenic radionuclides in cores from contaminated floodplains of the Yenisey River.

    PubMed

    Standring, W J F; Brown, J E; Dowdall, M; Korobova, E M; Linnik, V G; Volosov, A G

    2009-12-01

    The Mining and Chemical Industrial Combine, Zheleznogorsk (MCIC, previously known as Krasnoyarsk-26) on the River Yenisey has contaminated the surrounding environment with anthropogenic radionuclides as a result of discharges of radioactive wastes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the vertical distribution of anthropogenic contamination ((137)Cs and plutonium) within floodplain areas at different distances from the discharge point. Sites were chosen that display different characteristics with respect to periodic inundation with river water. Cs-137 activity concentrations were in the range 23-3770 Bq/kg (dry weight, d.w.); Pu-239,240 activity concentrations were in the range <0.01-14.2 Bq/kg (d.w.). Numerous sample cores exhibited sub-surface maxima which may be related to the historical discharges from the MCIC. Possible evidence indicating the deposition of earlier discharges at MCIC in deeper core layers was observed in the (238)Pu:(239,240)Pu activity ratio data: a Pu signal discernible from global fallout could be observed in numerous samples. Cs-137 and Pu-239,240 activity concentrations were correlated with the silt fraction (% by mass <63 microm) though no significant correlation was observed between (grain-size) normalised (137)Cs activity concentrations and distance downstream from the MCIC. PMID:19446379

  20. Ecological consequences of human niche construction: Examining long-term anthropogenic shaping of global species distributions

    PubMed Central

    Boivin, Nicole L.; Zeder, Melinda A.; Fuller, Dorian Q.; Crowther, Alison; Larson, Greger; Erlandson, Jon M.; Denham, Tim; Petraglia, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    The exhibition of increasingly intensive and complex niche construction behaviors through time is a key feature of human evolution, culminating in the advanced capacity for ecosystem engineering exhibited by Homo sapiens. A crucial outcome of such behaviors has been the dramatic reshaping of the global biosphere, a transformation whose early origins are increasingly apparent from cumulative archaeological and paleoecological datasets. Such data suggest that, by the Late Pleistocene, humans had begun to engage in activities that have led to alterations in the distributions of a vast array of species across most, if not all, taxonomic groups. Changes to biodiversity have included extinctions, extirpations, and shifts in species composition, diversity, and community structure. We outline key examples of these changes, highlighting findings from the study of new datasets, like ancient DNA (aDNA), stable isotopes, and microfossils, as well as the application of new statistical and computational methods to datasets that have accumulated significantly in recent decades. We focus on four major phases that witnessed broad anthropogenic alterations to biodiversity—the Late Pleistocene global human expansion, the Neolithic spread of agriculture, the era of island colonization, and the emergence of early urbanized societies and commercial networks. Archaeological evidence documents millennia of anthropogenic transformations that have created novel ecosystems around the world. This record has implications for ecological and evolutionary research, conservation strategies, and the maintenance of ecosystem services, pointing to a significant need for broader cross-disciplinary engagement between archaeology and the biological and environmental sciences. PMID:27274046

  1. Immobilization of lead in anthropogenic contaminated soils using phosphates with/without oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaojuan; Zhu, Jun; Fu, Qingling; Zuo, Jichao; Liu, Yonghong; Hu, Hongqing

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the effects of oxalic acid (OA) on the immobilization of Pb(II) in contaminated soils by phosphate materials, has considerable benefits for risk assessment and remediation strategies for the soil. A series of phosphate amendments with/without oxalic acid were applied to two anthropogenic contaminated soils. We investigated the immobilization of Pb(II) by KH2PO4, phosphate rock (PR), activated phosphate rock (APR) and synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAP) at different phosphate:Pb (P:Pb) molar ratios (0, 0.6, 2.0 and 4.0) in the presence/absence of 50 mmol oxalic acid/kg soil, respectively. The effects of treatments were evaluated using single extraction with deionized water or CaCl2, Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) sequential extraction and toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) methods. Our results showed that the concentration of water extractable, exchangeable and TCLP-Pb all decreased with incubation time. The concentration of water-extractable Pb after 120 days was reduced by 100% when soils were amended with APR, HAP and HAP+OA, and the TCLP-Pb was <5 mg/L for the red soil at P:Pb molar ratio 4.0. Water-soluble Pb could not be detected and the TCLP-Pb was <5 mg/L at all treatments applied to the yellow-brown soil. BCR results indicated that APR was most effective, although a slight enhancement of water-soluble phosphate was detected at the P:Pb molar ratio 4.0 at the beginning of incubation. Oxalic acid activated phosphates, and so mixing insoluble phosphates with oxalic acid may be a useful strategy to improve their effectiveness in reducing Pb bioavailability. PMID:25662240

  2. The distributions of one invasive and two native crayfishes in relation to coarse-scale natural and anthropogenic factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westhoff, J.T.; Rabeni, C.F.; Sowa, S.P.

    2011-01-01

    1. Native crayfishes are often extirpated from portions of their range because of interactions with invasive species, anthropogenic alterations to environmental conditions or a combination of these factors. Our goal was to identify coarse-scale natural and anthropogenic factors related to the current distributions of the invasive crayfish, Orconectes hylas, and two endemic crayfishes, Orconectes peruncus andOrconectes quadruncus in the St. Francis River drainage, Missouri, U.S.A. and to provide wider insights into the potential role of anthropogenic factors in facilitating species displacement. 2. We used classification trees to model coarse-scale natural and anthropogenic environmental factors and their relation to the presence or absence of each species. Model results were then used to predict probability of presence for each species within each stream segment throughout the entire St. Francis River drainage. 3. Factors related to geology and soils were the best predictors of species distributions. A dichotomy of these factors explained much of the discrete distributions of the two native species. Agricultural-related factors were identified as the most influential anthropogenic activity related to species distributions. All associations between the invasive species and anthropogenic factors were negative which suggested the invader was not likely to establish in heavily impacted areas. Overall, our models had high correct classification rates, and we were able to reliably predict the presence of the invader in the invaded drainage. 4. Given the negative associations of the invader with anthropogenic alterations at a coarse spatial scale, we believe other mechanisms are likely to be responsible for the widespread displacement of the two native species. These findings can be used to assist in conservation activities such as creation of refugia for native species and may direct future research to identify the mechanism(s) of species displacement.

  3. Uncertainty of spatial distributions of soil magnetic susceptibility in areas of different type of land cover and anthropogenic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, Jaroslaw; Fabijańczyk, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    There is still a high interest in the improvement of soil magnetometry procedures that would increase its accuracy. Soil magnetometry is usually used as a fast screening method that is used to assess the degree of soil pollution. As the magnetometric measurements do not provide the exact information about the concentration of elements in soil, it is very important to determine the uncertainty of the spatial distributions of soil magnetic susceptibility. The goal of this study was to analyze and present geostatistical methods of assessing the uncertainty of spatial distribution of soil magnetic susceptibility in areas of different land cover and anthropogenic pressure. In particular, spatial distributions of magnetic susceptibility measured on the soil surface using a MS2D Bartington device were calculated using indicator methods that make it possible to calculate the probability of exceeding the critical levels of soil magnetic susceptibility. Measurements were performed in areas located in the Upper Silesian Industrial Area in Poland, and in Norway. In these areas soil magnetic susceptibility was measured on the soil surface using a MS2D Bartington device. Additionally, soil samples were taken in order to perform chemical measurements that included the determination of a concentration of selected elements. Acknowledgment The research leading to these results has received funding from the Polish-Norwegian Research Programme operated by the National Centre for Research and Development underthe Norwegian Financial Mechanism 2009-2014 in the frame of Project IMPACT - Contract No Pol-Nor/199338/45/2013.

  4. Spatial distribution of dissolved cadmium in the Jiulong river-estuary system: Relevance of anthropogenic perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Deli; Yang, Xiqian; Zhai, Weidong; Li, Yan; Hong, Huasheng

    2015-12-01

    This study first examined the spatial distribution of dissolved cadmium (Cd) along with other hydrochemical parameters in a large subtropical river estuary system (the Jiulong River-Estuary, China) between 2008 and 2010, aiming to evaluate the impacts of the recently increasing anthropogenic perturbation in natural waters. The results showed that dissolved Cd was variable in the watershed with sporadically high concentrations (>0.6 nmol L-1). The significantly positive correlation of dissolved Cd with phosphate in the watershed (May 2008: dissolved Cd=0.22*P+0.0062, r=0.64, p<0.05) indicated that dissolved Cd levels have been elevated along with P by the increasing agricultural discharges and/or sewage effluents. The estuary was characterized with decreased levels of dissolved Cd in the highly turbid upper part (salinity: <5; dissolved Cd: <0.1 nmol L-1; Total Suspended Matter: 100-300 mg/L), and a mid-salinity maximum of dissolved Cd in the middle part, which were higher in Summer high river discharge period (0.40-0.54 nmol L-1) than in Fall low river discharge period (0.25-0.35 nmol L-1). Dissolved Cd generally decreased outwards in the lower estuary and nearby coastal waters as mixed with the low Cd-content seawater offshore (dissolved Cd= -0.025*Salinity+0.96, r=0.60, p<0.05). In particular, an enhancement of dissolved Cd (by ~0.2 nmol L-1) was observed in the lower estuary and estuarine plume zone as a result of sewage discharges nearby and/or Cd-enriched submarine groundwater discharges. Summarily, our exemplary study provides clear evidence that China's natural waters are currently subject to local perturbation due to the recently increasing anthropogenic activities.

  5. [Temporal and spatial distribution of anthropogenic ammonia emissions in China: 1994-2006].

    PubMed

    Dong, Wen-xuan; Xing, Jia; Wang, Shu-xiao

    2010-07-01

    Ammonia has both direct and indirect impacts on important environmental issues including acid deposition, regional fine particles and eutrophication. Estimation of anthropogenic ammonia emissions will provide valuable information for the pollution control of acid deposition and regional fine particle. Based on the provincial activity data on N-fertilizer application, livestock farming, N-fertilizer production and populations, this paper uses emission factor method to estimate China's atmospheric ammonia emissions, analyzes its historical trends and presents its geographical distributions from year 1994 to 2006. The national total atmospheric ammonia emissions are estimated to be 11.06 million tons (Mt) in 1994, which increase quickly to 16.07 Mt in 2006. Emissions from livestock farming, N-fertilizer application, N-fertilizer production and human excreta have increased from 4.47 Mt, 5.94 Mt, 0.09 Mt, and 0.59 Mt in 1994 to 6.61 Mt, 8.68 Mt, 0.14 Mt, 0.65 Mt respectively in 2006. Livestock farming and N-fertilizer application are the most important ammonia emission sources, which contributed 40.79 and 55.53 percent of total emissions respectively in 2006. In 2006, the average ammonia emission intensity is 1.67 t x km(-2) but there are large variations among atmospheric ammonia emissions from each province. Emissions from provinces including Henan, Shandong, Hebei, Sichuan and Jiangsu accounted for 40.82 percent of national emissions. PMID:20825010

  6. Sources and evolution of anthropogenic lead in dated sediments from Lake Clair, Québec, Canada.

    PubMed

    Ndzangou, Sabary Omer; Richer-Laflèche, Marc; Houle, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Two sediments cores were collected from the deepest part of Lake Clair (Québec, Canada) to assess the historical sources of Pb additions to the lake. The cores were collected by divers by carefully inserting a Plexiglas tube into the sediments. To determine the stratigraphic ages of the sediments, (210)Pb and (137)Cs activities were counted by gamma-ray spectroscopy. Lead concentrations and isotopic ratios were performed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), following digestion of the samples with a mixture of HF, HNO(3), and HClO(4) acids and Pb separation by anion-exchange chromatography. Starting at the middle of the 19th century, Pb content of the sediments increased until 1975. The maximum Pb enrichment factor of 35 times (relative to the natural background) was found in sediments deposited in 1975. At this time, excess Pb flux was estimated to be about 0.03 g m(-2) yr(-1). Before 1872, the Pb isotopic ratios were relatively stable (mean (206)Pb/(207)Pb = 1.20 +/- 0.01), reflecting the natural Pb background. Between 1872 and 1894, the source of anthropogenic Pb was highly radiogenic as shown by the Pb isotopic signatures of the sediments (mean (206)Pb/(207)Pb = 1.22 +/- 0.01), possibly reflecting deforestation and agricultural developments in the St.-Lawrence Valley. Between 1894 and 1937, widespread use of industrial and domestic charcoals may explain the isotopic composition of Pb accumulated in the sediments (mean (206)Pb/(207)Pb = 1.19 +/- 0.01). From 1937 to 1975, Pb isotopic compositions became less radiogenic ((206)Pb/(207)Pb from 1.18 to 1.17) even though elemental Pb abundance reached extremely high values (623 mg kg(-1)). This isotopic shift reflects increased use of alkyl-lead in gasoline. For sediments accumulated between 1967 and 1996, the U.S. contribution to anthropogenic Pb accumulated in Lake Clair sediments amounted to between 30 and 63%. PMID:15888887

  7. Distribution of lead in single atmospheric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, D. M.; Hudson, P. K.; Cziczo, D. J.; Gallavardin, S.; Froyd, K. D.; Johnston, M. V.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Reinard, M. S.; Thomson, D. S.; Thornberry, T.; Wexler, A. S.

    2007-03-01

    Three independent single particle mass spectrometers measured Pb in individual aerosol particles. These data provide unprecedented sensitivity and statistical significance for the measurement of Pb in single particles. This paper explores the reasons for the frequency of Pb in fine particles now that most gasoline is unleaded. Trace amounts of Pb were found in 5 to 25% of 250 to 3000 nm diameter particles sampled by both aircraft and surface instruments in the eastern and western United States. Over 5% of particles at a mountain site in Switzerland contained Pb. Particles smaller than 100 nm with high Pb content were also observed by an instrument that was only operated in urban areas. Lead was found on all types of particles, including Pb present on biomass burning particles from remote fires. Less common particles with high Pb contents contributed a majority of the total amount of Pb. Single particles with high Pb content often also contained alkali metals, Zn, Cu, Sn, As, and Sb. The association of Pb with Zn and other metals is also found in IMPROVE network filter data from surface sites. Sources of airborne Pb in the United States are reviewed for consistency with these data. The frequent appearance of trace Pb is consistent with widespread emissions of fine Pb particles from combustion sources followed by coagulation with larger particles during long-range transport. Industrial sources that directly emit Pb-rich particles also contribute to the observations. Clean regions of the western United States show some transport of Pb from Asia but most Pb over the United States comes from North American sources. Resuspension of Pb from soil contaminated by the years of leaded gasoline was not directly apparent.

  8. Distribution of lead in single atmospheric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, D. M.; Hudson, P. K.; Cziczo, D. J.; Gallavardin, S.; Froyd, K. D.; Johnston, M. V.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Reinard, M. S.; Thomson, D. S.; Thornberry, T.; Wexler, A. S.

    2007-06-01

    Three independent single particle mass spectrometers measured Pb in individual aerosol particles. These data provide unprecedented sensitivity and statistical significance for the measurement of Pb in single particles. This paper explores the reasons for the frequency of Pb in fine particles now that most gasoline is unleaded. Trace amounts of Pb were found in 5 to 25% of 250 to 3000 nm diameter particles sampled by both aircraft and surface instruments in the eastern and western United States. Over 5% of particles at a mountain site in Switzerland contained Pb. Particles smaller than 100 nm with high Pb content were also observed by an instrument that was only operated in urban areas. Lead was found on all types of particles, including Pb present on biomass burning particles from remote fires. Less common particles with high Pb contents contributed a majority of the total amount of Pb. Single particles with high Pb content often also contained alkali metals, Zn, Cu, Sn, As, and Sb. The association of Pb with Zn and other metals is also found in IMPROVE network filter data from surface sites. Sources of airborne Pb in the United States are reviewed for consistency with these data. The frequent appearance of trace Pb is consistent with widespread emissions of fine Pb particles from combustion sources followed by coagulation with larger particles during long-range transport. Industrial sources that directly emit Pb-rich particles also contribute to the observations. Clean regions of the western United States show some transport of Pb from Asia but most Pb over the United States comes from North American sources. Resuspension of Pb from soil contaminated by the years of leaded gasoline was not directly apparent.

  9. Temporal Change in Discharge Response in Unregulated Swedish Catchments - Quantifying Potential Effects of Anthropogenic Modifications in Stream Network Properties on Flow Time Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worman, A. L. E.; Åkesson, A. M.; Riml, J.; Seibert, J.

    2015-12-01

    Fourier spectral analysis of daily discharge time-series with a duration of 55-110 years in 79 unregulated catchments revealed that the discharge power spectrum slope has gradually increased (statistically significant at the 99% confidence level) over time. For the locations for which historical meteorological observations is available (the 41 southernmost catchments), the evaluation theoretically accounted for fluctuation in the precipitation power spectrum. The results indicate that (local) land-use changes within the catchments may have a relatively more important role (than climate change) for the temporal changes shown in the discharge power spectra. With a basis in stream network maps from present day in two different resolutions as well as a historical map from the 1880's, anthropogenic modifications, in terms of the flow paths within the stream networks, were identified for an agricultural catchment in southern Sweden. Through scenario modelling using a 1-D distributed routing model, the influence of common anthropogenic activities such as e.g. straightening of flowpaths, widening of stream channels to avoid damming and excavation to eliminate thresholds in the stream bottom topography, on the travel time distributions within a stream network were quantified. The map studies showed that the average flow path length had decreased over the last century. The study also shows that all of the studied anthropogenic factors can potentially have a substantial impact on the travel times through the stream networks - by decreasing the average travel time as well as by decreasing the variance. These types of temporal changes in stream network properties leads to a diminished possibility to attenuate peakflows, and are expected to have a substantial influence on discharge hydrographs. This study verifies the hypothesis that anthropogenic impacts of stream networks can influence the hydrological response in catchments, and that land-use changes on a local scale may be

  10. A 500 year sediment lake record of anthropogenic and natural inputs to Windermere (English Lake District) using double-spike lead isotopes, radiochronology, and sediment microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Miller, Helen; Croudace, Ian W; Bull, Jonathan M; Cotterill, Carol J; Dix, Justin K; Taylor, Rex N

    2014-07-01

    A high-resolution record of pollution is preserved in recent sediments from Windermere, the largest lake in the English Lake District. Data derived from X-ray core scanning (validated against wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence), radiochronological techniques ((210)Pb and (137)Cs) and ultrahigh precision, double-spike mass spectrometry for lead isotopes are combined to decipher the anthropogenic inputs to the lake. The sediment record suggests that while most element concentrations have been stable, there has been a significant increase in lead, zinc, and copper concentrations since the 1930s. Lead isotope down-core variations identify three major contributory sources of anthropogenic (industrial) lead, comprising gasoline lead, coal combustion lead (most likely source is coal-fired steam ships), and lead derived from Carboniferous Pb-Zn mineralization (mining activities). Periods of metal workings do not correlate with peaks in heavy metals due to the trapping efficiency of up-system lakes in the catchment. Heavy metal increases could be due to flood-induced metal inwash after the cessation of mining and the weathering of bedrock in the catchment. The combination of sediment analysis techniques used provides new insights into the pollutant depositional history of Windermere and could be similarly applied to other lake systems to determine the timing and scale of anthropogenic inputs. PMID:24902065

  11. Megafauna of vulnerable marine ecosystems in French mediterranean submarine canyons: Spatial distribution and anthropogenic impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabri, M.-C.; Pedel, L.; Beuck, L.; Galgani, F.; Hebbeln, D.; Freiwald, A.

    2014-06-01

    Vulnerable Marine Ecosystems (VME) in the deep Mediterranean Sea have been identified by the General Fisheries Commission for the Mediterranean as consisting of communities of Scleractinia (Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata), Pennatulacea (Funiculina quadrangularis) and Alcyonacea (Isidella elongata). This paper deals with video data recorded in the heads of French Mediterranean canyons. Quantitative observations were extracted from 101 video films recorded during the MEDSEACAN cruise in 2009 (Aamp/Comex). Qualitative information was extracted from four other cruises (two Marum/Comex cruises in 2009 and 2011 and two Ifremer cruises in 1995 and 2010) to support the previous observations in the Cassidaigne and Lacaze-Duthiers canyons. All the species, fishing impacts and litter recognized in the video films recorded from 180 to 700 m depth were mapped using GIS. The abundances and distributions of benthic fishing resources (marketable fishes, Aristeidae, Octopodidae), Vulnerable Marine Species, trawling scars and litter of 17 canyons were calculated and compared, as was the open slope between the Stoechades and Toulon canyons. Funiculina quadrangularis was rarely observed, being confined for the most part to the Marti canyon and, I. elongata was abundant in three canyons (Bourcart, Marti, Petit-Rhône). These two cnidarians were encountered in relatively low abundances, and it may be that they have been swept away by repeated trawling. The Lacaze-Duthiers and Cassidaigne canyons comprised the highest densities and largest colony sizes of scleractinian cold-water corals, whose distribution was mapped in detail. These colonies were often seen to be entangled in fishing lines. The alcyonacean Callogorgia verticillata was observed to be highly abundant in the Bourcart canyon and less abundant in several other canyons. This alcyonacean was also severely affected by bottom fishing gears and is proposed as a Vulnerable Marine Species. Our studies on anthropogenic

  12. Impact of anthropogenic Pb and ocean circulation on the recent distribution of Pb isotopes in the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Mi; Boyle, Edward A.; Gamo, Toshitaka; Obata, Hajime; Norisuye, Kazuhiro; Echegoyen, Yolanda

    2015-12-01

    Pb and Pb isotope ratios in the modern ocean have been altered significantly by anthropogenic Pb inputs over the past century. Most studies of anthropogenic Pb in the ocean have focused on the North Atlantic and North Pacific Oceans, and the impact of anthropogenic Pb inputs to the Indian Ocean and processes controlling the distribution of Pb in the Indian Ocean are poorly known. This study presents the Pb and Pb isotopic composition (206Pb/207Pb, 208Pb/207Pb) of 11 deep stations from the Indian Ocean Japanese GEOTRACES cruise (KH-09-5), from the Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea to the Southern Ocean (62°S). The Pb isotope ratios of the Indian Ocean range 1.140-1.190 for 206Pb/207Pb and 2.417-2.468 for 208Pb/207Pb, with lower ratios appearing in the shallow waters of the northern Indian Ocean and higher ratios appearing in the deep layers of the Southern Ocean. This result agrees with a previous study on Pb concentrations (Echegoyen et al., 2014) showing that the Indian Ocean, particularly its northern part, is largely perturbed by anthropogenic Pb inputs. 206Pb/207Pb and 208Pb/207Pb of the Indian sector Southern Ocean are still lower than natural Pb, showing this region was also affected by anthropogenic Pb. Anomalously low or high 206Pb/207Pb and 208Pb/207Pb were observed in the thermocline and shallow waters of the southern Indian Ocean and the Arabian Sea, which are ascribed to water mass distribution (e.g., Subantarctic Mode Water) and evolving Pb isotope ratios of this region as dominant anthropogenic Pb sources change. 206Pb/207Pb and 208Pb/207Pb in the Bay of Bengal are higher than those in the Arabian Sea, which might be the result of the anthropogenic Pb inputs from different provenance or seawater exchanging Pb isotopes with natural particles derived from rivers and/or sediments at the basin boundaries.

  13. Spatial distribution of organic and pyritic sulfur in surface sediments of eutrophic Jiaozhou Bay, China: clues to anthropogenic impacts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke-Ke; Zhu, Mao-Xu; Yang, Gui-Peng; Fan, De-Jiang; Huang, Xiang-Li

    2014-11-15

    Anthropogenic perturbations exert important impacts on sulfur geochemistry in marine sediments. In the study, chemical extraction was used to quantify four sulfur pools, i.e., pyrite, humic-acid sulfur (HA-S), fulvic-acid sulfur (FA-S), and residual organic sulfur (ROS), in surface sediments of eutrophic Jiaozhou Bay. Results show that riverine inputs are the main control on organic matter (OM) distribution in the sediments. OM enrichment in the eastern coast is mainly due to discharges of anthropogenic wastes. Spatial coupling of pyrite and FA-S vs. TOC points to the impacts of OM enrichment on formation and preservation of pyrite and FA-S. Poor spatial coupling of HA-S vs. TOC is due to low fractions of diagenetic OS in the pool. ROS is mainly from riverine inputs and anthropogenic OS has been superimposed on this pool. Spatial coupling among TOC, pyrite-S and FA-S is a sensitive indicator of anthropogenic impacts on benthic processes of the bay. PMID:25220315

  14. Seasonal variations in the sources of natural and anthropogenic lead deposited at the East Rongbuk Glacier in the high-altitude Himalayas.

    PubMed

    Burn-Nunes, Laurie; Vallelonga, Paul; Lee, Khanghyun; Hong, Sungmin; Burton, Graeme; Hou, Shugui; Moy, Andrew; Edwards, Ross; Loss, Robert; Rosman, Kevin

    2014-07-15

    Lead (Pb) isotopic compositions and concentrations, and barium (Ba) and indium (In) concentrations have been analysed at sub-annual resolution in three sections from a <110 m ice core dated to the 18th and 20th centuries, as well as snow pit samples dated to 2004/2005, recovered from the East Rongbuk Glacier in the high-altitude Himalayas. Ice core sections indicate that atmospheric chemistry prior to ~1,953 was controlled by mineral dust inputs, with no discernible volcanic or anthropogenic contributions. Eighteenth century monsoon ice core chemistry is indicative of dominant contributions from local Himalayan sources; non-monsoon ice core chemistry is linked to contributions from local (Himalayan), regional (Indian/Thar Desert) and long-range (North Africa, Central Asia) sources. Twentieth century monsoon and non-monsoon ice core data demonstrate similar seasonal sources of mineral dust, however with a transition to less-radiogenic isotopic signatures that suggests local and regional climate/environmental change. The snow pit record demonstrates natural and anthropogenic contributions during both seasons, with increased anthropogenic influence during non-monsoon times. Monsoon anthropogenic inputs are most likely sourced to South/South-East Asia and/or India, whereas non-monsoon anthropogenic inputs are most likely sourced to India and Central Asia. PMID:24797737

  15. Anthropogenic carbon estimates in the Weddell Sea using an optimized CFC based transit time distribution approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huhn, Oliver; Hauck, Judith; Hoppema, Mario; Rhein, Monika; Roether, Wolfgang

    2010-05-01

    We use a 20 year time series of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) observations along the Prime Meridian to determine the temporal evolution of anthropogenic carbon (Cant) in the two deep boundary currents which enter the Weddell Basin in the south and leave it in the north. The Cant is inferred from transit time distributions (TTDs), with parameters (mean transit time and dispersion) adjusted to the observed mean CFC histories in these recently ventilated deep boundary currents. We optimize that "classic" TTD approach by accounting for water exchange of the boundary currents with an old but not CFC and Cant free interior reservoir. This reservoir in turn, is replenished by the boundary currents, which we parameterize as first order mixing. Furthermore, we account for the time-dependence of the CFC and Cant source water saturation. A conceptual model of an ideal saturated mixed layer and exchange with adjacent water is adjusted to observed CFC saturations in the source regions. The time-dependence for the CFC saturation appears to be much weaker than for Cant. We find a mean transit time of 14 years and an advection/dispersion ratio of 5 for the deep southern boundary current. For the northern boundary current we find a mean transit time of 8 years and a much advection/dispersion ratio of 140. The fractions directly supplied by the boundary currents are in both cases in the order of 10%, while 90% are admixed from the interior reservoirs, which are replenished with a renewal time of about 14 years. We determine Cant ~ 11 umol/kg (reference year 2006) in the deep water entering the Weddell Sea in the south (~2.1 Sv), and 12 umol/kg for the deep water leaving the Weddell Sea in the north (~2.7 Sv). These Cant estimates are, however, upper limits, considering that the Cant source water saturation is likely to be lower than that for the CFCs. Comparison with Cant intrusion estimates based on extended multiple linear regression (using potential temperature, salinity, oxygen, and

  16. Distribution of polychaete assemblage in relation to natural environmental variation and anthropogenic stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zan, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Chongliang; Xu, Binduo; Xue, Ying; Ren, Yiping

    2015-08-01

    Polychaete are diverse species of the soft-bottom community, and are often used as indicators in environment monitoring programs. However, the effects of anthropogenic activities and natural environmental variation on polychaete assemblage are rarely addressed. The goals of this study are to identify the effects of natural environmental variation and anthropogenic stress on polychaete assemblage, and to explore the relationship between the polychaete assemblage structure and anthropogenic stress without considering the natural environmental variation. Based on the data collected from the surveys conducted in the tidal flat of Jiaozhou Bay, the relationship between polychaete assemblage structure and environmental variables was determined using multivariate statistical methods including hierarchical cluster analysis, multidimensional scaling (MDS) and canonical correspondence analysis (CCA). The results showed that the polychaete assemblage was dominated by two species, Amphictene japonica and Heteromastus filiformis, and could be divided into two subgroups characterized by high and low species abundance. CCA illustrated that the natural environmental variables including water temperature and the distance from coast had primary effects on the polychaete assemblage structure; while stress of contaminants, such as As and Hg, had the secondary influences; and stress from the aquacultured species, mainly Ruditapes philippinarum, had a limited effect. Colinearity between the natural environmental variables and anthropogenic stress variables caused a critical divergence in the interpretation of CCA results, which highlighted the risk of a lack of information in environment assessment. Glycinde gurjanovae, Sternaspis scutata and Eulalia bilineata may serve as the `contamination indicators', which need to be confirmed in future studies.

  17. Distribution of biologic, anthropogenic, and volcanic constituents as a proxy for sediment transport in the San Francisco Bay Coastal System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGann, Mary; Erikson, Li H.; Wan, Elmira; Powell, Charles L.; Maddocks, Rosalie F.

    2013-01-01

    Although conventional sediment parameters (mean grain size, sorting, and skewness) and provenance have typically been used to infer sediment transport pathways, most freshwater, brackish, and marine environments are also characterized by abundant sediment constituents of biological, and possibly anthropogenic and volcanic, origin that can provide additional insight into local sedimentary processes. The biota will be spatially distributed according to its response to environmental parameters such as water temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, organic carbon content, grain size, and intensity of currents and tidal flow, whereas the presence of anthropogenic and volcanic constituents will reflect proximity to source areas and whether they are fluvially- or aerially-transported. Because each of these constituents have a unique environmental signature, they are a more precise proxy for that source area than the conventional sedimentary process indicators. This San Francisco Bay Coastal System study demonstrates that by applying a multi-proxy approach, the primary sites of sediment transport can be identified. Many of these sites are far from where the constituents originated, showing that sediment transport is widespread in the region. Although not often used, identifying and interpreting the distribution of naturally-occurring and allochthonous biologic, anthropogenic, and volcanic sediment constituents is a powerful tool to aid in the investigation of sediment transport pathways in other coastal systems.

  18. Lead concentration distribution and source tracing of urban/suburban aquatic sediments in two typical famous tourist cities: Haikou and Sanya, China.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhicheng; Bao, Zhengyu; Wu, Guoai; Fu, Yangrong; Yang, Yi

    2010-11-01

    The content and spatial distribution of lead in the aquatic systems in two Chinese tropical cities in Hainan province (Haikou and Sanyan) show an unequal distribution of lead between the urban and the suburban areas. The lead content is significantly higher (72.3 mg/kg) in the urban area than the suburbs (15.0 mg/kg) in Haikou, but quite equal in Sanya (41.6 and 43.9 mg/kg). The frequency distribution histograms suggest that the lead in Haikou and in Sanya derives from different natural and/or anthropogenic sources. The isotopic compositions indicate that urban sediment lead in Haikou originates mainly from anthropogenic sources (automobile exhaust, atmospheric deposition, etc.) which contribute much more than the natural sources, while natural lead (basalt and sea sands) is still dominant in the suburban areas in Haikou. In Sanya, the primary source is natural (soils and sea sands). PMID:21072497

  19. Subcellular distribution of lead in cultured rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Mittelstaedt, R.A.; Pounds, J.G.

    1984-10-01

    A clear understanding of the sequence and molecular mechanism of the events involved in lead toxicity is hampered by a lack of information about lead compartmentation within the cell. As part of a continuing effort to identify the mechanism by which lead affects cellular functions, we examined the subcellular distribution of /sup 210/Pb in cultured hepatocytes. The cells were isolated, labeled, homogenized in sucrose-N-((2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine)-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid buffer, and fractionated into mitochondrial, microsomal, and cytosolic components by differential centrifugation. Complete fractionation of the cells revealed that 71% of the cellular /sup 210/Pb was associated with the mitochondria, 5% with the microsomes, and 24% with the cytosol. A modified, rapid fractionation procedure indicated that 45% of the cellular lead was associated with both the mitochondria and the cytosol and 10% with the microsomes. When the cells were separated into total particulates and cytosol with a single centrifugation, 22% of the /sup 210/Pb was associated with the soluble fraction. The process of homogenization and fractionation of the isolated hepatocytes altered the intracellular distribution of /sup 210/Pb. This experimental approach to studying the localization of lead may be compromised by the redistribution of /sup 210/Pb during the extensive centrifugations and resuspensions required for subcellular fractionation and suggests that the subcellular distribution patterns of /sup 210/Pb obtained by the fractionation of cells reflects the distribution of lead in the homogenate rather than the distribution of /sup 210/Pb in the intact cell.

  20. Aerosol size distribution and radiative forcing response to anthropogenically driven historical changes in biogenic secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Andrea, S. D.; Acosta Navarro, J. C.; Farina, S. C.; Scott, C. E.; Rap, A.; Farmer, D. K.; Spracklen, D. V.; Riipinen, I.; Pierce, J. R.

    2015-03-01

    Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) have changed in the past millennium due to changes in land use, temperature, and CO2 concentrations. Recent reconstructions of BVOC emissions have predicted that global isoprene emissions have decreased, while monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions have increased; however, all three show regional variability due to competition between the various influencing factors. In this work, we use two modeled estimates of BVOC emissions from the years 1000 to 2000 to test the effect of anthropogenic changes to BVOC emissions on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, global aerosol size distributions, and radiative effects using the GEOS-Chem-TOMAS (Goddard Earth Observing System; TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional) global aerosol microphysics model. With anthropogenic emissions (e.g., SO2, NOx, primary aerosols) turned off and BVOC emissions changed from year 1000 to year 2000 values, decreases in the number concentration of particles of size Dp > 80 nm (N80) of > 25% in year 2000 relative to year 1000 were predicted in regions with extensive land-use changes since year 1000 which led to regional increases in the combined aerosol radiative effect (direct and indirect) of > 0.5 W m-2 in these regions. We test the sensitivity of our results to BVOC emissions inventory, SOA yields, and the presence of anthropogenic emissions; however, the qualitative response of the model to historic BVOC changes remains the same in all cases. Accounting for these uncertainties, we estimate millennial changes in BVOC emissions cause a global mean direct effect of between +0.022 and +0.163 W m-2 and the global mean cloud-albedo aerosol indirect effect of between -0.008 and -0.056 W m-2. This change in aerosols, and the associated radiative forcing, could be a largely overlooked and important anthropogenic aerosol effect on regional climates.

  1. The influence of natural and anthropogenic secondary sources on the glyoxal global distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myriokefalitakis, S.; Vrekoussis, M.; Tsigaridis, K.; Wittrock, F.; Richter, A.; Brühl, C.; Volkamer, R.; Burrows, J. P.; Kanakidou, M.

    2008-01-01

    Glyoxal, the smallest dicarbonyl, which has recently been observed from space, is expected to provide indications on VOC oxidation and secondary aerosol formation in the troposphere. Glyoxal is known to be mostly of natural origin and is produced during biogenic VOC oxidation. However, a number of anthropogenically emitted hydrocarbons, like acetylene and aromatics, have been positively identified as glyoxal precursors. The present study investigates the contribution of pollution emissions to the glyoxal levels by taking into account only the secondary chemical formation of glyoxal from precursors emitted from biogenic, anthropogenic and biomass burning sources. For this purpose, a global 3-dimensional chemistry transport model of the troposphere (TM4) able to simulate the gas phase chemistry coupled with all major aerosol components is used. The model results are compared with satellite observations of glyoxal columns over hot spot areas. According to TM4 model results, the anthropogenic contribution to the glyoxal columns is found to reach 70% in the industrialized areas of the northern hemisphere and up to 20% in the tropics. It is on average three times larger than the secondary production of glyoxal from biomass burning sources. The chemical production of glyoxal is calculated to equal about 56 Tg y-1 with 70% produced from biogenic hydrocarbons oxidation, 17% from acetylene, 11% from aromatic chemistry, and 2% from ethene and propene. Glyoxal is destroyed by reactions mainly with OH radicals (22%) and by photolysis (65%), but it is also removed from the atmosphere through wet (11%) and dry deposition (6%). Secondary organic aerosol potential formation through glyoxal losses on/in aerosols and clouds was neglected here due to the significant uncertainties associated with the underlying chemistry. The global annual mean glyoxal burden and lifetime in the model domain are estimated at 0.02 Tg and 3 h, respectively.

  2. Influence of ethanol on lead distribution and biochemical changes in rats exposed to lead.

    PubMed

    Gupta, V; Gill, K D

    2000-01-01

    In the present study, an attempt has been made to investigate the effect of ethanol consumption on the distribution of lead in different regions of brain and body organs of male albino rats. Lead when administered intragastrically, for a period of eight weeks resulted in almost uniform accumulation of this metal in all the regions of brain, which increased by almost two fold when ethanol was given along with lead. Lead was also seen to compartmentalise in almost all the tissues of the body to varying extents, with the highest accumulation in the kidney. A progressive and appreciable accumulation of lead was seen in blood with a concomitant increase in ZPP levels in animals during the course of treatment, which increased further when ethanol was administered along with lead. The activity of delta-ALAD and AChE in blood was significantly decreased in lead as well as ethanol treated animals. However, in animals coexposed to lead and ethanol, the inhibition of delta-ALAD was not significantly different, when compared to only lead-treated animals. The results suggested that animals exposed to ethanol and lead simultaneously accumulate higher levels of lead in blood and brain of animals making them more vulnerable to the haematological and neurological toxic effects of lead. PMID:10680712

  3. Aerosol size distribution and radiative forcing response to anthropogenically driven historical changes in biogenic secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Andrea, S. D.; Acosta Navarro, J. C.; Farina, S. C.; Scott, C. E.; Rap, A.; Farmer, D. K.; Spracklen, D. V.; Riipinen, I.; Pierce, J. R.

    2014-10-01

    Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) have changed in the past millennium due to changes in land use, temperature and CO2 concentrations. Recent model reconstructions of BVOC emissions over the past millennium predicted changes in dominant secondary organic aerosol (SOA) producing BVOC classes (isoprene, monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes). The reconstructions predicted that global isoprene emissions have decreased (land-use changes to crop/grazing land dominate the reduction), while monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions have increased (temperature increases dominate the increases); however, all three show regional variability due to competition between the various influencing factors. These BVOC changes have largely been anthropogenic in nature, and land-use change was shown to have the most dramatic effect by decreasing isoprene emissions. In this work, we use two modeled estimates of BVOC emissions from the years 1000 to 2000 to test the effect of anthropogenic changes to BVOC emissions on SOA formation, global aerosol size distributions, and radiative effects using the GEOS-Chem-TOMAS global aerosol microphysics model. With anthropogenic emissions (e.g. SO2, NOx, primary aerosols) held at present day values and BVOC emissions changed from year 1000 to year 2000 values, decreases in the number concentration of particles of size Dp > 80 nm (N80) of >25% in year 2000 relative to year 1000 were predicted in regions with extensive land-use changes since year 1000 which led to regional increases in direct plus indirect aerosol radiative effect of >0.5 W m-2 in these regions. We test the sensitivity of our results to BVOC emissions inventory, SOA yields and the presence of anthropogenic emissions; however, the qualitative response of the model to historic BVOC changes remains the same in all cases. Accounting for these uncertainties, we estimate millennial changes in BVOC emissions cause a global mean direct effect of between +0.022 and +0.163 W m-2

  4. Assessing anthropogenic impact on boreal lakes with historical fish species distribution data and hydrogeochemical modeling

    PubMed Central

    Valinia, Salar; Englund, Göran; Moldan, Filip; Futter, Martyn N; Köhler, Stephan J; Bishop, Kevin; Fölster, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Quantifying the effects of human activity on the natural environment is dependent on credible estimates of reference conditions to define the state of the environment before the onset of adverse human impacts. In Europe, emission controls that aimed at restoring ecological status were based on hindcasts from process-based models or paleolimnological reconstructions. For instance, 1860 is used in Europe as the target for restoration from acidification concerning biological and chemical parameters. A more practical problem is that the historical states of ecosystems and their function cannot be observed directly. Therefore, we (i) compare estimates of acidification based on long-term observations of roach (Rutilus rutilus) populations with hindcast pH from the hydrogeochemical model MAGIC; (ii) discuss policy implications and possible scope for use of long-term archival data for assessing human impacts on the natural environment and (iii) present a novel conceptual model for interpreting the importance of physico-chemical and ecological deviations from reference conditions. Of the 85 lakes studied, 78 were coherently classified by both methods. In 1980, 28 lakes were classified as acidified with the MAGIC model, however, roach was present in 14 of these. In 2010, MAGIC predicted chemical recovery in 50% of the lakes, however roach only recolonized in five lakes after 1990, showing a lag between chemical and biological recovery. Our study is the first study of its kind to use long-term archival biological data in concert with hydrogeochemical modeling for regional assessments of anthropogenic acidification. Based on our results, we show how the conceptual model can be used to understand and prioritize management of physico-chemical and ecological effects of anthropogenic stressors on surface water quality. PMID:24535943

  5. Assessing anthropogenic impact on boreal lakes with historical fish species distribution data and hydrogeochemical modeling.

    PubMed

    Valinia, Salar; Englund, Göran; Moldan, Filip; Futter, Martyn N; Köhler, Stephan J; Bishop, Kevin; Fölster, Jens

    2014-09-01

    Quantifying the effects of human activity on the natural environment is dependent on credible estimates of reference conditions to define the state of the environment before the onset of adverse human impacts. In Europe, emission controls that aimed at restoring ecological status were based on hindcasts from process-based models or paleolimnological reconstructions. For instance, 1860 is used in Europe as the target for restoration from acidification concerning biological and chemical parameters. A more practical problem is that the historical states of ecosystems and their function cannot be observed directly. Therefore, we (i) compare estimates of acidification based on long-term observations of roach (Rutilus rutilus) populations with hindcast pH from the hydrogeochemical model MAGIC; (ii) discuss policy implications and possible scope for use of long-term archival data for assessing human impacts on the natural environment and (iii) present a novel conceptual model for interpreting the importance of physico-chemical and ecological deviations from reference conditions. Of the 85 lakes studied, 78 were coherently classified by both methods. In 1980, 28 lakes were classified as acidified with the MAGIC model, however, roach was present in 14 of these. In 2010, MAGIC predicted chemical recovery in 50% of the lakes, however roach only recolonized in five lakes after 1990, showing a lag between chemical and biological recovery. Our study is the first study of its kind to use long-term archival biological data in concert with hydrogeochemical modeling for regional assessments of anthropogenic acidification. Based on our results, we show how the conceptual model can be used to understand and prioritize management of physico-chemical and ecological effects of anthropogenic stressors on surface water quality. PMID:24535943

  6. Spatial distribution of soil lead pollution in Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkmann, R.

    1989-01-01

    The spatial distribution of lead pollution in soils of Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, was investigated to find the patterns and extent of health-threatening contamination. Samples were collected within three distinct land-use types: (i) lawns and gardens, (ii) major east-west arterials, and (iii) private properties at site-specific locations. Three-hundred and sixty-four soil samples were collected from lawns and gardens throughout the county; a total of 263 soil samples were collected along College Avenue, Oklahoma Avenue, Greenfield Avenue, Wisconsin Avenue, North Avenue, Capitol Drive, and Brown Deer Road, and a total of 55 soil samples were collected from three private properties. Several distinct patterns emerged from the mapped data. Broadly, soil lead pollution in lawns and gardens was highest in the central city and decreased north, south, and west toward the county lines and suburban fringe. Also, soil lead pollution along major arterials decreased away from busy intersections and was generally eliminated east of 42nd Street. At the three locations of intense sampling for site-specific examination, soil lead was concentrated within one meter of painted structures. Peripheral to the one meter zone, background levels of lead were found except in the central city where elevated soil lead levels were found in lawns. Health-threatening lead levels (>500 ppm) were found in soils collected using all three approaches: 24% of 11 soils collected from lawns and gardens; 43% of soils collected from major east-west arterials; and 27% of the soils collected from all three intensely examined properties. The sources of lead pollution in soil were more clearly suggested in intense sampling within small private properties. Lead-based paint caused contamination within one meter of painted structures and airborne lead from automobile exhaust outside that zone.

  7. Anthropogenic Environments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aerosols or airborne dust can originate from sources unrelated to anthropogenic activity but may also be initiated or exacerbated by anthropogenic actions. Anthropogenic dust refers to dust activity (emission and suppression) that is present due to human activity. Wind erosion in the U.S. is a sign...

  8. Distribution of anthropogenic fill material within the Y-12 plant area, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, G.E. Jr. |; Field, S.M.

    1995-10-01

    Widespread groundwater contamination in the vicinity of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has been documented through a variety of monitoring efforts since the late 1970s. Various contaminants, most notably volatile organic compounds (VOCs), have migrated through the subsurface and formed extensive contaminant plumes within the Knox Aquifer/Maynardville Limestone, the primary exit pathway for groundwater transport within the Bear Creek Valley. In 1991, an integrated, comprehensive effort (Upper East Fork Poplar Creek [UEFPC] Phase I monitoring network) was initiated in order to (1) identify contaminant source areas within the industrialized portions of the plant and (2) define contamination migration pathways existing between the source areas and the Knox Aquifer/Maynardville Limestone. Data obtained during previous studies have indicated that extensive zones of fill and buried utility trenches may serve as preferred migration pathways. In addition, portions of UEFPC were rerouted, with several of its tributaries being filled during the initial construction of the plant. These filled surface drainage features are also believed to serve as preferred migration pathways. The identification of preferred contaminant migration pathways within the Y-12 Plant area is essential and required to refine the current Bear Creek Valley groundwater conceptual model and to assist in the selection of technically feasible and cost effective remedial strategies. This report presents the results of an initial investigation of the occurrence of manmade (anthropogenic) fill and its effect upon groundwater movement within the plant area. These interpretations are subject to revision and improvement as further investigation of the effects of the fill upon contaminant migration progresses.

  9. Distribution of Lead and Transthyretin in Human Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Eichenbaum, Joseph W.; Zheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background The retinal pigment epithelium serves as a defensive barrier to the retina in the same way that the choroid plexus functions in the brain. Previous studies have shown that lead sequestration in the choroid plexus reduces the production and secretion of transthyretin by the choroid plexus. The purpose of this study was to investigate the distribution of lead and transthyretin in human eyes and to explore the potential effect of lead on transthyretin in human eyes. Methods Eight pairs of human eyes were obtained from the New York City Eyebank within 24 hours of postmortem. The eyes were dissected to obtain the aqueous, vitreous, retina, and choroid. Lead and transthyretin concentrations in ocular tissues and liquids were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry for lead and radioimmunoassay for transthyretin. Lead accumulated in the retina at concentrations that were 166, 739, and 5 times higher than those in the aqueous, vitreous, and choroid, respectively (p < 0.05 for all comparisons). Lead concentrations in ocular tissues or intraocular liquids did not change as a function of age or gender. The concentration of transthyretin in the vitreous (14.4 ± 5.1SE μg/mL) was twice as much as in the aqueous (7.0 ± 1.1SE μg/mL) and was significantly correlated to that in the retina (r = 0.93, p < 0.005). Conclusions This study indicates that lead accumulates in human ocular tissues, particularly in the retina. The markedly elevated retina lead level and its relationship to ocular transthyretin and other macromolecules bear further investigation. PMID:10930053

  10. Lead and aluminum in Atlantic surface waters (50°N to 50°S) reflecting anthropogenic and natural sources in the Eolian transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmers, Eckard; Rutgers van der Loeff, Michiel M.

    1993-01-01

    Lead and aluminum were measured with a 40-100 km resolution in surface water on two transects across the Atlantic Ocean, one in May 1990 from Cape Town to the North Sea, the other in November 1990 from the North Sea to the Strait of Magellan. Samples were drawn 14 m below surface at normal speed from a 2-m-long snorkel system mounted on the bottom of the ship directly into a clean-room area. In the tropics, both Pb and Al show maximum concentrations in the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) correlated with each other and with minimum salinities, indicating wet deposition as their common source. Even in this area characterized by large inputs of mineral aerosols, the Pb/Al ratio shows that the major source of soluble lead (>95%) is anthropogenic. At higher latitudes, Al is low throughout (10-20 nmol/kg), whereas enhanced Pb values show the anthropogenic inputs off south Africa, northern Argentina and especially western Europe. Very low Pb and especially Al concentrations in the upwelling areas associated with the Canary and Benguela currents show that the enhanced biogenic particle fluxes cause an efficient scavenging of both lithogenic particles known to arrive here by dry deposition, and of the adhering reactive trace metals.

  11. A century long sedimentary record of anthropogenic lead (Pb), Pb isotopes and other trace metals in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mengli; Boyle, Edward A; Switzer, Adam D; Gouramanis, Chris

    2016-06-01

    Reconstructing the history of metal deposition in Singapore lake sediments contributes to understanding the anthropogenic and natural metal deposition in the data-sparse Southeast Asia. To this end, we present a sedimentary record of Pb, Pb isotopes and eleven other metals (Ag, As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Tl, U and Zn) from a well-dated sediment core collected near the depocenter of MacRitchie Reservoir in central Singapore. Before the 1900s, the sedimentary Pb concentration was less than 2 mg/kg for both soil and sediment, with a corresponding (206)Pb/(207)Pb of ∼1.20. The Pb concentration increased to 55 mg/kg in the 1990s, and correspondingly the (206)Pb/(207)Pb decreased to less than 1.14. The (206)Pb/(207)Pb in the core top sediment is concordant with the (206)Pb/(207)Pb signal of aerosols in Singapore and other Southeast Asian cities, suggesting that Pb in the reservoir sediment was mainly from atmospheric deposition. Using the Pb concentration in the topmost layer of sediment, the estimated atmospheric Pb flux in Singapore today is ∼1.6 × 10(-2) g/m(2) yr. The concentrations of eleven other metals preserved in the sediment were also determined. A principal component analysis showed that most of the metals exhibit an increasing trend towards 1990s with a local concentration peak in the mid-20(th) century. PMID:26967352

  12. Lead distribution in soils impacted by a secondary lead smelter: Experimental and modelling approaches.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Arnaud R; Cancès, Benjamin; Ponthieu, Marie; Sobanska, Sophie; Benedetti, Marc F; Pourret, Olivier; Conreux, Alexandra; Calandra, Ivan; Martinet, Blandine; Morvan, Xavier; Gommeaux, Maxime; Marin, Béatrice

    2016-10-15

    Smelting activities are one of the most common sources of trace elements in the environment. The aim of this study was to determine the lead distribution in upper horizons (0-5 and 5-10cm) of acidic soils in the vicinity of a lead-acid battery recycling plant in northern France. The combination of chemical methods (sequential extractions), physical methods (Raman microspectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive spectrometer) and multi-surface complexation modelling enabled an assessment of the behaviour of Pb. Regardless of the studied soil, none of the Pb-bearing phases commonly identified in similarly polluted environments (e.g., anglesite) were observed. Lead was mainly associated with organic matter and manganese oxides. The association of Pb with these soil constituents can be interpreted as evidence of Pb redistribution in the studied soils following smelter particle deposition. PMID:27295589

  13. Distribution of chemical elements in attic dust and soil as reflection of lithology and anthropogenic influence in Slovenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajn, R.

    2003-05-01

    The aim of this study was to establish contents and distribution of chemical elements in attic dust in Slovenia, and to define them according to geology and anthiopogenic influence. Attic dust and topsoil (0-5 cm) samples were collected in the rural area in settlements without known industry and in six largest towns in Slovenia. Analysis of 42 chemical elements was performed. For estimation of the association between elements and sampling materials the R mode factor analysis was applied. Al, Ba, Co, Ci, Fe, La, Mn, Na, Nb, Ni, Sc, Th, Ti, Y, V and Zr in attic dust reflect the natural distribution. The highest elemental contents in attic dust occur in the areas of igneous and metmoiphic rocks and of flysch formation. High contents of the elemental association Co, Ci, Fe, Mn, and Ni reflect also centuries of ferrous metallurgy. Distribution of As, Cd, Cu, Hg, Mo, Sb, Sn, Sr, Pb and Zn represents the anthropogenically introduced chemical elements. Their averages in attic dust are higher compared to topsoil. High contents of these elements are a result of historical Pb-Zn mining and smelting.

  14. Mediated distribution pattern of organic compounds in estuarine sediment by anthropogenic debris.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chen-Chou; Bao, Lian-Jun; Tao, Shu; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2016-09-15

    Natural organic matter and grain size are considered as important parameters dictating the transport and fate of organic compounds in sediment. However, increasing evidence suggested that manufactured debris may alter the underlying mechanisms for biogeochemical cycling of organic compounds. To examine this assumption, estuarine sediment and embedded debris were collected from a fishery base in Guangdong Province of South China and analyzed for organophosphorus flame retardants (OPFRs), phthalates (PAEs), organotin compounds (OTs) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs). Coarse-size debris (>200μm) were heterogeneously distributed in sediment, and most abundant near the boat maintenance facilities, aquaculture zone and shipping channel. The median concentrations of OPFRs, OTs, PAEs and DDTs in debris were 11, 0.2, 11 and 3.9μgg(-1) dry sample weight(-1), respectively, 1 to 3 orders of magnitude greater than those in bulk sediment (19, 60, 240 and 570ngg(-1) dry sample weight(-1), respectively). Furthermore, OPFRs, OTs and PAEs were mostly (>99%) enriched in coarse-size (63-2000μm) sediment, and there was no significant correlation (p>0.05) between the concentrations of OPFRs, OTs and PAEs in bulk and size-fractioned sediment samples and total organic carbon or grain size, similar to the distribution pattern of DDTs reported previously. When distinct debris were removed from the light-density (<1.7gcm(-3)) fraction of coarse-size (200-2000μm) sediment, the concentration levels of OPFRs, OTs, PAEs and DDTs declined by 84%, 59%, 55% and 7%, respectively. Obviously, debris irregularly distributed in sediment can alter the sediment sorption capacity for OPFRs, OTs and PAEs, and thus may undermine the significance of organic matter and grain size to the distribution of organic chemicals in sediment. Finally, commonly used procedures for preparing sediment samples and screening of debris may disturb the grain size distribution or underestimate the abundance of

  15. Factors affecting the distribution of natural and anthropogenic radionuclides in the coastal Burullus Lake.

    PubMed

    El-Reefy, H I; Badran, H M; Sharshar, T; Hilal, M A; Elnimr, T

    2014-08-01

    In the present study, measurements of naturally occurring radioactive materials and (137)Cs activity in sediment were conducted for locations covering the entire Burullus Lake in order to gather information about radionuclides mobility and distribution. Low-background γ-spectrometry was employed to determine the activity concentrations of water and sediment samples. The activity concentrations of (226)Ra and (232)Th are close to uniform distribution in the lake environment. Among the different physical and chemical characteristics measured for water and sediment, only salinity and total organic matter content have the potential to affect the mobility of (137)Cs and (40)K. The results suggest that these two radionuclides are attached to different mobile particulates. Increasing salinity tends to strengthen the adsorption of (137)Cs and solubilization of (40)K in sediment. On the other hand, sediment with high organic matter content traps (137)Cs and (40)K associated particulates to bottom sediment. PMID:24657852

  16. Anthropogenic Landscape Homogenization: Size-distribution of Wetlands in Mid-western Prairie Landscapes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, N. B.; Stunkel, K.; Van Meter, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Prairie Pothole Region, extending from the Des Moines Lobe in Iowa into Canada, is a landscape dotted with thousands of glacially formed depressional wetlands. Vast areas of these wetlands have been drained for agriculture. Consequent losses in ecological and hydrological services have been recognized in the recent past, and restoration efforts are underway. Effective restoration requires understanding the distribution and connectivity of the original wetland network, and the effects of human interventions in altering it. The objective of our study was to (1) understand the size-distribution and spatial organization of depressional features in the Des Moines Lobe, (2) explore the role of human impacts on the same, and (3) understand how losses have impacted aquatic ecosystem services. We found that the size-frequency relationship of the depressional features follows a power law distribution that varies based on the landform type and the size of the study area. We compared depressions based on 1m LIDAR DEM with current wetlands based on National Wetlands Inventory (NWI) data to evaluate the effects of human disturbance on the landscape. The LIDAR captures the depressional areas that correspond to wetlands before the landscape was extensively tile-drained, while NWI captures the features of the existing wetlands in the area. Results show that we have preferentially drained larger and smaller wetlands, effectively homogenizing the landscape. Modeling is used to explore the role of homogenization on aquatic ecosystem responses.

  17. High-resolution distributed analysis of climate and anthropogenic changes on the hydrology of an Alpine catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatichi, S.; Rimkus, S.; Burlando, P.; Bordoy, R.; Molnar, P.

    2015-06-01

    A fully distributed hydrological analysis at scales significant for water management for present-day, and projected future climate conditions is presented for a catchment in the Alps. We selected the upper Rhone basin (Switzerland) as a test case for understanding anthropogenic impacts including climate change on water resources and flood risk in the Alpine area. The upper Rhone basin contains reservoirs, river diversions and irrigated areas offering the opportunity to study the interaction between climate change effects and hydraulic infrastructure. Anthropogenic disturbances of the flow regime were implemented in detail in the hydrological analysis. We downscaled climate model realizations using a methodology that accounts for the uncertainty in climate change projections related to the stochastic variability of precipitation and air temperature. We showed how climate change effects on streamflow propagate from high elevation headwater catchments to the river in the main valley by analyzing changes in several hydrological metrics and at various temporal scales across 297 control sections. Changes in the natural hydrological regime imposed by the existing hydraulic infrastructure are likely larger than climate change signals expected by the middle of the 21st century in most of the river network. Despite a strong uncertainty induced by stochastic climate variability, we identified an elevational dependence of climate change impacts with a severe reduction in streamflow due to the missing contribution of water from ice melt at high-elevation and a dampened effect downstream. Reduced ice cover and ice melt are likely to have significant implications for hydropower production. The impacts can emerge without any additional climate warming. A decrease of August-September discharge and an increase of hourly and daily maximum flows appear as plausible projected change for the most part of the catchment. However, it is unlikely that major changes in total runoff for the

  18. Source and distribution of sedimentary thallium in the Bohai Sea: Implications for hydrodynamic forces and anthropogenic impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ningjing; Liu, Jihua; Shi, Xuefa

    2015-04-01

    Source and distribution of sedimentary thallium in the Bohai Sea: Implications for hydrodynamic forces and anthropogenic impact Hu Ningjing, Liu Jihua, Shi Xuefa First Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration, Qingdao 266061, China Thallium (Tl), a non-essential and highly toxic trace metal, is listed as priority toxic pollutant by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) (Keith and Telliard, 1979). However, its geochemical cycling in aquatic environment has received far less attention than that of many other trace metals. This has been attributed to relatively little commercial interest in Tl and, until recently, problems inherent in its detection at environmental concentrations (Meeravali and Jiang, 2008). In this study, we investigated the sources, distribution and fate of Tl in surface sediments of the Bohai Sea (BS), China, based on the datasets of total Tl and chemical speciation of Tl of 408 surface sediment samples in the total entire BS. The enrichment factors and chemical speciation of Tl indicated that Tl in BS was dominated by natural Tl, although anthropogenic Tl contamination was observed in the Liuguhe River mouth; the mud deposits are the sinks of Tl and the regional currents and tide systems play a key role on the accumulation of Tl in BS. The distribution of Tl consistent with that of MnO and Fe2O3 as well as the level of Fe-Mn fraction is relatively high, indicating MnO and Fe2O3 influence the geochemical behaviors of Tl in the BS. Although the positive correlation between Tl and TOC is observed for the samples in the BS, however, level of Tl in oxidizable faction could be neglected, suggesting TOC might not be a major factor affecting the concentration of Tl in BS. The low proportion of Tl in the non-residual fraction dominated by the Fe-Mn oxides suggested that the labile Tl was controlled by the Fe-Mn oxides and Tl has a low bioavailability and a minor potential threat to biota in BS. Acknowledgements: this work

  19. Distribution regularities lead and cadmium in soils of northern landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodygin, Evgeny; Beznosikov, Vasily

    2013-04-01

    The background concentrations of lead and cadmium in soils of the southern part of the Komi Republic have been studied. It is found that the content of lead and cadmium in the soils of accumulative landscapes (depressions, floodplains) is generally higher than that in the soils of eluvial (interfluves) landscapes. Background (unpolluted) soils of the southern districts (Syktyvdinsk, Kortkeross, Sysola, Koigorod, and Priluzskii) of the Komi Republic were studied; their total area reaches 58 100 km2. Acid-soluble forms of metals (Pb, Cd) were determined according to a metrologically tested method with the use of an atomic emission spectrometer with inductively coupled argon plasma (Spectro Ciros, Germany). The lead concentrations in the A0A1 horizon of the studied soils vary from 6.5 to 40.0 mg/kg. The maximum lead concentrations exceed the minimum lead concentration by six times. Sandy soils have a considerably lower content of lead in comparison with loamy soils. The lead content in the profiles of loamy soils is higher than that in the parent material. Relatively low lead concentrations are typical of the podzols with a coarse texture and a high mobility of lead. The lead content in the soils is weakly correlated with the carbon content (r = 0.55), and the clay (<0.001 mm) content (r = 0.48). Cadmium occurs in nature in very low concentrations, as a rule as an admixture in zinc, lead-zinc, and lead-copper-zinc ore deposits. The dispersion of this element in the environment is due to industrial emissions. The uppermost (0-5 cm) soil horizons are enriched with cadmium under the impact of biological factors, and its concentrations in the humus horizons reaches 0.19-0.50 mg/kg in the southern part of the Komi Republic. Accumulative landscapes have maximum cadmium concentrations; eluvial landscapes are depleted of cadmium due to its removal with solid and liquid runoff. The distribution of cadmium in the soil profiles is relatively even with an insignificant maximum in

  20. Anthropogenic and natural lead isotopes in Fe-hydroxides and Fe-sulphates in a watershed associated with arsenic-enriched groundwater, Maine, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayuso, Robert A.; Foley, Nora K.

    2008-01-01

    A survey of the natural and anthropogenic sources of lead contributing to secondary minerals in sulphidic schists associated with arsenic-enriched groundwater in Coastal Maine shows that the most likely source is natural Pb, particularly from coexisting sulphide minerals. The secondary minerals also reflect notable contributions from anthropogenic Pb. The Pb isotopes establish pathways by which Pb, and by inference As, could have been transported from As-bearing minerals (arsenian pyrite, arsenopyrite, lollingite, orpiment, arsenic oxide and others), via sulphide oxidation or carbonation reactions into multiple generations of secondary minerals (goethite, hematite, jarosite, natrojarosite and others). Lead isotopic compositions of the sulphides and secondary minerals determined by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (n=53) range widely. Lead and As contents of the sulphides and secondary minerals overlap, and are generally positively correlated. Pyrite, the dominant sulphide in sulphidic schists associated with As-enriched groundwater in Coastal Maine, has values of 206Pb/204Pb from 18.186 to 18.391, 207Pb/204Pb from 15.617 to 15.657, 208Pb/204Pb from 38.052 to 38.210, 206Pb/207Pb from c. 1.1625 to 1.1760 and 208Pb/207Pb from c. 2.4276 to 2.4394. Mixtures of Fe-hydroxide and oxide minerals (predominantly goethite and hematite) and secondary Fe-sulphate minerals (jarosite, natrojarosite, rozenite and melanterite) in the sulphidic schists have overlapping but generally higher values of 206Pb/204Pb from 18.495 to 19.747 (one sample at 21.495), 207Pb/204Pb from 15.595 to 15.722 (one sample at 15.839), 208Pb/204Pb from 38.186 to 39.162,206Pb/207Pb from c.1.1860 to 1.2575 (one sample at 1.3855) and 208Pb/207Pb from c. 2.4441 to 2.4865 than the sulphides. Sulphides from Zn-Pb metal mines are somewhat less radiogenic than sulphides from the schists. Other sulphides (mostly pyrite) associated with pegmatites and granitic rocks are heterogeneous and more

  1. Estimating the in situ sediment-porewater distribution of PAHs and chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons in anthropogenic impacted sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Hans Peter H. Arp; Gijs D. Breedveld; Gerard Cornelissen

    2009-08-15

    It has become increasingly apparent that the in situ sediment-porewater distribution behavior of organic compounds within anthropogenic impacted sediments is quite diverse, and challenging to generalize. Traditional models based on octanol-water partitioning generally overestimate native porewater concentrations, and modern approaches accounting for multiple carbon fractions, including black carbon, appear sediment specific. To assess the diversity of this sorption behavior, we collected all peer-reviewed total organic carbon (TOC)-normalized in situ sediment-porewater distribution coefficients, K{sub TOC}, for impacted sediments. This entailed several hundreds of data for PAHs, PCBs, PCDD/Fs, and chlorinated benzenes, covering a large variety of sediments, locations, and experimental methods. Compound-specific KTOC could range up to over 3 orders of magnitude. Output from various predictive models for individual carbonaceous phases found in impacted sediments, based on peer-reviewed polyparameter linear free energy relationships (PP-LFERs), Raoult's Law, and the SPARC online-calculator, were tested to see if any of the models could consistently predict literature K{sub TOC} values within a factor of 30 (i.e. about 1.5 orders of magnitude, or half the range of K{sub TOC} values). The Raoult's Law model and coal tar PP-LFER achieved the sought-after accuracy for all tested compound classes, and are recommended for general, regional-scale modeling purposes. As impacted sediment-porewater distribution models are unlikely to get more accurate than this, this review underpins that the only way to accurately obtain accurate porewater concentrations is to measure them directly, and not infer them from sediment concentrations. 86 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Anthropogenic landscapes and pesticides distribution in waters of the river Júcar, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascual-Aguilar, Juan Antonio; Andreu, Vicente; Masià, Ana; Picó, Yolanda

    2014-05-01

    The quality of river flows may be affected by farming activities whenever dissolve substances persist as nonpoint source pollutants. Among contaminants, the group of pesticides is associated to farming activities. Their extended use depends on the dominant farming practice and the type of crop that, in turn, will be reflected on the specific pollutants and concentrations found. Their identifation in surface waters may also depend on the size and structure (to landscape scale) of the agriculture land. Thus, to understand surface waters transport and hydrological connectivity of contaminants in river flows research to large basin scale is needed. In this work it is assumed that at large geographical scale pesticides and herbicides are related to major landscape land use-cover types. The methodological framework developed consisted on the application of environmental forensic criteria combining laboratory analytical water samples and cartographic analysis using Geographical Information Systems (GIS). To the detection and quantification of pesticides, the sampling strategy consisted in the collection of 15 water samples distributed alongside the River Júcar and its two main tributaries (River Cabriel and Magro), located in the River Júcar drainage Basin, Spain. 50 pesticides were identified and quantified by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Geographical analysis were performed after geo-location of sampling points analytical results and integration in the GIS environment using land use-cover digital layers, togeheter with soil, lithology and topography layers. Out of 50 pesticides 20 were identified and 18 presented concentrations higher than the Limits of Quantification. Values ranged from 0.04 ng/L (Terbuthylazine-2 Hydroxy) to 79.39 ng/L (Carbendazim), 150.75 ng/L (Thiabenzadole) and 222.45 ng/L (Imazalil). Contaminants identified more frequently were Chlorpyriphos, Ethion, Chlorfenvinphos and Imazalil, found in 15, 13, 12 and

  3. Distributions of the carbonate system properties, anthropogenic CO2, and acidification during the 2008 BOUM cruise (Mediterranean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touratier, F.; Guglielmi, V.; Goyet, C.; Prieur, L.; Pujo-Pay, M.; Conan, P.; Falco, C.

    2012-03-01

    We relate here the distributions of two carbonate system key properties (total alkalinity, AT; and total dissolved inorganic carbon, CT) measured along a section in the Mediterranean Sea, going from Marseille (France) to the south of the Cyprus Island, during the 2008 BOUM cruise. The three main objectives of the present study are (1) to draw and comment on the distributions of AT and CT in the light of others properties like salinity, temperature, and dissolved oxygen, (2) to estimate the distribution of the anthropogenic CO2 (CANT) in the intermediate and the deep waters, and (3) to calculate the resulting variation of pH (acidification) since the beginning of the industrial era. Since the calculation of CANT is always an intense subject of debate, we apply two radically different approaches to estimate CANT: the very simple method TrOCA and the MIX approach, the latter being more precise but also more difficult to apply. A clear picture for the AT and the CT distributions is obtained: the mean concentration of AT is higher in the oriental basin while that of CT is higher in the occidental basin of the Mediterranean Sea, fully coherent with the previous published works. Despite of the two very different approaches we use here (TrOCA and MIX), the estimated distributions of CANT are very similar. These distributions show that the minimum of CANT encountered during the BOUM cruise is higher than 46.3 μmol kg-1 (TrOCA) or 48.8 μmol kg-1(MIX). All Mediterranean water masses (even the deepest) appear to be highly contaminated by CANT, as a result of the very intense advective processes that characterize the recent history of the Mediterranean circulation. As a consequence, unprecedented levels of acidification are reached with an estimated decrease of pH since the pre-industrial era of -0.148 to -0.061 pH unit, which places the Mediterranean Sea as one of the most acidified world marine ecosystem.

  4. Anthropogenic sources of PM 2.5's arsenic, lead, mercury and nickel in northern metropolitan Lisbon, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    do Carmo Freitas, Maria; Pacheco, Adriano M. G.; Ventura, Márcia G.

    2004-06-01

    As part of a contract for air-quality monitoring in the neighbourhood of an urban waste incinerator, measurements of PM 10 and PM 2.5 are being routinely evaluated at three sampling locations. Samples are collected for 24 h at the weekend and a working day, using a Gent collector (separates two fractions: PM 2.5 and PM 2.5-10). Filters are analysed by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE). As and Hg are determined by INAA, and Ni and Pb are obtained by PIXE. Considering a 24 h/week sampling basis, As and Pb concentrations in PM 2.5 show a seasonal trend with higher concentrations during autumn and winter; Ni levels are practically constant the whole year round, with a few episodes; and Hg concentrations tend to increase from October to September. A significant correlation appears for arsenic and lead, and arsenic and nickel.

  5. Dynamical next-to-next-to-leading order parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Delgado, P.; Reya, E.

    2009-04-01

    Utilizing recent deep inelastic scattering measurements ({sigma}{sub r},F{sub 2,3,L}) and data on hadronic dilepton production we determine at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) (3-loop) of QCD the dynamical parton distributions of the nucleon generated radiatively from valencelike positive input distributions at an optimally chosen low resolution scale (Q{sub 0}{sup 2}<1 GeV{sup 2}). These are compared with 'standard' NNLO distributions generated from positive input distributions at some fixed and higher resolution scale (Q{sub 0}{sup 2}>1 GeV{sup 2}). Although the NNLO corrections imply in both approaches an improved value of {chi}{sup 2}, typically {chi}{sub NNLO}{sup 2}{approx_equal}0.9{chi}{sub NLO}{sup 2}, present deep inelastic scattering data are still not sufficiently accurate to distinguish between NLO results and the minute NNLO effects of a few percent, despite the fact that the dynamical NNLO uncertainties are somewhat smaller than the NLO ones and both are, as expected, smaller than those of their standard counterparts. The dynamical predictions for F{sub L}(x,Q{sup 2}) become perturbatively stable already at Q{sup 2}=2-3 GeV{sup 2} where precision measurements could even delineate NNLO effects in the very small-x region. This is in contrast to the common standard approach but NNLO/NLO differences are here less distinguishable due to the larger 1{sigma} uncertainty bands. Within the dynamical approach we obtain {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z}{sup 2})=0.1124{+-}0.0020, whereas the somewhat less constrained standard fit gives {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z}{sup 2})=0.1158{+-}0.0035.

  6. The spatial distribution pattern of heavy metal concentrations in urban soils — a study of anthropogenic effects in Berehove, Ukraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vince, Tímea; Szabó, György; Csoma, Zoltán; Sándor, Gábor; Szabó, Szilárd

    2014-09-01

    In the present study we examined the Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn contamination levels of the soils of Berehove, a small city in West-Ukraine. As a first step we determined the spatial distribution of the heavy metal contents of the urban soils; then, by studying the land use structure of the city and by statistical analysis we identified the major sources of contamination; we established a matrix of correlations between the heavy metal contents of the soils and the different types of land use; and finally, we drew a conclusion regarding the possible origin(s) of these heavy metals. By means of multivariate statistical analysis we established that of the investigated metals, Ba, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn accumulated in the city's soils primarily as a result of anthropogenic activity. In the most polluted urban areas (i.e. in the industrial zones and along the roads and highways with heavy traffic), in the case of several metals (Ba, Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn) we measured concentration levels even two or three times higher than the threshold limit values. Furthermore, Cr, Fe and Ni are primarily of lithogenic origin; therefore, the soil concentrations of these heavy metals depend mainly on the chemical composition of the soil-forming rocks.

  7. The Distribution of Soil Organic Carbon Quantity and Quality in Soils of Southeastern Kentucky with Different Anthropogenic Histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, J. F.; Campbell, E. J.; Davis, C. M.; Thompson, N. E.; Sliter, M. M.

    2007-12-01

    A better understanding of the distribution of soil organic carbon across the landscape is needed for inputs to regional and global carbon budget modeling. In this field-based research we collected soil samples from southeastern Kentucky to better understand the influence of land-use, land management history, anthropogenic disturbances and geomorphologic landform upon the carbon quantity, or total soil carbon, and quality, i.e., decomposition state, turnover and history. Choice of the study site focused on comparison of soil organic trends globally as well as regionally due to increased focus on coal production thus impacting soil carbon, the geomorphologic footprint of the downcut, dissected terrain, and the predominant land-use transition from forest to reclaimed grassland and agricultural. Soil samples were collected from deciduous and mixed forests, floodplains, agricultural, reclaimed grassland and reclaimed forest. Soil sampling included homogenizing samples from ten soil pits at each site at four different depth increments, separation of samples into soil organic carbon pools based on size class and density fractionation, and analyzing the samples using an isotope ratio mass spectrometer and total elemental analyzer. Analysis of our work and other published data in the temperate forests of Appalachia show little variability of carbon isotopic records with depth across the region which contrasts published results from tropical regions and suggests larger regional variability in soil carbon turnover rates for tropical rain forests than temperate forests. At the same time variability of surface soils in the temperate region due to recent anthropogenic and geomorphologic disturbance was pronounced for both soil carbon quantity and quality including: (1) Reclaimed forest and grassland surface soils in general showed lower total carbon in comparison to undisturbed forest surface soils, as expected. (2) Carbon to nitrogen atomic ratio and carbon and nitrogen

  8. Characterization of anthropogenic impacts in a large urban center by examining the spatial distribution of halogenated flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yan-Li; Bao, Lian-Jun; Wu, Chen-Chou; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2016-08-01

    Anthropogenic impacts have continuously intensified in mega urban centers with increasing urbanization and growing population. The spatial distribution pattern of such impacts can be assessed with soil halogenated flame retardants (HFRs) as HFRs are mostly derived from the production and use of various consumer products. In the present study, soil samples were collected from the Pearl River Delta (PRD), a large urbanized region in southern China, and its surrounding areas and analyzed for a group of HFRs, i.e., polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), decabromodiphenyl ethane, bis(hexachlorocyclopentadieno)cyclooctane (DP) and hexabromobenzene. The sum concentrations of HFRs and PBDEs were in the ranges of 0.66-6500 and 0.37-5700 (mean: 290 and 250) ng g(-1) dry weight, respectively, around the middle level of the global range. BDE-209 was the predominant compound likely due to the huge amounts of usage and its persistence. The concentrations of HFRs were greater in the land-use types of residency, industry and landfill than in agriculture, forestry and drinking water source, and were also greater in the central PRD than in its surrounding areas. The concentrations of HFRs were moderately significantly (r(2) = 0.32-0.57; p < 0.05) correlated with urbanization levels, population densities and gross domestic productions in fifteen administrative districts. The spatial distribution of DP isomers appeared to be stereoselective as indicated by the similarity in the spatial patterns for the ratio of anti-DP versus the sum of DP isomers (fanti-DP) and DP concentrations. Finally, the concentrations of HFRs sharply decreased with increasing distance from an e-waste recycling site, indicating that e-waste derived HFRs largely remained in local soil. PMID:27203466

  9. The distribution of large herbivore hotspots in relation to environmental and anthropogenic correlates in the Mara region of Kenya.

    PubMed

    Bhola, Nina; Ogutu, Joseph O; Said, Mohamed Y; Piepho, Hans-Peter; Olff, Han

    2012-11-01

    1. The distributions of large herbivores in protected areas and their surroundings are becoming increasingly restricted by changing land use, with adverse consequences for wildlife populations. 2. We analyse changes in distributions of herbivore hotspots to understand their environmental and anthropogenic correlates using 50 aerial surveys conducted at a spatial resolution of 5 × 5 km(2) (n = 289 cells) in the Mara region of Kenya during 1977-2010. We compare the distributions across seasons, land use types (protection, pastoralism and agro-pastoralism) and 10 species with different body sizes and feeding styles. 3. Small herbivores that are the most susceptible to predation and dependent on high-quality forage concentrate in the greenest and wet areas and close to rivers in Masai pastoral ranches in both seasons. Livestock grazing creates conditions favouring small herbivores in these ranches, including high-quality short grasses and better visibility, implying facilitation. But in the reserve, they concentrate in browner, drier and flatter areas and farther from rivers, suggesting facilitation by large grazers in the wet season, or little competition with migratory herbivores occupying the reserve in the dry season. 4. In the wet season, medium herbivores concentrate in similar areas to small herbivores in the ranches and reserve. However, in the dry season, they stay in the reserve, and also concentrate in green and wet areas close to rivers when migrants occur in the reserve. As such areas typically have higher predation risk, this suggests facilitation by the migrants by absorbing most predation pressure or, alternatively, competitive displacement by the migrants from preferred habitats. 5. Large herbivores, which suffer the least predation, depend on bulk forage and are the most likely to engender conflicts with people, concentrate in the reserve all year. This suggests attraction to the taller and denser grass and perceived greater safety in the reserve in

  10. Effects of natural and anthropogenic processes in the distribution of marine litter in the deep Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Llodra, Eva; De Mol, Ben; Company, Joan B.; Coll, Marta; Sardà, Francesc

    2013-11-01

    The distribution, type and quantity of marine litter accumulated on the bathyal and abyssal Mediterranean seafloor has been studied in the framework of the Spanish national projects PROMETEO and DOS MARES and the ESF-EuroDEEP project BIOFUN. Litter was collected with an otter trawl and Agassiz trawl while sampling for megafauna on the Blanes canyon and adjacent slope (Catalan margin, north-western Mediterranean) between 900 and 2700 m depth, and on the western, central and eastern Mediterranean basins at 1200, 2000 and 3000 m depth. All litter was sorted into 8 categories (hard plastic, soft plastic, glass, metal, clinker, fabric, longlines and fishing nets) and weighed. The distribution of litter was analysed in relation to depth, geographic area and natural (bathymetry, currents and rivers) and anthropogenic (population density and shipping routes) processes. The most abundant litter types were plastic, glass, metal and clinker. Lost or discarded fishing gear was also commonly found. On the Catalan margin, although the data indicated an accumulation of litter with increasing depth, mean weight was not significantly different between depths or between the open slope and the canyon. We propose that litter accumulated in the canyon, with high proportions of plastics, has predominantly a coastal origin, while litter collected on the open slope, dominated by heavy litter, is mostly ship-originated, especially at sites under major shipping routes. Along the trans-Mediterranean transect, although a higher amount of litter seemed to be found on the Western Mediterranean, differences of mean weight were not significant between the 3 geographic areas and the 3 depths. Here, the shallower sites, also closer to the coast, had a higher proportion of plastics than the deeper sites, which had a higher proportion of heavy litter and were often affected by shipping routes. The weight of litter was also compared to biomass of megafauna from the same samples. On the Blanes slope

  11. Anthropogenic radionuclide fluxes and distribution in bottom sediments of the cooling basin of the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant.

    PubMed

    Marčiulionienė, D; Mažeika, J; Lukšienė, B; Jefanova, O; Mikalauskienė, R; Paškauskas, R

    2015-07-01

    Based on γ-ray emitting artificial radionuclide spectrometric measurements, an assessment of areal and vertical distribution of (137)Cs, (60)Co and (54)Mn activity concentrations in bottom sediments of Lake Drūkšiai was performed. Samples of bottom sediments from seven monitoring stations within the cooling basin were collected in 1988-1996 and 2007-2010 (in July-August). For radionuclide areal distribution analysis, samples from the surface 0-5 cm layer were used. Multi sample cores sliced 2 cm, 3 cm or 5 cm thick were used to study the vertical distribution of radionuclides. The lowest (137)Cs activity concentrations were obtained for two stations that were situated close to channels with radionuclide discharges, but with sediments that had a significantly smaller fraction of organic matter related to finest particles and consequently smaller radionuclide retention potential. The (137)Cs activity concentration was distributed quite evenly in the bottom sediments from other investigated monitoring stations. The highest (137)Cs activity concentrations in the bottom sediments of Lake Drūkšiai were measured in the period of 1988-1989; in 1990, the (137)Cs activity concentrations slightly decreased and they varied insignificantly over the investigation period. The obtained (238)Pu/(239,240)Pu activity ratio values in the bottom sediments of Lake Drūkšiai represented radioactive pollution with plutonium from nuclear weapon tests. Higher (60)Co and (54)Mn activity concentrations were observed in the monitoring stations that were close to the impact zones of the technical water outlet channel and industrial rain drainage system channel. (60)Co and (54)Mn activity concentrations in the bottom sediments of Lake Drūkšiai significantly decreased when operations at both INPP reactor units were stopped. The vertical distribution of radionuclides in bottom sediments revealed complicated sedimentation features, which may have been affected by a number of natural and

  12. Geogenic and Anthropogenic Moss Responsiveness to Element Distribution Around a Pb-Zn Mine, Toranica, Republic of Macedonia.

    PubMed

    Angelovska, Svetlana; Stafilov, Trajče; Šajn, Robert; Balabanova, Biljana

    2016-04-01

    Moss species (Homalothecium lutescens, Hypnum cupressiforme, Brachythecium glareosum, and Campthotecium lutescens) were used as suitable sampling media for biomonitoring the origin of heavy-metal pollution in the lead-zinc (Pb-Zn) mine "Toranica" near the Kriva Palanka town, Eastern Macedonia. The contents of 20 elements-silver (Ag), aluminum (Al), arsenic (As), barium (Ba), calcium (Ca), cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), potassium (K), lithium (Li), magnesium (Mg), manganese (Mn), sodium (Na), nickel (Ni), Pb, strontium (Sr), vanadium (V), and (Zn) were determined by atomic emission spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma. Data processing was applied with combinations of multivariate statistical methods: factor analysis, principal component analysis, and cluster analysis. Moss' responsiveness to the atmospheric distribution of the selected elements was investigated in correlation to the specific geology of the region (soil dusting). Lithogenic distribution was characterized with the distribution of three dominant geochemical associations: F1: Al-Li-V-Cr-Ni-Co, F2: Ba-Ca-Sr, and F3: Cd-Zn-Pb-Cu. Spatial distribution was constructed for visualization of the factor deposition. Furthermore, air distribution (passive biomonitoring) versus soil geochemistry of the analyzed elements was examined. Significant correlations were singled out for Pb, Zn, and Cd and for Mg(moss)/Na(soil). Characteristic lithological anomaly characterized the presence of the oldest geological volcanic rocks. Zone 1 (Pb-Zn mine surrounding) presents a unique area with hydrothermal action of Pb-Zn mineralization leading to polymetallic enrichments in soil. This phenomenon strongly affects the environment, which is a natural geochemical imprint in this unique area (described with the strong dominance of the geochemical association Cd-Zn-Pb-Cu). PMID:26888226

  13. Lead transfer in maternal milk, and the absorption, retention, distribution and excretion of lead in suckling mice

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Charles Arthur

    1980-01-01

    Suckling mice were found to absorb and retain a greater fraction of an oral lead dose than did adult mice. Pinocytotic activity and lead uptake (in vivo) were found to be greatest in the distal small intestinal tissue. Cortisone pretreatment results in precocious cessation of pinocytotic activity in the intestine of suckling mice. Cortisone pretreatment of adult mice had no effect on whole body lead retention or intestinal tissue content of lead following an oral dose. The data indicate that the distal small intestine is the site of active pinocytosis of lead, and that pinocytosis is the major mechanism involved in lead absorption in suckling mice. Developmental differences were also observed in the percentage of lead retained in the whole body. Both groups exhibited dose-independent lead retention, indicating a first-order absorption process for each age group. Lead distribution and elimination from organs also differed between suckling and adult mice. Developmental differences were observed in organ lead concentration for kidneys and brain following oral doses. Relative distribution of lead to the brains of suckling mice were greater than to adult brains. Whole body and bone lead elimination rates were reduced in suckling compared to adult mice. Brain lead elimination rates did not differ in suckling and adult mice. A lactating mouse model was developed to study lead transfer to suckling offspring. Lead was transferred in milk to suckling offspring from mothers which had previously ingested lead in the drinking water. Relative lead transfer to suckled offspring during lactation greatly exceeded transfer to fetuses during gestation. Lactation resulted in an increased rate of maternal lead elimination. Lead concentration in milk exceeded plasma concentration by a factor of approximately 25. (ERB)

  14. The distribution of anthropogenic REE in the Dutch distributaries of the Rhine: the role of suspended matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roskam, Gerlinde; Verheul, Marc; Klaver, Gerard; Bakker, Ingrid

    2014-05-01

    In nature rare earth elements (REE) occur in fixed ratios; contamination with a single rare earth element causes a clear deviation from the natural NASC normalized REE-patterns: an anomaly. REE are progressively used in many high technology products and processes. For example, gadolinium-containing chelates have been used since the '80s as contrasting agent in MRI-imaging. The pertaining anomaly is currently used as a tracer for distinguishing waste water from water unaffected by anthropogenic contamination. In the Dutch monitoring program in the Rhine-Meuse distributaries, total (10% HNO3 digested) and dissolved (< 0.45 µm) fractions in surface water are routinely analysed, and with two-week intervals suspended matter samples are collected with a centrifuge. Since 2008, the set of analysed elements was extended with REE, enabling this study. Lobith, the entry point of the River Rhine in The Netherlands, shows an annual oscillation in the magnitude of the lanthanum (La) anomaly. This positive La-anomaly was reported by Kulaksiz and Bau in 2011; they identified the point source as a production plant for catalysts used in petroleum refining in the German city of Worms. Since the spring of 2011, samarium (Sm) is used in the same process, resulting in matching La- and Sm-anomalies. The anthropogenic La and Sm concentrations are predominantly present in the total fraction, which suggests that the anthropogenic La and Sm concentrations are associated with suspended matter. The anthropogenic La and Sm concentrations are lower in the suspended matter samples collected with the centrifuge, suggesting a bias of these La and Sm concentrations in the finer fraction of the suspended matter. The anthropogenic La en Sm concentrations remain relatively constant throughout the rivers, but close to Lake IJsselmeer and the North Sea, sedimentation causes a sharp decrease in the anthropogenic concentrations. Detailed sampling of sediments, suspended matter and water could give a

  15. Tissue lead distribution and hematologic effects in American kestrels (Falco sparverius L.) fed biologically incorporated lead.

    PubMed

    Custer, T W; Franson, J C; Pattee, O H

    1984-01-01

    American kestrels were fed a diet containing 0.5, 120, 212, and 448 ppm (dry wt) biologically incorporated lead (Pb) for 60 days. The diet consisted of homogenized 4-wk-old cockerels raised on feed mixed with and without lead. No kestrels died and weights did not differ among treatment groups. The control group (0.5 ppm Pb) had the lowest mean concentration of lead and the high dietary group had the highest for the following tissues: Kidney, liver, femur, brain, and blood. Concentrations of lead were significantly correlated among tissues. There were no differences among treatment groups for packed cell volume, hemoglobin concentration, or erythrocyte count. PMID:6716559

  16. Comparison between Synthesized Lead Particles and Lead Solids Formed on Surfaces in Real Drinking Water Distribution Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this work is to compare the properties of lead solids formed during bench-scale precipitation experiments to solids found on lead pipe removed from real drinking water distribution systems and metal coupons used in pilot scale corrosion testing. Specifically, so...

  17. PREDICTING LEAD DISSOLUTION IN DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS: EFFECT OF FLUORIDE ADDITIVES ON LEAD SOLUBILITY AND CORROSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many water systems have encountered difficulties in meeting the action levels established by the Lead and Copper Rule. Several chemical parameters contribute to the corrosion of lead plumbing and may influence the nature of the passivating films formed on distribution materials....

  18. Impacts of Anthropogenic Emissions in the Southeastern U.S. on Heterogeneous Chemistry of Isoprene-Derived Epoxides Leading to Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surratt, J. D.; Pye, H.; Lin, Y.; Budisulistiorini, S.; Zhang, H.; Marth, W.; Cui, T.; Arashiro, M.; Chu, K.; Zhang, Z.; Sexton, K.; Piletic, I.; Xie, Y.; Capps, S. L.; Luecken, D.; Hutzell, W. T.; Jaoui, M.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Croteau, D.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Offenberg, J.; Kleindienst, T. E.; Lewandowski, M.; Edney, E.; Pinder, R. W.; Bartolotti, L.; Gold, A.

    2013-12-01

    Isoprene is a major source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA); however, the exact manner in which it forms SOA remains unclear. Improving our fundamental understanding of isoprene-derived SOA is key to improving existing air quality models, especially in the southeastern U.S. where models currently underestimate observations. By combining organic synthesis, computational calculations, mass spectrometry, smog chamber studies, and field measurements, we show that reactive epoxides, which include methacrylic acid epoxide (MAE) and isomeric isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX), produced from the photochemical oxidation of isoprene are key to SOA formation. Furthermore, anthropogenic pollutants (NOx and SO2) enhance isoprene-derived epoxides as an SOA source. In the laboratory, we find that the reactive uptake of synthetic IEPOX and MAE standards onto acidified sulfate aerosol yields known isoprene-derived SOA tracers (2-methlytetrols, 2-methylglyceric acid, C5-alkene triols, 3-methyltetrahydrofuran-3,4-diols, dimers and organosulfates) that we measure in fine aerosol collected from multiple sites across the southeastern U.S. using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and liquid chromatography coupled to diode array detection and electrospray ionization high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/DAD-ESI-QTOFMS). Notably, IEPOX- and MAE-derived SOA tracers account for ~19% of the organic aerosol mass in Yorkville, GA. Moreover, real-time continuous chemical measurements of fine aerosol made using an Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) during summer 2011 and summer 2013 in Atlanta, GA, and Look Rock, TN, respectively, resolved an IEPOX-oxygenated organic aerosol (IEPOX-OOA) factor when applying positive matrix factorization (PMF) to the organic mass spectral time series. In Atlanta, this factor is found to account for ~33% of the fine OA mass and is correlated with IEPOX-derived SOA tracers (r2 = 0.6), sulfate (r2 = 0.5), and to some

  19. Trend analysis of carbon monoxide distributions for changes in fire vs. anthropogenic sources in diverse African regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worden, H. M.; Worden, J. R.; Bloom, A. A.; Bowman, K. W.

    2015-12-01

    Satellite measurements of atmospheric carbon monoxide (CO) provide a signature for biomass burning and anthropogenic combustion-related pollution emissions. CO plays an important role in both air quality and climate as a precursor for tropospheric ozone and as a major sink of OH, the atmospheric "detergent" that affects the lifetime of methane and other pollutants. Worden et al., [2013] showed decreasing global CO values in time series of satellite total column CO measurements over the past decade. All of the satellite instruments that measure CO in the thermal infrared showed consistent inter-annual variability due to fires and possibly the global recession in late 2008. Observed decreases in CO over N. America and Europe were consistent with expected decreases in CO emissions inventories [Granier et al., 2011], however, the decrease is not uniform globally. In particular, Africa shows regions with smaller negative trends and potentially increasing trends in CO concentration. Here we examine trends for surface and total column CO concentrations in Africa over 2002-2014 using MOPITT V5J data. Our hypothesis is that temporal changes in CO will have different signatures related to anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions. We use singular value decomposition (SVD) with time series from different regions based on vegetation type and population density to diagnose the dominant trends and their potential drivers.

  20. Lead

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lead Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Lead Poisoning is Preventable If your home was built before ... of the RRP rule. Read more . Learn about Lead Poisoning Prevention Week . Report Uncertified Contractors and Environmental Violations ...

  1. Modeling the crystal distribution of lead-sulfate in lead-acid batteries with 3D spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, Moritz; Badeda, Julia; Sauer, Dirk Uwe

    2015-04-01

    For the reliability of lead-acid batteries it is important to have an accurate prediction of its response to load profiles. A model for the lead-sulfate growth is presented, which is embedded in a physical-chemical model with 3D spatial resolution is presented which is used for analyzing the different mechanism influencing the cell response. One import factor is the chemical dissolution and precipitation of lead-sulfate, since its dissolution speed limits the charging reaction and the accumulation of indissolvable of lead-sulfate leads to capacity degradation. The cell performance/behavior is not only determined by the amount of the sulfate but also by the radii and distribution of the crystals. The presented model can be used to for an improved understanding of the interaction of the different mechanisms.

  2. The distribution of blood lead levels and job titles among lead-acid battery workers in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chao, Kun-Yu; Shin, Wen-Yi; Chuang, Hung-Yi; Wang, Jung-Der

    2002-07-01

    There were several reports about elevated blood lead levels in lead battery workers. However, their subjects came from only one or several plants. We visited all the 23 registered lead-acid battery plants in Taiwan and collected their health examination records in 1992, the blood lead analyses of which were completed in 3 medical college hospitals. In total, we have obtained 1726 records. The average blood lead concentration was 37.1 ug/dl, and 37% of blood lead levels were more than 40 ug/dl (action level). The overall participation rate for health examination among employees was 69.4%. The participation rates were different among both plant sizes and job titles. Assuming that there was no peculiar variation within the four working zones (plate manufacture jobs, assembly jobs, part-time exposure jobs, and office jobs) in each plant, and that blood lead levels of our samples were stable after deleting newly hired workers, we estimated that the blood lead distributions of 2486 employees in these plants were 63.3%, 26.4%, 9.25% and 1.05% for below 40, 40-59, 60-79, and above 80 ug/dl respectively. We conclude that such an analysis should be performed each year to monitor the effectiveness of occupational hygiene in workplace of lead battery plants. PMID:12380325

  3. Lead

    MedlinePlus

    ... obvious symptoms, it frequently goes unrecognized. CDC’s Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program is committed to the Healthy People ... Lead Levels Information for Parents Tips for preventing lead poisoning About Us Overview of CDC’s Childhood Lead Poisoning ...

  4. Effects of dietary calcium on lead absorption, distribution, and elimination kinetics in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Aungst, B.J.; Fung, H.L.

    1985-01-01

    A pharmacokinetic analysis of lead absorption, distribution, and elimination was conducted in rats maintained on calcium-deficient, control, and calcium-supplemented diets. Dietary calcium affected lead disposition in a number of ways. Systematic lead clearance after a 10-mg/kg intracardiac lead dose was approximately 25% lower than control in rats administered dietary calcium supplements. In rats maintained on a calcium-deficient diet, systemic lead clearance was estimated to be 40% less than control. The apparent volume of lead distribution was increased. The apparent systemic availability of 1-, 10-, and 100-mg.kg oral lead doses was three- to fourfold greater than control in calcium-deficient rats. The percentage absorption was dose-dependent in control and calcium-deficient rats. The observed changes in lead absorption and systemic clearance associated with the calcium-deficient diet represent synergistic effects that could elevate blood lead accumulation and thus potentially influence susceptibility to lead toxicity.

  5. Distribution and integrated assessment of lead in an abandoned lead-acid battery site in Southwest China before redevelopment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Zhuo; Li, Fasheng; Guo, Guanlin

    2016-06-01

    Lead-acid battery sites have contributed enormous amounts of lead to the environment, significantly affecting its global biogeochemical cycle and leaving the potential risks to human health. An abandoned lead-acid battery site prepared for redevelopment was selected in order to study the distribution of lead in soils, plants, rhizosphere soils and soil solutions. In total, 197 samples from 77 boreholes were collected and analyzed. Single extractions by acetic acid (HOAc) were conducted to assess the bioavailability and speciation of lead in soils for comparison with the parts of the plants that are aboveground. Health risks for future residential development were evaluated by the integrated exposure uptake biokinetic (IEUBK) model. The results indicated that lead concentrations in 83% of the soil samples exceeded the Chinese Environmental Quality Standard for soil (350 mg/kg for Pb) and mainly occurred at depths between 0 and 1.5 m while accumulating at the surface of demolished construction waste and miscellaneous fill. Lead concentrations in soil solutions and HOAc extraction leachates were linked closely to the contents of aboveground Broussonetia papyrifera and Artemisia annua, two main types of local plants that were found at the site. The probability density of lead in blood (PbB) in excess of 10 µg/dL could overtake the 99% mark in the residential scenario. The findings provided a relatively integrated method to illustrate the onsite investigations and assessment for similar sites before remediation and future development from more comprehensive aspects. PMID:26921546

  6. Vertical Distribution of Lead and Mercury in the Wetland Argialbolls of the Sanjiang Plain in Northeastern China

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chunye; Li, Peizhong; Cheng, Hongguang; Ouyang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The wetland Argialbolls pedon was chosen to investigate the effects of pedogenic processes and anthropogenic activities on the vertical distribution of lead and mercury concentration and to assess the potential use of soil as an archive of atmospheric Pb and Hg pollution. The soil was sampled from 5 cm from the surface to a depth of 90 cm at two locations in the Sanjiang Plain in northeastern China. The soil was analyzed for pH, soil organic matter (SOM), Fe, Mn, and Al. The results indicate that the SOM concentration gradually decreased with depth, while Fe and Mn were reductively leached from the upper horizons and accumulated significantly in the lower argillic horizons. Atmospheric Pb and Hg deposition and their redistribution during the pedogenic process led to a unique vertical distribution in the wetland Argialbolls. Overall, Pb was leached from the upper horizons and then accumulated in the lower argillic horizons. However, the Hg concentration decreased with depth, following the SOM distribution. The Pb concentration was significantly correlated to the Fe and Mn concentrations in the Argialbolls profiles, while the Hg concentration was significantly correlated with SOM. Post-depositional mobility along the wetland Argialbolls profile is higher for Pb and low for Hg. Therefore, the Argialbolls profile does not provide an accurate reconstruction of atmospheric Pb deposition, but might provide an accurate reconstruction of net atmospheric Hg deposition. PMID:25894341

  7. Anthropogenic host plant expansion leads a nettle-feeding butterfly out of the forest: consequences for larval survival and developmental plasticity in adult morphology

    PubMed Central

    Merckx, Thomas; Serruys, Mélanie; Van Dyck, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Recent anthropogenic eutrophication has meant that host plants of nettle-feeding insects became quasi-omnipresent in fertile regions of Western Europe. However, host plant resource quality – in terms of microclimate and nutritional value – may vary considerably between the ‘original’ forest habitat and ‘recent’ agricultural habitat. Here, we compared development in both environmental settings using a split-brood design, so as to explore to what extent larval survival and adult morphology in the nettle-feeding butterfly Aglais urticae are influenced by the anthropogenic environment. Nettles along field margins had higher C/N ratios and provided warmer microclimates to larvae. Larvae developed 20% faster and tended to improve their survival rates, on the agricultural land compared to woodland. Our split-brood approach indicated plastic responses within families, but also family effects in the phenotypic responses. Adult males and females had darker wing pigmentation in the drier and warmer agricultural environment, which contrasts with the thermal melanism hypothesis. Developmental plasticity in response to this microclimatically different and more variable habitat was associated with a broader phenotypic parameter space for the species. Both habitat expansion and developmental plasticity are likely contributors to the ecological and evolutionary success of these nettle-feeding insects in anthropogenic environments under high nitrogen load. PMID:25926881

  8. Mineralogical and Molecular Microbial Characterization of a Lead Pipe Removed from a Drinking Water Distribution System

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (US EPA) Lead and Copper Rule established an action level for lead of 0.0 15 mg/L in a 1 liter first draw sample at the consumer's tap. Lead corrosion and solubility in drinking water distribution systems are largely controlled by the fo...

  9. Probable errors in width distributions of sea ice leads measured along a transect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Key, J.; Peckham, S.

    1991-01-01

    The degree of error expected in the measurement of widths of sea ice leads along a single transect are examined in a probabilistic sense under assumed orientation and width distributions, where both isotropic and anisotropic lead orientations are examined. Methods are developed for estimating the distribution of 'actual' widths (measured perpendicular to the local lead orientation) knowing the 'apparent' width distribution (measured along the transect), and vice versa. The distribution of errors, defined as the difference between the actual and apparent lead width, can be estimated from the two width distributions, and all moments of this distribution can be determined. The problem is illustrated with Landsat imagery and the procedure is applied to a submarine sonar transect. Results are determined for a range of geometries, and indicate the importance of orientation information if data sampled along a transect are to be used for the description of lead geometries. While the application here is to sea ice leads, the methodology can be applied to measurements of any linear feature.

  10. Distribution and transport of selected anthropogenic lipophilic organic compounds associated with Mississippi River suspended sediment, 1989-1990

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, C.E.; Pereira, W.E.; Leiker, T.J.

    1999-01-01

    In the first study on this scale, distribution and transport of selected hydrophobic halogenated organic compounds associated with suspended sediment from the lower Mississippi River and its principal tributaries were determined during two spring and two summer cruises. Lipophilic organic compounds identified on the suspended sediment included hexachlorobenzene, pentachlorobenzene, pentachloroanisole, dacthal, chlordane (cis- and trans- ), nonachlor (trans-), chlorthalonil, and penta-, hexa-, hepta-, and octachlorobiphenyls. Most of these compounds come from nonpoint sources. Mass loadings of most of the compounds increased from upstream to downstream on the main stem of the Mississippi River. Of the tributaries studied, the Ohio River had the most significant effect on contaminant loads. Suspended sediment transport to the Gulf of Mexico of the most abundant, widely distributed compound class, PCBs, was estimated at 6,750 kg per year.

  11. Recent distribution of lead in the Indian Ocean reflects the impact of regional emissions

    PubMed Central

    Echegoyen, Yolanda; Boyle, Edward A.; Lee, Jong-Mi; Gamo, Toshitaka; Obata, Hajime; Norisuye, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Humans have injected lead (Pb) massively into the earth surface environment in a temporally and spatially evolving pattern. A significant fraction is transported by the atmosphere into the surface ocean where we can observe its transport by ocean currents and sinking particles. This study of the Indian Ocean documents high Pb concentrations in the northern and tropical surface waters and extremely low Pb levels in the deep water. North of 20°S, dissolved Pb concentrations decrease from 42 to 82 pmol/kg in surface waters to 1.5–3.3 pmol/kg in deep waters. South of 20°S, surface water Pb concentrations decrease from 21 pmol/kg at 31°S to 7 pmol/kg at 62°S. This surface Pb concentration gradient reflects a southward decrease in anthropogenic Pb emissions. The upper waters of the north and central Indian Ocean have high Pb concentrations resulting from recent regional rapid industrialization and a late phase-out of leaded gasoline, and these concentrations are now higher than currently seen in the central North Pacific and North Atlantic oceans. The Antarctic sector of the Indian Ocean shows very low concentrations due to limited regional anthropogenic Pb emissions, high scavenging rates, and rapid vertical mixing, but Pb still occurs at higher levels than would have existed centuries ago. Penetration of Pb into the northern and central Indian Ocean thermocline waters is minimized by limited ventilation. Pb concentrations in the deep Indian Ocean are comparable to the other oceans at the same latitude, and deep waters of the central Indian Ocean match the lowest observed oceanic Pb concentrations. PMID:25313063

  12. Microbial Community Profile of a Lead Service Line Removed from a Drinking Water Distribution System

    EPA Science Inventory

    A corroded lead water pipe was removed from a drinking water distribution system and the microbial community was profiled using 16S rDNA techniques. This is the first report of the characterization of biofilm on a surface of a corroded lead drinking water pipe. The majority of ...

  13. Microbial Community Profile of a Lead Service Line Removed from a Drinking Water Distribution System▿

    PubMed Central

    White, Colin; Tancos, Matthew; Lytle, Darren A.

    2011-01-01

    A corroded lead service line was removed from a drinking water distribution system, and the microbial community was profiled using 16S rRNA gene techniques. This is the first report of the characterization of a biofilm on the surface of a corroded lead drinking water service line. The majority of phylotypes have been linked to heavy-metal-contaminated environments. PMID:21652741

  14. Effect of chronic lead intoxication on the distribution and elimination of amoxicillin in goats

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Ahmed M.; Abu-Basha, Ehab A.; Youssef, Salah A. H.; Amer, Aziza M.; Murphy, Patricia A.; Hauck, Catherine C.; Gehring, Ronette

    2013-01-01

    A study of amoxicillin pharmacokinetics was conducted in healthy goats and goats with chronic lead intoxication. The intoxicated goats had increased serum concentrations of liver enzymes (alanine aminotransferase and γ-glutamyl transferase), blood urea nitrogen, and reactivated δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase compared to the controls. Following intravenous amoxicillin (10 mg/kg bw) in control and lead-intoxicated goats, elimination half-lives were 4.14 and 1.26 h, respectively. The volumes of distribution based on the terminal phase were 1.19 and 0.38 L/kg, respectively, and those at steady-state were 0.54 and 0.18 L/kg, respectively. After intramuscular (IM) amoxicillin (10 mg/kg bw) in lead-intoxicated goats and control animals, the absorption, distribution, and elimination of the drug were more rapid in lead-intoxicated goats than the controls. Peak serum concentrations of 21.89 and 12.19 µg/mL were achieved at 1 h and 2 h, respectively, in lead-intoxicated and control goats. Amoxicillin bioavailability in the lead-intoxicated goats decreased 20% compared to the controls. After amoxicillin, more of the drug was excreted in the urine from lead-intoxicated goats than the controls. Our results suggested that lead intoxication in goats increases the rate of amoxicillin absorption after IM administration and distribution and elimination. Thus, lead intoxication may impair the therapeutic effectiveness of amoxicillin. PMID:23820209

  15. The influence of climate change on the global distribution and fate processes of anthropogenic persistent organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Kallenborn, Roland; Halsall, Crispin; Dellong, Maud; Carlsson, Pernilla

    2012-11-01

    The effect of climate change on the global distribution and fate of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) is of growing interest to both scientists and policy makers alike. The impact of warmer temperatures and the resulting changes to earth system processes on chemical fate are, however, unclear, although there are a growing number of studies that are beginning to examine these impacts and changes in a quantitative way. In this review, we examine broad areas where changes are occurring or are likely to occur with regard to the environmental cycling and fate of chemical contaminants. For this purpose we are examining scientific information from long-term monitoring data with particular emphasis on the Arctic, to show apparent changes in chemical patterns and behaviour. In addition, we examine evidence of changing chemical processes for a number of environmental compartments and indirect effects of climate change on contaminant emissions and behaviour. We also recommend areas of research to address knowledge gaps. In general, our findings indicate that the indirect consequences of climate change (i.e. shifts in agriculture, resource exploitation opportunities, etc.) will have a more marked impact on contaminants distribution and fate than direct climate change. PMID:23014859

  16. Distribution and assessment of heavy metals off the Changjiang River mouth and adjacent area during the past century and the relationship of the heavy metals with anthropogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Gang; Bi, Shipu; Xu, Gang; Zhang, Yong; Mei, Xi; Li, Anchun

    2015-07-15

    Forty-three surface sediment samples and one gravity core obtained from the offshore area of the Changjiang River were analyzed for selected heavy metals (Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, As, Hg) to evaluate the spatial distribution and potential ecological risk during the last century. The results indicated that the sediments are composed of silty sand, sandy silt and silt and were deposited in a relatively stable environment over the last century. The studied marine sediments are fine and easily adsorb heavy metals from aquatic systems. The heavy metal concentrations were found to be enriched in the sediments and were generally closely related to anthropogenic activities. However, the data analysis demonstrated that the levels of heavy metal contamination were below background values during the last century, indicating low ecological risk. Spatially, a higher concentration was found at the entrance to the Changjiang River, while it decreased to the northeast. The vertical distribution of contamination levels and ecological risk can be divided into four periods based on the downcore variation in heavy metals: pre-1940s, 1940s-1970s, 1970s-1990s and the late 1990s to the present. These conclusions form the basis for implementing appropriate policies to protect marine sediment quality. PMID:26002099

  17. Temporal and vertical distributions of anthropogenic 236U in the Japan Sea using a coral core and seawater samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Aya; Nomura, Tomoya; Steier, Peter; Gloser, Robin; Sasaki, Keiichi; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Nakakuki, Tomoeki; Takahashi, Yoshio; Yamano, Hiroya

    2016-01-01

    The input history of 236U to the surface water of the Japan Sea was reconstructed through measurement of the 236U/238U atom ratio in annual bands of a coral skeleton which was collected at Iki Island in the Tsushima Strait, the main entrance to the Japan Sea. The 236U/238U atom ratios and concentrations of U isotopes were measured for the period 1935-2010 using AMS and ICP-MS. The 236U/238U atom ratios revealed three prominent peaks: 4.51 × 10-9 in 1955, 6.15 × 10-9 in 1959 and 4.14 × 10-9 in 1963; thereafter the isotope ratios gradually decreased over the next several decades, attaining a value of ca.1.3 × 10-9 for the present day. A simplified depth profile model for 236U in the Japan Sea, using the reconstructed 236U value for the surface water together with observed depth profiles for 236U in the water column in 2010, yielded diffusion coefficients of 3.4-5.6 cm2/s for 6 sampling points. The diffusion coefficient values obtained for the northern stations were relatively large, and fitting uncertainty was also larger for stations in the northern region. It may be presumed that the distribution of 236U in the water columns have been influenced not only by diffusion but also by subduction of the surface water in the Japan Sea.

  18. A lead isotope distribution study in swine tissue using ICP-MS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, T.W.; Wiedmeyer, R.H.; Brown, L.D.; Casteel, S.W.

    1999-01-01

    In the United States lead is an ubiquitous environmental pollutant that is a serious human health hazard, especially for women of childbearing age, developing fetuses, and young children. Information concerning the uptake and distribution of lead to maternal and fetal tissues during pregnancy is poorly documented. A study was designed using domestic swine and lead isotope enrichment methodology to focus on maternal absorption and distribution of lead into bone and soft tissues, including the fetal compartment, under varying conditions of oral lead exposure and during altered physiological states (pregnant vs unbred). Total lead levels and Pb207/Pb206 ratios in bone (femur and vertebra), blood, and soft tissues (liver, kidney, brain) were determined by ICP-MS. Lead in fetal tissues derived from maternal bone could be differentiated from that derived from exogenous dosing. Unbred swine absorbed much less lead than pregnant females receiving the same dose. The accuracy and precision of ICP-MS at the instrumental level and for the entire method (sample collection, digestion, and analysis) were evaluated for both Pb207/Pb206 ratios and total lead. Several changes were suggested in method design to improve both instrumental and total method precision.

  19. Influence of blade angle distribution along leading edge on cavitation performance of a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Tan, L.; Cao, S. L.; Wang, Y. C.; Meng, G.; Qu, W. S.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of blade angle distribution along leading edge on cavitation performance of centrifugal pumps is analysed in the present paper. Three sets of blade angle distribution along leading edge for three blade inlet angles are chosen to design nine centrifugal pump impellers. The RNG k-epsilon turbulence model and the Zwart-Gerber-Belamri cavitation model are employed to simulate the cavitation flows in centrifugal pumps with different impellers and the same volute. The numerical results are compared with the experimental data, and the comparison proves that the numerical simulation can accurately predict the cavitation performance of centrifugal pumps. On the basis of the numerical simulations, the pump head variations with pump inlet pressure, and the flow details in centrifugal pump are revealed to demonstrate the influence of blade angle distribution along leading edge on cavitation performances of centrifugal pumps.

  20. Asymmetric distribution of Echinoid defines the epidermal leading edge during Drosophila dorsal closure.

    PubMed

    Laplante, Caroline; Nilson, Laura A

    2011-01-24

    During Drosophila melanogaster dorsal closure, lateral sheets of embryonic epidermis assemble an actomyosin cable at their leading edge and migrate dorsally over the amnioserosa, converging at the dorsal midline. We show that disappearance of the homophilic cell adhesion molecule Echinoid (Ed) from the amnioserosa just before dorsal closure eliminates homophilic interactions with the adjacent dorsal-most epidermal (DME) cells, which comprise the leading edge. The resulting planar polarized distribution of Ed in the DME cells is essential for the localized accumulation of actin regulators and for actomyosin cable formation at the leading edge and for the polarized localization of the scaffolding protein Bazooka/PAR-3. DME cells with uniform Ed fail to assemble a cable and protrude dorsally, suggesting that the cable restricts dorsal migration. The planar polarized distribution of Ed in the DME cells thus provides a spatial cue that polarizes the DME cell actin cytoskeleton, defining the epidermal leading edge and establishing its contractile properties. PMID:21263031

  1. IMPACTS OF ANTHROPOGENIC EMISSIONS IN THE SOUTHEASTERN U.S. ON HETEROGENEOUS CHEMISTRY OF ISOPRENE-DERIVED EPOXIDES LEADING TO SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOL FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proposed activities will yield the formulation of parameterizations that can be incorporated into SOA models that will lead to improvement in the ability to simulate isoprene SOA formation in the southeastern U. S. Specific results include: (1) characterization of reaction...

  2. In vivo distribution of lead in male and female rats after intraperitoneal and oral administration.

    PubMed

    Nwokocha, C R; Ufearo, C S; Owu, D U; Idemudo, N C; Ojukwu, L C

    2012-03-01

    The resultant effects of lead exposure are seen in almost all the systems of the body and results in toxicity to many organs. Since toxicity depends on its degree of uptake, distribution and metabolism, the authors investigated the differential uptake, accumulation and distribution of lead in organs of males and female Wistar rats following various routes of administration. Group 1 served as control male and control female; group 2 males and females received 5 mg/kg body weight of lead intraperitoneally for 8 days while group 3 males and female rats were administered drinking water containing 100 ppm of lead acetate for 18 days. Tissues were collected for analysis of the lead content using atomic absorption spectroscopy. The relative retention of lead by the tissues was greater in rats exposed to lead by the i.p. route varying in the order of accumulation / uptake in males as lungs > spleen > stomach > kidney > blood > heart and in females as spleen > stomach > heart > kidney > blood > lungs (i.p. route) and (oral route) as for males kidney > lungs > stomach > blood > heart > spleen, and females as kidney > lungs > stomach > blood > heart > spleen. Male Wistar rats showed more accumulation with oral exposure in lungs, spleen and blood with values for kidney and stomach being significantly (p < 0.05) higher when compared with females. Female Wistar rats showed more accumulation with i.p. exposure for spleen and stomach tissues while values for the heart was significantly (p < 0.05) higher than the males. Our findings suggest that lead retention and the organ distribution varied depending upon the sex and route of lead administration. PMID:21622679

  3. Anthropogenic dissolved and colloid/nanoparticle-bound samarium, lanthanum and gadolinium in the Rhine River and the impending destruction of the natural rare earth element distribution in rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulaksız, Serkan; Bau, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The strong increase in the consumption of rare earth elements (REE) in high-tech products and processes is accompanied by increasing amounts of REE released into the environment. Following the first report of Gd contamination of the hydrosphere in 1996, anthropogenic Gd originating from contrast agents has now been reported worldwide from river and estuarine waters, coastal seawater, groundwater and tap water. Recently, microcontamination with La, that is derived from a point source where catalysts for petroleum refining are produced, has been detected in the Rhine River in Germany and the Netherlands. Here we report the occurrence of yet another REE microcontamination of river water: in addition to anthropogenic Gd and La, the Rhine River now also shows significant amounts of anthropogenic Sm. The anthropogenic Sm, which enters the Rhine River north of Worms, Germany, with the same industrial wastewater that carries the anthropogenic La, can be traced through the Middle and Lower Rhine to the Netherlands. At Leverkusen, Germany, some 250 km downstream from the point source at Worms, anthropogenic Sm still contributes up to 87% of the total dissolved Sm concentration of the Rhine River. Results from ultrafiltration suggest that while the anthropogenic Gd is not particle-reactive and hence exclusively present in the truly dissolved REE pool (<10 kDa), the anthropogenic La and Sm are also present in the colloidal/nanoparticulate REE pool (between 10 kDa and 0.2 μm). Though difficult to quantify, our data suggest that the Rhine River may carry up to 5700 kg of anthropogenic La, up to 584 kg of anthropogenic Sm, and up to 730 kg of anthropogenic Gd per year toward the North Sea. There exist no regulatory limits for dissolved REE in natural waters, but total REE and Y (∑REY) concentrations of up to 0.14 mg/kg in the plume downstream of and 52.2 mg/kg at the head of an effluent pipe at Rhine-km 447.3 at Worms get close to and well-above, respectively, the levels at

  4. Next-to-Leading Order QCD Predictions for Z, gamma^* 3-Jet Distributions at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, C.F.; Bern, Z.; Dixon, L.J.; Cordero, F.Febres; Forde, D.; Gleisberg, T.; Ita, H.; Kosower, D.A.; Maitre, D.; /Durham U.

    2010-06-02

    Using BlackHat in conjunction with SHERPA, we have computed next-to-leading order QCD predictions for a variety of distributions in Z, {gamma}{sup {asterisk}}+ 1, 2, 3-jet production at the Tevatron, where the Z boson or off-shell photon decays into an electron-positron pair. We find good agreement between the NLO results for jet {sub pT} distributions and measurements by CDF and D0. We also present jetproduction ratios, or probabilities of finding one additional jet. As a function of vector-boson {sub pT} , the ratios have distinctive features which we describe in terms of a simple model capturing leading logarithms and phase-space and parton-distribution-function suppression.

  5. A new analytical approach to understanding nanoscale lead-iron interactions in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Trueman, Benjamin F; Gagnon, Graham A

    2016-07-01

    High levels of iron in distributed drinking water often accompany elevated lead release from lead service lines and other plumbing. Lead-iron interactions in drinking water distribution systems are hypothesized to be the result of adsorption and transport of lead by iron oxide particles. This mechanism was explored using point-of-use drinking water samples characterized by size exclusion chromatography with UV and multi-element (ICP-MS) detection. In separations on two different stationary phases, high apparent molecular weight (>669 kDa) elution profiles for (56)Fe and (208)Pb were strongly correlated (average R(2)=0.96, N=73 samples representing 23 single-unit residences). Moreover, (56)Fe and (208)Pb peak areas exhibited an apparent linear dependence (R(2)=0.82), consistent with mobilization of lead via adsorption to colloidal particles rich in iron. A UV254 absorbance peak, coincident with high molecular weight (56)Fe and (208)Pb, implied that natural organic matter was interacting with the hypothesized colloidal species. High molecular weight UV254 peak areas were correlated with both (56)Fe and (208)Pb peak areas (R(2)=0.87 and 0.58, respectively). On average, 45% (std. dev. 10%) of total lead occurred in the size range 0.05-0.45 μm. PMID:26971028

  6. Estuarine distributions of Zr, Hf, and Ag in the Hudson River and the implications for their continental and anthropogenic sources to seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrey, L. V.; Field, M. P.; Sherrell, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    Zirconium and Hf in seawater are derived from continental weathering and are transported to the oceans by rivers, but the modification of this flux with estuaries is largely unknown. Furthermore, there is no information as to whether there is a pollutant source of these metals that might affect their budget calculations in the modern ocean. To address the riverine flux and potential anthropogenic sources, the distributions of dissolved Zr and Hf have been measured in surface and bottom water through the Hudson River Estuary. The distribution of Ag is included because it is sensitive to urban sources and has partial similarities in its distribution to those of Zr and Hf. There is about 50% removal of Zr and Hf in surface water relative to their freshwater end-member concentrations of 243 and 3.1 pmol/kg as salinity starts to increase, but an urban source of these metals midestuary may obscure greater removal. Silver concentrations in surface water are below the detection limit until salinity of 3.5 is reached. The concentrations of Zr and Hf 0.5 m above the bottom are 1.5 to 3 times higher than their surface water concentrations throughout the estuary and may result from input of groundwater, diffusion from pore fluids, or inclusion of colloidal phases in our analyses. Downstream of the turbidity maximum, bottom water Ag concentrations are high due to release from particles that originally formed within the estuary and were moved inland following the spring freshet; this process may also affect Zr and Hf. The increase in the freshwater atomic Zr/Hf ratio from 70 to 80, characteristic of terrestrial rocks, to the elevated Zr/Hf (>110) ratio of seawater takes place at middle to high salinity due to enhanced release of Zr from resuspended particles and slower removal rates compared to Hf. A main implication of this study is that estuaries are a sink for Zr and Hf. The reduction of the predicted export of continental Zr and Hf to the oceans increases their previously

  7. Determination of nuclear parton distribution functions and their uncertainties at next-to-leading order

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, M.; Kumano, S.; Nagai, T.-H.

    2007-12-15

    Nuclear parton distribution functions (NPDFs) are determined by global analyses of experimental data on structure-function ratios F{sub 2}{sup A}/F{sub 2}{sup A'} and Drell-Yan cross-section ratios {sigma}{sub DY}{sup A}/{sigma}{sub DY}{sup A'}. The analyses are done in the leading order (LO) and next-to-leading order (NLO) of running coupling constant {alpha}{sub s}. Uncertainties of the NPDFs are estimated in both LO and NLO for finding possible NLO improvement. Valence-quark distributions are well determined, and antiquark distributions are also determined at x<0.1. However, the antiquark distributions have large uncertainties at x>0.2. Gluon modifications cannot be fixed at this stage. Although the advantage of the NLO analysis, in comparison with the LO one, is generally the sensitivity to the gluon distributions, gluon uncertainties are almost the same in the LO and NLO. It is because current scaling-violation data are not accurate enough to determine precise nuclear gluon distributions. Modifications of the PDFs in the deuteron are also discussed by including data on the proton-deuteron ratio F{sub 2}{sup D}/F{sub 2}{sup p} in the analysis. A code is provided for calculating the NPDFs and their uncertainties at given x and Q{sup 2} in the LO and NLO.

  8. Multivariate spatial analyses of the distribution and origin of trace and major elements in soils surrounding a secondary lead smelter.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Arnaud R; Morvan, Xavier; Saby, Nicolas P A; Cancès, Benjamin; Ponthieu, Marie; Gommeaux, Maxime; Marin, Béatrice

    2016-08-01

    Major and trace elements in soils originate from natural processes and different anthropogenic activities which are difficult to discriminate. On a 17-ha impacted site in northern France, two industrial sources of soil contamination were xidentified: a former iron foundry and a current secondary lead smelter. To discriminate and map natural and anthropogenic sources of major and trace elements on this site, the rarely applied MULTISPATI-principal component analysis (PCA) method was used. Using a 20-m × 20-m grid, 247 topsoil horizons were sampled and analysed with a field-portable X-ray fluorescence analyser for screening soil contamination. The study site was heavily contaminated with Pb and, to a lesser degree, with Sn. Summary statistics and enrichment factors allowed the differentiation of the main lithogenic or anthropogenic origin of the elements. The MULTISPATI-PCA method, which explained 73.9 % of the variability with the three first factors, evidenced strong spatial structures. Those spatial structures were attributed to different natural and artificial processes in the study area. The first axis can be interpreted as a lithogenic effect. Axes 2 and 3 reflect the two different contamination sources. Pb, Sn and S originated from the secondary lead smelter while Fe and Ca were mainly derived from the old iron foundry activity and the old railway built with foundry sand. This study demonstrated that the MULTISPATI-PCA method can be successfully used to investigate multicontaminated sites to discriminate the various sources of contamination. PMID:27094274

  9. Distribution of biologic, anthropogenic, and volcanic constituents as a proxy for sediment transport in the San Francisco Bay coastal system, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGann, M.; Erikson, L. H.; Wan, E.; Powell, C., II; Maddocks, R. F.

    2012-12-01

    The biological, anthropogenic, and volcanic constituents of more than 300 samples collected from 1995 to 2010 in San Francisco Bay and the nearby coastal area were analyzed to discern patterns of sediment transport and deposition. The biological constituents investigated include microfauna (benthic and planktic foraminifers, ostracods, radiolarians, diatoms, and thecamoebians), macrofauna (bivalve mollusks, gastropods, barnacles, bryozoa, worm tubes, echinoids, crabs, and fish fragments), and flora (woody stems, roots, spores, and seeds). The distributional pattern of the benthic foraminifers was further refined by Q-mode cluster analysis into four assemblages that reflect where the taxa reside: the Brackish Shallow Subtidal Assemblage, the Estuarine Shallow Subtidal Assemblage, the Estuarine Intermediate/Deep Subtidal Assemblage, and the Nearshore Marine Assemblage. The anthropogenic objects recovered in this study include welding slag and glass microspheres most likely used to increase roadway line reflectivity. The volcanic constituents are glass shards of the Pliocene (3.27 Ma) Nomlaki Tuff, and Miocene tephra mostly derived from the Great Central Valley (including from the 23-19 Ma Valley Springs Formation, among others) and from the Sonoma Volcanic Field of California. The presence of allochthonous sedimentological constituents in this study was used to identify pathways of sediment transport and deposition within the San Francisco Bay coastal system. Several patterns have been identified: 1) volcanic glass shards are transported from the Great Central Valley through the delta to all regions of the bay, including the extreme end of south bay, as well as along the coast outside the bay and southward to Pedro Point; 2) microorganisms (benthic and planktic foraminifers, ostracods, diatoms, and radiolaria) from the marine realm outside San Francisco Bay are found in the estuary at the southern end of south bay, commonly in the middle of San Pablo Bay, and

  10. Colonization History, Host Distribution, Anthropogenic Influence and Landscape Features Shape Populations of White Pine Blister Rust, an Invasive Alien Tree Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Brar, Simren; Tsui, Clement K. M.; Dhillon, Braham; Bergeron, Marie-Josée; Joly, David L.; Zambino, P. J.; El-Kassaby, Yousry A.; Hamelin, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    White pine blister rust is caused by the fungal pathogen Cronartium ribicola J.C. Fisch (Basidiomycota, Pucciniales). This invasive alien pathogen was introduced into North America at the beginning of the 20th century on pine seedlings imported from Europe and has caused serious economic and ecological impacts. In this study, we applied a population and landscape genetics approach to understand the patterns of introduction and colonization as well as population structure and migration of C. ribicola. We characterized 1,292 samples of C. ribicola from 66 geographic locations in North America using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and evaluated the effect of landscape features, host distribution, and colonization history on the structure of these pathogen populations. We identified eastern and western genetic populations in North America that are strongly differentiated. Genetic diversity is two to five times higher in eastern populations than in western ones, which can be explained by the repeated accidental introductions of the pathogen into northeastern North America compared with a single documented introduction into western North America. These distinct genetic populations are maintained by a barrier to gene flow that corresponds to a region where host connectivity is interrupted. Furthermore, additional cryptic spatial differentiation was identified in western populations. This differentiation corresponds to landscape features, such as mountain ranges, and also to host connectivity. We also detected genetic differentiation between the pathogen populations in natural stands and plantations, an indication that anthropogenic movement of this pathogen still takes place. These results highlight the importance of monitoring this invasive alien tree pathogen to prevent admixture of eastern and western populations where different pathogen races occur. PMID:26010250

  11. Distribution and possible immobilization of lead in a forest soil (Luvisol) profile.

    PubMed

    Sipos, Péter; Németh, Tibor; Mohai, Ilona

    2005-02-01

    Geochemical analyses using a sequential extraction method and lead adsorption studies were carried out in order to characterize the distribution and adsorption of lead on each genetic horizon of a Luvisol profile developed on a pelagic clayey aleurolite. Clay illuviation is the most important pedogenic process in the profile studied. Its clay mineralogy is characterized by chlorite/vermiculite species with increasing chlorite component downward. The amount of carbonate minerals strongly increases in the lower part of the profile resulting in an abrupt rise in soil pH within a small distance. The Pb content of the soil profile exceeds the natural geochemical background only in the Ao horizon, and its amount decreases with depth in the profile without correcting for differences in bulk density, suggesting the binding of Pb to soil organic matter. According to the sequential extraction analysis the organic matter and carbonate content of the soil have the most significant effect on lead distribution. This effect varies in the different soil horizons. Lead adsorption experiments were carried out on whole soil samples, soil clay fractions, as well as on their carbonate and organic matter free variant. The different soil horizons adsorb lead to different extents depending on their organic matter, clay mineral and carbonate content; and the mineralogical features of soil clays significantly affect their lead adsorption capacity. The clay fraction adsorbs 25% more lead than the whole soil, while in the calcareous subsoil a significant proportion of lead is precipitated due to the alkaline conditions. 10 and 5% of adsorbed Pb can be leached with distilled water in the organic matter and clay mineral dominated soil horizons, respectively. These results suggest that soil organic matter plays a decisive role in the adsorption of Pb, but the fixation by clay minerals is stronger. PMID:15688125

  12. Spherical particles and voids effect on current and potential distribution in integrated circuit leads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Dongqing; Sun, Yicai

    2015-06-01

    Relationships of resistance with a width of 0.1 μm for different heights and currents at a given volt drop are plotted for a 0.2 μm length smooth copper lead. The lead is specified to connect with the integrated circuit AD8622 with its Isr = 0.350 mA to determine the volt drop = 0.2 mV. The total current is computed according to the total resistance of the lead for the different void radius at this volt drop. The current density value at the right boundary is determined by Ohm’s law. After combining the integration of the total current as a prerequisite with the interpolation of current density values from the left, i.e. void edge to the right boundaries, their distribution is obtained, showing current crowding outside of their edges and a great resistance with the increase of their radius. The calculation errors for comparison with the Laplace equation are calculated, mainly located on the corners of void. The potential distribution can be obtained by multiplying sheet resistance to current density distribution. At last, the relationship between resistance, total current, current crowding and calculation errors with the different void radius and lead length are offered in several forms for use in the integrated circuit design.

  13. Lead distribution in Permo-Carboniferous coal from the North China Plate, China.

    PubMed

    Kunli, Luo; Jidong, Lu; Lianwu, Chen

    2005-02-01

    The content and distribution of the lead in coal, gangue and the sulfur ball and the pyritic gangue of the Permo-Carboniferous in the North China Plate have been systematically studied (nearly 300 samples) in this paper. The Permo-Carboniferous coals in the North China Plate account for nearly 44.45% of total Chinese coal resources, and most of the steam coals in China come from the Permo-Carboniferous coals in the North China Plate. The result shows that lead content in the coal varied from 1.45 to 63.60 mg kg(-1), averaging 23.95 mg kg(-1); the lead content of the sulfur ball and the pyritic gangue in the coal seam ranges from 70.26-1060 mg kg(-1), with an average of 271.28 mg kg(-1); the lead content of the gangue is from 29.5 to 77.81 mg kg(-1), averaging at 40.77 mg kg(-1). The lead in the coal seam is mainly concentrated in the pyrite, such as sulfur ball, pyritic gangue or pyrite, and is the least concentrated in the organic of coal. The content of the lead has a direct ratio with the ash and the pyretic sulfur. Coal washing can reduce the content of the pyretic sulfur and the lead. PMID:15688128

  14. Effect of dose level and pregnancy on the distribution and toxicity of intravenous lead in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Hackett, P.L.; Hess, J.O.; Sikov, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    Female Wistar rats were injected intravenously with tracer levels of /sup 210/Pb, alone or combined with carrier Pb(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/ at 5 or 25 mg/kg body weight at 9 or 15 days of gestation (dg). Tissue /sup 210/Pb distribution and retention, and lead excretion, were measured several times during the first 30 h and at 20 dg. Toxic effects following the administration of 25 mg/kg (a teratogenic dose) included an early decrease in hematocrit, hematuria, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and diarrhea, as well as an eventual loss of body weight and an increase in spleen and kidney weights. The stage of pregnancy at injection did not affect the retention and distribution of lead in major organs other than the reproductive system. Following injection of the 25-mg/kg dose, deposition of lead in the liver, kidney, spleen, and lung was elevated. Disproportionately high plasma lead levels were also observed at early times after the injection of the 25-mg/kg dose, and may act as a significant factor in placental lead transfer and subsequent malformations or fetal mortality.

  15. Effect of dose level and pregnancy on the distribution and toxicity of intravenous lead in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Hackett, P.L.; Hess, J.O.; Sikov, M.R.

    1982-05-01

    Female Wistar rats were injected intravenously with tracer levels of /sup 210/Pb, alone or combined with carrier Pb(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/ at 5 or 25 mg/kg body weight at 9 or 15 days of gestation (dg). Tissue /sup 210/Pb distribution and retention, and lead excretion, were measured several times during the first 30 h and at 20 dg. Toxic effects following the administration of 25 mg/kg (a tertogenic dose) included an early decrease in hematocrit, hematuria, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and diarrhea, as well as an eventual body weight and an increase in spleen and kidney weights. The stage of pregnancy at injection did not affect the retention and distribution of lead in major organs other than the reproductive system. Following injection of the 25-mg/kg dose, deposition of lead in the liver, kidney, spleen, and lung was elevated. Disproportionately high plasma lead levels were also observed at early times after the injection of the 25-mg/kg dose, and may act as a significant factor in placental lead transfer and subsequent malformations or fetal mortality.

  16. Distribution of lead, cadmium, and zinc in tissues of hens and chickens from Slovenia

    SciTech Connect

    Doganoc, D.Z.

    1996-12-01

    Lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) are environmental contaminants which are present in almost all living organisms and are non-essential for plants, animals and human beings. Zinc (Zn) is an essential element which occurs together with Cd and is linked with it. Little information exists about the contamination of tissues of hens and chickens with these elements. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of lead, cadmium, and zinc in different tissues of poultry and eggs in Slovenia. 10 refs., 7 tabs.

  17. Distribution of current in the electrodes of lead-acid batteries: a thermographic analysis approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streza, M.; Nuţ, C.; Tudoran, C.; Bunea, V.; Calborean, A.; Morari, C.

    2016-02-01

    An experimental method for the investigation of the current distribution in the electrodes of lead-acid batteries has been developed. The information is extracted by analysing the heat dissipation in the electrode during the discharge by using a high-performance IR camera. The effect of the current in the metallic grid can be de-convoluted from the total heat produced in the electrode by numerical processing of the temperature distribution over the electrode surface. By its simplicity and effectiveness, the proposed method has the potential to become an important tool in optimising electrode geometry.

  18. Current distribution over the electrode surface in a lead-acid cell during discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Král, Petr; Křivák, Petr; Bača, Petr; Calábek, Milan; Micka, Karel

    The current distribution over the plate surface in lead-acid cells in the course of discharge was determined mathematically by using the equivalent circuit method. The dependence of the internal cell resistance on the current and charge passed was determined by measurements on a laboratory cell. Six cell variants were considered differing by the location of tabs serving as current terminals. The results are presented in the form of 3D diagrams at various states of discharge. To make the current distribution nearly uniform, extended current tabs located at opposite ends of the plate electrodes were proposed.

  19. Leading twist nuclear shadowing, nuclear generalized parton distributions and nuclear DVCS at small x

    SciTech Connect

    Guzey, Vadim; Goeke, Klaus; Siddikov, Marat

    2009-01-01

    We generalize the leading twist theory of nuclear shadowing and calculate quark and gluon generalized parton distributions (GPDs) of spinless nuclei. We predict very large nuclear shadowing for nuclear GPDs. In the limit of the purely transverse momentum transfer, our nuclear GPDs become impact parameter dependent nuclear parton distributions (PDFs). Nuclear shadowing induces non-trivial correlations between the impact parameter $b$ and the light-cone fraction $x$. We make predictions for the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) amplitude and the DVCS cross section on $^{208}$Pb at high energies. We calculate the cross section of the Bethe-Heitler (BH) process and address the issue of the extraction of the DVCS signal from the $e A \\to e \\gamma A$ cross section. We find that the $e A \\to e \\gamma A$ differential cross section is dominated by DVCS at the momentum transfer $t$ near the minima of the nuclear form factor. We also find that nuclear shadowing leads

  20. Climate forcing by anthropogenic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Charlson, R J; Schwartz, S E; Hales, J M; Cess, R D; Coakley, J A; Hansen, J E; Hofmann, D J

    1992-01-24

    Although long considered to be of marginal importance to global climate change, tropospheric aerosol contributes substantially to radiative forcing, and anthropogenic sulfate aerosol in particular has imposed a major perturbation to this forcing. Both the direct scattering of shortwavelength solar radiation and the modification of the shortwave reflective properties of clouds by sulfate aerosol particles increase planetary albedo, thereby exerting a cooling influence on the planet. Current climate forcing due to anthropogenic sulfate is estimated to be -1 to -2 watts per square meter, globally averaged. This perturbation is comparable in magnitude to current anthropogenic greenhouse gas forcing but opposite in sign. Thus, the aerosol forcing has likely offset global greenhouse warming to a substantial degree. However, differences in geographical and seasonal distributions of these forcings preclude any simple compensation. Aerosol effects must be taken into account in evaluating anthropogenic influences on past, current, and projected future climate and in formulating policy regarding controls on emission of greenhouse gases and sulfur dioxide. Resolution of such policy issues requires integrated research on the magnitude and geographical distribution of aerosol climate forcing and on the controlling chemical and physical processes. PMID:17842894

  1. Climate forcing by anthropogenic aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlson, R. J.; Schwartz, S. E.; Hales, J. M.; Cess, R. D.; Coakley, J. A., Jr.; Hansen, J. E.; Hofmann, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Although long considered to be of marginal importance to global climate change, tropospheric aerosol contributes substantially to radiative forcing, and anthropogenic sulfate aerosol, in particular, has imposed a major perturbation to this forcing. Both the direct scattering of short-wavelength solar radiation and the modification of the shortwave reflective properties of clouds by sulfate aerosol particles increase planetary albedo, thereby exerting a cooling influence on the planet. Current climate forcing due to anthropogenic sulfate is estimated to be -1 to -2 watts per square meter, globally averaged. This perturbation is comparable in magnitude to current anthropogenic greenhouse gas forcing but opposite in sign. Thus, the aerosol forcing has likely offset global greenhouse warming to a substantial degree. However, differences in geographical and seasonal distributions of these forcings preclude any simple compensation. Aerosol effects must be taken into account in evaluating anthropogenic influences on past, current, and projected future climate and in formulating policy regarding controls on emission of greenhouse gases and sulfur dioxide. Resolution of such policy issues requires integrated research on the magnitude and geographical distribution of aerosol climate forcing and on the controlling chemical and physical processes.

  2. Kinetics of cesium lead halide perovskite nanoparticle growth; focusing and de-focusing of size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koolyk, Miriam; Amgar, Daniel; Aharon, Sigalit; Etgar, Lioz

    2016-03-01

    In this work we study the kinetics of cesium lead halide perovskite nanoparticle (NP) growth; the focusing and de-focusing of the NP size distribution. Cesium lead halide perovskite NPs are considered to be attractive materials for optoelectronic applications. Understanding the kinetics of the formation of these all-inorganic perovskite NPs is critical for reproducibly and reliably generating large amounts of uniformly sized NPs. Here we investigate different growth durations for CsPbI3 and CsPbBr3 NPs, tracking their growth by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and size distribution analysis. As a result, we are able to provide a detailed model for the kinetics of their growth. It was observed that the CsPbI3 NPs exhibit focusing of the size distribution in the first 20 seconds of growth, followed by de-focusing over longer growth durations, while the CsPbBr3 NPs show de-focusing of the size distribution starting from the beginning of the growth. The monomer concentration is depleted faster in the case of CsPbBr3 than in the case of CsPbI3, due to faster diffusion of the monomers, which increases the critical radius and results in de-focusing of the population. Accordingly, focusing is not observed within 40 seconds of growth in the case of CsPbBr3. This study provides important knowledge on how to achieve a narrow size distribution of cesium lead halide perovskite NPs when generating large amounts of these promising, highly luminescent NPs.In this work we study the kinetics of cesium lead halide perovskite nanoparticle (NP) growth; the focusing and de-focusing of the NP size distribution. Cesium lead halide perovskite NPs are considered to be attractive materials for optoelectronic applications. Understanding the kinetics of the formation of these all-inorganic perovskite NPs is critical for reproducibly and reliably generating large amounts of uniformly sized NPs. Here we investigate different growth durations for CsPbI3 and CsPbBr3 NPs, tracking

  3. Effect of Size Refinement and Distribution of the Lubricating Lead Phases in the Spray Forming High-Leaded Tin Bronze on Wear Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Pengfei; Wang, Deping; Yan, Biao; Mo, Fan

    2013-07-01

    Recently, the wear properties of high-leaded tin bronze were greatly concerned. In this work, the effect of size refinement and distribution of the lubricating lead phases in the spray forming (SF) high-leaded tin bronze on wear rates was studied by using scanning electron microscopy and sliding adhesive wear tests. It was observed that compared to the conventional casting bronze, the SF bronze features finer and more dispersed lead phases that formed more lubricating films in microstructure, which leads to the less wear rates.

  4. The association between spatial distribution of common malignancies and soil lead concentration in Isfahan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Rashidi, Masoumeh; Rameshat, Mohammad Hossein; Gharib, Hadi; Rouzbahani, Reza; Ghias, Majid; Poursafa, Parinaz

    2012-01-01

    Background: Malignancies are primarily environmental diseases mostly attributed to environmental factors. By plotting the prevalence and spatial distribution maps, important differences can be observed in detail. This study aimed to determine the association between map distribution of malignancies and the geological phenomena of lead (Pb) accumulation in soil in the province of Isfahan, Iran. Methods: Spatial distribution maps of malignant diseases were plotted by using data recorded during 2007 to 2009 in the Isfahan Cancer Registry Program. Data on Pb accumulation in soil was obtained from the National Geological Survey and Mineral Exploration. Pb concentrations were documented in three parts of agricultural, non-agricultural, urban, and industrial land. The geographical mapping of cancers and soil Pb were then incorporated into a geographic information system (GIS) to create a spatial distribution model. Results: The spatial distributions of ten common malignant diseases in the province, i.e. skin cancers, hematological malignancies, and breast cancers, followed by other malignancies were scattered based on Pb distribution. In fact, common cancers were more prevalent in the parts of the province where soil Pb was more abundant. Conclusion: The findings of this study underscore the importance of preventing Pb exposure and controlling industrial production of Pb. The data is also important to establish further effects modeling for cancers. Moreover, physicians and health professionals should consider the impact of environmental factors on their patients’ health. PMID:23267396

  5. Distribution of oceanic and continental leads in the Arabian-Nubian Shield

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stacey, J.S.; Stoeser, D.B.

    1983-01-01

    New common lead data for feldspar, whole-rock, and galena samples from the Arabian-Nubian Shield, together with data from previous work, can be divided into two main groups. Group I leads have oceanic (mantle) characteristics, whereas group II leads have incorporated a continental-crustal component of at least early Proterozoic age. The group I leads are found in rocks from the Red Sea Hills of Egypt and the western and southern parts of the Arabian Shield. Group II leads are found in rocks from the northeastern and eastern parts of the Arabian Shield, as well as from the southeastern Shield near Najran. They are also found in rocks to the south in Yemen, to the east in Oman, and to the west at Aswan, Egypt. This distribution of data suggests that the Arabian-Nubian Shield has an oceanic core flanked by rocks that have developed, at least in part, from older continental material. Two mechanisms are suggested by which this older lead component could have been incorporated into the late Proterozoic rocks, and each may have operated in different parts of the Shield. The older lead component either was derived directly from an underlying early Proterozoic basement or was incorporated from subducted pelagic sediments or sediments derived from an adjacent continent. New U-Pb zircon data indicate the presence of an early Proterozoic basement southeast of Jabal Dahul in the eastern Arabian Shield. These data, together with 2,000-Ma-old zircons from the Al Amar fault zone, verify the implication of the common lead data that at least a part of the eastern Arabian Shield has an older continental basement. Because continental margins are particularly favorable locations for development of ore deposits, these findings may have important economic implications, particularly for tin, tungsten, and molybdenum exploration. ?? 1983 Springer-Verlag.

  6. Distribution of toxic elements and transfer from the environment to humans traced by using lead isotopes. A case of study in the Sarno River basin, south Italy.

    PubMed

    Cicchella, Domenico; Hoogewerff, Jurian; Albanese, Stefano; Adamo, Paola; Lima, Annamaria; Taiani, Manuela V E; De Vivo, Benedetto

    2016-04-01

    The results of a large geochemical study on various environmental media (soil, stream sediment, groundwater, surface water, lettuce and human hair) of the Sarno River basin, which is one of the most polluted areas in Italy, are presented. Further, it aims to deepen our understanding of the distribution of Pb and its isotope composition for the differentiation between natural and anthropogenic metal sources. Our results show the environmental media to be significantly enriched in Cr, Cu, Pb, Hg, Zn, and to a lesser extent in Sb, Cd and Ni compared to the natural local background variation. The numerous industrial activities (mainly tanneries) have caused environmental pollution especially Cr and Hg in soils and sediment samples. Such contamination is also evident in lettuce and in the hair of the resident population, which shows particularly high values for both Cr and Hg. The unusually high As, Be and Sn concentrations arise mostly from natural sources due to the volcanic nature of the investigated area. Lead isotope measurements indicate a trend suggesting mixing between two end-members, one of clear natural origin (geogenic) and another related to human activities (anthropogenic). Lead isotope results demonstrate that Pb in hair of inhabitants is similar to those in the local topsoil and that gasoline is one of the main, but not the only source of metal pollution. The most important exposure risks within the study area are associated with toxic elements levels in topsoil and stream sediment, and the ingestion of locally grown lettuce. The high concentrations of these elements in hair are a further confirmation of this exposure pathway. PMID:26164469

  7. Dispersal leads to spatial autocorrelation in species distributions: A simulation model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bahn, V.; Krohn, W.B.; O'Connor, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    Compared to population growth regulated by local conditions, dispersal has been underappreciated as a central process shaping the spatial distribution of populations. This paper asks: (a) which conditions increase the importance of dispersers relative to local recruits in determining population sizes? and (b) how does dispersal influence the spatial distribution patterns of abundances among connected populations? We approached these questions with a simulation model of populations on a coupled lattice with cells of continuously varying habitat quality expressed as carrying capacities. Each cell contained a population with the basic dynamics of density-regulated growth, and was connected to other populations by immigration and emigration. The degree to which dispersal influenced the distribution of population sizes depended most strongly on the absolute amount of dispersal, and then on the potential population growth rate. Dispersal decaying in intensity with distance left close neighbours more alike in population size than distant populations, leading to an increase in spatial autocorrelation. The spatial distribution of species with low potential growth rates is more dependent on dispersal than that of species with high growth rates; therefore, distribution modelling for species with low growth rates requires particular attention to autocorrelation, and conservation management of these species requires attention to factors curtailing dispersal, such as fragmentation and dispersal barriers. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Simulated big sagebrush regeneration supports predicted changes at the trailing and leading edges of distribution shifts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schlaepfer, Daniel R.; Taylor, Kyle A.; Pennington, Victoria E.; Nelson, Kellen N.; Martin, Trace E.; Rottler, Caitlin M.; Lauenroth, William K.; Bradford, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Many semi-arid plant communities in western North America are dominated by big sagebrush. These ecosystems are being reduced in extent and quality due to economic development, invasive species, and climate change. These pervasive modifications have generated concern about the long-term viability of sagebrush habitat and sagebrush-obligate wildlife species (notably greater sage-grouse), highlighting the need for better understanding of the future big sagebrush distribution, particularly at the species' range margins. These leading and trailing edges of potential climate-driven sagebrush distribution shifts are likely to be areas most sensitive to climate change. We used a process-based regeneration model for big sagebrush, which simulates potential germination and seedling survival in response to climatic and edaphic conditions and tested expectations about current and future regeneration responses at trailing and leading edges that were previously identified using traditional species distribution models. Our results confirmed expectations of increased probability of regeneration at the leading edge and decreased probability of regeneration at the trailing edge below current levels. Our simulations indicated that soil water dynamics at the leading edge became more similar to the typical seasonal ecohydrological conditions observed within the current range of big sagebrush ecosystems. At the trailing edge, an increased winter and spring dryness represented a departure from conditions typically supportive of big sagebrush. Our results highlighted that minimum and maximum daily temperatures as well as soil water recharge and summer dry periods are important constraints for big sagebrush regeneration. Overall, our results confirmed previous predictions, i.e., we see consistent changes in areas identified as trailing and leading edges; however, we also identified potential local refugia within the trailing edge, mostly at sites at higher elevation. Decreasing

  9. Thermodynamic modeling of lead distribution among matte, slag, and liquid copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degterov, Sergei A.; Pelton, Arthur D.

    1999-12-01

    Recently, a thermodynamic database was developed for the calculation of equilibria involved in the production of copper. The present study is concerned with the further development of the thermodynamic models and the database of model parameters for the matte, slag, and blister copper phases with a view to including Pb in the database and permitting calculations in the seven-component system Pb-Cu-Ca-Fe-Si-O-S. Thermodynamic and phase equilibrium data available in the literature are reviewed, critically assessed, and optimized with the modified quasi-chemical model. When used with the Gibbs energy minimization software and other databases of the FACT thermodynamic computing system, the database developed in the present study can be used for the calculation of matte-slag-copper-gas phase equilibria during copper smelting and converting. The distribution of lead among these phases can be computed. For example, the distribution of lead among matte, silica-saturated slag, and copper has been calculated at metal saturation, or under fixed partial pressure of SO2, and has been compared with the available experimental data. The Pb distributions among the equilibrium phases have been calculated under various conditions, which are difficult to study experimentally, such as at magnetite saturation or under various oxygen partial pressures and iron to silica ratios in the slag.

  10. Distribution and effects of intravenous lead in the fetoplacental unit of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Hackett, P.L.; Hess, J.O.; Sikov, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    Lead metabolism was studied in the fetoplacental unit (FPU) of Wistar rats during the genesis of developmental abnormalities and embryonic death. Female rats were injected iv with tracer /sup 210/Pb(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/, alone or in combination with 5 or 25 mg Pb(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2//kg, at 9 or 15 days of gestation (dg). The distribution of lead and its effects were determined in the FPUs during the ensuing 30-h period and at 20 dg. Hemorrhage of the egg cylinder was noted as early as 6 h postinjection of 25 mg/kg at 9 dg. By 20 dg, fetuses exhibited characteristic stunting and external malformations (gastrochisis and severe skeletal defects). Administration of this dose at 15 dg produced petechial hemorrhage in fetal brain within 90 min; more massive hemorrhage was a consistent observation by 24 h. At 20 dg, embryo mortality was 44% in rats injected with 25 mg/kg at 9 dg and 100% in those injected at 15 dg. At 90 min after injection, lead content of 15-dg FPUs was 10 times that of the 9-dg FPUs, but the weights of the 15-dg FPUs were 16 times greater. Values remained relatively constant in 15-dg FPUs for 30 h, but early clearance was observed after injection at 9 dg, with a return to 90-min values by 20 dg. In the 15-dg FPUs, placental clearance was followed by fetal lead incorporation, which reached a maximum at 6 h. Fetal lead values were constant from 6 to 30 h after injection at tracer and 5-mg/kg dose levels, but values increased progressively at 25 mg/kg. Both temporal and quantitative relationships of fetal lead metabolism were disrupted by the 25-mg/kg dose, but the nature of the effect was determined by the stage of fetal development at exposure.

  11. Distribution and effects of intravenous lead in the fetoplacental unit of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Hackett, P.L.; Hess, J.O.; Sikov, M.R.

    1982-05-01

    Lead metabolism was studied in the fetoplacental unit (FPU) of Wistar rats during the genesis of developmental abnormalities and embryonic death. Female rats were injected iv with tracer /sup 210/Pb(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/, alone or in combination with 5 or 25 mg Pb(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2//kg, at 9 or 15 days of gestation (dg). The distribution of lead and its effects were determined in the FPUs during the ensuing 30-h period and at 20 dg. Hemorrhage of the egg cylinder was noted as early as 6 h postinjection of 25 mg/kg at 9 dg. By 20 dg, fetuses exhibited characteristic stunting and external malformations (gastroschisis and severe skeletal defects). Administration of this dose at 15 dg produced petechial hemorrhage in fetal brain within 90 min; more massive hemorrhage was a consistent observation by 24 h. At 20 dg, embryo mortality was 44% in rats injected with 25 mg/kg at 9 dg and 100% in those injected at 15 dg. At 90 min after injection, lead content of 15-dg FPUs were 16 times greater. Values remained relatively constant in 15-dg FPUs for 30 h, but early clearance was observed after injection at 9 dg, with a return to 90-min values by 20 dg. In the 15-dg FPUs, placental clearance was followed by fetal lead incorporation, which reached a maximum at 6 h. Fetal lead values were constant from 6 to 30 h after injection at tracer and 5-mg/kg dose levels, but values increased progressively at 25 mg/kg. Both temporal and quantitative relationships of fetal lead metabolism were disrupted by the 25-mg/kg dose, but the nature of the effect was determined by the stage of fetal development at exposure.

  12. A seller-buyer supply chain model with exponential distribution lead time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahri, Mehrab; Tarokh, Mohammad Jafar

    2012-08-01

    Supply chain is an accepted way of remaining in the competition in today's rapidly changing market. This paper presents a coordinated seller-buyer supply chain model in two stages, which is called Joint Economic Lot Sizing (JELS) in literature. The delivery activities in the supply chain consist of a single raw material. We assume that the delivery lead time is stochastic and follows an exponential distribution. Also, the shortage during the lead time is permitted and completely back-ordered for the buyer. With these assumptions, the annual cost function of JELS is minimized. At the end, a numerical example is presented to show that the integrated approach considerably improves the costs in comparison with the independent decisions by seller and buyer.

  13. Next-to-Leading Order Predictions for W + 3-Jet Distributions at Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, C.F.; Bern, Z.; Dixon, L.J.; Febres Cordero, F.; Forde, D.; Gleisberg, T.; Ita, H.; Kosower, D.A.; Maitre, D.; /Durham U.

    2009-12-09

    We present next-to-leading order QCD predictions for a variety of distributions in W + 3-jet production at both the Tevatron and the Large Hadron Collider. We include all subprocesses and incorporate the decay of the W boson into leptons. Our results are in excellent agreement with existing Tevatron data and provide the first quantitatively precise next-to-leading order predictions for the LHC. We include all terms in an expansion in the number of colors, confirming that the specific leading-color approximation used in our previous study is accurate to within three percent. The dependence of the cross section on renormalization and factorization scales is reduced significantly with respect to a leading-order calculation. We study different dynamical scale choices, and find that the total transverse energy is significantly better than choices used in previous phenomenological studies. We compute the one-loop matrix elements using on-shell methods, as numerically implemented in the BlackHat code. The remaining parts of the calculation, including generation of the real-emission contributions and integration over phase space, are handled by the SHERPA package.

  14. Origin and patterns of distribution of trace elements in street dust: Unleaded petrol and urban lead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miguel, Eduardo de; Llamas, Juan F.; Chacón, Enrique; Berg, Torunn; Larssen, Steinar; Røyset, Oddvar; Vadset, Marit

    The elemental composition, patterns of distribution and possible sources of street dust are not common to all urban environments, but vary according to the peculiarities of each city. The common features and dissimilarities in the origin and nature of street dust were investigated through a series of studies in two widely different cities, Madrid (Spain) and Oslo (Norway), between 1990 and 1994. The most comprehensive sampling campaign was carried out in the Norwegian capital during the summer of 1994. An area of 14 km 2, covering most of downtown Oslo and some residential districts to the north of the city, was divided into 1 km2 mapping units, and 16 sampling increments of approximately 150 g were collected from streets and roads in each of them. The fraction below 100 μm was acid-digested and analysed by ICP-MS. Statistical analyses of the results suggest that chemical elements in street dust can be classified into three groups: "urban" elements (Ba, Cd, Co, Cu, Mg, Pb, Sb, Ti, Zn), "natural" elements (Al, Ga, La, Mn, Na, Sr, Th, Y) and elements of a mixed origin or which have undergone geochemical changes from their original sources (Ca, Cs, Fe, Mo, Ni, Rb, Sr, U). Soil resuspension and/or mobilisation appears to be the most important source of "natural" elements, while "urban" elements originate primarily from traffic and from the weathering and corrosion of building materials. The data for Pb seem to prove that the gradual shift from leaded to unleaded petrol as fuel for automobiles has resulted in an almost proportional reduction in the concentration of Pb in dust particles under 100 μm. This fact and the spatial distribution of Pb in the city strongly suggest that lead sources other than traffic (i.e. lead accumulated in urban soil over the years) may contribute as much lead, if not more, to urban street dust.

  15. Angular distribution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies on compacted lead ion selective membrane powers

    SciTech Connect

    Young, V.; McCaslin, P.C.

    1985-04-01

    Changes in the distribution of species in the near surface region of compacted lead ion selective membrane powders, as revealed by angular distribution XPS, are reported. Scanning electron micrographs of pellets pressed at pressures ranging from a low of 7 lb/in./sup 2/ to a high of 15,000 lb/in./sup 2/ reveal surfaces of almost undistorted, compacted spheres with an average diameter of 0.25 ..mu..m. For untreated membranes, angular distribution XPS reveals the stratification of the near surface region of the surface layer of spheres. Scanning electron micrographs of EDTA and HClO/sub 4/ treated pellets show that an erosion of the surfaces occurs and angular distribution XPS analysis reveals the stratification of the near surface region of the new surfaces. Profilometry has been used to measure the surface topography of the pellets, and the data have been used to assess the effect of roughness on XPS intensity ratios. 47 references, 8 figures, 4 tables.

  16. [Distribution characteristics of lead in different particle size fractions of surface soil of a lead-acid battery factory contaminated site].

    PubMed

    Yue, Xi; Sun, Ti-chang; Huang, Jin-lou

    2013-09-01

    In this research, six topsoil samples (0-20 cm) were collected in the heavy-metal lead contaminated soil of one lead battery factory in south-west China as research object, which were later divided into seven particle size fractions, and analyzed for the lead concentration as well as the correlation between the lead concentration and the organic matter content. The result showed that five soil samples were contaminated with lead with different pollution levels, and there were two different trends in the changes of lead concentration as of the change of soil particle size. The lead concentration of the three samples from sewage treatment workshop, the workshop A and the workshop B, showed a first declining and then ascending trend with the decreasing particle size. The lead concentration of the soil samples of the packing workshop and the former production workshop A showed a decreasing trend when the particle size decreased. The lead concentration and the organic matter content showed a positive linear correlation (R2 = 0.8232). Soil organic matter has the ability of lead enrichment, and the ability declines with the decreasing particle size. Soil texture may be an important factor for the interaction between soil organic matter and lead distribution. PMID:24289023

  17. Chemical oceanography. Increasing anthropogenic nitrogen in the North Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Kim, Il-Nam; Lee, Kitack; Gruber, Nicolas; Karl, David M; Bullister, John L; Yang, Simon; Kim, Tae-Wook

    2014-11-28

    The recent increase in anthropogenic emissions of reactive nitrogen from northeastern Asia and the subsequent enhanced deposition over the extensive regions of the North Pacific Ocean (NPO) have led to a detectable increase in the nitrate (N) concentration of the upper ocean. The rate of increase of excess N relative to phosphate (P) was found to be highest (~0.24 micromoles per kilogram per year) in the vicinity of the Asian source continent, with rates decreasing eastward across the NPO, consistent with the magnitude and distribution of atmospheric nitrogen deposition. This anthropogenically driven increase in the N content of the upper NPO may enhance primary production in this N-limited region, potentially leading to a long-term change of the NPO from being N-limited to P-limited. PMID:25430767

  18. Increasing anthropogenic nitrogen in the North Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Il-Nam; Lee, Kitack; Gruber, Nicolas; Karl, David M.; Bullister, John L.; Yang, Simon; Kim, Tae-Wook

    2014-11-01

    The recent increase in anthropogenic emissions of reactive nitrogen from northeastern Asia and the subsequent enhanced deposition over the extensive regions of the North Pacific Ocean (NPO) have led to a detectable increase in the nitrate (N) concentration of the upper ocean. The rate of increase of excess N relative to phosphate (P) was found to be highest (∼0.24 micromoles per kilogram per year) in the vicinity of the Asian source continent, with rates decreasing eastward across the NPO, consistent with the magnitude and distribution of atmospheric nitrogen deposition. This anthropogenically driven increase in the N content of the upper NPO may enhance primary production in this N-limited region, potentially leading to a long-term change of the NPO from being N-limited to P-limited.

  19. Asian anthropogenic dust and its climate effect (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Liu, J.; Chen, B.

    2013-12-01

    Anthropogenic dust originates mainly from areas of localized human disturbance, such as traffic-on-roads, agricultural fields, grazing, military installations, construction sites, and off-road vehicle areas. To understand historical and possible future changes in dust emissions, the percentage of atmospheric dust load originating from anthropogenic source and its distribution must be quantified. CALIPSO lidar, which shoots a laser into the atmosphere, provides new insight into the detection of anthropogenic dust emission. Here, we present the distribution of Asian anthropogenic dust emissions and its relation to human activity by using CALIPSO lidar measurements. We found that the local anthropogenic dust aerosols account for significant portion of the total dust burden in the atmosphere. The anthropogenic dust emissions mainly occur over the heavy human activity and poor ecosystem region, such as semi-arid region. The impact of Asian anthropogenic dust on regional climate will also be discussed in this talk.

  20. Mobilization and distribution of lead originating from roof dust and wet deposition in a roof runoff system.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jianghua; Yu, Haixia; Huang, Xiaogu

    2015-12-01

    In this research, the mobilization and distribution of lead originating in roof dust and wet deposition were investigated within a roof dust-rooftop-runoff system. The results indicated that lead from roof dust and wet deposition showed different transport dynamics in runoff system and that this process was significantly influenced by the rainfall intensity. Lead present in the roof dust could be easily washed off into the runoff, and nearly 60 % of the total lead content was present in particulate form. Most of the lead from the roof dust was transported during the late period of rainfall; however, the lead concentration was higher for several minutes at the rainfall beginning. Even though some of the lead from wet deposition, simulated with a standard isotope substance, was adsorbed onto adhered roof dust and/or retained on rooftop in runoff system, most of it (50-82 %) remained as dissolved lead in the runoff for rainfall events of varying intensity. Regarding the distribution of lead in the runoff system, the results indicated that it could be carried in the runoff in dissolved and particulate form, be adsorbed to adhered roof dust, or remain on the rooftop because of adsorption to the roof material. Lead from the different sources showed different distribution patterns that were also related to the rainfall intensity. Higher rainfall intensity resulted in a higher proportion of lead in the runoff and a lower proportion of lead remaining on the rooftop. PMID:26289339

  1. Determination of Polarised Parton Distributions in the Nucleon --- Next to Leading Order QCD Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatur, Stanislaw; Bartelski, Jan; Kurzela, Miroslaw

    2000-03-01

    We have made next to leading order QCD fit to the deep inelastic spin asymmetries on nucleons and we have determined polarised quark and gluon densities. The functional form for such distributions was inspired by the Martin, Roberts and Stirling fit for unpolarised case. In addition to usually used data points (averaged over x and Q2) we have also considered the sample containing points with similar x and different Q2. It seems that splitting of quark densities into valence and sea contribution is strongly model dependent and only their sum (i.e. , Δ u and Δ d) can be precisely determined from the data. Integrated polarised gluon contribution, contrary to some expectations, is relatively small and the sign of it depends on the fact which sample of data points is used.

  2. Lead in Chinese coals: distribution, modes of occurrence, and environmental effects.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ting; Liu, Guijian; Zhou, Chuncai; Sun, Ruoyu; Chen, Jian; Wu, Dun

    2014-06-01

    Lead (Pb) has gained much attention since the 1970s because of its potential and cumulative toxicity. As one of the most hazardous elements in coals, Pb can be released into the environment during coal mining, processing, and utilization. This study presents a synthesis on the abundance, distribution, modes of occurrence, and environmental impacts of Pb in Chinese coals. Using the expected coal reserves as the weighting factor and based on the previously published Pb content in 4,304 coal samples (including results obtained in our laboratory) from main coalfields or coal mines in China, the weighted mean Pb content in Chinese coals is 13.0 μg/g, which is higher than that of the American coals (11 μg/g) and average world coals (7.8 μg/g). With respect to regional distribution of Pb in Chinese coals, Pb content can be arbitrarily divided into three groups (<20, 20-40, >40 μg/g). Following this classification, coals from Tibet have the highest average Pb content (128.94 μg/g). The abundance of Pb in coals varies with coal-forming periods and coal ranks, with the late Triassic and higher rank coals having the highest Pb content, which could be ascribed to regional geochemical differences and later geological evolution as well as magma hydrothermal activities. The enrichment of Pb in coals is influenced by several geological factors, including coal-forming plants, source rocks, hydrothermal fluid, and depositional environment. Pb, dominantly associates with sulfide minerals, especially galena in coals. During coal combustion or pyrolysis, Pb is partly emitted into the atmosphere and partly partitioned to solid residues. Accumulation of Pb from coal utilization in human body could lead to a range of health problems and increase the risk of cancer. PMID:24218089

  3. Revisiting the pion leading-twist distribution amplitude within the QCD background field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Tao; Wu, Xing-Gang; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Huang, Tao; Fu, Hai-Bing; Han, Hua-Yong

    2014-07-01

    We study the pion leading-twist distribution amplitude (DA) within the framework of Shifman-Vainshtein-Zakharov sum rules under the background field theory. To improve the accuracy of the sum rules, we expand both the quark propagator and the vertex (z.D↔)n of the correlator up to dimension-six operators in the background field theory. The sum rules for the pion DA moments are obtained, in which all condensates up to dimension-six have been taken into consideration. Using the sum rules, we obtain ⟨ξ2⟩|1 GeV=0.338±0.032, ⟨ξ4⟩|1GeV=0.211±0.030 and ⟨ξ6⟩|1GeV=0.163±0.030. It is shown that the dimension-six condensates shall provide sizable contributions to the pion DA moments. We show that the first Gegenbauer moment of the pion leading-twist DA is a2π|1 GeV=0.403±0.093, which is consistent with those obtained in the literature within errors but prefers a larger central value as indicated by lattice QCD predictions.

  4. Neutron Dark-Field Imaging of the Domain Distribution in the Intermediate State of Lead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimann, T.; Schulz, M.; Grünzweig, C.; Kaestner, A.; Bauer, A.; Böni, P.; Mühlbauer, S.

    2016-02-01

    The intermediate state (IS) of a type-I superconductor is characterized by coexistence of Meissner phase and normal conducting phase. Experiments on the topology of the IS show a variety of universal domain patterns which are also seen in various other physical, chemical or even biological systems on various length and time scales. The possibility to easily tune the domain structure of the IS by a variation of magnetic field or temperature ideally qualifies type-I superconductors as general model systems for the investigation of domain nucleation and distribution. However, the experimental observation of the IS domain structure was up to now restricted to either thin films or surfaces. We demonstrate how neutron grating interferometry (nGI) probes the IS domain distribution in the interior of a bulk single-crystalline lead sample. By means of nGI, we are able to visualize the field penetration process into the superconductor as well as the hysteretic behavior of the intermediate state morphology. Finally, the impact of nGI for investigations on bulk domain nucleation is discussed, as this technique is applicable on many other systems that reveal a phase separation on a micrometer length scale.

  5. Distribution of haemic neoplasia of soft-shelled clams in Prince Edward Island: an examination of anthropogenic factors and effects of experimental fungicide exposure.

    PubMed

    Mateo, D R; MacCallum, G S; McGladdery, S E; Davidson, J

    2016-05-01

    Haemic neoplasia was first considered a disease of concern for soft-shell clams in Prince Edward Island (PEI) when it was diagnosed as the cause of mass mortalities in 1999. The aetiology of the disease remains elusive, but has been associated with environmental degradation. In this study, a 2-year (2001-2002) geographic and seasonal survey was conducted for haemic neoplasia, using histology, in soft-shell clams from PEI. In addition, using geographic information system, the association between anthropogenic factors in the watersheds at sites affected by haemic neoplasia and the prevalence of the disease was investigated. Finally, histopathological changes were assessed in soft-shell clams experimentally exposed to four concentrations of chlorothalonil for 27 days. Haemic neoplasia could not be induced at any concentration of chlorothalonil. Clams exposed to a concentration of 1000 μg L(-1) of the fungicide, however, exhibited an LC50 of 17 days. Although this information provides additional toxicity information (LC50) for soft-shell clams, further experiments are required to assess longer term exposure to the fungicide. The highest prevalences of haemic neoplasia in PEI were found in North River and Miscouche (28.3-50.9% and 33.0-77.8%, respectively). No clear seasonal patterns were found. There was a correlation between haemic neoplasia prevalence and watersheds with a high percentage of potato acreage and forest coverage (P = 0.026 and P = 0.045, respectively), suggesting a link between anthropogenic activity and the prevalence of the disease. PMID:26123078

  6. Quantitative assessment of atmospheric emissions of toxic heavy metals from anthropogenic sources in China: historical trend, spatial variation distribution, uncertainties and control policies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, H. Z.; Zhu, C. Y.; Gao, J. J.; Cheng, K.; Hao, J. M.; Wang, K.; Hua, S. B.; Wang, Y.; Zhou, J. R.

    2015-04-01

    Anthropogenic atmospheric emissions of typical toxic heavy metals have received worldwide concerns due to their adverse effects on human health and the ecosystem. By determining the best available representation of time-varying emission factors with S-shape curves, we established the multiyear comprehensive atmospheric emission inventories of 12 typical toxic heavy metals (Hg, As, Se, Pb, Cd, Cr, Ni, Sb, Mn, Co, Cu and Zn) from primary anthropogenic activities in China for the period of 1949-2012 for the first time. Further, we allocated the annual emissions of these heavy metals in 2010 at a high spatial resolution of 0.5° × 0.5° grid with ArcGIS methodology and surrogate indexes, such as regional population and gross domestic product (GDP). Our results show that the historical emissions of Hg, As, Se, Cd, Cr, Ni, Sb, Mn, Co, Cu and Zn during the period of 1949-2012, have been increased by about 22-128 times at an annual average growth rate of 5.1-8.0%, amounting to about 79 570 t in 2012. Nonferrous metal smelting, coal combustion of industrial boilers, brake and tyre wear, and ferrous metals smelting represent the dominant sources for Hg / Cd, As / Se / Pb / Cr / Ni / Mn / Co, Sb / Cu, and Zn, respectively. In terms of spatial variation, the majority of emissions were concentrated in relatively developed regions, especially for the northern, eastern and southern coastal regions. In addition, because of the flourishing nonferrous metals smelting industry, several southwestern and central-southern provinces play a prominent role in some specific toxic heavy metals emissions, like Hg in Guizhou and As in Yunnan. Finally, integrated countermeasures are proposed to minimize the final toxic heavy metals discharge on accounting of the current and future demand of energy-saving and pollution reduction in China.

  7. Quantitative assessment of atmospheric emissions of toxic heavy metals from anthropogenic sources in China: historical trend, spatial distribution, uncertainties, and control policies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, H. Z.; Zhu, C. Y.; Gao, J. J.; Cheng, K.; Hao, J. M.; Wang, K.; Hua, S. B.; Wang, Y.; Zhou, J. R.

    2015-09-01

    Anthropogenic atmospheric emissions of typical toxic heavy metals have caused worldwide concern due to their adverse effects on human health and the ecosystem. By determining the best available representation of time-varying emission factors with S-shape curves, we establish the multiyear comprehensive atmospheric emission inventories of 12 typical toxic heavy metals (Hg, As, Se, Pb, Cd, Cr, Ni, Sb, Mn, Co, Cu, and Zn) from primary anthropogenic activities in China for the period of 1949-2012 for the first time. Further, we allocate the annual emissions of these heavy metals in 2010 at a high spatial resolution of 0.5° × 0.5° grid with ArcGIS methodology and surrogate indexes, such as regional population and gross domestic product (GDP). Our results show that the historical emissions of Hg, As, Se, Cd, Cr, Ni, Sb, Mn, Co, Cu, and Zn, during the period of 1949-2012, increased by about 22-128 times at an annual average growth rate of 5.1-8.0 %, reaching about 526.9-22 319.6 t in 2012. Nonferrous metal smelting, coal combustion of industrial boilers, brake and tyre wear, and ferrous metal smelting represent the dominant sources of heavy metal emissions. In terms of spatial variation, the majority of emissions are concentrated in relatively developed regions, especially for the northern, eastern, and southern coastal regions. In addition, because of the flourishing nonferrous metal smelting industry, several southwestern and central-southern provinces play a prominent role in some specific toxic heavy metals emissions, like Hg in Guizhou and As in Yunnan. Finally, integrated countermeasures are proposed to minimize the final toxic heavy metals discharge on account of the current and future demand of energy-saving and pollution reduction in China.

  8. Speciation and distribution of cadmium and lead in salinized horizons of antrosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgariu, D.; Bulgariu, L.; Astefanei, D.

    2009-04-01

    The utilization of intensive technologies for the vegetable cultivation in glass houses by the administration of high doses of organic fertilizes, the supra-dimensional irrigation and the maintaining of soil at high humidity state, in special in case of vicious drainage have as result the rapid degradation of morphological, chemical and physical characteristics of soils, concretized by: (i) decrease of structural aggregates stability; (ii) more dense packing of soil; (iii) accumulation of easy soluble salts (in special at superior horizons level); (iv) limitation of organic compounds and micro-elements biodisponibility. All these determined a significant reduction of productivity and of exploitation duration of soils from glass houses. These phenomena modified continuously the dynamic of speciation processes and inter-phases distribution, of heavy metals in soils from glass houses, and can determined a non-controlled accumulation of heavy metals, in special as mobile forms with high biodisponibility. Ours studied have been performed using soil profiles drawing from Copou-glass house, Iasi (Romania). Has been followed the modification of distribution for speciation forms of cadmium and lead (two heavy metals with high toxicity degree), between hortic antrosol horizons, and between chemical-mineralogical components of this, with the progressive salinization of superior horizons, in 2007-2008 period. The separation, differentiation and determination of cadmium and lead speciation forms was done by combined solid-liquid sequential extraction (SPE) and extraction in aqueous polymer-inorganic salt two-phase systems (ABS) procedure, presented in some of ours previous studies. After extraction, the total contents of the two heavy metals and fractions from these differential bonded by mineral and organic components of hortic antrosol have been determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. The specific interaction mechanisms of Cd and Pb with organic-mineral components of

  9. Order-disorder transition in conflicting dynamics leading to rank-frequency generalized beta distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Martinez, R.; Martinez-Mekler, G.; Cocho, G.

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of rank-ordered distributions of phenomena present in a variety of fields such as biology, sociology, linguistics, finance and geophysics has been a matter of intense research. Often power laws have been encountered; however, their validity tends to hold mainly for an intermediate range of rank values. In a recent publication (Martínez-Mekler et al., 2009 [7]), a generalization of the functional form of the beta distribution has been shown to give excellent fits for many systems of very diverse nature, valid for the whole range of rank values, regardless of whether or not a power law behavior has been previously suggested. Here we give some insight on the significance of the two free parameters which appear as exponents in the functional form, by looking into discrete probabilistic branching processes with conflicting dynamics. We analyze a variety of realizations of these so-called expansion-modification models first introduced by Wentian Li (1989) [10]. We focus our attention on an order-disorder transition we encounter as we vary the modification probability p. We characterize this transition by means of the fitting parameters. Our numerical studies show that one of the fitting exponents is related to the presence of long-range correlations exhibited by power spectrum scale invariance, while the other registers the effect of disordering elements leading to a breakdown of these properties. In the absence of long-range correlations, this parameter is sensitive to the occurrence of unlikely events. We also introduce an approximate calculation scheme that relates this dynamics to multinomial multiplicative processes. A better understanding through these models of the meaning of the generalized beta-fitting exponents may contribute to their potential for identifying and characterizing universality classes.

  10. Estimation of global anthropogenic dust aerosol using CALIOP satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B.; Huang, J.; Liu, J.

    2014-12-01

    Anthropogenic dust aerosols are those produced by human activity, which mainly come from cropland, pasture, and urban in this paper. Because understanding of the emissions of anthropogenic dust is still very limited, a new technique for separating anthropogenic dust from natural dustusing CALIPSO dust and planetary boundary layer height retrievalsalong with a land use dataset is introduced. Using this technique, the global distribution of dust is analyzed and the relative contribution of anthropogenic and natural dust sources to regional and global emissions are estimated. Local anthropogenic dust aerosol due to human activity, such as agriculture, industrial activity, transportation, and overgrazing, accounts for about 22.3% of the global continentaldust load. Of these anthropogenic dust aerosols, more than 52.5% come from semi-arid and semi-wet regions. On the whole, anthropogenic dust emissions from East China and India are higher than other regions.

  11. An estimate of anthropogenic carbon into the north east Atlantic between Scotland and Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rerolle, V. M. C.; Esposito, M.; Hartman, S. E.; Hydes, D. J.; Achterberg, E. P.

    2012-04-01

    The uptake of anthropogenic CO2 by the oceans since the industrial revolution is considered to have considerably buffered atmospheric CO2 increases and thereby slow global climate change. However, the CO2 uptake is reducing the ocean's capacity to absorb future atmospheric CO2 which may lead to more pronounced climate forcings. We investigated the accumulation of anthropogenic carbon in the Atlantic Ocean on a section between Scotland and Iceland, as part of the UK climate monitoring strategy. This part of the North Atlantic represents an important carbon sink and hence plays a key role in moderating the climate. Repeat sampling on this section known as the "Extended Ellet Line -EEL" has be carried out on three recent cruises in 2009, 2010 and 2011 for work on the carbonate system. The most detailed dissolved inorganic carbon and alkalinity measurements from RRS Discovery cruise D365 in 2011 are used to determine the distribution of anthropogenic carbon along the EEL section. Two different approaches are used to estimate the anthropogenic carbon concentration: a back calculation technique (ΔC*) and the extended multiple linear regression method with data from the CARINA dataset. The aim is to describe the anthropogenic carbon distribution for the region by comparing the two methods of calculation approaches and relate it to the water masses. The impacts of large-scale atmospheric forcings such as the North Atlantic Oscillation and the Atlantic Multidecadal Variability on the carbon uptake rate are also considered.

  12. Transport, ultrastructural localization, and distribution of chemical forms of lead in radish (Raphanus sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Shen, Hong; Xu, Liang; Zhu, Xianwen; Li, Chao; Zhang, Wei; Xie, Yang; Gong, Yiqin; Liu, Liwang

    2015-01-01

    Lead (Pb), a ubiquitous but highly toxic heavy metal (HM), is harmful to human health through various pathways including by ingestion of contaminated vegetables. Radish is a worldwide root vegetable crop with significant health and nutritional benefits. However, little is known about Pb translocation and distribution within radish plants after its uptake by the roots. In this study, Pb stress was induced using Pb(NO3)2 in hydroponic culture, aiming to characterize the transport, ultrastructural localization, and distribution of chemical forms of Pb in different tissues of radish. The results showed that the majority of Pb (85.76-98.72%) was retained in underground organs including lateral roots, root heads and taproot skins, while a small proportion of Pb was absorbed by root flesh (0.44-1.56%) or transported to the shoot (1.28-14.24%). A large proportion of Pb (74.11-99.30%) was integrated with undissolved Pb oxalate, protein and pectates forming Pb-phosphate complexes. Moreover, a low-Pb-accumulating line of radish showed a higher proportion of Pb in water-soluble form compared with a high-Pb-accumulating line. Subcellular distribution analysis showed that a large proportion of Pb was bound to cell wall fraction in lateral roots (71.08-80.40%) and taproot skin (46.22-77.94%), while the leaves and roots had 28.36-39.37% and 27.35-46.51% of Pb stored in the soluble fraction, respectively. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed Pb precipitates in intercellular space, cell wall, plasma lemma and vacuoles. Fractionation results also showed the accumulation of Pb on the cell wall, intercellular space and vacuole, and low uptake of undissolved Pb oxalate, protein, pectates and Pb-phosphate complexes, which might be due to low transport efficiency and Pb tolerance of radish. These findings would provide insight into molecular mechanism of Pb uptake and translocation in radish and facilitate development of low-Pb-content cultivars in root vegetable

  13. Transport, ultrastructural localization, and distribution of chemical forms of lead in radish (Raphanus sativus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Shen, Hong; Xu, Liang; Zhu, Xianwen; Li, Chao; Zhang, Wei; Xie, Yang; Gong, Yiqin; Liu, Liwang

    2015-01-01

    Lead (Pb), a ubiquitous but highly toxic heavy metal (HM), is harmful to human health through various pathways including by ingestion of contaminated vegetables. Radish is a worldwide root vegetable crop with significant health and nutritional benefits. However, little is known about Pb translocation and distribution within radish plants after its uptake by the roots. In this study, Pb stress was induced using Pb(NO3)2 in hydroponic culture, aiming to characterize the transport, ultrastructural localization, and distribution of chemical forms of Pb in different tissues of radish. The results showed that the majority of Pb (85.76–98.72%) was retained in underground organs including lateral roots, root heads and taproot skins, while a small proportion of Pb was absorbed by root flesh (0.44–1.56%) or transported to the shoot (1.28–14.24%). A large proportion of Pb (74.11–99.30%) was integrated with undissolved Pb oxalate, protein and pectates forming Pb–phosphate complexes. Moreover, a low-Pb-accumulating line of radish showed a higher proportion of Pb in water-soluble form compared with a high-Pb-accumulating line. Subcellular distribution analysis showed that a large proportion of Pb was bound to cell wall fraction in lateral roots (71.08–80.40%) and taproot skin (46.22–77.94%), while the leaves and roots had 28.36–39.37% and 27.35–46.51% of Pb stored in the soluble fraction, respectively. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed Pb precipitates in intercellular space, cell wall, plasma lemma and vacuoles. Fractionation results also showed the accumulation of Pb on the cell wall, intercellular space and vacuole, and low uptake of undissolved Pb oxalate, protein, pectates and Pb–phosphate complexes, which might be due to low transport efficiency and Pb tolerance of radish. These findings would provide insight into molecular mechanism of Pb uptake and translocation in radish and facilitate development of low-Pb-content cultivars

  14. Spatial distribution, health risk assessment, and isotopic composition of lead contamination of street dusts in different functional areas of Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Han, Lanfang; Gao, Bo; Wei, Xin; Xu, Dongyu; Gao, Li

    2016-02-01

    Street dusts from heavy density traffic area (HDTA), tourism area (TA), residential area (RA), and educational area (EA) in Beijing were collected to explore the distribution, health risk assessment, and source of lead (Pb). The average concentration of Pb in TA was the highest among the four areas. Compared with other cities, Pb concentrations in Beijing were generally at moderate or low levels. The average value (14.05) of ecological risk index (RI) indicated that Pb was at "low pollution risk" status. According to the calculation on hazard index (HI), the ingestion of dust particles of children and adults was the major route of exposure to street dusts in four studied areas, followed by dermal contact. The lower values of HI than 1 further suggested that non-carcinogenic risks of Pb in the street dusts were in the low range. Comparing (206)Pb/(207)Pb and (208)Pb/(207)Pb ratios of street dusts with other environmental samples, it was found that atmospheric deposition of coal combustion dust might be the main pathway for anthropogenic Pb input to the street dusts in four functional areas. PMID:26490894

  15. Distribution and surface enrichment of radionuclides in lead-bismuth eutectic from spallation targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer-Rotzler, Bernadette; Neuhausen, Jörg; Boutellier, Viktor; Wohlmuther, Michael; Zanini, L.; David, J.-C.; Türler, Andreas; Schumann, Dorothea

    2016-07-01

    With the development of new high-power neutron spallation sources --both for scientific application and as neutron production tool for accelerator-driven systems-- the demand for experimentally obtained nuclear data on the residue nuclei production in the target is constantly increasing. In the present work, we examined two lead-bismuth-eutectic targets, irradiated with high-energy protons, concerning their radionuclide content and the spatial distribution of selected isotopes. The first one was the so-called ISOLDE target, being irradiated with 1-1.4GeV protons at CERN-ISOLDE, the second one was the MEGAPIE target, irradiated at PSI with 590MeV protons. In particular, we investigated the phenomenon of radionuclide enrichment on free surfaces in both targets. It turned out that considerable accumulation can be found especially in the case of lanthanides. The depletion process is enhanced at increased temperatures. The results are compared with theoretical predictions; some possible consequences of the findings are illustrated.

  16. Spatial distribution of the trace elements zinc, strontium and lead in human bone tissue.

    PubMed

    Pemmer, B; Roschger, A; Wastl, A; Hofstaetter, J G; Wobrauschek, P; Simon, R; Thaler, H W; Roschger, P; Klaushofer, K; Streli, C

    2013-11-01

    Trace elements are chemical elements in minute quantities, which are known to accumulate in the bone. Cortical and trabecular bones consist of bone structural units (BSUs) such as osteons and bone packets of different mineral content and are separated by cement lines. Previous studies investigating trace elements in bone lacked resolution and therefore very little is known about the local concentration of zinc (Zn), strontium (Sr) and lead (Pb) in BSUs of human bone. We used synchrotron radiation induced micro X-ray fluorescence analysis (SR μ-XRF) in combination with quantitative backscattered electron imaging (qBEI) to determine the distribution and accumulation of Zn, Sr, and Pb in human bone tissue. Fourteen human bone samples (10 femoral necks and 4 femoral heads) from individuals with osteoporotic femoral neck fractures as well as from healthy individuals were analyzed. Fluorescence intensity maps were matched with BE images and correlated with calcium (Ca) content. We found that Zn and Pb had significantly increased levels in the cement lines of all samples compared to the surrounding mineralized bone matrix. Pb and Sr levels were found to be correlated with the degree of mineralization. Interestingly, Zn intensities had no correlation with Ca levels. We have shown for the first time that there is a differential accumulation of the trace elements Zn, Pb and Sr in BSUs of human bone indicating different mechanisms of accumulation. PMID:23932972

  17. Distributions of selenium, iodine, lead, thorium and uranium in Japanese river waters

    SciTech Connect

    Tagami, K.; Uchida, S.

    2007-07-01

    Long-lived radionuclides released from nuclear facilities, such as deep underground disposal facilities, could reach humans through several transfer paths in the environment. Uses of ground water and river water for agricultural field irrigation and for drinking water are important paths. In order to understand behavior of long-lived radionuclides in the terrestrial water environment, we carried out a natural analogue study, that is, measurement of selenium (Se), iodine (I), lead (Pb), thorium (Th) and uranium (U) concentrations in 45 Japanese rivers at 10 sampling points from the upper stream to the river mouth for each river. Geometric mean concentrations for Se, I, Pb, Th and U were 0.057, 1.4, 0.039, 0.0055, 0.0109 ng/mL, respectively. Distribution patterns from upper stream to river mouth were different by elements, for instance, the concentrations of I, Th and U increased when the sampling points were nearer the river mouth, while that of Se were almost constant. For Pb, the highest value was observed in the middle part of each river in many cases. (authors)

  18. Derivation of soil thresholds for lead applying species sensitivity distribution: A case study for root vegetables.

    PubMed

    Ding, Changfeng; Ma, Yibing; Li, Xiaogang; Zhang, Taolin; Wang, Xingxiang

    2016-02-13

    The combination of food quality standard and soil-plant transfer models can be used to derive critical limits of heavy metals for agricultural soils. In this paper, a robust methodology is presented, taking the variations of plant species and cultivars and soil properties into account to derive soil thresholds for lead (Pb) applying species sensitivity distribution (SSD). Three species of root vegetables (four cultivars each for radish, carrot, and potato) were selected to investigate their sensitivity differences for accumulating Pb through greenhouse experiment. Empirical soil-plant transfer model was developed from carrot New Kuroda grown in twenty-one soils covering a wide variation in physicochemical properties and was used to normalize the bioaccumulation data of non-model cultivars. The relationship was then validated to be reliable and would not cause over-protection using data from field experimental sites and published independent studies. The added hazardous concentration for protecting 95% of the cultivars not exceeding the food quality standard (HC5add) were then calculated from the Burr Type III function fitted SSD curves. The derived soil Pb thresholds based on the added risk approach (total soil concentration subtracting the natural background part) were presented as continuous or scenario criteria depending on the combination of soil pH and CEC. PMID:26513560

  19. Spatial distribution of the trace elements zinc, strontium and lead in human bone tissue☆

    PubMed Central

    Pemmer, B.; Roschger, A.; Wastl, A.; Hofstaetter, J.G.; Wobrauschek, P.; Simon, R.; Thaler, H.W.; Roschger, P.; Klaushofer, K.; Streli, C.

    2013-01-01

    Trace elements are chemical elements in minute quantities, which are known to accumulate in the bone. Cortical and trabecular bones consist of bone structural units (BSUs) such as osteons and bone packets of different mineral content and are separated by cement lines. Previous studies investigating trace elements in bone lacked resolution and therefore very little is known about the local concentration of zinc (Zn), strontium (Sr) and lead (Pb) in BSUs of human bone. We used synchrotron radiation induced micro X-ray fluorescence analysis (SR μ-XRF) in combination with quantitative backscattered electron imaging (qBEI) to determine the distribution and accumulation of Zn, Sr, and Pb in human bone tissue. Fourteen human bone samples (10 femoral necks and 4 femoral heads) from individuals with osteoporotic femoral neck fractures as well as from healthy individuals were analyzed. Fluorescence intensity maps were matched with BE images and correlated with calcium (Ca) content. We found that Zn and Pb had significantly increased levels in the cement lines of all samples compared to the surrounding mineralized bone matrix. Pb and Sr levels were found to be correlated with the degree of mineralization. Interestingly, Zn intensities had no correlation with Ca levels. We have shown for the first time that there is a differential accumulation of the trace elements Zn, Pb and Sr in BSUs of human bone indicating different mechanisms of accumulation. PMID:23932972

  20. Comparative effects of ten dithiocarbamate and thiuram compounds on tissue distribution and excretion of lead in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Oskarsson, A.

    1987-10-01

    The dithiocarbamate and thiuram compounds, including disulfiram, were compared for their efficacies in influencing tissue distribution of a trace dose of intravenously injected lead plus /sup 203/Pb in rats. The tested compounds were sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDTC), sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate (DMDTC), tetraethylthiuram disulfide (disulfiram), a complex of zinc and manganese ethylenebisdithiocarbamate (mancozeb), manganese ethylenebisdithiocarbamate (maneb), sodium monomethyldithiocarbamate (metham), zinc propylene bisdithiocarbamate (propineb), tetramethylthiuram disulfide (thiram), zinc ethylenebisdithiocarbamate (zineb), and zinc dimethyldithiocarbamate (ziram). The results of this study show that interactions can occur between lead and DEDTC, DMDTC, disulfiram, metham, thiram, and ziram, resulting in increased levels of lead in brain and probably potentiation of the neurotoxic effects of lead.

  1. A survey of spatially distributed exterior dust lead loadings in New York City

    SciTech Connect

    Caravanos, Jack; Weiss, Arlene L.; Blaise, Marc J.; Jaeger, Rudolph J. . E-mail: jaegerr@envmed.com

    2006-02-15

    This work documents ambient lead dust deposition values (lead loading) for the boroughs of New York City in 2003-2004. Currently, no regulatory standards exist for exterior concentrations of lead in settled dust. This is in contrast to the clearance and risk assessment standards that exist for interior residential dust. The reported potential for neurobehavioral toxicity and adverse cognitive development in children due to lead exposure prompts public health concerns about undocumented lead sources. Such sources may include settled dust of outdoor origin. Dust sampling throughout the five boroughs of NYC was done from the top horizontal portion of pedestrian traffic control signals (PTCS) at selected street intersections along main thoroughfares. The data (n=214 samples) show that lead in dust varies within each borough with Brooklyn having the highest median concentration (730{mu}g/ft{sup 2}), followed in descending order by Staten Island (452{mu}g/ft{sup 2}), the Bronx (382{mu}g/ft{sup 2}), Queens (198{mu}g/ft{sup 2}) and finally, Manhattan (175{mu}g/ft{sup 2}). When compared to the HUD/EPA indoor lead in dust standard of 40{mu}g/ft{sup 2}, our data show that this value is exceeded in 86% of the samples taken. An effort was made to determine the source of the lead in the dust atop of the PTCS. The lead in the dust and the yellow signage paint (which contains lead) were compared using isotopic ratio analysis. Results showed that the lead-based paint chip samples from intact signage did not isotopically match the dust wipe samples taken from the same surface. We know that exterior dust containing lead contributes to interior dust lead loading. Therefore, settled leaded dust in the outdoor environment poses a risk for lead exposure to children living in urban areas, namely, areas with elevated childhood blood lead levels and background lead dust levels from a variety of unidentified sources.

  2. In vivo distribution and excretion studies and in vitro blood studies on the kinetics of lead-203 in beagle dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Coombs, Mark A.

    1980-01-01

    The distribution of carrier free lead-203 between plasma and cells of canine blood in vitro was measured. Activity in the plasma decreased to less than 5% of the initial blood activity during the first 15 min and then exponentially with a half time of 160 min. Incubation in cell free plasma before addition to whole blood transformed the isotope, decreasing the amount subsequently associated with cells. In animal studies, activity was measured in plasma, blood cells, urine, and feces after exposure to lead-203. In one group, the animals were exposed by intravenous injection of dilute citric acid solutions of isotope. In a second group, carrier free isotope which had been transformed by incubation in plasma was injected intravenously. The kinetics of the distribution of the isotope differed between the two experimental groups. After injection of the transformed lead, the lead-203 content of the blood cell fraction rose from 10% of the dose at 5 min to 21% to 43% at 13 h. The red cell activity after injection of citric acid solutions of lead-203 remained between 50 and 60% of the dose from 5 min to 12 h post exposure. Excretion of lead in the urine during the first day after injection of transformed lead ranged from 5 to 45% of the dose, while that of citric acid solutions of lead was between 1 and 2%. Linear compartmental models for distribution of the isotope were developed for both in vitro and in vivo experimental systems. In three additional experiments, animals were exposed to lead-203 extravascularly. In one, using a dilute citric acid solution of the isotope, plasma activity resembled that observed after intravenous injection, suggesting that isotope was transformed by extravascular fluids before reaching the circulation. In the two remaining experiments the animals were exposed to lead-203 by gavage. The results suggest that lead absorbed from the gut may have been transformed before reaching the circulation. (ERB)

  3. Next-to-leading order QCD predictions for Z,{gamma}*+3-jet distributions at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, C. F.; Bern, Z.; Ita, H.; Dixon, L. J.; Gleisberg, T.; Febres Cordero, F.; Forde, D.; Kosower, D. A.; Maitre, D.

    2010-10-01

    Using BlackHat in conjunction with SHERPA, we have computed next-to-leading order QCD predictions for a variety of distributions in Z,{gamma}*+1, 2, 3-jet production at the Tevatron, where the Z boson or off-shell photon decays into an electron-positron pair. We find good agreement between the next-to-leading order results for jet p{sub T} distributions and measurements by CDF and D0. We also present jet-production ratios, or probabilities of finding one additional jet. As a function of vector-boson p{sub T}, the ratios have distinctive features which we describe in terms of a simple model capturing leading logarithms and phase-space and parton-distribution-function suppression.

  4. Experimental Pressure Distributions over Wing Tips at Mach Number 1.9 I : Wing Tip with Subsonic Leading Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagger, James M; Mirels, Harold

    1949-01-01

    An investigation was conducted at a Mach number of 1.91 to determine spanwise pressure distribution over a wing tip in a region influenced by a sharp subsonic leading edge swept back at 70 degrees. Except for pressure distribution on the top surface in the immediate vicinity of the subsonic leading edge, the maximum difference between linearized theory and experimental data was 2 1/2 percent (of free-stream dynamic pressure) for angles of attack up to 4 degrees and 7 percent for angles of attack up to 8 degrees. Pressures on the top surface nearest the subsonic edge indicated local expansions beyond values predicted by linearized theory.

  5. Comparative Climate Responses of Anthropogenic Greenhouse Gases, All Major Aerosol Components, Black Carbon, and Methane, Accounting for the Evolution of the Aerosol Mixing State and of Clouds/Precipitation from Multiple Aerosol Size Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, M. Z.

    2005-12-01

    Several modeling studies to date have simulated the global climate response of anthropogenic greenhouse gases and bulk (non-size-resolved) sulfate or generic aerosol particles together, but no study has examined the climate response of greenhouse gases simultaneously with all major size- and composition resolved aerosol particle components. Such a study is important for improving our understanding of the effects of anthropogenic pollutants on climate. Here, the GATOR-GCMOM model is used to study the global climate response of (a) all major greenhouse gases and size-resolved aerosol components, (b) all major greenhouse gases alone, (c) fossil-fuel soot (black carbon, primary organic matter, sulfuric acid, bisulfate, sulfate), and (d) methane. Aerosol components treated in all simulations included water, black carbon, primary organic carbon, secondary organic carbon, sulfuric acid, bisulfate, sulfate, nitrate, chloride, ammonium, sodium, hydrogen ion, soil dust, and pollen/spores. Fossil-fuel soot (FFS) was emitted into its own size distribution. All other components, including biofuel and biomass soot, sea-spray, soil dust, etc., were emitted into a second distribution (MIX). The FFS distribution grew by condensation of secondary organic matter and sulfuric acid, hydration of water, and dissolution of nitric acid, ammonia, and hydrochloric acid. It self-coagulated and heterocoagulated with the MIX distribution, which also grew by condensation, hydration, and dissolution. Treatment of separate distributions for FFS allowed FFS to evolve from an external mixture to an internal mixture. In both distributions, black carbon was treated as a core component for optical calculations. Both aerosol distributions served as CCN during explicit size-resolved cloud formation. The resulting clouds grew by coagulation and condensation, coagulated with interstitial aerosol particles, and fell to the surface as rain and snow, carrying aerosol constituents with them. Thus, cloud

  6. Geomorphology of anthropogenic landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofia, Giulia; Tarolli, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    The construction of urban areas and the development of road networks leave a significant signature on the Earth surface, providing a geomorphological evidence to support the idea that humans are nowadays a geomorphic agent having deep effects on the morphological organization of the landscape. The reconstruction or identification of anthropogenic topographies, therefore, provides a mechanism for quantifying anthropogenic changes to the landscape systems in the Anthropocene. Following this research line, the present study tests the effectiveness of a recently published topographic index, the Slope Local Length of Autocorrelation (SLLAC, Sofia et al. 2014) to portrait anthropogenic geomorphology, focusing in particular on road network density, and urban complexity (UCI). At first, the research considers the increasing of anthropic structures and the resulting changes in the SLLAC and in two derived parameters (mean SLLAC per km2 and SLLAC roughness, or Surface Peak Curvature -Spc). As a second step, considering the SLLAC derived indices, the anthropogenic geomorphology is automatically depicted using a k-means clustering algorithm. In general, the increasing of road network density or of the UCI is positively correlated to the mean SLLAC per km2, while the Spc is negatively correlated to the increasing of the anthropic structures. Areas presenting different road network organization are effectively captured considering multiple combinations of the defined parameters. Landscapes with small scattered towns, and a network with long roads in a dendritic shape (with hierarchical branching) are characterized simultaneously by high mean SLLAC and low Spc. Large and complex urban areas served by rectilinear networks with numerous short straight lines and right angles, have either a maximized mean SLLAC or a minimized Spc or both. In all cases, the anthropogenic landscape identified by the procedure is comparable to the ones identified manually from orthophoto, with the

  7. Laser ablation ICP-MS analysis of the radial distribution of lead in the femur of Alligator mississippiensis.

    PubMed

    Seltzer, Michael D; Lance, Valentine A; Elsey, Ruth M

    2006-06-15

    A laser ablation ICP-MS technique has been used to examine the radial distribution of lead in transverse sections of alligator femur. Annual bone growth in the femur results in the deposition of incremental layers of calcified tissue at the periphery of existing bone. Patterns of lead concentration within these layers provide a record of time-dependent accumulation from which exposure history can potentially be deduced. Femur specimens obtained from captive-reared alligators exhibited levels of lead accumulation that were entirely consistent with previously documented clinical signs of lead intoxication. In contrast, femurs obtained from wild alligators contained only minor amounts of lead that were likely accumulated as a result of incidental exposure. PMID:15982720

  8. Distributed Leadership in Action: Leading High-Performing Leadership Teams in English Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Tony; Glover, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Heroic models of leadership based on the role of the principal have been supplemented by an emerging recognition of the value of "distributed leadership". The work of effective senior leadership teams (SLTs) is an important manifestation of distributed leadership, but there has been only limited research addressing the relationship between this…

  9. Fostering the Capacity for Distributed Leadership: A Post-Heroic Approach to Leading School Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klar, Hans W.; Huggins, Kristin Shawn; Hammonds, Hattie L.; Buskey, Frederick C.

    2016-01-01

    Principals are being encouraged to distribute leadership to increase schools' organizational capacities, and enhance student growth and learning. Extant research on distributed leadership practices provides an emerging basis for adopting such approaches. Yet, relatively less attention has been paid to examining the principal's role in fostering…

  10. A Study on Voltage Rise Control Effect by Leading Power Factor Operation of PVs Considering Tap Change of Distribution Transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimaru, Masa-Aki; Tamachi, Hideki; Komami, Shintaroh

    Voltage rise problem in distribution networks has been discussed as the foremost concern against the penetration of large amount of photovoltaics (PVs). As a solution of such problem, using voltage regulation facility such as SVC (Static Var Compensator) or Loop power flow controller are proposed. However, it might require major investments in the distribution network and that means the cost would be imposed on the nation. In this paper, the authors focus on latent ability of the present distribution network and PVs to find solution against the problem and propose a low cost solution to mitigate the voltage rise by using constant leading power factor operation of PVs. The distribution voltages are calculated in case of increasing highly penetrated PVs, where it is very important to make an aggregated model of the distribution networks including loads and PVs. The authors aggregate a lot of loads and PVs by using an aggregation method called “Y-connection”. As a result of having simulated with the aggregated realistic model of distribution networks, the authors confirmed that using a combination of leading power factor operation by Q = -0.2P and LDC of distribution transformer make it possible to maintain adequate voltage without voltage regulation facility such as SVC.

  11. Pressure distributions from subsonic tests of an advanced laminar-flow-control wing with leading- and trailing-edge flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applin, Zachary T.; Gentry, Garl L., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    An unswept, semispan wing model equipped with full-span leading- and trailing-edge flaps was tested in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel to determine the effect of high-lift components on the aerodynamics of an advanced laminar-flow-control (LFC) airfoil section. Chordwise pressure distributions near the midsemispan were measured for four configurations: cruise, trailing-edge flap only, and trailing-edge flap with a leading-edge Krueger flap of either 0.10 or 0.12 chord. Part 1 of this report (under separate cover) presents a representative sample of the plotted pressure distribution data for each configuration tested. Part 2 presents the entire set of plotted and tabulated pressure distribution data. The data are presented without analysis.

  12. Potential sources and racial disparities in the residential distribution of soil arsenic and lead among pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Davis, Harley T; Aelion, C Marjorie; Liu, Jihong; Burch, James B; Cai, Bo; Lawson, Andrew B; McDermott, Suzanne

    2016-05-01

    Exposure to arsenic (As) or lead (Pb) has been associated with adverse health outcomes, and high-risk populations can be disproportionately exposed to these metals in soils. The objectives of this study were: to examine if predicted soil As and Pb concentrations at maternal residences of South Carolina (SC) low-income mothers differed based on maternal race (non-Hispanic black versus white), to examine whether differences in predicted residential soil As and Pb concentrations among black and white mothers differed by socioeconomic status (SES), and to examine whether such disparities persisted after controlling for anthropogenic sources of these metals, including direction from, and distance to industrial facilities. Kriged soil As and Pb concentrations were estimated at maternal residences in 11 locations in SC, and models with maternal race and individual and US Census block group level SES measures were examined. US Environmental Protection Agency Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) facility As and Pb releases categorized by distance and direction to block groups in which mothers resided were also identified, as were proxy measures for historic use of leaded gasoline (road density) and Pb-based paint (categories of median year home built by US Census block group). Consistent racial disparities were observed for predicted residential soil As and Pb concentrations, and the disparity was stronger for Pb than As (betas from adjusted models for black mothers were 0.12 and 2.2 for As and Pb, respectively, all p<0.006). Higher road density and older homes in block groups were more closely associated with higher predicted soil As and Pb concentrations than on-site releases of As and Pb categorized by facility location. These findings suggest that non-Hispanic black mothers in this study population had elevated residential As and Pb soil concentrations, after adjusting for SES, and that soil As and Pb concentrations were not associated with recent industrial releases. PMID

  13. Distribution and transport of selected anthropogenic organic compounds on Mississippi River suspended sediment (U.S.A.), May/June 1988

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, C.E.; Pereira, W.E.; Leiker, T.J.

    1994-01-01

    The distribution and transport of selected hydrophobic halogenated organic compounds on suspended sediment from the lower Mississippi River were determined using discharge-weighted sampling with concurrent discharge measurements. Trends in compound concentration from upstream to downstream and the effects of selected tributaries were determined. The compounds identified on the suspended sediment include pentachlorobenzene, hexachlorobenzene, pentachloroanisole, dacthal, chlordane (trans-), nonachlor (trans-), chlorthalonil, and penta-, hexa-, hepta- and octachlorobiphenyls. Loads of most of the compounds increased from upstream to downstream on the main stem of the Mississippi River. Of the tributaries studied, the Ohio River had the most significant effect on the loads.The distribution and transport of selected hydrophobic halogenated organic compounds on suspended sediment from the lower Mississippi River were determined using discharge-weighted sampling with concurrent discharge measurements. Trends in compound concentration from upstream to downstream and the effects of selected tributaries were determined. The compounds identified on the suspended sediment include pentachlorobenzene, hexachlorobenzene, pentachloroanisole, dacthal, chlordane (trans-), nonachlor (trans-), chlorthalonil, and penta-, hexa-, hepta- and octachlorobiphenyls. Loads of most of the compounds increased from upstream to downstream on the main stem of the Mississippi River. Of the tributaries studied, the Ohio River had the most significant effect on the loads.

  14. Lead in the environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pattee, O.H.; Pain, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    Anthropogenic uses of lead have probably altered its availability and environmental distribution more than any other toxic element. Consequently, lead concentrations in many living organisms may be approaching thresholds of toxicity for the adverse effects of lead. Such thresholds are difficult to define, as they vary with the chemical and physical form of lead, exposure regime, other elements present and also vary both within and between species. The technological capability to accurately quantify low lead concentrations has increased over the last decade, and physiological and behavioral effects have been measured in wildlife with tissue lead concentrations below those previously considered safe for humans.s.236 Consequently. lead criteria for the protection of wildlife and human health are frequently under review, and 'thresholds' of lead toxicity are being reconsidered. Proposed lead criteria for the protection of natural resources have been reviewed by Eisler. Uptake of lead by plants is limited by its generally low availability in soils and sediments, and toxicity may be limited by storage mechanisms and its apparently limited translocation within most plants. Lead does not generally accumulate within the foliar parts of plants, which limits its transfer to higher trophic levels. Although lead may concentrate in plant and animal tissues, no evidence of biomagnification exists. Acid deposition onto surface waters and soils with low buffering capacity may influence the availability of lead for uptake by plants and animals, and this may merit investigation at susceptible sites. The biological significance of chronic low-level lead exposure to wildlife is sometimes difficult to quantify. Animals living in urban environments or near point sources of lead emission are inevitably subject to greater exposure to lead and enhanced risk of lead poisoning. Increasingly strict controls on lead emissions in many countries have reduced exposure to lead from some sources

  15. Diagnosis and Design for School Improvement: Using a Distributed Perspective to Lead and Manage Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spillane, James P.; Coldren, Amy Franz

    2011-01-01

    This practical resource highlights the critical importance of diagnosis and design in the work of leading and managing for school improvement. The authors maintain that today's school leaders and managers, under intense pressure to improve student learning, cannot simply adopt and implement pre-packaged reforms manufactured outside the school.…

  16. [Distribution characteristic and bioaccessibility of lead in kindergarten dust of Wuhan City].

    PubMed

    Sun, Guang-Yi; Bi, Xiang-Yang; Li, Zhong-Gen; Chen, Yu-Peng

    2011-11-01

    The characteristics of lead pollution and the associated health risk of children for the dust samples from 69 representative kindergartens in different type districts of Wuhan were investigated. Total lead concentration and bioaccessibility according to physiologically based extraction test (PBET) were determined. Results showed that the levels of lead concentration in dust ranged from 36.3 to 1 523 mg x kg(-1) with an average value of 169 mg x kg(-1), lower than published data from other areas. The great spatial variation of Pb in dust indicated that specific sites have been seriously contaminated by Pb. The bioaccessibilities of Pb in dusts were 35% +/- 15% at gastric phases and 7.6% +/- 5.8% at intestinal phases. According to the predicted model with the Integration Exposure Uptake Biokinetic Model (IEUBK), the geometric mean blood lead of children (0-6 years) was 2.73 microg x dL(-1), of which over 10 microg x dL(-1) was less than 0.001% and exceeded 5 microg x dL(-1) was 3.32%. PMID:22295628

  17. THE OCCURRENCE OF CONTAMINANT ACCUMULATION IN LEAD PIPE SCALES FROM DOMESTIC DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous work has shown that contaminants, such as Al, As and Ra, can accumulate in drinking water distribution system solids. The release of accumulated contaminants back into the water supply could result in elevated levels at consumers’ taps, and current monitoring practices d...

  18. Lead and other metals distribution in local cooking salt from the Fofi salt- spring in Akwana, Middle Benue Trough, Nigeria

    SciTech Connect

    Dim, L.A.; Kinyua, A.M.; Munyithya, J.M.; Adetunji, J. )

    1991-06-01

    Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) technique has been used to determine the concentrations of lead(Pb) and other heavy metals in local cooking salts (LCS) from Akwana village, Middle Benue Trough, Nigeria. The comparison of the distribution of these metals in LCS, fake salt (FS) and the usual common salts (CS) are given. Lead was found to be enriched in LCS by factor exceeding 200 times compared to the other salts. The origin of Pb contamination in the LCS is examined and its effects on the inhabitants of the village are considered.

  19. Lead in ancient Rome's city waters.

    PubMed

    Delile, Hugo; Blichert-Toft, Janne; Goiran, Jean-Philippe; Keay, Simon; Albarède, Francis

    2014-05-01

    It is now universally accepted that utilization of lead for domestic purposes and water distribution presents a major health hazard. The ancient Roman world was unaware of these risks. How far the gigantic network of lead pipes used in ancient Rome compromised public health in the city is unknown. Lead isotopes in sediments from the harbor of Imperial Rome register the presence of a strong anthropogenic component during the beginning of the Common Era and the Early Middle Ages. They demonstrate that the lead pipes of the water distribution system increased Pb contents in drinking water of the capital city by up to two orders of magnitude over the natural background. The Pb isotope record shows that the discontinuities in the pollution of the Tiber by lead are intimately entwined with the major issues affecting Late Antique Rome and its water distribution system. PMID:24753588

  20. Detection of anthropogenic dust using CALIPSO lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Liu, J.; Chen, B.; Nasiri, S. L.

    2015-04-01

    Anthropogenic dusts are those produced by human activities on disturbed soils, which are mainly cropland, pasture, and urbanized regions and are a subset of the total dust load which includes natural sources from desert regions. Our knowledge of anthropogenic dusts is still very limited due to a lack of data on source distribution and magnitude, and on their effect on radiative forcing which may be comparable to other anthropogenic aerosols. To understand the contribution of anthropogenic dust to the total global dust load and its effect on radiative transfer and climate, it is important to identify them from total dust. In this study, a new technique for distinguishing anthropogenic dust from natural dust is proposed by using Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) dust and planetary boundary layer (PBL) height retrievals along with a land use dataset. Using this technique, the global distribution of dust is analyzed and the relative contribution of anthropogenic and natural dust sources to regional and global emissions are estimated. Results reveal that local anthropogenic dust aerosol due to human activity, such as agriculture, industrial activity, transportation, and overgrazing, accounts for about 25% of the global continental dust load. Of these anthropogenic dust aerosols, more than 53% come from semi-arid and semi-wet regions. Annual mean anthropogenic dust column burden (DCB) values range from 0.42 g m-2 with a maximum in India to 0.12 g m-2 with a minimum in North America. A better understanding of anthropogenic dust emission will enable us to focus on human activities in these critical regions and with such knowledge we will be better able to improve global dust models and to explore the effects of anthropogenic emission on radiative forcing, climate change and air quality in the future.

  1. Anthropogenic climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Budyko, M.I.; Izreal, Yu.A.

    1991-01-01

    The climate modeling community would agree that the present generation of theoretical models cannot adequately answer important question about the climatic implications of increasing concentrations of CO[sub 2] and other greenhouse gases. Society, however, is presently deciding by its action, or inaction, the policies that will deal with the extent and results of our collective flatulence. In this situation, an engineering approach to estimating the developing pattern of anthropogenic climate change is appropriate. For example, Budyko has argued that, while scientists may have made great advances in modelling the flow around an airfoil, engineers make extensive use of empirical equations and measurements to design airplanes that fly. Budyko and Izreal have produced an encyclopedic treatise summarizing the results of Soviet researchers in applying empirical and semiempirical methods to estimating future climatic patterns, and some of their ensuring effects. These techniques consist mainly of statistical relationships derived from 1850-1950 network data and of patterns revealed by analysis of paleoclimatic data. An important part of the Soviet effort in anthropogenic climate-change studies is empirical techniques that represent independent verification of the results of theoretical climate models.

  2. Uptake of anthropogenic CO/sub 2/ by lateral transport models of the ocean based on the distribution of bomb-produced /sup 14/C

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, T.H.

    1986-01-01

    The pattern of global water column inventories of bomb-produced /sup 14/C suggests that a sizeable portion of bomb /sup 14/C that entered the Antarctic, northern Pacific, and tropical oceans has been transported to adjacent temperate regions. Models of lateral transport of surface water in the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans are based on this distribution pattern. Upwelling of bomb-/sup 14/C-free water from below takes place in the Antarctic, northern Pacific, and tropical regions; downwelling of surface water occurs in the temperate oceans and northern Atlantic. Uptake of excess CO/sub 2/ by these models is calculated using the observed Mauna Loa pCO/sub 2/ record as an input function. Results indicate that 35% of fossil fuel CO/sub 2/ is taken up by these model oceans during the period 1958-1980. Considering the observed airborne fraction of 0.55, it appears that ca 10% of the global fossil fuel CO/sub 2/ is still missing.

  3. X7R Lead-Complex Perovskite Dielectrics with Inhomogeneous Compositional Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchikoba, Fumio; Ito, Takashi; Nakajima, Shigeyuki

    1995-05-01

    Excess- WO3 Pb(Mg1/2W1/2)O3-PbTiO3-Pb(Ni2/3Nb2/3)O3 polycrystalline dielectric material was investigated. This material met EIA X7R specifications (the change of the capacitance is less than 15% over the temperature range from -55° C to +125° C). The material showed inhomogeneous compositional distributions within grains that consisted of three main parts, each possessing a different temperature dependence of the dielectric constant. It was found that the flat-temperature dependence of the dielectric constant in this system could be attributed to this inhomogeneous compositional distribution. Using this material, multilayer ceramic capacitors were fabricated.

  4. The leading twist light-cone distribution amplitudes for the S-wave and P-wave Bc mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ji; Yang, Deshan

    2016-07-01

    The light-cone distribution amplitudes (LCDAs) serve as important nonperturbative inputs for the study of hard exclusive processes. In this paper, we calculate ten LCDAs at twist-2 for the S-wave and P-wave B c mesons up to the next-to-leading order (NLO) of the strong coupling α s and leading order of the velocity expansion. Each one of these ten LCDAs is expressed as a product of a perturbatively calculable distribution and a universal NRQCD matrix-element. By use of the spin symmetry, only two NRQCD matrix-elements will be involved. The reduction of the number of non-perturbative inputs will improve the predictive power of collinear factorization.

  5. Gas-phase particle size distributions and lead loss during spray pyrolysis of (Bi,Pb)--Sr--Ca--Cu--O

    SciTech Connect

    Gurav, A.S.; Kodas, T.T.; Joutsensaari, J.; Kauppinen, E.I.; Zilliacus, R.

    1995-07-01

    Gas-phase particle size distributions and lead loss were measured during formation of (Bi,Pb)--Sr--Ca--Cu--O and pure PbO particles by spray pyrolysis at different temperatures. A differential mobility analyzer (DMA) in conjunction with a condensation particle counter (CPC) was used to monitor the gas-phase particle size distributions, and a Berner-type low-pressure impactor was used to obtain mass size distributions and a Berner-type low-pressure impactor was used to obtain mass size distributions and size-classified samples for chemical analysis. For (Bi,Pb)--Sr--Ca--Cu--O, as the processing temperature was raised from 200 to 700 {degree}C, the number average particle size decreased due to metal nitrate decomposition, intraparticle reactions forming mixed-metal oxides and particle densification. The geometric number mean particle diameter was 0.12 {mu}m at 200 {degree}C and reduced to 0.08 and 0.07 {mu}m, respectively, at 700 and 900 {degree}C. When the reactor temperature was raised from 700 and 800 {degree}C to 900 {degree}C, a large number ({similar_to}10{sup 7} no./cm{sup 3}) of new ultrafine particles were formed from PbO vapor released from the particles and the reactor walls. Particles made at temperatures up to 700 {degree}C maintained their initial stoichiometry over the whole range of particle size monitored, however; those made at 800 {degree}C and above were heavily depleted in lead in the size range 0.5--5.0 {mu}m. The evaporative losses of lead oxide from (Bi,Pb)--Sr--Ca--Cu--O particles were compared with the losses from PbO particles to gain insight into the pathways involved in lead loss and the role of intraparticle processes in controlling it.

  6. Distribution of lead and barium in gunshot residue particles derived from 0.22 caliber rimfire ammunition.

    PubMed

    Coumbaros, J; Kirkbride, K P; Kobus, H; Sarvas, I

    2001-11-01

    0.22 caliber rimfire ammunition is commonly encountered in firearms incidents in Australia. This paper reports on work which has confirmed the nonhomogeneous nature of gunshot residue (GSR) particles and that the lead and barium distribution within particles varies significantly with the particle size and structure. The outcome has been an improved understanding of how the particle formation influences the ability to determine the origin of GSR derived specifically from 0.22 caliber rim fire ammunition. PMID:11714145

  7. Serum immunoglobulins and lymphocyte subset distributions in children and adults living in communities assessed for lead and cadmium exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Sarasua, S.M.; Vogt, R.F.; Henderson, L.O.; Jones, P.A.; Lybarger, J.A.

    2000-05-12

    This study assessed the impact of environmental cadmium and lead exposure on the immune system of more than 2,000 children and adults. Serum immunoglobulins [immunoglobulins (lg) A, G, and M] and peripheral blood lymphocyte phenotypes (T cells, B cells, NK cells, and CD4/CD8 subsets) were measured in a total of 2041 children and adults who lived either in sites with elevated soil levels of cadmium and lead (n = 1,561) or in comparison communities (n = 480). The blood lead and urine cadmium levels of participants were somewhat higher than national average mean blood lead levels were 7 {micro}g/dl for participants aged 6--35 mo; 6 {micro}g/dl for participants aged 36--71 mo, 4 {micro}g/dl for participants aged 6--15 yr; and 4.3 {micro}g/dl for participants aged 16--75 yr. Multivariate analysis indicated no marked differences in any of the immune marker distributions attributed to lead for adults or children over 3 yr of age. However, in children under age 3, increased blood lead levels, principally those over 15 {micro}g/dl were associated with increases in IgA, IgC, IgM, and circulating B/lymphocytes. Youth adults urine cadmium levels over 1.5 {micro}g/g were associated with higher levels of IgA and circulating B.

  8. Accumulation and Distribution of Lead and Chromium in Laboratory-Scale Constructed Wetlands Inoculated with Metal-Tolerant Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Amabilis-Sosa, Leonel E; Siebe, Christina; Moeller-Chávez, Gabriela; Durán-Domínguez-de-Bazúa, María del Carmen

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation and distribution of lead and chromium was tested in a laboratory-scale constructed wetland (CW) inoculated with metal-tolerant bacteria. Two non-inoculated systems also were evaluated, one planted and the other unplanted. Mass balances indicated that 57% of chromium input was accumulated into inoculated CW after 151 days of operation. The distribution was similar in support media and vegetation, in which 78% was transferred to aerial part. Similarly Pb was accumulated 29% in the support media and 39% in vegetation, which was distributed 52% in rhizome and 48% in aerial part. Significantly lower amounts of heavy metals were accumulated in non-inoculated systems than in the inoculated wetlands (p < 0.005). In addition, a markedly higher proportion of chromium in aerial vegetation and of lead in the suspended fraction of the effluent was exhibited, which raises a subsequent recovery of the metal by harvest and settling, respectively. Results indicate that CW inoculated with metal-tolerant bacteria might be a suitable option for treating wastewater with content of lead and chromium. PMID:26023800

  9. Lead distribution and possible sources along vertical zone spectrum of typical ecosystems in the Gongga Mountain, eastern Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ji; Tang, Ronggui; Sun, Shouqin; Yang, Dandan; She, Jia; Yang, Peijun

    2015-08-01

    A total of 383 samples from soil, plant, litterfall and precipitation in four typical ecosystems of Gongga Mountain were collected. Pb concentrations of samples were measured and analyzed. The results showed mean Pb concentrations in different soil layers were in the order of O > A > C, and mean Pb concentrations of the aboveground parts of plant was 3.60 ± 2.54 mg kg-1, with the minimum value of 0.77 mg kg-1 and the maximum value of 10.90 mg kg-1. Pb concentrations in soil's O-horizon and A-horizon showed a downward trend with increasing elevation (the determination coefficient R2 was 0.9478, 0.7918 and 0.9759 respectively). In contrast to other soil layers, the level of Pb concentrations in O-horizon (incomplete decomposition) was significantly high. Litterfall decomposition, atmospheric deposition and the unique climate could be main factors leading high Pb accumulation in soil's O-horizon. What's more, significant correlation (R2 = 0.8126, P < 0.05) was found between Pb concentrations in fine roots and soil's A-horizon confirms that fine roots could adsorb and accumulate Pb materials in soil. In general, the fact that Pb inputted into the typical ecosystems in the Gongga Mountain via long-range transportation and deposition of the atmosphere from external Pb sources could be confirmed by the HYSPLIT model and the ratio of CPb/CAl in plants (leaves) and CPb/CAl in litterfall. The mining activities and increasing anthropogenic activities (tourism development) could be main sources of Pb in this area. In order to better understand Pb sources and eco-risks of these typical ecosystems, litterfall decomposition characteristics, biomass of productivity of forest ecosystem, Pb isotopic tracing among air mass, twigs, leaves, litterfall and O-horizon soil in this vertical belt should also be taken into consideration.

  10. Distribution of metals and accumulation of lead by different tissues in the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis (L.)

    SciTech Connect

    Pyatt, F.B.; Pyatt, A.J.; Pentreath, V.W.

    1997-07-01

    The concentrations of several metals in different body tissues of the freshwater snail, Lymnaea stagnalis (L.), collected from an uncontaminated environment, were measured by electron probe X-ray microanalysis. Significant concentrations of the potentially toxic elements manganese, titanium, and copper were detected in all tissues, although they were not detectable in the water sampled at collection; bioaccumulation is thus evidenced. Highest concentrations of manganese and copper were present in the shell, while highest concentrations of titanium were present in the head and foot. Experimental snails were continuously exposed to lead chloride (lead at 5 ppm) for an experimental period of 3 weeks. Both elements were accumulated to different extents by the snail tissues but with high concentrations again in the head of the animals, and chloride also in the visceral hump. No significant alterations in the distribution of the other elements measured were observed in the lead chloride-exposed animals.

  11. Discrete Step Sizes of Molecular Motors Lead to Bimodal Non-Gaussian Velocity Distributions under Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Huong T.; Chakrabarti, Shaon; Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D.

    2016-08-01

    Fluctuations in the physical properties of biological machines are inextricably linked to their functions. Distributions of run lengths and velocities of processive molecular motors, like kinesin-1, are accessible through single-molecule techniques, but rigorous theoretical models for these probabilities are lacking. Here, we derive exact analytic results for a kinetic model to predict the resistive force (F )-dependent velocity [P (v )] and run length [P (n )] distribution functions of generic finitely processive molecular motors. Our theory quantitatively explains the zero force kinesin-1 data for both P (n ) and P (v ) using the detachment rate as the only parameter. In addition, we predict the F dependence of these quantities. At nonzero F , P (v ) is non-Gaussian and is bimodal with peaks at positive and negative values of v , which is due to the discrete step size of kinesin-1. Although the predictions are based on analyses of kinesin-1 data, our results are general and should hold for any processive motor, which walks on a track by taking discrete steps.

  12. Discrete Step Sizes of Molecular Motors Lead to Bimodal Non-Gaussian Velocity Distributions under Force.

    PubMed

    Vu, Huong T; Chakrabarti, Shaon; Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D

    2016-08-12

    Fluctuations in the physical properties of biological machines are inextricably linked to their functions. Distributions of run lengths and velocities of processive molecular motors, like kinesin-1, are accessible through single-molecule techniques, but rigorous theoretical models for these probabilities are lacking. Here, we derive exact analytic results for a kinetic model to predict the resistive force (F)-dependent velocity [P(v)] and run length [P(n)] distribution functions of generic finitely processive molecular motors. Our theory quantitatively explains the zero force kinesin-1 data for both P(n) and P(v) using the detachment rate as the only parameter. In addition, we predict the F dependence of these quantities. At nonzero F, P(v) is non-Gaussian and is bimodal with peaks at positive and negative values of v, which is due to the discrete step size of kinesin-1. Although the predictions are based on analyses of kinesin-1 data, our results are general and should hold for any processive motor, which walks on a track by taking discrete steps. PMID:27564000

  13. Lead (Pb) and other metals in New York City community garden soils: factors influencing contaminant distributions.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Rebecca G; Spliethoff, Henry M; Ribaudo, Lisa N; Lopp, Donna M; Shayler, Hannah A; Marquez-Bravo, Lydia G; Lambert, Veronique T; Ferenz, Gretchen S; Russell-Anelli, Jonathan M; Stone, Edie B; McBride, Murray B

    2014-04-01

    Urban gardens provide affordable fresh produce to communities with limited access to healthy food but may also increase exposure to lead (Pb) and other soil contaminants. Metals analysis of 564 soil samples from 54 New York City (NYC) community gardens found at least one sample exceeding health-based guidance values in 70% of gardens. However, most samples (78%) did not exceed guidance values, and medians were generally below those reported in NYC soil and other urban gardening studies. Barium (Ba) and Pb most frequently exceeded guidance values and along with cadmium (Cd) were strongly correlated with zinc (Zn), a commonly measured nutrient. Principal component analysis suggested that contaminants varied independently from organic matter and geogenic metals. Contaminants were associated with visible debris and a lack of raised beds; management practices (e.g., importing uncontaminated soil) have likely reduced metals concentrations. Continued exposure reduction efforts would benefit communities already burdened by environmental exposures. PMID:24502997

  14. Lead (Pb) and other metals in New York City community garden soils: factors influencing contaminant distributions

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Rebecca G.; Spliethoff, Henry M.; Ribaudo, Lisa N.; Lopp, Donna M.; Shayler, Hannah A.; Marquez-Bravo, Lydia G.; Lambert, Veronique T.; Ferenz, Gretchen S.; Russell-Anelli, Jonathan M.; Stone, Edie B.; McBride, Murray B.

    2014-01-01

    Urban gardens provide affordable fresh produce to communities with limited access to healthy food but may also increase exposure to lead (Pb) and other soil contaminants. Metals analysis of 564 soil samples from 54 New York City (NYC) community gardens found at least one sample exceeding health-based guidance values in 70% of gardens. However, most samples (78%) did not exceed guidance values, and medians were generally below those reported in NYC soil and other urban gardening studies. Barium (Ba) and Pb most frequently exceeded guidance values and along with cadmium (Cd) were strongly correlated with zinc (Zn), a commonly measured nutrient. Principal component analysis suggested that contaminants varied independently from organic matter and geogenic metals. Contaminants were associated with visible debris and a lack of raised beds; management practices (e.g., importing uncontaminated soil) have likely reduced metals concentrations. Continued exposure reduction efforts would benefit communities already burdened by environmental exposures. PMID:24502997

  15. Mass hierarchy in identified particle distributions in proton-lead collisions.

    PubMed

    Bożek, Piotr; Broniowski, Wojciech; Torrieri, Giorgio

    2013-10-25

    We study the mass dependence for identified particle average transverse momentum and harmonic flow coefficients in proton-lead (p-Pb) collisions, recently measured at the LHC. The collective mechanism in the p-Pb system predicts a specific mass ordering in these observables: the growth of the average transverse momentum with the particle mass and a mass splitting of the elliptic flow coefficient, i.e., smaller differential elliptic flow of protons than pions for p(T)<2 GeV. This provides an opportunity to distinguish between the collective scenario and the mechanism based on the initial gluon dynamics in the evolution of the p-Pb system. PMID:24206481

  16. The Influence of Hydrothermal Plumes on the Distribution of Anthropogenic Radionuclides Between the Particulate and Dissolved Phases: Results from U.S. Geotraces Equatorial Pacific Zonal Transect GP16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenna, T. C.; Villa Alfageme, M.; Casacuberta Arola, N.; Masque, P.

    2014-12-01

    Here we present and discuss the results from the analysis of samples from selected stations collected on the US GEOTRACES Equatorial Pacific Zonal Transect (GP16) completed in 2013. The section, between Peru and Tahiti, encompasses a range of processes that influence the supply, removal, and internal cycling of trace metals and offers the opportunity to gain a better understanding of the drivers of the transport and fate of contaminants in the ocean. The capability to analyze water and filtered particulate samples in the quantities available, allows us to determine the partitioning of selected radionuclides among dissolved and particulate forms (Kd) and estimate Pu-particulate fluxes. The overarching objective of our work is to determine the concentrations of several anthropogenic radionuclides, including 239Pu, 240Pu, 237Np, and 137Cs with sufficient resolution to define their basin-wide distributions in the Pacific Ocean. Data collected in the East Pacific Rise hydrothermal plume allows a discussion on the partitioning behavior of plutonium and neptunium.

  17. Lead distribution and fluxes in a high-elevation forest in northern Vermont

    SciTech Connect

    Friedland, A.J.; Johnson, A.H.

    1985-01-01

    High-elevation forests receive large amounts of atmospheric lead (Pb) and accumulate it in the forest floor. In order to determine Pb partitioning in a montane, coniferous forest, we analyzed forest floor and mineral soil (Haplorthods and Fragiorthods), and vegetation parts (leaves, twigs, bark, wood) for their Pb content. Soil and stream water were sampled to estimate Pb flux. Mean Pb concentration in trees, in mg kg/sup -1/, was root bark (33.0), twigs (28.3), bark (23.0) > root wood (10.4) > foliage (3), wood (3). Total Pb in above-ground biomass (trees + shrubs + herbs) was 0.89 kg ha/sup -1/. Lead in the organic horizon (forest floor) was 20 kg ha/sup -1/ while Pb in the mineral horizon (E + B) was 63 kg ha/sup -1/. Monitoring of soil water for one year yielded volume-weighted mean Pb concentrations of 3.7, 1.8, 1.1, and 1.0 ..mu..g L/sup -1/ at 3-, 12-, 25-, and 40-cm depth, respectively. Stream Pb concentration averaged 0.6 ..mu..g l/sup -1/. We estimated annual Pb input of > 700 g ha/sup -1/ yr/sup -1/. Estimated output from the forest in stream water was < 12 g ha/sup -1/ yr/sup -1/. Annual accumulation in the forest floor is approximately 3% of the current forest floor Pb amount. At current accumulation rates, forest floor Pb amount will double in 30 to 40 yr. At current leaching rates, mean residence time of Pb in the forest floor is approximately 500 yr. The ratio of Pb input to output for the forest is 60:1.

  18. Detecting anthropogenic footprints in sea level rise

    PubMed Central

    Dangendorf, Sönke; Marcos, Marta; Müller, Alfred; Zorita, Eduardo; Riva, Riccardo; Berk, Kevin; Jensen, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    While there is scientific consensus that global and local mean sea level (GMSL and LMSL) has risen since the late nineteenth century, the relative contribution of natural and anthropogenic forcing remains unclear. Here we provide a probabilistic upper range of long-term persistent natural GMSL/LMSL variability (P=0.99), which in turn, determines the minimum/maximum anthropogenic contribution since 1900. To account for different spectral characteristics of various contributing processes, we separate LMSL into two components: a slowly varying volumetric component and a more rapidly changing atmospheric component. We find that the persistence of slow natural volumetric changes is underestimated in records where transient atmospheric processes dominate the spectrum. This leads to a local underestimation of possible natural trends of up to ∼1 mm per year erroneously enhancing the significance of anthropogenic footprints. The GMSL, however, remains unaffected by such biases. On the basis of a model assessment of the separate components, we conclude that it is virtually certain (P=0.99) that at least 45% of the observed increase in GMSL is of anthropogenic origin. PMID:26220773

  19. Detecting anthropogenic footprints in sea level rise.

    PubMed

    Dangendorf, Sönke; Marcos, Marta; Müller, Alfred; Zorita, Eduardo; Riva, Riccardo; Berk, Kevin; Jensen, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    While there is scientific consensus that global and local mean sea level (GMSL and LMSL) has risen since the late nineteenth century, the relative contribution of natural and anthropogenic forcing remains unclear. Here we provide a probabilistic upper range of long-term persistent natural GMSL/LMSL variability (P=0.99), which in turn, determines the minimum/maximum anthropogenic contribution since 1900. To account for different spectral characteristics of various contributing processes, we separate LMSL into two components: a slowly varying volumetric component and a more rapidly changing atmospheric component. We find that the persistence of slow natural volumetric changes is underestimated in records where transient atmospheric processes dominate the spectrum. This leads to a local underestimation of possible natural trends of up to ∼1 mm per year erroneously enhancing the significance of anthropogenic footprints. The GMSL, however, remains unaffected by such biases. On the basis of a model assessment of the separate components, we conclude that it is virtually certain (P=0.99) that at least 45% of the observed increase in GMSL is of anthropogenic origin. PMID:26220773

  20. Detecting anthropogenic footprints in sea level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dangendorf, Sönke; Marcos, Marta; Müller, Alfred; Zorita, Eduardo; Riva, Riccardo; Berk, Kevin; Jensen, Jürgen

    2015-07-01

    While there is scientific consensus that global and local mean sea level (GMSL and LMSL) has risen since the late nineteenth century, the relative contribution of natural and anthropogenic forcing remains unclear. Here we provide a probabilistic upper range of long-term persistent natural GMSL/LMSL variability (P=0.99), which in turn, determines the minimum/maximum anthropogenic contribution since 1900. To account for different spectral characteristics of various contributing processes, we separate LMSL into two components: a slowly varying volumetric component and a more rapidly changing atmospheric component. We find that the persistence of slow natural volumetric changes is underestimated in records where transient atmospheric processes dominate the spectrum. This leads to a local underestimation of possible natural trends of up to ~1 mm per year erroneously enhancing the significance of anthropogenic footprints. The GMSL, however, remains unaffected by such biases. On the basis of a model assessment of the separate components, we conclude that it is virtually certain (P=0.99) that at least 45% of the observed increase in GMSL is of anthropogenic origin.

  1. Altered Arachidonate Distribution in Macrophages from Caveolin-1 Null Mice Leading to Reduced Eicosanoid Synthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Astudillo, Alma M.; Pérez-Chacón, Gema; Meana, Clara; Balgoma, David; Pol, Albert; del Pozo, Miguel A.; Balboa, María A.; Balsinde, Jesús

    2011-01-01

    In this work we have studied the effect of caveolin-1 deficiency on the mechanisms that regulate free arachidonic acid (AA) availability. The results presented here demonstrate that macrophages from caveolin-1-deficient mice exhibit elevated fatty acid incorporation and remodeling and a constitutively increased CoA-independent transacylase activity. Mass spectrometry-based lipidomic analyses reveal stable alterations in the profile of AA distribution among phospholipids, manifested by reduced levels of AA in choline glycerophospholipids but elevated levels in ethanolamine glycerophospholipids and phosphatidylinositol. Furthermore, macrophages from caveolin-1 null mice show decreased AA mobilization and prostaglandin E2 and LTB4 production upon cell stimulation. Collectively, these results provide insight into the role of caveolin-1 in AA homeostasis and suggest an important role for this protein in the eicosanoid biosynthetic response. PMID:21852231

  2. Supercube grains leading to a strong cube texture and a broad grain size distribution after recrystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, F. X.; Zhang, Y. B.; Pantleon, W.; Jensen, D. Juul

    2015-08-01

    This work revisits the classical subject of recrystallization of cold-rolled copper. Two characterization techniques are combined: three-dimensional X-ray diffraction using synchrotron X-rays, which is used to measure the growth kinetics of individual grains in situ, and electron backscatter diffraction, which is used for statistical analysis of the microstructural evolution. As the most striking result, the strong cube texture after recrystallization is found to be related to a few super large cube grains, which were named supercube grains. These few supercube grains become large due to higher growth rates. However, most other cube grains do not grow preferentially. Because of the few supercube grains, the grain size distribution after recrystallization is broad. Reasons for the higher growth rates of supercube grains are discussed, and are related to the local deformed microstructure.

  3. Cultivar variations in cadmium and lead accumulation and distribution among 30 wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weitao; Liang, Lichen; Zhang, Xue; Zhou, Qixing

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, heavy metal pollution in agricultural soil in China has received public concern. The concept of low-accumulation cultivars (LACs) was proposed to minimize the influx of pollutants to the human food chain. Variations in Cd and Pb accumulation, distribution, and tolerance among 30 wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars were studied in a hydroponic experiment to preliminary identify LACs of Cd or Pb for further field experiments. Of the 30 wheat cultivars tested, 27 and 26 wheat cultivars showed no effect of the Cd/Pb treatments on the shoot and root biomass, respectively. The results showed that the tested wheat cultivars had considerable tolerance to Cd and Pb toxicity. Significant (p < 0.05) differences in shoot Cd concentration were observed among the tested wheat cultivars under treatments Cd1.0 and Cd1.0Pb15, ranging from 0.91 to 6.74 and from 0.87 to 5.96, with the mean of 3.83 and 2.94 mg kg(-1) DW, respectively. Significant (p < 0.05) differences in shoot Pb concentration were also observed among the tested wheat cultivars under treatments Pb15 and Cd1.0Pb15, ranging from 22.18 to 94.03 and from 18.30 to 76.88, with the mean of 50.38 and 41.20 mg kg(-1) DW, respectively. Low accumulation and internal distribution may both affect the cultivar differences in Cd and Pb accumulation in wheat shoots. Overall, wheat cultivars LF-13, LF-16, and LF-21 had lower Cd-accumulating abilities in their shoots. Wheat cultivars LF-13, LF-23, LF-26, and LF-27 showed low Pb accumulation characteristics in their shoots. An antagonistic interaction occurred between Cd and Pb in accumulation in wheat roots and shoots, which will be further studied in field experiments. PMID:25548022

  4. Reexamining cluster radioactivity in trans-lead nuclei with consideration of specific density distributions in daughter nuclei and clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Yibin; Ren, Zhongzhou; Ni, Dongdong

    2016-08-01

    We further investigate the cluster emission from heavy nuclei beyond the lead region in the framework of the preformed cluster model. The refined cluster-core potential is constructed by the double-folding integral of the density distributions of the daughter nucleus and the emitted cluster, where the radius or the diffuseness parameter in the Fermi density distribution formula is determined according to the available experimental data on the charge radii and the neutron skin thickness. The Schrödinger equation of the cluster-daughter relative motion is then solved within the outgoing Coulomb wave-function boundary conditions to obtain the decay width. It is found that the present decay width of cluster emitters is clearly enhanced as compared to that in the previous case, which involved the fixed parametrization for the density distributions of daughter nuclei and clusters. Among the whole procedure, the nuclear deformation of clusters is also introduced into the calculations, and the degree of its influence on the final decay half-life is checked to some extent. Moreover, the effect from the bubble density distribution of clusters on the final decay width is carefully discussed by using the central depressed distribution.

  5. Researches on current distribution and plate conductivity of valve-regulated lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tao; Ou, Wenjun; Feng, Bo; Huang, Binbin; Liu, Minyi; Zhao, Wenchao; Guo, Yonglang

    2012-07-01

    A cell with tall plates was simulated by two cells and the controlled voltage with time was successfully used to measure the response current-time curves. It indicates that the current in the upper part of the plate is much higher than that in the lower part in early stage of the discharge, but in late stage, it is reversed, especially at high discharge rates. The upper part of the plate has higher capacity and deeper depth of discharge (DOD) so that the active mass degrades and sheds more quickly in cyclic applications. In the initial discharge, the lead sulfate formed at positive plates produces the internal stress and enhances the electric connection among the active mass particles. But the positive active mass only contributes a little to the conductivity of plates. The negative active mass with a bit shrinking but no passivation has better conductivity than the expanded active mass. The higher ohmic polarization of the active mass appears at higher discharge rates, in the upper part of the plates, in the late stage of the discharge, in aged battery, especially for negative plates.

  6. Lead tolerance mechanism in Conyza canadensis: subcellular distribution, ultrastructure, antioxidative defense system, and phytochelatins.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Zhou, Chuifan; Huang, Meiying; Luo, Jiewen; Hou, Xiaolong; Wu, Pengfei; Ma, Xiangqing

    2016-03-01

    We used hydroponic experiments to examine the effects of different concentrations of lead (Pb) on the performance of the Pb-tolerable plant Conyza canadensis. In these experiments, most of the Pb was accumulated in the roots; there was very little Pb accumulated in stems and leaves. C. canadensis is able to take up significant amounts of Pb whilst greatly restricting its transportation to specific parts of the aboveground biomass. High Pb concentrations inhibited plant growth, increased membrane permeability, elevated antioxidant enzyme activity in roots, and caused a significant increase in root H2O2 and malondialdehyde content. Analysis of Pb content at the subcellular level showed that most Pb was associated with the cell wall fraction, followed by the nucleus-rich fraction, and with a minority present in the mitochondrial and soluble fractions. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis of root cells revealed that the cell wall and intercellular space in C. canadensis roots are the main locations of Pb accumulation. Additionally, high Pb concentrations adversely affected the cellular structure of C. canadensis roots. The increased enzyme activity suggests that the antioxidant system may play an important role in eliminating or alleviating Pb toxicity in C. canadensis roots. However, the levels of non-protein sulfhydryl compounds, glutathione, and phytochelatin did not significantly change in either the roots or leaves under Pb-contaminated treatments. Our results provide strong evidence that cell walls restrict Pb uptake into the root and act as an important barrier protecting root cells, while demonstrating that antioxidant enzyme levels are correlated with Pb exposure. These findings demonstrate the roles played by these detoxification mechanisms in supporting Pb tolerance in C. canadensis. PMID:26733305

  7. Assessment of Environmental Distribution of Lead in Some Municipalities of South-Eastern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Nduka, John Kanayochukwu; Orisakwe, Orish Ebere

    2010-01-01

    Lead (Pb) levels were measured in roadside surface soils, dust particles and rain water samples from the urban cities of Enugu, Awka, Onitsha, Nnewi, Aba, Port Harcourt and Warri in Southern Nigeria in 2007 and 2008. Samples were collected during the dry season, while rain water samples were collected during the early rain (April–June), mid rain (July–August) and late rain seasons (September–October) for the two years. Soil samples were collected from traffic congested roads, dust was collected by tying a plastic basin on a pole 1.5 m above ground level and leaving it for 45 days. Rain samples were collected from three equidistant points. Samples were analyzed by AAS. The highest soil Pb of 120.00 ± 0.00 and 80.36 ± 0.00 mg/kg were reported in Onitsha for 2007 and 2008, respectively. Nnewi showed 33.40 ± 0.01 and 4,238.29 ± 0.00 mg/kg for 2007 and 2008. Aba had 22.56 ± 0.01 and 21.28 ± 0.00 mg/kg for 2007 and 2008. Higher concentrations were recorded for Nnewi and Port Harcourt in 2008 than in 2007. Enugu had more in 2007 while Awka had more in 2008. Dust Pb ranged from 0.13–0.49 mg/kg and 0.15–0.47 mg/kg for 2007 and 2008, respectively. Rain samples had the least Pb concentration, ranging from 0.103 ± 0.000 to 0.163 ± 0.046 mg/L. We may conclude that Nigerians are exposed to environmental Pb. PMID:20644686

  8. Assessment of environmental distribution of lead in some municipalities of South-Eastern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Nduka, John Kanayochukwu; Orisakwe, Orish Ebere

    2010-06-01

    Lead (Pb) levels were measured in roadside surface soils, dust particles and rain water samples from the urban cities of Enugu, Awka, Onitsha, Nnewi, Aba, Port Harcourt and Warri in Southern Nigeria in 2007 and 2008. Samples were collected during the dry season, while rain water samples were collected during the early rain (April-June), mid rain (July-August) and late rain seasons (September-October) for the two years. Soil samples were collected from traffic congested roads, dust was collected by tying a plastic basin on a pole 1.5 m above ground level and leaving it for 45 days. Rain samples were collected from three equidistant points. Samples were analyzed by AAS. The highest soil Pb of 120.00 +/- 0.00 and 80.36 +/- 0.00 mg/kg were reported in Onitsha for 2007 and 2008, respectively. Nnewi showed 33.40 +/- 0.01 and 4,238.29 +/- 0.00 mg/kg for 2007 and 2008. Aba had 22.56 +/- 0.01 and 21.28 +/- 0.00 mg/kg for 2007 and 2008. Higher concentrations were recorded for Nnewi and Port Harcourt in 2008 than in 2007. Enugu had more in 2007 while Awka had more in 2008. Dust Pb ranged from 0.13-0.49 mg/kg and 0.15-0.47 mg/kg for 2007 and 2008, respectively. Rain samples had the least Pb concentration, ranging from 0.103 +/- 0.000 to 0.163 +/- 0.046 mg/L. We may conclude that Nigerians are exposed to environmental Pb. PMID:20644686

  9. On the distribution of dissolved lead in the Loire estuary and the North Biscay continental shelf, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waeles, Matthieu; Riso, Ricardo D.; Maguer, Jean-François; Guillaud, Jean-François; Le Corre, Pierre

    2008-07-01

    The dissolved lead was studied in the whole salinity gradient of the system composed of the Loire estuary and the North Biscay continental shelf. About 130 samples were collected in winter 2001 and spring 2002 during Nutrigas and Gasprod campaigns (Programme PNEC-Golfe de Gascogne, RV Thalassa) and metal measurements were conducted on board by Potentiometric Stripping Analysis. In the Loire estuary, levels of dissolved lead ranged from 0.15 to 0.24 nM and from 0.04 to 0.26 nM in winter and spring, respectively. Compared to the concentrations reported in 1987 and 1990 (0.4-1.7 nM; Boutier, B., Chiffoleau, J.F., Auger, D., Truquet, I., 1993. Influence of the Loire river on dissolved lead and cadmium concentrations in coastal waters of Brittany. Estuar. Coast. Shelf S., 36:133-143, Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science 36, 133-143) our study indicated much lower values. The fall in concentration in the estuary could be attributed to the stopping of activity of Octel, a big manufacturer of tetra alkyl lead. Discharge in dissolved metal to the continental shelf by the Loire river was assessed as 7.5 and 1.9 kg day - 1 for winter and spring, respectively. On the continental shelf, levels of dissolved lead varied within 0.06 and 0.27 nM in winter (0.15 ± 0.06 nM, sd = 1.96, n = 49), whereas concentrations measured in spring were in the range 0.06-0.17 nM (0.09 ± 0.03 nM, sd = 1.96, n = 60). This difference in metal concentration was related to the amounts of rainfall that have fallen over the continental shelf: estimations of inputs by this way (74 and 32 kg day - 1 in winter and spring, respectively) appeared to be significantly higher than inputs from the Loire river (7.5 and 1.9 kg day - 1 in winter and spring, respectively). The distributions of dissolved metal in the surface waters highlighted the role of suspended particular matter (SPM) for a rapid "trapping" of lead near the mouth of the estuary. The vertical distributions showed, in the stratified area, a

  10. Simulation of the current distribution in lead-acid batteries to investigate the dynamic charge acceptance in flooded SLI batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowal, Julia; Schulte, Dominik; Sauer, Dirk Uwe; Karden, Eckhard

    Measurements show that the dynamic charge acceptance (DCA) of flooded SLI lead-acid batteries during micro-cycling in conventional and micro-hybrid vehicles is strongly dependent on the short-term history, such as previous charge or discharge, current rate, lowest state of charge in the last 24 h and more. Factors of 10 have been reported. Inhomogeneous current distribution, especially as a result of acid stratification, has been suggested to explain the DCA variability. This hypothesis was investigated by simulation of a two-dimensional macrohomogeneous model. It provides a spatial resolution of three elements in horizontal direction in each electrode and three elements in vertical direction. For an existing set of parameters, different current profiles were analyzed with regard to the current distribution during charging and discharging. In these simulations, a strong impact of the short-term history on current, charge and acid density distribution was found as well as a strong influence of micro-cycles on both charge distribution and acid stratification.

  11. Detection of anthropogenic dust using CALIPSO lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J. P.; Liu, J. J.; Chen, B.; Nasiri, S. L.

    2015-10-01

    Anthropogenic dusts are those produced by human activities on disturbed soils, which are mainly cropland, pastureland, and urbanized regions, and are a subset of the total dust load which includes natural sources from desert regions. Our knowledge of anthropogenic dusts is still very limited due to a lack of data. To understand the contribution of anthropogenic dust to the total global dust load, it is important to identify it apart from total dust. In this study, a new technique for distinguishing anthropogenic dust from natural dust is proposed by using Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) dust and planetary boundary layer (PBL) height retrievals along with a land use data set. Using this technique, the global distribution of dust is analyzed and the relative contribution of anthropogenic and natural dust sources to regional and global emissions are estimated. Results reveal that local anthropogenic dust aerosol due to human activity, such as agriculture, industrial activity, transportation, and overgrazing, accounts for about 25 % of the global continental dust load. Of these anthropogenic dust aerosols, more than 53 % come from semi-arid and semi-wet regions. Annual mean anthropogenic dust column burden (DCB) values range from 0.42 g m-2, with a maximum in India, to 0.12 g m-2, with a minimum in North America. A better understanding of anthropogenic dust emission will enable us to focus on human activities in these critical regions and with such knowledge we will be more able to improve global dust models and to explore the effects of anthropogenic emission on radiative forcing, climate change, and air quality in the future.

  12. Anthropogenic Aerosols and the Dust Bowl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazavilan, E. J.; Leibensperger, E. M.

    2014-12-01

    We use a general circulation model (GISS GCM ModelE) to study the impact of anthropogenic aerosols on the 1930s Dust Bowl. The Dust Bowl was primarily forced by anomalous sea surface temperatures, but may have been partially shaped by the large amounts of black carbon emitted at that time. A simulation using observed 1932-1938 sea surface temperature and sea ice distributions reveal drier and warmer conditions in the central U.S. Adding the influence of 1930s anthropogenic aerosols exacerbates the drying and warm conditions (0.2 °C increase over mid-west continental US, and a decrease of -0.1 mm/day of precipitation). We find that these changes are concurrent with a weakening and shift of the Bermuda High.

  13. Anthropogenic Emission Inventories for SAFARI 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, G.; van der Merwe, M.

    2001-12-01

    Surface emission inventories are required as input into atmospheric transport models and other investigations forming part of SAFARI 2000. We have generated an anthropogenic emissions inventory for continental Africa south of the equator. It covers the period 1999 to 2001 with a monthly temporal resolution and a 20km spatial resolution. The anthropogenic inventory covers emissions of CH4, CO2, CO, SO2, VOC (volatile organic carbons), NOx and N2O from the energy sector, mines, transport, industries and other major emitting sectors, in all major emitting countries south of the equator. The baseline country total emissions data were taken from the 1990 IPCC Greenhouse Gas Inventory Country Summaries. Emissions reported for 1990 were extrapolated to the SAFARI 2000 study period, temporally distributed by month and spatially disaggregated according to sector-specific driver surfaces. This anthropogenic emissions inventory together with others developed during SAFARI 2000, namely those for soil, vegetation, domestic biomass combustion and fire constitute a comprehensive new emissions inventory.

  14. Effects of 1,25-dihydroxicolecalciferol and dietary calcium-phosphate on distribution of lead to tissues during growth

    SciTech Connect

    Cortina-Ramirez, G.E.; Cerbon-Solorzano, J.; Calderon-Salinas, J.V. . E-mail: jcalder@cinvestav.mx

    2006-01-15

    The susceptibility to the toxic effects of lead (Pb) is mainly mediated by age and nutritional and hormonal status, and children are among the most vulnerable to them. During growth, an increase in calcium, phosphate and vitamin D in diet is recommended to enhance calcium and phosphate intestinal absorption and bone deposit. Calcium and phosphate reduce lead intestinal absorption, and 1,25-dihydroxicolecalciferol (1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}) (active metabolite of vitamin D) increases both lead and calcium intestinal absorption. However, the effects of 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} on lead bone deposit and redistribution to soft tissues are not well known. In this study, we examined the effects of calcium-phosphate diet supplementation and the administration of 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} on Pb distribution to soft tissue and bone in growing rats exposed to Pb. Rats (21 days old) were exposed for 28 days to 100 ppm of Pb solution in drinking water. Calcium and phosphate in diet were increased from 1 to 2.5% and from 0.65 to 1.8%, respectively, and 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} was administrated by intraperitoneal injection of 7.2 ng/kg every 7 days. Between 21 and 49 days, the body weight increased about 5 times. The results showed that high calcium-phosphate diet led to lower Pb concentration in blood and in bone, but Pb liver and kidney concentrations increased, which indicates that absorption and bone deposit redistribution of Pb decreased. On the other hand, no effect of this diet rich in calcium-phosphate in Pb concentration was observed in brain. Blood and bone Pb concentrations increased even more when the high calcium-phosphate diet included 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}. In the rats treated only with 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}, blood and bone Pb concentrations were lower. Higher concentrations of lead in the soft organs were observed also in rats treated under a high calcium-phosphate diet plus 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} administration. The above mentioned results suggested that 1,25(OH

  15. Diode-Pumped Organo-Lead Halide Perovskite Lasing in a Metal-Clad Distributed Feedback Resonator.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yufei; Kerner, Ross A; Grede, Alex J; Brigeman, Alyssa N; Rand, Barry P; Giebink, Noel C

    2016-07-13

    Organic-inorganic lead halide perovskite semiconductors have recently reignited the prospect of a tunable, solution-processed diode laser, which has the potential to impact a wide range of optoelectronic applications. Here, we demonstrate a metal-clad, second-order distributed feedback methylammonium lead iodide perovskite laser that marks a significant step toward this goal. Optically pumping this device with an InGaN diode laser at low temperature, we achieve lasing above a threshold pump intensity of 5 kW/cm(2) for durations up to ∼25 ns at repetition rates exceeding 2 MHz. We show that the lasing duration is not limited by thermal runaway and propose instead that lasing ceases under continuous pumping due to a photoinduced structural change in the perovskite that reduces the gain on a submicrosecond time scale. Our results indicate that the architecture demonstrated here could provide the foundation for electrically pumped lasing with a threshold current density Jth < 5 kA/cm(2) under sub-20 ns pulsed drive. PMID:27331618

  16. Bringing Home the Trash: Do Colony-Based Differences in Foraging Distribution Lead to Increased Plastic Ingestion in Laysan Albatrosses?

    PubMed Central

    Young, Lindsay C.; Vanderlip, Cynthia; Duffy, David C.; Afanasyev, Vsevolod; Shaffer, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    When searching for prey, animals should maximize energetic gain, while minimizing energy expenditure by altering their movements relative to prey availability. However, with increasing amounts of marine debris, what once may have been ‘optimal’ foraging strategies for top marine predators, are leading to sub-optimal diets comprised in large part of plastic. Indeed, the highly vagile Laysan albatross (Phoebastria immutabilis) which forages throughout the North Pacific, are well known for their tendency to ingest plastic. Here we examine whether Laysan albatrosses nesting on Kure Atoll and Oahu Island, 2,150 km apart, experience different levels of plastic ingestion. Twenty two geolocators were deployed on breeding adults for up to two years. Regurgitated boluses of undigestable material were also collected from chicks at each site to compare the amount of plastic vs. natural foods. Chicks from Kure Atoll were fed almost ten times the amount of plastic compared to chicks from Oahu despite boluses from both colonies having similar amounts of natural food. Tracking data indicated that adults from either colony did not have core overlapping distributions during the early half of the breeding period and that adults from Kure had a greater overlap with the putative range of the Western Garbage Patch corroborating our observation of higher plastic loads at this colony. At-sea distributions also varied throughout the year suggesting that Laysan albatrosses either adjusted their foraging behavior according to constraints on time away from the nest or to variation in resources. However, in the non-breeding season, distributional overlap was greater indicating that the energy required to reach the foraging grounds was less important than the total energy available. These results demonstrate how a marine predator that is not dispersal limited alters its foraging strategy throughout the reproductive cycle to maximize energetic gain and how this has led to differences in

  17. Bringing home the trash: do colony-based differences in foraging distribution lead to increased plastic ingestion in Laysan albatrosses?

    PubMed

    Young, Lindsay C; Vanderlip, Cynthia; Duffy, David C; Afanasyev, Vsevolod; Shaffer, Scott A

    2009-01-01

    When searching for prey, animals should maximize energetic gain, while minimizing energy expenditure by altering their movements relative to prey availability. However, with increasing amounts of marine debris, what once may have been 'optimal' foraging strategies for top marine predators, are leading to sub-optimal diets comprised in large part of plastic. Indeed, the highly vagile Laysan albatross (Phoebastria immutabilis) which forages throughout the North Pacific, are well known for their tendency to ingest plastic. Here we examine whether Laysan albatrosses nesting on Kure Atoll and Oahu Island, 2,150 km apart, experience different levels of plastic ingestion. Twenty two geolocators were deployed on breeding adults for up to two years. Regurgitated boluses of undigestable material were also collected from chicks at each site to compare the amount of plastic vs. natural foods. Chicks from Kure Atoll were fed almost ten times the amount of plastic compared to chicks from Oahu despite boluses from both colonies having similar amounts of natural food. Tracking data indicated that adults from either colony did not have core overlapping distributions during the early half of the breeding period and that adults from Kure had a greater overlap with the putative range of the Western Garbage Patch corroborating our observation of higher plastic loads at this colony. At-sea distributions also varied throughout the year suggesting that Laysan albatrosses either adjusted their foraging behavior according to constraints on time away from the nest or to variation in resources. However, in the non-breeding season, distributional overlap was greater indicating that the energy required to reach the foraging grounds was less important than the total energy available. These results demonstrate how a marine predator that is not dispersal limited alters its foraging strategy throughout the reproductive cycle to maximize energetic gain and how this has led to differences in plastic

  18. Identification And Distribution Of Vanadinite (Pb5(V5+O4)3Cl) In Lead Pipe Corrosion By-Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study presents the first detailed look at vanadium (V) speciation in drinking water pipe corrosion scales. A pool of 34 scale layers from 15 lead or lead-lined pipes representing eight different municipal drinking water distribution systems in the Northeastern and Midwester...

  19. The lateral distributions of charged particles of energy greater than 0.3 E sub crit in electron-photon cascades in lead and air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krys, E.; Wasilewski, A.

    1985-01-01

    In recent investigations, both theoretical and experimental, the agreement between cascade theory and experimental data is pointed out. The radial distributions obtained from the Monte Carlo simulation are compared ith the results of the analytical theory for all particles in cascades. The data on the mean radius of electron lateral distribution in air are compared with those in lead.

  20. Mildly compromised tetrahydrobiopterin cofactor biosynthesis due to Pts variants leads to unusual body fat distribution and abdominal obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    Korner, Germaine; Scherer, Tanja; Adamsen, Dea; Rebuffat, Alexander; Crabtree, Mark; Rassi, Anahita; Scavelli, Rossana; Homma, Daigo; Ledermann, Birgit; Konrad, Daniel; Ichinose, Hiroshi; Wolfrum, Christian; Horsch, Marion; Rathkolb, Birgit; Klingenspor, Martin; Beckers, Johannes; Wolf, Eckhard; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Fuchs, Helmut; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Blau, Nenad; Rozman, Jan; Thöny, Beat

    2016-03-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an essential cofactor for the aromatic amino acid hydroxylases, alkylglycerol monooxygenase, and nitric oxide synthases (NOS). Inborn errors of BH4 metabolism lead to severe insufficiency of brain monoamine neurotransmitters while augmentation of BH4 by supplementation or stimulation of its biosynthesis is thought to ameliorate endothelial NOS (eNOS) dysfunction, to protect from (cardio-) vascular disease and/or prevent obesity and development of the metabolic syndrome. We have previously reported that homozygous knock-out mice for the 6-pyruvolytetrahydropterin synthase (PTPS; Pts-ko/ko) mice with no BH4 biosynthesis die after birth. Here we generated a Pts-knock-in (Pts-ki) allele expressing the murine PTPS-p.Arg15Cys with low residual activity (15% of wild-type in vitro) and investigated homozygous (Pts-ki/ki) and compound heterozygous (Pts-ki/ko) mutants. All mice showed normal viability and depending on the severity of the Pts alleles exhibited up to 90% reduction of PTPS activity concomitant with neopterin elevation and mild reduction of total biopterin while blood L-phenylalanine and brain monoamine neurotransmitters were unaffected. Yet, adult mutant mice with compromised PTPS activity (i.e., Pts-ki/ko, Pts-ki/ki or Pts-ko/wt) had increased body weight and elevated intra-abdominal fat. Comprehensive phenotyping of Pts-ki/ki mice revealed alterations in energy metabolism with proportionally higher fat content but lower lean mass, and increased blood glucose and cholesterol. Transcriptome analysis indicated changes in glucose and lipid metabolism. Furthermore, differentially expressed genes associated with obesity, weight loss, hepatic steatosis, and insulin sensitivity were consistent with the observed phenotypic alterations. We conclude that reduced PTPS activity concomitant with mildly compromised BH4-biosynthesis leads to abnormal body fat distribution and abdominal obesity at least in mice. This study associates a novel

  1. Lead in ancient Rome’s city waters

    PubMed Central

    Delile, Hugo; Blichert-Toft, Janne; Goiran, Jean-Philippe; Keay, Simon; Albarède, Francis

    2014-01-01

    It is now universally accepted that utilization of lead for domestic purposes and water distribution presents a major health hazard. The ancient Roman world was unaware of these risks. How far the gigantic network of lead pipes used in ancient Rome compromised public health in the city is unknown. Lead isotopes in sediments from the harbor of Imperial Rome register the presence of a strong anthropogenic component during the beginning of the Common Era and the Early Middle Ages. They demonstrate that the lead pipes of the water distribution system increased Pb contents in drinking water of the capital city by up to two orders of magnitude over the natural background. The Pb isotope record shows that the discontinuities in the pollution of the Tiber by lead are intimately entwined with the major issues affecting Late Antique Rome and its water distribution system. PMID:24753588

  2. Anthropogenic Aerosols and the Evolution of U.S. Droughts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibensperger, E. M.; Cazavilan, E. J.

    2014-12-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols interact with solar radiation to influence regional to global climate. Trends in aerosol concentrations have impacted the evolution of surface air temperatures and the hydrological cycle over the last 150 years, but the magnitude of influence and any role in shaping extreme events remains uncertain. We use a general circulation model (GISS GCM ModelE) to study the impact of anthropogenic aerosols on the formation of two potential U.S. droughts. Two periods are analyzed, the 1930s Dust Bowl and the 1970s "missed drought". Each period realized ocean conditions ripe for the formation of central U.S. drought, but experienced differing composition and amounts of anthropogenic aerosol forcing. Simulations forced solely by observed sea surface temperature and sea ice distributions reveal drier and warmer conditions in the central U.S. (annual decreases of up to 0.5 mm/day and warming of 0.5°C). We find that anthropogenic aerosols of the 1930s, containing a significant warming component from U.S. black carbon, exacerbated the warm conditions (0.2°C) and provided slightly drier conditions. In contrast, anthropogenic aerosols of the 1970s, containing a large cooling component from U.S. sulfate, reduced annual precipitation deficits and lowered temperatures by up to 0.4°C. Our results showcase the importance of anthropogenic aerosol forcing in the evolution of U.S. droughts.

  3. Lead in soil and agricultural products in the Huainan Coal Mining Area, Anhui, China: levels, distribution, and health implications.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ting; Liu, Guijian; Zhou, Chuncai; Lu, Lanlan

    2015-03-01

    Heavy metal accumulation in agricultural soil is of great concern, as heavy metals can be finally transferred to the human body through the food chain. A field survey was conducted to investigate the lead (Pb) levels and distribution in soil, agricultural products (wheat, paddy, and soybean), and fish, in the Huainan Coal Mining Area (HCMA), Anhui Province, China, to provide reference information to local inhabitants. The daily intake and target hazard quotients of Pb through food consumption were assessed. Results showed that the mean Pb concentration in soil was higher than the Huainan soil background Pb value but lower than the maximum allowance Pb concentration for agricultural soil (GB 15618-2008). The elevated Pb in soil, especially in rainy months (June to August in Huainan), might be related to Pb leaching from ambient coal gangue piles. Excessive Pb concentration was found in the grains of food crops, which would pose a potential health risk to local inhabitants. Therein, wheat showed higher Pb bioaccumulation ability than other crops. With regard to the Pb levels in muscles, fishes were considered to be safe for consumption. The calculations on daily intake and tolerable hazard quotient of Pb suggest that the potential health hazard posed by Pb is currently insignificant for the inhabitants in the HCMA. PMID:25724617

  4. Improvements and Validation of Sulfur Dioxide Retrievals from Aura/OMI Observations of Anthropogenic Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, K.; Krotkov, N. A.; He, H.; Dickerson, R. R.; Li, C.

    2011-12-01

    Both natural and anthropogenic sources can release the trace gas, sulfur dioxide (SO2), into the atmosphere, in which it is usually oxidized to form sulfate aerosols, affecting the environment and climate. The largest contributions to the total annual sulfur budget are anthropogenic emissions from combustions of fossil fuels and smelting of metal ores. While these sources emit SO2 into the atmospheric planetary boundary layer (PBL), leading to air quality degradation near the source regions, the pollutants are sometimes lifted into the free troposphere and subsequently transported over long distances, affecting remote regions. It is therefore important to monitor the spatial and temporal distribution of SO2 over the globe. This can be accomplished with satellite UV remote sensing, as exemplified by the SO2 data derived from the global daily observations made by the Dutch-Finnish Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on board NASA's Aura spacecraft launched in July 2004. In this presentation, we describe the recent progress in developing an advanced algorithm to improve detection and quantification of anthropogenic SO2, and compare the new retrievals with the operational OMI SO2 products to show significant reduction in noise and bias. We also present validation results obtained by the comparisons with co-located in-situ aircraft measurements in China in 2005 - 2008 and during DISCOVER-AQ field experiment in Maryland in July 2011, to illustrate improved accuracy achieved with the advanced algorithm.

  5. Ring distributions leading to species formation: a global topographic analysis of geographic barriers associated with ring species

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the mid 20th century, Ernst Mayr and Theodosius Dobzhansky championed the significance of circular overlaps or ring species as the perfect demonstration of speciation, yet in the over 50 years since, only a handful of such taxa are known. We developed a topographic model to evaluate whether the geographic barriers that favor processes leading to ring species are common or rare, and to predict where other candidate ring barriers might be found. Results Of the 952,147 geographic barriers identified on the planet, only about 1% are topographically similar to barriers associated with known ring taxa, with most of the likely candidates occurring in under-studied parts of the world (for example, marine environments, tropical latitudes). Predicted barriers separate into two distinct categories: (i) single cohesive barriers (< 50,000 km2), associated with taxa that differentiate at smaller spatial scales (salamander: Ensatina eschscholtzii; tree: Acacia karroo); and (ii) composite barriers - formed by groups of barriers (each 184,000 to 1.7 million km2) in close geographic proximity (totaling 1.9 to 2.3 million km2) - associated with taxa that differentiate at larger spatial scales (birds: Phylloscopus trochiloides and Larus (sp. argentatus and fuscus)). When evaluated globally, we find a large number of cohesive barriers that are topographically similar to those associated with known ring taxa. Yet, compared to cohesive barriers, an order of magnitude fewer composite barriers are similar to those that favor ring divergence in species with higher dispersal. Conclusions While these findings confirm that the topographic conditions that favor evolutionary processes leading to ring speciation are, in fact, rare, they also suggest that many understudied natural systems could provide valuable demonstrations of continuous divergence towards the formation of new species. Distinct advantages of the model are that it (i) requires no a priori information on the relative

  6. Predicting Anthropogenic Noise Contributions to US Waters.

    PubMed

    Gedamke, Jason; Ferguson, Megan; Harrison, Jolie; Hatch, Leila; Henderson, Laurel; Porter, Michael B; Southall, Brandon L; Van Parijs, Sofie

    2016-01-01

    To increase understanding of the potential effects of chronic underwater noise in US waters, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) organized two working groups in 2011, collectively called "CetSound," to develop tools to map the density and distribution of cetaceans (CetMap) and predict the contribution of human activities to underwater noise (SoundMap). The SoundMap effort utilized data on density, distribution, acoustic signatures of dominant noise sources, and environmental descriptors to map estimated temporal, spatial, and spectral contributions to background noise. These predicted soundscapes are an initial step toward assessing chronic anthropogenic noise impacts on the ocean's varied acoustic habitats and the animals utilizing them. PMID:26610977

  7. Mapping 1995 global anthropogenic emissions of mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacyna, Jozef M.; Pacyna, Elisabeth G.; Steenhuisen, Frits; Wilson, Simon

    This paper presents maps of anthropogenic Hg emissions worldwide within a 1°×1° latitude/longitude grid system in 1995. As such, the paper is designed for modelers simulating the Hg transport within air masses and Hg deposition to aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Maps of total Hg emissions and its three main chemical species: elemental gaseous Hg, divalent gaseous Hg, and particle-associated Hg are presented. The main emissions occur in southeast Asia (particularly in China), South Africa, Central and Eastern Europe, and the Eastern United States. These are the regions where coal combustion is the main source of electricity and heat production. Waste incineration adds to these emissions in the Eastern United States. Emissions of total Hg and its three species are quite similar in terms of their (global) spatial distributions. They reflect the worldwide distribution of coal consumption in large power plants, industrial burners, and small combustion units, such as residential and commercial furnaces.

  8. Estimating animal mortality from anthropogenic hazards

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carcass searches are a common method for studying the risk of anthropogenic hazards to wildlife, including non-target poisoning and collisions with anthropogenic structures. Typically, numbers of carcasses found must be corrected for scavenging rates and imperfect detection. Para...

  9. Past and Future of the Anthropogenic Biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, E. C.

    2010-12-01

    Human populations and their use of land have now transformed most of the terrestrial biosphere into anthropogenic biomes (anthromes). As anthromes have emerged as the dominant global forms of ecological pattern and process, human interactions with terrestrial ecosystems have become a key earth system process, determining the structure and functioning of the biosphere. This presentation explores Ester Boserup’s land use intensification theories as models for understanding the emergence and dynamics of anthromes and their ecological processes, including their biogeochemistry and community structure, from the mostly wild biosphere of the Holocene to the primarily anthropogenic biosphere of the present and future. Existing global models and data for human population growth and land use over the Holocene differ in their portrayal of the global transition to a mostly anthropogenic biosphere. Yet there is little doubt that human populations have continued to grow over the long term and that anthromes have been increasingly important global ecological systems for millennia. This is conclusive evidence that human interactions with ecosystems can be sustained over the long-term, albeit under conditions that may no longer be realizable by either Earth or human systems. The classic Malthusian paradigm, in which human population growth outstrips natural resources leading to population collapse is unsupported by historical observations at global scale. Boserupian intensification is the better model, providing a robust theoretical foundation in which socio-ecological systems evolve as human populations increase, towards increasingly efficient use of limiting natural resources and enhanced production of anthropogenic ecological services such as food. This is not a story of technical advance, but rather of the forced adoption of ever more energy-intensive technical solutions in support of ever increasing population demands. And it does explain historical changes in the biosphere

  10. Anthropogenic carbon in the East Greenland Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jutterström, Sara; Jeansson, Emil

    2008-07-01

    Sections of dissolved inorganic anthropogenic carbon ( CTanthro) based on 2002 data in the East Greenland Current (EGC) are presented. The CTanthro has been estimated using a model based on optimum multiparameter analysis with predefined source water types. Values of CTanthro have been assigned to the source water types through age estimations based on the transit time distribution (TTD) technique. The validity of this approach is discussed and compared to other methods. The results indicated that the EGC had rather high levels of CTanthro in the whole water column, and the anthropogenic signal of the different source areas were detected along the southward transit. We estimated an annual transport of CTanthro with the Denmark Strait overflow ( σθ > 27.8 kg m -3) of ∼0.036 ± 0.005 Gt C y -1. The mean CTanthro concentration in this density range was ∼30 μmol kg -1. The main contribution was from Atlantic derived waters, the Polar Intermediate Water and the Greenland Sea Arctic Intermediate Water.