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Sample records for anti hiv-1 activity

  1. Anti-HIV-1 Activity of Flavonoid Myricetin on HIV-1 Infection in a Dual-Chamber In Vitro Model

    PubMed Central

    Pasetto, Silvana; Pardi, Vanessa; Murata, Ramiro Mendonça

    2014-01-01

    HIV infection by sexual transmission remains an enormous global health concern. More than 1 million new infections among women occur annually. Microbicides represent a promising prevention strategy that women can easily control. Among emerging therapies, natural small molecules such as flavonoids are an important source of new active substances. In this study we report the in vitro cytotoxicity and anti-HIV-1 and microbicide activity of the following flavonoids: Myricetin, Quercetin and Pinocembrin. Cytotoxicity tests were conducted on TZM-bl, HeLa, PBMC, and H9 cell cultures using 0.01–100 µM concentrations. Myricetin presented the lowest toxic effect, with Quercetin and Pinocembrin relatively more toxic. The anti-HIV-1 activity was tested with TZM-bl cell plus HIV-1 BaL (R5 tropic), H9 and PBMC cells plus HIV-1 MN (X4 tropic), and the dual tropic (X4R5) HIV-1 89.6. All flavonoids showed anti-HIV activity, although Myricetin was more effective than Quercetin or Pinocembrin. In TZM-bl cells, Myricetin inhibited ≥90% of HIV-1 BaL infection. The results were confirmed by quantification of HIV-1 p24 antigen in supernatant from H9 and PBMC cells following flavonoid treatment. In H9 and PBMC cells infected by HIV-1 MN and HIV-1 89.6, Myricetin showed more than 80% anti-HIV activity. Quercetin and Pinocembrin presented modest anti-HIV activity in all experiments. Myricetin activity was tested against HIV-RT and inhibited the enzyme by 49%. Microbicide activities were evaluated using a dual-chamber female genital tract model. In the in vitro microbicide activity model, Myricetin showed promising results against different strains of HIV-1 while also showing insignificant cytotoxic effects. Further studies of Myricetin should be performed to identify its molecular targets in order to provide a solid biological foundation for translational research. PMID:25546350

  2. Anti-HIV-1 activity of eight monofloral Iranian honey types.

    PubMed

    Behbahani, Mandana

    2014-01-01

    Monofloral Iranian honeys from eight floral sources were analyzed to determine their anti-HIV-1 activities as well as their effects on lymphocyte proliferation. The Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) used in this study were prepared from five healthy volunteers who were seronegative for HIV, HCV, HBV and TB. The anti-HIV-1 activity of eight different honeys was performed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay and high pure viral nucleic acid kit. The results demonstrated that monofloral honeys from Petro selinum sativum, Nigella sativa, Citrus sinensis, Zataria multiflora, Citrus aurantium and Zizyphus mauritiana flowers had potent anti-HIV-1 activity with half maximal effective concentration (EC50) values of 37.5, 88, 70, 88, 105 and 5 µg/ml respectively. However, monofloral Iranian honeys from Astragalus gummifer and Chamaemelum nobile flowers had weak anti-HIV-1 activity. The frequency and intensity of CD4 expression on PBMCs increased in the presence of all honey types. CD19 marker were also increased after the treatment with monofloral honeys from Z. multiflora and N. sativa. The anti-HIV-1 agent in monofloral honeys from P. sativum, N. sativa, Z. multiflora and Z. mauritiana flowers was detected by spectroscopic analysis as methylglyoxal. Time of drug addition studies demonstrated that the inhibitory effect of methylglyoxal is higher on the late stage of HIV-1 infection. The result demonstrated that methylglyoxal isolated from monofloral honey types is a good candidate for preclinical evaluation of anti-HIV-1 therapies. PMID:25333699

  3. DNA Triplex-Based Complexes Display Anti-HIV-1-Cell Fusion Activity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Zhang, Tao; Xu, Xiaoyu; Chong, Huihui; Lai, Wenqing; Jiang, Xifeng; Wang, Chao; He, Yuxian; Liu, Keliang

    2015-08-01

    DNA triplexes with hydrophobic modifications were designed and evaluated for their activity as inhibitors of the cell fusion of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Triplex inhibitors displayed low micromolar activities in the cell-cell fusion assay and nanomolar activities in the anti-HIV-1 pseudovirus test. Helix structure and the presence of sufficient numbers of hydrophobic regions were essential for the antifusion activity. Results from native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and a fluorescent resonance energy transfer-based inhibitory assay indicated that these triplexes may interact with the primary pocket at the glycoprotein 41 (gp41) N-heptad repeat, thereby inhibiting formation of the HIV-1 gp41 6-helical bundle. Triplex-based complexes may represent a novel category of HIV-1 inhibitors in anti-HIV-1 drug discovery. PMID:26192705

  4. Anti-HIV-1 activity of a tripodal receptor that recognizes mannose oligomers.

    PubMed

    Rivero-Buceta, Eva; Carrero, Paula; Casanova, Elena; Doyagüez, Elisa G; Madrona, Andrés; Quesada, Ernesto; Peréz-Pérez, María Jesús; Mateos, Raquel; Bravo, Laura; Mathys, Leen; Noppen, Sam; Kiselev, Evgeny; Marchand, Christophe; Pommier, Yves; Liekens, Sandra; Balzarini, Jan; Camarasa, María José; San-Félix, Ana

    2015-12-01

    The glycoprotein gp120 of the HIV-1 viral envelope has a high content in mannose residues, particularly α-1,2-mannose oligomers. Compounds that interact with these high-mannose type glycans may disturb the interaction between gp120 and its (co)receptors and are considered potential anti-HIV agents. Previously, we demonstrated that a tripodal receptor (1), with a central scaffold of 1,3,5-triethylbenzene substituted with three 2,3,4-trihydroxybenzoyl groups, selectively recognizes α-1,2-mannose polysaccharides. Here we present additional studies to determine the anti-HIV-1 activity and the mechanism of antiviral activity of this compound. Our studies indicate that 1 shows anti-HIV-1 activity in the low micromolar range and has pronounced gp120 binding and HIV-1 integrase inhibitory capacity. However, gp120 binding rather than integrase inhibition seems to be the primary mechanism of antiviral activity of 1. PMID:26540494

  5. Anti-HIV-1 Activity of Elafin Is More Potent than Its Precursor's, Trappin-2, in Genital Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Drannik, Anna G.; Nag, Kakon; Yao, Xiao-Dan; Henrick, Bethany M.; Jain, Sumiti; Ball, T. Blake; Plummer, Francis A.; Wachihi, Charles; Kimani, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Cervicovaginal lavage fluid (CVL) is a natural source of anti-HIV-1 factors; however, molecular characterization of the anti-HIV-1 activity of CVL remains elusive. In this study, we confirmed that CVLs from HIV-1-resistant (HIV-R) compared to HIV-1-susceptible (HIV-S) commercial sex workers (CSWs) contain significantly larger amounts of serine antiprotease trappin-2 (Tr) and its processed form, elafin (E). We assessed anti-HIV-1 activity of CVLs of CSWs and recombinant E and Tr on genital epithelial cells (ECs) that possess (TZM-bl) or lack (HEC-1A) canonical HIV-1 receptors. Our results showed that immunodepletion of 30% of Tr/E from CVL accounted for up to 60% of total anti-HIV-1 activity of CVL. Knockdown of endogenous Tr/E in HEC-1A cells resulted in significantly increased shedding of infectious R5 and X4 HIV-1. Pretreatment of R5, but not X4 HIV-1, with either Tr or E led to inhibition of HIV-1 infection of TZM-bl cells. Interestingly, when either HIV-1 or cells lacking canonical HIV-1 receptors were pretreated with Tr or E, HIV-1 attachment and transcytosis were significantly reduced, and decreased attachment was not associated with altered expression of syndecan-1 or CXCR4. Determination of 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of Tr and E anti-HIV-1 activity indicated that E is ∼130 times more potent than its precursor, Tr, despite their equipotent antiprotease activities. This study provides the first experimental evidence that (i) Tr and E are among the principal anti-HIV-1 molecules of CVL; (ii) Tr and E affect cell attachment and transcytosis of HIV-1; (iii) E is more efficient than Tr regarding anti-HIV-1 activity; and (iv) the anti-HIV-1 effect of Tr and E is contextual. PMID:22345469

  6. In vitro anti-HIV-1 activity of fucoidan from Sargassum swartzii.

    PubMed

    Dinesh, Subramaniam; Menon, Thangam; Hanna, Luke E; Suresh, V; Sathuvan, M; Manikannan, M

    2016-01-01

    Sargassum swartzii, a marine brown algae with wide range of biological properties belongs to the family Sargassaceae. Bioactive fucoidan fractions (CFF, FF1 and FF2) were isolated from S. swartzii and characterized by linear gradient anion-exchange chromatography and FT-IR. The characterized fucoidan fractions contained mainly sugars, sulfate and uronic acid. In the present study, anti-HIV-1 property of the fucoidan fractions was investigated. Fraction FF2 was found to exhibit significant anti-HIV-1 activity at concentrations of 1.56 and 6.25 μg/ml as observed by >50% reduction in HIV-1 p24 antigen levels and reverse transcriptase activity. Fucoidan fractions have no cytotoxic effects on PBMCs at the concentration range of 1.56-1000 μg/ml. These results suggest that fucoidan fractions could have inhibitory activity against HIV and has potential as an anti-HIV-1 agent. PMID:26472515

  7. In vitro anti-HIV-1 activity of salicylidene acylhydrazide compounds.

    PubMed

    Forthal, Donald N; Phan, Tran B; Slepenkin, Anatoly V; Landucci, Gary; Chu, Hencelyn; Elofsson, Mikael; Peterson, Ellena

    2012-10-01

    Salicylidene acylhydrazide compounds have been shown to inhibit bacterial pathogens, including Chlamydia and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. If such compounds could also target HIV-1, their potential use as topical microbicides to prevent sexually transmitted infections would be considerable. In this study, the in vitro anti-HIV-1 activity, cytotoxicity and mechanism of action of several salicylidene acylhydrazides were determined. Inhibitory activity was assessed using TZM-bl cells and primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as targets for HIV-1 infection. Antiviral activity was measured against cell-free and cell-associated virus and in vaginal fluid and semen simulants. Since the antibacterial activity of salicylidene acylhydrazides is reversible by Fe(2+), the ability of Fe(2+) and other cations to reverse the anti-HIV-1 activity of the compounds was determined. Real-time PCR was also employed to determine the stage affected in the HIV-1 replication cycle. Four compounds with 50% inhibitory concentrations against HIV-1 of 1-7 μM were identified. In vitro toxicity varied but was generally limited. Activity was similar against three R5 clade B primary isolates and whether the target for virus replication was TZM-bl cells or PBMCs. Compounds inhibited cell-free and cell-associated virus and were active in vaginal fluid and semen simulants. Fe(2+), but not other cations, reversed the anti-HIV-1 effect. Finally, the inhibitory effect of the compounds occurred at a post-integration step. In conclusion, salicylidene acylhydrazides were identified with in vitro anti-HIV-1 activity in the micromolar range. The activity of these compounds against other sexually transmitted pathogens makes them potential candidates to formulate for use as a broad-spectrum topical genital microbicide. PMID:22819150

  8. Semi-synthesis of oxygenated dolabellane diterpenes with highly in vitro anti-HIV-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Pardo-Vargas, Alonso; Ramos, Freddy A; Cirne-Santos, Claudio Cesar; Stephens, Paulo Roberto; Paixão, Izabel Christina Palmer; Teixeira, Valeria Laneuville; Castellanos, Leonardo

    2014-09-15

    Research on dolabellane diterpenes of brown algae Dictyota spp. has shown that these diterpenoids have strong anti-HIV-1 activity, but there are not data about antiviral activity of dolabellane diterpenes isolated from octocorals, which are antipodes of those isolated from the brown algae. Dolabellanes 13-keto-1(R),11(S)-dolabella-3(E),7(E),12(18)-triene (1) and β-Araneosene (2) were isolated from the Caribbean octocoral Eunicea laciniata, and both showed low anti-HIV-1 activity and low toxicity. Since it was shown that oxygenated dolabellanes from algae have better anti-HIV-1 activity, in this work some derivatives of the main dolabellane of E. laciniata1 were obtained by epoxidation (3), epoxide opening (4), and allylic oxidation (5). The derivatives showed significant improvement in the anti-HIV-1potency (100-fold), being compounds 3 and 5 the most active ones. Their high antiviral activities, along with their low cytotoxicity, make them promissory antiviral compounds; and it is worth noting that the absolute configuration at the ring junction in the dolabellane skeleton does not seem to be determinant in the antiviral potency of these diterpeneoids. PMID:25176328

  9. The anti-HIV activity of ADS-J1 targets the HIV-1 gp120

    SciTech Connect

    Armand-Ugon, Mercedes; Clotet-Codina, Imma; Tintori, Cristina; Manetti, Fabrizio; Clotet, Bonaventura; Botta, Maurizio; Este, Jose A. . E-mail: jaeste@irsicaixa.es

    2005-12-05

    Recent data suggest that heparin sulfates may bind to a CD4 induced epitope in the HIV-1 gp120 that constitutes the coreceptor binding site. We have studied the mechanism of action of ADS-J1, a non-peptidic compound selected by docking analysis to interact with gp41 and to interfere with the formation of N-36/C-34 complexes in sandwich ELISA experiments. We show that ADS-J1 blocked the binding of wild-type HIV-1 NL4-3 strain to MT-4 cells but not virus-cell binding of a polyanion-resistant virus. However, ADS-J1 blocked the replication of polyanion-resistant, T-20- and C34-resistant HIV-1, suggesting a second mechanism of action. Development of resistance to ADS-J1 on the polyanion-resistant HIV-1 led to mutations in gp120 coreceptor binding site and not in gp41. Time of addition experiments confirmed that ADS-J1, but not polyanions such as dextran sulfate or AR177, worked at a step that mimics the activity of an HIV coreceptor antagonist but prior to gp41-dependent fusion. We conclude that ADS-J1 may bind to the HIV coreceptor binding site as its mechanism of anti-HIV activity.

  10. Molecular cloning and anti-HIV-1 activities of APOBEC3s from northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Liang; Song, Jia-Hao; Pang, Wei; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2016-07-18

    Northern pig-tailed macaques (NPMs, Macaca leonina) are susceptible to HIV-1 infection largely due to the loss of HIV-1-restricting factor TRIM5α. However, great impediments still exist in the persistent replication of HIV-1 in vivo, suggesting some viral restriction factors are reserved in this host. The APOBEC3 proteins have demonstrated a capacity to restrict HIV-1 replication, but their inhibitory effects in NPMs remain elusive. In this study, we cloned the NPM A3A-A3H genes, and determined by BLAST searching that their coding sequences (CDSs) showed 99% identity to the corresponding counterparts from rhesus and southern pig-tailed macaques. We further analyzed the anti-HIV-1 activities of the A3A-A3H genes, and found that A3G and A3F had the greatest anti-HIV-1 activity compared with that of other members. The results of this study indicate that A3G and A3F might play critical roles in limiting HIV-1 replication in NPMs in vivo. Furthermore, this research provides valuable information for the optimization of monkey models of HIV-1 infection. PMID:27469256

  11. Molecular cloning and anti-HIV-1 activities of APOBEC3s from northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina)

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, Xiao-Liang; SONG, Jia-Hao; PANG, Wei; ZHENG, Yong-Tang

    2016-01-01

    Northern pig-tailed macaques (NPMs, Macaca leonina) are susceptible to HIV-1 infection largely due to the loss of HIV-1-restricting factor TRIM5α. However, great impediments still exist in the persistent replication of HIV-1 in vivo, suggesting some viral restriction factors are reserved in this host. The APOBEC3 proteins have demonstrated a capacity to restrict HIV-1 replication, but their inhibitory effects in NPMs remain elusive. In this study, we cloned the NPM A3A-A3H genes, and determined by BLAST searching that their coding sequences (CDSs) showed 99% identity to the corresponding counterparts from rhesus and southern pig-tailed macaques. We further analyzed the anti-HIV-1 activities of the A3A-A3H genes, and found that A3G and A3F had the greatest anti-HIV-1 activity compared with that of other members. The results of this study indicate that A3G and A3F might play critical roles in limiting HIV-1 replication in NPMs in vivo. Furthermore, this research provides valuable information for the optimization of monkey models of HIV-1 infection. PMID:27469256

  12. A beta-galactose-specific lectin isolated from the marine worm Chaetopterus variopedatus possesses anti-HIV-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Hua; Kong, Jing; Li, Wei; Molchanova, Valentina; Chikalovets, Irina; Belogortseva, Natalia; Luk'yanov, Pavel; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2006-01-01

    A 30 kDa beta-galactose-specific lectin named CVL was isolated from the polychaete marine worm Chaetopterus variopedatus (Annelida) and its anti-HIV-1 activity in vitro was determined. Results showed that CVL inhibited cytopathic effect induced by HIV-1 and the production of viral p24 antigen. The EC(50) values were 0.0043 and 0.057 microM, respectively. Time-of-addition analysis of anti-HIV-1 activity indicated its action was at the early stage of virus replication. CVL could blocked the cell-to-cell fusion process of HIV infected and uninfected cells with an EC(50) of 0.073 microM. The inhibition of HIV-1 entry into host cells was demonstrated by using fluorescence-based real-time quantify PCR. At CVL concentration of 0.33 microM and 0.07 microM, 86% and 21% virus attachment were blocked, respectively. The anti-HIV-1 action of CVL might relate to blockade of HIV-1 entry into cells. PMID:16316787

  13. Synthesis and anti-HIV-1 activity of N-hydroxy-N1-aminoguanidines.

    PubMed

    Doubell, P C; Oliver, D W

    1992-01-01

    The synthesis of 13 new Schiff bases of N-hydroxy-N1-aminoguanidines starting from thiosemicarbazide are reported. These new derivatives were for the first time tested against infection by the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) using the human T-lymphocyte cell line. Four N-hydroxy-N1-aminoguanidines exhibited HIV-1 inhibition in the micromolar range. The most active compound, [1-(1'-chloro-2'-hydroxy-3'-methoxybenzylidene)amino]-3-hydroxy guanidine inhibited HIV-1 by 96% at 10 micrograms/ml concentration. All the derivatives exhibited substantial cytotoxicity at 320 micrograms/ml concentration. The results indicate that the activity against HIV-1 increases with increasing hydrophobicity and substituents with electron-donating properties. PMID:1586383

  14. Design of a novel cyclotide-based CXCR4 antagonist with anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Aboye, Teshome L.; Ha, Helen; Majumber, Subhabrata; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger; Shekhtman, Alexander; Neamati, Nouri; Camarero, Julio A.

    2012-01-01

    Herein, we report for the first time the design and synthesis of a novel cyclotide able to efficiently inhibit HIV-1 viral replication by selectively targeting cytokine receptor CXCR4. This was accomplished by grafting a series of topologically modified CVX15 based peptides onto the loop 6 of cyclotide MCoTI-I. The most active compound produced in this study was a potent CXCR4 antagonist (EC50 ≈ 20 nM) and an efficient HIV-1 cell-entry blocker (EC50 ≈ 2 nM). This cyclotide also showed high stability in human serum thereby providing a promising lead compound for the design of a novel type of peptide-based anti-cancer and anti-HIV-1 therapeutics. PMID:23151033

  15. Diarylpyrimidine-dihydrobenzyloxopyrimidine hybrids: new, wide-spectrum anti-HIV-1 agents active at (sub)-nanomolar level.

    PubMed

    Rotili, Dante; Tarantino, Domenico; Artico, Marino; Nawrozkij, Maxim B; Gonzalez-Ortega, Emmanuel; Clotet, Bonaventura; Samuele, Alberta; Esté, José A; Maga, Giovanni; Mai, Antonello

    2011-04-28

    Here, we describe a novel small series of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) that combine peculiar structural features of diarylpyrimidines (DAPYs) and dihydro-alkoxy-benzyl-oxopyrimidines (DABOs). These DAPY-DABO hybrids (1-4) showed a characteristic SAR profile and a nanomolar anti-HIV-1 activity at both enzymatic and cellular level. In particular, the two compounds 4d and 2d, with a (sub)nanomolar activity against wild-type and clinically relevant HIV-1 mutant strains, were selected as lead compounds for next optimization studies. PMID:21438533

  16. Synthesis and in vitro anti-HIV-1 activity of a series of N-arylsulfonyl-3-propionylindoles.

    PubMed

    Che, Zhiping; Tian, Yuee; Hu, Zhenjie; Chen, Yingwu; Liu, Shengming; Chen, Genqiang

    2016-01-01

    Fifteen N-arylsulfonyl-3-propionylindoles (3a-o) were prepared and preliminarily evaluated as in vitro inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). Three compounds 3c, 3g and 3i exhibited potent anti-HIV-1 activity with effective concentration (EC(50)) values of 0.8, 4.0 and 1.2 μg/mL, and therapeutic index (TI) values of 11.7, 16.6 and 84.1, respectively. N-(m-Nitro)phenylsulfonyl-3-propionyl-6-methylindole (3i) exhibited the most promising and best activity against HIV-1 replication. The cytotoxicity of these compounds was assessed as well. PMID:27124676

  17. Is wetter better? An evaluation of over-the-counter personal lubricants for safety and anti-HIV-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Dezzutti, Charlene S; Brown, Elizabeth R; Moncla, Bernard; Russo, Julie; Cost, Marilyn; Wang, Lin; Uranker, Kevin; Kunjara Na Ayudhya, Ratiya P; Pryke, Kara; Pickett, Jim; Leblanc, Marc-André; Rohan, Lisa C

    2012-01-01

    Because lubricants may decrease trauma during coitus, it is hypothesized that they could aid in the prevention of HIV acquisition. Therefore, safety and anti-HIV-1 activity of over-the-counter (OTC) aqueous- (n = 10), lipid- (n = 2), and silicone-based (n = 2) products were tested. The rheological properties of the lipid-based lubricants precluded testing with the exception of explant safety testing. Six aqueous-based gels were hyperosmolar, two were nearly iso-osmolar, and two were hypo-osmolar. Evaluation of the panel of products showed Gynol II (a spermicidal gel containing 2% nonoxynol-9), KY Jelly, and Replens were toxic to Lactobacillus. Two nearly iso-osmolar aqueous- and both silicone-based gels were not toxic toward epithelial cell lines or ectocervical or colorectal explant tissues. Hyperosmolar lubricants demonstrated reduction of tissue viability and epithelial fracture/sloughing while the nearly iso-osmolar and silicon-based lubricants showed no significant changes in tissue viability or epithelial modifications. While most of the lubricants had no measurable anti-HIV-1 activity, three lubricants which retained cell viability did demonstrate modest anti-HIV-1 activity in vitro. To determine if this would result in protection of mucosal tissue or conversely determine if the epithelial damage associated with the hyperosmolar lubricants increased HIV-1 infection ex vivo, ectocervical tissue was exposed to selected lubricants and then challenged with HIV-1. None of the lubricants that had a moderate to high therapeutic index protected the mucosal tissue. These results show hyperosmolar lubricant gels were associated with cellular toxicity and epithelial damage while showing no anti-viral activity. The two iso-osmolar lubricants, Good Clean Love and PRÉ, and both silicone-based lubricants, Female Condom 2 lubricant and Wet Platinum, were the safest in our testing algorithm. PMID:23144863

  18. Is Wetter Better? An Evaluation of Over-the-Counter Personal Lubricants for Safety and Anti-HIV-1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dezzutti, Charlene S.; Brown, Elizabeth R.; Moncla, Bernard; Russo, Julie; Cost, Marilyn; Wang, Lin; Uranker, Kevin; Kunjara Na Ayudhya, Ratiya P.; Pryke, Kara; Pickett, Jim; LeBlanc, Marc-André; Rohan, Lisa C.

    2012-01-01

    Because lubricants may decrease trauma during coitus, it is hypothesized that they could aid in the prevention of HIV acquisition. Therefore, safety and anti-HIV-1 activity of over-the-counter (OTC) aqueous- (n = 10), lipid- (n = 2), and silicone-based (n = 2) products were tested. The rheological properties of the lipid-based lubricants precluded testing with the exception of explant safety testing. Six aqueous-based gels were hyperosmolar, two were nearly iso-osmolar, and two were hypo-osmolar. Evaluation of the panel of products showed Gynol II (a spermicidal gel containing 2% nonoxynol-9), KY Jelly, and Replens were toxic to Lactobacillus. Two nearly iso-osmolar aqueous- and both silicone-based gels were not toxic toward epithelial cell lines or ectocervical or colorectal explant tissues. Hyperosmolar lubricants demonstrated reduction of tissue viability and epithelial fracture/sloughing while the nearly iso-osmolar and silicon-based lubricants showed no significant changes in tissue viability or epithelial modifications. While most of the lubricants had no measurable anti-HIV-1 activity, three lubricants which retained cell viability did demonstrate modest anti-HIV-1 activity in vitro. To determine if this would result in protection of mucosal tissue or conversely determine if the epithelial damage associated with the hyperosmolar lubricants increased HIV-1 infection ex vivo, ectocervical tissue was exposed to selected lubricants and then challenged with HIV-1. None of the lubricants that had a moderate to high therapeutic index protected the mucosal tissue. These results show hyperosmolar lubricant gels were associated with cellular toxicity and epithelial damage while showing no anti-viral activity. The two iso-osmolar lubricants, Good Clean Love and PRÉ, and both silicone-based lubricants, Female Condom 2 lubricant and Wet Platinum, were the safest in our testing algorithm. PMID:23144863

  19. Short Communication: Limited Anti-HIV-1 Activity of Maraviroc in Mucosal Tissues.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Patricia; Herrera, Carolina; Armanasco, Naomi; Nuttall, Jeremy; Shattock, Robin J

    2016-04-01

    The potential of maraviroc (MVC), a small-molecule CCR5 antagonist, as a candidate to prevent HIV-1 sexual transmission by oral or topical dosing has not yet been completely established. Using relevant cellular and mucosal tissue explant models, we show partial antiviral activity of MVC when tested in multiple preclinical dosing strategies. PMID:26711323

  20. Structural Determinants for the Selective Anti-HIV-1 Activity of the All-β Alternative Conformer of XCL1

    PubMed Central

    Guzzo, Christina; Fox, Jamie C.; Miao, Huiyi; Volkman, Brian F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 replication is regulated in vivo by a complex network of cytokines and chemokines. XCL1/lymphotactin, a unique metamorphic chemokine, was recently identified as a broad-spectrum endogenous HIV-1 inhibitor that blocks viral entry via direct interaction with the gp120 envelope glycoprotein. HIV-1 inhibition by XCL1 requires access to the alternative all-β conformation, which interacts with glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) but not with the specific XCL1 receptor, XCR1. To investigate the structural determinants of the HIV-inhibitory function of XCL1, we performed a detailed structure-function analysis of a stabilized all-β variant, XCL1 W55D. Individual alanine substitutions of two basic residues within the 40s' loop, K42 and R43, abrogated the ability of XCL1 to bind to the viral envelope and block HIV-1 infection; moreover, a loss of HIV-inhibitory function, albeit less marked, was seen upon individual mutation of three additional basic residues: R18, R35, and K46. In contrast, mutation of K42 to arginine did not cause any loss of function, suggesting that the interaction with gp120 is primarily electrostatic in nature. Strikingly, four of these five residues cluster to form a large (∼350 Å2) positively charged surface in the all-β XCL1 conformation, whereas they are dissociated in the classic chemokine fold, which is inactive against HIV-1, providing a structural basis for the selective antiviral activity of the alternatively folded XCL1. Furthermore, we observed that changes to the N-terminal domain, which is proximal to the cluster of putative HIV-1 gp120-interacting residues, also affect the antiviral activity of XCL1. Interestingly, the complement of residues involved in HIV-1 blockade is partially overlapping, but distinct from those involved in the GAG-binding function of XCL1. These data identify key structural determinants of anti-HIV activity in XCL1, providing new templates for the development of HIV-1 entry inhibitors. IMPORTANCE The host

  1. Autoimmune anti-HIV-1gp120 antibody with antiidiotype-like activity in sera and immune complexes of HIV-1-related immunologic thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed Central

    Karpatkin, S; Nardi, M

    1992-01-01

    Autoimmune antiidiotype-like antibody (Ab2) directed against anti-HIV-1gp120 (Ab1) was found in high titer in the sera of 10 consecutive homosexual and 11 narcotic addict HIV-1-related immunologic thrombocytopenia (HIV-1-ITP) patients, was barely detectable in 10 nonthrombocytopenic HIV-1 sero-positive individuals, and was not detectable in 5 normal subjects by use of a solid-phase RIA. Reactivity of autologous Ab2 for Ab1 was 4-120-fold greater than Ab2 for homologous Ab1. Affinity-purified Ab2 did not block the binding of affinity-purified Ab1 to its HIV-1gp120 epitopes on immunoblot, indicating the absence of "internal image" antiidiotype. Both Ab1 and Ab2 are precipitable from sera with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and present in a macromolecular complex that is excluded by gel filtration on G200 and contains IgG, IgM, C3, and the anti-F(ab')2 antiidiotype-like complex. PEG-precipitable complexes bind to platelets in a saturation-dependent manner. Neither affinity-purified Ab1 nor Ab2 binds to platelets. However, the combination of Ab1 and Ab2 (preincubated for 2 h at 22 degrees C) binds to platelets in a saturation-dependent manner at an optimum ratio range of 10-20:1. Ab2 reactivity correlates with serum PEG-precipitable immune complex level (r = 0.91; P less than 0.001) and with thrombocytopenia (r = 0.89; P less than 0.001). We suggest that the anti-HIV-1gp120 antiidiotype-like complex contributes to the markedly elevated platelet Ig and C3 level of HIV-1-ITP patients and propose that this may contribute to their thrombocytopenia. Images PMID:1737832

  2. Functional advantage of educated KIR2DL1(+) natural killer cells for anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent activation.

    PubMed

    Gooneratne, S L; Center, R J; Kent, S J; Parsons, M S

    2016-04-01

    Evidence from the RV144 HIV-1 vaccine trial implicates anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vaccine-conferred protection from infection. Among effector cells that mediate ADCC are natural killer (NK) cells. The ability of NK cells to be activated in an antibody-dependent manner is reliant upon several factors. In general, NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent activation is most robust in terminally differentiated CD57(+) NK cells, as well as NK cells educated through ontological interactions between inhibitory killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) and their major histocompatibility complex class I [MHC-I or human leucocyte antigen (HLA-I)] ligands. With regard to anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent NK cell activation, previous research has demonstrated that the epidemiologically relevant KIR3DL1/HLA-Bw4 receptor/ligand combination confers enhanced activation potential. In the present study we assessed the ability of the KIR2DL1/HLA-C2 receptor/ligand combination to confer enhanced activation upon direct stimulation with HLA-I-devoid target cells or antibody-dependent stimulation with HIV-1 gp140-pulsed CEM.NKr-CCR5 target cells in the presence of an anti-HIV-1 antibody source. Among donors carrying the HLA-C2 ligand for KIR2DL1, higher interferon (IFN)-γ production was observed within KIR2DL1(+) NK cells than in KIR2DL1(-) NK cells upon both direct and antibody-dependent stimulation. No differences in KIR2DL1(+) and KIR2DL1(-) NK cell activation were observed in HLA-C1 homozygous donors. Additionally, higher activation in KIR2DL1(+) than KIR2DL1(-) NK cells from HLA-C2 carrying donors was observed within less differentiated CD57(-) NK cells, demonstrating that the observed differences were due to education and not an overabundance of KIR2DL1(+) NK cells within differentiated CD57(+) NK cells. These observations are relevant for understanding the regulation of anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent NK cell responses. PMID:26647083

  3. Aaptamine Derivatives with Antifungal and Anti-HIV-1 Activities from the South China Sea Sponge Aaptos aaptos

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hao-Bing; Yang, Fan; Sun, Fan; Li, Jing; Jiao, Wei-Hua; Gan, Jian-Hong; Hu, Wen-Zhen; Lin, Hou-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Five new alkaloids of aaptamine family, compounds (1–5) and three known derivatives (6–8), have been isolated from the South China Sea sponge Aaptos aaptos. The structures of all compounds were unambiguously elucidated by spectroscopic analyses, as well as by comparison with the literature data. Compounds 1–2 are characterized with triazapyrene lactam skeleton, whereas compounds 4–5 share an imidazole-fused aaptamine moiety. These compounds were evaluated in antifungal and anti-HIV-1 assays. Compounds 3, 7, and 8 showed antifungal activity against six fungi, with MIC values in the range of 4 to 64 μg/mL. Compounds 7–8 exhibited anti-HIV-1 activity, with inhibitory rates of 88.0% and 72.3%, respectively, at a concentration of 10 μM. PMID:25532563

  4. In vitro anti-HIV-1 activities of kaempferol and kaempferol-7-O-glucoside isolated from Securigera securidaca

    PubMed Central

    Behbahani, M.; Sayedipour, S.; Pourazar, A.; Shanehsazzadeh, M.

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we reported that the kaempferol and kaempferol-7-O-glucoside isolated from Securigera securidaca showed potent anti-HSV activity. In the present study the anti-HIV-1 activities of kaempferol and kaempferol-7-O-glucoside are investigated at different concentrations (100, 50, 25 and 10 μg/ml) using HIV-1 p24 Antigen kit. Real-time Polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was also used for quantification of full range of virus load observed in treated and untreated cells. According to the results of RT- PCR, tested compounds at a concentration of 100 μg/ml exerted potent inhibitory effect. Time of drug addition experiments demonstrated that these compounds exerted their inhibitory effects on the early stage of HIV infection. The results also showed potent anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activity. Antiviral activity of kaempferol-7-O-glucoside was more pronounced than that of kaempferol. These findings demonstrate that kaempferol-7-O-glucoside could be considered as a new potential drug candidate for the treatment of HIV infection which requires further assessments. PMID:26339261

  5. In vitro anti-HIV-1 activities of kaempferol and kaempferol-7-O-glucoside isolated from Securigera securidaca.

    PubMed

    Behbahani, M; Sayedipour, S; Pourazar, A; Shanehsazzadeh, M

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we reported that the kaempferol and kaempferol-7-O-glucoside isolated from Securigera securidaca showed potent anti-HSV activity. In the present study the anti-HIV-1 activities of kaempferol and kaempferol-7-O-glucoside are investigated at different concentrations (100, 50, 25 and 10 μg/ml) using HIV-1 p24 Antigen kit. Real-time Polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was also used for quantification of full range of virus load observed in treated and untreated cells. According to the results of RT- PCR, tested compounds at a concentration of 100 μg/ml exerted potent inhibitory effect. Time of drug addition experiments demonstrated that these compounds exerted their inhibitory effects on the early stage of HIV infection. The results also showed potent anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activity. Antiviral activity of kaempferol-7-O-glucoside was more pronounced than that of kaempferol. These findings demonstrate that kaempferol-7-O-glucoside could be considered as a new potential drug candidate for the treatment of HIV infection which requires further assessments. PMID:26339261

  6. Anti-HIV-1 Activity of Elafin Depends on Its Nuclear Localization and Altered Innate Immune Activation in Female Genital Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xiao-Dan; Henrick, Bethany M.; Ball, T. Blake; Plummer, Francis A.; Wachihi, Charles; Kimani, Joshua; Rosenthal, Kenneth L.

    2012-01-01

    Elafin (E) and its precursor trappin-2 (Tr) are alarm antiproteases with antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities. Tr and E (Tr/E) have been associated with HIV-1 resistance. We recently showed that Tr/E reduced IL-8 secretion and NF-κB activation in response to a mimic of viral dsRNA and contributed to anti-HIV activity of cervicovaginal lavage fluid (CVL) of HIV-resistant (HIV-R) commercial sex workers (CSWs). Additionally, Tr, and more so E, were found to inhibit attachment/entry and transcytosis of HIV-1 in human endometrial HEC-1A cells, acting through virus or cells. Given their immunomodulatory activity, we hypothesized that Tr/E could exert anti-HIV-1 activity at multiple levels. Here, using tagged and untagged Tr/E proteins, we comparatively evaluated their protease inhibitory, anti-HIV-1, and immunomodulatory activities, and cellular distribution. E appeared to function as an autocrine/paracrine factor in HEC-1A cells, and anti-HIV-1 activity of E depended on its unmodified N-terminus and altered cellular innate activation, but not its antiprotease activity. Specifically, exogenously added N-terminus-unmodified E was able to enter the nucleus and to reduce viral attachment/entry and transcytosis, preferentially affecting R5-HIV-1ADA, but not X4-HIV-1IIIB. Further, anti-HIV-1 activity of E was associated with significantly decreased HIV-1-triggered IL-8 release, attenuated NF-κB/p65 nuclear translocation, and significantly modulated mRNA expression of innate sensors TLR3 and RIG-I in HEC-1A cells. Most importantly, we found that elevated Tr/E in CVLs of HIV-R CSWs were associated with lower mRNA levels of TLRs 2, 3, 4 and RIG-I in the genital ECs from this cohort, suggesting a link between Tr/E, HIV-1 resistance and modulated innate viral recognition in the female genital mucosa. Collectively, our data indicate that unmodified N-terminus is critical for intranuclear localization and anti-HIV-1 activity of E. We also propose that E-mediated altered

  7. A New Neolignan, and the Cytotoxic and Anti-HIV-1 Activities of Constituents from the Roots of Dasymaschalon sootepense.

    PubMed

    Hongthong, Sakchai; Kuhakarn, Chutima; Jaipetch, Thaworn; Piyachaturawat, Pawinee; Jariyawat, Surawat; Suksen, Kanoknetr; Limthongkul, Jitra; Nuntasaen, Narong; Reutrakul, Vichai

    2016-06-01

    Bioassay-guided isolation from the ethyl acetate extract of Dasymaschalon sootepense roots led to the isolation of twelve compounds including a new dihydrobenzo-furan neolignan, (+)-(2S,3S)-2,3-dihydro-2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-3-methylbenzofuran-5-carbaldehyde (5), and eleven known compounds (1-4, and 6-12). The chemical structures and stereochemistry of all the isolated compounds were established by spectroscopic techniques. The known compounds 4 and 6 have been fully characterized spectroscopically, including their absolute configurations. Cytotoxic and anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) activities of compounds 1-3, 5 and 8-12 were determined. Among compounds screened, compounds 2, 3 and 10 displayed weak cytotoxic activity with ED50 values ranging from 9.6-47.5 μM and only compound 2 was found weakly active against HIV-1 RT with an IC50 value of 323.2 μM. PMID:27534123

  8. Evaluation of anti-HIV-1 activity of a new iridoid glycoside isolated from Avicenna marina, in vitro.

    PubMed

    Behbahani, Mandana

    2014-11-01

    This study was carried out to check the efficacy of methanol seed extract of Avicenna marina and its column chromatographic fractions on Peripheral Blood Mono nuclear Cells (PBMCs) toxicity and HIV-1 replication. The anti-HIV-1 activities of crude methanol extract and its fractions were performed by use of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay and HIV-1 p24 antigen kit. A time of drug addiction approach was also done to identify target of anti-HIV compound. The activity of the extracts on CD4, CD3, CD19 and CD45 expression in lymphocytes population was performed by use of flow cytometry. The most active anti-HIV agent was detected by spectroscopic analysis as 2'-O-(4-methoxycinnamoyl) mussaenosidic acid. The apparent effective concentrations for 50% virus replication (EC50) of methanol extract and iridoid glycoside were 45 and 0.1 μg/ml respectively. The iridoid glycoside also did not have any observable effect on the proportion of CD4, CD3, CD19 and CD45 cells or on the intensity of their expressions on PBMCs. In addition, the expression level of C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) and chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) on CD4(+) T cells were decreased in cells treated with this iridoid glycoside. The reduction of these two HIV coreceptors and the result of time of addition study demonstrated that this iridoid glycoside restricts HIV-1 replication on the early stage of HIV infection. PMID:25239814

  9. Preliminary crystallographic studies of an anti-HIV-1 protease antibody that inhibits enzyme activity.

    PubMed Central

    Lescar, J.; Stouracova, R.; Riottot, M. M.; Chitarra, V.; Brynda, J.; Fabry, M.; Horejsi, M.; Sedlacek, J.; Bentley, G. A.

    1996-01-01

    F11.2.32, a monoclonal antibody directed against the HIV-1 protease, displays strong inhibitory effects toward the catalytic activity of the enzyme. The antibody cross-reacts with peptides 36-46 and 36-57 from the protease. Crystals of the Fab have been obtained both in the free state and as complexes formed with the protease peptide fragments, 36-46 and 36-57. Diffraction data have been collected for the free and complexed forms of Fab F11.2.32 and preliminary models for the crystal structures were obtained by molecular replacement. PMID:8732768

  10. The C-Terminal Sequence of IFITM1 Regulates Its Anti-HIV-1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Qinghua; Liu, Shan-Lu; Qiao, Wentao; Liang, Chen

    2015-01-01

    The interferon-inducible transmembrane (IFITM) proteins inhibit a wide range of viruses. We previously reported the inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strain BH10 by human IFITM1, 2 and 3. It is unknown whether other HIV-1 strains are similarly inhibited by IFITMs and whether there exists viral countermeasure to overcome IFITM inhibition. We report here that the HIV-1 NL4-3 strain (HIV-1NL4-3) is not restricted by IFITM1 and its viral envelope glycoprotein is partly responsible for this insensitivity. However, HIV-1NL4-3 is profoundly inhibited by an IFITM1 mutant, known as Δ(117–125), which is deleted of 9 amino acids at the C-terminus. In contrast to the wild type IFITM1, which does not affect HIV-1 entry, the Δ(117–125) mutant diminishes HIV-1NL4-3 entry by 3-fold. This inhibition correlates with the predominant localization of Δ(117–125) to the plasma membrane where HIV-1 entry occurs. In spite of strong conservation of IFITM1 among most species, mouse IFITM1 is 19 amino acids shorter at its C-terminus as compared to human IFITM1 and, like the human IFITM1 mutant Δ(117–125), mouse IFITM1 also inhibits HIV-1 entry. This is the first report illustrating the role of viral envelope protein in overcoming IFITM1 restriction. The results also demonstrate the importance of the C-terminal region of IFITM1 in modulating the antiviral function through controlling protein subcellular localization. PMID:25738301

  11. The Lupane-type Triterpene 30-Oxo-calenduladiol Is a CCR5 Antagonist with Anti-HIV-1 and Anti-chemotactic Activities*

    PubMed Central

    Barroso-González, Jonathan; El Jaber-Vazdekis, Nabil; García-Expósito, Laura; Machado, José-David; Zárate, Rafael; Ravelo, Ángel G.; Estévez-Braun, Ana; Valenzuela-Fernández, Agustín

    2009-01-01

    The existence of drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viruses in patients receiving antiretroviral treatment urgently requires the characterization and development of new antiretroviral drugs designed to inhibit resistant viruses and to complement the existing antiretroviral strategies against AIDS. We assayed several natural or semi-synthetic lupane-type pentacyclic triterpenes in their ability to inhibit HIV-1 infection in permissive cells. We observed that the 30-oxo-calenduladiol triterpene, compound 1, specifically impaired R5-tropic HIV-1 envelope-mediated viral infection and cell fusion in permissive cells, without affecting X4-tropic virus. This lupane derivative competed for the binding of a specific anti-CCR5 monoclonal antibody or the natural CCL5 chemokine to the CCR5 viral coreceptor with high affinity. 30-Oxo-calenduladiol seems not to interact with the CD4 antigen, the main HIV receptor, or the CXCR4 viral coreceptor. Our results suggest that compound 1 is a specific CCR5 antagonist, because it binds to the CCR5 receptor without triggering cell signaling or receptor internalization, and inhibits RANTES (regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted)-mediated CCR5 internalization, intracellular calcium mobilization, and cell chemotaxis. Furthermore, compound 1 appeared not to interact with β-chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR2b, CCR3, or CCR4. Thereby, the 30-oxo-calenduladiol-associated anti-HIV-1 activity against R5-tropic virus appears to rely on the selective occupancy of the CCR5 receptor to inhibit CCR5-mediated HIV-1 infection. Therefore, it is plausible that the chemical structure of 30-oxo-calenduladiol or other related dihydroxylated lupane-type triterpenes could represent a good model to develop more potent anti-HIV-1 molecules to inhibit viral infection by interfering with early fusion and entry steps in the HIV life cycle. PMID:19386595

  12. [HPLC enantioseparation, absolute configuration determination and anti-HIV-1 activity of (±)-F18 enantiomers].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei-lei; Xue, Hai; Li, Li; Lu, Xiao-fan; Chen, Zhi-wei; Lu, Gang

    2015-06-01

    Racemic (±)-F18 (10-chloromethyl-11-demethyl-12-oxo-calanolide A), an analog of nature product (+)-calanolide A, is a new anti-HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcript inhibitor (NNRTI). A successful enantioseparation of (±)-F18 offering (R)-F18 and (S)-F18 was achieved by a chiral stationary phase prepared HPLC. Their absolute configurations were determined by measurement of their electronic circular dichroisms combined with modem quantum-chemical calculations. Further investigation revealed that (R)-F18 and (S)-F18 shared a similar anti-HIV activities, however, (R)-F18 was more potent than (S)-F18 against wild-type virus, K101E mutation and P225H mutation pseudoviruses. PMID:26521445

  13. Anti-HIV-1 activity of phlorotannin derivative 8,4‴-dieckol from Korean brown alga Ecklonia cava.

    PubMed

    Karadeniz, Fatih; Kang, Kyong-Hwa; Park, Jae W; Park, Sun-Joo; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2014-01-01

    8,4‴-dieckol is a natural product which has been isolated from brown alga, Ecklonia cava. This polyphenolic compound is a phlorotannin derivative with a broad range of bioactivities. Its inhibitory activity on human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) was tested and the results indicated that 8,4‴-dieckol inhibited HIV-1 induced syncytia formation, lytic effects, and viral p24 antigen production at noncytotoxic concentrations. Furthermore, it was found that 8,4‴-dieckol selectively inhibited the activity of HIV-1 reverse trancriptase (RT) enzyme with 91% inhibition ratio at the concentration of 50 μM. HIV-1 entry was also inhibited by 8,4‴-dieckol. According to data from this study, 8,4‴-dieckol is an effective compound against HIV-1 with high potential for further studies. These results suggest that it might be used as a drug candidate for the development of new generation therapeutic agents, although further studies on the mechanism of inhibition should be addressed. PMID:25229850

  14. Synthesis and Anti-HIV-1 Activity Evaluation for Novel 3a,6a-Dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrazole-4,6-dione Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guan-Nan; Luo, Rong-Hua; Zhou, Yu; Zhang, Xing-Jie; Li, Jian; Yang, Liu-Meng; Zheng, Yong-Tang; Liu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The search for new molecular constructs that resemble the critical two-metal binding pharmacophore and the halo-substituted phenyl functionality required for HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibition represents a vibrant area of research within drug discovery. As reported herein, we have modified our recently disclosed 1-[2-(4-fluorophenyl)ethyl]-pyrrole-2,5-dione scaffolds to design 35 novel compounds with improved biological activities against HIV-1. These new compounds show single-digit micromolar antiviral potencies against HIV-1 and low toxicity. Among of them, compound 9g and 15i had potent anti-HIV-1 activities (EC50 < 5 μM) and excellent therapeutic index (TI, CC50/EC50 > 100). These two compounds have potential as lead compounds for further optimization into clinical anti-HIV-1 agents. PMID:27617994

  15. The anti-inflammatory activity of curcumin protects the genital mucosal epithelial barrier from disruption and blocks replication of HIV-1 and HSV-2.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Victor H; Nazli, Aisha; Dizzell, Sara E; Mueller, Kristen; Kaushic, Charu

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a known mechanism that facilitates HIV acquisition and the spread of infection. In this study, we evaluated whether curcumin, a potent and safe anti-inflammatory compound, could be used to abrogate inflammatory processes that facilitate HIV-1 acquisition in the female genital tract (FGT) and contribute to HIV amplification. Primary, human genital epithelial cells (GECs) were pretreated with curcumin and exposed to HIV-1 or HIV glycoprotein 120 (gp120), both of which have been shown to disrupt epithelial tight junction proteins, including ZO-1 and occludin. Pre-treatment with curcumin prevented disruption of the mucosal barrier by maintaining ZO-1 and occludin expression and maintained trans-epithelial electric resistance across the genital epithelium. Curcumin pre-treatment also abrogated the gp120-mediated upregulation of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin (IL)-6, which mediate barrier disruption, as well as the chemokines IL-8, RANTES and interferon gamma-induced protein-10 (IP-10), which are capable of recruiting HIV target cells to the FGT. GECs treated with curcumin and exposed to the sexually transmitted co-infecting microbes HSV-1, HSV-2 and Neisseria gonorrhoeae were unable to elicit innate inflammatory responses that indirectly induced activation of the HIV promoter and curcumin blocked Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated induction of HIV replication in chronically infected T-cells. Finally, curcumin treatment resulted in significantly decreased HIV-1 and HSV-2 replication in chronically infected T-cells and primary GECs, respectively. All together, our results suggest that the use of anti-inflammatory compounds such as curcumin may offer a viable alternative for the prevention and/or control of HIV replication in the FGT. PMID:25856395

  16. Gnidimacrin, a Potent Anti-HIV Diterpene, Can Eliminate Latent HIV-1 Ex Vivo by Activation of Protein Kinase C β.

    PubMed

    Lai, Weihong; Huang, Li; Zhu, Lei; Ferrari, Guido; Chan, Cliburn; Li, Wei; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Chen, Chin-Ho

    2015-11-12

    HIV-1-latency-reversing agents, such as histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs), were ineffective in reducing latent HIV-1 reservoirs ex vivo using CD4 cells from patients as a model. This deficiency poses a challenge to current pharmacological approaches for HIV-1 eradication. The results of this study indicated that gnidimacrin (GM) was able to markedly reduce the latent HIV-1 DNA level and the frequency of latently infected cells in an ex vivo model using patients peripheral blood mononuclear cells. GM induced approximately 10-fold more HIV-1 production than the HDACI SAHA or romidepsin, which may be responsible for the effectiveness of GM in reducing latent HIV-1 levels. GM achieved these effects at low picomolar concentrations by selective activation of protein kinase C βI and βII. Notably, GM was able to reduce the frequency of HIV-1 latently infected cells at concentrations without global T cell activation or stimulating inflammatory cytokine production. GM merits further development as a clinical trial candidate for latent HIV-1 eradication. PMID:26509731

  17. Application of ant colony optimization in development of models for prediction of anti-HIV-1 activity of HEPT derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zare-Shahabadi, Vali; Abbasitabar, Fatemeh

    2010-09-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship models were derived for 107 analogs of 1-[(2-hydroxyethoxy) methyl]-6-(phenylthio)thymine, a potent inhibitor of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. The activities of these compounds were investigated by means of multiple linear regression (MLR) technique. An ant colony optimization algorithm, called Memorized_ACS, was applied for selecting relevant descriptors and detecting outliers. This algorithm uses an external memory based upon knowledge incorporation from previous iterations. At first, the memory is empty, and then it is filled by running several ACS algorithms. In this respect, after each ACS run, the elite ant is stored in the memory and the process is continued to fill the memory. Here, pheromone updating is performed by all elite ants collected in the memory; this results in improvements in both exploration and exploitation behaviors of the ACS algorithm. The memory is then made empty and is filled again by performing several ACS algorithms using updated pheromone trails. This process is repeated for several iterations. At the end, the memory contains several top solutions for the problem. Number of appearance of each descriptor in the external memory is a good criterion for its importance. Finally, prediction is performed by the elitist ant, and interpretation is carried out by considering the importance of each descriptor. The best MLR model has a training error of 0.47 log (1/EC(50)) units (R(2) = 0.90) and a prediction error of 0.76 log (1/EC(50)) units (R(2) = 0.88). PMID:20575016

  18. Structure-Based Design of a Small Molecule CD4-Antagonist with Broad Spectrum Anti-HIV-1 Activity.

    PubMed

    Curreli, Francesca; Kwon, Young Do; Zhang, Hongtao; Scacalossi, Daniel; Belov, Dmitry S; Tikhonov, Artur A; Andreev, Ivan A; Altieri, Andrea; Kurkin, Alexander V; Kwong, Peter D; Debnath, Asim K

    2015-09-10

    Earlier we reported the discovery and design of NBD-556 and their analogs which demonstrated their potential as HIV-1 entry inhibitors. However, progress in developing these inhibitors has been stymied by their CD4-agonist properties, an unfavorable trait for use as drug. Here, we demonstrate the successful conversion of a full CD4-agonist (NBD-556) through a partial CD4-agonist (NBD-09027), to a full CD4-antagonist (NBD-11021) by structure-based modification of the critical oxalamide midregion, previously thought to be intolerant of modification. NBD-11021 showed unprecedented neutralization breath for this class of inhibitors, with pan-neutralization against a panel of 56 Env-pseudotyped HIV-1 representing diverse subtypes of clinical isolates (IC50 as low as 270 nM). The cocrystal structure of NBD-11021 complexed to a monomeric HIV-1 gp120 core revealed its detail binding characteristics. The study is expected to provide a framework for further development of NBD series as HIV-1 entry inhibitors for clinical application against AIDS. PMID:26301736

  19. Selective non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors. New 2,3-dihydrothiazolo[2,3-a]isoindol-5(9bH)-ones and related compounds with anti-HIV-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Mertens, A; Zilch, H; König, B; Schäfer, W; Poll, T; Kampe, W; Seidel, H; Leser, U; Leinert, H

    1993-08-20

    A series of substituted 2,3-dihydrothiazolo[2,3-a]isoindol-5(9bH)-ones and related compounds 1-73 were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to inhibit reverse transcriptase (RT) of the human immune deficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) and replication of HIV-1 in MT2 cells. The antiviral activity of these compounds depends on the stereoselective configuration of the substituent in position 9b. Structure-activity studies were done within these series of compounds to determine the optimum substituents for antiviral activity. The most potent inhibitors were found in the class of 2,3-dihydrothiazolo[2,3-a]isoindol-5(9bH)-ones bearing a phenyl ring system in position 9b optionally substituted with one or two methyl groups or a chlorine atom in position 8. The most active analogues (R)-(+)-1, (R)-(+)-6, (R)-(+)-13, (R)-(+)-26, and (R)-(+)-53 inhibit the HIV-1 RT with an IC50 between 16 and 300 nM and an IC50 between 10 and 392 nM in MT2 cells, respectively. PMID:7689109

  20. Rational design, synthesis, anti-HIV-1 RT and antimicrobial activity of novel 3-(6-methoxy-3,4-dihydroquinolin-1(2H)-yl)-1-(piperazin-1-yl)propan-1-one derivatives.

    PubMed

    Chander, Subhash; Wang, Ping; Ashok, Penta; Yang, Liu-Meng; Zheng, Yong-Tang; Murugesan, Sankaranarayanan

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, fifteen novel 3-(6-methoxy-3,4-dihydroquinolin-1(2H)-yl)-1-(piperazin-1-yl)propan-1-one (6a-o) derivatives were designed as inhibitor of HIV-1 RT using ligand based drug design approach and in-silico evaluated for drug-likeness properties. Designed compounds were synthesized, characterized and in-vitro evaluated for RT inhibitory activity against wild HIV-1 RT strain. Among the tested compounds, four compounds (6a, 6b, 6j and 6o) exhibited significant inhibition of HIV-1 RT (IC50⩽10μg/ml). All synthesized compounds were also evaluated for anti-HIV-1 activity as well as cytotoxicity on T lymphocytes, in which compounds 6b and 6l exhibited significant anti-HIV activity (EC50 values 4.72 and 5.45μg/ml respectively) with good safety index. Four compounds (6a, 6b, 6j and 6o) found significantly active against HIV-1 RT in the in-vitro assay were in-silico evaluated against two mutant RT strains as well as one wild strain. Further, titled compounds were evaluated for in-vitro antibacterial (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida, Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus) and antifungal (Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger) activities. PMID:27288643

  1. Herpes simplex virus type-2 stimulates HIV-1 replication in cervical tissues: implications for HIV-1 transmission and efficacy of anti-HIV-1 microbicides

    PubMed Central

    Rollenhagen, C; Lathrop, M J; Macura, S L; Doncel, G F; Asin, S N

    2014-01-01

    Herpes Simplex virus Type-2 (HSV-2) increases the risk of HIV-1 acquisition, yet the mechanism for this viral pathogen to regulate the susceptibility of the cervicovaginal mucosa to HIV-1 is virtually unknown. Using ex vivo human ectocervical tissue models, we report greater levels of HIV-1 reverse transcription, DNA integration, RNA expression, and virions release in HIV-1/HSV-2 co-infected tissues compared with HIV-1 only infected tissues (P<0.05). Enhanced HIV-1 replication was associated with increased CD4, CCR5, and CD38 transcription (P<0.05) and increased number of CD4+/CCR5+/CD38+ T cells in HIV-1/HSV-2 co-infected tissues compared with tissues infected with HIV-1 alone. Tenofovir (TFV) 1% gel, the leading microbicide candidate, demonstrated only partial protection against HIV-1, when applied vaginally before and after sexual intercourse. It is possible that mucosal inflammation, in particular that induced by HSV-2 infection, may have decreased TFV efficacy. HSV-2 upregulated the number of HIV-1-infected cells and elevated the concentration of TFV needed to decrease HIV-1 infection. Similarly, only high concentrations of TFV inhibited HSV-2 replication in HIV-1/HSV-2-infected tissues. Thus, HSV-2 co-infection and mucosal immune cell activation should be taken into consideration when designing preventative strategies for sexual transmission of HIV-1. PMID:24496317

  2. Catalytically-active complex of HIV-1 integrase with a viral DNA substrate binds anti-integrase drugs.

    PubMed

    Alian, Akram; Griner, Sarah L; Chiang, Vicki; Tsiang, Manuel; Jones, Gregg; Birkus, Gabriel; Geleziunas, Romas; Leavitt, Andrew D; Stroud, Robert M

    2009-05-19

    HIV-1 integration into the host cell genome is a multistep process catalyzed by the virally-encoded integrase (IN) protein. In view of the difficulty of obtaining a stable DNA-bound IN at high concentration as required for structure determination, we selected IN-DNA complexes that form disulfide linkages between 5'-thiolated DNA and several single mutations to cysteine around the catalytic site of IN. Mild reducing conditions allowed for selection of the most thermodynamically-stable disulfide-linked species. The most stable complexes induce tetramer formation of IN, as happens during the physiological integration reaction, and are able to catalyze the strand transfer step of retroviral integration. One of these complexes also binds strand-transfer inhibitors of HIV antiviral drugs, making it uniquely valuable among the mutants of this set for understanding portions of the integration reaction. This novel complex may help define substrate interactions and delineate the mechanism of action of known integration inhibitors. PMID:19416821

  3. Syndecan-Fc Hybrid Molecule as a Potent In Vitro Microbicidal Anti-HIV-1 Agent▿

    PubMed Central

    Bobardt, Michael D.; Chatterji, Udayan; Schaffer, Lana; de Witte, Lot; Gallay, Philippe A.

    2010-01-01

    In the absence of a vaccine, there is an urgent need for the development of safe and effective topical microbicides to prevent the sexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). In this study, we proposed to develop a novel class of microbicides using syndecan as the antiviral agent. Specifically, we generated a soluble syndecan-Fc hybrid molecule by fusing the ectodomain of syndecan-1 to the Fc domain of a human IgG. We then tested the syndecan-Fc hybrid molecule for various in vitro microbicidal anti-HIV-1 properties. Remarkably, the syndecan-Fc hybrid molecule possesses multiple attractive microbicidal properties: (i) it blocks HIV-1 infection of primary targets including T cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells (DC); (ii) it exhibits a broad range of antiviral activity against primary HIV-1 isolates, multidrug resistant HIV-1 isolates, HIV-2, and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV); (iii) it prevents transmigration of HIV-1 through human primary genital epithelial cells; (iv) it prevents HIV-1 transfer from dendritic cells to CD4+ T cells; (v) it is potent when added 2 h prior to addition of HIV-1 to target cells; (vi) it is potent at a low pH; (vii) it blocks HIV-1 infectivity when diluted in genital fluids; and (viii) it prevents herpes simplex virus infection. The heparan sulfate chains of the syndecan-Fc hybrid molecule are absolutely required for HIV-1 neutralization. Several lines of evidence suggest that the highly conserved Arg298 in the V3 region of gp120 serves as the locus for the syndecan-Fc hybrid molecule neutralization. In conclusion, this study suggests that the syndecan-Fc hybrid molecule represents the prototype of a new generation of microbicidal agents that may have promise for HIV-1 prevention. PMID:20439611

  4. Catalytically-active complex of HIV-1 integrase with a viral DNA substrate binds anti-integrase drugs

    PubMed Central

    Alian, Akram; Griner, Sarah L.; Chiang, Vicki; Tsiang, Manuel; Jones, Gregg; Birkus, Gabriel; Geleziunas, Romas; Leavitt, Andrew D.; Stroud, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 integration into the host cell genome is a multistep process catalyzed by the virally-encoded integrase (IN) protein. In view of the difficulty of obtaining a stable DNA-bound IN at high concentration as required for structure determination, we selected IN–DNA complexes that form disulfide linkages between 5′-thiolated DNA and several single mutations to cysteine around the catalytic site of IN. Mild reducing conditions allowed for selection of the most thermodynamically-stable disulfide-linked species. The most stable complexes induce tetramer formation of IN, as happens during the physiological integration reaction, and are able to catalyze the strand transfer step of retroviral integration. One of these complexes also binds strand-transfer inhibitors of HIV antiviral drugs, making it uniquely valuable among the mutants of this set for understanding portions of the integration reaction. This novel complex may help define substrate interactions and delineate the mechanism of action of known integration inhibitors. PMID:19416821

  5. Activation of HIV-1 with Nanoparticle-Packaged Small-Molecule Protein Phosphatase-1-Targeting Compound

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kahli A.; Lin, Xionghao; Bolshakov, Oleg; Griffin, James; Niu, Xiaomei; Kovalskyy, Dmytro; Ivanov, Andrey; Jerebtsova, Marina; Taylor, Robert E.; Akala, Emmanuel; Nekhai, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    Complete eradication of HIV-1 infection is impeded by the existence of latent HIV-1 reservoirs in which the integrated HIV-1 provirus is transcriptionally inactive. Activation of HIV-1 transcription requires the viral Tat protein and host cell factors, including protein phosphatase-1 (PP1). We previously developed a library of small compounds that targeted PP1 and identified a compound, SMAPP1, which induced HIV-1 transcription. However, this compound has a limited bioavailability in vivo and may not be able to reach HIV-1-infected cells and induce HIV-1 transcription in patients. We packaged SMAPP1 in polymeric polyethylene glycol polymethyl methacrylate nanoparticles and analyzed its release and the effect on HIV-1 transcription in a cell culture. SMAPP1 was efficiently packaged in the nanoparticles and released during a 120-hr period. Treatment of the HIV-1-infected cells with the SMAPP1-loaded nanoparticles induced HIV-1 transcription. Thus, nanoparticles loaded with HIV-1-targeting compounds might be useful for future anti-HIV-1 therapeutics. PMID:26839837

  6. Synthesis, evaluation of anti-HIV-1 and anti-HCV activity of novel 2′,3′-dideoxy-2′,2′-difluoro-4′-azanucleosides

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Montero, Saúl; Fernández, Susana; Sanghvi, Yogesh S.; Theodorakis, Emmanuel A.; Detorio, Mervi A.; Mcbrayer, Tamara R.; Whitaker, Tony; Schinazi, Raymond F.; Gotor, Vicente; Ferrero, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    A series of 2′,3′-dideoxy-2′,2′-difluoro-4′-azanucleosides of both pyrimidine and purine nucleobases were synthesized in an efficient manner starting from commercially available L-pyroglutamic acid via glycosylation of difluorinated pyrrolidine derivative 15. Several 4′-azanucleosides were prepared as a separable mixture of α- and β-anomers. The 6-chloropurine analogue was obtained as a mixture of N7 and N9 regioisomers and their structures were identified based on NOESY and HMBC spectral data. Among the 4′-azanucleosides tested as HIV-1 inhibitors in primary human lymphocytes, four compounds showed modest activity and the 5-fluorouracil analogue (18d) was found to be the most active compound (EC50 = 36.9 μM) in this series. None of the compounds synthesized in this study demonstrated anti-HCV activity. PMID:23085031

  7. Short Communication: Anti-HIV-1 Envelope Immunoglobulin Gs in Blood and Cervicovaginal Samples of Beninese Commercial Sex Workers

    PubMed Central

    Batraville, Laurie-Anne; Richard, Jonathan; Veillette, Maxime; Labbé, Annie-Claude; Alary, Michel; Guédou, Fernand; Kaufmann, Daniel E.; Poudrier, Johanne

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Characterization of the immune correlates of protection against HIV infection is crucial for the development of preventive strategies. This study examined HIV-1 envelope (Env) glycoproteins, specifically immunoglobulin G (IgG), in systemic and mucosal compartments of female Beninese commercial sex workers (CSWs). Samples of 23 HIV-1-positive and 20 highly exposed HIV-1-seronegative (HESN) CSWs were studied. HIV-1 Env-specific IgG detection in sera and cervicovaginal lavages (CVLs) from the study population was done by cell-based ELISA. The HIV neutralizing activity was evaluated with a neutralization assay. The HIV-1-specific antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) response of the cohort was measured with a FACS-based assay evaluating the ADCC-mediated elimination of gp120-coated target cells. No anti-HIV-1 Env-specific IgG neutralizing or ADCC activities were detected in samples from HESN CSWs. Samples from HIV-1-infected CSWs presented ADCC activity in both sera and CVLs. Anti-Env IgG from sera and CVLs from HIV-1-infected CSWs preferentially recognized Env in its CD4-bound conformation. HIV-1-infected CSWs have ADCC-mediating IgG that preferentially recognizes Env in its CD4-bound conformation at the mucosal site. PMID:25354025

  8. A single injection of anti-HIV-1 antibodies protects against repeated SHIV challenges.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Rajeev; Nishimura, Yoshiaki; Pegu, Amarendra; Nason, Martha C; Klein, Florian; Gazumyan, Anna; Golijanin, Jovana; Buckler-White, Alicia; Sadjadpour, Reza; Wang, Keyun; Mankoff, Zachary; Schmidt, Stephen D; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Mascola, John R; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Martin, Malcolm A

    2016-05-01

    Despite the success of potent anti-retroviral drugs in controlling human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, little progress has been made in generating an effective HIV-1 vaccine. Although passive transfer of anti-HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies can protect mice or macaques against a single high-dose challenge with HIV or simian/human (SIV/HIV) chimaeric viruses (SHIVs) respectively, the long-term efficacy of a passive antibody transfer approach for HIV-1 has not been examined. Here we show, on the basis of the relatively long-term protection conferred by hepatitis A immune globulin, the efficacy of a single injection (20 mg kg(-1)) of four anti-HIV-1-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (VRC01, VRC01-LS, 3BNC117, and 10-1074 (refs 9 - 12)) in blocking repeated weekly low-dose virus challenges of the clade B SHIVAD8. Compared with control animals, which required two to six challenges (median = 3) for infection, a single broadly neutralizing antibody infusion prevented virus acquisition for up to 23 weekly challenges. This effect depended on antibody potency and half-life. The highest levels of plasma-neutralizing activity and, correspondingly, the longest protection were found in monkeys administered the more potent antibodies 3BNC117 and 10-1074 (median = 13 and 12.5 weeks, respectively). VRC01, which showed lower plasma-neutralizing activity, protected for a shorter time (median = 8 weeks). The introduction of a mutation that extends antibody half-life into the crystallizable fragment (Fc) domain of VRC01 increased median protection from 8 to 14.5 weeks. If administered to populations at high risk of HIV-1 transmission, such an immunoprophylaxis regimen could have a major impact on virus transmission. PMID:27120156

  9. Anti-phospholipid human monoclonal antibodies inhibit CCR5-tropic HIV-1 and induce β-chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hua-Xin; Alam, S. Munir; Scearce, Richard M.; Plonk, M. Kelly; Kozink, Daniel M.; Drinker, Mark S.; Zhang, Ruijun; Xia, Shi-Mao; Sutherland, Laura L.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Giles, Ian P.; Kappes, John C.; Ochsenbauer-Jambor, Christina; Edmonds, Tara G.; Soares, Melina; Barbero, Gustavo; Forthal, Donald N.; Landucci, Gary; Chang, Connie; King, Steven W.; Kavlie, Anita; Denny, Thomas N.; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Chen, Pojen P.; Thorpe, Philip E.; Montefiori, David C.

    2010-01-01

    Traditional antibody-mediated neutralization of HIV-1 infection is thought to result from the binding of antibodies to virions, thus preventing virus entry. However, antibodies that broadly neutralize HIV-1 are rare and are not induced by current vaccines. We report that four human anti-phospholipid monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) (PGN632, P1, IS4, and CL1) inhibit HIV-1 CCR5-tropic (R5) primary isolate infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with 80% inhibitory concentrations of <0.02 to ∼10 µg/ml. Anti-phospholipid mAbs inhibited PBMC HIV-1 infection in vitro by mechanisms involving binding to monocytes and triggering the release of MIP-1α and MIP-1β. The release of these β-chemokines explains both the specificity for R5 HIV-1 and the activity of these mAbs in PBMC cultures containing both primary lymphocytes and monocytes. PMID:20368576

  10. Anti-HIV-1 activity of salivary MUC5B and MUC7 mucins from HIV patients with different CD4 counts

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background We have previously shown that MUC5B and MUC7 mucins from saliva of HIV negative individuals inhibit HIV-1 activity by 100% in an in vitro assay. The purpose of this subsequent study was to investigate whether MUC5B and MUC7 from saliva of HIV patients or with full blown AIDS had a similar inhibitory activity against the virus. Methods Salivary MUC5B and MUC7 from HIV patients with different CD4 counts (< 200, 200-400 and > 400) were incubated with HIV-1 prior to infection of the human T lymphoblastoid cell line (CEM SS cells). Cells were then cultured and viral replication was measured by a qualitative p24 antigen assay. The size, charge and immunoreactivity of mucins from HIV negative and positive individuals was also analysed by SDS-PAGE, Western blot and ELISA respectively. Results It was shown that irrespective of their CD4 counts both MUC5B and MUC7 from HIV patients, unlike the MUC5B and MUC7 from HIV negative individuals, did not inhibit HIV-1 activity. Size, charge and immunoreactivity differences between the mucins from HIV negative and positive individuals and among the mucins from HIV patients of different CD4 count was observed by SDS-PAGE, Western blot and ELISA. Conclusions Purified salivary mucins from HIV positive patients do not inhibit the AIDS virus in an in vitro assay. Although the reason for the inability of mucins from infected individuals to inhibit the virus is not known, it is likely that there is an alteration of the glycosylation pattern, and therefore of charge of mucin, in HIV positive patients. The ability to inhibit the virus by aggregation by sugar chains is thus diminished. PMID:20946627

  11. Bispecific Anti-HIV-1 Antibodies with Enhanced Breadth and Potency.

    PubMed

    Bournazos, Stylianos; Gazumyan, Anna; Seaman, Michael S; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Ravetch, Jeffrey V

    2016-06-16

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) against the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) suppress viremia in animal models of HIV-1 and humans. To achieve potent activity without the emergence of viral escape mutants, co-administration of different bNAbs is necessary to target distinct epitopes essential for viral fitness. Here, we report the development of bispecific anti-Env neutralizing antibodies (biNAbs) with potent activity. Synergistic activity of biNAbs was achieved by combining an engineered hinge domain of IgG3 to increase Fab domain flexibility necessary for hetero-bivalent binding to the Env trimer while retaining the functional properties of the IgG1-Fc. Compared to unmodified biNAbs, hinge domain variants exhibited substantially improved neutralization activity, with particular combinations showing evidence of synergistic neutralization potency in vitro and enhanced in vivo therapeutic activity in HIV-1-infected humanized mice. These findings suggest innovative strategies for generating biNAbs with enhanced neutralization breadth and potency, representing ideal candidate molecules for the control of HIV-1 infection. PMID:27315478

  12. Broad activation of latent HIV-1 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Barton, Kirston; Hiener, Bonnie; Winckelmann, Anni; Rasmussen, Thomas Aagaard; Shao, Wei; Byth, Karen; Lanfear, Robert; Solomon, Ajantha; McMahon, James; Harrington, Sean; Buzon, Maria; Lichterfeld, Mathias; Denton, Paul W; Olesen, Rikke; Østergaard, Lars; Tolstrup, Martin; Lewin, Sharon R; Søgaard, Ole Schmeltz; Palmer, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The 'shock and kill' approach to cure human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) includes transcriptional induction of latent HIV-1 proviruses using latency-reversing agents (LRAs) with targeted immunotherapy to purge infected cells. The administration of LRAs (panobinostat or vorinostat) to HIV-1-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy induces a significant increase in cell-associated unspliced (CA-US) HIV-1 RNA from CD4(+) T cells. However, it is important to discern whether the increases in CA-US HIV-1 RNA are due to limited or broad activation of HIV-1 proviruses. Here we use single-genome sequencing to find that the RNA transcripts observed following LRA administration are genetically diverse, indicating activation of transcription from an extensive range of proviruses. Defective sequences are more frequently found in CA HIV-1 RNA than in HIV-1 DNA, which has implications for developing an accurate measure of HIV-1 reservoir size. Our findings provide insights into the effects of panobinostat and vorinostat as LRAs for latent HIV-1. PMID:27605062

  13. Ectopic expression of anti-HIV-1 shRNAs protects CD8+ T cells modified with CD4ζ CAR from HIV-1 infection and alleviates impairment of cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Kamata, Masakazu; Kim, Patrick Y.; Ng, Hwee L.; Ringpis, Gene-Errol E.; Kranz, Emiko; Chan, Joshua; O'Connor, Sean; Yang, Otto O.; Chen, Irvin S.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are artificially engineered receptors that confer a desired specificity to immune effector T cells. As an HIV-1-specific CAR, CD4ζ CAR has been extensively tested in vitro as well as in clinical trials. T cells modified with this CAR mediated highly potent anti-HIV-1 activities in vitro and were well-tolerated in vivo, but exerted limited effects on viral load and reservoir size due to poor survival and/or functionality of the transduced cells in patients. We hypothesize that ectopic expression of CD4ζ on CD8+ T cells renders them susceptible to HIV-1 infection, resulting in poor survival of those cells. To test this possibility, highly purified CD8+ T cells were genetically modified with a CD4ζ-encoding lentiviral vector and infected with HIV-1. CD8+ T cells were vulnerable to HIV-1 infection upon expression of CD4ζ as evidenced by elevated levels of p24Gag in cells and culture supernatants. Concurrently, the number of CD4ζ-modified CD8+ T cells was reduced relative to control cells upon HIV-1 infection. To protect these cells from HIV-1 infection, we co-expressed two anti-HIV-1 shRNAs previously developed by our group together with CD4ζ. This combination vector was able to suppress HIV-1 infection without impairing HIV-1-dependent effector activities of CD4ζ. In addition, the number of CD4ζ-modified CD8+ T cells maintained similar levels to that of the control even under HIV-1 infection. These results suggest that protecting CD4ζ-modified CD8+ T cells from HIV-1 infection is required for prolonged HIV-1-specific immune surveillance. PMID:25998390

  14. Creation of chimeric human/rabbit APOBEC1 with HIV-1 restriction and DNA mutation activities.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Terumasa; Ong, Eugene Boon Beng; Watanabe, Nobumoto; Sakaguchi, Nobuo; Maeda, Kazuhiko; Koito, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    APOBEC1 (A1) proteins from lagomorphs and rodents have deaminase-dependent restriction activity against HIV-1, whereas human A1 exerts a negligible effect. To investigate these differences in the restriction of HIV-1 by A1 proteins, a series of chimeric proteins combining rabbit and human A1s was constructed. Homology models of the A1s indicated that their activities derive from functional domains that likely act in tandem through a dimeric interface. The C-terminal region containing the leucine-rich motif and the dimerization domains of rabbit A1 is important for its anti-HIV-1 activity. The A1 chimeras with strong anti-HIV-1 activity were incorporated into virions more efficiently than those without anti-HIV-1 activity, and exhibited potent DNA-mutator activity. Therefore, the C-terminal region of rabbit A1 is involved in both its packaging into the HIV-1 virion and its deamination activity against both viral cDNA and genomic RNA. This study identifies the novel molecular mechanism underlying the target specificity of A1. PMID:26738439

  15. Creation of chimeric human/rabbit APOBEC1 with HIV-1 restriction and DNA mutation activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Terumasa; Ong, Eugene Boon Beng; Watanabe, Nobumoto; Sakaguchi, Nobuo; Maeda, Kazuhiko; Koito, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    APOBEC1 (A1) proteins from lagomorphs and rodents have deaminase-dependent restriction activity against HIV-1, whereas human A1 exerts a negligible effect. To investigate these differences in the restriction of HIV-1 by A1 proteins, a series of chimeric proteins combining rabbit and human A1s was constructed. Homology models of the A1s indicated that their activities derive from functional domains that likely act in tandem through a dimeric interface. The C-terminal region containing the leucine-rich motif and the dimerization domains of rabbit A1 is important for its anti-HIV-1 activity. The A1 chimeras with strong anti-HIV-1 activity were incorporated into virions more efficiently than those without anti-HIV-1 activity, and exhibited potent DNA-mutator activity. Therefore, the C-terminal region of rabbit A1 is involved in both its packaging into the HIV-1 virion and its deamination activity against both viral cDNA and genomic RNA. This study identifies the novel molecular mechanism underlying the target specificity of A1.

  16. Creation of chimeric human/rabbit APOBEC1 with HIV-1 restriction and DNA mutation activities

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Terumasa; Ong, Eugene Boon Beng; Watanabe, Nobumoto; Sakaguchi, Nobuo; Maeda, Kazuhiko; Koito, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    APOBEC1 (A1) proteins from lagomorphs and rodents have deaminase-dependent restriction activity against HIV-1, whereas human A1 exerts a negligible effect. To investigate these differences in the restriction of HIV-1 by A1 proteins, a series of chimeric proteins combining rabbit and human A1s was constructed. Homology models of the A1s indicated that their activities derive from functional domains that likely act in tandem through a dimeric interface. The C-terminal region containing the leucine-rich motif and the dimerization domains of rabbit A1 is important for its anti-HIV-1 activity. The A1 chimeras with strong anti-HIV-1 activity were incorporated into virions more efficiently than those without anti-HIV-1 activity, and exhibited potent DNA-mutator activity. Therefore, the C-terminal region of rabbit A1 is involved in both its packaging into the HIV-1 virion and its deamination activity against both viral cDNA and genomic RNA. This study identifies the novel molecular mechanism underlying the target specificity of A1. PMID:26738439

  17. Ectopic expression of anti-HIV-1 shRNAs protects CD8{sup +} T cells modified with CD4ζ CAR from HIV-1 infection and alleviates impairment of cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Kamata, Masakazu; Kim, Patrick Y.; Ng, Hwee L.; Ringpis, Gene-Errol E.; Kranz, Emiko; Chan, Joshua; O'Connor, Sean; Yang, Otto O.; Chen, Irvin S.Y.

    2015-07-31

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are artificially engineered receptors that confer a desired specificity to immune effector T cells. As an HIV-1-specific CAR, CD4ζ CAR has been extensively tested in vitro as well as in clinical trials. T cells modified with this CAR mediated highly potent anti-HIV-1 activities in vitro and were well-tolerated in vivo, but exerted limited effects on viral load and reservoir size due to poor survival and/or functionality of the transduced cells in patients. We hypothesize that ectopic expression of CD4ζ on CD8{sup +} T cells renders them susceptible to HIV-1 infection, resulting in poor survival of those cells. To test this possibility, highly purified CD8{sup +} T cells were genetically modified with a CD4ζ-encoding lentiviral vector and infected with HIV-1. CD8{sup +} T cells were vulnerable to HIV-1 infection upon expression of CD4ζ as evidenced by elevated levels of p24{sup Gag} in cells and culture supernatants. Concurrently, the number of CD4ζ-modified CD8{sup +} T cells was reduced relative to control cells upon HIV-1 infection. To protect these cells from HIV-1 infection, we co-expressed two anti-HIV-1 shRNAs previously developed by our group together with CD4ζ. This combination vector was able to suppress HIV-1 infection without impairing HIV-1-dependent effector activities of CD4ζ. In addition, the number of CD4ζ-modified CD8{sup +} T cells maintained similar levels to that of the control even under HIV-1 infection. These results suggest that protecting CD4ζ-modified CD8{sup +} T cells from HIV-1 infection is required for prolonged HIV-1-specific immune surveillance. - Highlights: • Ectopic expression of CD4ζ CAR in CD8{sup +} T cells renders them susceptible to HIV-1 infection. • Co-expression of two anti-HIV-1 shRNAs protects CD4ζ CAR-modified CD8{sup +} T cells from HIV-1 infection. • Protecting CD4ζ CAR-modified CD8{sup +} T cells from HIV-1 infection suppresses its cytopathic effect.

  18. Hybrid spreading mechanisms and T cell activation shape the dynamics of HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changwang; Zhou, Shi; Groppelli, Elisabetta; Pellegrino, Pierre; Williams, Ian; Borrow, Persephone; Chain, Benjamin M; Jolly, Clare

    2015-04-01

    HIV-1 can disseminate between susceptible cells by two mechanisms: cell-free infection following fluid-phase diffusion of virions and by highly-efficient direct cell-to-cell transmission at immune cell contacts. The contribution of this hybrid spreading mechanism, which is also a characteristic of some important computer worm outbreaks, to HIV-1 progression in vivo remains unknown. Here we present a new mathematical model that explicitly incorporates the ability of HIV-1 to use hybrid spreading mechanisms and evaluate the consequences for HIV-1 pathogenenesis. The model captures the major phases of the HIV-1 infection course of a cohort of treatment naive patients and also accurately predicts the results of the Short Pulse Anti-Retroviral Therapy at Seroconversion (SPARTAC) trial. Using this model we find that hybrid spreading is critical to seed and establish infection, and that cell-to-cell spread and increased CD4+ T cell activation are important for HIV-1 progression. Notably, the model predicts that cell-to-cell spread becomes increasingly effective as infection progresses and thus may present a considerable treatment barrier. Deriving predictions of various treatments' influence on HIV-1 progression highlights the importance of earlier intervention and suggests that treatments effectively targeting cell-to-cell HIV-1 spread can delay progression to AIDS. This study suggests that hybrid spreading is a fundamental feature of HIV infection, and provides the mathematical framework incorporating this feature with which to evaluate future therapeutic strategies. PMID:25837979

  19. Development and Identification of a Novel Anti-HIV-1 Peptide Derived by Modification of the N-Terminal Domain of HIV-1 Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Sala, Marina; Spensiero, Antonia; Esposito, Francesca; Scala, Maria C.; Vernieri, Ermelinda; Bertamino, Alessia; Manfra, Michele; Carotenuto, Alfonso; Grieco, Paolo; Novellino, Ettore; Cadeddu, Marta; Tramontano, Enzo; Schols, Dominique; Campiglia, Pietro; Gomez-Monterrey, Isabel M.

    2016-01-01

    The viral enzyme integrase (IN) is essential for the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and represents an important target for the development of new antiretroviral drugs. In this study, we focused on the N-terminal domain (NTD), which is mainly involved into protein oligomerization process, for the development and synthesis of a library of overlapping peptide sequences, with specific length and specific offset covering the entire native protein sequence NTD IN 1–50. The most potent fragment, VVAKEIVAH (peptide 18), which includes a His residue instead of the natural Ser at position 39, inhibits the HIV-1 IN activity with an IC50 value of 4.5 μM. Amino acid substitution analysis on this peptide revealed essential residues for activity and allowed us to identify two nonapeptides (peptides 24 and 25), that show a potency of inhibition similar to the one of peptide 18. Interestingly, peptide 18 does not interfere with the dynamic interplay between IN subunits, while peptides 24 and 25 modulated these interactions in different manners. In fact, peptide 24 inhibited the IN-IN dimerization, while peptide 25 promoted IN multimerization, with IC50 values of 32 and 4.8 μM, respectively. In addition, peptide 25 has shown to have selective anti-infective cell activity for HIV-1. These results confirmed peptide 25 as a hit for further development of new chemotherapeutic agents against HIV-1. PMID:27375570

  20. Development and Identification of a Novel Anti-HIV-1 Peptide Derived by Modification of the N-Terminal Domain of HIV-1 Integrase.

    PubMed

    Sala, Marina; Spensiero, Antonia; Esposito, Francesca; Scala, Maria C; Vernieri, Ermelinda; Bertamino, Alessia; Manfra, Michele; Carotenuto, Alfonso; Grieco, Paolo; Novellino, Ettore; Cadeddu, Marta; Tramontano, Enzo; Schols, Dominique; Campiglia, Pietro; Gomez-Monterrey, Isabel M

    2016-01-01

    The viral enzyme integrase (IN) is essential for the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and represents an important target for the development of new antiretroviral drugs. In this study, we focused on the N-terminal domain (NTD), which is mainly involved into protein oligomerization process, for the development and synthesis of a library of overlapping peptide sequences, with specific length and specific offset covering the entire native protein sequence NTD IN 1-50. The most potent fragment, VVAKEIVAH (peptide 18), which includes a His residue instead of the natural Ser at position 39, inhibits the HIV-1 IN activity with an IC50 value of 4.5 μM. Amino acid substitution analysis on this peptide revealed essential residues for activity and allowed us to identify two nonapeptides (peptides 24 and 25), that show a potency of inhibition similar to the one of peptide 18. Interestingly, peptide 18 does not interfere with the dynamic interplay between IN subunits, while peptides 24 and 25 modulated these interactions in different manners. In fact, peptide 24 inhibited the IN-IN dimerization, while peptide 25 promoted IN multimerization, with IC50 values of 32 and 4.8 μM, respectively. In addition, peptide 25 has shown to have selective anti-infective cell activity for HIV-1. These results confirmed peptide 25 as a hit for further development of new chemotherapeutic agents against HIV-1. PMID:27375570

  1. Enhancement of the basal-level activity of HIV-1 long terminal repeat by HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J L; Sharma, P L; Crumpacker, C S

    2000-03-15

    Two HIV-1 proteins, Tat and NCp7 (NC), have zinc finger-like structures. NC is a virion protein and has been shown to accumulate in the nucleus 8 h postinfection. Since transcription factors with zinc fingers assist the transcriptional activity of both RNA polymerases II and III, we examined the effect of NC on HIV-1 LTR-directed gene expression. The HIV-1 NC binds to the HIV-1 LTR and results in a mobility shift in polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Competition assays with cold probes revealed that the binding of NC and formation of a DNA-protein complex could be prevented by the addition of excess unlabeled LTR self-probe, but not the HIV-1 V3 envelope gene. The DNase I footprint analysis showed that NC binds to six regions within HIV-1 LTR, four of which are near the transcription start site. The NC alone enhances LTR basal-level activity in RNA runoff experiments. When the general transcription factors (GTFs) were added in the assay, NC enhances NF-kappaB, Sp1, and TFIIB-induced HIV-1 LTR-directed RNA transcription. RNA transcription directed by the adenovirus major late promoter, however, is not significantly affected by NC in the cell-free system. Transient transfection of human T lymphocytes with the plasmids containing HIV-1 nc or gag showed enhancement of LTR-CAT activity. Moreover, transfection of HIV-1 provirus containing mutations in NC zinc-finger domains dramatically decreases the enhancement activity in human T cells, in which HIV-1 LTR is stably integrated into the cellular genome. These observations show that NC binds to HIV-1 LTR and cooperatively enhances GTFs and NF-kappaB induced HIV-1 LTR basal-level activity. NC may play the role of a nucleation protein, which binds to LTR and enhances basal-level transcription by recruiting cellular transcription factors to the HIV-1 promoter in competition with cellular promoters. PMID:10704334

  2. Testing anti-HIV activity of antiretroviral agents in vitro using flow cytometry analysis of CEM-GFP cells infected with transfection-derived HIV-1 NL4-3.

    PubMed

    Frezza, Caterina; Grelli, Sandro; Federico, Maurizio; Marino-Merlo, Francesca; Mastino, Antonio; Macchi, Beatrice

    2016-06-01

    An assay, specifically optimized to evaluate the anti-HIV activity of antiretrovirals by flow cytometry analysis, is described. As widely used anti-HIV agents, zidovudine (AZT), abacavir (ABC), 2',3'-dideoxyinosine (DDI), lamivudine (3TC), nevirapine (NVP), and efavirenz (EFV), and as drugs of recent approval raltegravir (RAL), etravirine (ETR), and rilpivirine (RPV), were utilized as reference drugs. HIV-1 NL4-3 virus was prepared by transfection of HEK293T cells with purified plasmid DNA and quantified by p24 antigen-capture assay. For infection, CEM-GFP cells were exposed to vehicle or to several concentrations of the drugs for 2 hr at 37 °C before HIV-1 NL4-3 was added to each sample. The adsorption was prolonged for 3 hr at 37 °C. After 72 hr of incubation, HIV-induced GFP expression in infected CEM-GFP cells was assessed by flow cytometry analysis and expressed as % positive cells. For comparison, p24 production in supernatants was assessed by a commercial ELISA kit. On the basis of IC50 values, the anti-HIV activity, as assayed by this method, was EFV > 3TC > AZT > NVP > DDI > ABC and ETR > RPV > RAL. The comparison between the IC50 values calculated through flow cytometry and p24 production revealed overlapping results, showing that the optimized protocol of CEM-GFP infection with HIV NL4-3 is a suitable method to perform quantitative, rapid and low-expensive screening tests to evaluate the in vitro effect of new candidate anti-HIV drugs. PMID:26519867

  3. Natural Plant Alkaloid (Emetine) Inhibits HIV-1 Replication by Interfering with Reverse Transcriptase Activity.

    PubMed

    Chaves Valadão, Ana Luiza; Abreu, Celina Monteiro; Dias, Juliana Zanatta; Arantes, Pablo; Verli, Hugo; Tanuri, Amilcar; de Aguiar, Renato Santana

    2015-01-01

    Ipecac alkaloids are secondary metabolites produced in the medicinal plant Psychotria ipecacuanha. Emetine is the main alkaloid of ipecac and one of the active compounds in syrup of Ipecac with emetic property. Here we evaluated emetine's potential as an antiviral agent against Human Immunodeficiency Virus. We performed in vitro Reverse Transcriptase (RT) Assay and Natural Endogenous Reverse Transcriptase Activity Assay (NERT) to evaluate HIV RT inhibition. Emetine molecular docking on HIV-1 RT was also analyzed. Phenotypic assays were performed in non-lymphocytic and in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMC) with HIV-1 wild-type and HIV-harboring RT-resistant mutation to Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (M184V). Our results showed that HIV-1 RT was blocked in the presence of emetine in both models: in vitro reactions with isolated HIV-1 RT and intravirion, measured by NERT. Emetine revealed a strong potential of inhibiting HIV-1 replication in both cellular models, reaching 80% of reduction in HIV-1 infection, with low cytotoxic effect. Emetine also blocked HIV-1 infection of RT M184V mutant. These results suggest that emetine is able to penetrate in intact HIV particles, and bind and block reverse transcription reaction, suggesting that it can be used as anti-HIV microbicide. Taken together, our findings provide additional pharmacological information on the potential therapeutic effects of emetine. PMID:26111177

  4. Design, synthesis and anti-HIV-1 evaluation of hydrazide-based peptidomimetics as selective gelatinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liang; Wang, Ping; Wu, Ji-Feng; Yang, Liu-Meng; Wang, Rui-Rui; Pang, Wei; Li, Yong-Gang; Shen, Yue-Mao; Zheng, Yong-Tang; Li, Xun

    2016-05-01

    As our ongoing work on research of gelatinase inhibitors, an array of hydrazide-containing peptidomimetic derivatives bearing quinoxalinone as well as spiro-heterocyclic backbones were designed, synthesized, and assayed for their in vitro enzymatic inhibitory effects. The results demonstrated that both the quinoxalinone (series I and II) and 1,4-dithia-7-azaspiro[4,4]nonane-based hydrazide peptidomimetics (series III) displayed remarkably selectivity towards gelatinase A as compared to APN, with IC50 values in the micromole range. Structure-activity relationships were herein briefly discussed. Given evidences have validated that gelatinase inhibition may be contributable to the therapy of HIV-1 infection, all the target compounds were also submitted to the preliminary in vitro anti-HIV-1 evaluation. It resulted that gelatinase inhibition really has positive correlation with anti-HIV-1 activity, especially compounds 4m and 7h, which gave enhanced gelatinase inhibition in comparison with the positive control LY52, and also decent anti-HIV-1 potencies. The FlexX docking results provided a straightforward insight into the binding pattern between inhibitors and gelatinase, as well as the selective inhibition towards gelatinase over APN. Collectively, our research encouraged potent gelatinase inhibitors might be used in the development of anti-HIV-1 agents. And else, compounds 4m and 7h might be promising candidates to be considered for further chemical optimization. PMID:27039251

  5. Antiviral activity of CYC202 in HIV-1-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Agbottah, Emmanuel; de La Fuente, Cynthia; Nekhai, Sergie; Barnett, Anna; Gianella-Borradori, Athos; Pumfery, Anne; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2005-01-28

    There are currently 40 million individuals in the world infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has led to a significant reduction in AIDS-related morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, up to 25% of patients discontinue their initial HAART regimen. Current HIV-1 inhibitors target the fusion of the virus to the cell and two viral proteins, reverse transcriptase and protease. Here, we examined whether other targets, such as an activated transcription factor, could be targeted to block HIV-1 replication. We specifically asked whether we could target a cellular kinase needed for HIV-1 transcription using CYC202 (R-roscovitine), a pharmacological cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor. We targeted the cdk2-cyclin E complex in HIV-1-infected cells because both cdk2 and cyclin E are nonessential during mammalian development and are likely replaced by other kinases. We found that CYC202 effectively inhibits wild type and resistant HIV-1 mutants in T-cells, monocytes, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells at a low IC(50) and sensitizes these cells to enhanced apoptosis resulting in a dramatic drop in viral titers. Interestingly, the effect of CYC202 is independent of cell cycle stage and more specific for the cdk2-cyclin E complex. Finally, we show that cdk2-cyclin E is loaded onto the HIV-1 genome in vivo and that CYC202 is able to inhibit the uploading of this cdk-cyclin complex onto HIV-1 DNA. Therefore, targeting cellular enzymes necessary for HIV-1 transcription, which are not needed for cell survival, is a compelling strategy to inhibit wild type and mutant HIV-1 strains. PMID:15531588

  6. Gelsolin activity controls efficient early HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV-1 entry into target lymphocytes requires the activity of actin adaptors that stabilize and reorganize cortical F-actin, like moesin and filamin-A. These alterations are necessary for the redistribution of CD4-CXCR4/CCR5 to one pole of the cell, a process that increases the probability of HIV-1 Envelope (Env)-CD4/co-receptor interactions and that generates the tension at the plasma membrane necessary to potentiate fusion pore formation, thereby favouring early HIV-1 infection. However, it remains unclear whether the dynamic processing of F-actin and the amount of cortical actin available during the initial virus-cell contact are required to such events. Results Here we show that gelsolin restructures cortical F-actin during HIV-1 Env-gp120-mediated signalling, without affecting cell-surface expression of receptors or viral co-receptor signalling. Remarkably, efficient HIV-1 Env-mediated membrane fusion and infection of permissive lymphocytes were impaired when gelsolin was either overexpressed or silenced, which led to a loss or gain of cortical actin, respectively. Indeed, HIV-1 Env-gp120-induced F-actin reorganization and viral receptor capping were impaired under these experimental conditions. Moreover, gelsolin knockdown promoted HIV-1 Env-gp120-mediated aberrant pseudopodia formation. These perturbed-actin events are responsible for the inhibition of early HIV-1 infection. Conclusions For the first time we provide evidence that through its severing of cortical actin, and by controlling the amount of actin available for reorganization during HIV-1 Env-mediated viral fusion, entry and infection, gelsolin can constitute a barrier that restricts HIV-1 infection of CD4+ lymphocytes in a pre-fusion step. These findings provide important insights into the complex molecular and actin-associated dynamics events that underlie early viral infection. Thus, we propose that gelsolin is a new factor that can limit HIV-1 infection acting at a pre-fusion step

  7. CRISPR-mediated Activation of Latent HIV-1 Expression.

    PubMed

    Limsirichai, Prajit; Gaj, Thomas; Schaffer, David V

    2016-03-01

    Complete eradication of HIV-1 infection is impeded by the existence of cells that harbor chromosomally integrated but transcriptionally inactive provirus. These cells can persist for years without producing viral progeny, rendering them refractory to immune surveillance and antiretroviral therapy and providing a permanent reservoir for the stochastic reactivation and reseeding of HIV-1. Strategies for purging this latent reservoir are thus needed to eradicate infection. Here, we show that engineered transcriptional activation systems based on CRISPR/Cas9 can be harnessed to activate viral gene expression in cell line models of HIV-1 latency. We further demonstrate that complementing Cas9 activators with latency-reversing compounds can enhance latent HIV-1 transcription and that epigenome modulation using CRISPR-based acetyltransferases can also promote viral gene activation. Collectively, these results demonstrate that CRISPR systems are potentially effective tools for inducing latent HIV-1 expression and that their use, in combination with antiretroviral therapy, could lead to improved therapies for HIV-1 infection. PMID:26607397

  8. Isolation, structure, and HIV-1-integrase inhibitory activity of structurally diverse fungal metabolites.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sheo B; Jayasuriya, Hiranthi; Dewey, Raymond; Polishook, Jon D; Dombrowski, Anne W; Zink, Deborah L; Guan, Ziqiang; Collado, Javier; Platas, Gonzalo; Pelaez, Fernando; Felock, Peter J; Hazuda, Daria J

    2003-12-01

    HIV-1 integrase is a critical enzyme for replication of HIV, and its inhibition is one of the most promising new drug strategies for anti-retroviral therapy, with potentially significant advantages over existing therapies. In this report, a series of HIV-1 inhibitors isolated from the organic extract of fermentations from terrestrial fungi is described. These fungal species, belonging to a variety of genera, were collected from throughout the world following the strict guidelines of Rio Convention on Biodiversity. The polyketide- and terpenoid-derived inhibitors are represented by two naphthoquinones, a biphenyl and two triphenyls, a benzophenone, four aromatics with or without catechol units, a linear aliphatic terpenoid, a diterpenoid, and a sesterterpenoid. These compounds inhibited the coupled and strand-transfer reaction of HIV-1 integrase with an IC(50) value of 0.5-120 micro M. The bioassay-directed isolation, structure elucidation, and HIV-1 inhibitory activity of these compounds are described. PMID:14714192

  9. Oxaliplatin antagonizes HIV-1 latency by activating NF-κB without causing global T cell activation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xiaoli; Liu, Sijie; Wang, Pengfei; Qu, Xiying; Wang, Xiaohui; Zeng, Hanxian; Chen, Huabiao; Zhu, Huanzhang

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • The chemotherapeutic drug oxaliplatin reactivates latent HIV-1 in this cell line model of HIV-1 latency. • Reactivation is synergized when oxaliplatin is used in combination with valproic acid. • Oxaliplatin reactivates latent HIV-1 through activation of NF-kB and does not induce T cell activation. - Abstract: Reactivation of latent HIV-1 is a promising strategy for the clearance of the viral reservoirs. Because of the limitations of current agents, identification of new latency activators is urgently required. Using an established model of HIV-1 latency, we examined the effect of Oxaliplatin on latent HIV-1 reactivation. We showed that Oxaliplatin, alone or in combination with valproic acid (VPA), was able to reactivate HIV-1 without inducing global T cell activation. We also provided evidence that Oxaliplatin reactivated HIV-1 expression by inducing nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) nuclear translocation. Our results indicated that Oxaliplatin could be a potential drug candidate for anti-latency therapies.

  10. A synthetic heparan sulfate-mimetic peptide conjugated to a mini CD4 displays very high anti- HIV-1 activity independently of coreceptor usage.

    PubMed

    Connell, Bridgette Janine; Baleux, Françoise; Coic, Yves-Marie; Clayette, Pascal; Bonnaffé, David; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues

    2012-01-27

    The HIV-1 envelope gp120, which features both the virus receptor (CD4) and coreceptor (CCR5/CXCR4) binding sites, offers multiple sites for therapeutic intervention. However, the latter becomes exposed, thus vulnerable to inhibition, only transiently when the virus has already bound cellular CD4. To pierce this defense mechanism, we engineered a series of heparan sulfate mimicking tridecapeptides and showed that one of them target the gp120 coreceptor binding site with μM affinity. Covalently linked to a CD4-mimetic that binds to gp120 and renders the coreceptor binding domain available to be targeted, the conjugated tridecapeptide now displays nanomolar affinity for its target. Using solubilized coreceptors captured on top of sensorchip we show that it inhibits gp120 binding to both CCR5 and CXCR4 and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells broadly inhibits HIV-1 replication with an IC(50) of 1 nM. PMID:22284360

  11. HIV-1 vaccine development: constrained peptide immunogens show improved binding to the anti-HIV-1 gp41 MAb.

    PubMed

    McGaughey, G B; Citron, M; Danzeisen, R C; Freidinger, R M; Garsky, V M; Hurni, W M; Joyce, J G; Liang, X; Miller, M; Shiver, J; Bogusky, M J

    2003-03-25

    The human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) transmembrane glycoprotein gp41 mediates viral entry through fusion of the target cellular and viral membranes. A segment of gp41 containing the sequence Glu-Leu-Asp-Lys-Trp-Ala has previously been identified as the epitope of the HIV-1 neutralizing human monoclonal antibody 2F5 (MAb 2F5). The 2F5 epitope is highly conserved among HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins. Antibodies directed at the 2F5 epitope have neutralizing effects on a broad range of laboratory-adapted HIV-1 variants and primary isolates. Recently, a crystal structure of the epitope bound to the Fab fragment of MAb 2F5 has shown that the 2F5 peptide adopts a beta-turn conformation [Pai, E. F., Klein, M. H., Chong, P., and Pedyczak, A. (2000) World Intellectual Property Organization Patent WO-00/61618]. We have designed cyclic peptides to adopt beta-turn conformations by the incorporation of a side-chain to side-chain lactam bridge between the i and i + 4 residues containing the Asp-Lys-Trp segment. Synthesis of extended, nonconstrained peptides encompassing the 2F5 epitope revealed that the 13 amino acid sequence, Glu-Leu-Leu-Glu-Leu-Asp-Lys-Trp-Ala-Ser-Leu-Trp-Asn, maximized MAb 2F5 binding. Constrained analogues of this sequence were explored to optimize 2F5 binding affinity. The solution conformations of the constrained peptides have been characterized by NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling techniques. The results presented here demonstrate that both inclusion of the lactam constraint and extension of the 2F5 segment are necessary to elicit optimal antibody binding activity. The ability of these peptide immunogens to stimulate a high titer, peptide-specific immune response incapable of viral neutralization is discussed in regard to developing an HIV-1 vaccine designed to elicit a 2F5-like immune response. PMID:12641452

  12. Evaluation of anti-HIV-1 mutagenic nucleoside analogues.

    PubMed

    Vivet-Boudou, Valérie; Isel, Catherine; El Safadi, Yazan; Smyth, Redmond P; Laumond, Géraldine; Moog, Christiane; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Marquet, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Because of their high mutation rates, RNA viruses and retroviruses replicate close to the threshold of viability. Their existence as quasi-species has pioneered the concept of "lethal mutagenesis" that prompted us to synthesize pyrimidine nucleoside analogues with antiviral activity in cell culture consistent with an accumulation of deleterious mutations in the HIV-1 genome. However, testing all potentially mutagenic compounds in cell-based assays is tedious and costly. Here, we describe two simple in vitro biophysical/biochemical assays that allow prediction of the mutagenic potential of deoxyribonucleoside analogues. The first assay compares the thermal stabilities of matched and mismatched base pairs in DNA duplexes containing or not the nucleoside analogues as follows. A promising candidate should display a small destabilization of the matched base pair compared with the natural nucleoside and the smallest gap possible between the stabilities of the matched and mismatched base pairs. From this assay, we predicted that two of our compounds, 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxyuridine and 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxycytidine, should be mutagenic. The second in vitro reverse transcription assay assesses DNA synthesis opposite nucleoside analogues inserted into a template strand and subsequent extension of the newly synthesized base pairs. Once again, only 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxyuridine and 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxycytidine are predicted to be efficient mutagens. The predictive potential of our fast and easy first line screens was confirmed by detailed analysis of the mutation spectrum induced by the compounds in cell culture because only compounds 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxyuridine and 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxycytidine were found to increase the mutation frequency by 3.1- and 3.4-fold, respectively. PMID:25398876

  13. Docking of anti-HIV-1 oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone derivatives as potential HSV-1 DNA polymerase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, Julliane Diniz; Albuquerque, Magaly Girão; Leal, Kátia Zaccur; Santos, Fernanda da Costa; Batalha, Pedro Netto; Brozeguini, Leonardo; Seidl, Peter R.; de Alencastro, Ricardo Bicca; Cunha, Anna Cláudia; de Souza, Maria Cecília B. V.; Ferreira, Vitor F.; Giongo, Viveca A.; Cirne-Santos, Cláudio; Paixão, Izabel C. P.

    2014-09-01

    Although there are many antiviral drugs available for the treatment of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections, still the synthesis of new anti-HSV candidates is an important strategy to be pursued, due to the emergency of resistant HSV strains mainly in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infected patients. Some 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinolines, such as PNU-183792 (1), show a broad spectrum antiviral activity against human herpes viruses, inhibiting the viral DNA polymerase (POL) without affecting the human POLs. Thus, on an ongoing antiviral research project, our group has synthesized ribonucleosides containing the 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline (quinolone) heterocyclic moiety, such as the 6-Cl derivative (2), which is a dual antiviral agent (HSV-1 and HIV-1). Molecular dynamics simulations of the complexes of 1 and 2 with the HSV-1 POL suggest that structural modifications of 2 should increase its experimental anti-HSV-1 activity, since its ribosyl and carboxyl groups are highly hydrophilic to interact with a hydrophobic pocket of this enzyme. Therefore, in this work, comparative molecular docking simulations of 1 and three new synthesized oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone HIV-1 inhibitors (3-5), which do not contain those hydrophilic groups, were carried out, in order to access these modifications in the proposition of new potential anti-HSV-1 agents, but maintaining the anti-HIV-1 activity. Among the docked compounds, the oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone 3 is the best candidate for an anti-HSV-1 agent, and, in addition, it showed anti-HIV-1 activity (EC50 = 3.4 ± 0.3 μM). Compounds 2 and 3 were used as templates in the design of four new oxoquinoline-acylhydrazones (6-9) as potential anti-HSV-1 agents to increase the antiviral activity of 2. Among the docked compounds, oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone 7 was selected as the best candidate for further development of dual anti-HIV/HSV activity.

  14. Antimalarial activity of HIV-1 protease inhibitor in chromone series.

    PubMed

    Lerdsirisuk, Pradith; Maicheen, Chirattikan; Ungwitayatorn, Jiraporn

    2014-12-01

    Increasing parasite resistance to nearly all available antimalarial drugs becomes a serious problem to human health and necessitates the need to continue the search for new effective drugs. Recent studies have shown that clinically utilized HIV-1 protease (HIV-1 PR) inhibitors can inhibit the in vitro and in vivo growth of Plasmodium falciparum. In this study, a series of chromone derivatives possessing HIV-1 PR inhibitory activity has been tested for antimalarial activity against P. falciparum (K1 multi-drug resistant strain). Chromone 15, the potent HIV-1 PR inhibitor (IC50=0.65μM), was found to be the most potent antimalarial compound with IC50=0.95μM while primaquine and tafenoquine showed IC50=2.41 and 1.95μM, respectively. Molecular docking study of chromone compounds against plasmepsin II, an aspartic protease enzyme important in hemoglobin degradation, revealed that chromone 15 exhibited the higher binding affinity (binding energy=-13.24kcal/mol) than the known PM II inhibitors. Thus, HIV-1 PR inhibitor in chromone series has the potential to be a new class of antimalarial agent. PMID:25462990

  15. Anti-HIV-1 integrase compounds from Dioscorea bulbifera and molecular docking study.

    PubMed

    Chaniad, Prapaporn; Wattanapiromsakul, Chatchai; Pianwanit, Somsak; Tewtrakul, Supinya

    2016-06-01

    Context Dioscorea bulbifera L. (Dioscoreaceae) has been used in a traditional Thai longevity medicine preparation. Isolation of inhibitors from natural products is a potential source for continuous development of new HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors. Objective The objective of this study is to isolate the compounds and evaluate their anti-HIV-1 IN activity, as well as to predict the potential interactions of the compounds with an IN. Materials and methods The ethyl acetate and water fractions (1-100 μg/mL) of Dioscorea bulbifera bulbils were isolated and tested for their anti-HIV-1 IN activity using the multiplate integration assay (MIA). The interactions of the active compounds with IN were investigated using a molecular docking method. Results and discussions The ethyl acetate and water fractions of Dioscorea bulbifera bulbils afforded seven compounds. Among these, allantoin (1), 2,4,3',5'-tetrahydroxybibenzyl (2), and 5,7,4'-trihydroxy-2-styrylchromone (5) were isolated for the first time from this plant. Myricetin (4) exhibited the most potent activity with an IC50 value of 3.15 μM, followed by 2,4,6,7-tetrahydroxy-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene (3, IC50 value= 14.20 μM), quercetin-3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (6, IC50 value = 19.39 μM) and quercetin-3-O-β-d-galactopyranoside (7, IC50 value = 21.80 μM). Potential interactions of the active compounds (3, 4, 6, and 7) with the IN active site were additionally investigated. Compound 4 showed the best binding affinity to IN and formed strong interactions with various amino acid residues. These compounds interacted with Asp64, Thr66, His67, Glu92, Asp116, Gln148, Glu152, Asn155, and Lys159, which are involved in both the 3'-processing and strand transfer reactions of IN. In particular, galloyl, catechol, and sugar moieties were successful inhibitors for HIV-1 IN. PMID:26864337

  16. Structural requirements for potent anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and sperm-immobilizing activities of cyclohexenyl thiourea and urea non-nucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    D'Cruz, Osmond J; Venkatachalam, Taracad K; Mao, Chen; Qazi, Sanjive; Uckun, Fatih M

    2002-12-01

    The current pandemic of sexually transmitted human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) has created an urgent need for a new type of microbicide, one that is both a spermicide and a virucide. In a systematic effort to identify a non-detergent-type antiviral spermicide, we have rationally designed and synthesized a series of cyclohexenyl thiourea (CHET) nonnucleoside inhibitors (NNIs) of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) with sperm-immobilizing activity (SIA). To gain further insight into the structural requirements for the optimal activity of these dual-function NNIs, we compared the effects of thiazolyl, benzothiazolyl, and pyridyl ring substitutions and functionalization with electron-donating and electron-withdrawing groups as well as the importance of thiourea and urea moieties of 15 heterocyclic ring-substituted NNIs. RT activity and p24 antigen production in HIV-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells were used as markers of viral replication. Computer-assisted sperm analysis was used for evaluating SIA of CHET compounds. The rabbit model was used for evaluation of in vivo mucosal toxicity and contraceptive activity of the lead NNIs. Three CHET-NNIs with a bromo, chloro, or methyl substitution at the 5 position of the pyridyl ring exhibited potent anti-HIV activity at nanomolar concentrations (IC(50) = 3-5 nM) and SIA at micromolar concentrations (EC(50) = 45-96 micro M). The dual-function CHET-NNIs were potent inhibitors of drug-resistant HIV-1 strains with genotypic and phenotypic NNI resistance. Upon substitution of the sulfur atom of the thiourea moiety with an oxygen atom, the most striking difference noted was a 38-fold reduction in time required for 50% sperm immobilization (T(1/2)). A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis was used in deriving regression equations between 20 physicochemical properties and SIA of NNIs. QSAR analysis showed that the T(1/2) values positively correlated with

  17. Blocking CXCL9 Decreases HIV-1 Replication and Enhances the Activity of Prophylactic Antiretrovirals in Human Cervical Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Macura, Sherrill L.; Lathrop, Melissa J.; Gui, Jiang; Doncel, Gustavo F.; Rollenhagen, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The interferon-gamma–induced chemokine CXCL9 is expressed in a wide range of inflammatory conditions including those affecting the female genital tract. CXCL9 promotes immune cell recruitment, activation, and proliferation. The role of CXCL9 in modulating HIV-1 infection of cervicovaginal tissues, a main portal of viral entry, however, has not been established. We report a link between CXCL9 and HIV-1 replication in human cervical tissues and propose CXCL9 as a potential target to enhance the anti–HIV-1 activity of prophylactic antiretrovirals. Design: Using ex vivo infection of human cervical tissues as a model of mucosal HIV-1 acquisition, we described the effect of CXCL9 neutralization on HIV-1 gene expression and mucosal CD4+ T-cell activation. The anti-HIV-1 activity of tenofovir, the leading mucosal pre-exposure prophylactic microbicide, alone or in combination with CXCL9 neutralization was also studied. Methods: HIV-1 replication was evaluated by p24 ELISA. HIV-1 DNA and RNA, and CD4, CCR5, and CD38 transcription were evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Frequency of activated cervical CD4+ T cells was quantified using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Results: Antibody blocking of CXCL9 reduced HIV-1 replication by decreasing mucosal CD4+ T-cell activation. CXCL9 neutralization in combination with suboptimal concentrations of tenofovir, possibly present in the cervicovaginal tissues of women using the drug inconsistently, demonstrated an earlier and greater decrease in HIV-1 replication compared with tissues treated with tenofovir alone. Conclusions: CXCL9 neutralization reduces HIV-1 replication and may be an effective target to enhance the efficacy of prophylactic antiretrovirals. PMID:26545124

  18. Akt inhibitors as an HIV-1 infected macrophage-specific anti-viral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chugh, Pauline; Bradel-Tretheway, Birgit; Monteiro-Filho, Carlos MR; Planelles, Vicente; Maggirwar, Sanjay B; Dewhurst, Stephen; Kim, Baek

    2008-01-01

    Background Unlike CD4+ T cells, HIV-1 infected macrophages exhibit extended life span even upon stress, consistent with their in vivo role as long-lived HIV-1 reservoirs. Results Here, we demonstrate that PI3K/Akt inhibitors, including clinically available Miltefosine, dramatically reduced HIV-1 production from long-living virus-infected macrophages. These PI3K/Akt inhibitors hyper-sensitize infected macrophages to extracellular stresses that they are normally exposed to, and eventually lead to cell death of infected macrophages without harming uninfected cells. Based on the data from these Akt inhibitors, we were able to further investigate how HIV-1 infection utilizes the PI3K/Akt pathway to establish the cytoprotective effect of HIV-1 infection, which extends the lifespan of infected macrophages, a key viral reservoir. First, we found that HIV-1 infection activates the well characterized pro-survival PI3K/Akt pathway in primary human macrophages, as reflected by decreased PTEN protein expression and increased Akt kinase activity. Interestingly, the expression of HIV-1 or SIV Tat is sufficient to mediate this cytoprotective effect, which is dependent on the basic domain of Tat – a region that has previously been shown to bind p53. Next, we observed that this interaction appears to contribute to the downregulation of PTEN expression, since HIV-1 Tat was found to compete with PTEN for p53 binding; this is known to result in p53 destabilization, with a consequent reduction in PTEN protein production. Conclusion Since HIV-1 infected macrophages display highly elevated Akt activity, our results collectively show that PI3K/Akt inhibitors may be a novel therapy for interfering with the establishment of long-living HIV-1 infected reservoirs. PMID:18237430

  19. Internal-image anti-idiotype HIV-1gp120 antibody in human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1)-seropositive individuals with thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed Central

    Karpatkin, S; Nardi, M A; Kouri, Y H

    1992-01-01

    Anti-CD4 antibody was found in 30% of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1)-seropositive thrombocytopenic patients compared with 5% of nonthrombocytopenic seropositive patients (chi 2 = 21.7, P less than 0.001) and was shown by the following observations to contain internal-image anti-idiotype antibody (Ab2) directed against the antibody (Ab1) to gp120, the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein that binds to CD4: (i) affinity-purified anti-CD4 (Ab2) bound to affinity-purified anti-HIV-1gp120 (Ab1) on solid-phase radioimmunoassay, and binding could be blocked by recombinant CD4 (rCD4) as well as recombinant gp120 (rgp120); (ii) F(ab')2 fragments of Ab1 inhibited the binding of Ab2 to rCD4; (iii) Ab2 inhibited the binding of Ab1 to HIV-1 beads; (iv) Ab2 inhibited the binding of Ab1 to gp120 on immunoblot; (v) Ab2 bound to the CD4 receptor on a CD4-bearing T-cell line, H9; (vi) Ab3 (anti-rgp120) could be produced in vivo by immunizing mice with Ab2, and binding of Ab3 to rgp120 could be blocked with rCD4; and (vii) three different Ab2 preparations bound to two different homologous Ab1 preparations. Ab1 or Ab2 alone did not bind to platelets, whereas the idiotype-anti-idiotype complex did bind to platelets in a concentration-dependent manner. Binding of the internal-image complex was 10-fold greater than that of a non-internal-image Ab1-Ab2 complex composed of anti-HIV-1gp120 and anti-anti-HIV-1gp120. Thus, patients with HIV-1 thrombocytopenia contain internal-image idiotype-anti-idiotype complexes that could be affecting CD4 cell number or function, inhibiting HIV-1 binding to CD4 cells or contributing to HIV-1 thrombocytopenia. Images PMID:1741404

  20. Varying modulation of HIV-1 LTR activity by Baf complexes.

    PubMed

    Van Duyne, Rachel; Guendel, Irene; Narayanan, Aarthi; Gregg, Edward; Shafagati, Nazly; Tyagi, Mudit; Easley, Rebecca; Klase, Zachary; Nekhai, Sergei; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2011-08-19

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) long terminal repeat is present on both ends of the integrated viral genome and contains regulatory elements needed for transcriptional initiation and elongation. Post-integration, a highly ordered chromatin structure consisting of at least five nucleosomes, is found at the 5' long terminal repeat, the location and modification state of which control the state of active viral replication as well as silencing of the latent HIV-1 provirus. In this context, the chromatin remodeling field rapidly emerges as having a critical role in the control of viral gene expression. In the current study, we focused on unique Baf subunits that are common to the most highly recognized of chromatin remodeling proteins, the SWI/SNF (switching-defective-sucrose non-fermenting) complexes. We find that at least two Baf proteins, Baf53 and Baf170, are highly regulated in HIV-1-infected cells. Previously, studies have shown that the depletion of Baf53 in uninfected cells leads to the expansion of chromosomal territories and the decompaction of the chromatin. Baf53, in the presence of HIV-1 infection, co-elutes off of a chromatographic column as a different-sized complex when compared to uninfected cells and appears to be predominantly phosphorylated. The innate function of Baf53-containing complexes appears to be transcriptionally suppressive, in that knocking down Baf53 increases viral gene expression from cells both transiently and chronically infected with HIV-1. Additionally, cdk9/cyclin T in the presence of Tat is able to phosphorylate Baf53 in vitro, implying that this posttranslationally modified form relieves the suppressive effect and allows for viral transcription to proceed. PMID:21699904

  1. Structure based activity prediction of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Marc R; Koymans, Lucien M H; Vinkers, H Maarten; Daeyaert, Frits F D; Heeres, Jan; Lewi, Paul J; Janssen, Paul A J

    2005-03-24

    We have developed a fast and robust computational method for prediction of antiviral activity in automated de novo design of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors. This is a structure-based approach that uses a linear relation between activity and interaction energy with discrete orientation sampling and with localized interaction energy terms. The localization allows for the analysis of mutations of the protein target and for the separation of inhibition and a specific binding to the enzyme. We apply the method to the prediction of pIC(50) of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors. The model predicts the activity of an arbitrary compound with a q(2) of 0.681 and an average absolute error of 0.66 log value, and it is fast enough to be used in high-throughput computational applications. PMID:15771460

  2. HIV-1-negative female sex workers sustain high cervical IFNɛ, low immune activation, and low expression of HIV-1-required host genes.

    PubMed

    Abdulhaqq, S A; Zorrilla, C; Kang, G; Yin, X; Tamayo, V; Seaton, K E; Joseph, J; Garced, S; Tomaras, G D; Linn, K A; Foulkes, A S; Azzoni, L; VerMilyea, M; Coutifaris, C; Kossenkov, A V; Showe, L; Kraiselburd, E N; Li, Q; Montaner, L J

    2016-07-01

    Sex workers practicing in high HIV endemic areas have been extensively targeted to test anti-HIV prophylactic strategies. We hypothesize that in women with high levels of genital exposure to semen changes in cervico-vaginal mucosal and/or systemic immune activation will contribute to a decreased susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. To address this question, we assessed sexual activity and immune activation status (in peripheral blood), as well as cellular infiltrates and gene expression in ectocervical mucosa biopsies in female sex workers (FSWs; n=50), as compared with control women (CG; n=32). FSWs had low-to-absent HIV-1-specific immune responses with significantly lower CD38 expression on circulating CD4(+) or CD8(+) T-cells (both: P<0.001) together with lower cervical gene expression of genes associated with leukocyte homing and chemotaxis. FSWs also had increased levels of interferon-ɛ (IFNɛ) gene and protein expression in the cervical epithelium together with reduced expression of genes associated with HIV-1 integration and replication. A correlative relationship between semen exposure and elevated type-1 IFN expression in FSWs was also established. Overall, our data suggest that long-term condomless sex work can result in multiple changes within the cervico-vaginal compartment that would contribute to sustaining a lower susceptibility for HIV-1 infection in the absence of HIV-specific responses. PMID:26555708

  3. HIV-1 Negative Female Sex Workers Sustain High Cervical IFNε, Low Immune Activation and Low Expression of HIV-1 Required Host Genes

    PubMed Central

    Abdulhaqq, Shaheed A.; Zorrilla, Carmen; Kang, Guobin; Yin, Xiangfan; Tamayo, Vivian; Seaton, Kelly E.; Joseph, Jocelin; Garced, Sheyla; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Linn, Kristin A.; Foulkes, Andrea S.; Azzoni, Livio; VerMilyea, Matthew; Coutifaris, Christos; Kossenkov, Andrew V.; Showe, Louise; Kraiselburd, Edmundo N.; Li, Qingsheng; Montaner, Luis J.

    2015-01-01

    Sex workers within high HIV endemic areas are often a target population where anti-HIV prophylactic strategies are tested. We hypothesize that in women with high levels of genital exposure to semen changes in cervicovaginal mucosal and/or systemic immune activation will contribute to a decreased susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. To address this question, we assessed sexual activity, immune activation status (in peripheral blood), as well as cellular infiltrates and gene expression in ectocervical mucosa biopsies in female sex workers [FSW] (n=50), as compared to control women [CG] (n=32). FSW had low to absent HIV-1 specific immune responses with significantly lower CD38 expression on circulating CD4+ or CD8+ T-Cells (both: p<0.001) together with lower cervical gene expression of genes associated with leukocyte homing and chemotaxis. FSW also had increased levels of Interferon-ε gene and protein expression in the cervical epithelium together with reduced expression of genes associated with HIV-1 integration and replication. A correlative relationship between semen exposure and elevated type-1 IFN expression in FSW was also established. Overall, our data suggest that long-term condomless sex work can result in multiple changes within the cervicovaginal compartment that would contribute to sustaining a lower susceptibility for HIV-1 infection in absence of HIV-specific responses. PMID:26555708

  4. Silibinin Inhibits HIV-1 Infection by Reducing Cellular Activation and Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Janela; Lovelace, Erica S.; Elahi, Shokrollah; Maurice, Nicholas J.; Wagoner, Jessica; Dragavon, Joan; Mittler, John E.; Kraft, Zane; Stamatatos, Leonidis; Horton, Helen; De Rosa, Stephen C.; Coombs, Robert W.; Polyak, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Purified silymarin-derived natural products from the milk thistle plant (Silybum marianum) block hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and inhibit T cell proliferation in vitro. An intravenous formulation of silibinin (SIL), a major component of silymarin, displays anti-HCV effects in humans and also inhibits T-cell proliferation in vitro. We show that SIL inhibited replication of HIV-1 in TZM-bl cells, PBMCs, and CEM cells in vitro. SIL suppression of HIV-1 coincided with dose-dependent reductions in actively proliferating CD19+, CD4+, and CD8+ cells, resulting in fewer CD4+ T cells expressing the HIV-1 co-receptors CXCR4 and CCR5. SIL inhibition of T-cell growth was not due to cytotoxicity measured by cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or necrosis. SIL also blocked induction of the activation markers CD38, HLA-DR, Ki67, and CCR5 on CD4+ T cells. The data suggest that SIL attenuated cellular functions involved in T-cell activation, proliferation, and HIV-1 infection. Silymarin-derived compounds provide cytoprotection by suppressing virus infection, immune activation, and inflammation, and as such may be relevant for both HIV mono-infected and HIV/HCV co-infected subjects. PMID:22848626

  5. Potent and Broad Anti-HIV-1 Activity Exhibited by a Glycosyl-Phosphatidylinositol-Anchored Peptide Derived from the CDR H3 of Broadly Neutralizing Antibody PG16▿†‡

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lihong; Wen, Michael; Wang, Weiming; Wang, Shumei; Yang, Lifei; Liu, Yong; Qian, Mengran; Zhang, Linqi; Shao, Yiming; Kimata, Jason T.; Zhou, Paul

    2011-01-01

    PG9 and PG16 are two recently isolated quaternary-specific human monoclonal antibodies that neutralize 70 to 80% of circulating HIV-1 isolates. The crystal structure of PG16 shows that it contains an exceptionally long CDR H3 that forms a unique stable subdomain that towers above the antibody surface to confer fine specificity. To determine whether this unique architecture of CDR H3 itself is sufficient for epitope recognition and neutralization, we cloned CDR H3 subdomains derived from human monoclonal antibodies PG16, PG9, b12, E51, and AVF and genetically linked them to a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) attachment signal. Each fusion gene construct is expressed and targeted to lipid rafts of plasma membranes through a GPI anchor. Moreover, GPI-CDR H3(PG16, PG9, and E51), but not GPI-CDR H3(b12 and AVF), specifically neutralized multiple clades of HIV-1 isolates with a great degree of potency when expressed on the surface of transduced TZM-bl cells. Furthermore, GPI-anchored CDR H3(PG16), but not GPI-anchored CDR H3(AVF), specifically confers resistance to HIV-1 infection when expressed on the surface of transduced human CD4+ T cells. Finally, the CDR H3 mutations (Y100HF, D100IA, and G7) that were previously shown to compromise the neutralization activity of antibody PG16 also abolished the neutralization activity of GPI-CDR H3(PG16). Thus, we conclude that the CDR H3 subdomain of PG16 neutralizes HIV-1 when targeted to the lipid raft of the plasma membrane of HIV-1-susceptible cells and that GPI-CDR H3 can be an alternative approach for determining whether the CDR H3 of certain antibodies alone can exert epitope recognition and neutralization. PMID:21715497

  6. Insights into the mechanism of inhibition of CXCR4: identification of Piperidinylethanamine analogs as anti-HIV-1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Das, Debananda; Maeda, Kenji; Hayashi, Yasuhiro; Gavande, Navnath; Desai, Darshan V; Chang, Simon B; Ghosh, Arun K; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2015-04-01

    The cellular entry of HIV-1 into CD4(+) T cells requires ordered interactions of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein with C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) receptors. However, such interactions, which should be critical for rational structure-based discovery of new CXCR4 inhibitors, remain poorly understood. Here we first determined the effects of amino acid substitutions in CXCR4 on HIV-1NL 4 - 3 glycoprotein-elicited fusion events using site-directed mutagenesis-based fusion assays and identified 11 potentially key amino acid substitutions, including D97A and E288A, which caused >30% reductions in fusion. We subsequently carried out a computational search of a screening library containing ∼604,000 compounds, in order to identify potential CXCR4 inhibitors. The computational search used the shape of IT1t, a known CXCR4 inhibitor, as a reference and employed various algorithms, including shape similarity, isomer generation, and docking against a CXCR4 crystal structure. Sixteen small molecules were identified for biological assays based on their high shape similarity to IT1t, and their putative binding modes formed hydrogen bond interactions with the amino acids identified above. Three compounds with piperidinylethanamine cores showed activity and were resynthesized. One molecule, designated CX6, was shown to significantly inhibit fusion elicited by X4 HIV-1NL 4 - 3 glycoprotein (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50], 1.9 μM), to inhibit Ca(2+) flux elicited by stromal cell-derived factor 1α (SDF-1α) (IC50, 92 nM), and to exert anti-HIV-1 activity (IC50, 1.5 μM). Structural modeling demonstrated that CX6 bound to CXCR4 through hydrogen bond interactions with Asp97 and Glu288. Our study suggests that targeting CXCR4 residues important for fusion elicited by HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein should be a useful and feasible approach to identifying novel CXCR4 inhibitors, and it provides important insights into the mechanism by which small-molecule CXCR4 inhibitors exert

  7. NMR characterization of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase binding to various non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors with different activities

    PubMed Central

    Thammaporn, Ratsupa; Yagi-Utsumi, Maho; Yamaguchi, Takumi; Boonsri, Pornthip; Saparpakorn, Patchreenart; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Techasakul, Supanna; Kato, Koichi; Hannongbua, Supa

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT) is an important target for antiviral therapy against acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. However, the efficiency of available drugs is impaired most typically by drug-resistance mutations in this enzyme. In this study, we applied a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic technique to the characterization of the binding of HIV-1 RT to various non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) with different activities, i.e., nevirapine, delavirdine, efavirenz, dapivirine, etravirine, and rilpivirine. 1H-13C heteronuclear single-quantum coherence (HSQC) spectral data of HIV-1 RT, in which the methionine methyl groups of the p66 subunit were selectively labeled with 13C, were collected in the presence and absence of these NNRTIs. We found that the methyl 13C chemical shifts of the M230 resonance of HIV-1 RT bound to these drugs exhibited a high correlation with their anti-HIV-1 RT activities. This methionine residue is located in proximity to the NNRTI-binding pocket but not directly involved in drug interactions and serves as a conformational probe, indicating that the open conformation of HIV-1 RT was more populated with NNRTIs with higher inhibitory activities. Thus, the NMR approach offers a useful tool to screen for novel NNRTIs in developing anti-HIV drugs. PMID:26510386

  8. Hydrophobic Core Flexibility Modulates Enzyme Activity in HIV-1 Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Seema; Cai, Yufeng; Nalam, Madhavi N.L.; Bolon, Daniel N.A.; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2012-09-11

    Human immunodeficiency virus Type-1 (HIV-1) protease is crucial for viral maturation and infectivity. Studies of protease dynamics suggest that the rearrangement of the hydrophobic core is essential for enzyme activity. Many mutations in the hydrophobic core are also associated with drug resistance and may modulate the core flexibility. To test the role of flexibility in protease activity, pairs of cysteines were introduced at the interfaces of flexible regions remote from the active site. Disulfide bond formation was confirmed by crystal structures and by alkylation of free cysteines and mass spectrometry. Oxidized and reduced crystal structures of these variants show the overall structure of the protease is retained. However, cross-linking the cysteines led to drastic loss in enzyme activity, which was regained upon reducing the disulfide cross-links. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that altered dynamics propagated throughout the enzyme from the engineered disulfide. Thus, altered flexibility within the hydrophobic core can modulate HIV-1 protease activity, supporting the hypothesis that drug resistant mutations distal from the active site can alter the balance between substrate turnover and inhibitor binding by modulating enzyme activity.

  9. In Vivo Molecular Dissection of the Effects of HIV-1 in Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Lucy C. K.; Pollara, Gabriele; Pascoe, Mellissa; Tomlinson, Gillian S.; Lehloenya, Rannakoe J.; Roe, Jennifer; Meldau, Richard; Miller, Robert F.; Ramsay, Alan; Chain, Benjamin M.; Dheda, Keertan; Noursadeghi, Mahdad

    2016-01-01

    Increased risk of tuberculosis (TB) associated with HIV-1 infection is primarily attributed to deficient T helper (Th)1 immune responses, but most people with active TB have robust Th1 responses, indicating that these are not sufficient to protect against disease. Recent findings suggest that favourable outcomes following Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection arise from finely balanced inflammatory and regulatory pathways, achieving pathogen control without immunopathology. We hypothesised that HIV-1 and antiretroviral therapy (ART) exert widespread changes to cell mediated immunity, which may compromise the optimal host protective response to TB and provide novel insights into the correlates of immune protection and pathogenesis. We sought to define these effects in patients with active TB by transcriptional profiling of tuberculin skin tests (TST) to make comprehensive molecular level assessments of in vivo human immune responses at the site of a standardised mycobacterial challenge. We showed that the TST transcriptome accurately reflects the molecular pathology at the site of human pulmonary TB, and used this approach to investigate immune dysregulation in HIV-1/TB co-infected patients with distinct clinical phenotypes associated with TST reactivity or anergy and unmasking TB immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) after initiation of ART. HIV-1 infected patients with positive TSTs exhibited preserved Th1 responses but deficient immunoregulatory IL10-inducible responses. Those with clinically negative TSTs revealed profound anergy of innate as well as adaptive immune responses, except for preservation of type 1 interferon activity, implicated in impaired anti-mycobacterial immunity. Patients with unmasking TB IRIS showed recovery of Th1 immunity to normal levels, but exaggerated Th2-associated responses specifically. These mechanisms of immune dysregulation were localised to the tissue microenvironment and not evident in peripheral blood. TST

  10. In Vivo Molecular Dissection of the Effects of HIV-1 in Active Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bell, Lucy C K; Pollara, Gabriele; Pascoe, Mellissa; Tomlinson, Gillian S; Lehloenya, Rannakoe J; Roe, Jennifer; Meldau, Richard; Miller, Robert F; Ramsay, Alan; Chain, Benjamin M; Dheda, Keertan; Noursadeghi, Mahdad

    2016-03-01

    Increased risk of tuberculosis (TB) associated with HIV-1 infection is primarily attributed to deficient T helper (Th)1 immune responses, but most people with active TB have robust Th1 responses, indicating that these are not sufficient to protect against disease. Recent findings suggest that favourable outcomes following Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection arise from finely balanced inflammatory and regulatory pathways, achieving pathogen control without immunopathology. We hypothesised that HIV-1 and antiretroviral therapy (ART) exert widespread changes to cell mediated immunity, which may compromise the optimal host protective response to TB and provide novel insights into the correlates of immune protection and pathogenesis. We sought to define these effects in patients with active TB by transcriptional profiling of tuberculin skin tests (TST) to make comprehensive molecular level assessments of in vivo human immune responses at the site of a standardised mycobacterial challenge. We showed that the TST transcriptome accurately reflects the molecular pathology at the site of human pulmonary TB, and used this approach to investigate immune dysregulation in HIV-1/TB co-infected patients with distinct clinical phenotypes associated with TST reactivity or anergy and unmasking TB immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) after initiation of ART. HIV-1 infected patients with positive TSTs exhibited preserved Th1 responses but deficient immunoregulatory IL10-inducible responses. Those with clinically negative TSTs revealed profound anergy of innate as well as adaptive immune responses, except for preservation of type 1 interferon activity, implicated in impaired anti-mycobacterial immunity. Patients with unmasking TB IRIS showed recovery of Th1 immunity to normal levels, but exaggerated Th2-associated responses specifically. These mechanisms of immune dysregulation were localised to the tissue microenvironment and not evident in peripheral blood. TST

  11. Screening of anti-HIV-1 inophyllums by HPLC-DAD of Calophyllum inophyllum leaf extracts from French Polynesia Islands.

    PubMed

    Laure, Frédéric; Raharivelomanana, Phila; Butaud, Jean-François; Bianchini, Jean-Pierre; Gaydou, Emile M

    2008-08-22

    Various pyranocoumarins, calophyllolide, inophyllums B, C, G(1), G(2) and P, from Calophyllum inophyllum (Clusiaceae) leaves of French Polynesia (Austral, Marquesas, Society and Tuamotu archipelagos) have been determined in 136 leaf extracts using a high pressure liquid chromatography-UV-diode array detection (HPLC-UV-DAD) technique. Results show a wide range in chemical composition within trees growing on eighteen islands. The use of multivariate statistical analyses (PCA) shows geographical distribution of inophyllums and indicate those rich in HIV-1 active (+)-inophyllums. Inophyllum B and P contents (0.0-39.0 and 0.0-21.8 mg kg(-1), respectively) confirm the chemodiversity of this species within the large area of French Polynesia. The study suggests the presence of interesting chemotypes which could be used as plant source for anti-HIV-1 drugs. PMID:18706320

  12. Comparison of three quantification methods for the TZM-bl pseudovirus assay for screening of anti-HIV-1 agents.

    PubMed

    Xing, Liying; Wang, Shunyi; Hu, Qin; Li, Jingtao; Zeng, Yi

    2016-07-01

    The TZM-bl pseudovirus assay is commonly used to evaluate the efficacy of neutralizing antibodies and small molecular inhibitors in HIV-1 research. Here, to determine the optimal measurement method for screening anti-HIV-1 inhibitors, we compared three measurement methods based on firefly luciferase and β-galactosidase activities. The 50% tissue culture infective doses (TCID50) of the pseudoviruses were determined using the luciferase, β-galactosidase colorimetric, and 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-β-D-galactopyranoside (X-gal) staining assays. Three commercial reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (azidothymidine, nevirapine, and lamivudine) were tested as reference drugs to compare the reproducibility, linear correlation, and half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values determined using these methods. In the TCID50 assay, the sensitivity of β-galactosidase colorimetric assay was almost 562 times lower than that of the other two methods. Reproducible dose-response curves were obtained for the inhibitors with all methods; the IC50 values of the inhibitors were not significantly different. Linear regression analysis showed linear correlation between methods. Compared to the β-galactosidase colorimetric assay, the other two methods have the advantage of high sensitivity and are less affected by interference. In conclusion, the luciferase and X-gal staining assays, which can be applied either alone or combined, are recommended for anti-HIV-1 inhibitor screening. PMID:27016178

  13. Therapeutic doses of irradiation activate viral transcription and induce apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells.

    PubMed

    Iordanskiy, Sergey; Van Duyne, Rachel; Sampey, Gavin C; Woodson, Caitlin M; Fry, Kelsi; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao; Romerio, Fabio; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2015-11-01

    The highly active antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV-1 RNA in plasma to undetectable levels. However, the virus continues to persist in the long-lived resting CD4(+) T cells, macrophages and astrocytes which form a viral reservoir in infected individuals. Reactivation of viral transcription is critical since the host immune response in combination with antiretroviral therapy may eradicate the virus. Using the chronically HIV-1 infected T lymphoblastoid and monocytic cell lines, primary quiescent CD4(+) T cells and humanized mice infected with dual-tropic HIV-1 89.6, we examined the effect of various X-ray irradiation (IR) doses (used for HIV-related lymphoma treatment and lower doses) on HIV-1 transcription and viability of infected cells. Treatment of both T cells and monocytes with IR, a well-defined stress signal, led to increase of HIV-1 transcription, as evidenced by the presence of RNA polymerase II and reduction of HDAC1 and methyl transferase SUV39H1 on the HIV-1 promoter. This correlated with the increased GFP signal and elevated level of intracellular HIV-1 RNA in the IR-treated quiescent CD4(+) T cells infected with GFP-encoding HIV-1. Exposition of latently HIV-1infected monocytes treated with PKC agonist bryostatin 1 to IR enhanced transcription activation effect of this latency-reversing agent. Increased HIV-1 replication after IR correlated with higher cell death: the level of phosphorylated Ser46 in p53, responsible for apoptosis induction, was markedly higher in the HIV-1 infected cells following IR treatment. Exposure of HIV-1 infected humanized mice with undetectable viral RNA level to IR resulted in a significant increase of HIV-1 RNA in plasma, lung and brain tissues. Collectively, these data point to the use of low to moderate dose of IR alone or in combination with HIV-1 transcription activators as a potential application for the "Shock and Kill" strategy for latently HIV-1 infected cells. PMID:26184775

  14. Isolated HIV-1 core is active for reverse transcription.

    PubMed

    Warrilow, David; Stenzel, Deborah; Harrich, David

    2007-01-01

    Whether purified HIV-1 virion cores are capable of reverse transcription or require uncoating to be activated is currently controversial. To address this question we purified cores from a virus culture and tested for the ability to generate authentic reverse transcription products. A dense fraction (approximately 1.28 g/ml) prepared without detergent, possibly derived from disrupted virions, was found to naturally occur as a minor sub-fraction in our preparations. Core-like particles were identified in this active fraction by electron microscopy. We are the first to report the detection of authentic strong-stop, first-strand transfer and full-length minus strand products in this core fraction without requirement for an uncoating activity. PMID:17956635

  15. Synthesis and Inhibiting Activity of Some 4-Hydroxycoumarin Derivatives on HIV-1 Protease

    PubMed Central

    Stanchev, Stancho; Jensen, Frank; Hinkov, Anton; Atanasov, Vasil; Genova-Kalou, Petia; Argirova, Radka; Manolov, Ilia

    2011-01-01

    Six novel 4-hydroxycoumarin derivatives were rationally synthesized, verified, and characterized by molecular docking using crystal HIV-1 protease. Molecular docking studies predicted antiprotease activity of (7) and (10). The most significant functional groups, responsible for the interaction with HIV-1 protease by hydrogen bonds formation are pyran oxygen, atom, lactone carbonyl oxygen and one of the hydroxyl groups. The newly synthesized compounds were biologically tested in MT-4 cells for inhibiting HIV-1 replication, exploring the protection of cells from the cytopathic effect of HIV measured by cell survival in MTT test. One derivative −7 showed 76–78% inhibition of virus infectivity with IC50 = 0.01 nM, much less than the maximal nontoxic concentration (1 mM). Antiprotease activity of 7 in two different concentrations was detected to be 25%. Nevertheless, the results of study of (7) encourage using it as a pharmacophore for further synthesis and evaluation of anti-HIV activity. PMID:22389842

  16. The Presence and Anti-HIV-1 Function of Tenascin C in Breast Milk and Genital Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Jaeger, Frederick; McGuire, Erin; Fouda, Genevieve; Amos, Joshua; Barbas, Kimberly; Ohashi, Tomoo; Alam, S. Munir; Erickson, Harold; Permar, Sallie R.

    2016-01-01

    Tenascin-C (TNC) is a newly identified innate HIV-1-neutralizing protein present in breast milk, yet its presence and potential HIV-inhibitory function in other mucosal fluids is unknown. In this study, we identified TNC as a component of semen and cervical fluid of HIV-1-infected and uninfected individuals, although it is present at a significantly lower concentration and frequency compared to that of colostrum and mature breast milk, potentially due to genital fluid protease degradation. However, TNC was able to neutralize HIV-1 after exposure to low pH, suggesting that TNC could be active at low pH in the vaginal compartment. As mucosal fluids are complex and contain a number of proteins known to interact with the HIV-1 envelope, we further studied the relationship between the concentration of TNC and neutralizing activity in breast milk. The amount of TNC correlated only weakly with the overall innate HIV-1-neutralizing activity of breast milk of uninfected women and negatively correlated with neutralizing activity in milk of HIV-1 infected women, indicating that the amount of TNC in mucosal fluids is not adequate to impede HIV-1 transmission. Moreover, the presence of polyclonal IgG from milk of HIV-1 infected women, but not other HIV-1 envelope-binding milk proteins or monoclonal antibodies, blocked the neutralizing activity of TNC. Finally, as exogenous administration of TNC would be necessary for it to mediate measurable HIV-1 neutralizing activity in mucosal compartments, we established that recombinantly produced TNC has neutralizing activity against transmitted/founder HIV-1 strains that mimic that of purified TNC. Thus, we conclude that endogenous TNC concentration in mucosal fluids is likely inadequate to block HIV-1 transmission to uninfected individuals. PMID:27182834

  17. The ribonuclease activity of SAMHD1 is required for HIV-1 restriction

    PubMed Central

    Ryoo, Jeongmin; Choi, Jongsu; Oh, Changhoon; Kim, Sungchul; Seo, Minji; Kim, Seokyoung; Seo, Daekwan; Kim, Jongkyu; White, Tommy E.; Brandariz-Nunez, Alberto; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Hollenbaugh, Joseph A.; Kim, Baek; Baek, Daehyun

    2015-01-01

    The HIV-1 restriction factor SAMHD11,2 is proposed to inhibit HIV-1 replication by depleting the intracellular dNTP pool3-5. However, the phosphorylation of SAMHD1 regulates its ability to restrict HIV-1 without decreasing cellular dNTP levels6-8, which is not consistent with a role for SAMHD1 dNTPase activity in HIV-1 restriction. Here, we show that SAMHD1 possesses RNase activity and that the RNase but not the dNTPase function is essential for HIV-1 restriction. By enzymatically characterizing Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS)-associated SAMHD1 mutations and mutations in the allosteric dGTP-binding site of SAMHD1, we identify SAMHD1 mutants that are RNase-positive but dNTPase-negative (SAMHD1D137N) or RNase-negative but dNTPase-positive (SAMHD1Q548A). The allosteric mutant SAMHD1D137N is able to restrict HIV-1 infection, whereas the AGS mutant SAMHD1Q548A is defective for HIV-1 restriction. SAMHD1 associates with HIV-1 RNA and degrades it during the early phases of infection. SAMHD1 silencing in macrophages and CD4+ T cells from healthy donors increases HIV-1 RNA stability, rendering the cells permissive for HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of SAMHD1 at T592 negatively regulates its RNase activity in vivo and impedes HIV-1 restriction. Our results reveal that the RNase activity of SAMHD1 is responsible for preventing HIV-1 infection by directly degrading the HIV-1 RNA. PMID:25038827

  18. Design, synthesis and in-vitro evaluation of novel tetrahydroquinoline carbamates as HIV-1 RT inhibitor and their antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Chander, Subhash; Ashok, Penta; Zheng, Yong-Tang; Wang, Ping; Raja, Krishnamohan S; Taneja, Akash; Murugesan, Sankaranarayanan

    2016-02-01

    Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NNRTIs) are vital class of drugs in treating HIV-1 infection, but drug resistance and toxicity drive the need for effective new inhibitors with potent antiviral activity, less toxicity and improved physicochemical properties. In the present study, twelve novel 1-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-(3,4-dihydroquinolin-1(2H)-yl)ethyl phenylcarbamate derivatives were designed as inhibitor of HIV-1 RT using the ligand based drug design approach and in-silico evaluated for drug-likeness properties. Designed compounds were synthesized, characterized and in-vitro evaluated for RT inhibitory activity against wild HIV-1 RT. Among these, four compounds (6b, 6i, 6j and 6l) exhibited significant inhibition of HIV-1 RT (IC50 ⩽ 20 μM). Among four compounds, most active compounds 6b and 6j inhibited the RT activity with IC50 8.12 and 5.42 μM respectively. Docking studies of compounds 6b and 6j were performed against wild HIV-1 RT in order to predict their putative binding mode with selected target. Further, cytotoxicity and anti-HIV activity of compounds 6b and 6j were evaluated on T lymphocytes (C8166 cells). All the synthesized compounds were also evaluated for antifungal activity against Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger fungal strains. PMID:26717022

  19. Engineered Bispecific Antibodies with Exquisite HIV-1-Neutralizing Activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yaoxing; Yu, Jian; Lanzi, Anastasia; Yao, Xin; Andrews, Chasity D; Tsai, Lily; Gajjar, Mili R; Sun, Ming; Seaman, Michael S; Padte, Neal N; Ho, David D

    2016-06-16

    While the search for an efficacious HIV-1 vaccine remains elusive, emergence of a new generation of virus-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has re-ignited the field of passive immunization for HIV-1 prevention. However, the plasticity of HIV-1 demands additional improvements to these mAbs to better ensure their clinical utility. Here, we report engineered bispecific antibodies that are the most potent and broad HIV-neutralizing antibodies to date. One bispecific antibody, 10E8V2.0/iMab, neutralized 118 HIV-1 pseudotyped viruses tested with a mean 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 0.002 μg/mL. 10E8V2.0/iMab also potently neutralized 99% of viruses in a second panel of 200 HIV-1 isolates belonging to clade C, the dominant subtype accounting for ∼50% of new infections worldwide. Importantly, 10E8V2.0/iMab reduced virus load substantially in HIV-1-infected humanized mice and also provided complete protection when administered prior to virus challenge. These bispecific antibodies hold promise as novel prophylactic and/or therapeutic agents in the fight against HIV-1. PMID:27315479

  20. Differential activity of candidate microbicides against early steps of HIV-1 infection upon complement virus opsonization

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background HIV-1 in genital secretions may be opsonized by several molecules including complement components. Opsonized HIV-1 by complement enhances the infection of various mucosal target cells, such as dendritic cells (DC) and epithelial cells. Results We herein evaluated the effect of HIV-1 complement opsonization on microbicide candidates' activity, by using three in vitro mucosal models: CCR5-tropic HIV-1JR-CSF transcytosis through epithelial cells, HIV-1JR-CSF attachment on immature monocyte-derived dendritic cells (iMDDC), and infectivity of iMDDC by CCR5-tropic HIV-1BaL and CXCR4-tropic HIV-1NDK. A panel of 10 microbicide candidates [T20, CADA, lectines HHA & GNA, PVAS, human lactoferrin, and monoclonal antibodies IgG1B12, 12G5, 2G12 and 2F5], were investigated using cell-free unopsonized or opsonized HIV-1 by complements. Only HHA and PVAS were able to inhibit HIV trancytosis. Upon opsonization, transcytosis was affected only by HHA, HIV-1 adsorption on iMDDC by four molecules (lactoferrin, IgG1B12, IgG2G5, IgG2G12), and replication in iMDDC of HIV-1BaL by five molecules (lactoferrin, CADA, T20, IgG1B12, IgG2F5) and of HIV-1NDK by two molecules (lactoferrin, IgG12G5). Conclusion These observations demonstrate that HIV-1 opsonization by complements may modulate in vitro the efficiency of candidate microbicides to inhibit HIV-1 infection of mucosal target cells, as well as its crossing through mucosa. PMID:20546571

  1. D77, one benzoic acid derivative, functions as a novel anti-HIV-1 inhibitor targeting the interaction between integrase and cellular LEDGF/p75

    SciTech Connect

    Du Li; Zhao Yaxue; Chen, Jing; Yang Liumeng; Zheng Yongtang; Tang Yun Shen Xu Jiang Hualiang

    2008-10-10

    Integration of viral-DNA into host chromosome mediated by the viral protein HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an essential step in the HIV-1 life cycle. In this process, Lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75) is discovered to function as a cellular co-factor for integration. Since LEDGF/p75 plays an important role in HIV integration, disruption of the LEDGF/p75 interaction with IN has provided a special interest for anti-HIV agent discovery. In this work, we reported that a benzoic acid derivative, 4-[(5-bromo-4-{l_brace}[2,4-dioxo-3-(2-oxo-2-phenylethyl) -1,3-thiazolidin-5-ylidene]methyl{r_brace}-2-ethoxyphenoxy)methyl]benzoic acid (D77) could potently inhibit the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction and affect the HIV-1 IN nuclear distribution thus exhibiting antiretroviral activity. Molecular docking with site-directed mutagenesis analysis and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) binding assays has clarified possible binding mode of D77 against HIV-1 integrase. As the firstly discovered small molecular compound targeting HIV-1 integrase interaction with LEDGF/p75, D77 might supply useful structural information for further anti-HIV agent discovery.

  2. A study of the topoisomerase II activity in HIV-1 replication using the ferrocene derivatives as probes.

    PubMed

    Kondapi, Anand K; Satyanarayana, Nathamu; Saikrishna, A D

    2006-06-15

    Human Topoisomerase II is present in two isoforms, 170KDa alpha and 180KDa beta. Both the isoforms play a crucial role in maintenance of topological changes during DNA replication and recombination. It has been shown that Topoisomerase II activity is required for HIV-1 replication and the enzyme is phosphorylated during early time points of HIV-1 replication. In the present study, we have studied the molecular action of Topoisomerase II inhibitors, azalactone ferrocene (AzaFecp), Thiomorpholide amido methyl ferrocene (ThioFecp), and Ruthenium benzene amino pyridine (Ru(ben)Apy) on cell proliferation and also on various events of HIV-1 replication cycle. The Topoisomerase II beta over-expressing neuroblastoma cell line shows a higher sensitivity to these compounds compared to the Sup-T1 cell line. All the three Topoisomerase II inhibitors show significant anti-HIV activity at nanomolar concentrations against an Indian isolate of HIV-1(93IN101) in Sup-T1 cell line. An analysis of action of these compounds on proviral DNA synthesis at 5h of post-infection shows that they inhibit proviral DNA synthesis as well as the formation of pre-integration complexes completely. Further analysis, using polymerase chain reaction and western blot, showed that both the Topoisomerase II alpha and beta isoforms are present in the pre-integration complexes, suggesting their significant role in HIV-1 replication. PMID:16712776

  3. Novel Bifunctional Quinolonyl Diketo Acid Derivatives as HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors: Design, Synthesis, Biological Activities and Mechanism of Action

    PubMed Central

    Di Santo, Roberto; Costi, Roberta; Roux, Alessandra; Artico, Marino; Lavecchia, Antonio; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore; Palmisano, Lucia; Andreotti, Mauro; Amici, Roberta; Galluzzo, Clementina Maria; Nencioni, Lucia; Palamara, Anna Teresa; Pommier, Yves; Marchand, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    The virally encoded integrase protein is an essential enzyme in the life cycle of the HIV-1 virus and represents an attractive and validated target in the development of therapeutics against HIV infection. Drugs that selectively inhibit this enzyme, when used in combination with inhibitors of reverse transcriptase and protease, are believed to be highly effective in suppressing the viral replication. Among the HIV-1 integrase inhibitors, the β-diketo acids (DKAs) represent a major lead for anti-HIV-1drug development. In this study, novel bifunctional quinolonyl diketo acid derivatives were designed, synthesized and tested for their inhibitory ability against HIV-1 integrase. The compounds are potent inhibitors of integrase activity. Particularly, derivative 8 is a potent IN inhibitor for both steps of the reaction (3′-processing and strand transfer) and exhibits both high antiviral activity against HIV-1 infected cells and low cytotoxicity. Molecular modeling studies provide a plausible mechanism of action, which is consistent with ligand SARs and enzyme photo-crosslinking experiments. PMID:16539381

  4. Constitutively Active MAVS Inhibits HIV-1 Replication via Type I Interferon Secretion and Induction of HIV-1 Restriction Factors

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sachin; Termini, James M.; Issac, Biju; Guirado, Elizabeth; Stone, Geoffrey W.

    2016-01-01

    Type I interferon is known to inhibit HIV-1 replication through the induction of interferon stimulated genes (ISG), including a number of HIV-1 restriction factors. To better understand interferon-mediated HIV-1 restriction, we constructed a constitutively active form of the RIG-I adapter protein MAVS. Constitutive MAVS was generated by fusion of full length MAVS to a truncated form of the Epstein Barr virus protein LMP1 (ΔLMP1). Supernatant from ΔLMP1-MAVS-transfected 293T cells contained high levels of type I interferons and inhibited HIV replication in both TZM-bl and primary human CD4+ T cells. Supernatant from ΔLMP1-MAVS-transfected 293T cells also inhibited replication of VSV-G pseudotyped single cycle SIV in TZM-bl cells, suggesting restriction was post-entry and common to both HIV and SIV. Gene array analysis of ΔLMP1-MAVS-transfected 293T cells and trans-activated CD4+ T cells showed significant upregulation of ISG, including previously characterized HIV restriction factors Viperin, Tetherin, MxB, and ISG56. Interferon blockade studies implicated interferon-beta in this response. In addition to direct viral inhibition, ΔLMP1-MAVS markedly enhanced secretion of IFN-β and IL-12p70 by dendritic cells and the activation and maturation of dendritic cells. Based on this immunostimulatory activity, an adenoviral vector (Ad5) expressing ΔLMP1-MAVS was tested as a molecular adjuvant in an HIV vaccine mouse model. Ad5-Gag antigen combined with Ad5-ΔLMP1-MAVS enhanced control of vaccinia-gag replication in a mouse challenge model, with 4/5 animals showing undetectable virus following challenge. Overall, ΔLMP1-MAVS is a promising reagent to inhibit HIV-1 replication in infected tissues and enhance vaccine-mediated immune responses, while avoiding toxicity associated with systemic type I interferon administration. PMID:26849062

  5. ADAR1 is a Novel Multi Targeted Anti HIV-1 Cellular Protein

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Nabanita; Wang, Tianyi; Ding, Ming; Tumne, Ashwin; Chen, Yue; Wang, Qingde; Gupta, Phalguni

    2011-01-01

    We examined the antiviral activity of ADAR1 against HIV-1. Our results indicated that ADAR1 in a transfection system inhibited production of viral proteins and infectious HIV-1 in various cell lines including 293T, HeLa, Jurkat T and primary CD4+ T cells, and was active against a number of X4 and R5 HIV-1 of different clades. Further analysis showed that ADAR1 inhibited viral protein synthesis without any effect on viral RNA synthesis. Mutational analysis showed that ADAR1 introduced most of the A-to-G mutations in the rev RNA, in the region of RNA encoding for Rev Response Element (RRE) binding domain and in env RNA. These mutations inhibited the binding of rev to the RRE and inhibited transport of primary transcripts like gag, pol and env from nucleus to cytoplasm resulting in inhibition of viral protein synthesis without any effect on viral RNA synthesis. Furthermore, ADAR1 induced mutations in the env gene inhibited viral infectivity. PMID:22104209

  6. Strategies for Eliciting HIV-1 Inhibitory Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Tomaras, Georgia D.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review Major roadblocks persist in the development of vaccines that elicit potent neutralizing antibodies targeting diverse HIV-1 strains, similar to known broadly neutralizing HIV-1 human monoclonal antibodies. Alternatively, other types of anti-HIV-1 envelope antibodies that may not neutralize HIV-1 in traditional neutralization assays but have other anti-HIV-1 activities (hereafter termed HIV-1 inhibitory antibodies) can be elicited by current vaccine strategies, and numerous studies are exploring their roles in preventing HIV-1 acquisition. We review examples of strategies for eliciting potentially protective HIV-1 inhibitory antibodies. Recent Findings Heterologous prime-boost strategies can yield anti-HIV immune responses; although only one (canarypox prime, Env protein boost) has been tested and shown positive results in an efficacy trial (RV144). Although the immune correlates of protection are as yet undefined, the reduced rate of acquisition without a significant effect on initial viral loads or CD4+ T cell counts, have raised the hypothesis of an RV144 vaccine-elicited transient protective B cell response. Summary In light of the RV144 trial, there is a critical need to define the entire functional spectrum of anti-HIV-1 antibodies, how easily each can be elicited, and how effective different types of antibody effector mechanisms can be in prevention of HIV-1 transmission. PMID:20978384

  7. Regulatory T cells and chronic immune activation in human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1)-infected children

    PubMed Central

    Freguja, R; Gianesin, K; Mosconi, I; Zanchetta, M; Carmona, F; Rampon, O; Giaquinto, C; De Rossi, A

    2011-01-01

    The function of CD4+ T cells with regulatory activity (Tregs) is the down-regulation of immune responses. This suppressive activity may limit the magnitude of effector responses, resulting in failure to control human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) infection, but may also suppress chronic immune activation, a characteristic feature of HIV-1 disease. We evaluated the correlation between viral load, immune activation and Tregs in HIV-1-infected children. Eighty-nine HIV-1-infected children (aged 6–14 years) were included in the study and analysed for HIV-1 plasmaviraemia, HIV-1 DNA load, CD4 and CD8 cell subsets. Treg cells [CD4+ CD25highCD127lowforkhead box P3 (FoxP3high)] and CD8-activated T cells (CD8+CD38+) were determined by flow cytometry. Results showed that the number of activated CD8+CD38+ T cells increased in relation to HIV-1 RNA plasmaviraemia (r = 0·403, P < 0·0001). The proportion of Tregs also correlated positively with HIV-1 plasmaviraemia (r = 0·323, P = 0·002), but correlated inversely with CD4+ cells (r = −0·312, P = 0·004), thus suggesting a selective expansion along with increased viraemia and CD4+ depletion. Interestingly, a positive correlation was found between the levels of Tregs and CD8+CD38+ T cells (r = 0·305, P = 0·005), and the percentage of Tregs tended to correlate with HIV-1 DNA load (r = 0·224, P = 0·062). Overall, these findings suggest that immune activation contributes to the expansion of Treg cells. In turn, the suppressive activity of Tregs may impair effector responses against HIV-1, but appears to be ineffective in limiting immune activation. PMID:21438872

  8. HIV-1 integration landscape during latent and active infection

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Lillian; Silva, Israel T.; Oliveira, Thiago Y.; Rosales, Rafael A.; Parrish, Erica H.; Learn, Gerald H.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Czartoski, Julie L.; McElrath, M. Juliana; Lehmann, Clara; Klein, Florian; Caskey, Marina; Walker, Bruce D.; Siliciano, Janet D.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Jankovic, Mila; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The barrier to curing HIV-1 is thought to reside primarily in CD4+ T cells containing silent proviruses. To characterize these latently infected cells, we studied the integration profile of HIV-1 in viremic progressors, individuals receiving antiretroviral therapy, and viremic controllers. Clonally expanded T cells represented the majority of all integrations and increased during therapy. However, none of the 75 expanded T cell clones assayed contained intact virus. In contrast, the cells bearing single integration events decreased in frequency over time on therapy, and the surviving cells were enriched for HIV-1 integration in silent regions of the genome. Finally, there was a strong preference for integration into, or in close proximity to Alu repeats, which were also enriched in local hotspots for integration. The data indicate that dividing clonally expanded T cells contain defective proviruses, and that the replication competent reservoir is primarily found in CD4+ T cells that remain relatively quiescent. PMID:25635456

  9. Chromatin dynamics associated with HIV-1 Tat activated transcription

    PubMed Central

    Easley, Rebecca; Van Duyne, Rachel; Coley, Will; Guendel, Irene; Dadgar, Sherry; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2009-01-01

    Summary Chromatin remodeling is an essential event for HIV-1 transcription. Over the last two decades this field of research has come to the forefront, as silencing of the HIV-1 provirus through chromatin modifications has been linked to latency. Here, we focus on chromatin remodeling, especially in relation to the transactivator Tat, and review the most important and newly emerging studies that investigate remodeling mechanisms. We begin by discussing covalent modifications that can alter chromatin structure including acetylation, deacetylation, and methylation, as well as topics addressing the interplay between chromatin remodeling and splicing. Next, we focus on complexes that use the energy of ATP to remove or secure nucleosomes and can additionally act to control HIV-1 transcription. Finally, we cover recent literature on viral microRNAs which have been shown to alter chromatin structure by inducing methylation or even by remodeling nucleosomes. PMID:19716452

  10. Characterization of RNA binding and chaperoning activities of HIV-1 Vif protein

    PubMed Central

    Sleiman, Dona; Bernacchi, Serena; Xavier Guerrero, Santiago; Brachet, Franck; Larue, Valéry; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Tisné, Carine

    2014-01-01

    The viral infectivity factor (Vif) is essential for the productive infection and dissemination of HIV-1 in non-permissive cells, containing the cellular anti-HIV defense cytosine deaminases APOBEC3 (A3G and A3F). Vif neutralizes the antiviral activities of the APOBEC3G/F by diverse mechanisms including their degradation through the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway and their translational inhibition. In addition, Vif appears to be an active partner of the late steps of viral replication by interacting with Pr55Gag, reverse transcriptase and genomic RNA. Here, we expressed and purified full-length and truncated Vif proteins, and analyzed their RNA binding and chaperone properties. First, we showed by CD and NMR spectroscopies that the N-terminal domain of Vif is highly structured in solution, whereas the C-terminal domain remains mainly unfolded. Both domains exhibited substantial RNA binding capacities with dissociation constants in the nanomolar range, whereas the basic unfolded C-terminal domain of Vif was responsible in part for its RNA chaperone activity. Second, we showed by NMR chemical shift mapping that Vif and NCp7 share the same binding sites on tRNALys3, the primer of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. Finally, our results indicate that Vif has potent RNA chaperone activity and provide direct evidence for an important role of the unstructured C-terminal domain of Vif in this capacity. PMID:25144404

  11. Comparison of Classifier Fusion Methods for Predicting Response to Anti HIV-1 Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Altmann, André; Rosen-Zvi, Michal; Prosperi, Mattia; Aharoni, Ehud; Neuvirth, Hani; Schülter, Eugen; Büch, Joachim; Struck, Daniel; Peres, Yardena; Incardona, Francesca; Sönnerborg, Anders; Kaiser, Rolf; Zazzi, Maurizio; Lengauer, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Background Analysis of the viral genome for drug resistance mutations is state-of-the-art for guiding treatment selection for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected patients. These mutations alter the structure of viral target proteins and reduce or in the worst case completely inhibit the effect of antiretroviral compounds while maintaining the ability for effective replication. Modern anti-HIV-1 regimens comprise multiple drugs in order to prevent or at least delay the development of resistance mutations. However, commonly used HIV-1 genotype interpretation systems provide only classifications for single drugs. The EuResist initiative has collected data from about 18,500 patients to train three classifiers for predicting response to combination antiretroviral therapy, given the viral genotype and further information. In this work we compare different classifier fusion methods for combining the individual classifiers. Principal Findings The individual classifiers yielded similar performance, and all the combination approaches considered performed equally well. The gain in performance due to combining methods did not reach statistical significance compared to the single best individual classifier on the complete training set. However, on smaller training set sizes (200 to 1,600 instances compared to 2,700) the combination significantly outperformed the individual classifiers (p<0.01; paired one-sided Wilcoxon test). Together with a consistent reduction of the standard deviation compared to the individual prediction engines this shows a more robust behavior of the combined system. Moreover, using the combined system we were able to identify a class of therapy courses that led to a consistent underestimation (about 0.05 AUC) of the system performance. Discovery of these therapy courses is a further hint for the robustness of the combined system. Conclusion The combined EuResist prediction engine is freely available at http://engine.euresist.org. PMID

  12. First Membrane Proximal External Region-Specific Anti-HIV1 Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal IgA1 Presenting Short CDRH3 and Low Somatic Mutations.

    PubMed

    Benjelloun, Fahd; Oruc, Zeliha; Thielens, Nicole; Verrier, Bernard; Champier, Gael; Vincent, Nadine; Rochereau, Nicolas; Girard, Alexandre; Jospin, Fabienne; Chanut, Blandine; Genin, Christian; Cogné, Michel; Paul, Stephane

    2016-09-01

    Mucosal HIV-1-specific IgA have been described as being able to neutralize HIV-1 and to block viral transcytosis. In serum and saliva, the anti-HIV IgA response is predominantly raised against the envelope of HIV-1. In this work, we describe the in vivo generation of gp41-specific IgA1 in humanized α1KI mice to produce chimeric IgA1. Mice were immunized with a conformational immunogenic gp41-transfected cell line. Among 2300 clones screened by immunofluorescence microscopy, six different gp41-specific IgA with strong recognition of gp41 were identified. Two of them have strong neutralizing activity against primary HIV-1 tier 1, 2, and 3 strains and present a low rate of somatic mutations and autoreactivity, unlike what was described for classical gp41-specific IgG. Epitopes were identified and located in the hepted repeat 2/membrane proximal external region. These Abs could be of interest in prophylactic treatment to block HIV-1 penetration in mucosa or in chronically infected patients in combination with antiretroviral therapy to reduce viral load and reservoir. PMID:27481846

  13. Polyclonal B-cell activation reveals antibodies against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in HIV-1-seronegative individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Jehuda-Cohen, T; Slade, B A; Powell, J D; Villinger, F; De, B; Folks, T M; McClure, H M; Sell, K W; Ahmed-Ansari, A

    1990-01-01

    Identification of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals is of paramount importance for the control of the spread of AIDS worldwide. Currently, the vast majority of screening centers throughout the world rely on serological techniques. As such, clinically asymptomatic but HIV-infected, seronegative individuals are rarely identified. In this report we show that 18% (30/165) of seronegative individuals who were considered to be a unique cohort of patients at high risk for HIV infection had circulating B cells that, upon in vitro polyclonal activation with pokeweed mitogen, produced antibodies reactive with HIV. Furthermore, polymerase chain reaction analysis of DNA obtained from aliquots of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from these seronegative but pokeweed mitogen assay-positive individuals tested revealed the presence of HIV-specific sequences in a significant number of samples. In addition, depletion of CD8+ T cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HIV-1-seronegative individuals prior to in vitro culture with pokeweed mitogen resulted in increased sensitivity for detecting HIV-reactive antibodies. This assay has obvious epidemiological implications, especially in the case of high-risk groups, and also provides a simple technique to enhance detection of HIV-infected individuals. Of further interest is the determination of the mechanisms related to the lack of HIV-specific antibodies in the serum of these infected individuals. Images PMID:2111024

  14. Human cervicovaginal mucus contains an activity that hinders HIV-1 movement.

    PubMed

    Shukair, S A; Allen, S A; Cianci, G C; Stieh, D J; Anderson, M R; Baig, S M; Gioia, C J; Spongberg, E J; Kauffman, S M; McRaven, M D; Lakougna, H Y; Hammond, C; Kiser, P F; Hope, T J

    2013-03-01

    Cervical and vaginal epithelia are primary barriers against HIV type I (HIV-1) entry during male-to-female transmission. Cervical mucus (CM) is produced by the endocervix and forms a layer locally as well as in the vaginal compartment in the form of cervicovaginal mucus (CVM). To study the potential barrier function of each mucus type during HIV-1 transmission, we quantified HIV-1 mobility in CM and CVM ex vivo using fluorescent microscopy. Virions and 200-nm PEGylated beads were digitally tracked and mean-squared displacement was calculated. The mobility of beads increased significantly in CVM compared with CM, consistent with the known decreased mucin concentration of CVM. Unexpectedly, HIV-1 diffusion was significantly hindered in the same CVM samples in which bead diffusion was unhindered. Inhibition of virus transport was envelope-independent. Our results reveal a previously unknown activity in CVM that is capable of impeding HIV-1 mobility to enhance mucosal barrier function. PMID:22990624

  15. Cytotoxic and HIV-1 enzyme inhibitory activities of Red Sea marine organisms

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cancer and HIV/AIDS are two of the greatest public health and humanitarian challenges facing the world today. Infection with HIV not only weakens the immune system leading to AIDS and increasing the risk of opportunistic infections, but also increases the risk of several types of cancer. The enormous biodiversity of marine habitats is mirrored by the molecular diversity of secondary metabolites found in marine animals, plants and microbes which is why this work was designed to assess the anti-HIV and cytotoxic activities of some marine organisms of the Red Sea. Methods The lipophilic fractions of methanolic extracts of thirteen marine organisms collected from the Red Sea (Egypt) were screened for cytotoxicity against two human cancer cell lines; leukaemia (U937) and cervical cancer (HeLa) cells. African green monkey kidney cells (Vero) were used as normal non-malignant control cells. The extracts were also tested for their inhibitory activity against HIV-1 enzymes, reverse transcriptase (RT) and protease (PR). Results Cytotoxicity results showed strong activity of the Cnidarian Litophyton arboreum against U-937 (IC50; 6.5 μg/ml ±2.3) with a selectivity index (SI) of 6.45, while the Cnidarian Sarcophyton trochliophorum showed strong activity against HeLa cells (IC50; 5.2 μg/ml ±1.2) with an SI of 2.09. Other species showed moderate to weak cytotoxicity against both cell lines. Two extracts showed potent inhibitory activity against HIV-1 protease; these were the Cnidarian jelly fish Cassiopia andromeda (IC50; 0.84 μg/ml ±0.05) and the red algae Galaxura filamentosa (2.6 μg/ml ±1.29). It is interesting to note that the most active extracts against HIV-1 PR, C. andromeda and G. filamentosa showed no cytotoxicity in the three cell lines at the highest concentration tested (100 μg/ml). Conclusion The strong cytotoxicity of the soft corals L. arboreum and S. trochliophorum as well as the anti-PR activity of the jelly fish C. andromeda and the red

  16. The dual action of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase -1 (PARP-1) inhibition in HIV-1 infection: HIV-1 LTR inhibition and diminution in Rho GTPase activity

    PubMed Central

    Rom, Slava; Reichenbach, Nancy L.; Dykstra, Holly; Persidsky, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    Multifactorial mechanisms comprising countless cellular factors and virus-encoded transactivators regulate the transcription of HIV-1 (HIV). Since poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) regulates numerous genes through its interaction with various transcription factors, inhibition of PARP-1 has surfaced recently as a powerful anti-inflammatory tool. We suggest a novel tactic to diminish HIV replication via PARP-1 inhibition in an in vitro model system, exploiting human primary monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). PARP-1 inhibition was capable to lessen HIV replication in MDM by 60–80% after 7 days infection. Tat, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) are known triggers of the Long Terminal Repeat (LTR), which can switch virus replication. Tat overexpression in MDM transfected with an LTR reporter plasmid resulted in a 4.2-fold increase in LTR activation; PARP inhibition caused 70% reduction of LTR activity. LTR activity, which increased 3-fold after PMA or TNFα treatment, was reduced by PARP inhibition (by 85–95%). PARP inhibition in MDM exhibited 90% diminution in NFκB activity (known to mediate TNFα- and PMA-induced HIV LTR activation). Cytoskeleton rearrangements are important in effective HIV-1 infection. PARP inactivation reduced actin cytoskeleton rearrangements by affecting Rho GTPase machinery. These discoveries suggest that inactivation of PARP suppresses HIV replication in MDM by via attenuation of LTR activation, NFκB suppression and its effects on the cytoskeleton. PARP appears to be essential for HIV replication and its inhibition may provide an effective approach to management of HIV infection. PMID:26379653

  17. Monitoring of the lactonase activity of paraoxonase-1 enzyme in HIV-1-infection

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Clara; Marinho, Aline; Morello, Judit; Almeida, Gabriela; Caixas, Umbelina; Soto, Karina; Monteiro, Emilia; Pereira, Sofia

    2014-01-01

    Paraoxonase-1 (PON1) is a high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-associated enzyme known as a free radical scavenging system (1). PON-1 has three main activities, responsible for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential: paraoxonase, arylesterase and lactonase (LACase), the latest to be discovered and pointed out to be its native activity (2). Among other physiological roles, the LACase might minimize the deleterious effects of hyperhomocysteinaemia in infection, by detoxifying the highly reactive metabolite homocysteine-thiolactone (HcyTL) (3),4. In the present work, we have developed and applied a method to quantify LACase activity and to explore the role of this enzyme in HIV-infection and virological response. The LACase activity was monitored in a cohort of HIV-1-infected patients, through the titration of 3-(o-hydroxyphenyl) propionic acid, formed upon the LACase-mediated hydrolysis of the substrate dihydrocoumarin. The study protocol was approved by the Ethics Committee of Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Central and Hospital Prof. Doutor Fernando Fonseca. All patients gave their written informed consent and were adults with documented HIV-1-infection, regardless of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) use. Naïve patients and patients who had received continuous antiretroviral treatment for more than one month were included. A total of 179 HIV-1-infected patients were included on this study (51% Men, 39% non-Caucasian, 45±13 years old). Patients with non-suppressed viraemia, either from the non-cART (n=89, 12±4 kU/L, p<0.01) or from the cART with detectable viral load (n=11, 10±5 kU/L, p<0.05) groups, had lower activity than the cART with suppressed viraemia (n=79, 15±7 kU/L) (Kruskal–Wallis test). Among naïve patients, higher viral load (> 31,500 cps/mL, Spearman r=−0.535, p=0.003) and lower CD4+ T-cells count (< 500 cell/mm3, Pearson r=0.326, p=0.024) were associated with the LACase activity. The present study suggests that lower LACase activity is

  18. MULTIPLE WAYS OF TARGETING APOBEC3/VIF INTERACTIONS FOR ANTI-HIV-1 DRUG DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jessica L.; Bu, Wei; Burdick, Ryan C.; Pathak, Vinay K.

    2009-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infections and the resulting acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) pandemic remain a global challenge in the absence of a protective vaccine and because of rapid selection of drug-resistant viral variants in response to all currently available antiviral therapies. Development of new and highly active antiviral agents would greatly facilitate effective clinical management of HIV-1 infections and delay the onset of AIDS. Recent advances in our understanding of intracellular immunity conferred by host cytidine deaminases APOBEC3G (A3G) and APOBEC3F (A3F), and the mechanism by which the virally encoded Virion Infectivity Factor (Vif) protein induces their proteasomal degradation, provide fresh opportunities for the development of novel antiviral treatments. Interestingly, the interactions between Vif-A3G and Vif-A3F that overcome this host defense mechanism are structurally distinct, and provide two potential targets for antiviral drug development. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of APOBEC3/Vif interactions and recent efforts to target these interactions for antiviral drug development. PMID:19837465

  19. Sequential Immunization Elicits Broadly Neutralizing Anti-HIV-1 Antibodies in Ig Knockin Mice.

    PubMed

    Escolano, Amelia; Steichen, Jon M; Dosenovic, Pia; Kulp, Daniel W; Golijanin, Jovana; Sok, Devin; Freund, Natalia T; Gitlin, Alexander D; Oliveira, Thiago; Araki, Tatsuya; Lowe, Sarina; Chen, Spencer T; Heinemann, Jennifer; Yao, Kai-Hui; Georgeson, Erik; Saye-Francisco, Karen L; Gazumyan, Anna; Adachi, Yumiko; Kubitz, Michael; Burton, Dennis R; Schief, William R; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2016-09-01

    A vaccine that elicits broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) against HIV-1 is likely to be protective, but this has not been achieved. To explore immunization regimens that might elicit bNAbs, we produced and immunized mice expressing the predicted germline PGT121, a bNAb specific for the V3-loop and surrounding glycans on the HIV-1 spike. Priming with an epitope-modified immunogen designed to activate germline antibody-expressing B cells, followed by ELISA-guided boosting with a sequence of directional immunogens, native-like trimers with decreasing epitope modification, elicited heterologous tier-2-neutralizing responses. In contrast, repeated immunization with the priming immunogen did not. Antibody cloning confirmed elicitation of high levels of somatic mutation and tier-2-neutralizing antibodies resembling the authentic human bNAb. Our data establish that sequential immunization with specifically designed immunogens can induce high levels of somatic mutation and shepherd antibody maturation to produce bNAbs from their inferred germline precursors. PMID:27610569

  20. Antihuman Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Activity of Rare Earth Metal Complexes of 4-Hydroxycoumarins in Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Manolov, Ilia; Raleva, Sevda; Genova, Petya; Savov, Alexey; Froloshka, Liliana; Dundarova, Daniela; Argirova, Radka

    2006-01-01

    The cerium Ce(III), lanthanum La(III), and neodymium Nd(III) complexes with 4-hydroxy-3-(3-oxo-1-phenylbutyl)-2H-1-benzopyran-2-one (warfarin) (W) and 3,3′-benzylidenebis[4-hydroxycoumarin] (1) were synthesized and studied for the first time for cytotoxicity (on MT-2 cells) and as anti-HIV agents under acute and chronic infection. The complexes were characterized by different physicochemical methods: mass spectrometry, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, and IR spectroscopy. The spectra of the complexes were interpreted on the basis of comparison with the spectrum of the free ligands. Anti-HIV effect of the complexes/ligands was measured in MT-2 cells by microtiter infection assay. Detection of endogenous reverse transcriptase (RT) activity and RT processivity by PCR indicative for proviral DNA synthesis demonstrated that anti-HIV activity has not been linked to early stages of viral replication. No effect on late steps of viral replication has been found using cells chronically producing HIV-1LAI virus. La(W) demonstrated anti-HIV activity (IC50=21.4 μM) close to maximal nontoxic concentration. Nd(W), Ce(1), and Nd(1) demonstrated limited anti-HIV potency, so none of the complexes seems appropriate to be used in clinic. Further targeting of HIV-1 inhibition by La(W) is under progress. PMID:17497016

  1. TAR RNA decoys inhibit tat-activated HIV-1 transcription after preinitiation complex formation.

    PubMed Central

    Bohjanen, P R; Liu, Y; Garcia-Blanco, M A

    1997-01-01

    The ability of the HIV-1 Tat protein to trans -activate HIV-1 transcription in vitro is specifically inhibited by a circular TAR RNA decoy. This inhibition is not overcome by adding an excess of Tat to the reaction but is partially overcome by adding Tat in combination with nuclear extract, suggesting that TAR RNA might function by interacting with a complex containing Tat and cellular factor(s). A cell-free transcription system involving immobilized DNA templates was used to further define the factor(s) that interact with TAR RNA. Preinitiation complexes formed in the presence or absence of Tat were purified on immobilized templates containing the HIV-1 promoter. After washing, nucleotides and radiolabelled UTP were added and transcription was measured. The presence of Tat during preinitiation complex formation resulted in an increase in the level of full-length HIV-1 transcripts. This Tat-activated increase in HIV-1 transcription was not inhibited by circular TAR decoys added during preinitiation complex formation but was inhibited by circular TAR decoys subsequently added during the transcription reaction. These results suggest that TAR decoys inhibit Tat-activated HIV-1 transcription after preinitiation complex formation, perhaps by interacting with components of transcription complexes. PMID:9358155

  2. Rationally Designed Interfacial Peptides Are Efficient In Vitro Inhibitors of HIV-1 Capsid Assembly with Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bocanegra, Rebeca; Nevot, María; Doménech, Rosa; López, Inmaculada; Abián, Olga; Rodríguez-Huete, Alicia; Cavasotto, Claudio N.; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Gómez, Javier; Martínez, Miguel Ángel; Neira, José Luis; Mateu, Mauricio G.

    2011-01-01

    Virus capsid assembly constitutes an attractive target for the development of antiviral therapies; a few experimental inhibitors of this process for HIV-1 and other viruses have been identified by screening compounds or by selection from chemical libraries. As a different, novel approach we have undertaken the rational design of peptides that could act as competitive assembly inhibitors by mimicking capsid structural elements involved in intersubunit interfaces. Several discrete interfaces involved in formation of the mature HIV-1 capsid through polymerization of the capsid protein CA were targeted. We had previously designed a peptide, CAC1, that represents CA helix 9 (a major part of the dimerization interface) and binds the CA C-terminal domain in solution. Here we have mapped the binding site of CAC1, and shown that it substantially overlaps with the CA dimerization interface. We have also rationally modified CAC1 to increase its solubility and CA-binding affinity, and designed four additional peptides that represent CA helical segments involved in other CA interfaces. We found that peptides CAC1, its derivative CAC1M, and H8 (representing CA helix 8) were able to efficiently inhibit the in vitro assembly of the mature HIV-1 capsid. Cocktails of several peptides, including CAC1 or CAC1M plus H8 or CAI (a previously discovered inhibitor of CA polymerization), or CAC1M+H8+CAI, also abolished capsid assembly, even when every peptide was used at lower, sub-inhibitory doses. To provide a preliminary proof that these designed capsid assembly inhibitors could eventually serve as lead compounds for development of anti-HIV-1 agents, they were transported into cultured cells using a cell-penetrating peptide, and tested for antiviral activity. Peptide cocktails that drastically inhibited capsid assembly in vitro were also able to efficiently inhibit HIV-1 infection ex vivo. This study validates a novel, entirely rational approach for the design of capsid assembly

  3. AIDS dementia is associated with massive, activated HIV-1 infection and concomitant expression of several cytokines.

    PubMed Central

    Nuovo, G. J.; Alfieri, M. L.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We recently showed that acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) dementia is associated with activated infection of microglia, neurons, and astrocytes by HIV-1. However, it is doubtful whether infection per se is responsible for the dramatic symptoms associated with AIDS dementia. The purpose of this study was to determine the histologic distribution of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) of several cytokines that have been implicated in AIDS pathogenesis and to correlate this expression pattern with the in situ localization of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified HIV-1 nucleic acids in the central nervous system (CNS). MATERIALS AND METHODS: HIV-1 DNA was detected by PCR in situ hybridization. HIV-1 RNA and cytokine expression, including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF), inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS), and macrophage inflammatory protein alpha (MIP-1 alpha) and MIP-1 beta mRNA were detected by reverse transcriptase (RT) in situ PCR. RESULTS: Amplified viral DNA was detected in each of the seven HIV-1-positive cases and in none of the five negative controls. In people with AIDS dementia, many HIV-1 DNA-positive cells were detected in regions of the CNS that corresponded to clinical symptomatology. In AIDS patients with minimal CNS involvement, rare HIV-1-infected microglial cells were noted. Viral RNA was detected primarily in cases of AIDS dementia. TNF, iNOS, MIP-1 alpha and MIP-1 beta expression localized to tissues from AIDS dementia cases where HIV-1 infected cells were plentiful. Colocalization experiments showed that these cytokines were transcribed mostly by viral-negative cells. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that two key elements in AIDS dementia are massive productive viral infection, involving microglia, neurons, and astrocytes, and concomitant stimulation of cytokine transcription in the neighboring uninfected cells. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 PMID:8784788

  4. Association of Blood Biomarkers of Bone Turnover in HIV-1 Infected Individuals Receiving Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ART)

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Najib; Butch, Anthony W; Quint, Joshua J; Detels, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association of bone turnover biomarkers with blood levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP), osteocalcin (OC), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), parathyroid hormone (PTH), and other blood markers in HIV-1 infected men receiving anti-retroviral therapy (ART). Advances in the treatment of HIV-1 infection have extended the life span of HIV-1 infected individuals. However, these advances may come at the price of metabolic side effects and bone disorders, including premature osteopenia, osteoporosis and osteonecrosis. Methods Analyses of Ostase BAP, osteocalcin, and TRAP in blood were measured in three groups of MACS participants: 35 HIV-1 infected men on ART (A); 35 HIV-1- infected men not on ART (B); and 34 HIV-1 uninfected men (C). Results The mean and standard deviation results for groups A, B, and C were 19.7 ± 6.56, 17.2 ± 3.96, and 16.9 ± 5.78 for ostase BAP; 7.9 ± 9.53, 8.5 ± 8.30, and 5.5 ± 1.65 for osteocalcin; and 3.9 ± 1.04, 3.1 ± 0.81, and 2.5 ± 0.59 for TRAP, respectively. Simple and multivariate analyses showed significant differences in mean TRAP and BAP concentrations between the three groups. In addition strong correlations between blood levels of Ostase BAP and TRAP (r=0.570, p=0.0004), and between blood levels of Ostase BAP and PTH (r=0.436, P=0.0098) for HIV-1 infected men on ART were observed. Conclusion New strategies for measurement of blood and urine biochemical markers of bone formation and resorption during bone turnover can be useful for clinical monitoring of treatment of HIV-1 infected patients. Recently developed methods for measuring serum levels of TRAP and Ostase BAP represent superior laboratory tools for assessing the hyperactivity of osteoclasts, osteoblasts and bone loss in HIV-1 infected individuals receiving ART. Measurements of TRAP and BAP as bone turnover biomarkers are economical and are important for monitoring bone metabolism during ART and

  5. Prothymosin-α Variants Elicit Anti-HIV-1 Response via TLR4 Dependent and Independent Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gusella, G. Luca; Teixeira, Avelino; Aberg, Judith; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Mosoian, Arevik

    2016-01-01

    Background Prothymosin α (ProTα) (isoform 2: iso2) is a widely distributed, small acidic protein with intracellular and extracellular-associated functions. Recently, we identified two new ProTα variants with potent anti-HIV activity from CD8+ T cells and cervicovaginal lavage. The first is a splice variant of the ProTα gene known as isoB and the second is the product of ProTα pseudogene 7 (p7). Similarly to iso2, the anti-HIV activity of both variants is mediated by type I IFN. Here we tested whether the immunomodulatory activity of isoB and p7 are also TLR4 dependent and determined their kinetic of release in response to HIV-1 infection. Methods Type I, type III, TNF-α and IL-6 mRNA inducing activity was determined in macrophages from wild type and TLR4 knockout mice treated with recombinant ProTα variants. Supernatants from mock and HIV infected cells were analyzed by mass spectrometry in positive and negative modes for the presence of ProTα variants. In silico structural and functional analysis of ProTα variants were performed. Results We show that both isoB and p7 upregulate IFN-β, IFN-λ1, IL-6, TNF-α and RANTES mRNAs in primary human macrophages. The potent stimulation of IFN-β by the recombinant ProTα variants in human macrophages is dependent on the TLR4 pathway, whereas the induction of TNF-α and IL-6 may also occur independently of TLR4, suggesting the interaction of ProTα variants with other signaling molecules/receptors. In silico analyses confirmed that the novel isoB and p7 variants are intrinsically disordered proteins, which lack the NLS and mass spectrometry showed release of ProTα variants within minutes post HIV-1 infection. These features are consistent with the function of ProTα variants as damage associate molecular patterns (DAMPs). Conclusions Our findings indicate that ProTα variants strongly inhibit viral replication mainly, but not exclusively, through TLR4 signaling and that they are released within minutes of viral

  6. Selective induction of CTL ‘helper’ rather than killer activity by natural epitope variants promotes DC-mediated HIV-1 dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Mailliard, Robbie B.; Smith, Kellie N.; Fecek, Ronald J.; Rappocciolo, Giovanna; Nascimento, Eduardo J. M.; Marques, Ernesto T.; Watkins, Simon C.; Mullins, James I.; Rinaldo, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of HIV-1 to rapidly accumulate mutations provides the virus with an effective means of escaping CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses. Here we describe how subtle alterations in CTL epitopes expressed by naturally occurring HIV-1 variants can result in an incomplete escape from CTL recognition, providing the virus with a selective advantage. Rather than paralyzing the CTL response, these epitope modifications selectively induce the CTL to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines in the absence of target killing. Importantly, instead of dampening the immune response through CTL elimination of variant antigen-expressing immature dendritic cells (iDC), a positive CTL-to-DC immune feedback loop dominates whereby the iDC differentiate into mature pro-inflammatory DC. Moreover, these CTL-programmed DC exhibit a superior capacity to mediate HIV-1 trans-infection of T cells. This discordant induction of CTL helper activity in the absence of killing likely contributes to the chronic immune activation associated with HIV-1 infection, and can be utilized by HIV-1 to promote viral dissemination and persistence. Our findings highlight the need to address the detrimental potential of eliciting dysfunctional cross-reactive memory CTL responses when designing and implementing anti-HIV-1 immunotherapies. PMID:23913962

  7. Two M-T hook residues greatly improve the antiviral activity and resistance profile of the HIV-1 fusion inhibitor SC29EK

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Peptides derived from the C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR) of HIV-1 gp41 such as T20 (Enfuvirtide) and C34 are potent viral fusion inhibitors. We have recently found that two N-terminal residues (Met115 and Thr116) of CHR peptides form a unique M-T hook structure that can greatly enhance the binding and anti-HIV activity of inhibitors. Here, we applied two M-T hook residues to optimize SC29EK, an electrostatically constrained peptide inhibitor with a potent anti-HIV activity. Results The resulting peptide MT-SC29EK showed a dramatically increased binding affinity and could block the six-helical bundle (6-HB) formation more efficiently. As expected, MT-SC29EK potently inhibited HIV-1 entry and infection, especially against those T20- and SC29EK-resistant HIV-1 variants. More importantly, MT-SC29EK and its short form (MT-SC22EK) suffered from the difficulty to induce HIV-1 resistance during the in vitro selection, suggesting their high genetic barriers to the development of resistance. Conclusions Our studies have verified the M-T hook structure as a vital strategy to design novel HIV-1 fusion inhibitors and offered an ideal candidate for clinical development. PMID:24884671

  8. Structure-activity relationship studies on clinically relevant HIV-1 NNRTIs.

    PubMed

    Rawal, R K; Murugesan, V; Katti, S B

    2012-01-01

    In addition to the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), protease inhibitors (PIs) and integrase inhibitors (INIs), nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) have contributed significantly in the treatment of HIV-1 infections. More than 60 structurally different classes of compounds have been identified as NNRTIs, which are specifically inhibiting HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). Five NNRTIs (nevirapine, delavirdine, efavirenz, etravirine and rilpivirine) have been approved by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for clinical use. The NNRTIs bind with a specific 'pocket' site of HIV-1 RT (allosteric site) that is closely associated with the NRTI binding site. Due to mutations of the amino acid residues surrounding the NNRTI-binding site, NNRTIs are notorious for rapidly eliciting resistance. Though, the emergence of resistant HIV strains can be circumvented if the NNRTIs are used either alone or in combination with NRTIs (AZT, 3TC, ddI, ddC, TVD or d4T) and PIs (Indinavir, nelfinavir, saquinavir, ritonavir and lopinavir etc.) as shown by both a decrease in plasma HIV-1 RNA levels and increased CD4 T-cells. Here we are going to discuss recent advances in structure activity relationship studies on nevirapine, delavirdine, efavirenz, etravirine, rilpivirine and 4-thiazolidinones (privileged scaffold) HIV-1 NNRTIs. PMID:22998569

  9. Nuclear Factor 90(NF90) targeted to TAR RNA inhibits transcriptional activation of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Agbottah, Emmanuel T; Traviss, Christine; McArdle, James; Karki, Sambhav; St Laurent, Georges C; Kumar, Ajit

    2007-01-01

    Background Examination of host cell-based inhibitors of HIV-1 transcription may be important for attenuating viral replication. We describe properties of a cellular double-stranded RNA binding protein with intrinsic affinity for HIV-1 TAR RNA that interferes with Tat/TAR interaction and inhibits viral gene expression. Results Utilizing TAR affinity fractionation, North-Western blotting, and mobility-shift assays, we show that the C-terminal variant of nuclear factor 90 (NF90ctv) with strong affinity for the TAR RNA, competes with Tat/TAR interaction in vitro. Analysis of the effect of NF90ctv-TAR RNA interaction in vivo showed significant inhibition of Tat-transactivation of HIV-1 LTR in cells expressing NF90ctv, as well as changes in histone H3 lysine-4 and lysine-9 methylation of HIV chromatin that are consistent with the epigenetic changes in transcriptionally repressed gene. Conclusion Structural integrity of the TAR element is crucial in HIV-1 gene expression. Our results show that perturbation Tat/TAR RNA interaction by the dsRNA binding protein is sufficient to inhibit transcriptional activation of HIV-1. PMID:17565699

  10. Neutralizing antibody and anti-retroviral drug sensitivities of HIV-1 isolates resistant to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Pugach, Pavel; Ketas, Thomas J.; Michael, Elizabeth; Moore, John P.

    2008-08-01

    The small molecule CCR5 inhibitors are a new class of drugs for treating infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). They act by binding to the CCR5 co-receptor and preventing its use during HIV-1-cell fusion. Escape mutants can be raised against CCR5 inhibitors in vitro and will arise when these drugs are used clinically. Here, we have assessed the responses of CCR5 inhibitor-resistant viruses to other anti-retroviral drugs that act by different mechanisms, and their sensitivities to neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). The rationale for the latter study is that the resistance pathway for CCR5 inhibitors involves changes in the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), which are also targets for NAbs. The escape mutants CC101.19 and D1/85.16 were selected for resistance to AD101 and vicriviroc (VVC), respectively, from the primary R5 HIV-1 isolate CC1/85. Each escape mutant was cross-resistant to other small molecule CCR5 inhibitors (aplaviroc, maraviroc, VVC, AD101 and CMPD 167), but sensitive to protein ligands of CCR5: the modified chemokine PSC-RANTES and the humanized MAb PRO-140. The resistant viruses also retained wild-type sensitivity to the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) zidovudine, the non-nucleoside RTI nevirapine, the protease inhibitor atazanavir and other attachment and fusion inhibitors that act independently of CCR5 (BMS-806, PRO-542 and enfuvirtide). Of note is that the escape mutants were more sensitive than the parental CC1/85 isolate to a subset of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and to some sera from HIV-1-infected people, implying that sequence changes in Env that confer resistance to CCR5 inhibitors can increase the accessibility of some NAb epitopes. The need to preserve NAb resistance may therefore be a constraint upon how escape from CCR5 inhibitors occurs in vivo.

  11. Anti-HIV-1 protease triterpenoid saponins from the seeds of Aesculus chinensis.

    PubMed

    Yang, X W; Zhao, J; Cui, Y X; Liu, X H; Ma, C M; Hattori, M; Zhang, L H

    1999-11-01

    Eight bioactive triterpenoid saponins (1-8) were isolated from the seeds of Aesculus chinensis, four of which are novel compounds. The major saponins were identified as escin Ia (1), Ib (2), isoescin Ia (3) and Ib (4), while the new compounds were identified as 22alpha-tigloyl-28-acetylprotoaescigenin-3beta-O-¿beta -D-glucopyranos yl (1-2) ¿beta-D-glucopyranosyl (1-4)-beta-D-glucopyranosiduronic acid (escin IVc, 5), 22alpha-angeloyl-28-acetylprotoaescigenin-3beta-O-¿bet a-D-glucopyrano syl (1-2) ¿beta-D-glucopyranosyl (1-4)-beta-D-glucopyranosiduronic acid (escin IVd, 6), 28-tigloylprotoaescigenin-3beta-O-¿beta-D-glucopyranosyl (1-2) ¿beta-D-glucopyranosyl (1-4)-beta-D-glucopyranosiduronic acid (escin IVe, 7), and 28-angeloylprotoaescigenin-3beta-O-¿beta-D-glucopyranosyl (1-2) ¿beta-D-glucopyranosyl (1-4)-beta-D-glucopyranosiduronic acid (escin IVf, 8). The structures were determined by chemical and spectroscopic methods. All the above compounds were evaluated for their inhibitory activity against HIV-1 protease. PMID:10579862

  12. A Nonfucosylated Variant of the anti-HIV-1 Monoclonal Antibody b12 Has Enhanced FcγRIIIa-Mediated Antiviral Activity In Vitro but Does Not Improve Protection against Mucosal SHIV Challenge in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Moldt, Brian; Shibata-Koyama, Mami; Rakasz, Eva G.; Schultz, Niccole; Kanda, Yutaka; Dunlop, D. Cameron; Finstad, Samantha L.; Jin, Chenggang; Landucci, Gary; Alpert, Michael D.; Dugast, Anne-Sophie; Parren, Paul W. H. I.; Nimmerjahn, Falk; Evans, David T.; Alter, Galit; Forthal, Donald N.; Schmitz, Jörn E.; Iida, Shigeru; Poignard, Pascal; Watkins, David I.

    2012-01-01

    Eliciting neutralizing antibodies is thought to be a key activity of a vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). However, a number of studies have suggested that in addition to neutralization, interaction of IgG with Fc gamma receptors (FcγR) may play an important role in antibody-mediated protection. We have previously obtained evidence that the protective activity of the broadly neutralizing human IgG1 anti-HIV monoclonal antibody (MAb) b12 in macaques is diminished in the absence of FcγR binding capacity. To investigate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) as a contributor to FcγR-associated protection, we developed a nonfucosylated variant of b12 (NFb12). We showed that, compared to fully fucosylated (referred to as wild-type in the text) b12, NFb12 had higher affinity for human and rhesus macaque FcγRIIIa and was more efficient in inhibiting viral replication and more effective in killing HIV-infected cells in an ADCC assay. Despite these more potent in vitro antiviral activities, NFb12 did not enhance protection in vivo against repeated low-dose vaginal challenge in the simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)/macaque model compared to wild-type b12. No difference in protection, viral load, or infection susceptibility was observed between animals given NFb12 and those given fully fucosylated b12, indicating that FcγR-mediated activities distinct from FcγRIIIa-mediated ADCC may be important in the observed protection against SHIV challenge. PMID:22457527

  13. Alkyl Amine Bevirimat Derivatives Are Potent and Broadly Active HIV-1 Maturation Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Urano, Emiko; Ablan, Sherimay D.; Mandt, Rebecca; Pauly, Gary T.; Sigano, Dina M.; Schneider, Joel P.; Martin, David E.; Nitz, Theodore J.; Wild, Carl T.

    2015-01-01

    Concomitant with the release of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) particles from the infected cell, the viral protease cleaves the Gag polyprotein precursor at a number of sites to trigger virus maturation. We previously reported that a betulinic acid-derived compound, bevirimat (BVM), blocks HIV-1 maturation by disrupting a late step in protease-mediated Gag processing: the cleavage of the capsid-spacer peptide 1 (CA-SP1) intermediate to mature CA. BVM was shown in multiple clinical trials to be safe and effective in reducing viral loads in HIV-1-infected patients. However, naturally occurring polymorphisms in the SP1 region of Gag (e.g., SP1-V7A) led to a variable response in some BVM-treated patients. The reduced susceptibility of SP1-polymorphic HIV-1 to BVM resulted in the discontinuation of its clinical development. To overcome the loss of BVM activity induced by polymorphisms in SP1, we carried out an extensive medicinal chemistry campaign to develop novel maturation inhibitors. In this study, we focused on alkyl amine derivatives modified at the C-28 position of the BVM scaffold. We identified a set of derivatives that are markedly more potent than BVM against an HIV-1 clade B clone (NL4-3) and show robust antiviral activity against a variant of NL4-3 containing the V7A polymorphism in SP1. One of the most potent of these compounds also strongly inhibited a multiclade panel of primary HIV-1 isolates. These data demonstrate that C-28 alkyl amine derivatives of BVM can, to a large extent, overcome the loss of susceptibility imposed by polymorphisms in SP1. PMID:26482309

  14. Kinase control prevents HIV-1 reactivation in spite of high levels of induced NF-κB activity.

    PubMed

    Wolschendorf, Frank; Bosque, Alberto; Shishido, Takao; Duverger, Alexandra; Jones, Jennifer; Planelles, Vicente; Kutsch, Olaf

    2012-04-01

    Despite its clinical importance, the molecular biology of HIV-1 latency control is at best partially understood, and the literature remains conflicting. The most recent description that latent HIV-1 is integrated into actively expressed host genes has further confounded the situation. This lack of molecular understanding complicates our efforts to identify therapeutic compounds or strategies that could reactivate latent HIV-1 infection in patients, a prerequisite for the eradication of HIV-1 infection. Currently, many therapeutic development efforts operate under the assumption that a restrictive histone code could govern latent infection and that either dissipation of the histone-based restrictions or NF-κB activation could be sufficient to trigger HIV-1 reactivation. We here present data that suggest an additional, higher level of molecular control. During a high-content drug screening effort, we identified AS601245 as a potent inhibitor of HIV-1 reactivation in latently infected primary T cells and T cell lines. In either system, AS601245 inhibited HIV-1 reactivation despite high levels of induced NF-κB activation. This finding suggests the presence of a gatekeeper kinase activity that controls latent HIV-1 infection even in the presence of high levels of NF-κB activity. Potential therapeutic stimuli that do not target this gatekeeper kinase will likely fail to trigger efficient system-wide HIV-1 reactivation. PMID:22345467

  15. Kinase Control Prevents HIV-1 Reactivation in Spite of High Levels of Induced NF-κB Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wolschendorf, Frank; Bosque, Alberto; Shishido, Takao; Duverger, Alexandra; Jones, Jennifer; Planelles, Vicente

    2012-01-01

    Despite its clinical importance, the molecular biology of HIV-1 latency control is at best partially understood, and the literature remains conflicting. The most recent description that latent HIV-1 is integrated into actively expressed host genes has further confounded the situation. This lack of molecular understanding complicates our efforts to identify therapeutic compounds or strategies that could reactivate latent HIV-1 infection in patients, a prerequisite for the eradication of HIV-1 infection. Currently, many therapeutic development efforts operate under the assumption that a restrictive histone code could govern latent infection and that either dissipation of the histone-based restrictions or NF-κB activation could be sufficient to trigger HIV-1 reactivation. We here present data that suggest an additional, higher level of molecular control. During a high-content drug screening effort, we identified AS601245 as a potent inhibitor of HIV-1 reactivation in latently infected primary T cells and T cell lines. In either system, AS601245 inhibited HIV-1 reactivation despite high levels of induced NF-κB activation. This finding suggests the presence of a gatekeeper kinase activity that controls latent HIV-1 infection even in the presence of high levels of NF-κB activity. Potential therapeutic stimuli that do not target this gatekeeper kinase will likely fail to trigger efficient system-wide HIV-1 reactivation. PMID:22345467

  16. Brief Report: Macrophage Activation in HIV-2-Infected Patients Is Less Affected by Antiretroviral Treatment-sCD163 in HIV-1, HIV-2, and HIV-1/2 Dually Infected Patients.

    PubMed

    Hønge, Bo L; Andersen, Morten N; Jespersen, Sanne; Medina, Candida; Correira, Faustino G; Jakobsen, Martin R; Laursen, Alex; Erikstrup, Christian; Møller, Holger J; Wejse, Christian

    2016-07-01

    The course of disease among HIV-2, HIV-1, and HIV-1/2 dually infected patients is different. We investigated the macrophage activation marker soluble CD163 (sCD163) dynamics in 212 HIV-1, HIV-2, and HIV-1/2 dually infected patients. There were no differences in sCD163 levels at baseline or during follow-up without antiretroviral therapy (ART). At follow-up on ART, median sCD163 levels were decreased for HIV-1-infected patients (P < 0.001), but not among HIV-2 (P = 0.093) or HIV-1/2 dually infected patients (P = 0.145). The larger decrease in sCD163 levels among HIV-1-infected patients during ART may indicate an HIV type-dependent differential effect of ART on macrophage activation during HIV infection. PMID:26825178

  17. The Effect of Chloroquine on Immune Activation and Interferon Signatures Associated with HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Jeffrey M; Bosinger, Steven E; Kang, Minhee; Belaunzaran-Zamudio, Pablo; Matining, Roy M; Wilson, Cara C; Flexner, Charles; Clagett, Brian; Plants, Jill; Read, Sarah; Purdue, Lynette; Myers, Laurie; Boone, Linda; Tebas, Pablo; Kumar, Princy; Clifford, David; Douek, Daniel; Silvestri, Guido; Landay, Alan L; Lederman, Michael M

    2016-07-01

    Immune activation associated with HIV-1 infection contributes to morbidity and mortality. We studied whether chloroquine, through Toll-like receptor (TLR) antagonist properties, could reduce immune activation thought to be driven by TLR ligands, such as gut-derived bacterial elements and HIV-1 RNAs. AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5258 was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in 33 HIV-1-infected participants off antiretroviral therapy (ART) and 37 participants on ART. Study participants in each cohort were randomized 1:1 to receive chloroquine 250 mg orally for the first 12 weeks then cross over to placebo for 12 weeks or placebo first and then chloroquine. Combining the periods of chloroquine use in both arms of the on-ART cohort yielded a modest reduction in the proportions of CD8 T cells co-expressing CD38 and DR (median decrease = 3.0%, p = .003). The effect on immune activation in the off-ART cohort was likely confounded by increased plasma HIV-1 RNA during chloroquine administration (median 0.29 log10 increase, p < .001). Transcriptional analyses in the off-ART cohort showed decreased expression of interferon-stimulated genes in 5 of 10 chloroquine-treated participants and modest decreases in CD38 and CCR5 RNAs in all chloroquine-treated participants. Chloroquine modestly reduced immune activation in ART-treated HIV-infected participants. Clinical Trials Registry Number: NCT00819390. PMID:26935044

  18. Replication of HIV-1 deleted Nef mutants in chronically immune activated human T cells.

    PubMed

    Shapira-Nahor, Orit; Maayan, Shlomo; Peden, Keith W C; Rabinowitz, Ruth; Schlesinger, Michael; Alian, Akram; Panet, Amos

    2002-11-10

    Lymphocytes (PBMC) obtained from blood of HIV-sera negative Ethiopian immigrants (ETH) were highly susceptible to HIV-1 infection in vitro with no need for stimulation by mitogens. As the HIV nef gene product has been shown to enhance viral replication in stimulated primary lymphocytes, we investigated in this work the role of Nef in viral replication in the ETH cells. Lymphocytes obtained from ETH individuals supported high replication of wild-type HIV-1 and low but significant replication level of the two deleted Nef mutants (encode truncated Nef proteins consisting only of either the first 35 or the first 86 amino acids of Nef). In contrast, no replication was observed in nonactivated cells obtained from non-ETH individuals. After activation of the PBMC from ETH individuals with PHA, replication of both wild-type strains and the two deleted Nef mutant viruses further increased. The CD4(+) T cells of ETH individuals exhibited elevated levels of the surface activation markers CD45RO and HLA-DR, compared with T cells derived from non-ETH group. Likewise, expression of the chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 on these cells was higher in the ETH group than in the non-ETH group. Replication of HIV-1 wild-type and the isogenic-deleted Nef mutants was significantly correlated with the proportion of ETH cells expressing CD45RO and the chemokine receptors. This study suggests that HIV-1 may respond differently to several activation states characteristic of T cells. One activation state, defined by chronically activated lymphocytes from ETH individuals, is permissive to the wild-type HIV-1 and, to a lesser degree, to the Nef mutants. Further activation of these cells by exogenous stimuli enhances replication of the virus. Our results support the notion that Nef enhances the basal level of T cell activation and consequently, viral replication. PMID:12482665

  19. Diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection: multicenter evaluation of a newly developed anti-HIV 1 and 2 enzyme immunoassay.

    PubMed Central

    Hess, G; Avillez, F; Lourenco, M H; D'Agostino, F; Cambie, G; Piot, P; Vercauteren, G; Michl, U; Melchior, W; Bayer, H

    1994-01-01

    A new anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and 2 (anti-HIV 1 and 2) test is described. It uses recombinant p24 and peptides covering gp32, gp41, and gp120 to identify HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections. This test has been shown to be specific (99.5%) and sensitive (99.8%). In this respect, the assay was equal or superior to anti-HIV 1 and 2 tests run as references. The test was able to discriminate sera from patients with HIV infections from those from uninfected individuals with excellence; it also exerted high intra- and interassay precisions. The "modular" concept of the test allows the use of single components (gp32 or gp41) to separate between HIV-2 and HIV-1 infections, respectively. PMID:8150950

  20. Sulfonic acid polymers: Highly potent inhibition of HIV-1 and HIV-2 reverse transcriptase and antiviral activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, P.; Verma, S.; Tan, G.T.; Wickramasinghe, A.; Pezzuto, J.M.; Huges, S.H.; Baba, M.

    1993-12-31

    In an extension of the authors` work in the sulfonic acid polymer area they have evaluated the reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitory activity of several varying molecular weight aromatic and aliphatic derivatives. All the polymers possess anti-HIV activity at doses that are non-toxic to the host cells and act by inhibiting viral adsorption. In the RT assay, poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid) exhibited highly potent inhibition with IC{sub 50} values of 0.0008 {mu}M and 0.0007 {mu}M for HIV-1 and HIV-2 RT respectively. The discovery of the anti-RT potential of these derivatives provides the impetus to investigate additional intervention strategies that are coupled with the facilitated cellular penetration of these agents.

  1. Similarities in the HIV-1 and ASV Integrease Active Site Upon Metal Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Lins, Roberto D.; Straatsma, TP; Briggs, J. M.

    2000-04-05

    The HIV-1 integrase, which is essential for viral replication, catalyzes the insertion of viral DNA into the host chromosome thereby recruiting host cell machinery into making viral proteins. It represents the third main HIV enzyme target for inhibitor design, the first two being the reverse transcriptase and the protease. We report here a fully hydrated 2 ns molecular dynamics simulation performed using parallel NWChem3.2.1 with the AMBER95 force field. The HIV-1 integrase catalytic domain previously determined by crystallography (1B9D) and modeling including two Mg2+ ions placed into the active site based on an alignment against an ASV integrase structure containing two divalent metals (1VSH), was used as the starting structure. The simulation reveals a high degree of flexibility in the region of residues 140-149 even in the presence of a second divalent metal ion and a dramatic conformational change of the side chain of E152 when the second metal ion is present. This study shows similarities in the behavior of the catalytic residues in the HIV-1 and ASV integrases upon metal binding. The present simulation also provides support to the hypothesis that the second metal ion is likely to be carried into the HIV-1 integrase active site by the substrate, a strand of DNA.

  2. An altered intestinal mucosal microbiome in HIV-1 infection is associated with mucosal and systemic immune activation and endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Dillon, S M; Lee, E J; Kotter, C V; Austin, G L; Dong, Z; Hecht, D K; Gianella, S; Siewe, B; Smith, D M; Landay, A L; Robertson, C E; Frank, D N; Wilson, C C

    2014-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection disrupts the intestinal immune system, leading to microbial translocation and systemic immune activation. We investigated the impact of HIV-1 infection on the intestinal microbiome and its association with mucosal T-cell and dendritic cell (DC) frequency and activation, as well as with levels of systemic T-cell activation, inflammation, and microbial translocation. Bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing was performed on colon biopsies and fecal samples from subjects with chronic, untreated HIV-1 infection and uninfected control subjects. Colon biopsies of HIV-1-infected subjects had increased abundances of Proteobacteria and decreased abundances of Firmicutes compared with uninfected donors. Furthermore at the genus level, a significant increase in Prevotella and decrease in Bacteroides was observed in HIV-1-infected subjects, indicating a disruption in the Bacteroidetes bacterial community structure. This HIV-1-associated increase in Prevotella abundance was associated with increased numbers of activated colonic T cells and myeloid DCs. Principal coordinates analysis demonstrated an HIV-1-related change in the microbiome that was associated with increased mucosal cellular immune activation, microbial translocation, and blood T-cell activation. These observations suggest that an important relationship exists between altered mucosal bacterial communities and intestinal inflammation during chronic HIV-1 infection. PMID:24399150

  3. An altered intestinal mucosal microbiome in HIV-1 infection is associated with mucosal and systemic immune activation and endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, SM; Lee, EJ; Kotter, CV; Austin, GL; Dong, Z; Hecht, DK; Gianella, S; Siewe, B; Smith, DM; Landay, AL; Robertson, CE; Frank, DN; Wilson, CC

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 infection disrupts the intestinal immune system, leading to microbial translocation and systemic immune activation. We investigated the impact of HIV-1 infection on the intestinal microbiome and its association with mucosal T cell and dendritic cell (DC) frequency and activation, as well as with levels of systemic T cell activation, inflammation and microbial translocation. Bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing was performed on colon biopsies and fecal samples from subjects with chronic, untreated HIV-1 infection and uninfected control subjects. Colon biopsies of HIV-1 infected subjects had increased abundances of Proteobacteria and decreased abundances of Firmicutes compared to uninfected donors. Furthermore at the genus level, a significant increase in Prevotella and decrease in Bacteroides was observed in HIV-1 infected subjects, indicating a disruption in the Bacteroidetes bacterial community structure. This HIV-1-associated increase in Prevotella abundance was associated with increased numbers of activated colonic T cells and myeloid DCs. Principal coordinates analysis demonstrated an HIV-1-related change in the microbiome that was associated with increased mucosal cellular immune activation, microbial translocation and blood T cell activation. These observations suggest that an important relationship exists between altered mucosal bacterial communities and intestinal inflammation during chronic HIV-1 infection. PMID:24399150

  4. Exosomes derived from HIV-1-infected cells contain trans-activation response element RNA.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Aarthi; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Das, Ravi; Van Duyne, Rachel; Santos, Steven; Jaworski, Elizabeth; Guendel, Irene; Sampey, Gavin; Dalby, Elizabeth; Iglesias-Ussel, Maria; Popratiloff, Anastas; Hakami, Ramin; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Young, Mary; Subra, Caroline; Gilbert, Caroline; Bailey, Charles; Romerio, Fabio; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2013-07-01

    Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles produced by healthy and virus-infected cells. Exosomes derived from infected cells have been shown to contain viral microRNAs (miRNAs). HIV-1 encodes its own miRNAs that regulate viral and host gene expression. The most abundant HIV-1-derived miRNA, first reported by us and later by others using deep sequencing, is the trans-activation response element (TAR) miRNA. In this study, we demonstrate the presence of TAR RNA in exosomes from cell culture supernatants of HIV-1-infected cells and patient sera. TAR miRNA was not in Ago2 complexes outside the exosomes but enclosed within the exosomes. We detected the host miRNA machinery proteins Dicer and Drosha in exosomes from infected cells. We report that transport of TAR RNA from the nucleus into exosomes is a CRM1 (chromosome region maintenance 1)-dependent active process. Prior exposure of naive cells to exosomes from infected cells increased susceptibility of the recipient cells to HIV-1 infection. Exosomal TAR RNA down-regulated apoptosis by lowering Bim and Cdk9 proteins in recipient cells. We found 10(4)-10(6) copies/ml TAR RNA in exosomes derived from infected culture supernatants and 10(3) copies/ml TAR RNA in the serum exosomes of highly active antiretroviral therapy-treated patients or long term nonprogressors. Taken together, our experiments demonstrated that HIV-1-infected cells produced exosomes that are uniquely characterized by their proteomic and RNA profiles that may contribute to disease pathology in AIDS. PMID:23661700

  5. Triple Activity of Lamivudine Releasing Sulfonated Polymers against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Danial, Maarten; Andersen, Anna H F; Zuwala, Kaja; Cosson, Steffen; Riber, Camilla Frich; Smith, Anton A A; Tolstrup, Martin; Moad, Graeme; Zelikin, Alexander N; Postma, Almar

    2016-07-01

    In this article a library of polymeric therapeutic agents against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is presented. The library of statistical copolymers of varied molar mass was synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. The synthesized polymers comprise pendent hydroxyl and sulfonated side chains as well as the reverse transcriptase prodrug lamivudine (3TC) attached via a disulfide self-immolative linker. The glutathione mediated release of 3TC is demonstrated as well as the antiviral efficacy against HIV entry and polymerase activity. Although a high degree of polymer sulfonation is required for effective HIV entry inhibition, polymers with approximately ∼50% sulfonated monomer demonstrated potent kinase independent reverse transcriptase inhibition. In addition, the sulfonated polymers demonstrate activity against DNA-DNA polymerase, which suggests that these polymers may exhibit activity against a broad spectrum of viruses. In summary, the polymers described provide a triple-active arsenal against HIV with extracellular activity via entry inhibition and intracellular activity by kinase-dependent lamivudine-based and kinase-independent sulfonated polymer based inhibition. Since these sulfonated copolymers are easily formulated into gels, we envision them to be particularly suited for topical application to prevent the mucosal transmission of viruses, particularly HIV. PMID:27244595

  6. Prevalence and distribution of the GBV-C/HGV among HIV-1-infected patients under anti-retroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Alcalde, Rosana; Nishiya, Anna; Casseb, Jorge; Inocêncio, Lilian; Fonseca, Luiz A M; Duarte, Alberto J S

    2010-08-01

    Infection with GB virus C (GBV-C) or hepatitis G virus (HGV) is highly prevalent among HIV/AIDS patients. GBV-C/HGV viremia has not been associated with liver disease and seems to slow HIV disease progression. To study the GBV-C/HGV genotypes prevalence among HIV/AIDS patients and its association with HIV viral load (VL) and CD4+ lymphocyte counts. From February 2003 to February 2004, we analyzed 210 HIV-1-infected subjects who were on anti-retroviral therapy (ART). For 63 of them a PCR-nested to the non-coding 5' (5'NCR) region of the GBV-C/HGV was done, and for 49 a DNA direct sequencing was done. A phylogenetic analysis was performed by PHYLIP program. 63 (30%) of the HIV-1-infected patients were co-infected with GBV-C/HGV. The phylogenetic analysis revealed the following genotypes (and respective relative frequencies): 1 (10%), 2a (41%), 2b (43%), and 3 (6%). Co-infected patients presented lower HIV-1 VL and higher T CD4+ lymphocyte cells counts as compared with patients negative for GBV-C/HGV sequences (log=4.52 vs. 4.71, p=0.036), and T CD4+ lymphocyte counts (cells/mm(3)=322.6 vs. 273.5, p=0.081, respectively). T CD4+ cells counts equal to, or higher than, 200/mm(3) were significantly more common among co-infected patients than among HIV-infected-only patients (p=0.042). The lowest T CD4+ cells counts were associated with genotype 1 and the highest with genotype 2b (p=0.05). The GBV-C/HGV infection prevalence was 30% among HIV-1-infected subjects, and was associated with lower VL and higher CD4+ lymphocyte counts. GBV-C/HGV genotype 2b may be associated with better immunological response. PMID:20420864

  7. Association between active GB virus-C (hepatitis G) infection and HIV-1 disease in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Yirrell, D L; Wright, E; Shafer, L A; Campbell, E; Van der Paal, L; Kaleebu, P; Grosskurth, H; Whitworth, J A

    2007-04-01

    Although not linked to a disease, GB virus-C viraemia has been associated with an improved prognosis in HIV-1-co-infected individuals. Most studies have been conducted on men (men who have sex with men or injection drug users) infected with HIV-1 subtype B, whereas here we report on both male and female subjects from rural Uganda, predominantly infected via the heterosexual route with HIV-1 subtypes A and D. In a longitudinal study of 272 participants, 47 were GBV-C positive and 181 negative, as determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, in both of two plasma samples taken a median of 5.0 years apart. The remainder either acquired (25) or cleared (19) infection. Multilevel regression analyses and Cox survival analyses revealed that participants chronically infected with GBV-C had a slower decline in CD4(+) T cells (P<0.001) and increased survival time (P=0.041) compared with GBV-C RNA-negative, HIV-positive adults. We show that the association between active GBV-C co-infection and improved survival of HIV-1-infected adults is not restricted to HIV subtype B, but is also observed in both males and females infected with HIV subtypes A and D. PMID:17509174

  8. HIV-1-inhibiting activity of the essential oil of Ridolfia segetum and Oenanthe crocata.

    PubMed

    Bicchi, Carlo; Rubiolo, Patrizia; Ballero, Mauro; Sanna, Cinzia; Matteodo, Maura; Esposito, Francesca; Zinzula, Luca; Tramontano, Enzo

    2009-10-01

    The essential oils of Ridolfia segetum (L.) Moris and Oenanthe crocata L. (Apiaceae), collected in Sardinia (Italy), have been assayed for two enzyme-associated activities of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT): RNA-dependent DNA polymerase (RDDP) activity and ribonuclease H (RNase H) activity. In biochemical assays, the essential oils inhibited HIV-1 RT RDDP activity in a dose-dependent manner, while they were inactive towards RNase H activity. Furthermore, the oils were cytotoxic towards K (562) cell replication. GC-MS analysis of the essential oils obtained by steam distillation of the aerial parts showed that the main components of R. segetum were alpha-phellandrene, alpha-terpinolene, beta-phellandrene, and dillapiol and those of O. crocata were sabinene, TRANS-beta-ocimene, CIS-beta-ocimene, and beta-pinene. PMID:19347799

  9. Synthesis and Anti-HIV-1 Evaluation of Some Novel MC-1220 Analogs as Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Loksha, Yasser M; Pedersen, Erik B; Loddo, Roberta; La Colla, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    Some novel MC-1220 analogs were synthesized by condensation of 4,6-dichloro-N-methylpyrimidin-2-amine derivatives (1a,b and 15) and/or 4-chloro-6-methoxy-N,N,5-trimethylpyrimidin-2-amine (2a) with the sodium salt of 2,6-difluorophenylacetonitrile followed by treatment with aqueous sodium hydroxide in methanol, alkylation, reduction, halogenation, and/or acidic hydrolysis. All synthesized compounds were evaluated for their activity against HIV-1. The most active compound in this study was compound 7, which showed activity against HIV-1 comparable to that of MC-1220. The only difference in structure between compound 7 and MC-1220 is a fluoro atom instead of a CH3 group. PMID:26996241

  10. Activation domains of transcription factors mediate replication dependent transcription from a minimal HIV-1 promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, R D; Lee, B A; Jackson, S P; Proudfoot, N J

    1996-01-01

    Transcription from a minimal HIV-1 promoter containing the three Sp1 binding sites and TATA box can be activated without Tat by template DNA replication. Here we show that this activation can also be mediated by recombinant GAL4 fusion proteins containing the activation domains of Sp1, VP16 or CTF (or by full-length GAL4) targeted to the HIV-1 promoter by replacing the Sp1 sites with five GAL4 binding sites. Thus Sp1 is not unique in its ability to mediate replication activated transcription, although the degree of processivity elicited by the different activators varied significantly from strongly processive (GAL4-VP16) to relatively non-processive (GAL4-Sp1 or -CTF). Processive GAL4-VP16-activated transcription, but not efficient initiation, required multiple GAL4 binding sites. In the presence of Tat, transcription with GAL4-SP1 and GAL4-CTF was further activated (principally at the level of processivity) but GAL4-VP16-potentiated transcription was only slightly stimulated. The Tat-dependent switch from non-processive to fully processive transcription was particularly marked for GAL4-Sp1, an effect which may be relevant to the selection of Sp1 binding sites by the HIV-1 promoter. PMID:8604293

  11. Effect of mimetic CDK9 inhibitors on HIV-1 activated transcription

    PubMed Central

    Van Duyne, Rachel; Guendel, Irene; Jaworski, Elizabeth; Sampey, Gavin; Klase, Zachary; Chen, Hao; Zeng, Chen; Kovalskyy, Dmytro; el Kouni, Mahmoud H.; Lepene, Benjamin; Patanarut, Alexis; Nekhai, Sergei; Price, David H.; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2013-01-01

    Potent antiretroviral therapy (ART) has transformed HIV-1 infection into a chronic manageable disease; however drug resistance remains a common problem that limits the effectiveness and clinical benefits of this type of treatment. The discovery of viral reservoirs in the body, in which HIV-1 may persist, has helped to explain why therapeutic eradication of HIV-1 has proved so difficult. In the current study we utilized a combination of structure based analysis of Cyclin/CDK complexes with our previously published Tat peptide derivatives. We modeled the Tat peptide inhibitors with CDKs and found a particular pocket which showed the most stable binding site (Cavity 1) using in silico analysis. Furthermore, we were able to find peptide mimetics that bound to similar regions using in silico searches of a chemical library, followed by cell based biological assays. Using these methods we obtained the first generation mimetic drugs and tested these compounds on HIV-1 LTR activated transcription. Using biological assays followed by similar in silico analysis to find a 2nd generation drugs resembling the original mimetic, we found the new targets of Cavity 1 and Cavity 2 regions on CDK9. We examined the 2nd generation mimetic against various viral isolates, and observed a generalized suppression of most HIV-1 isolates. Finally, the drug inhibited viral replication in humanized mouse models of Rag2-/-γc-/- with no toxicity to the animals at tested concentrations. Our results suggest that it may be possible to model peptide inhibitors into available crystal structures and further find drug mimetics using in silico analysis. PMID:23247501

  12. Characterization of RNA binding and chaperoning activities of HIV-1 Vif protein. Importance of the C-terminal unstructured tail.

    PubMed

    Sleiman, Dona; Bernacchi, Serena; Xavier Guerrero, Santiago; Brachet, Franck; Larue, Valéry; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Tisne, Carine

    2014-01-01

    The viral infectivity factor (Vif) is essential for the productive infection and dissemination of HIV-1 in non-permissive cells, containing the cellular anti-HIV defense cytosine deaminases APOBEC3 (A3G and A3F). Vif neutralizes the antiviral activities of the APOBEC3G/F by diverse mechanisms including their degradation through the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway and their translational inhibition. In addition, Vif appears to be an active partner of the late steps of viral replication by interacting with Pr55(Gag), reverse transcriptase and genomic RNA. Here, we expressed and purified full-length and truncated Vif proteins, and analyzed their RNA binding and chaperone properties. First, we showed by CD and NMR spectroscopies that the N-terminal domain of Vif is highly structured in solution, whereas the C-terminal domain remains mainly unfolded. Both domains exhibited substantial RNA binding capacities with dissociation constants in the nanomolar range, whereas the basic unfolded C-terminal domain of Vif was responsible in part for its RNA chaperone activity. Second, we showed by NMR chemical shift mapping that Vif and NCp7 share the same binding sites on tRNA(Lys) 3, the primer of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. Finally, our results indicate that Vif has potent RNA chaperone activity and provide direct evidence for an important role of the unstructured C-terminal domain of Vif in this capacity. PMID:25144404

  13. [Identification of Env-specific monoclonal antibodies from Chinese HIV-1 infected person by B cell activation and RT-PCR cloning].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Min; Xu, Ke; Yu, Shuang-Qing; Ding, Lin-Lin; Luo, Hai-Yan; Flinko, Robin; Lewis, George K; Feng, Xia; Shao, Ji-Rong; Guan, Yong-Jun; Zeng, Yi

    2012-06-01

    To obtain protective human monoclonal antibody from HIV-1 infected person, we adapted a technology for isolating antigen specific monoclonal antibody from human memory B cells through in vitro B cell activation coupled with RT-PCT and expression cloning. Human B cells were purified by negative sorting from PBMCs of HIV-1 infected individuals and memory B cells were further enriched using anti-CD27 microbeads. Two hundred memory B cells per well were cultured in 96-well round-bottom plates Env-specific antibodies in supernatants were with feeder cells in medium containing EBV and CpG. screened by ELISA after 1-2 weeks' culture. Cells from positive wells of Env-specific antibody were harvested and total RNA was isolated. Human VH and Vkappa or Vlambda genes were amplified by RT-PCR and cloned into IgG1 and kappa or lambda expressing vectors. Functional VH and Vkappa or Vlambda were identified by cotransfecting 293T cells with individual heavy chain and light chain clones followed by analysis of culture supernatants by ELISA for Env-specific antibodies. Finally, corresponding mAb was produced by transient transfection of 293T cells with the identified VH and Vkappa/lambda pair and purified by protein A affinity chromatography. Purified monocolonal antibodies were used for HIV-1 specific antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and neutralizing activity assay. Four monocolonal Env-specific antibodies were isolated from one HIV-1 subtype B' infected individual. Two of them showed strong ADCC activity and one showed weak neutralizing activity against HIV-1. Its further studies on their application in therapeutic or prophylactic vaccines against HIV-1 should be grounded. PMID:22978159

  14. Octanorcucurbitane and cucurbitane triterpenoids from the tubers of Hemsleya endecaphylla with HIV-1 inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Chao; Zhang, Gao-Hong; Zhang, Zhong-Quan; Qiu, Ming-Hua; Zheng, Yong-Tang; Yang, Liu-Meng; Yu, Kai-Bei

    2008-01-01

    Two new cucurbitacins, endecaphyllacins A (1) and B (2), together with six known analogues (3-8), were isolated from the tubers of Hemsleya endecaphylla. The structures of 1 and 2 were elucidated by NMR and MS spectroscopic analysis. The relative stereochemistry of 1 was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 4 (cucurbitacin B) showed potent anti-HIV-1 in C8166 cells (EC=0.09 microg/mL) with a selectivity index of 16.7. PMID:18088099

  15. Short communication: T cell activation in HIV-1/herpes simplex virus-2-coinfected Kenyan women receiving valacyclovir.

    PubMed

    Roxby, Alison C; Liu, Amy Y; Drake, Alison L; Kiarie, James N; Richardson, Barbra; Lohman-Payne, Barbara L; John-Stewart, Grace C; Wald, Anna; De Rosa, Stephen; Farquhar, Carey

    2013-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) suppression with acyclovir or valacyclovir reduces HIV-1 viral RNA levels; one hypothesis is that HSV-2 suppression reduces immune activation. We measured T cell immune activation markers among women participating in a randomized placebo-controlled trial of valacyclovir to reduce HIV-1 RNA levels among pregnant women. Although valacyclovir was associated with lower HIV-1 RNA levels, the distribution of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) CD38(+)HLA-DR(+) T cells was not different among women taking valacyclovir when compared to women taking placebo. Further study is needed to understand the mechanism of HIV-1 RNA reduction following herpes suppression among those coinfected with HIV-1 and HSV-2. PMID:22852760

  16. A Highly Conserved Residue of the HIV-1 gp120 Inner Domain Is Important for Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity Responses Mediated by Anti-cluster A Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shilei; Veillette, Maxime; Coutu, Mathieu; Prévost, Jérémie; Scharf, Louise; Bjorkman, Pamela J.; Ferrari, Guido; Robinson, James E.; Stürzel, Christina; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Sauter, Daniel; Kirchhoff, Frank; Lewis, George K.; Pazgier, Marzena

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that sera from HIV-1-infected individuals contain antibodies able to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). These antibodies preferentially recognize envelope glycoprotein (Env) epitopes induced upon CD4 binding. Here, we show that a highly conserved tryptophan at position 69 of the gp120 inner domain is important for ADCC mediated by anti-cluster A antibodies and sera from HIV-1-infected individuals. PMID:26637462

  17. Crystal structures of multidrug-resistant HIV-1 protease in complex with two potent anti-malarial compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Yong; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Woster, Patrick M.; Kovari, Ladislau C.; Gupta, Deepak

    2012-06-19

    Two potent inhibitors (compounds 1 and 2) of malarial aspartyl protease, plasmepsin-II, were evaluated against wild type (NL4-3) and multidrug-resistant clinical isolate 769 (MDR) variants of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) aspartyl protease. Enzyme inhibition assays showed that both 1 and 2 have better potency against NL4-3 than against MDR protease. Crystal structures of MDR protease in complex with 1 and 2 were solved and analyzed. Crystallographic analysis revealed that the MDR protease exhibits a typical wide-open conformation of the flaps (Gly48 to Gly52) causing an overall expansion in the active site cavity, which, in turn caused unstable binding of the inhibitors. Due to the expansion of the active site cavity, both compounds showed loss of direct contacts with the MDR protease compared to the docking models of NL4-3. Multiple water molecules showed a rich network of hydrogen bonds contributing to the stability of the ligand binding in the distorted binding pockets of the MDR protease in both crystal structures. Docking analysis of 1 and 2 showed a decrease in the binding affinity for both compounds against MDR supporting our structure-function studies. Thus, compounds 1 and 2 show promising inhibitory activity against HIV-1 protease variants and hence are good candidates for further development to enhance their potency against NL4-3 as well as MDR HIV-1 protease variants.

  18. Cordysobin, a novel alkaline serine protease with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory activity from the medicinal mushroom Cordyceps sobolifera.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shou-Xian; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Guo-Qing; Zhao, Shuang; Xu, Feng; Geng, Xiao-Li; Wang, He-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    A novel serine protease, designated as cordysobin, was purified from dried fruiting bodies of the mushroom Cordyceps sobolifera. The isolation procedure utilized ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and SP-Sepharose followed by gel filtration on Superdex 75. The protease did not adsorb on DEAE-cellulose but bound to SP-Sepharose. In sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), the protease resolved as a single band with an apparent molecular mass of 31 kDa. Its optimal pH was 10.0, and the optimal temperature was 65°C. The protease displayed a K(m) value of 0.41 μM and 13.44 μM·min⁻¹ using Suc-Leu-Leu-Val-Tyr-MCA as substrate at pH 10.0 and 37°C. Protease activity was enhanced by the Fe²⁺ ion at low concentration range of 1.25-10 mM and was strongly inhibited by Hg²⁺ up to 1.25 mM. The protease was strongly inhibited by chymostatin and phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), suggesting that it is a serine protease. It manifested significant inhibitory activity toward HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) with an IC₅₀ value of 8.2×10⁻³ μM, which is the highest anti-HIV-1 RT activity of reported mushroom proteins. PMID:22014786

  19. Multiple Protein Kinases via Activation of Transcription Factors NF-κB, AP-1 and C/EBP-δ Regulate the IL-6/IL-8 Production by HIV-1 Vpr in Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gangwani, Mohitkumar R.; Kumar, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Neurocognitive impairments affect a substantial population of HIV-1 infected individuals despite the success of anti-retroviral therapy in controlling viral replication. Astrocytes are emerging as a crucial cell type that might be playing a very important role in the persistence of neuroinflammation seen in patients suffering from HIV-1 associated neurocognitive disorders. HIV-1 viral proteins including Vpr exert neurotoxicity through direct and indirect mechanisms. Induction of IL-8 in microglial cells has been shown as one of the indirect mechanism through which Vpr reduces neuronal survival. We show that HIV-1 Vpr induces IL-6 and IL-8 in astrocytes in a time-dependent manner. Additional experiments utilizing chemical inhibitors and siRNA revealed that HIV-1 Vpr activates transcription factors NF-κB, AP-1 and C/EBP-δ via upstream protein kinases PI3K/Akt, p38-MAPK and Jnk-MAPK leading to the induction of IL-6 and IL-8 in astrocytes. We demonstrate that one of the mechanism for neuroinflammation seen in HIV-1 infected individuals involves induction of IL-6 and IL-8 by Vpr in astrocytes. Understanding the molecular pathways involved in the HIV-1 neuroinflammation would be helpful in the design of adjunct therapy to ameliorate some of the symptoms associated with HIV-1 neuropathogenesis. PMID:26270987

  20. Oocyte activation and latent HIV-1 reactivation: AMPK as a common mechanism of action linking the beginnings of life and the potential eradication of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Finley, Jahahreeh

    2016-08-01

    In all mammalian species studied to date, the initiation of oocyte activation is orchestrated through alterations in intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling. Upon sperm binding to the oocyte plasma membrane, a sperm-associated phospholipase C (PLC) isoform, PLC zeta (PLCζ), is released into the oocyte cytoplasm. PLCζ hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to produce diacylglycerol (DAG), which activates protein kinase C (PKC), and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3), which induces the release of Ca(2+) from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) stores. Subsequent Ca(2+) oscillations are generated that drive oocyte activation to completion. Ca(2+) ionophores such as ionomycin have been successfully used to induce artificial human oocyte activation, facilitating fertilization during intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) procedures. Early studies have also demonstrated that the PKC activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) acts synergistically with Ca(2+) ionophores to induce parthenogenetic activation of mouse oocytes. Interestingly, the Ca(2+)-induced signaling cascade characterizing sperm or chemically-induced oocyte activation, i.e. the "shock and live" approach, bears a striking resemblance to the reactivation of latently infected HIV-1 viral reservoirs via the so called "shock and kill" approach, a method currently being pursued to eradicate HIV-1 from infected individuals. PMA and ionomycin combined, used as positive controls in HIV-1 latency reversal studies, have been shown to be extremely efficient in reactivating latent HIV-1 in CD4(+) memory T cells by inducing T cell activation. Similar to oocyte activation, T cell activation by PMA and ionomycin induces an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations and activation of DAG, PKC, and downstream Ca(2+)-dependent signaling pathways necessary for proviral transcription. Interestingly, AMPK, a master regulator of cell metabolism that is activated thorough the induction of cellular

  1. Validation of a computed radiography device to monitor the HIV-1 RNase H activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, F.; Fanti, V.; Marzeddu, R.; Randaccio, P.; Tramontano, E.; Zinzula, L.

    2009-08-01

    A commercially available computed radiography (CR) system for dental radiography was used to produce images from radiolabeled polyacrilamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) assays. Typically, similar investigations require specific and expensive autoradiography devices. The CR unit was characterized in terms of sensitivity and fading by means of a 90Sr source that well simulates the experimental conditions, and then used for quantitative analyses of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) polymerase-independent ribonuclease H (RNase H) activity monitored by PAGE analysis. The results showed that the present methodology allows quantifying effectively the RNase H catalyses and that the obtained data are in good agreement with previous reference works. Finally, in order to further validate the present method in terms of relationship between enzyme activity, the rate of products formation and signal intensity, a PAGE analyses of the HIV-1 RNase H inhibition by the known diketo acid derivative RDS1643 was carried out.

  2. The broad anti-viral agent glycyrrhizin directly modulates the fluidity of plasma membrane and HIV-1 envelope

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Cell entry of enveloped viruses requires a wide-fusion-pore mechanism, involving clustering of fusion-activated proteins and fluidization of the plasma membrane and viral envelope. In the present study, GL (glycyrrhizin) is reported to lower membrane fluidity, thus suppressing infection by HIV, influenza A virus and vesicular stomatitis virus, but not by poliovirus. GL-treated HIV-1 particles showed reduced infectivity. GL also inhibited cell-to-cell fusion induced by HIV-1 and HTLV-I (human T-cell leukaemia virus type I). However, when cells treated with 1 mg/ml GL were placed in GL-free medium, they showed increased susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and HTLV-I fusion due to enhancement of membrane fluidity. The membrane dependence of GL and GL removal experiments suggest that GL does affect the cell entry of viruses. HIVs with more gp120 were less dependent on temperature and less sensitive to GL treatment than those with less gp120, indicating that the existence of more gp120 molecules resulted in a higher probability of forming a cluster of fusion-activated proteins. PMID:16053446

  3. Cytotoxic, Cytostatic and HIV-1 PR Inhibitory Activities of the Soft Coral Litophyton arboreum

    PubMed Central

    Ellithey, Mona S.; Lall, Namrita; Hussein, Ahmed A.; Meyer, Debra

    2013-01-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation using different chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques in the analysis of the Red Sea soft coral Litophyton arboreum led to the isolation of nine compounds; sarcophytol M (1), alismol (2), 24-methylcholesta-5,24(28)-diene-3β-ol (3), 10-O-methyl alismoxide (4), alismoxide (5), (S)-chimyl alcohol (6), 7β-acetoxy-24-methylcholesta-5-24(28)-diene-3,19-diol (7), erythro-N-dodecanoyl-docosasphinga-(4E,8E)-dienine (8), and 24-methylcholesta-5,24(28)-diene-3β,7β,19-triol (9). Some of the isolated compounds demonstrated potent cytotoxic- and/or cytostatic activity against HeLa and U937 cancer cell lines and inhibitory activity against HIV-1 protease (PR). Compound 7 was strongly cytotoxic against HeLa cells (CC50 4.3 ± 0.75 µM), with selectivity index of SI 8.1, which was confirmed by real time cell electronic sensing (RT-CES). Compounds 2, 7, and 8 showed strong inhibitory activity against HIV-1 PR at IC50s of 7.20 ± 0.7, 4.85 ± 0.18, and 4.80 ± 0.92 µM respectively. In silico docking of most compounds presented comparable scores to that of acetyl pepstatin, a known HIV-1 PR inhibitor. Interestingly, compound 8 showed potent HIV-1 PR inhibitory activity in the absence of cytotoxicity against the cell lines used. In addition, compounds 2 and 5 demonstrated cytostatic action in HeLa cells, revealing potential use in virostatic cocktails. Taken together, data presented here suggest Litophyton arboreum to contain promising compounds for further investigation against the diseases mentioned. PMID:24336129

  4. Synergistic activity profile of griffithsin in combination with tenofovir, maraviroc and enfuvirtide against HIV-1 clade C

    SciTech Connect

    Ferir, Geoffrey; Palmer, Kenneth E.; Schols, Dominique

    2011-09-01

    Griffithsin (GRFT) is possibly the most potent anti-HIV peptide found in natural sources. Due to its potent and broad-spectrum antiviral activity and unique safety profile it has great potential as topical microbicide component. Here, we evaluated various combinations of GRFT against HIV-1 clade B and clade C isolates in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and in CD4{sup +} MT-4 cells. In all combinations tested, GRFT showed synergistic activity profile with tenofovir, maraviroc and enfuvirtide based on the median effect principle with combination indices (CI) varying between 0.34 and 0.79 at the calculated EC{sub 95} level. Furthermore, the different glycosylation patterns on the viral envelope of clade B and clade C gp120 had no observable effect on the synergistic interactions. Overall, we can conclude that the evaluated two-drug combination increases their antiviral potency and supports further clinical investigations in pre-exposure prophylaxis for GRFT combinations in the context of HIV-1 clade C infection.

  5. Defining the level of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease activity required for HIV-1 particle maturation and infectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Rosé, J R; Babé, L M; Craik, C S

    1995-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease is the enzyme required for processing of the Gag and Gag-Pol polyproteins to yield mature, infectious virions. Although the complete absence of proteolytic activity prevents maturation, the level of activity sufficient for maturation and subsequent infectivity has not been determined. Amino acid substitutions that reduce catalytic activity without affecting substrate recognition have been engineered into the active site of the HIV-1 protease. The catalytic efficiency (kcat) of the HIV-1 protease is decreased 4-fold when threonine 26 is replaced by serine (T26S) and approximately 50-fold when alanine 28 is replaced by serine (A28S). Genes containing these mutations were cloned into a proviral vector for analysis of their effects on virion maturation and infectivity. The results show that virions containing the T26S protease variant, in which only 25% of the protease is active, are very similar to wild-type virions, although slight reductions in infectivity are observed. Virions containing the A28S protease variant are not infectious, even though a limited amount of polyprotein processing does occur. There appears to be a linear correlation between the level of protease activity and particle infectivity. Our observations suggest that a threshold of protease activity exists between a 4-fold and 50-fold reduction, below which processing is insufficient to yield infectious particles. Our data also suggest that a reduction of protease activity by 50-fold or greater is sufficient to prevent the formation of infectious particles. PMID:7535864

  6. Specific Elimination of Latently HIV-1 Infected Cells Using HIV-1 Protease-Sensitive Toxin Nanocapsules

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jing; Yan, Ming; Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Xie, Yiming; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs suppress HIV-1 plasma viremia to undetectable levels; however, latent HIV-1 persists in reservoirs within HIV-1-infected patients. The silent provirus can be activated through the use of drugs, including protein kinase C activators and histone deacetylase inhibitors. This “shock” approach is then followed by “kill” of the producing cells either through direct HIV-1-induced cell death or natural immune mechanisms. However, these mechanisms are relatively slow and effectiveness is unclear. Here, we develop an approach to specifically target and kill cells that are activated early in the process of virus production. We utilize a novel nanocapsule technology whereby the ricin A chain is encapsulated in an inactive form within a polymer shell. Specificity for release of the ricin A toxin is conferred by peptide crosslinkers that are sensitive to cleavage by HIV-1 protease. By using well-established latent infection models, J-Lat and U1 cells, we demonstrate that only within an HIV-1-producing cell expressing functional HIV-1 protease will the nanocapsule release its ricin A cargo, shutting down viral and cellular protein synthesis, and ultimately leading to rapid death of the producer cell. Thus, we provide proof of principle for a novel technology to kill HIV-1-producing cells without effects on non-target cells. PMID:27049645

  7. Specific Elimination of Latently HIV-1 Infected Cells Using HIV-1 Protease-Sensitive Toxin Nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Yan, Ming; Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Xie, Yiming; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S Y

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs suppress HIV-1 plasma viremia to undetectable levels; however, latent HIV-1 persists in reservoirs within HIV-1-infected patients. The silent provirus can be activated through the use of drugs, including protein kinase C activators and histone deacetylase inhibitors. This "shock" approach is then followed by "kill" of the producing cells either through direct HIV-1-induced cell death or natural immune mechanisms. However, these mechanisms are relatively slow and effectiveness is unclear. Here, we develop an approach to specifically target and kill cells that are activated early in the process of virus production. We utilize a novel nanocapsule technology whereby the ricin A chain is encapsulated in an inactive form within a polymer shell. Specificity for release of the ricin A toxin is conferred by peptide crosslinkers that are sensitive to cleavage by HIV-1 protease. By using well-established latent infection models, J-Lat and U1 cells, we demonstrate that only within an HIV-1-producing cell expressing functional HIV-1 protease will the nanocapsule release its ricin A cargo, shutting down viral and cellular protein synthesis, and ultimately leading to rapid death of the producer cell. Thus, we provide proof of principle for a novel technology to kill HIV-1-producing cells without effects on non-target cells. PMID:27049645

  8. Activation and lysis of human CD4 cells latently infected with HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Pegu, Amarendra; Asokan, Mangaiarkarasi; Wu, Lan; Wang, Keyun; Hataye, Jason; Casazza, Joseph P.; Guo, Xiaoti; Shi, Wei; Georgiev, Ivelin; Zhou, Tongqing; Chen, Xuejun; O'Dell, Sijy; Todd, John-Paul; Kwong, Peter D.; Rao, Srinivas S.; Yang, Zhi-yong; Koup, Richard A.; Mascola, John R.; Nabel, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of AIDS with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) remains lifelong largely because the virus persists in latent reservoirs. Elimination of latently infected cells could therefore reduce treatment duration and facilitate immune reconstitution. Here we report an approach to reduce the viral reservoir by activating dormant viral gene expression and directing T lymphocytes to lyse previously latent, HIV-1-infected cells. An immunomodulatory protein was created that combines the specificity of a HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibody with that of an antibody to the CD3 component of the T-cell receptor. CD3 engagement by the protein can stimulate T-cell activation that induces proviral gene expression in latently infected T cells. It further stimulates CD8 T-cell effector function and redirects T cells to lyse these previously latent-infected cells through recognition of newly expressed Env. This immunomodulatory protein could potentially help to eliminate latently infected cells and deplete the viral reservoir in HIV-1-infected individuals. PMID:26485194

  9. Carbohydrate-functionalized nanovaccines preserve HIV-1 antigen stability and activate antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Vela Ramirez, J E; Roychoudhury, R; Habte, H H; Cho, M W; Pohl, N L B; Narasimhan, B

    2014-01-01

    The functionalization of polymeric nanoparticles with ligands that target specific receptors on immune cells offers the opportunity to tailor adjuvant properties by conferring pathogen mimicking attributes to the particles. Polyanhydride nanoparticles are promising vaccine adjuvants with desirable characteristics such as immunomodulation, sustained antigen release, activation of antigen presenting cells (APCs), and stabilization of protein antigens. These capabilities can be exploited to design nanovaccines against viral pathogens, such as HIV-1, due to the important role of dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages in viral spread. In this work, an optimized process was developed for carbohydrate functionalization of HIV-1 antigen-loaded polyanhydride nanoparticles. The carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles preserved antigenic properties upon release and also enabled sustained antigen release kinetics. Particle internalization was observed to be chemistry-dependent with positively charged nanoparticles being taken up more efficiently by DCs. Up-regulation of the activation makers CD40 and CD206 was demonstrated with carboxymethyl-α-d-mannopyranosyl-(1,2)-d-mannopyranoside functionalized nanoparticles. The secretion of the cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α was shown to be chemistry-dependent upon stimulation with carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles. These results offer important new insights upon the interactions between carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles and APCs and provide foundational information for the rational design of targeted nanovaccines against HIV-1. PMID:25068589

  10. Carbohydrate-functionalized nanovaccines preserve HIV-1 antigen stability and activate antigen presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Vela Ramirez, J.E.; Roychoudhury, R.; Habte, H.H.; Cho, M. W.; Pohl, N. L. B.; Narasimhan, B.

    2015-01-01

    The functionalization of polymeric nanoparticles with ligands that target specific receptors on immune cells offers the opportunity to tailor adjuvant properties by conferring pathogen mimicking attributes to the particles. Polyanhydride nanoparticles are promising vaccine adjuvants with desirable characteristics such as immunomodulation, sustained antigen release, activation of antigen presenting cells, and stabilization of protein antigens. These capabilities can be exploited to design nanovaccines against viral pathogens, such as HIV-1, due to the important role of dendritic cells and macrophages in viral spread. In this work, an optimized process was developed for carbohydrate functionalization of HIV-1 antigen-loaded polyanhydride nanoparticles. The carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles preserved antigenic properties upon release and also enabled sustained antigen release kinetics. Particle internalization was observed to be chemistry-dependent with positively charged nanoparticles being taken up more efficiently by dendritic cells. Up-regulation of the activation makers CD40 and CD206 was demonstrated with carboxymethyl-α-d-mannopyranosyl-(1,2)-d-mannopyranoside functionalized nanoparticles. The secretion of the cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α was shown to be chemistry-dependent upon stimulation with carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles. These results offer important new insights upon the interactions between carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles and antigen presenting cells and provide foundational information for the rational design of targeted nanovaccines against HIV-1. PMID:25068589

  11. The HIV-1 Tat Protein Has a Versatile Role in Activating Viral Transcription ▿

    PubMed Central

    Das, Atze T.; Harwig, Alex; Berkhout, Ben

    2011-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that the Tat protein has a pivotal role in HIV-1 replication because it stimulates transcription from the viral long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter by binding to the TAR hairpin in the nascent RNA transcript. However, a multitude of additional Tat functions have been suggested. The importance of these functions is difficult to assess in replication studies with Tat-mutated HIV-1 variants because of the dominant negative effect on viral gene expression. We therefore used an HIV-1 construct that does not depend on the Tat-TAR interaction for transcription to reevaluate whether or not Tat has a second essential function in HIV-1 replication. This HIV-rtTA variant uses the incorporated Tet-On gene expression system for activation of transcription and replicates efficiently upon complete TAR deletion. Here we demonstrated that Tat inactivation does nevertheless severely inhibit replication. Upon long-term culturing, the Tat-minus HIV-rtTA variant acquired mutations in the U3 region that improved promoter activity and reestablished replication. We showed that in the absence of a functional TAR, Tat remains important for viral transcription via Sp1 sequence elements in the U3 promoter region. Substitution of these U3 sequences with nonrelated promoter elements created a virus that replicates efficiently without Tat in SupT1 T cells. These results indicate that Tat has a versatile role in transcription via TAR and U3 elements. The results also imply that Tat has no other essential function in viral replication in cultured T cells. PMID:21752913

  12. APOBEC3G inhibits HIV-1 RNA elongation by inactivating the viral trans-activation response element.

    PubMed

    Nowarski, Roni; Prabhu, Ponnandy; Kenig, Edan; Smith, Yoav; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Kotler, Moshe

    2014-07-29

    Deamination of cytidine residues in viral DNA is a major mechanism by which APOBEC3G (A3G) inhibits vif-deficient human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. dC-to-dU transition following RNase-H activity leads to viral cDNA degradation, production of non-functional proteins, formation of undesired stop codons and decreased viral protein synthesis. Here, we demonstrate that A3G provides an additional layer of defense against HIV-1 infection dependent on inhibition of proviral transcription. HIV-1 transcription elongation is regulated by the trans-activation response (TAR) element, a short stem-loop RNA structure required for elongation factors binding. Vif-deficient HIV-1-infected cells accumulate short viral transcripts and produce lower amounts of full-length HIV-1 transcripts due to A3G deamination of the TAR apical loop cytidine, highlighting the requirement for TAR loop integrity in HIV-1 transcription. We further show that free single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) termini are not essential for A3G activity and a gap of CCC motif blocked with juxtaposed DNA or RNA on either or 3'+5' ends is sufficient for A3G deamination. These results identify A3G as an efficient mutator and that deamination of (-)SSDNA results in an early block of HIV-1 transcription. PMID:24859335

  13. APOBEC3G Inhibits HIV-1 RNA Elongation by Inactivating the Viral Trans-Activation Response Element

    PubMed Central

    Nowarski, Roni; Prabhu, Ponnandy; Kenig, Edan; Smith, Yoav; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Kotler, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    Deamination of cytidine residues in viral DNA (vDNA) is a major mechanism by which APOBEC3G (A3G) inhibits vif-deficient HIV-1 replication. dC to dU transition following RNase-H activity leads to viral cDNA degradation, production of non-functional proteins, formation of undesired stop codons and decreased viral protein synthesis. Here we demonstrate that A3G provides an additional layer of defence against HIV-1 infection dependent on inhibition of proviral transcription. HIV-1 transcription elongation is regulated by the trans-activation response (TAR) element, a short stem-loop RNA structure required for elongation factors binding. Vif-deficient HIV-1-infected cells accumulate short viral transcripts and produce lower amounts of full-length HIV-1 transcripts due to A3G deamination of the TAR apical loop cytidine, highlighting the requirement for TAR loop integrity in HIV-1 transcription. Finally, we show that free ssDNA termini are not essential for A3G activity and a gap of CCC motif blocked with juxtaposed DNA or RNA on either or 3′+5′ ends is sufficient for A3G deamination, identifying A3G as an efficient mutator, and that deamination of (−)SSDNA results in an early block of HIV-1 transcription. PMID:24859335

  14. Low SAMHD1 expression following T-cell activation and proliferation renders CD4+ T cells susceptible to HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Ruffin, Nicolas; Brezar, Vedran; Ayinde, Diana; Lefebvre, Cécile; Wiesch, Julian Schulze Zur; van Lunzen, Jan; Bockhorn, Maximilian; Schwartz, Olivier; Hocini, Hakim; Lelievre, Jean-Daniel; Banchereau, Jacques; Levy, Yves; Seddiki, Nabila

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: HIV-1 replication depends on the state of cell activation and division. It is established that SAMHD1 restricts HIV-1 infection of resting CD4+ T cells. The modulation of SAMHD1 expression during T-cell activation and proliferation, however, remains unclear, as well as a role for SAMHD1 during HIV-1 pathogenesis. Methods: SAMHD1 expression was assessed in CD4+ T cells after their activation and in-vitro HIV-1 infection. We performed phenotype analyzes using flow cytometry on CD4+ T cells from peripheral blood and lymph nodes from cohorts of HIV-1-infected individuals under antiretroviral treatment or not, and controls. Results: We show that SAMHD1 expression decreased during CD4+ T-cell proliferation in association with an increased susceptibility to in-vitro HIV-1 infection. Additionally, circulating memory CD4+ T cells are enriched in cells with low levels of SAMHD1. These SAMHD1low cells are highly differentiated, exhibit a large proportion of Ki67+ cycling cells and are enriched in T-helper 17 cells. Importantly, memory SAMHD1low cells were depleted from peripheral blood of HIV-infected individuals. We also found that follicular helper T cells present in secondary lymphoid organs lacked the expression of SAMHD1, which was accompanied by a higher susceptibility to HIV-1 infection in vitro. Conclusion: We demonstrate that SAMHD1 expression is decreased during CD4+ T-cell activation and proliferation. Also, CD4+ T-cell subsets known to be more susceptible to HIV-1 infection, for example, T-helper 17 and follicular helper T cells, display lower levels of SAMHD1. These results pin point a role for SAMHD1 expression in HIV-1 infection and the concomitant depletion of CD4+ T cells. PMID:25715102

  15. Exhaustion of Activated CD8 T Cells Predicts Disease Progression in Primary HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hickling, Stephen; Hurst, Jacob; Meyerowitz, Jodi; Willberg, Christian B.; Robinson, Nicola; Brown, Helen; Kinloch, Sabine; Babiker, Abdel; Nwokolo, Nneka; Fox, Julie; Fidler, Sarah; Phillips, Rodney; Frater, John

    2016-01-01

    The rate at which HIV-1 infected individuals progress to AIDS is highly variable and impacted by T cell immunity. CD8 T cell inhibitory molecules are up-regulated in HIV-1 infection and associate with immune dysfunction. We evaluated participants (n = 122) recruited to the SPARTAC randomised clinical trial to determine whether CD8 T cell exhaustion markers PD-1, Lag-3 and Tim-3 were associated with immune activation and disease progression. Expression of PD-1, Tim-3, Lag-3 and CD38 on CD8 T cells from the closest pre-therapy time-point to seroconversion was measured by flow cytometry, and correlated with surrogate markers of HIV-1 disease (HIV-1 plasma viral load (pVL) and CD4 T cell count) and the trial endpoint (time to CD4 count <350 cells/μl or initiation of antiretroviral therapy). To explore the functional significance of these markers, co-expression of Eomes, T-bet and CD39 was assessed. Expression of PD-1 on CD8 and CD38 CD8 T cells correlated with pVL and CD4 count at baseline, and predicted time to the trial endpoint. Lag-3 expression was associated with pVL but not CD4 count. For all exhaustion markers, expression of CD38 on CD8 T cells increased the strength of associations. In Cox models, progression to the trial endpoint was most marked for PD-1/CD38 co-expressing cells, with evidence for a stronger effect within 12 weeks from confirmed diagnosis of PHI. The effect of PD-1 and Lag-3 expression on CD8 T cells retained statistical significance in Cox proportional hazards models including antiretroviral therapy and CD4 count, but not pVL as co-variants. Expression of ‘exhaustion’ or ‘immune checkpoint’ markers in early HIV-1 infection is associated with clinical progression and is impacted by immune activation and the duration of infection. New markers to identify exhausted T cells and novel interventions to reverse exhaustion may inform the development of novel immunotherapeutic approaches. PMID:27415828

  16. Exhaustion of Activated CD8 T Cells Predicts Disease Progression in Primary HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Matthias; Pantazis, Nikos; Martin, Genevieve E; Hickling, Stephen; Hurst, Jacob; Meyerowitz, Jodi; Willberg, Christian B; Robinson, Nicola; Brown, Helen; Fisher, Martin; Kinloch, Sabine; Babiker, Abdel; Weber, Jonathan; Nwokolo, Nneka; Fox, Julie; Fidler, Sarah; Phillips, Rodney; Frater, John

    2016-07-01

    The rate at which HIV-1 infected individuals progress to AIDS is highly variable and impacted by T cell immunity. CD8 T cell inhibitory molecules are up-regulated in HIV-1 infection and associate with immune dysfunction. We evaluated participants (n = 122) recruited to the SPARTAC randomised clinical trial to determine whether CD8 T cell exhaustion markers PD-1, Lag-3 and Tim-3 were associated with immune activation and disease progression. Expression of PD-1, Tim-3, Lag-3 and CD38 on CD8 T cells from the closest pre-therapy time-point to seroconversion was measured by flow cytometry, and correlated with surrogate markers of HIV-1 disease (HIV-1 plasma viral load (pVL) and CD4 T cell count) and the trial endpoint (time to CD4 count <350 cells/μl or initiation of antiretroviral therapy). To explore the functional significance of these markers, co-expression of Eomes, T-bet and CD39 was assessed. Expression of PD-1 on CD8 and CD38 CD8 T cells correlated with pVL and CD4 count at baseline, and predicted time to the trial endpoint. Lag-3 expression was associated with pVL but not CD4 count. For all exhaustion markers, expression of CD38 on CD8 T cells increased the strength of associations. In Cox models, progression to the trial endpoint was most marked for PD-1/CD38 co-expressing cells, with evidence for a stronger effect within 12 weeks from confirmed diagnosis of PHI. The effect of PD-1 and Lag-3 expression on CD8 T cells retained statistical significance in Cox proportional hazards models including antiretroviral therapy and CD4 count, but not pVL as co-variants. Expression of 'exhaustion' or 'immune checkpoint' markers in early HIV-1 infection is associated with clinical progression and is impacted by immune activation and the duration of infection. New markers to identify exhausted T cells and novel interventions to reverse exhaustion may inform the development of novel immunotherapeutic approaches. PMID:27415828

  17. Virion encapsidated HIV-1 Vpr induces NFAT to prime non-activated T cells for productive infection

    PubMed Central

    Höhne, Kristin; Businger, Ramona; van Nuffel, Anouk; Bolduan, Sebastian; Koppensteiner, Herwig; Baeyens, Ann; Vermeire, Jolien; Malatinkova, Eva; Verhasselt, Bruno; Schindler, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The majority of T cells encountered by HIV-1 are non-activated and do not readily allow productive infection. HIV-1 Vpr is highly abundant in progeny virions, and induces signalling and HIV-1 LTR transcription. We hence hypothesized that Vpr might be a determinant of non-activated T-cell infection. Virion-delivered Vpr activated nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) through Ca2+ influx and interference with the NFAT export kinase GSK3β. This leads to NFAT translocation and accumulation within the nucleus and was required for productive infection of unstimulated primary CD4+ T cells. A mutagenesis approach revealed correlation of Vpr-mediated NFAT activation with its ability to enhance LTR transcription and mediate cell cycle arrest. Upon NFAT inhibition, Vpr did not augment resting T-cell infection, and showed reduced G2/M arrest and LTR transactivation. Altogether, Vpr renders unstimulated T cells more permissive for productive HIV-1 infection and stimulates activation of productively infected as well as virus-exposed T cells. Therefore, it could be involved in the establishment and reactivation of HIV-1 from viral reservoirs and might have an impact on the levels of immune activation, which are determinants of HIV-1 pathogenesis. PMID:27383627

  18. Immune-Based Approaches to the Prevention of Mother-to-child-Transmission of HIV-1: Active and Passive Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Lohman-Payne, Barb; Slyker, Jennifer; Rowland-Jones, Sarah L.

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Despite more than two decades of research, an effective vaccine that can prevent HIV-1 infection in populations exposed to the virus remains elusive. In the pursuit of an HIV-1 vaccine, does prevention of exposure to maternal HIV-1 in utero, at birth or in early life through breast-milk require special consideration? In this article we will review what is known about the immune mechanisms of susceptibility and resistance to mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV-1 and will summarise studies that have used passive or active immunisation strategies to interrupt -MTCT of HIV-1. We will also describe potentially modifiable infectious co-factors that may enhance transmission and/or disease progression (especially in the developing world). Ultimately an effective prophylactic vaccine against HIV-1 infection will need to be deployed as part of the Extended Programme of Immunisation (EPI) recommended by the World Health Organisation (WHO) for use in developing countries, so it is important to understand how the infant immune system responds to HIV-1 antigens, both in natural infection and presented by candidate vaccines. PMID:21078451

  19. A continuous enzyme-coupled assay for triphosphohydrolase activity of HIV-1 restriction factor SAMHD1.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Laurence H; Kunzelmann, Simone; Webb, Martin R; Taylor, Ian A

    2015-01-01

    The development of deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP)-based drugs requires a quantitative understanding of any inhibition, activation, or hydrolysis by off-target cellular enzymes. SAMHD1 is a regulatory dNTP-triphosphohydrolase that inhibits HIV-1 replication in human myeloid cells. We describe here an enzyme-coupled assay for quantifying the activation, inhibition, and hydrolysis of dNTPs, nucleotide analogues, and nucleotide analogue inhibitors by triphosphohydrolase enzymes. The assay facilitates mechanistic studies of triphosphohydrolase enzymes and the quantification of off-target effects of nucleotide-based antiviral and chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:25331707

  20. 1,6-Bis[(benzyloxy)methyl]uracil derivatives-Novel antivirals with activity against HIV-1 and influenza H1N1 virus.

    PubMed

    Geisman, Alexander N; Valuev-Elliston, Vladimir T; Ozerov, Alexander A; Khandazhinskaya, Anastasia L; Chizhov, Alexander O; Kochetkov, Sergey N; Pannecouque, Christophe; Naesens, Lieve; Seley-Radtke, Katherine L; Novikov, Mikhail S

    2016-06-01

    A series of 1,6-bis[(benzyloxy)methyl]uracil derivatives combining structural features of both diphenyl ether and pyridone types of NNRTIs were synthesized. Target compounds were found to inhibit HIV-1 reverse transcriptase at micro- and submicromolar levels of concentrations and exhibited anti-HIV-1 activity in MT-4 cell culture, demonstrating resistance profile similar to first generation NNRTIs. The synthesized compounds also showed profound activity against influenza virus (H1N1) in MDCK cell culture without detectable cytotoxicity. The lead compound of this assay appeared to exceed rimantadine, amantadine, ribavirin and oseltamivir carboxylate in activity. The mechanism of action of 1,6-bis[(benzyloxy)methyl]uracils against influenza virus is currently under investigation. PMID:27112451

  1. A simplified and less expensive strategy for confirming anti HIV-1 screening results in a diagnostic laboratory in Lubumbashi, Zaire.

    PubMed

    Laleman, G; Kambale, M; Van Kerckhoven, I; Kapila, N; Konde, M; Selemani, U; Piot, P; van der Groen, G

    1991-12-01

    The conventional algorithm for HIV testing based on the confirmation of all positive anti-HIV screening reactions by Western blot (WB) is too expensive for developing countries. We investigated the validity of confirming positive screening assay reactions by a second screening test, limiting the use of the supplemental assay to the discrepant test results (algorithm 3), or screening all sera with 2 different assays and retesting all discrepant results by a supplemental assay (algorithm 4) on a panel of 519 sera in a regional reference laboratory in Lubumbashi, Zaire. Combining the Vironostika anti-HTLV-III ELISA with HIV Chek 1 + 2 or Clonatec Rapid HIV 1/2 Ab on all samples and retesting the discrepant results in WB or a line immunoassay (INNO-LIA) (algorithm 4), yielded a sensitivity of 100% and specificities of 98.4% and 99.0% respectively, at costs of 7.3 US $ and 9.3 US $ per test, respectively, for a 40% prevalence of HIV antibody positive samples. The conventional algorithm scored a sensitivity of 97.1% and a specificity of 100% for 11.3 US $ per test. The testing strategy of combining HIV Chek 1 + 2 and Clonatec Rapid HIV 1/2 Ab, an interesting option for small isolated centra, had a 96.6% sensitivity, but yielded only a slightly better specificity of 99.0%, as compared to 97.8% for HIV Chek alone. The price of combining the two simple assays using algorithm 3 was 6.8 US $ per test, using algorithm 4 was 10.6 US $. HIV testing strategies based on ELISA and a simple HIV test are a valuable alternative for reference laboratories faced with a high prevalence of HIV positive samples. PMID:1789703

  2. Activities, crystal structures and molecular dynamics of dihydro-1H-isoindole derivatives, inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase

    PubMed Central

    Métifiot, Mathieu; Maddali, Kasthuraiah; Johnson, Barry C.; Hare, Stephen; Smith, Steven J.; Zhao, XueZhi; Marchand, Christophe; Burke, Terrence R.; Hughes, Stephen H.; Cherepanov, Peter; Pommier, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Based on a series of lactam and phthalimide derivatives that inhibit HIV-1 integrase, we developed a new derivative, XZ-259, with biochemical and antiviral activities comparable to raltegravir. We determined the crystal structures of XZ-259 and four other derivatives in complex with the prototype foamy virus intasome. The compounds bind at the integrase-Mg2+-DNA interface of the integrase active site. In biochemical and antiviral assays, XZ-259 inhibits raltegravir-resistant HIV-1 integrases harboring the Y143R mutation. Molecular modeling is also presented suggesting that XZ-259 can bind in the HIV-1 intasome with its dimethyl sulfonamide group adopting two opposite orientations. Molecular dynamics analyses of the HIV-1 intasome highlight the importance of the viral DNA in drug potency. PMID:23075516

  3. The HEPT Analogue WPR-6 Is Active against a Broad Spectrum of Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Drug-Resistant HIV-1 Strains of Different Serotypes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weisi; Zhao, Jianxiong; Sun, Jianping; Yin, Qianqian; Wang, Yan; Jiao, Yang; Liu, Junyi; Jiang, Shibo; Shao, Yiming; Wang, Xiaowei; Ma, Liying

    2015-08-01

    Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are important components of the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) used to treat human immunodeficiency type 1 virus (HIV-1). However, because of the emergence of drug resistance and the adverse effects of current anti-HIV drugs, it is essential to develop novel NNRTIs with an excellent safety profile, improved activity against NNRTI-resistant viruses, and enhanced activity against clinical isolates of different subtypes. Here, we have identified 1-[(benzyloxy)methyl]-6-(3,5-dimethylbenzyl)-5-iodopyrimidine-2,4(1H,3H)-dione (WPR-6), a novel NNRTI with a 50% effective concentration (EC50) of 2 to 4 nM against laboratory-adapted HIV-1 strain SF33 and an EC50 of 7 to 14 nM against nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-resistant HIV-1 strain 7391 with a therapeutic index of >1 × 10(4). A panel of five representative clinical virus isolates of different subtypes circulating predominantly in China was highly sensitive to WPR-6, with EC50s ranging from 1 to 6 nM. In addition, WPR-6 showed excellent antiviral potency against the most prevalent NNRTI-resistant viruses containing the K103N and Y181C mutations. To determine whether WPR-6 selects for novel resistant mutants, in vitro resistance selection was conducted with laboratory-adapted HIV-1 strain SF33 on MT-4 cells. The results demonstrated that V106I and Y188L were the two dominant NNRTI-associated resistance mutations detected in the breakthrough viruses. Taken together, these in vitro data indicate that WPR-6 has greater efficacy than the reference HEPT analogue TNK651 and the marketed drug nevirapine against HIV-1. However, to develop it as a new NNRTI, further improvement of its pharmacological properties is warranted. PMID:26055365

  4. Ion specific effects of alkali cations on the catalytic activity of HIV-1 protease.

    PubMed

    Pokorná, Jana; Heyda, Jan; Konvalinka, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus 1 protease (HIV-1 PR), an important therapeutic target for the treatment of AIDS, is one of the most well-studied enzymes. However, there is still much to learn about the regulation of the activity and inhibition of this key viral enzyme. Specifically, the mechanism of activation of HIV-1 PR from the viral polyprotein upon HIV maturation is still not understood. It has been suggested that external factors like pH or salt concentration might contribute to regulation of this crucial step in the viral life cycle. Recently, we analyzed the activity of HIV-1 PR in aqueous solutions of sodium and potassium chloride by experimental determination of enzyme kinetics and molecular dynamics simulations. We showed that the effect of salt concentration is cation-specific [Heyda et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2009 (11), 7599]. In this study, we extended this analysis for other alkali cations and found that the dependence of the initial velocity of peptide substrate hydrolysis on the nature of the cation follows the Hofmeister series, with the exception of caesium. Significantly higher catalytic efficiencies both in terms of substrate binding (K(M)) and turnover number (kcat) are observed in the presence of K+ compared to Na+ or Li+ at corresponding salt concentrations. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that both lithium and sodium are attracted more strongly than potassium and caesium to the protein surface, mostly due to stronger interactions with carboxylate side chain groups of aspartates and glutamates. Furthermore, we observed a surprising decrease in the K(M) value for a specific substrate at very low salt concentration. The molecular mechanism of this phenomenon will be further analyzed. PMID:23795510

  5. GSK3β-Activation is a Point of Convergence for HIV-1 and Opiate-Mediated Interactive Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Masvekar, Ruturaj R.; El-Hage, Nazira; Hauser, Kurt F.; Knapp, Pamela E.

    2015-01-01

    Infection of the CNS with HIV-1 occurs rapidly after primary peripheral infection. HIV-1 can induce a wide range of neurological deficits, collectively known as HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders. Our previous work has shown that the selected neurotoxic effects induced by individual viral proteins, Tat and gp120, and by HIV+ supernatant are enhanced by co-exposure to morphine. This mimics co-morbid neurological effects observed in opiate-abusing HIV+ patients. Although there is a correlation between opiate drug abuse and progression of HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders, the mechanisms underlie interactions between HIV-1 and opiates remain obscure. Previous studies have shown that HIV-1 induces neurotoxic effects through abnormal activation of GSK3β. Interestingly, expression of GSK3β has shown to be elevated in brains of young opiate abusers indicating that GSK3β is also linked to neuropathology seen with opiate abusing patients. Thus, we hypothesize that GSK3β activation is a point of convergence for HIV- and opiate-mediated interactive neurotoxic effects. Neuronal cultures were treated with supernatant from HIV-1SF162-infected THP-1 cells, in the presence or absence of morphine and GSK3β inhibitors. Our results show that GSK3β inhibitors, including valproate and small molecule inhibitors, significantly reduce HIV-1-mediated neurotoxic outcomes, and also negate interactions with morphine that result in cell death, suggesting that GSK3β-activation is an important point of convergence and a potential therapeutic target for HIV- and opiate-mediated neurocognitive deficits. PMID:25616162

  6. Inhibition of reverse transcriptase activity increases stability of the HIV-1 core.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Fricke, Thomas; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies showed that HIV-1 reverse transcription occurs during or before uncoating, linking mechanistically reverse transcription with uncoating. Here we show that inhibition of reverse transcriptase (RT) during HIV-1 infection by pharmacologic or genetic means increased the stability of the HIV-1 core during infection. Interestingly, HIV-1 particles with increased core stability were resistant to the core-destabilizing effects of rhesus TRIM5α (TRIM5α(rh)). Collectively, this work implies that the surface of the HIV-1 core is dynamic and changes upon the ongoing processes within the core. PMID:23077298

  7. Structural Insights on the Role of Antibodies in HIV-1 Vaccine and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    West, Anthony P.; Scharf, Louise; Scheid, Johannes F.; Klein, Florian; Bjorkman, Pamela J.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2014-01-01

    Despite 30 years of effort, there is no effective vaccine for HIV-1. However, antibodies can prevent HIV-1 infection in humanized mice and macaques when passively transferred. New single-cell-based methods have uncovered many broad and potent donor-derived antibodies, and structural studies have revealed the molecular bases for their activities. The new data suggest why such antibodies are difficult to elicit and inform HIV-1 vaccine development efforts. In addition to protecting against infection, the newly identified antibodies can suppress active infections in mice and macaques, suggesting they could be valuable additions to anti-HIV-1 therapies and to strategies to eradicate HIV-1 infection. PMID:24529371

  8. Systemic Immune Activation Profiles of HIV-1 Subtype C-Infected Children and Their Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Makhubele, Tinyiko G.; Steel, Helen C.; Anderson, Ronald; van Dyk, Gisela; Theron, Annette J.; Rossouw, Theresa M.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about immune activation profiles of children infected with HIV-1 subtype C. The current study compared levels of selected circulating biomarkers of immune activation in HIV-1 subtype C-infected untreated mothers and their children with those of healthy controls. Multiplex bead array, ELISA, and immunonephelometric procedures were used to measure soluble CD14 (sCD14), beta-2 microglobulin (β2M), CRP, MIG, IP-10, and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1). Levels of all 6 biomarkers were significantly elevated in the HIV-infected mothers and, with the exception of MIG, in their children (P < 0.01–P < 0.0001). The effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and maternal smoking on these biomarkers were also assessed. With the exception of TGF-β1, which was unchanged in the children 12 months after therapy, initiation of ART was accompanied by decreases in the other biomarkers. Regression analysis revealed that although most biomarkers were apparently unaffected by smoking, exposure of children to maternal smoking was associated with a significant increase in IP-10. These findings demonstrate that biomarkers of immune activation are elevated in HIV-infected children pre-ART and decline, with the exception of TGF-β1, after therapy. Although preliminary, elevation of IP-10 in smoke-exposed infants is consistent with a higher level of immune activation in this group. PMID:27019552

  9. Potent and broad neutralizing activity of a single chain antibody fragment against cell-free and cell-associated HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Andrew Rosa; Ptak, Roger G; Wang, Yanping; Dimitrov, Antony S; Alam, S. Munir; Wieczorek, Lindsay; Bouma, Peter; Fouts, Timothy; Jiang, Shibo; Polonis, Victoria R; Haynes, Barton F; Quinnan, Gerald V; Montefiori, David C; Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2010-01-01

    Several human monoclonal antibodies (hmAbs) exhibit relatively potent and broad neutralizing activity against HIV-1, but there has not been much success in using them as potential therapeutics. We have previously hypothesized and demonstrated that small engineered antibodies can target highly conserved epitopes that are not accessible by full-size antibodies. However, their potency has not been comparatively evaluated with known HIV-1-neutralizing hmAbs against large panels of primary isolates. We report here the inhibitory activity of an engineered single chain antibody fragment (scFv), m9, against several panels of primary HIV-1 isolates from group M (clades A–G) using cell-free and cell-associated virus in cell line-based assays. M9 was much more potent than scFv 17b, and more potent than or comparable to the best-characterized broadly neutralizing hmAbs IgG1 b12, 2G12, 2F5 and 4e10. It also inhibited cell-to-cell transmission of HIV-1 with higher potency than enfuvirtide (t-20, Fuzeon). M9 competed with a sulfated CCR5 N-terminal peptide for binding to gp120-CD4 complex, suggesting an overlapping epitope with the coreceptor binding site. M9 did not react with phosphatidylserine (pS) and cardiolipin (CL), nor did it react with a panel of autoantigens in an antinuclear autoantibody (ANA) assay. We further found that escape mutants resistant to m9 did not emerge in an immune selection assay. these results suggest that m9 is a novel anti-HIV-1 candidate with potential therapeutic or prophylactic properties, and its epitope is a new target for drug or vaccine development. PMID:20305395

  10. Infection by HIV-1 blocked by binding of dextrin 2-sulphate to the cell surface of activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and cultured T-cells.

    PubMed Central

    Shaunak, S; Gooderham, N J; Edwards, R J; Payvandi, N; Javan, C M; Baggett, N; MacDermot, J; Weber, J N; Davies, D S

    1994-01-01

    1. Structural analogues of a sulphated polysaccharide, dextrin sulphate, were synthesized and tested for their ability to block infection by HIV-1. Using the T-cell lines, C8166 and HPB-ALL, and the laboratory adapted strains of HIV-1.MN, HIV-1.IIIb and HIV-1.RF, dextrin 2-sulphate (D2S) combined the best combination of high anti-HIV-1 activity (95% inhibitory concentration (IC95) = 230 nM) and low anticoagulant activity. It also blocked infection of activated peripheral blood mononuclear (PBMN) cells by five primary viral isolates at an IC95 of 230-3700 nM depending upon the primary viral isolate tested. 2. In saturation binding studies, [3H]-D2S bound to a cell surface protein on HPB-ALL cells in a specific and saturable manner with a Kd of 82 +/- 14 nM and a Bmax of 4.8 +/- 0.3 pmol/10(6) cells. It bound to other human T-cell lines in a similar manner. 3. There was very little binding of [3H]-D2S to freshly isolated PBMN cells (Bmax 0.18 +/- 0.03 pmol/10(6) cells) and these cells could not be infected by HIV-1. Culture of PBMN cells in lymphocyte growth medium (LGM) containing IL-2 did not significantly change the Bmax of [3H]-D2S. In contrast, PBMN cells which had been cultured with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA; 5 micrograms ml-1) for 72 h had a Bmax of [3H]-D2S binding of 7.2 +/- 0.1 pmol/10(6) cells and these cells could be infected by HIV-1. Removal of the PHA and further culture of the PBMN cells in LGM containing IL-2 resulted in a fall in the Bmax to 2.0 +/- 0.1 pmol/10(6) cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7812605

  11. Activation of Cannabinoid Type 2 Receptors Inhibits HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein gp120-Induced Synapse Loss

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Jung; Shin, Angela H.

    2011-01-01

    HIV-1 infection of the central nervous system is associated with dendritic and synaptic damage that correlates with cognitive decline in patients with HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD). HAD is due in part to the release of viral proteins from infected cells. Because cannabinoids modulate neurotoxic and inflammatory processes, we investigated their effects on changes in synaptic connections induced by the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120. Morphology and synapses between cultured hippocampal neurons were visualized by confocal imaging of neurons expressing DsRed2 and postsynaptic density protein 95 fused to green fluorescent protein (PSD95-GFP). Twenty-four-hour treatment with gp120 IIIB decreased the number of PSD95-GFP puncta by 37 ± 4%. The decrease was concentration-dependent (EC50 = 153 ± 50 pM). Synapse loss preceded cell death as defined by retention of DsRed2 fluorescence gp120 activated CXCR4 on microglia to evoke interleukin-1β (IL-1β) release. Pharmacological studies determined that sequential activation of CXCR4, the IL-1β receptor, and the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor was required. Expression of alternative reading frame polypeptide, which inhibits the ubiquitin ligase murine double minute 2, protected synapses, implicating the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Cannabimimetic drugs are of particular relevance to HAD because of their clinical and illicit use in patients with AIDS. The cannabinoid receptor full agonist [(R)-(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3[(4-morpholinyl)methyl]pyrrolo[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazinyl]-(1-naphthalenyl) methanone mesylate salt] (Win55,212-2) inhibited gp120-induced IL-1β production and synapse in a manner reversed by a cannabinoid type 2 receptor antagonist. In contrast, Win55,212-2 did not inhibit synapse loss elicited by exposure to the HIV-1 protein Tat. These results indicate that cannabinoids prevent the impairment of network function produced by gp120 and, thus, might have therapeutic potential in HAD. PMID:21670103

  12. Neisseria gonorrhoeae enhances HIV-1 infection of primary resting CD4+ T cells through TLR2 activation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jian; Rapista, Aprille; Teleshova, Natalia; Mosoyan, Goar; Jarvis, Gary A; Klotman, Mary E; Chang, Theresa L

    2010-03-15

    Sexually transmitted infections increase the likelihood of HIV-1 transmission. We investigated the effect of Neisseria gonorrheae (gonococcus [GC]) exposure on HIV replication in primary resting CD4(+) T cells, a major HIV target cell during the early stage of sexual transmission of HIV. GC and TLR2 agonists, such as peptidylglycan (PGN), Pam(3)CSK(4), and Pam(3)C-Lip, a GC-derived synthetic lipopeptide, but not TLR4 agonists including LPS or GC lipooligosaccharide enhanced HIV-1 infection of primary resting CD4(+) T cells after viral entry. Pretreatment of CD4(+) cells with PGN also promoted HIV infection. Anti-TLR2 Abs abolished the HIV enhancing effect of GC and Pam(3)C-Lip, indicating that GC-mediated enhancement of HIV infection of resting CD4(+) T cells was through TLR2. IL-2 was required for TLR2-mediated HIV enhancement. PGN and GC induced cell surface expression of T cell activation markers and HIV coreceptors, CCR5 and CXCR4. The maximal postentry HIV enhancing effect was achieved when PGN was added immediately after viral exposure. Kinetic studies and analysis of HIV DNA products indicated that GC exposure and TLR2 activation enhanced HIV infection at the step of nuclear import. We conclude that GC enhanced HIV infection of primary resting CD4(+) T cells through TLR2 activation, which both increased the susceptibility of primary CD4(+) T cells to HIV infection as well as enhanced HIV-infected CD4(+) T cells at the early stage of HIV life cycle after entry. This study provides a molecular mechanism by which nonulcerative sexually transmitted infections mediate enhancement of HIV infection and has implication for HIV prevention and therapeutics. PMID:20147631

  13. Phenyl-1-Pyridin-2yl-ethanone-based iron chelators increase IκB-α expression, modulate CDK2 and CDK9 activities, and inhibit HIV-1 transcription.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Namita; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Kovalskyy, Dmytro; Breuer, Denitra; Niu, Xiaomei; Lin, Xionghao; Xu, Min; Gavrilenko, Konstantin; Kashanchi, Fatah; Dhawan, Subhash; Nekhai, Sergei

    2014-11-01

    HIV-1 transcription is activated by the Tat protein, which recruits CDK9/cyclin T1 to the HIV-1 promoter. CDK9 is phosphorylated by CDK2, which facilitates formation of the high-molecular-weight positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) complex. We previously showed that chelation of intracellular iron inhibits CDK2 and CDK9 activities and suppresses HIV-1 transcription, but the mechanism of the inhibition was not understood. In the present study, we tested a set of novel iron chelators for the ability to inhibit HIV-1 transcription and elucidated their mechanism of action. Novel phenyl-1-pyridin-2yl-ethanone (PPY)-based iron chelators were synthesized and examined for their effects on cellular iron, HIV-1 inhibition, and cytotoxicity. Activities of CDK2 and CDK9, expression of CDK9-dependent and CDK2-inhibitory mRNAs, NF-κB expression, and HIV-1- and NF-κB-dependent transcription were determined. PPY-based iron chelators significantly inhibited HIV-1, with minimal cytotoxicity, in cultured and primary cells chronically or acutely infected with HIV-1 subtype B, but they had less of an effect on HIV-1 subtype C. Iron chelators upregulated the expression of IκB-α, with increased accumulation of cytoplasmic NF-κB. The iron chelators inhibited CDK2 activity and reduced the amount of CDK9/cyclin T1 in the large P-TEFb complex. Iron chelators reduced HIV-1 Gag and Env mRNA synthesis but had no effect on HIV-1 reverse transcription. In addition, iron chelators moderately inhibited basal HIV-1 transcription, equally affecting HIV-1 and Sp1- or NF-κB-driven transcription. By virtue of their involvement in targeting several key steps in HIV-1 transcription, these novel iron chelators have the potential for the development of new therapeutics for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:25155598

  14. Phenyl-1-Pyridin-2yl-Ethanone-Based Iron Chelators Increase IκB-α Expression, Modulate CDK2 and CDK9 Activities, and Inhibit HIV-1 Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Namita; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Kovalskyy, Dmytro; Breuer, Denitra; Niu, Xiaomei; Lin, Xionghao; Xu, Min; Gavrilenko, Konstantin; Kashanchi, Fatah; Dhawan, Subhash

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 transcription is activated by the Tat protein, which recruits CDK9/cyclin T1 to the HIV-1 promoter. CDK9 is phosphorylated by CDK2, which facilitates formation of the high-molecular-weight positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) complex. We previously showed that chelation of intracellular iron inhibits CDK2 and CDK9 activities and suppresses HIV-1 transcription, but the mechanism of the inhibition was not understood. In the present study, we tested a set of novel iron chelators for the ability to inhibit HIV-1 transcription and elucidated their mechanism of action. Novel phenyl-1-pyridin-2yl-ethanone (PPY)-based iron chelators were synthesized and examined for their effects on cellular iron, HIV-1 inhibition, and cytotoxicity. Activities of CDK2 and CDK9, expression of CDK9-dependent and CDK2-inhibitory mRNAs, NF-κB expression, and HIV-1- and NF-κB-dependent transcription were determined. PPY-based iron chelators significantly inhibited HIV-1, with minimal cytotoxicity, in cultured and primary cells chronically or acutely infected with HIV-1 subtype B, but they had less of an effect on HIV-1 subtype C. Iron chelators upregulated the expression of IκB-α, with increased accumulation of cytoplasmic NF-κB. The iron chelators inhibited CDK2 activity and reduced the amount of CDK9/cyclin T1 in the large P-TEFb complex. Iron chelators reduced HIV-1 Gag and Env mRNA synthesis but had no effect on HIV-1 reverse transcription. In addition, iron chelators moderately inhibited basal HIV-1 transcription, equally affecting HIV-1 and Sp1- or NF-κB-driven transcription. By virtue of their involvement in targeting several key steps in HIV-1 transcription, these novel iron chelators have the potential for the development of new therapeutics for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:25155598

  15. Monocyte activation by circulating fibronectin fragments in HIV-1-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Trial, JoAnn; Rubio, Jose A; Birdsall, Holly H; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria; Rossen, Roger D

    2004-08-01

    To identify signals that can alter leukocyte function in patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), we analyzed single blood samples from 74 HIV-1-infected patients and additional blood was collected at 90-day intervals from 51 HIV-1-infected patients over a 516 +/- 172 (mean +/- SD) day interval. Despite the absence of circulating immune complexes and normalization of phagocytic function, compared with controls, the fraction of patients' monocytes expressing CD49e and CD62L was decreased and expression of CD11b and CD86 increased. Plasma from 63% of patients but none from normal controls contained 110-120 kDa fibronectin fragments (FNf). Presence of FNf did not reflect poor adherence to therapy. Addition of FNf to normal donor blood in vitro replicated changes in monocyte CD49e, CD62L, CD11b, and CD86 seen in vivo. FNf also induced monocytes to release a serine proteinase, nominally identified as proteinase-3, that hydrolyzed cell surface CD49e. alpha(1)-Antitrypsin blocked FNf-induced shedding of CD49e in a dose-dependent manner. Plasma with a normal frequency of CD49e(+) monocytes contained antiproteases that partially blocked FNf-induced monocyte CD49e shedding, whereas plasma from patients with a low frequency of CD49e(+) monocytes did not block this effect of FNf. Electrophoretic analyses of plasma from the latter group of patients suggested that a significant fraction of their alpha(1)-antitrypsin was tied up in high molecular mass complexes. These results suggest that monocyte behavior in HIV-1-infected patients may be influenced by FNf and the ratio of protease and antiproteases in the cells' microenvironment. PMID:15265957

  16. The role of Vif oligomerization and RNA chaperone activity in HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Batisse, Julien; Guerrero, Santiago; Bernacchi, Serena; Sleiman, Dona; Gabus, Caroline; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Marquet, Roland; Tisné, Carine; Paillart, Jean-Christophe

    2012-11-01

    The viral infectivity factor (Vif) is essential for the productive infection and dissemination of HIV-1 in non-permissive cells that involve most natural HIV-1 target cells. Vif counteracts the packaging of two cellular cytidine deaminases named APOBEC3G (A3G) and A3F by diverse mechanisms including the recruitment of an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex and the proteasomal degradation of A3G/A3F, the inhibition of A3G mRNA translation or by a direct competition mechanism. In addition, Vif appears to be an active partner of the late steps of viral replication by participating in virus assembly and Gag processing, thus regulating the final stage of virion formation notably genomic RNA dimerization and by inhibiting the initiation of reverse transcription. Vif is a small pleiotropic protein with multiple domains, and recent studies highlighted the importance of Vif conformation and flexibility in counteracting A3G and in binding RNA. In this review, we will focus on the oligomerization and RNA chaperone properties of Vif and show that the intrinsic disordered nature of some Vif domains could play an important role in virus assembly and replication. Experimental evidence demonstrating the RNA chaperone activity of Vif will be presented. PMID:22728817

  17. HIV-1 Tat Protein Induces Production of Proinflammatory Cytokines by Human Dendritic Cells and Monocytes/Macrophages through Engagement of TLR4-MD2-CD14 Complex and Activation of NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Leghmari, Kaoutar; Serrero, Manutea; Delobel, Pierre; Izopet, Jacques; BenMohamed, Lbachir; Bahraoui, Elmostafa

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported that the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) Tat protein induced the expression of programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) on dendritic cells (DCs) through a TLR4 pathway. However, the underlying mechanisms by which HIV-1 Tat protein induces the abnormal hyper-activation of the immune system seen in HIV-1 infected patients remain to be fully elucidated. In the present study, we report that HIV-1 Tat protein induced the production of significant amounts of the pro-inflammatory IL-6 and IL-8 cytokines by DCs and monocytes from both healthy and HIV-1 infected patients. Such production was abrogated in the presence of anti-TLR4 blocking antibodies or soluble recombinant TLR4-MD2 as a decoy receptor, suggesting TLR4 was recruited by Tat protein. Tat-induced murine IL-6 and CXCL1/KC a functional homologue of human IL-8 was abolished in peritoneal macrophages derived from TLR4 KO but not from Wt mice, confirming the involvement of the TLR4 pathway. Furthermore, the recruitment of TLR4-MD2-CD14 complex by Tat protein was demonstrated by the activation of TLR4 downstream pathways including NF-κB and SOCS-1 and by down-modulation of cell surface TLR4 by endocytosis in dynamin and lipid-raft-dependent manners. Collectively, these findings demonstrate, for the first time, that HIV-1 Tat interacts with TLR4-MD2-CD14 complex and activates the NF-κB pathway, leading to overproduction of IL-6 and IL-8 pro-inflammatory cytokines by myeloid cells from both healthy and HIV-1 infected patients. This study reveals a novel mechanism by which HIV-1, via its early expressed Tat protein, hijacks the TLR4 pathway, hence establishing abnormal hyper-activation of the immune system. PMID:26090662

  18. Nucleic Acid Chaperone Activity of HIV-1 NC Proteins Investigated by Single Molecule DNA Stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Mark C.; Gorelick, Robert J.; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Bloomfield, Victor A.

    2002-03-01

    HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein (NC) is a nucleic acid chaperone protein that is responsible for facilitating numerous nucleic acid rearrangements throughout the reverse transcription cycle of HIV-1. To understand the mechanism of NC’s chaperone function, we carried out single molecule DNA stretching studies in the presence of NC and mutant forms of NC. Using an optical tweezers instrument, we stretch single DNA molecules from the double-stranded helical state to the single-stranded (coil) state. Based on the observed cooperativity of DNA force-induced melting, we find that the fraction of melted base pairs at room temperature is increased dramatically in the presence of NC. Thus, upon NC binding, increased thermal fluctuations cause continuous melting and reannealing of base pairs so that DNA strands are able to rapidly sample configurations in order to find the lowest energy state. While NC destabilizes the double-stranded form of DNA, a mutant form of NC that lacks the zinc finger structures does not. DNA stretching experiments carried out in the presence of NC variants containing more subtle changes in the zinc finger structures were conducted to elucidate the contribution of each individual finger to NC’s chaperone activity, and these results will be reported.

  19. Mode of action of SDZ NIM 811, a nonimmunosuppressive cyclosporin A analog with activity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1): interference with early and late events in HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Steinkasserer, A; Harrison, R; Billich, A; Hammerschmid, F; Werner, G; Wolff, B; Peichl, P; Palfi, G; Schnitzel, W; Mlynar, E

    1995-02-01

    SDZ NIM 811 is a cyclosporin A analog that is completely devoid of immunosuppressive capacity but exhibits potent and selective anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) activity. The mechanism of action of SDZ NIM 811 is clearly different from those of all other anti-HIV agents described so far. In cell-free assays, it is not an inhibitor of reverse transcriptase, protease, integrase, and it does not interfere with Rev or Tat function. SDZ NIM 811 does not down-regulate CD4 or inhibit fusion between infected and uninfected, CD4-expressing cells. p24 production from chronically HIV-infected cells is not impaired either. To elucidate the mode of action of SDZ NIM 811, we performed DNA PCR analysis in HIV-1 IIIB-infected MT4 cells in one cycle of virus replication. The effects of SDZ NIM 811 on the kinetics of viral DNA synthesis, appearance of two-long terminal repeat circles (2-LTR circles), and integration of DNA were studied. SDZ NIM 811 inhibited 2-LTR circle formation in a concentration-dependent manner, which is indicative of nuclear localization of preintegration complexes. Half-maximal inhibition was achieved at 0.17 microgram/ml; this concentration is close to the 50% inhibitory concentrations (0.01 to 0.2 microgram/ml) for viral growth inhibition. As expected, integration of proviral DNA into cellular DNA was also inhibited by SDZ NIM 811. Analysis of the viral particles produced by SDZ NIM 811-treated, chronically infected cells revealed amounts of capsid proteins, reverse transcriptase activity, and viral RNA comparable to those of the untreated control. However, these particles showed a dose-dependent reduction in infectivity (50% inhibitory concentration of 0.028 microgram/ml) which indicates that the assembly process is also impaired by SDZ NIM 811. Gag proteins are postulated to play a role not only in assembly but also in early steps of viral replication, e.g., nuclear localization of the preintegration complex. Recently, it was reported that

  20. Bryostatin activates HIV-1 latent expression in human astrocytes through a PKC and NF-ĸB-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Laura; Martínez-Bonet, Marta; Sánchez, Javier; Fernández-Pineda, Alejandra; Jiménez, José Luis; Muñoz, Eduardo; Moreno, Santiago; Álvarez, Susana; Muñoz-Fernández, Ma Ángeles

    2015-01-01

    Multiple studies have shown that HIV-1 patients may develop virus reservoirs that impede eradication; these reservoirs include the central nervous system (CNS). Despite an undetectable viral load in patients treated with potent antiretrovirals, current therapy is unable to purge the virus from these latent reservoirs. To broaden the inhibitory range and effectiveness of current antiretrovirals, the potential of bryostatin was investigated as a latent HIV-1 activator. We used primary astrocytes, NHA cells, and astrocytoma cells U-87. Infected cells with HIV-1(NL4.3) were treated with bryostatin alone or in combination with different inhibitors. HIV-1 production was quantified by using ELISA. Transcriptional activity was measured using luciferase reporter gene assays by using lipofectin. We performed cotransfection experiments of the LTR promoter with the active NF-κB member p65/relA. To confirm the NF-κB role, Western blot and confocal microscopy were performed. Bryostatin reactivates latent viral infection in the NHA and U87 cells via activation of protein kinase C (PKC)-alpha and -delta, because the PKC inhibitors rottlerin and GF109203X abrogated the bryostatin effect. No alteration in cell proliferation was found. Moreover, bryostatin strongly stimulated LTR transcription by activating the transcription factor NF-κB. Bryostatin could be a beneficial adjunct to the treatment of HIV-1 brain infection. PMID:26199173

  1. Bryostatin activates HIV-1 latent expression in human astrocytes through a PKC and NF-ĸB-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Laura; Martínez-Bonet, Marta; Sánchez, Javier; Fernández-Pineda, Alejandra; Jiménez, José Luis; Muñoz, Eduardo; Moreno, Santiago; Álvarez, Susana; Muñoz-Fernández, Mª Ángeles

    2015-01-01

    Multiple studies have shown that HIV-1 patients may develop virus reservoirs that impede eradication; these reservoirs include the central nervous system (CNS). Despite an undetectable viral load in patients treated with potent antiretrovirals, current therapy is unable to purge the virus from these latent reservoirs. To broaden the inhibitory range and effectiveness of current antiretrovirals, the potential of bryostatin was investigated as a latent HIV-1 activator. We used primary astrocytes, NHA cells, and astrocytoma cells U-87. Infected cells with HIV-1NL4.3 were treated with bryostatin alone or in combination with different inhibitors. HIV-1 production was quantified by using ELISA. Transcriptional activity was measured using luciferase reporter gene assays by using lipofectin. We performed cotransfection experiments of the LTR promoter with the active NF-κB member p65/relA. To confirm the NF-κB role, Western blot and confocal microscopy were performed. Bryostatin reactivates latent viral infection in the NHA and U87 cells via activation of protein kinase C (PKC)-alpha and -delta, because the PKC inhibitors rottlerin and GF109203X abrogated the bryostatin effect. No alteration in cell proliferation was found. Moreover, bryostatin strongly stimulated LTR transcription by activating the transcription factor NF-κB. Bryostatin could be a beneficial adjunct to the treatment of HIV-1 brain infection. PMID:26199173

  2. Single peptide and anti-idiotype based immunizations can broaden the antibody response against the variable V3 domain of HIV-1 in mice.

    PubMed

    Boudet, F; Keller, H; Kieny, M P; Thèze, J

    1995-05-01

    The third variable (V3) domain of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) external envelope glycoprotein gp120 is a major target of neutralizing antibodies in infected persons and in experimental immunized animals. Given the high degree of sequence variability of V3, the humoral response toward this region is very type-specific. In the present study, we evaluated the potential of a single peptide and an anti-idiotypic antibody to broaden the anti-V3 antibody specificity in BALB/c mice. We show that a synthetic peptide derived from the V3 determinant of HIV-1 MN isolate (V3MN), when used as an immunogen, was able to induce an antibody response to multiple (up to six) HIV-1 strains. The extent of this cross-reactivity, which tended to enlarge as the injections increased, appeared to be inversely correlated with the binding affinity to V3MN peptide. These data thus present evidence that, despite its great sequence heterogeneity, the V3 loop encompasses conserved amino-acid positions and/or stretches which may be less immunogenic than their variable counterparts. We additionally demonstrate that a rabbit anti-idiotype (Ab2), recognizing a binding site related idiotype on a V3-specific mouse monoclonal antibody (Ab1), could mount a broadened humoral response (Ab3) in mice. Unlike nominal antibody Ab1 which strictly reacted with the European HIV-1 LAI isolate, elicited Ab3 recognized the two divergent HIV-1 strains SF2 and 1286, originating respectively from North America and Central Africa, in addition to LAI. The reasons accounting for this Ab2-induced enlargement of the V3 antibody response are discussed. Our findings suggest that single peptide and anti-idiotype based immunizations may provide viable approaches to overcome, at least in part, HIV epitope variability. PMID:7783749

  3. C/EBP- and Tat-mediated activation of the HIV-1 LTR in CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Quiterio, Shane; Grant, Christian; Hogan, Tricia H; Krebs, Fred C; Wigdahl, Brian

    2003-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage within the bone marrow and peripheral blood plays an important role in the pathologic events leading to the development of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) as well as HIV-1 dementia (HIVD). The TF-1 erythro-myeloid cell line is being utilized as a model cellular phenotype to examine HIV-1 infection of a hematopoietic progenitor cell population. Expression of TF-1 cell surface marker RNAs and proteins was characterized by RT-PCR and FACS, respectively, and compared to those of the well characterized U-937 monocytic cell line. Transcription factors in TF-1 and U-937 cells that have been shown to be important for sustaining the expression of HIV-1 LTR activity were also examined. TF-1 cells were shown to contain the transcription factors C/EBP, Sp1, and NF-kappaB. C/EBP- and Tat-mediated induction of the YU-2 LTR was examined. Relative C/EBP induction of the HIV-1 strain YU-2 LTR was greater in TF-1 cells than in U-937 cells. When the C/EBP sites I and II were mutated to sequences with a low relative affinity for C/EBP factors, there was a reduction of Tat-mediated trans-activation in TF-1 cells, but not in U-937 cells. These studies form the foundation for investigations into the relationship between HIV-1 infection of bone marrow and peripheral blood precursor cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage and pathogenesis associated with HIV-1 infection of the immune and central nervous system (CNS). PMID:12642037

  4. ZNF10 inhibits HIV-1 LTR activity through interaction with NF-κB and Sp1 binding motifs.

    PubMed

    Nishitsuji, Hironori; Sawada, Leila; Sugiyama, Ryuichi; Takaku, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    Kruppel-associated box-containing zinc finger (KRAB-ZNF) genes constitute the single largest gene family of transcriptional repressors in the genomes of higher organisms. In this study, we isolated 52 cDNA clones of KRAB-ZFPs from U1 cell lines and screened them to identify which were capable of regulating HIV-1 gene expression. We identified 5 KRAB-ZFPs that suppressed ⩾50% of HIV-1 LTR. Of the 5 identified KRAB-ZFPs, the expression of ZNF10 significantly enhanced the transcriptional repression activity of the LTR compared with other ZNFs. In addition, the depletion of endogenous ZNF10 led to the activation of HIV-1 LTR. The repressor activity of ZNF10 was required for TRIM28, SETDB1 and HP1-gamma binding. These results indicate that ZNF10 could be involved in a potent intrinsic antiretroviral defense. PMID:26096782

  5. Structure of an anti-HIV-1 hammerhead ribozyme complex with a 17-mer DNA substrate analog of HIV-1 gag RNA and a mechanism for the cleavage reaction: 750 MHz NMR and computer experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ojha, R. P.; Dhingra, M. M.; Sarma, M. H.; Myer, Y. P.; Setlik, R. F.; Shibata, M.; Kazim, A. L.; Ornstein, R. L.; Rein, R.; Turner, C. J.; Sarma, R. H.

    1997-01-01

    between the anti HIV-1 gag ribozyme and its abortive DNA substrate manifests in the detection of a continuous track of A.T base pairs; this suggests that the interaction between the ribozyme and its DNA substrate is stronger than the one observed in the case of the free ribozyme where the bases in stem I and stem III regions interact strongly with the ribozyme core region (Sarma, R. H., et al. FEBS Letters 375, 317-23, 1995). The complex formation provides certain guidelines in the design of suitable therapeutic ribozymes. If the residues in the ribozyme stem regions interact with the conserved core, it may either prevent or interfere with the formation of a catalytically active tertiary structure.

  6. Structure of an anti-HIV-1 hammerhead ribozyme complex with a 17-mer DNA substrate analog of HIV-1 gag RNA and a mechanism for the cleavage reaction: 750 MHz NMR and computer experiments.

    PubMed

    Ojha, R P; Dhingra, M M; Sarma, M H; Myer, Y P; Setlik, R F; Shibata, M; Kazim, A L; Ornstein, R L; Rein, R; Turner, C J; Sarma, R H

    1997-10-01

    between the anti HIV-1 gag ribozyme and its abortive DNA substrate manifests in the detection of a continuous track of A.T base pairs; this suggests that the interaction between the ribozyme and its DNA substrate is stronger than the one observed in the case of the free ribozyme where the bases in stem I and stem III regions interact strongly with the ribozyme core region (Sarma, R. H., et al. FEBS Letters 375, 317-23, 1995). The complex formation provides certain guidelines in the design of suitable therapeutic ribozymes. If the residues in the ribozyme stem regions interact with the conserved core, it may either prevent or interfere with the formation of a catalytically active tertiary structure. PMID:9399149

  7. Anti-HIV activity of thiosemicarbazone and semicarbazone derivatives of (+/-)-3-menthone.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Vibha; Pandeya, S N; Pannecouque, Christophe; Witvrouw, Myriam; De Clercq, E

    2002-05-01

    A series of thiosemicarbazones and semicarbazone derivatives of (+/-)-3-menthone have been synthesized and their anti-HIV activity evaluated against HIV-1(III(B))and HIV-2 (ROD). The studies revealed that maximum protection is offered by chloro-substituted derivatives 2 and 7 against HIV-1 (III(B)) and HIV-2 (ROD). PMID:12210774

  8. 5-Alkyl-6-benzyl-2-(2-oxo-2-phenylethylsulfanyl)pyrimidin-4(3H)-ones, a series of anti-HIV-1 agents of the dihydro-alkoxy-benzyl-oxopyrimidine family with peculiar structure-activity relationship profile.

    PubMed

    Nawrozkij, Maxim B; Rotili, Dante; Tarantino, Domenico; Botta, Giorgia; Eremiychuk, Alexandre S; Musmuca, Ira; Ragno, Rino; Samuele, Alberta; Zanoli, Samantha; Armand-Ugón, Mercedes; Clotet-Codina, Imma; Novakov, Ivan A; Orlinson, Boris S; Maga, Giovanni; Esté, José A; Artico, Marino; Mai, Antonello

    2008-08-14

    A series of dihydro-alkylthio-benzyl-oxopyrimidines (S-DABOs) bearing a 2-aryl-2-oxoethylsulfanyl chain at pyrimidine C2, an alkyl group at C5, and a 2,6-dichloro-, 2-chloro-6-fluoro-, and 2,6-difluoro-benzyl substitution at C6 (oxophenethyl- S-DABOs, 6-8) is here described. The new compounds showed low micromolar to low nanomolar (in one case subnanomolar) inhibitory activity against wt HIV-1. Against clinically relevant HIV-1 mutants (K103N, Y181C, and Y188L) as well as in enzyme (wt and K103N, Y181I, and L100I mutated RTs) assays, compounds carrying an ethyl/ iso-propyl group at C5 and a 2,6-dichloro-/2-chloro-6-fluoro-benzyl moiety at C6 were the most potent derivatives, also characterized by low fold resistance ratio. Interestingly, the structure-activity relationship (SAR) data drawn from this DABO series are more related to HEPT than to DABO derivatives. These findings were at least in part rationalized by the description of a fair superimposition between the 6-8 and TNK-651 (a HEPT analogue) binding modes in both WT and Y181C RTs. PMID:18630898

  9. The MSHA strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa activated TLR pathway and enhanced HIV-1 DNA vaccine immunoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jue; Liu, Yong; Liu, Ying; Shao, Yiming

    2012-01-01

    The mannose-sensitive hemagglutination pilus strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA-MSHA) has been shown to trigger naïve immune responses through the activation of monocytes, macrophages, natural killer cells (NK cells) and antigen presenting cells (APCs). Based on the hypothesis that PA-MSHA activates natural immunity through the Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway, we scanned several critical TLR pathway molecules in mouse splenocytes using high-throughput real-time QRT-PCR and co-stimulatory molecule in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) following in vitro stimulation by PA-MSHA. PA-MSHA enabled activation of the TLR pathway mediated by NF-κB and JNK signaling in splenocytes, and the co-stimulatory molecule CD86 was up-regulated in BMDCs. We then assessed the adjuvant effect of PA-MSHA for HIV-1 DNA vaccines. In comparison to DNA inoculation alone, co-inoculation with low dosage of PA-MSHA enhanced specific immunoreactivity against HIV-1 Env in both cellular and humoral responses, and promoted antibody avidity maturation. However, high doses of adjuvant resulted in an immunosuppressive effect; a two- or three-inoculation regimen yielded low antibody responses and the two-inoculation regimen exhibited only a slight cellular immunity response. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the utility of PA-MSHA as an adjuvant to a DNA vaccine. Further research is needed to investigate the exact mechanisms through which PA-MSHA achieves its adjuvant effects on innate immune responses, especially on dendritic cells. PMID:23077664

  10. A cell-free enzymatic activity assay for the evaluation of HIV-1 drug resistance to protease inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Satoko; Masaoka, Takashi; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Morishita, Ryo; Iwatani, Yasumasa; Tatsumi, Masashi; Endo, Yaeta; Yamamoto, Naoki; Sugiura, Wataru; Ryo, Akihide

    2015-01-01

    Due to their high frequency of genomic mutations, human retroviruses often develop resistance to antiretroviral drugs. The emergence of drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a significant obstacle to the effective long-term treatment of HIV infection. The development of a rapid and versatile drug-susceptibility assay would enable acquisition of phenotypic information and facilitate determination of the appropriate choice of antiretroviral agents. In this study, we developed a novel in vitro method, termed the Cell-free drug susceptibility assay (CFDSA), for monitoring phenotypic information regarding the drug resistance of HIV-1 protease (PR). The CFDSA utilizes a wheat germ cell-free protein production system to synthesize enzymatically active HIV-1 PRs directly from PCR products amplified from HIV-1 molecular clones or clinical isolates in a rapid one-step procedure. Enzymatic activity of PRs can be readily measured by AlphaScreen (Amplified Luminescent Proximity Homogeneous Assay Screen) in the presence or absence of clinically used protease inhibitors (PIs). CFDSA measurement of drug resistance was based on the fold resistance to the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of various PIs. The CFDSA could serve as a non-infectious, rapid, accessible, and reliable alternative to infectious cell-based phenotypic assays for evaluation of PI-resistant HIV-1. PMID:26583013

  11. Neonatal intrahippocampal HIV-1 protein Tat1-86 injection: Neurobehavioral alterations in the absence of increased inflammatory cytokine activation

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Landhing M.; Fitting, Sylvia; Booze, Rosemarie M.; Webb, Katy M.; Mactutus, Charles F.

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric AIDS caused by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) remains one of the leading worldwide causes of childhood morbidity and mortality. HIV-1 proteins, such as Tat and gp120, are believed to play a crucial role in the neurotoxicity of pediatric HIV-1 infection. Detrimental effects on development, behavior, and neuroanatomy follow neonatal exposure to the HIV-1 viral toxins Tat1-72 and gp120. The present study investigated the neurobehavioral effects induced by the HIV-1 neurotoxic protein Tat1-86, which encodes the first and second exons of the Tat protein. In addition, the potential effects of HIV-1 toxic proteins Tat1-86 and gp120 on inflammatory pathways were examined in neonatal brains. Vehicle, 25 μg Tat1-86 or 100 ng gp120 was injected into the hippocampus of male Sprague-Dawley pups on postnatal day 1 (PD1). Tat1-86 induced developmental neurotoxic effects, as witnessed by delays in eye opening, delays in early reflex development and alterations in prepulse inhibition (PPI) and between-session habituation of locomotor activity. Overall, the neurotoxic profile of Tat1-86 appeared more profound in the developing nervous system in vivo relative to that seen with the first exon encoded Tat1-72 (Fitting et al., 2008b), as noted on measures of eye opening, righting reflex, and PPI. Neither the direct PD1 CNS injection of the viral HIV-1 protein variant Tat1-86, nor the HIV-1 envelope protein gp120, at doses sufficient to induce neurotoxicity, necessarily induced significant expression of the inflammatory cytokine IL-1β or inflammatory factors NFκ-β and Iκ-β. The findings agree well with clinical observations that indicate delays in developmental milestones of pediatric HIV-1 patients, and suggest that activation of inflammatory pathways is not an obligatory response to viral protein-induced neurotoxicity that is detectable with behavioral assessments. Moreover, the amino acids encoded by the second tat exon may have unique actions on the

  12. Exosomes from HIV-1-infected Cells Stimulate Production of Pro-inflammatory Cytokines through Trans-activating Response (TAR) RNA.

    PubMed

    Sampey, Gavin C; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Schwab, Angela; Barclay, Robert; Punya, Shreya; Chung, Myung-Chul; Hakami, Ramin M; Zadeh, Mohammad Asad; Lepene, Benjamin; Klase, Zachary A; El-Hage, Nazira; Young, Mary; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2016-01-15

    HIV-1 infection results in a chronic illness because long-term highly active antiretroviral therapy can lower viral titers to an undetectable level. However, discontinuation of therapy rapidly increases virus burden. Moreover, patients under highly active antiretroviral therapy frequently develop various metabolic disorders, neurocognitive abnormalities, and cardiovascular diseases. We have previously shown that exosomes containing trans-activating response (TAR) element RNA enhance susceptibility of undifferentiated naive cells to HIV-1 infection. This study indicates that exosomes from HIV-1-infected primary cells are highly abundant with TAR RNA as detected by RT-real time PCR. Interestingly, up to a million copies of TAR RNA/μl were also detected in the serum from HIV-1-infected humanized mice suggesting that TAR RNA may be stable in vivo. Incubation of exosomes from HIV-1-infected cells with primary macrophages resulted in a dramatic increase of proinflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNF-β, indicating that exosomes containing TAR RNA could play a direct role in control of cytokine gene expression. The intact TAR molecule was able to bind to PKR and TLR3 effectively, whereas the 5' and 3' stems (TAR microRNAs) bound best to TLR7 and -8 and none to PKR. Binding of TAR to PKR did not result in its phosphorylation, and therefore, TAR may be a dominant negative decoy molecule in cells. The TLR binding through either TAR RNA or TAR microRNA potentially can activate the NF-κB pathway and regulate cytokine expression. Collectively, these results imply that exosomes containing TAR RNA could directly affect the proinflammatory cytokine gene expression and may explain a possible mechanism of inflammation observed in HIV-1-infected patients under cART. PMID:26553869

  13. The Association of Human Cytomegalovirus with Biomarkers of Inflammation and Immune Activation in HIV-1-Infected Women.

    PubMed

    Lurain, Nell S; Hanson, Barbara A; Hotton, Anna L; Weber, Kathleen M; Cohen, Mardge H; Landay, Alan L

    2016-02-01

    Three groups of cytomegalovirus (CMV)-seropositive women (total n = 164) were selected from the Chicago Women's Interagency HIV-1 Study to investigate the association between CMV coinfection and immune activation: (1) HIV-1 viremic, (2) HIV-1 aviremic, and (3) HIV-1 uninfected. Quantitative measures of CMV serum IgG, CMV DNA, and serum biomarkers interleukin (IL)-6, soluble CD163 (sCD163), soluble CD14 (sCD14), and interferon gamma-induced protein (IP10) were obtained. Levels of CMV IgG and the serum biomarkers were significantly higher in the HIV-1 viremic group compared to the aviremic and uninfected groups (p < 0.001). No significant associations with CMV IgG levels were found for HIV-uninfected women. When each of the HIV-infected groups was analyzed, sCD14 levels in the viremic women were significantly associated with CMV IgG levels with p < 0.02 when adjusted for age, CD4 count, and HIV viral load. There was also a modest association (p = 0.036) with IL-6 from plasma and cervical vaginal lavage specimens both unadjusted and adjusted for CD4 count and HIV viral load. The association of CMV IgG level with sCD14 implicates the monocyte as a potential site for interaction of the two viruses, which eventually may lead to non-AIDS-defining pathological conditions. PMID:26422187

  14. Enzymatic synthesis of acyclic nucleoside thiophosphonate diphosphates: effect of the α-phosphorus configuration on HIV-1 RT activity.

    PubMed

    Priet, Stéphane; Roux, Loic; Saez-Ayala, Magali; Ferron, François; Canard, Bruno; Alvarez, Karine

    2015-05-01

    The acyclic nucleosides thiophosphonates (9-[2-(thiophosphonomethoxy)ethyl]adenine (S-PMEA) and (R)-9-[2-(thiophosphonomethoxy)propyl]adenine (S-PMPA), exhibit antiviral activity against HIV-1, -2 and HBV. Their diphosphate forms S-PMEApp and S-PMPApp, synthesized as stereoisomeric mixture, are potent inhibitors of wild-type (WT) HIV-1 RT. Understanding HIV-1 RT stereoselectivity, however, awaits resolution of the diphosphate forms into defined stereoisomers. To this aim, thiophosphonate monophosphates S-PMEAp and S-PMPAp were synthesized and used in a stereocontrolled enzyme-catalyzed phosphoryl transfer reaction involving either nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) or creatine kinase (CK) to obtain thiophosphonate diphosphates as separated isomers. We then quantified substrate preference of recombinant WT HIV-1 RT toward pure stereoisomers using in vitro steady-state kinetic analyses. The crystal structure of a complex between Dictyostelium NDPK and S-PMPApp at 2.32Å allowed to determine the absolute configuration at the α-phosphorus atom in relation to the stereo-preference of studied enzymes. The RP isomer of S-PMPApp and S-PMEApp are the preferred substrate over SP for both NDPK and HIV-1 RT. PMID:25766862

  15. Rev-RRE Functional Activity Differs Substantially Among Primary HIV-1 Isolates.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Patrick E; Tebit, Denis M; Rekosh, David; Hammarskjold, Marie-Louise

    2016-09-01

    The HIV-1 replication cycle requires the nucleocytoplasmic export of intron-containing viral RNAs, a process that is ordinarily restricted. HIV overcomes this by means of the viral Rev protein, which binds to an RNA secondary structure called the Rev response element (RRE) present in all unspliced or incompletely spliced viral RNA transcripts. The resulting mRNP complex is exported through interaction with cellular factors. The Rev-RRE binding interaction is increasingly understood to display remarkable structural plasticity, but little is known about how Rev-RRE sequence differences affect functional activity. To study this issue, we utilized a lentiviral vector assay in which vector titer is dependent on the activity of selected Rev-RRE pairs. We found that Rev-RRE functional activity varies significantly (up to 24-fold) between naturally occurring viral isolates. The activity differences of the Rev-RRE cognate pairs track closely with Rev, but not with RRE activity. This variation in Rev activity is not correlated with differences in Rev steady state protein levels. These data suggest that Rev sequence differences drive substantial variation in Rev-RRE functional activity between patients. Such variation may play a role in viral adaptation to different immune milieus within and between patients and may be significant in the establishment of latency. The identification of differences in Rev-RRE functional activity in naturally occurring isolates may also permit more efficient production of lentiviral vectors. PMID:27147495

  16. Structural and Thermodynamic Basis of Epitope Binding by Neutralizing and Nonneutralizing Forms of the Anti-HIV-1 Antibody 4E10

    PubMed Central

    Rujas, Edurne; Gulzar, Naveed; Morante, Koldo; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Scott, Jamie K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The 4E10 antibody recognizes the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of the HIV-1 Env glycoprotein gp41 transmembrane subunit, exhibiting one of the broadest neutralizing activities known to date. The neutralizing activity of 4E10 requires solvent-exposed hydrophobic residues at the apex of the complementarity-determining region (CDR) H3 loop, but the molecular basis for this requirement has not been clarified. Here, we report the cocrystal structures and the energetic parameters of binding of a peptide bearing the 4E10-epitope sequence (4E10ep) to nonneutralizing versions of the 4E10 Fab. Nonneutralizing Fabs were obtained by shortening and decreasing the hydrophobicity of the CDR-H3 loop (termed ΔLoop) or by substituting the two tryptophan residues of the CDR-H3 apex with Asp residues (termed WDWD), which also decreases hydrophobicity but preserves the length of the loop. The analysis was complemented by the first crystal structure of the 4E10 Fab in its ligand-free state. Collectively, the data ruled out major conformational changes of CDR-H3 at any stage during the binding process (equilibrium or transition state). Although these mutations did not impact the affinity of wild-type Fab for the 4E10ep in solution, the two nonneutralizing versions of 4E10 were deficient in binding to MPER inserted in the plasma membrane (mimicking the environment faced by the antibody in vivo). The conclusions of our structure-function analysis strengthen the idea that to exert effective neutralization, the hydrophobic apex of the solvent-exposed CDR-H3 loop must recognize an antigenic structure more complex than just the linear α-helical epitope and likely constrained by the viral membrane lipids. IMPORTANCE The broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 4E10 antibody blocks infection caused by nearly all viral strains and isolates examined thus far. However, 4E10 (or 4E10-like) antibodies are rarely found in HIV-1-infected individuals or elicited through vaccination

  17. Targeted HIV-1 Latency Reversal Using CRISPR/Cas9-Derived Transcriptional Activator Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bialek, Julia K.; Dunay, Gábor A.; Voges, Maike; Schäfer, Carola; Spohn, Michael; Stucka, Rolf; Hauber, Joachim; Lange, Ulrike C.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 technology is currently considered the most advanced tool for targeted genome engineering. Its sequence-dependent specificity has been explored for locus-directed transcriptional modulation. Such modulation, in particular transcriptional activation, has been proposed as key approach to overcome silencing of dormant HIV provirus in latently infected cellular reservoirs. Currently available agents for provirus activation, so-called latency reversing agents (LRAs), act indirectly through cellular pathways to induce viral transcription. However, their clinical performance remains suboptimal, possibly because reservoirs have diverse cellular identities and/or proviral DNA is intractable to the induced pathways. We have explored two CRISPR/Cas9-derived activator systems as targeted approaches to induce dormant HIV-1 proviral DNA. These systems recruit multiple transcriptional activation domains to the HIV 5’ long terminal repeat (LTR), for which we have identified an optimal target region within the LTR U3 sequence. Using this target region, we demonstrate transcriptional activation of proviral genomes via the synergistic activation mediator complex in various in culture model systems for HIV latency. Observed levels of induction are comparable or indeed higher than treatment with established LRAs. Importantly, activation is complete, leading to production of infective viral particles. Our data demonstrate that CRISPR/Cas9-derived technologies can be applied to counteract HIV latency and may therefore represent promising novel approaches in the quest for HIV elimination. PMID:27341108

  18. Single DNA molecule stretching measures the activity of chemicals that target the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein

    PubMed Central

    Cruceanu, Margareta; Stephen, Andrew G.; Beuning, Penny J.; Gorelick, Robert J.; Fisher, Robert J.; Williams, Mark C.

    2006-01-01

    We develop a biophysical method for investigating chemical compounds that target the nucleic acid chaperone activity of HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NCp7). We used an optical tweezers instrument to stretch single λ-DNA molecules through the helix-to-coil transition in the presence of NCp7 and various chemical compounds. The change in the helix-coil transition width induced by wild-type NCp7 and its zinc finger variants correlates with in vitro nucleic acid chaperone activity measurements and in vivo assays. The compound-NC interaction measured here reduces NCp7’s capability to alter the transition width. Purified compounds from the NCI Diversity set, 119889, 119911, and 119913 reduce the chaperone activity of 5 nM NC in aqueous solution at 10 nM, 25 nM, and 100 nM concentration, respectively. Similarly, gallein reduced the activity of 4 nM NC at 100 nM concentration. Further analysis allows us to dissect the impact of each compound on both sequence-specific and non-sequence-specific DNA binding of NC, two of the main components of NC’s nucleic acid chaperone activity. These results suggest that DNA stretching experiments can be used to screen chemical compounds targeting NC proteins, and to further explore the mechanisms by which these compounds interact with NC and alter its nucleic acid chaperone activity. PMID:17034752

  19. A novel ribonuclease with potent HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory activity from cultured mushroom Schizophyllum commune.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong-Chang; Zhang, Guo-Qing; Ng, Tzi-Bun; Wang, He-Xiang

    2011-10-01

    A 20-kDa ribonuclease (RNase) was purified from fresh fruiting bodies of cultured Schizophyllum commune mushrooms. The RNase was not adsorbed on Affi-gel blue gel but adsorbed on DEAE-cellulose and CM-cellulose. It exhibited maximal RNase activity at pH 6.0 and 70°C. It demonstrated the highest ribonucleolytic activity toward poly (U) (379.5 μ/mg), the second highest activity toward poly (C) (244.7 μ/mg), less activity toward poly (A) (167.4 μ/mg), and much weaker activity toward poly (G) (114.5 μ/mg). The RNase inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with an IC(50) of 65 μM. No effect on [(3)H-methyl]-thymidine uptake by lymphoma MBL2 cells and leukemia L1210 cells was observed at 100 μM concentration of the RNase. A comparison of RNases from S. commune and Volvariella volvacea revealed that they demonstrated some similarities in N-terminal amino acid sequence, optimum pH and polyhomoribonucleotide specificity. However, some differences in chromatographic behavior and molecular mass were observed. PMID:22068498

  20. Anti-HIV-1 nanotherapeutics: promises and challenges for the future

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Supriya D; Aalinkeel, Ravikumar; Law, Wing-Cheung; Reynolds, Jessica L; Nair, Bindukumar B; Sykes, Donald E; Yong, Ken-Tye; Roy, Indrajit; Prasad, Paras N; Schwartz, Stanley A

    2012-01-01

    The advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has significantly improved the prognosis for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, however the adverse side effects associated with prolonged HAART therapy use continue. Although systemic viral load can be undetectable, the virus remains sequestered in anatomically privileged sites within the body. Nanotechnology-based delivery systems are being developed to target the virus within different tissue compartments and are being evaluated for their safety and efficacy. The current review outlines the various nanomaterials that are becoming increasingly used in biomedical applications by virtue of their robustness, safety, multimodality, and multifunctionality. Nanotechnology can revolutionize the field of HIV medicine by not only improving diagnosis, but also by improving delivery of antiretrovirals to targeted regions in the body and by significantly enhancing the efficacy of the currently available antiretroviral medications. PMID:23055735

  1. HIV-1 Structural Proteins Serve as PAMPs for TLR2 Heterodimers Significantly Increasing Infection and Innate Immune Activation

    PubMed Central

    Henrick, Bethany M.; Yao, Xiao-Dan; Rosenthal, Kenneth Lee

    2015-01-01

    Immune activation is critical to HIV infection and pathogenesis; however, our understanding of HIV innate immune activation remains incomplete. Recently we demonstrated that soluble TLR2 (sTLR2) physically inhibited HIV-induced NFκB activation and inflammation, as well as HIV-1 infection. In light of these findings, we hypothesized that HIV-1 structural proteins may serve as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) for cellular TLR2 heterodimers. These studies made use of primary human T cells and TZMbl cells stably transformed to express TLR2 (TZMbl-2). Our results demonstrated that cells expressing TLR2 showed significantly increased proviral DNA compared to cells lacking TLR2, and mechanistically this may be due to a TLR2-mediated increased CCR5 expression. Importantly, we show that HIV-1 structural proteins, p17, p24, and gp41, act as viral PAMPs signaling through TLR2 and its heterodimers leading to significantly increased immune activation via the NFκB signaling pathway. Using co-immunoprecipitation and a dot blot method, we demonstrated direct protein interactions between these viral PAMPs and TLR2, while only p17 and gp41 bound to TLR1. Specifically, TLR2/1 heterodimer recognized p17 and gp41, while p24 lead to immune activation through TLR2/6. These results were confirmed using TLR2/1 siRNA knock down assays which ablated p17 and gp41-induced cellular activation and through studies of HEK293 cells expressing selected TLRs. Interestingly, our results show in the absence of TLR6, p24 bound to TLR2 and blocked p17 and gp41-induced activation, thus providing a novel mechanism by which HIV-1 can manipulate innate sensing. Taken together, our results identified, for the first time, novel HIV-1 PAMPs that play a role in TLR2-mediated cellular activation and increased proviral DNA. These findings have important implications for our fundamental understanding of HIV-1 immune activation and pathogenesis, as well as HIV-1 vaccine development. PMID:26347747

  2. Cell type specificity and structural determinants of IRES activity from the 5' leaders of different HIV-1 transcripts.

    PubMed

    Plank, Terra-Dawn M; Whitehurst, James T; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2013-07-01

    Internal ribosome entry site (IRES) RNAs are important regulators of gene expression, but their diverse molecular mechanisms remain partially understood. The HIV-1 gag transcript leader contains an IRES that may be a good model for understanding the function of many other IRESs. We investigated the possibility that this IRES' function is linked to both the structure of the RNA and its cellular environment. We find that in the context of a bicistronic reporter construct, HIV-1 gag IRES' activity is cell type-specific, with higher activity in T-cell culture systems that model the natural target cells for HIV-1 infection. This finding underscores how an IRES may be fine tuned to function in certain cells, perhaps owing to cell type-specific protein factors. Using RNA probing and mutagenesis, we demonstrate that the HIV-1 gag IRES does not use pre-folded RNA structure to drive function, a finding that gives insight into how conformationally dynamic IRESs operate. Furthermore, we find that a common exon drives IRES activity in a diverse set of alternatively spliced transcripts. We propose a mechanism in which a structurally plastic RNA element confers the ability to initiate translation internally, and activity from this common element is modulated by 3' nucleotides added by alternative splicing. PMID:23661682

  3. Cell type specificity and structural determinants of IRES activity from the 5′ leaders of different HIV-1 transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Plank, Terra-Dawn M.; Whitehurst, James T.; Kieft, Jeffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    Internal ribosome entry site (IRES) RNAs are important regulators of gene expression, but their diverse molecular mechanisms remain partially understood. The HIV-1 gag transcript leader contains an IRES that may be a good model for understanding the function of many other IRESs. We investigated the possibility that this IRES’ function is linked to both the structure of the RNA and its cellular environment. We find that in the context of a bicistronic reporter construct, HIV-1 gag IRES’ activity is cell type-specific, with higher activity in T-cell culture systems that model the natural target cells for HIV-1 infection. This finding underscores how an IRES may be fine tuned to function in certain cells, perhaps owing to cell type-specific protein factors. Using RNA probing and mutagenesis, we demonstrate that the HIV-1 gag IRES does not use pre-folded RNA structure to drive function, a finding that gives insight into how conformationally dynamic IRESs operate. Furthermore, we find that a common exon drives IRES activity in a diverse set of alternatively spliced transcripts. We propose a mechanism in which a structurally plastic RNA element confers the ability to initiate translation internally, and activity from this common element is modulated by 3′ nucleotides added by alternative splicing. PMID:23661682

  4. HIV-1 TAR RNA-binding proteins control TAT activation of translation in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Braddock, M; Powell, R; Blanchard, A D; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M

    1993-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) gene expression is activated by the viral TAT protein that interacts with an RNA sequence, TAR, located at the 5' end of all viral mRNAs. TAT functions primarily as a transcriptional activator in mammalian cells. However, in Xenopus oocytes TAT functions primarily as a translational activator. TAR is an RNA structure comprising a partially base-paired stem, a tripyrimidine bulge in the upper stem, and an unpaired six-nucleotide loop. In vitro, TAT binds directly to the bulge with no requirement for the loop. In vivo, however, mutations in the loop abolish TAT activation of transcription and translation, implying a requirement for TAR-binding cellular factors. We now provide genetic evidence for the presence of two TAR-specific cellular factors in Xenopus oocytes. These factors display independent and mutually exclusive interactions with either the loop or the bulge region of TAR. Furthermore, by using in vivo RNA competition assays we show that the cellular factors regulate the accessibility of the TAT binding site. The fact that Xenopus oocytes contain factors that specifically interact with a human viral RNA sequence might indicate that the TAT/TAR interaction is subverting a conserved pathway in the cell. PMID:8422967

  5. Poly(ethylene glycol) enclatherated pectin-mucin submicron matrices for intravaginal anti-HIV-1 drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Mashingaidze, Felix; Choonara, Yahya E; Kumar, Pradeep; du Toit, Lisa C; Maharaj, Vinesh; Buchmann, Eckhart; Pillay, Viness

    2016-04-30

    This paper explores the potential of polyethylene glycol enclatherated pectin-mucin (PEG-encl-PEC:MUC) submicron matrices (SMMs) as an intravaginal drug delivery system capable of delivering an anti-HIV-1 agent (zidovudine; AZT) over a prolonged duration. A three factor and three level (3(3)) Box-Behnken statistical design was employed to optimize the SMMs. Optimized PEG-encl-PEC:MUC SMMs prepared as a stable W/O emulsion (determined by the degree of reversible colloidal phenomena) were spherical with a mean particle size of 270.6±5.533nm and mean zeta potential of -34.4±0.539mV. The microencapsulation of AZT and the hydrogen bonding mediated shielding of AZT by SMMs was confirmed by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) analysis. The thermochemical (differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis) data proposed that Ca(2+)-based macromolecular ionic crosslinking as well as the intermolecular interactions may be responsible for the thermal stability of the delivery system. The partially amorphous nature of drug-loaded SMMs, as confirmed by X-ray diffraction patterns, further strengthened the matricization of AZT into the pectin-mucin matrix. In vitro drug release studies from the SMMs showed approximately 91% zidovudine release in simulated vaginal fluid (SVF) and 94% in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) in 24h. The mean dissolution time (MDT) of zidovudine from the SMMs was 5.974h. The attainment of required dimensional structure and drug release profiles from SMMs highlights the potential of their inclusion into a secondary carrier system for extended and controlled intravaginal stay. PMID:26943973

  6. Iron chelators ICL670 and 311 inhibit HIV-1 transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Debebe, Zufan; Ammosova, Tatyana; Jerebtsova, Marina; Kurantsin-Mills, Joseph; Niu, Xiaomei; Charles, Sharroya; Richardson, Des R.; Ray, Patricio E.; Gordeuk, Victor R.; Nekhai, Sergei

    2007-10-25

    HIV-1 replication is induced by an excess of iron and iron chelation by desferrioxamine (DFO) inhibits viral replication by reducing proliferation of infected cells. Treatment of cells with DFO and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (311) inhibit expression of proteins that regulate cell-cycle progression, including cycle-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2). Our recent studies showed that CDK2 participates in HIV-1 transcription and viral replication suggesting that inhibition of CDK2 by iron chelators might also affect HIV-1 transcription. Here we evaluated the effect of a clinically approved orally effective iron chelator, 4-[3,5-bis-(hydroxyphenyl)-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl]-benzoic acid (ICL670) and 311 on HIV-1 transcription. Both ICL670 and 311 inhibited Tat-induced HIV-1 transcription in CEM-T cells, 293T and HeLa cells. Neither ICL670 nor 311 induced cytotoxicity at concentrations that inhibited HIV-1 transcription. The chelators decreased cellular activity of CDK2 and reduced HIV-1 Tat phosphorylation by CDK2. Neither ICL670A or 311 decreased CDK9 protein level but significantly reduced association of CDK9 with cyclin T1 and reduced phosphorylation of Ser-2 residues of RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain. In conclusion, our findings add to the evidence that iron chelators can inhibit HIV-1 transcription by deregulating CDK2 and CDK9. Further consideration should be given to the development of iron chelators for future anti-retroviral therapeutics.

  7. A novel small-molecule inhibitor of HIV-1 entry

    PubMed Central

    Heredia, Alonso; Latinovic, Olga S; Barbault, Florent; de Leeuw, Erik PH

    2015-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral therapy has transformed HIV-1 infection into a managed condition with near-normal life expectancy. However, a significant number of patients remain with limited therapeutic options due to HIV-1 resistance, side effects, or drug costs. Further, it is likely that current drugs will not retain efficacy, due to risks of side effects and transmitted resistance. Results We describe compound 5660386 (3-ethyl-2-[3-(1,3,3-trimethyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-ylidene)-1-propen-1-yl]-1,3-benzothiazol-3-ium) as a novel inhibitor of HIV-1 entry. Compound 5660386 inhibits HIV-1 entry in cell lines and primary cells, binds to HIV-1 envelope protein, and inhibits the interaction of GP120 to CD4. Further, compound 5660386 showed a unique and broad-range activity against primary HIV-1 isolates from different subtypes and geographical areas. Conclusion Development of small-molecule entry inhibitors of HIV-1 such as 5660386 may lead to novel classes of anti-HIV-1 therapeutics. These inhibitors may be particularly effective against viruses resistant to current antiretroviral drugs and could have potential applications in both treatment and prevention. PMID:26491257

  8. Innate Immune Activity Correlates with CD4 T Cell-Associated HIV-1 DNA Decline during Latency-Reversing Treatment with Panobinostat

    PubMed Central

    Olesen, Rikke; Vigano, Selena; Rasmussen, Thomas A.; Søgaard, Ole S.; Ouyang, Zhengyu; Buzon, Maria; Bashirova, Arman; Carrington, Mary; Palmer, Sarah; Brinkmann, Christel R.; Yu, Xu G.; Østergaard, Lars; Tolstrup, Martin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The pharmaceutical reactivation of dormant HIV-1 proviruses by histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) represents a possible strategy to reduce the reservoir of HIV-1-infected cells in individuals treated with suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). However, the effects of such latency-reversing agents on the viral reservoir size are likely to be influenced by host immune responses. Here, we analyzed the immune factors associated with changes in proviral HIV-1 DNA levels during treatment with the potent HDACi panobinostat in a human clinical trial involving 15 cART-treated HIV-1-infected patients. We observed that the magnitude, breadth, and cytokine secretion profile of HIV-1-specific CD8 T cell responses were unrelated to changes in HIV-1 DNA levels in CD4 T cells during panobinostat treatment. In contrast, the proportions of CD3− CD56+ total NK cells and CD16+ CD56dim NK cells were inversely correlated with HIV-1 DNA levels throughout the study, and changes in HIV-1 DNA levels during panobinostat treatment were negatively associated with the corresponding changes in CD69+ NK cells. Decreasing levels of HIV-1 DNA during latency-reversing treatment were also related to the proportions of plasmacytoid dendritic cells, to distinct expression patterns of interferon-stimulated genes, and to the expression of the IL28B CC genotype. Together, these data suggest that innate immune activity can critically modulate the effects of latency-reversing agents on the viral reservoir and may represent a target for future immunotherapeutic interventions in HIV-1 eradication studies. IMPORTANCE Currently available antiretroviral drugs are highly effective in suppressing HIV-1 replication, but the virus persists, despite treatment, in a latent form that does not actively express HIV-1 gene products. One approach to eliminate these cells, colloquially termed the “shock-and-kill” strategy, focuses on the use of latency-reversing agents that induce active

  9. Requirement for HIV-1 TAR sequences for Tat activation in rodent cells.

    PubMed

    Sutton, J A; Braddock, M; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M

    1995-01-10

    HIV-1 gene expression is activated via an interaction between the virally encoded Tat protein and a target RNA, TAR. TAR is located at the immediate 5' end of all viral mRNAs and comprises a partially base-paired stem with a tripyrimidine bulge in the upper stem and a hexanucleotide loop. In vitro, Tat binds specifically to the bulge and upper stem region with no requirement for the loop. In contrast, when Tat activation is analyzed in primate cells, mutations in the loop abolish activation, suggesting a critical role for loop binding cellular factors. However, in rodent cells the reverse is true. Messages with a mutation in the TAR loop are activated whereas messages harboring a wild-type TAR sequence are not activated. By testing the effect of mutations in the bulge and stem in the context of mutation in the loop we now show that this loop-independent activation by Tat in rodent cells requires the critical bulge-stem sequences needed for Tat binding in vitro. These data suggest that in rodent cells, as in vitro, Tat does not require a loop binding cofactor. In rodent cells containing human chromosome 12 (CHO12), however, Tat activation is both bulge and loop dependent. It appears that rodent cells, but not CHO12 cells, are refractory to the normal Tat/TAR activation pathway not by virtue of lacking a loop binding cofactor, but rather by the presence of a loop binding inhibitor of either Tat binding or the activation process. PMID:7530399

  10. Blocking Type I Interferon Production: A New Therapeutic Option to Reduce the HIV-1-Induced Immune Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ries, Moritz; Pritschet, Kathrin; Schmidt, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy has dramatically improved the morbidity and mortality of HIV-1-infected individuals. A total of 25 licensed drugs provide the basis for an optimized virus-suppressive treatment of nearly each subject. The promises of immune reconstitution and normal life expectancy, however, fall short for a number of patients, either through inadequate recovery of CD4+ T-cell counts or the occurrence of non-AIDS defining malignancies. In this respect, the prevalence of Epstein-Barr virus-associated Hodgkin lymphoma and human papillomavirus-related anal neoplasia is rising in aging HIV-1-infected individuals despite antiretroviral therapy. An important cause appears to be the HIV-1-induced chronic immune activation, propagated by inappropriate release of proinflammatory cytokines and type I interferons. This immune dysregulation can be reduced in vitro by inhibitors blocking the endosomal acidification. Recent data suggest that this concept is also of relevance in vivo, which opens the door for adjuvant immunomodulatory therapies in HIV-1 infection. PMID:22203858

  11. Membrane-Active Sequences within gp41 Membrane Proximal External Region (MPER) Modulate MPER-Containing Peptidyl Fusion Inhibitor Activity and the Biosynthesis of HIV-1 Structural Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Si Min; Jejcic, Alenka; Tam, James P.; Vahlne, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The membrane proximal external region (MPER) is a highly conserved membrane-active region located at the juxtamembrane positions within class I viral fusion glycoproteins and essential for membrane fusion events during viral entry. The MPER in the human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) envelope protein (Env) interacts with the lipid bilayers through a cluster of tryptophan (Trp) residues and a C-terminal cholesterol-interacting motif. The inclusion of the MPER N-terminal sequence contributes to the membrane reactivity and anti-viral efficacy of the first two anti-HIV peptidyl fusion inhibitors T20 and T1249. As a type I transmembrane protein, Env also interacts with the cellular membranes during its biosynthesis and trafficking. Here we investigated the roles of MPER membrane-active sequences during both viral entry and assembly, specifically, their roles in the design of peptidyl fusion inhibitors and the biosynthesis of viral structural proteins. We found that elimination of the membrane-active elements in MPER peptides, namely, penta Trp→alanine (Ala) substitutions and the disruption of the C-terminal cholesterol-interacting motif through deletion inhibited the anti-viral effect against the pseudotyped HIV-1. Furthermore, as compared to C-terminal dimerization, N-terminal dimerization of MPER peptides and N-terminal extension with five helix-forming residues enhanced their anti-viral efficacy substantially. The secondary structure study revealed that the penta-Trp→Ala substitutions also increased the helical content in the MPER sequence, which prompted us to study the biological relevance of such mutations in pre-fusion Env. We observed that Ala mutations of Trp664, Trp668 and Trp670 in MPER moderately lowered the intracellular and intraviral contents of Env while significantly elevating the content of another viral structural protein, p55/Gag and its derivative p24/capsid. The data suggest a role of the gp41 MPER in the membrane-reactive events during

  12. Neutralizing antibodies decrease the envelope fluidity of HIV-1

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Shinji Monde, Kazuaki; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Kimura, Tetsuya; Maeda, Yosuke; Yusa, Keisuke

    2008-01-05

    For successful penetration of HIV-1, the formation of a fusion pore may be required in order to accumulate critical numbers of fusion-activated gp41 with the help of fluidization of the plasma membrane and viral envelope. An increase in temperature to 40 {sup o}C after viral adsorption at 25 {sup o}C enhanced the infectivity by 1.4-fold. The enhanced infectivity was inhibited by an anti-CXCR4 peptide, T140, and anti-V3 monoclonal antibodies (0.5{beta} and 694/98-D) by post-attachment neutralization, but not by non-neutralizing antibodies (670-30D and 246-D) specific for the C5 of gp120 and cluster I of gp41, respectively. Anti-HLA-II and an anti-HTLV-I gp46 antibody, LAT27, neutralized the molecule-carrying HIV-1{sub C-2(MT-2)}. The anti-V3 antibodies suppressed the fluidity of the HIV-1{sub C-2} envelope, whereas the non-neutralizing antibodies did not. The anti-HLA-II antibody decreased the envelope fluidity of HIV-1{sub C-2(MT-2)}, but not that of HIV-1{sub C-2}. Therefore, fluidity suppression by these antibodies represents an important neutralization mechanism, in addition to inhibition of viral attachment.

  13. Sargassum fusiforme fraction is a potent and specific inhibitor of HIV-1 fusion and reverse transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Paskaleva, Elena E; Lin, Xudong; Duus, Karen; McSharry, James J; Veille, Jean-Claude L; Thornber, Carol; Liu, Yanze; Lee, David Yu-Wei; Canki, Mario

    2008-01-01

    Sargassum fusiforme (Harvey) Setchell has been shown to be a highly effective inhibitor of HIV-1 infection. To identify its mechanism of action, we performed bioactivity-guided fractionation on Sargassum fusiforme mixture. Here, we report isolation of a bioactive fraction SP4-2 (S. fusiforme), which at 8 μg/ml inhibited HIV-1 infection by 86.9%, with IC50 value of 3.7 μg. That represents 230-fold enhancement of antiretroviral potency as compared to the whole extract. Inhibition was mediated against both CXCR4 (X4) and CCR5 (R5) tropic HIV-1. Specifically, 10 μg/ml SP4-2 blocked HIV-1 fusion and entry by 53%. This effect was reversed by interaction of SP4-2 with sCD4, suggesting that S. fusiforme inhibits HIV-1 infection by blocking CD4 receptor, which also explained observed inhibition of both X4 and R5-tropic HIV-1. SP4-2 also inhibited HIV-1 replication after virus entry, by directly inhibiting HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) in a dose dependent manner by up to 79%. We conclude that the SP4-2 fraction contains at least two distinct and biologically active molecules, one that inhibits HIV-1 fusion by interacting with CD4 receptor, and another that directly inhibits HIV-1 RT. We propose that S. fusiforme is a lead candidate for anti-HIV-1 drug development. PMID:18197976

  14. Cocaine promotes both initiation and elongation phase of HIV-1 transcription by activating NF-κB and MSK1 and inducing selective epigenetic modifications at HIV-1 LTR

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, Geetaram; Farley, Kalamo; El-Hage, Nazira; Aiamkitsumrit, Benjamas; Fassnacht, Ryan; Kashanchi, Fatah; Ochem, Alex; Simon, Gary L.; Karn, Jonathan; Hauser, Kurt F.; Tyagi, Mudit

    2015-09-15

    Cocaine accelerates human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) replication by altering specific cell-signaling and epigenetic pathways. We have elucidated the underlying molecular mechanisms through which cocaine exerts its effect in myeloid cells, a major target of HIV-1 in central nervous system (CNS). We demonstrate that cocaine treatment promotes HIV-1 gene expression by activating both nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-ĸB) and mitogen- and stress-activated kinase 1 (MSK1). MSK1 subsequently catalyzes the phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine 10, and p65 subunit of NF-ĸB at 276th serine residue. These modifications enhance the interaction of NF-ĸB with P300 and promote the recruitment of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) to the HIV-1 LTR, supporting the development of an open/relaxed chromatin configuration, and facilitating the initiation and elongation phases of HIV-1 transcription. Results are also confirmed in primary monocyte derived macrophages (MDM). Overall, our study provides detailed insights into cocaine-driven HIV-1 transcription and replication. - Highlights: • Cocaine induces the initiation phase of HIV transcription by activating NF-ĸB. • Cocaine induced NF-ĸB phosphorylation promotes its interaction with P300. • Cocaine enhances the elongation phase of HIV transcription by stimulating MSK1. • Cocaine activated MSK1 catalyzes the phosphorylation of histone H3 at its Ser10. • Cocaine induced H3S10 phosphorylation facilitates the recruitment of P-TEFb at LTR.

  15. Active replication of HIV-1 at the lymphoepithelial surface of the tonsil.

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, S. S.; Tenner-Racz, K.; Racz, P.; Wenig, B. M.; Hansen, C. H.; Heffner, D.; Nelson, A. M.; Pope, M.; Steinman, R. M.

    1997-01-01

    Cells that are infected with HIV-1 were visualized at the mucosal surface of the nasopharyngeal and palatine tonsils in 14 specimens from patients with CD4+ T-cell counts of 200 to 900/microliter and 2- to 10-year histories of HIV-1 infection. Most of the cells with intracellular HIV-1 protein were small but multinucleated. The majority of these syncytia could be double labeled for HIV-1 RNA and a dendritic cell marker S100. In the palatine tonsil, the infected cells were not found in the stratified squamous epithelium that is adjacent to the pharynx. Instead, the S100+ infected syncytia were localized to the surface of tonsil invaginations or crypts. This mucosa, termed lymphoepithelium, contains antigen-transporting M cells that lie above regions where S100+ dendritic cells are juxtaposed with CD4+ lymphocytes. Likewise, infected cells were found in lymphoepithelium and not respiratory epithelium of nasopharyngeal tonsils or adenoids. We propose that lymphoepithelia, the histological term that describes the specialized regions where antigens access mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue, are sites where HIV-1 replication can be enhanced in syncytia derived from dendritic cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9212735

  16. Genetic variation of the HIV-1 integrase region in newly diagnosed anti-retroviral drug-naïve patients with HIV/AIDS in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, J-Y; Kim, E-J; Choi, J-Y; Kwon, O-K; Kim, G J; Choi, S Y; Kim, S S

    2011-08-01

    The survival time of HIV/AIDS patients in Korea has increased since HAART (highly active anti-retroviral therapy) was introduced. However, the occurrence of drug-resistant strains requires new anti-retroviral drugs, one of which, an integrase inhibitor (INI), was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2007. INIs have been used for therapy in many countries and are about to be employed in Korea. Therefore, it is important to identify basic mutant variants prior to the introduction of INIs in order to estimate their efficacy. To monitor potential drug-resistant INI mutations in Korean HIV/AIDS patients, the polymorphism of the int gene was investigated together with the pol gene using a genotypic assay for 75 randomly selected Korean HIV-1 patients newly diagnosed in 2007. The drug-resistant mutation sequences were analysed using the Stanford HIV DB and the International AIDS Society resistance testing-USA panel (IAS-USA). Seventy strains of Korean subtype B were compared with foreign subtype-B strains, and there were no significantly different variants of the int gene region in the study population. Major mutation sites in the integrase (E92Q, F121Y, G140A/S, Y143C/R, Q148H/R/K and N155H) were not detected, and only a few minor mutation sites (L74M, V151I, E157Q, V165I, I203M, S230N and D232N) were identified in 21 strains (28%). Resistance due to mutations in the pol gene was observed in a single strain (1.3%) resistant to protease inhibitors (PIs) and in four strains (5.3%) resistant to reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTIs). In summary, this demonstrates that INIs will be susceptible to drug naïve HIV/AIDS patients in Korea. PMID:20946407

  17. Effector kinase coupling enables high-throughput screens for direct HIV-1 Nef antagonists with antiretroviral activity.

    PubMed

    Emert-Sedlak, Lori A; Narute, Purushottam; Shu, Sherry T; Poe, Jerrod A; Shi, Haibin; Yanamala, Naveena; Alvarado, John Jeff; Lazo, John S; Yeh, Joanne I; Johnston, Paul A; Smithgall, Thomas E

    2013-01-24

    HIV-1 Nef, a critical AIDS progression factor, represents an important target protein for antiretroviral drug discovery. Because Nef lacks intrinsic enzymatic activity, we developed an assay that couples Nef to the activation of Hck, a Src family member and Nef effector protein. Using this assay, we screened a large, diverse chemical library and identified small molecules that block Nef-dependent Hck activity with low micromolar potency. Of these, a diphenylpyrazolo compound demonstrated submicromolar potency in HIV-1 replication assays against a broad range of primary Nef variants. This compound binds directly to Nef via a pocket formed by the Nef dimerization interface and disrupts Nef dimerization in cells. Coupling of nonenzymatic viral accessory factors to host cell effector proteins amenable to high-throughput screening may represent a general strategy for the discovery of new antimicrobial agents. PMID:23352142

  18. Structure of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase with the Inhibitor -thujaplicinol Bound at the RNase H Active Site

    SciTech Connect

    Himmel, D.; Maegley, K; Pauly, T; Bauman, J; Das, K; Dharia, C; Clark, Jr., A; Ryan, K; Hickey, M; et al.

    2009-01-01

    Novel inhibitors are needed to counteract the rapid emergence of drug-resistant HIV variants. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) has both DNA polymerase and RNase H (RNH) enzymatic activities, but approved drugs that inhibit RT target the polymerase. Inhibitors that act against new targets, such as RNH, should be effective against all of the current drug-resistant variants. Here, we present 2.80 {angstrom} and 2.04 {angstrom} resolution crystal structures of an RNH inhibitor, {beta}-thujaplicinol, bound at the RNH active site of both HIV-1 RT and an isolated RNH domain. {beta}-thujaplicinol chelates two divalent metal ions at the RNH active site. We provide biochemical evidence that {beta}-thujaplicinol is a slow-binding RNH inhibitor with noncompetitive kinetics and suggest that it forms a tropylium ion that interacts favorably with RT and the RNA:DNA substrate.

  19. Impaired NK Cell Activation and Chemotaxis toward Dendritic Cells Exposed to Complement-Opsonized HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Ellegård, Rada; Crisci, Elisa; Andersson, Jonas; Shankar, Esaki M.; Nyström, Sofia; Hinkula, Jorma

    2015-01-01

    Mucosa resident dendritic cells (DCs) may represent one of the first immune cells that HIV-1 encounters during sexual transmission. The virions in body fluids can be opsonized with complement factors because of HIV-mediated triggering of the complement cascade, and this appears to influence numerous aspects of the immune defense targeting the virus. One key attribute of host defense is the ability to attract immune cells to the site of infection. In this study, we investigated whether the opsonization of HIV with complement (C-HIV) or a mixture of complement and Abs (CI-HIV) affected the cytokine and chemokine responses generated by DCs, as well as their ability to attract other immune cells. We found that the expression levels of CXCL8, CXCL10, CCL3, and CCL17 were lowered after exposure to either C-HIV or CI-HIV relative to free HIV (F-HIV). DCs exposed to F-HIV induced higher cell migration, consisting mainly of NK cells, compared with opsonized virus, and the chemotaxis of NK cells was dependent on CCL3 and CXCL10. NK cell exposure to supernatants derived from HIV-exposed DCs showed that F-HIV induced phenotypic activation (e.g., increased levels of TIM3, CD69, and CD25) and effector function (e.g., production of IFNγ and killing of target cells) in NK cells, whereas C-HIV and CI-HIV did not. The impairment of NK cell recruitment by DCs exposed to complement-opsonized HIV and the lack of NK activation may contribute to the failure of innate immune responses to control HIV at the site of initial mucosa infection. PMID:26157174

  20. Impaired NK Cell Activation and Chemotaxis toward Dendritic Cells Exposed to Complement-Opsonized HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Ellegård, Rada; Crisci, Elisa; Andersson, Jonas; Shankar, Esaki M; Nyström, Sofia; Hinkula, Jorma; Larsson, Marie

    2015-08-15

    Mucosa resident dendritic cells (DCs) may represent one of the first immune cells that HIV-1 encounters during sexual transmission. The virions in body fluids can be opsonized with complement factors because of HIV-mediated triggering of the complement cascade, and this appears to influence numerous aspects of the immune defense targeting the virus. One key attribute of host defense is the ability to attract immune cells to the site of infection. In this study, we investigated whether the opsonization of HIV with complement (C-HIV) or a mixture of complement and Abs (CI-HIV) affected the cytokine and chemokine responses generated by DCs, as well as their ability to attract other immune cells. We found that the expression levels of CXCL8, CXCL10, CCL3, and CCL17 were lowered after exposure to either C-HIV or CI-HIV relative to free HIV (F-HIV). DCs exposed to F-HIV induced higher cell migration, consisting mainly of NK cells, compared with opsonized virus, and the chemotaxis of NK cells was dependent on CCL3 and CXCL10. NK cell exposure to supernatants derived from HIV-exposed DCs showed that F-HIV induced phenotypic activation (e.g., increased levels of TIM3, CD69, and CD25) and effector function (e.g., production of IFNγ and killing of target cells) in NK cells, whereas C-HIV and CI-HIV did not. The impairment of NK cell recruitment by DCs exposed to complement-opsonized HIV and the lack of NK activation may contribute to the failure of innate immune responses to control HIV at the site of initial mucosa infection. PMID:26157174

  1. Chemically Programmed Antibodies As HIV-1 Attachment Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Herein, we describe the design and application of two small-molecule anti-HIV compounds for the creation of chemically programmed antibodies. N-Acyl-β-lactam derivatives of two previously described molecules BMS-378806 and BMS-488043 that inhibit the interaction between HIV-1 gp120 and T-cells were synthesized and used to program the binding activity of aldolase antibody 38C2. Discovery of a successful linkage site to BMS-488043 allowed for the synthesis of chemically programmed antibodies with affinity for HIV-1 gp120 and potent HIV-1 neutralization activity. Derivation of a successful conjugation strategy for this family of HIV-1 entry inhibitors enables its application in chemically programmed antibodies and vaccines and may facilitate the development of novel bispecific antibodies and topical microbicides. PMID:23750312

  2. Potent and Targeted Activation of Latent HIV-1 Using the CRISPR/dCas9 Activator Complex

    PubMed Central

    Saayman, Sheena M; Lazar, Daniel C; Scott, Tristan A; Hart, Jonathan R; Takahashi, Mayumi; Burnett, John C; Planelles, Vicente; Morris, Kevin V; Weinberg, Marc S

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 provirus integration results in a persistent latently infected reservoir that is recalcitrant to combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) with lifelong treatment being the only option. The “shock and kill” strategy aims to eradicate latent HIV by reactivating proviral gene expression in the context of cART treatment. Gene-specific transcriptional activation can be achieved using the RNA-guided CRISPR-Cas9 system comprising single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) with a nuclease-deficient Cas9 mutant (dCas9) fused to the VP64 transactivation domain (dCas9-VP64). We engineered this system to target 23 sites within the long terminal repeat promoter of HIV-1 and identified a “hotspot” for activation within the viral enhancer sequence. Activating sgRNAs transcriptionally modulated the latent proviral genome across multiple different in vitro latency cell models including T cells comprising a clonally integrated mCherry-IRES-Tat (LChIT) latency system. We detected consistent and effective activation of latent virus mediated by activator sgRNAs, whereas latency reversal agents produced variable activation responses. Transcriptomic analysis revealed dCas9-VP64/sgRNAs to be highly specific, while the well-characterized chemical activator TNFα induced widespread gene dysregulation. CRISPR-mediated gene activation represents a novel system which provides enhanced efficiency and specificity in a targeted latency reactivation strategy and represents a promising approach to a “functional cure” of HIV/AIDS. PMID:26581162

  3. The activity of candidate virucidal agents, low pH and genital secretions against HIV-1 in vitro.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, T J; Kinchington, D; Kangro, H O; Jeffries, D J

    1995-01-01

    The effect of low pH, normally present in the female genital tract, on HIV viability was examined. HIV is more acid stable than previously reported with no substantial reduction in infectivity occurring until pH levels are reduced below 4.5. The virucidal activity of 3 topical spermicides and chlorhexidine was assessed in vitro using previously established and newly modified assay systems. None of the agents tested had a selectivity index (SI) greater than 5.2. Semen and cervical secretions were assessed for their ability to inhibit HIV-1. While no virucidal effect was found in the latter, seminal fluid was found to have significant activity against HIV-1 and a SI of approximately 50. PMID:7548290

  4. HIV-1 Encephalopathy among Perinatally Infected Children: Neuropathogenesis and Response to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Charles D.

    2006-01-01

    HIV-1 encephalopathy among perinatally infected children in the United States was initially defined by a classic triad of findings that included: (1) developmental delay, (2) secondary or acquired microcephaly, and (3) pyramidal tract neuromotor deficits. The most severe form of this disorder typically occurred among young children who developed…

  5. A critical role for alternative polyadenylation factor CPSF6 in targeting HIV-1 integration to transcriptionally active chromatin.

    PubMed

    Sowd, Gregory A; Serrao, Erik; Wang, Hao; Wang, Weifeng; Fadel, Hind J; Poeschla, Eric M; Engelman, Alan N

    2016-02-23

    Integration is vital to retroviral replication and influences the establishment of the latent HIV reservoir. HIV-1 integration favors active genes, which is in part determined by the interaction between integrase and lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF)/p75. Because gene targeting remains significantly enriched, relative to random in LEDGF/p75 deficient cells, other host factors likely contribute to gene-tropic integration. Nucleoporins 153 and 358, which bind HIV-1 capsid, play comparatively minor roles in integration targeting, but the influence of another capsid binding protein, cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 6 (CPSF6), has not been reported. In this study we knocked down or knocked out CPSF6 in parallel or in tandem with LEDGF/p75. CPSF6 knockout changed viral infectivity kinetics, decreased proviral formation, and preferentially decreased integration into transcriptionally active genes, spliced genes, and regions of chromatin enriched in genes and activating histone modifications. LEDGF/p75 depletion by contrast preferentially altered positional integration targeting within gene bodies. Dual factor knockout reduced integration into genes to below the levels observed with either single knockout and revealed that CPSF6 played a more dominant role than LEDGF/p75 in directing integration to euchromatin. CPSF6 complementation rescued HIV-1 integration site distribution in CPSF6 knockout cells, but complementation with a capsid binding mutant of CPSF6 did not. We conclude that integration targeting proceeds via two distinct mechanisms: capsid-CPSF6 binding directs HIV-1 to actively transcribed euchromatin, where the integrase-LEDGF/p75 interaction drives integration into gene bodies. PMID:26858452

  6. Specifically modified Env immunogens activate B-cell precursors of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies in transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Andrew T.; Gray, Matthew D.; Dosenovic, Pia; Gitlin, Alexander D.; Freund, Natalia T.; Petersen, John; Correnti, Colin; Johnsen, William; Kegel, Robert; Stuart, Andrew B.; Glenn, Jolene; Seaman, Michael S.; Schief, William R.; Strong, Roland K.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Stamatatos, Leonidas

    2016-01-01

    VRC01-class broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies protect animals from experimental infection and could contribute to an effective vaccine response. Their predicted germline forms (gl) bind Env inefficiently, which may explain why they are not elicited by HIV-1 Env-immunization. Here we show that an optimized Env immunogen can engage multiple glVRC01-class antibodies. Furthermore, this immunogen activates naive B cells expressing the human germline heavy chain of 3BNC60, paired with endogenous mouse light chains in vivo. To address whether it activates B cells expressing the fully humanized gl3BNC60 B-cell receptor (BCR), we immunized mice carrying both the heavy and light chains of gl3BNC60. B cells expressing this BCR display an autoreactive phenotype and fail to respond efficiently to soluble forms of the optimized immunogen, unless it is highly multimerized. Thus, specifically designed Env immunogens can activate naive B cells expressing human BCRs corresponding to precursors of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies even when the B cells display an autoreactive phenotype. PMID:26907590

  7. Specifically modified Env immunogens activate B-cell precursors of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Andrew T; Gray, Matthew D; Dosenovic, Pia; Gitlin, Alexander D; Freund, Natalia T; Petersen, John; Correnti, Colin; Johnsen, William; Kegel, Robert; Stuart, Andrew B; Glenn, Jolene; Seaman, Michael S; Schief, William R; Strong, Roland K; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Stamatatos, Leonidas

    2016-01-01

    VRC01-class broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies protect animals from experimental infection and could contribute to an effective vaccine response. Their predicted germline forms (gl) bind Env inefficiently, which may explain why they are not elicited by HIV-1 Env-immunization. Here we show that an optimized Env immunogen can engage multiple glVRC01-class antibodies. Furthermore, this immunogen activates naive B cells expressing the human germline heavy chain of 3BNC60, paired with endogenous mouse light chains in vivo. To address whether it activates B cells expressing the fully humanized gl3BNC60 B-cell receptor (BCR), we immunized mice carrying both the heavy and light chains of gl3BNC60. B cells expressing this BCR display an autoreactive phenotype and fail to respond efficiently to soluble forms of the optimized immunogen, unless it is highly multimerized. Thus, specifically designed Env immunogens can activate naive B cells expressing human BCRs corresponding to precursors of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies even when the B cells display an autoreactive phenotype. PMID:26907590

  8. Influence of Drug Resistance Mutations on the Activity of HIV-1 Subtypes A and B Integrases: a Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Shadrina, O. A.; Zatsepin, T. S.; Agapkina, Yu. Yu.; Isaguliants, M. G.; Gottikh, M. B.

    2015-01-01

    Integration of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) DNA into the genome of an infected cell is one of the key steps in the viral replication cycle. The viral enzyme integrase (IN), which catalyzes the integration, is an attractive target for the development of new antiviral drugs. However, the HIV-1 therapy often results in the IN gene mutations inducing viral resistance to integration inhibitors. To assess the impact of drug resistance mutations on the activity of IN of HIV-1 subtype A strain FSU-A, which is dominant in Russia, variants of the consensus IN of this subtype containing the primary resistance mutations G118R and Q148K and secondary compensatory substitutions E138K and G140S were prepared and characterized. Comparative study of these enzymes with the corresponding mutants of IN of HIV-1 subtype B strains HXB-2 was performed. The mutation Q148K almost equally reduced the activity of integrases of both subtypes. Its negative effect was partially compensated by the secondary mutations E138K and G140S. Primary substitution G118R had different influence on the activity of proteins of the subtypes A and B, and the compensatory effect of the secondary substitution E138K also depended on the viral subtype. Comparison of the mutants resistance to the known strand transfer inhibitors raltegravir and elvitegravir, and a new inhibitor XZ-259 (a dihydro-1H-isoindol derivative), showed that integrases of both subtypes with the Q148K mutation were insensitive to raltegravir and elvitegravir but were effectively inhibited by XZ-259. The substitution G118R slightly reduced the efficiency of IN inhibition by raltegravir and elvitegravir and caused no resistance to XZ_259. PMID:25927004

  9. The Nucleoside Analog BMS-986001 Shows Greater In Vitro Activity against HIV-2 than against HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Raugi, Dana N.; Wu, Vincent H.; Leong, Sally S.; Parker, Kate M.; Oakes, Mariah K.; Sow, Papa Salif; Ba, Selly; Seydi, Moussa; Gottlieb, Geoffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment options for individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) are restricted by the intrinsic resistance of the virus to nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) and the reduced susceptibility of HIV-2 to several protease inhibitors (PIs) used in antiretroviral therapy (ART). In an effort to identify new antiretrovirals for HIV-2 treatment, we evaluated the in vitro activity of the investigational nucleoside analog BMS-986001 (2′,3′-didehydro-3′-deoxy-4′-ethynylthymidine; also known as censavudine, festinavir, OBP-601, 4′-ethynyl stavudine, or 4′-ethynyl-d4T). In single-cycle assays, BMS-986001 inhibited HIV-2 isolates from treatment-naive individuals, with 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) ranging from 30 to 81 nM. In contrast, EC50s for group M and O isolates of HIV-1 ranged from 450 to 890 nM. Across all isolates tested, the average EC50 for HIV-2 was 9.5-fold lower than that for HIV-1 (64 ± 18 nM versus 610 ± 200 nM, respectively; mean ± standard deviation). BMS-986001 also exhibited full activity against HIV-2 variants whose genomes encoded the single amino acid changes K65R and Q151M in reverse transcriptase, whereas the M184V mutant was 15-fold more resistant to the drug than the parental HIV-2ROD9 strain. Taken together, our findings show that BMS-986001 is an effective inhibitor of HIV-2 replication. To our knowledge, BMS-986001 is the first nucleoside analog that, when tested against a diverse collection of HIV-1 and HIV-2 isolates, exhibits more potent activity against HIV-2 than against HIV-1 in culture. PMID:26392486

  10. The Nucleoside Analog BMS-986001 Shows Greater In Vitro Activity against HIV-2 than against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Smith, Robert A; Raugi, Dana N; Wu, Vincent H; Leong, Sally S; Parker, Kate M; Oakes, Mariah K; Sow, Papa Salif; Ba, Selly; Seydi, Moussa; Gottlieb, Geoffrey S

    2015-12-01

    Treatment options for individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) are restricted by the intrinsic resistance of the virus to nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) and the reduced susceptibility of HIV-2 to several protease inhibitors (PIs) used in antiretroviral therapy (ART). In an effort to identify new antiretrovirals for HIV-2 treatment, we evaluated the in vitro activity of the investigational nucleoside analog BMS-986001 (2',3'-didehydro-3'-deoxy-4'-ethynylthymidine; also known as censavudine, festinavir, OBP-601, 4'-ethynyl stavudine, or 4'-ethynyl-d4T). In single-cycle assays, BMS-986001 inhibited HIV-2 isolates from treatment-naive individuals, with 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) ranging from 30 to 81 nM. In contrast, EC50s for group M and O isolates of HIV-1 ranged from 450 to 890 nM. Across all isolates tested, the average EC50 for HIV-2 was 9.5-fold lower than that for HIV-1 (64 ± 18 nM versus 610 ± 200 nM, respectively; mean ± standard deviation). BMS-986001 also exhibited full activity against HIV-2 variants whose genomes encoded the single amino acid changes K65R and Q151M in reverse transcriptase, whereas the M184V mutant was 15-fold more resistant to the drug than the parental HIV-2ROD9 strain. Taken together, our findings show that BMS-986001 is an effective inhibitor of HIV-2 replication. To our knowledge, BMS-986001 is the first nucleoside analog that, when tested against a diverse collection of HIV-1 and HIV-2 isolates, exhibits more potent activity against HIV-2 than against HIV-1 in culture. PMID:26392486

  11. Inhibiting early-stage events in HIV-1 replication by small-molecule targeting of the HIV-1 capsid.

    PubMed

    Kortagere, Sandhya; Madani, Navid; Mankowski, Marie K; Schön, Arne; Zentner, Isaac; Swaminathan, Gokul; Princiotto, Amy; Anthony, Kevin; Oza, Apara; Sierra, Luz-Jeannette; Passic, Shendra R; Wang, Xiaozhao; Jones, David M; Stavale, Eric; Krebs, Fred C; Martín-García, Julio; Freire, Ernesto; Ptak, Roger G; Sodroski, Joseph; Cocklin, Simon; Smith, Amos B

    2012-08-01

    The HIV-1 capsid (CA) protein plays essential roles in both early and late stages of virl replication and has emerged as a novel drug target. We report hybrid structure-based virtual screening to identify small molecules with the potential to interact with the N-terminal domain (NTD) of HIV-1 CA and disrupt early, preintegration steps of the HIV-1 replication cycle. The small molecule 4,4'-[dibenzo[b,d]furan-2,8-diylbis(5-phenyl-1H-imidazole-4,2-diyl)]dibenzoic acid (CK026), which had anti-HIV-1 activity in single- and multiple-round infections but failed to inhibit viral replication in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), was identified. Three analogues of CK026 with reduced size and better drug-like properties were synthesized and assessed. Compound I-XW-053 (4-(4,5-diphenyl-1H-imidazol-2-yl)benzoic acid) retained all of the antiviral activity of the parental compound and inhibited the replication of a diverse panel of primary HIV-1 isolates in PBMCs, while displaying no appreciable cytotoxicity. This antiviral activity was specific to HIV-1, as I-XW-053 displayed no effect on the replication of SIV or against a panel of nonretroviruses. Direct interaction of I-XW-053 was quantified with wild-type and mutant CA protein using surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry. Mutation of Ile37 and Arg173, which are required for interaction with compound I-XW-053, crippled the virus at an early, preintegration step. Using quantitative PCR, we demonstrated that treatment with I-XW-053 inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcription in multiple cell types, indirectly pointing to dysfunction in the uncoating process. In summary, we have identified a CA-specific compound that targets and inhibits a novel region in the NTD-NTD interface, affects uncoating, and possesses broad-spectrum anti-HIV-1 activity. PMID:22647699

  12. Impact of viral activators and epigenetic regulators on HIV-1 LTRs containing naturally occurring single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sonia; Pirrone, Vanessa; Alexaki, Aikaterini; Nonnemacher, Michael R; Wigdahl, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Following human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integration into host cell DNA, the viral promoter can become transcriptionally silent in the absence of appropriate signals and factors. HIV-1 gene expression is dependent on regulatory elements contained within the long terminal repeat (LTR) that drive the synthesis of viral RNAs and proteins through interaction with multiple host and viral factors. Previous studies identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) site I and Sp site III (3T, C-to-T change at position 3, and 5T, C-to-T change at position 5 of the binding site, respectively, when compared to the consensus B sequence) that are low affinity binding sites and correlate with more advanced stages of HIV-1 disease. Stably transfected cell lines containing the wild type, 3T, 5T, and 3T5T LTRs were developed utilizing bone marrow progenitor, T, and monocytic cell lines to explore the LTR phenotypes associated with these genotypic changes from an integrated chromatin-based microenvironment. Results suggest that in nonexpressing cell clones LTR-driven gene expression occurs in a SNP-specific manner in response to LTR activation or treatment with trichostatin A treatment, indicating a possible cell type and SNP-specific mechanism behind the epigenetic control of LTR activation. PMID:25629043

  13. Gut dendritic cell activation links an altered colonic microbiome to mucosal and systemic T-cell activation in untreated HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Dillon, S M; Lee, E J; Kotter, C V; Austin, G L; Gianella, S; Siewe, B; Smith, D M; Landay, A L; McManus, M C; Robertson, C E; Frank, D N; McCarter, M D; Wilson, C C

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1-associated disruption of intestinal homeostasis is a major factor contributing to chronic immune activation and inflammation. Dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial in maintaining intestinal homeostasis, but the impact of HIV-1 infection on intestinal DC number and function has not been extensively studied. We compared the frequency and activation/maturation status of colonic myeloid DC (mDC) subsets (CD1c(+) and CD1c(neg)) and plasmacytoid DCs in untreated HIV-1-infected subjects with uninfected controls. Colonic mDCs in HIV-1-infected subjects had increased CD40 but decreased CD83 expression, and CD40 expression on CD1c(+) mDCs positively correlated with mucosal HIV-1 viral load, with mucosal and systemic cytokine production, and with frequencies of activated colon and blood T cells. Percentage of CD83(+)CD1c(+) mDCs negatively correlated with frequencies of interferon-γ-producing colon CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. CD40 expression on CD1c(+) mDCs positively associated with abundance of high prevalence mucosal Prevotella copri and Prevotella stercorea but negatively associated with a number of low prevalence mucosal species, including Rumminococcus bromii. CD1c(+) mDC cytokine production was greater in response to in vitro stimulation with Prevotella species relative to R. bromii. These findings suggest that, during HIV infection, colonic mDCs become activated upon exposure to mucosal pathobiont bacteria leading to mucosal and systemic immune activation. PMID:25921339

  14. Gut Dendritic Cell Activation Links an Altered Colonic Microbiome to Mucosal and Systemic T Cell Activation in Untreated HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, SM; Lee, EJ; Kotter, CV; Austin, GL; Gianella, S; Siewe, B; Smith, DM; Landay, AL; McManus, MC; Robertson, CE; Frank, DN; McCarter, MD; Wilson, CC

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1-associated disruption of intestinal homeostasis is a major factor contributing to chronic immune activation and inflammation. Dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial in maintaining intestinal homeostasis, but the impact of HIV-1 infection on intestinal DC number and function has not been extensively studied. We compared the frequency and activation/maturation status of colonic myeloid DC (mDC) subsets (CD1c+ and CD1cneg) and plasmacytoid DCs in untreated HIV-1-infected subjects with uninfected controls. Colonic mDCs in HIV-1-infected subjects had increased CD40 but decreased CD83 expression, and CD40 expression on CD1c+ mDCs positively correlated with mucosal HIV-1 viral load, with mucosal and systemic cytokine production, and with frequencies of activated colon and blood T cells. Percent of CD83+CD1c+ mDCs negatively correlated with frequencies of IFN-γ-producing colon CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. CD40 expression on CD1c+ mDCs positively associated with abundance of high prevalence mucosal Prevotella copri and P. stercorea, but negatively associated with a number of low prevalence mucosal species including Rumminococcus bromii. CD1c+ mDC cytokine production was greater in response to in vitro stimulation with Prevotella species relative to R. bromii. These findings suggest that during HIV infection, colonic mDCs become activated upon exposure to mucosal pathobiont bacteria leading to mucosal and systemic immune activation. PMID:25921339

  15. Synthesis and evaluation of substituted 4-(N-benzylamino)cinnamate esters as potential anti-cancer agents and HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Faridoon; Edkins, Adrienne L; Isaacs, Michelle; Mnkandhla, Dumisani; Hoppe, Heinrich C; Kaye, Perry T

    2016-08-01

    Encouraging selectivity and low micromolar activity against HeLa cervical carcinoma (IC50⩾3.0μM) and the aggressive MDA-MB-231 triple negative breast carcinoma (IC50⩾9.6μM) cell lines has been exhibited by a number of readily accessible 4-(N-benzylamino)cinnamate esters. The potential of the ligands as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors has also been examined. PMID:27317645

  16. Increased Escherichia coli-Induced Interleukin-23 Production by CD16+ Monocytes Correlates with Systemic Immune Activation in Untreated HIV-1-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Manuzak, Jennifer A.; Dillon, Stephanie M.; Lee, Eric J.; Dong, Zachary M.; Hecht, Daniel K.

    2013-01-01

    The level of microbial translocation from the intestine is increased in HIV-1 infection. Proinflammatory cytokine production by peripheral antigen-presenting cells in response to translocated microbes or microbial products may contribute to systemic immune activation, a hallmark of HIV-1 infection. We investigated the cytokine responses of peripheral blood myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) and monocytes to in vitro stimulation with commensal enteric Escherichia coli in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from untreated HIV-1-infected subjects and from uninfected controls. Levels of interleukin 23 (IL-23) produced by PBMC from HIV-1-infected subjects in response to E. coli stimulation were significantly higher than those produced by PBMC from uninfected subjects. IL-23 was produced primarily by CD16+ monocytes. This subset of monocytes was increased in frequency and expressed higher levels of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in HIV-1-infected individuals than in controls. Blocking TLR4 on total CD14+ monocytes reduced IL-23 production in response to E. coli stimulation. Levels of soluble CD27, an indicator of systemic immune activation, were elevated in HIV-1-infected subjects and were associated with the percentage of CD16+ monocytes and the induction of IL-23 by E. coli, providing a link between these parameters and systemic inflammation. Taken together, these results suggest that IL-23 produced by CD16+ monocytes in response to microbial stimulation may contribute to systemic immune activation in HIV-1-infected individuals. PMID:24067979

  17. ASK1 restores the antiviral activity of APOBEC3G by disrupting HIV-1 Vif-mediated counteraction

    PubMed Central

    Miyakawa, Kei; Matsunaga, Satoko; Kanou, Kazuhiko; Matsuzawa, Atsushi; Morishita, Ryo; Kudoh, Ayumi; Shindo, Keisuke; Yokoyama, Masaru; Sato, Hironori; Kimura, Hirokazu; Tamura, Tomohiko; Yamamoto, Naoki; Ichijo, Hidenori; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Ryo, Akihide

    2015-01-01

    APOBEC3G (A3G) is an innate antiviral restriction factor that strongly inhibits the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). An HIV-1 accessory protein, Vif, hijacks the host ubiquitin–proteasome system to execute A3G degradation. Identification of the host pathways that obstruct the action of Vif could provide a new strategy for blocking viral replication. We demonstrate here that the host protein ASK1 (apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1) interferes with the counteraction by Vif and revitalizes A3G-mediated viral restriction. ASK1 binds the BC-box of Vif, thereby disrupting the assembly of the Vif–ubiquitin ligase complex. Consequently, ASK1 stabilizes A3G and promotes its incorporation into viral particles, ultimately reducing viral infectivity. Furthermore, treatment with the antiretroviral drug AZT (zidovudine) induces ASK1 expression and restores the antiviral activity of A3G in HIV-1-infected cells. This study thus demonstrates a distinct function of ASK1 in restoring the host antiviral system that can be enhanced by AZT treatment. PMID:25901786

  18. Design, synthesis and antiviral activity of entry inhibitors that target the CD4-binding site of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Curreli, Francesca; Choudhury, Spreeha; Pyatkin, Ilya; Zagorodnikov, Victor P.; Bulay, Anna Khulianova; Altieri, Andrea; Kwon, Young Do; Kwong, Peter D.; Debnath, Asim K.

    2012-01-01

    The CD4 binding site on HIV-1 gp120 has been validated as a drug target to prevent HIV-1 entry to cells. Previously, we identified two small molecule inhibitors consisting of a 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine ring linked by an oxalamide to a p-halide-substituted phenyl group, which target this site, specifically, a cavity termed “Phe43 cavity”. Here we use synthetic chemistry, functional assessment and structure-based analysis to explore variants of each region of these inhibitors for improved antiviral properties. Alterations of the phenyl group and of the oxalamide linker indicated that these regions were close to optimal in the original lead compounds. Design of a series of compounds, where the tetramethylpiperidine ring was replaced with new scaffolds, lead to improved antiviral activity. These new scaffolds provide insight into the surface chemistry at the entrance of the cavity and offer additional opportunities by which to optimize further these potential-next-generation therapeutics and microbicides against HIV-1. PMID:22524483

  19. Entry inhibitor-based microbicides are active in vitro against HIV-1 isolates from multiple genetic subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Ketas, Thomas J.; Schader, Susan M.; Zurita, Juan; Teo, Esther; Polonis, Victoria; Lu Min; Klasse, Per Johan; Moore, John P. . E-mail: jpm2003@med.cornell.edu

    2007-08-01

    Inhibitors of viral entry are under consideration as topical microbicides to prevent HIV-1 sexual transmission. Small molecules targeting HIV-1 gp120 (BMS-378806) or CCR5 (CMPD167), and a peptide fusion inhibitor (C52L), each blocks vaginal infection of macaques by a SHIV. A microbicide, however, must be active against multiple HIV-1 variants. We therefore tested BMS-C (a BMS-378806 derivative), CMPD167, C52L and the CXCR4 ligand AMD3465, alone and in combination, against 25 primary R5, 12 X4 and 7 R5X4 isolates from subtypes A-G. At high concentrations (0.1-1 {mu}M), the replication of most R5 isolates in human donor lymphocytes was inhibited by > 90%. At lower concentrations, double and triple combinations were more effective than individual inhibitors. Similar results were obtained with X4 viruses when AMD3465 was substituted for CMPD167. The R5X4 viruses were inhibited by combining AMD3465 with CMPD167, or by the coreceptor-independent compounds. Thus, combining entry inhibitors may improve microbicide effectiveness.

  20. Anticancer molecule AS1411 exhibits low nanomolar antiviral activity against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Métifiot, Mathieu; Amrane, Samir; Mergny, Jean-Louis; Andreola, Marie-Line

    2015-11-01

    During clinical trials, a number of fully characterized molecules are dropped along the way because they do not provide enough benefit for the patient. Some of them show limited side effects and might be of great use for other applications. AS1411 is a nucleolin-targeting aptamer that underwent phase II clinical trials as anticancer agent. Here, we show that AS1411 exhibits extremely potent antiviral activity and is therefore an attractive new lead as anti-HIV agent. PMID:26363100

  1. The Cytoplasmic Domain of the HIV-1 Glycoprotein gp41 Induces NF-κB Activation Through TGF-β-Activated Kinase 1

    PubMed Central

    Postler, Thomas S.; Desrosiers, Ronald C.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The human and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and SIV) primarily infect lymphocytes, which must be activated for efficient viral replication. We show that the cytoplasmic domain of the transmembrane glycoprotein gp41 (gp41CD) of both HIV-1 and SIV induces activation of NF-κB, a cellular factor important for proviral genome transcription and lymphocyte activation. This NF-κB activating property localized to a region 12–25 (SIV) or 59–70 (HIV-1) residues from the gp41 membrane-spanning domain. An siRNA-based screen of 42 key NF-κB regulators revealed that gp41CD-mediated activation occurs through the canonical NF-κB pathway via TGF-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1). TAK1 activity was required for gp41CD-mediated NF-κB activation, and HIV-1-derived gp41CD physically interacted with TAK1 through the same region required for NF-κB activation. Importantly, an NF-κB activation-deficient HIV-1 mutant exhibited increased dependence on cellular activation for replication. These findings demonstrate an evolutionarily conserved role for gp41CD in activating NF-κB to promote infection. PMID:22341466

  2. Modification and structure-activity relationship of a small molecule HIV-1 inhibitor targeting the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingsong; Le, Nhut; Heredia, Alonso; Song, Haijing; Redfield, Robert; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes selected modification and structure-activity relationship of the small molecule HIV-1 inhibitor, 4-benzoyl-1-[(4-methoxy-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridin-3-yl)oxoacetyl]-2-(R)-methylpiperazine (BMS-378806). The results revealed: i) that both the presence and configuration (R vs. S) of the 3-methyl group on the piperazine moiety are important for the antiviral activity, with the 3-(R)-methyl derivatives showing the highest activity; ii) that the electronegativity of the C-4 substituent on the indole or azaindole ring seems to be important for the activity, with a small, electron-donating group such as a fluoro or a methoxy group showing enhanced activity, while a nitro group diminishes the activity; iii) that the N-1 position of the indole ring is not eligible for modification without losing activity; and iv) that bulky groups around the C-4 position of the indole or azaindole ring diminish the activity, probably due to steric hindrance in the binding. We found that a synthetic bivalent compound with two BMS-378806 moieties being tethered by a spacer demonstrated about 5-fold enhanced activity in an nM range against HIV-1 infection than the corresponding monomeric inhibitor. But the polyacrylamide-based polyvalent compounds did not show inhibitory activity at up to 200 nM. PMID:15858664

  3. Features of Recently Transmitted HIV-1 Clade C Viruses that Impact Antibody Recognition: Implications for Active and Passive Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Rademeyer, Cecilia; Korber, Bette; Seaman, Michael S.; Giorgi, Elena E.; Thebus, Ruwayhida; Robles, Alexander; Sheward, Daniel J.; Wagh, Kshitij; Carey, Brittany R.; Gao, Hongmei; Greene, Kelli M.; Tang, Haili; Marais, Jinny C.; Diphoko, Thabo E.; Hraber, Peter; Tumba, Nancy; Moore, Penny L.; Gray, Glenda E.; Kublin, James; McElrath, M. Juliana; Vermeulen, Marion; Middelkoop, Keren; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Hoelscher, Michael; Maboko, Leonard; Makhema, Joseph; Robb, Merlin L.; Abdool Karim, Salim; Abdool Karim, Quarraisha; Kim, Jerome H.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Gao, Feng; Swanstrom, Ronald; Morris, Lynn; Montefiori, David C.; Williamson, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    The development of biomedical interventions to reduce acquisition of HIV-1 infection remains a global priority, however their potential effectiveness is challenged by very high HIV-1 envelope diversity. Two large prophylactic trials in high incidence, clade C epidemic regions in southern Africa are imminent; passive administration of the monoclonal antibody VRC01, and active immunization with a clade C modified RV144-like vaccines. We have created a large representative panel of C clade viruses to enable assessment of antibody responses to vaccines and natural infection in Southern Africa, and we investigated the genotypic and neutralization properties of recently transmitted clade C viruses to determine how viral diversity impacted antibody recognition. We further explore the implications of these findings for the potential effectiveness of these trials. A panel of 200 HIV-1 Envelope pseudoviruses was constructed from clade C viruses collected within the first 100 days following infection. Viruses collected pre-seroconversion were significantly more resistant to serum neutralization compared to post-seroconversion viruses (p = 0.001). Over 13 years of the study as the epidemic matured, HIV-1 diversified (p = 0.0009) and became more neutralization resistant to monoclonal antibodies VRC01, PG9 and 4E10. When tested at therapeutic levels (10ug/ml), VRC01 only neutralized 80% of viruses in the panel, although it did exhibit potent neutralization activity against sensitive viruses (IC50 titres of 0.42 μg/ml). The Gp120 amino acid similarity between the clade C panel and candidate C-clade vaccine protein boosts (Ce1086 and TV1) was 77%, which is 8% more distant than between CRF01_AE viruses and the RV144 CRF01_AE immunogen. Furthermore, two vaccine signature sites, K169 in V2 and I307 in V3, associated with reduced infection risk in RV144, occurred less frequently in clade C panel viruses than in CRF01_AE viruses from Thailand. Increased resistance of pre

  4. Features of Recently Transmitted HIV-1 Clade C Viruses that Impact Antibody Recognition: Implications for Active and Passive Immunization.

    PubMed

    Rademeyer, Cecilia; Korber, Bette; Seaman, Michael S; Giorgi, Elena E; Thebus, Ruwayhida; Robles, Alexander; Sheward, Daniel J; Wagh, Kshitij; Garrity, Jetta; Carey, Brittany R; Gao, Hongmei; Greene, Kelli M; Tang, Haili; Bandawe, Gama P; Marais, Jinny C; Diphoko, Thabo E; Hraber, Peter; Tumba, Nancy; Moore, Penny L; Gray, Glenda E; Kublin, James; McElrath, M Juliana; Vermeulen, Marion; Middelkoop, Keren; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Hoelscher, Michael; Maboko, Leonard; Makhema, Joseph; Robb, Merlin L; Abdool Karim, Salim; Abdool Karim, Quarraisha; Kim, Jerome H; Hahn, Beatrice H; Gao, Feng; Swanstrom, Ronald; Morris, Lynn; Montefiori, David C; Williamson, Carolyn

    2016-07-01

    The development of biomedical interventions to reduce acquisition of HIV-1 infection remains a global priority, however their potential effectiveness is challenged by very high HIV-1 envelope diversity. Two large prophylactic trials in high incidence, clade C epidemic regions in southern Africa are imminent; passive administration of the monoclonal antibody VRC01, and active immunization with a clade C modified RV144-like vaccines. We have created a large representative panel of C clade viruses to enable assessment of antibody responses to vaccines and natural infection in Southern Africa, and we investigated the genotypic and neutralization properties of recently transmitted clade C viruses to determine how viral diversity impacted antibody recognition. We further explore the implications of these findings for the potential effectiveness of these trials. A panel of 200 HIV-1 Envelope pseudoviruses was constructed from clade C viruses collected within the first 100 days following infection. Viruses collected pre-seroconversion were significantly more resistant to serum neutralization compared to post-seroconversion viruses (p = 0.001). Over 13 years of the study as the epidemic matured, HIV-1 diversified (p = 0.0009) and became more neutralization resistant to monoclonal antibodies VRC01, PG9 and 4E10. When tested at therapeutic levels (10ug/ml), VRC01 only neutralized 80% of viruses in the panel, although it did exhibit potent neutralization activity against sensitive viruses (IC50 titres of 0.42 μg/ml). The Gp120 amino acid similarity between the clade C panel and candidate C-clade vaccine protein boosts (Ce1086 and TV1) was 77%, which is 8% more distant than between CRF01_AE viruses and the RV144 CRF01_AE immunogen. Furthermore, two vaccine signature sites, K169 in V2 and I307 in V3, associated with reduced infection risk in RV144, occurred less frequently in clade C panel viruses than in CRF01_AE viruses from Thailand. Increased resistance of pre

  5. Reactivation of latently infected HIV-1 viral reservoirs and correction of aberrant alternative splicing in the LMNA gene via AMPK activation: Common mechanism of action linking HIV-1 latency and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Finley, Jahahreeh

    2015-09-01

    Although the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has proven highly effective in controlling and suppressing HIV-1 replication, the persistence of latent but replication-competent proviruses in a small subset of CD4(+) memory T cells presents significant challenges to viral eradication from infected individuals. Attempts to eliminate latent reservoirs are epitomized by the 'shock and kill' approach, a strategy involving the combinatorial usage of compounds that influence epigenetic modulation and initiation of proviral transcription. However, efficient regulation of viral pre-mRNA splicing through manipulation of host cell splicing machinery is also indispensible for HIV-1 replication. Interestingly, aberrant alternative splicing of the LMNA gene via the usage of a cryptic splice site has been shown to be the cause of most cases of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), a rare genetic condition characterized by an accelerated aging phenotype due to the accumulation of a truncated form of lamin A known as progerin. Recent evidence has shown that inhibition of the splicing factors ASF/SF2 (or SRSF1) and SRp55 (or SRSF6) leads to a reduction or an increase in progerin at both the mRNA and protein levels, respectively, thus altering the LMNA pre-mRNA splicing ratio. It is also well-established that during the latter stages of HIV-1 infection, an increase in the production and nuclear export of unspliced viral mRNA is indispensible for efficient HIV-1 replication and that the presence of ASF/SF2 leads to excessive viral pre-mRNA splicing and a reduction of unspliced mRNA, while the presence of SRp55 inhibits viral pre-mRNA splicing and aids in the generation and translation of unspliced HIV-1 mRNAs. The splicing-factor associated protein and putative mitochondrial chaperone p32 has also been shown to inhibit ASF/SF2, increase unspliced HIV-1 viral mRNA, and enhance mitochondrial DNA replication and oxidative phosphorylation. It is our hypothesis that activation of

  6. The root extract of the medicinal plant Pelargonium sidoides is a potent HIV-1 attachment inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Helfer, Markus; Koppensteiner, Herwig; Schneider, Martha; Rebensburg, Stephanie; Forcisi, Sara; Müller, Constanze; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Schindler, Michael; Brack-Werner, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Global HIV-1 treatment would benefit greatly from safe herbal medicines with scientifically validated novel anti-HIV-1 activities. The root extract from the medicinal plant Pelargonium sidoides (PS) is licensed in Germany as the herbal medicine EPs®7630, with numerous clinical trials supporting its safety in humans. Here we provide evidence from multiple cell culture experiments that PS extract displays potent anti-HIV-1 activity. We show that PS extract protects peripheral blood mononuclear cells and macrophages from infection with various X4 and R5 tropic HIV-1 strains, including clinical isolates. Functional studies revealed that the extract from PS has a novel mode-of-action. It interferes directly with viral infectivity and blocks the attachment of HIV-1 particles to target cells, protecting them from virus entry. Analysis of the chemical footprint of anti-HIV activity indicates that HIV-1 inhibition is mediated by multiple polyphenolic compounds with low cytotoxicity and can be separated from other extract components with higher cytotoxicity. Based on our data and its excellent safety profile, we propose that PS extract represents a lead candidate for the development of a scientifically validated herbal medicine for anti-HIV-1 therapy with a mode-of-action different from and complementary to current single-molecule drugs. PMID:24489923

  7. The Root Extract of the Medicinal Plant Pelargonium sidoides Is a Potent HIV-1 Attachment Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Helfer, Markus; Koppensteiner, Herwig; Schneider, Martha; Rebensburg, Stephanie; Forcisi, Sara; Müller, Constanze; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Schindler, Michael; Brack-Werner, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Global HIV-1 treatment would benefit greatly from safe herbal medicines with scientifically validated novel anti-HIV-1 activities. The root extract from the medicinal plant Pelargonium sidoides (PS) is licensed in Germany as the herbal medicine EPs®7630, with numerous clinical trials supporting its safety in humans. Here we provide evidence from multiple cell culture experiments that PS extract displays potent anti-HIV-1 activity. We show that PS extract protects peripheral blood mononuclear cells and macrophages from infection with various X4 and R5 tropic HIV-1 strains, including clinical isolates. Functional studies revealed that the extract from PS has a novel mode-of-action. It interferes directly with viral infectivity and blocks the attachment of HIV-1 particles to target cells, protecting them from virus entry. Analysis of the chemical footprint of anti-HIV activity indicates that HIV-1 inhibition is mediated by multiple polyphenolic compounds with low cytotoxicity and can be separated from other extract components with higher cytotoxicity. Based on our data and its excellent safety profile, we propose that PS extract represents a lead candidate for the development of a scientifically validated herbal medicine for anti-HIV-1 therapy with a mode-of-action different from and complementary to current single-molecule drugs. PMID:24489923

  8. Brief Report: HIV-1 Infection Results in Increased Frequency of Active and Inflammatory SlanDCs that Produce High Level of IL-1β.

    PubMed

    Tufa, Dejene M; Ahmad, Fareed; Chatterjee, Debanjana; Ahrenstorf, Gerrit; Schmidt, Reinhold E; Jacobs, Roland

    2016-09-01

    HIV infection is marked by phenotypic and functional alterations of immune cells. Different studies have shown both numerical and functional deterioration of dendritic cells in HIV-1-infected patients. In this study, we report an increase of inflammatory 6-sulfo LacNAc dendritic cells (slanDCs) that are more activated and produce higher amounts of interleukin (IL)-1β during HIV-1 infection as compared with healthy controls. IL-1β plays a regulatory role in chronic inflammatory disorders. Therefore, our findings might reveal a compensatory regulatory function of slanDCs during HIV-1 infection. PMID:27243902

  9. Productive Replication of vif-Chimeric HIV-1 in Feline Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Melissa A.; Hu, Chunling; Saenz, Dyana T.; Fadel, Hind J.; Sims, Olivia; Peretz, Mary; Poeschla, Eric M.

    2010-01-01

    Nonprimate animal models of HIV-1 infection are prevented by missing cellular cofactors and by antiviral actions of species-specific host defense factors. These blocks are profound in rodents but may be less abundant in certain Carnivora. Here, we enabled productive, spreading replication and passage of HIV-1 in feline cells. Feline fibroblasts, T-cell lines, and primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells supported early and late HIV-1 life cycle phases in a manner equivalent to that of human cells, except that produced virions had low infectivity. Stable expression of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) Vif-green fluorescent protein (GFP) in HIV-1 entry receptor-complemented feline (CrFK) cells enabled robust spreading HIV-1 replication. FIV Vif colocalized with feline APOBEC3 (fA3) proteins, targeted them for degradation, and prevented G→A hypermutation of the HIV-1 cDNA by fA3CH and fA3H. HIV-1 Vif was inactive against fA3s as expected and even paradoxically augmented restriction in some assays. In an interesting contrast, simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac Vif had substantial anti-fA3 activities, which were complete against fA3CH and partial against fA3H. Moreover, both primate lentiviral Vifs colocalized with fA3s and could be pulled down from cell lysates by fA3CH. HIV-1 molecular clones that encode FIV Vif or SIVmac Vif (HIV-1VF and HIV-1VS) were then constructed. These viruses replicated productively in HIV-1 receptor-expressing CrFK cells and could be passaged serially to uninfected cells. Thus, with the exception of entry receptors, the cat genome can supply the dependency factors needed by HIV-1, and a main restriction can be countered by vif chimerism. The results raise the possibility that the domestic cat could yield an animal model of HIV-1 infection. PMID:20463079

  10. CRISPR/gRNA-directed synergistic activation mediator (SAM) induces specific, persistent and robust reactivation of the HIV-1 latent reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yonggang; Yin, Chaoran; Zhang, Ting; Li, Fang; Yang, Wensheng; Kaminski, Rafal; Fagan, Philip Regis; Putatunda, Raj; Young, Won-Bin; Khalili, Kamel; Hu, Wenhui

    2015-01-01

    Current antiretroviral therapy does not eliminate the integrated and transcriptionally silent HIV-1 provirus in latently infected cells. Recently, a "shock and kill" strategy has been extensively explored to eradicate the HIV-1 latent reservoirs for a permanent cure of AIDS. The therapeutic efficacy of currently used agents remains disappointing because of low efficiency, non-specificity and cellular toxicity. Here we present a novel catalytically-deficient Cas9-synergistic activation mediator (dCas9-SAM) technology to selectively, potently and persistently reactivate the HIV-1 latent reservoirs. By screening 16 MS2-mediated single guide RNAs, we identified long terminal repeat (LTR)-L and O that surround the enhancer region (-165/-145 for L and -92/-112 for O) and induce robust reactivation of HIV-1 provirus in HIV-1 latent TZM-bI epithelial, Jurkat T lymphocytic and CHME5 microglial cells. This compulsory reactivation induced cellular suicide via toxic buildup of viral proteins within HIV-1 latent Jurkat T and CHME5 microglial cells. These results suggest that this highly effective and target-specific dCas9-SAM system can serve as a novel HIV-latency-reversing therapeutic tool for the permanent elimination of HIV-1 latent reservoirs. PMID:26538064

  11. CRISPR/gRNA-directed synergistic activation mediator (SAM) induces specific, persistent and robust reactivation of the HIV-1 latent reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yonggang; Yin, Chaoran; Zhang, Ting; Li, Fang; Yang, Wensheng; Kaminski, Rafal; Fagan, Philip Regis; Putatunda, Raj; Young, Won-Bin; Khalili, Kamel; Hu, Wenhui

    2015-01-01

    Current antiretroviral therapy does not eliminate the integrated and transcriptionally silent HIV-1 provirus in latently infected cells. Recently, a “shock and kill” strategy has been extensively explored to eradicate the HIV-1 latent reservoirs for a permanent cure of AIDS. The therapeutic efficacy of currently used agents remains disappointing because of low efficiency, non-specificity and cellular toxicity. Here we present a novel catalytically-deficient Cas9-synergistic activation mediator (dCas9-SAM) technology to selectively, potently and persistently reactivate the HIV-1 latent reservoirs. By screening 16 MS2-mediated single guide RNAs, we identified long terminal repeat (LTR)-L and O that surround the enhancer region (-165/-145 for L and -92/-112 for O) and induce robust reactivation of HIV-1 provirus in HIV-1 latent TZM-bI epithelial, Jurkat T lymphocytic and CHME5 microglial cells. This compulsory reactivation induced cellular suicide via toxic buildup of viral proteins within HIV-1 latent Jurkat T and CHME5 microglial cells. These results suggest that this highly effective and target-specific dCas9-SAM system can serve as a novel HIV-latency-reversing therapeutic tool for the permanent elimination of HIV-1 latent reservoirs. PMID:26538064

  12. Systematic evaluation of methyl ester bioisosteres in the context of developing alkenyldiarylmethanes (ADAMs) as non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) for anti-HIV-1 chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Ayako; Sakamoto, Takeshi; Takayama, Jun; Xuan, Meiyan; Okazaki, Mari; Hartman, Tracy L; Buckheit, Robert W; Pannecouque, Christophe; Cushman, Mark

    2016-07-01

    The alkenyldiarylmethanes (ADAMs) are a class of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) targeting HIV-1. Four chemically and metabolically stabilized ADAMs incorporating N-methoxyimidoyl halide replacements of the methyl esters of the lead compound were previously reported. In this study, twenty-five new ADAMs were synthesized in order to investigate the biological consequences of installing nine different methyl ester bioisosteres at three different locations. Attempts to define a universal rank order of methyl ester bioisosteres and discover the 'best' one in terms of inhibitory activity versus HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) led to the realization that the potencies are critically dependent on the surrounding structure at each location, and therefore the definition of universal rank order is impossible. This investigation produced several new non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in which all three of the three methyl esters of the lead compound were replaced by methyl ester bioisosteres, resulting in compounds that are more potent as HIV-1 RT inhibitors and antiviral agents than the lead compound itself and are expected to also be more metabolically stable than the lead compound. PMID:27234889

  13. Hyperthermia Stimulates HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Roesch, Ferdinand; Meziane, Oussama; Kula, Anna; Nisole, Sébastien; Porrot, Françoise; Anderson, Ian; Mammano, Fabrizio; Fassati, Ariberto; Marcello, Alessandro; Benkirane, Monsef; Schwartz, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    HIV-infected individuals may experience fever episodes. Fever is an elevation of the body temperature accompanied by inflammation. It is usually beneficial for the host through enhancement of immunological defenses. In cultures, transient non-physiological heat shock (42–45°C) and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) modulate HIV-1 replication, through poorly defined mechanisms. The effect of physiological hyperthermia (38–40°C) on HIV-1 infection has not been extensively investigated. Here, we show that culturing primary CD4+ T lymphocytes and cell lines at a fever-like temperature (39.5°C) increased the efficiency of HIV-1 replication by 2 to 7 fold. Hyperthermia did not facilitate viral entry nor reverse transcription, but increased Tat transactivation of the LTR viral promoter. Hyperthermia also boosted HIV-1 reactivation in a model of latently-infected cells. By imaging HIV-1 transcription, we further show that Hsp90 co-localized with actively transcribing provirus, and this phenomenon was enhanced at 39.5°C. The Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG abrogated the increase of HIV-1 replication in hyperthermic cells. Altogether, our results indicate that fever may directly stimulate HIV-1 replication, in a process involving Hsp90 and facilitation of Tat-mediated LTR activity. PMID:22807676

  14. Elevated levels of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) in the plasma of HIV-1-infected patients and in HIV-1-infected cell cultures: a relevant role on viral replication

    PubMed Central

    Regis, Eduardo G.; Barreto-de-Souza, Victor; Morgado, Mariza M.; Bozza, Marcelo T.; Leng, Lin; Bucala, Richard; Bou-Habib, Dumith C.

    2011-01-01

    The cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory and infectious diseases, however its role in HIV-1 infection is unknown. Here we show that HIV-1-infected patients present elevated plasma levels of MIF, that HIV-1-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) release a greater amount of MIF, and that the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 induces MIF secretion from uninfected PBMCs. The HIV-1 replication in PBMCs declines when these cells were treated with anti-MIF antibodies, or when treated with the ABC-transporter inhibitor probenecid, which also inhibited MIF secretion. The addition of recombinant MIF (rhMIF) to HIV-1-infected PBMCs enhances viral replication of CCR5- or CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 isolates. Using a T CD4+ cell lineage containing an HIV long terminal repeats (LTR)-Luciferase construct, we detected that rhMIF promotes transcription from HIV-1 LTR. Our results show that HIV-1 induces MIF secretion and suggest that MIF influences the HIV-1 biology through activation of HIV-1 LTR. PMID:20085845

  15. Structure–Activity Relationship Studies of Indole-Based Compounds as Small Molecule HIV-1 Fusion Inhibitors Targeting Glycoprotein 41

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We previously described indole-containing compounds with the potential to inhibit HIV-1 fusion by targeting the hydrophobic pocket of transmembrane glycoprotein gp41. Here we report optimization and structure–activity relationship studies on the basic scaffold, defining the role of shape, contact surface area, and molecular properties. Thirty new compounds were evaluated in binding, cell–cell fusion, and viral replication assays. Below a 1 μM threshold, correlation between binding and biological activity was diminished, indicating an amphipathic requirement for activity in cells. The most active inhibitor 6j exhibited 0.6 μM binding affinity and 0.2 μM EC50 against cell–cell fusion and live virus replication and was active against T20 resistant strains. Twenty-two compounds with the same connectivity displayed a consensus pose in docking calculations, with rank order matching the biological activity. The work provides insight into requirements for small molecule inhibition of HIV-1 fusion and demonstrates a potent low molecular weight fusion inhibitor. PMID:24856833

  16. Characterization and in vitro activity of a branched peptide boronic acid that interacts with HIV-1 RRE RNA.

    PubMed

    Wynn, Jessica E; Zhang, Wenyu; Tebit, Denis M; Gray, Laurie R; Hammarskjold, Marie-Louise; Rekosh, David; Santos, Webster L

    2016-09-01

    A branched peptide containing multiple boronic acids was found to bind RRE IIB selectively and inhibit HIV-1 p24 capsid production in a dose-dependent manner. Structure-activity relationship studies revealed that branching in the peptide is crucial for the low micromolar binding towards RRE IIB, and the peptide demonstrates selectivity towards RRE IIB in the presence of tRNA. Footprinting studies suggest a binding site on the upper stem and internal loop regions of the RNA, which induces enzymatic cleavage of the internal loops of RRE IIB upon binding. PMID:27091070

  17. Subunit-selective mutagenesis indicates minimal polymerase activity in heterodimer-associated p51 HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Le Grice, S F; Naas, T; Wohlgensinger, B; Schatz, O

    1991-12-01

    We have purified and determined functional parameters of reconstituted, recombinant HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) heterodimers within which either the p66 or p51 polypeptide was selectively mutated in one or both aspartic acid residues constituting the proposed polymerase active site (-Y-M-D-D-). Heterodimers containing a mutated p51 polypeptide retain almost wild type levels of both RNA-dependent DNA polymerase and ribonuclease H (RNaseH) activity. In contrast, heterodimers whose p66 polypeptide was likewise mutated exhibit wild type RNaseH activity but are deficient in RNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity. These results indicate that in heterodimer RT, the p51 component cannot compensate for active site mutations eliminating the activity of p66, indirectly implying that solely the p66 aspartic acid residues of heterodimer are crucial for catalysis. PMID:1718745

  18. The availability of the primer activation signal (PAS) affects the efficiency of HIV-1 reverse transcription initiation

    PubMed Central

    Ooms, Marcel; Cupac, Daniel; Abbink, Truus E. M.; Huthoff, Hendrik; Berkhout, Ben

    2007-01-01

    Initiation of reverse transcription of a retroviral RNA genome is strictly regulated. The tRNA primer binds to the primer binding site (PBS), and subsequent priming is triggered by the primer activation signal (PAS) that also pairs with the tRNA. We observed that in vitro reverse transcription initiation of the HIV-1 leader RNA varies in efficiency among 3′-end truncated transcripts, despite the presence of both PBS and PAS motifs. As the HIV-1 leader RNA can adopt two different foldings, we investigated if the conformational state of the transcripts did influence the efficiency of reverse transcription initiation. However, mutant transcripts that exclusively fold one or the other structure were similarly active, thereby excluding the possibility of regulation of reverse transcription initiation by the structure riboswitch. We next set out to determine the availability of the PAS element. This sequence motif enhances the efficiency of reverse transcription initiation, but its activity is regulated because the PAS motif is initially base paired within the wild-type template. We measured that the initiation efficiency on different templates correlates directly with accessibility of the PAS motif. Furthermore, changes in PAS are critical to facilitate a primer-switch to a new tRNA species, demonstrating the importance of this enhancer element. PMID:17308346

  19. HIV-1 Dual Infected LTNP-EC Patients Developed an Unexpected Antibody Cross-Neutralizing Activity

    PubMed Central

    Pernas, Maria; Sanchez-Merino, Victor; Casado, Concepcion; Merino-Mansilla, Alberto; Olivares, Isabel; Yuste, Eloisa; Lopez-Galindez, Cecilio

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the neutralization breadth in dually infected (DI) HIV-1 long-term non-progressor elite controller patients (LTNP-EC) using a representative minipanel of 6 viruses from 5 different subtypes. Our results showed an improved neutralization breadth in DI LTNP-EC patients when compared with matched LTNP single-infected patients. The role of viral diversity in neutralization was estimated with the Shannon Entropy and the p-distance in viral quasispecies. We found a positive correlation between neutralization breadth and diversity within the viral quasispecies. This correlation could explain why a group of LTNP-EC patients developed a broad neutralizing response despite having undetectable levels of viremia. PMID:26258485

  20. HIV-1 Dual Infected LTNP-EC Patients Developed an Unexpected Antibody Cross-Neutralizing Activity.

    PubMed

    Pernas, Maria; Sanchez-Merino, Victor; Casado, Concepcion; Merino-Mansilla, Alberto; Olivares, Isabel; Yuste, Eloisa; Lopez-Galindez, Cecilio

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the neutralization breadth in dually infected (DI) HIV-1 long-term non-progressor elite controller patients (LTNP-EC) using a representative minipanel of 6 viruses from 5 different subtypes. Our results showed an improved neutralization breadth in DI LTNP-EC patients when compared with matched LTNP single-infected patients. The role of viral diversity in neutralization was estimated with the Shannon Entropy and the p-distance in viral quasispecies. We found a positive correlation between neutralization breadth and diversity within the viral quasispecies. This correlation could explain why a group of LTNP-EC patients developed a broad neutralizing response despite having undetectable levels of viremia. PMID:26258485

  1. Matrix Domain Modulates HIV-1 Gag's Nucleic Acid Chaperone Activity via Inositol Phosphate Binding ▿

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher P.; Datta, Siddhartha A. K.; Rein, Alan; Rouzina, Ioulia; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2011-01-01

    Retroviruses replicate by reverse transcribing their single-stranded RNA genomes into double-stranded DNA using specific cellular tRNAs to prime cDNA synthesis. In HIV-1, human tRNA3Lys serves as the primer and is packaged into virions during assembly. The viral Gag protein is believed to chaperone tRNA3Lys placement onto the genomic RNA primer binding site; however, the timing and possible regulation of this event are currently unknown. Composed of the matrix (MA), capsid (CA), nucleocapsid (NC), and p6 domains, the multifunctional HIV-1 Gag polyprotein orchestrates the highly coordinated process of virion assembly, but the contribution of these domains to tRNA3Lys annealing is unclear. Here, we show that NC is absolutely essential for annealing and that the MA domain inhibits Gag's tRNA annealing capability. During assembly, MA specifically interacts with inositol phosphate (IP)-containing lipids in the plasma membrane (PM). Surprisingly, we find that IPs stimulate Gag-facilitated tRNA annealing but do not stimulate annealing in Gag variants lacking the MA domain or containing point mutations involved in PM binding. Moreover, we find that IPs prevent MA from binding to nucleic acids but have little effect on NC or Gag. We propose that Gag binds to RNA either with both NC and MA domains or with NC alone and that MA-IP interactions alter Gag's binding mode. We propose that MA's interactions with the PM trigger the switch between these two binding modes and stimulate Gag's chaperone function, which may be important for the regulation of events such as tRNA primer annealing. PMID:21123373

  2. HIV-1-infected and immune-activated macrophages induce astrocytic differentiation of human cortical neural progenitor cells via the STAT3 pathway.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hui; Sun, Lijun; Jia, Beibei; Lan, Xiqian; Zhu, Bing; Wu, Yumei; Zheng, Jialin

    2011-01-01

    Diminished adult neurogenesis is considered a potential mechanism in the pathogenesis of HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD). In HAD, HIV-1-infected and immune-activated brain mononuclear phagocytes (MP; perivascular macrophages and microglia) drive central nervous system (CNS) inflammation and may alter normal neurogenesis. We previously demonstrated HIV-1-infected and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activated monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) inhibit human neural progenitor cell (NPC) neurogenesis, while enhancing astrogliogenesis through the secretion of the inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), in vitro and in vivo. Here we further test the hypothesis that HIV-1-infected/activated MDM promote NPC astrogliogenesis via activation of the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), a critical factor for astrogliogenesis. Our results show that LPS-activated MDM-conditioned medium (LPS-MCM) and HIV-infected/LPS-activated MDM-conditioned medium (LPS+HIV-MCM) induced Janus kinase 1 (Jak1) and STAT3 activation. Induction of the Jak-STAT3 activation correlated with increased glia fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression, demonstrating an induction of astrogliogenesis. Moreover, STAT3-targeting siRNA (siSTAT3) decreased MCM-induced STAT3 activation and NPC astrogliogenesis. Furthermore, inflammatory cytokines (including IL-6, IL-1β and TNF-α) produced by LPS-activated and/or HIV-1-infected MDM may contribute to MCM-induced STAT3 activation and astrocytic differentiation. These observations were confirmed in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice with HIV-1 encephalitis (HIVE). In HIVE mice, siRNA control (without target sequence, sicon) pre-transfected NPCs injected with HIV-1-infected MDM showed more astrocytic differentiation and less neuronal differentiation of NPCs as compared to NPC injection alone. siSTAT3 abrogated HIV-1-infected MDM-induced astrogliogenesis of injected NPCs. Collectively, these

  3. Iron chelators ICL670 and 311 inhibit HIV-1 transcription.

    PubMed

    Debebe, Zufan; Ammosova, Tatyana; Jerebtsova, Marina; Kurantsin-Mills, Joseph; Niu, Xiaomei; Charles, Sharroya; Richardson, Des R; Ray, Patricio E; Gordeuk, Victor R; Nekhai, Sergei

    2007-10-25

    HIV-1 replication is induced by an excess of iron and iron chelation by desferrioxamine (DFO) inhibits viral replication by reducing proliferation of infected cells. Treatment of cells with DFO and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (311) inhibit expression of proteins that regulate cell-cycle progression, including cycle-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2). Our recent studies showed that CDK2 participates in HIV-1 transcription and viral replication suggesting that inhibition of CDK2 by iron chelators might also affect HIV-1 transcription. Here we evaluated the effect of a clinically approved orally effective iron chelator, 4-[3,5-bis-(hydroxyphenyl)-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl]-benzoic acid (ICL670) and 311 on HIV-1 transcription. Both ICL670 and 311 inhibited Tat-induced HIV-1 transcription in CEM-T cells, 293T and HeLa cells. Neither ICL670 nor 311 induced cytotoxicity at concentrations that inhibited HIV-1 transcription. The chelators decreased cellular activity of CDK2 and reduced HIV-1 Tat phosphorylation by CDK2. Neither ICL670A or 311 decreased CDK9 protein level but significantly reduced association of CDK9 with cyclin T1 and reduced phosphorylation of Ser-2 residues of RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain. In conclusion, our findings add to the evidence that iron chelators can inhibit HIV-1 transcription by deregulating CDK2 and CDK9. Further consideration should be given to the development of iron chelators for future anti-retroviral therapeutics. PMID:17631934

  4. Discovery of novel anti-HIV-1 agents based on a broadly neutralizing antibody against the envelope gp120 V3 loop: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Andrianov, Alexander M; Kashyn, Ivan A; Tuzikov, Alexander V

    2014-12-01

    A computer-aided search for novel anti-HIV-1 agents able to mimic the pharmacophore properties of broadly neutralizing antibody (bNAb) 3074 was carried out based on the analysis of X-ray complexes of this antibody Fab with the MN, UR29, and VI191 peptides from the V3 loop of the HIV envelope protein gp120. Using these empirical data, peptidomimetic candidates of bNAb 3074 were identified by a public, web-oriented virtual screening platform (pepMMsMIMIC) and models of these candidates bound to the above V3 peptides were generated by molecular docking. The docking calculations identified four molecules exhibiting a high affinity to all of the V3 peptides. These molecules were selected as the most probable peptidomimetics of bNAb 3074. Finally, the stability of the complexes of these molecules with the MN, UR29, and VI191 V3 peptides was estimated by molecular dynamics and free energy simulations. Specific binding to the V3 loop was accomplished primarily by π-π interactions between the aromatic rings of the peptidomimetics and the conserved Phe-20 and/or Tyr-21 of the V3 immunogenic crown. In a mechanism similar to that of bNAb 3074, these compounds were found to block the tip of the V3 loop forming its invariant structural motif that contains residues critical for cell tropism. Based on these findings, the compounds selected are considered as promising basic structures for the rational design of novel, potent, and broad-spectrum anti-HIV-1 therapeutics. PMID:24251545

  5. Dynamic interactions of the HIV-1 Tat with nucleic acids are critical for Tat activity in reverse transcription.

    PubMed

    Boudier, Christian; Humbert, Nicolas; Chaminade, Françoise; Chen, Yingying; de Rocquigny, Hugues; Godet, Julien; Mauffret, Olivier; Fossé, Philippe; Mély, Yves

    2014-01-01

    The HIV-1 transactivator of transcription (Tat) protein is thought to stimulate reverse transcription (RTion). The Tat protein and, more specifically, its (44-61) domain were recently shown to promote the annealing of complementary DNA sequences representing the HIV-1 transactivation response element TAR, named dTAR and cTAR, that plays a key role in RTion. Moreover, the kinetic mechanism of the basic Tat(44-61) peptide in this annealing further revealed that this peptide constitutes a representative nucleic acid annealer. To further understand the structure-activity relationships of this highly conserved domain, we investigated by electrophoresis and fluorescence approaches the binding and annealing properties of various Tat(44-61) mutants. Our data showed that the Tyr47 and basic residues of the Tat(44-61) domain were instrumental for binding to cTAR through stacking and electrostatic interactions, respectively, and promoting its annealing with dTAR. Furthermore, the annealing efficiency of the mutants clearly correlates with their ability to rapidly associate and dissociate the complementary oligonucleotides and to promote RTion. Thus, transient and dynamic nucleic acid interactions likely constitute a key mechanistic component of annealers and the role of Tat in the late steps of RTion. Finally, our data suggest that Lys50 and Lys51 acetylation regulates Tat activity in RTion. PMID:24153111

  6. Dynamic interactions of the HIV-1 Tat with nucleic acids are critical for Tat activity in reverse transcription

    PubMed Central

    Boudier, Christian; Humbert, Nicolas; Chaminade, Françoise; Chen, Yingying; de Rocquigny, Hugues; Godet, Julien; Mauffret, Olivier; Fossé, Philippe; Mély, Yves

    2014-01-01

    The HIV-1 transactivator of transcription (Tat) protein is thought to stimulate reverse transcription (RTion). The Tat protein and, more specifically, its (44–61) domain were recently shown to promote the annealing of complementary DNA sequences representing the HIV-1 transactivation response element TAR, named dTAR and cTAR, that plays a key role in RTion. Moreover, the kinetic mechanism of the basic Tat(44–61) peptide in this annealing further revealed that this peptide constitutes a representative nucleic acid annealer. To further understand the structure–activity relationships of this highly conserved domain, we investigated by electrophoresis and fluorescence approaches the binding and annealing properties of various Tat(44–61) mutants. Our data showed that the Tyr47 and basic residues of the Tat(44–61) domain were instrumental for binding to cTAR through stacking and electrostatic interactions, respectively, and promoting its annealing with dTAR. Furthermore, the annealing efficiency of the mutants clearly correlates with their ability to rapidly associate and dissociate the complementary oligonucleotides and to promote RTion. Thus, transient and dynamic nucleic acid interactions likely constitute a key mechanistic component of annealers and the role of Tat in the late steps of RTion. Finally, our data suggest that Lys50 and Lys51 acetylation regulates Tat activity in RTion. PMID:24153111

  7. HIV-1 Adenoviral Vector Vaccines Expressing Multi-Trimeric BAFF and 4-1BBL Enhance T Cell Mediated Anti-Viral Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sachin; Raffa, Francesca N.; Fuller, Katherine A.; Rivas, Yaelis; Philip, Sakhi; Kornbluth, Richard S.; Stone, Geoffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviral vectored vaccines have shown considerable promise but could be improved by molecular adjuvants. Ligands in the TNF superfamily (TNFSF) are potential adjuvants for adenoviral vector (Ad5) vaccines based on their central role in adaptive immunity. Many TNFSF ligands require aggregation beyond the trimeric state (multi-trimerization) for optimal biological function. Here we describe Ad5 vaccines for HIV-1 Gag antigen (Ad5-Gag) adjuvanted with the TNFSF ligands 4-1BBL, BAFF, GITRL and CD27L constructed as soluble multi-trimeric proteins via fusion to Surfactant Protein D (SP-D) as a multimerization scaffold. Mice were vaccinated with Ad5-Gag combined with Ad5 expressing one of the SP-D-TNFSF constructs or single-chain IL-12p70 as adjuvant. To evaluate vaccine-induced protection, mice were challenged with vaccinia virus expressing Gag (vaccinia-Gag) which is known to target the female genital tract, a major route of sexually acquired HIV-1 infection. In this system, SP-D-4-1BBL or SP-D-BAFF led to significantly reduced vaccinia-Gag replication when compared to Ad5-Gag alone. In contrast, IL-12p70, SP-D-CD27L and SP-D-GITRL were not protective. Histological examination following vaccinia-Gag challenge showed a dramatic lymphocytic infiltration into the uterus and ovaries of SP-D-4-1BBL and SP-D-BAFF-treated animals. By day 5 post challenge, proinflammatory cytokines in the tissue were reduced, consistent with the enhanced control over viral replication. Splenocytes had no specific immune markers that correlated with protection induced by SP-D-4-1BBL and SP-D-BAFF versus other groups. IL-12p70, despite lack of anti-viral efficacy, increased the total numbers of splenic dextramer positive CD8+ T cells, effector memory T cells, and effector Gag-specific CD8+ T cells, suggesting that these markers are poor predictors of anti-viral immunity in this model. In conclusion, soluble multi-trimeric 4-1BBL and BAFF adjuvants led to strong protection from vaccinia

  8. Design of novel CXCR4 antagonists that are potent inhibitors of T-tropic (X4) HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Skerlj, Renato; Bridger, Gary; McEachern, Ernest; Harwig, Curtis; Smith, Chris; Kaller, Alan; Veale, Duane; Yee, Helen; Skupinska, Krystyna; Wauthy, Rossana; Wang, Letian; Baird, Ian; Zhu, Yongbao; Burrage, Kate; Yang, Wen; Sartori, Michael; Huskens, Dana; De Clercq, Erik; Schols, Dominique

    2011-03-01

    A novel series of CXCR4 antagonists were identified based on the substantial redesign of AMD070. These compounds possessed potent anti-HIV-1 activity and showed excellent pharmacokinetics in rat and dog. PMID:21295470

  9. Stimulation of HIV-1 Replication in Immature Dendritic Cells in Contact with Primary CD4 T or B Lymphocytes ▿

    PubMed Central

    Holl, Vincent; Xu, Ke; Peressin, Maryse; Lederle, Alexandre; Biedma, Marina Elizabeth; Delaporte, Maryse; Decoville, Thomas; Schmidt, Sylvie; Laumond, Géraldine; Aubertin, Anne-Marie; Moog, Christiane

    2010-01-01

    Sexual transmission is the major route of HIV-1 infection worldwide. Dendritic cells (DCs) from the mucosal layers are considered to be the initial targets of HIV-1 and probably play a crucial role in HIV-1 transmission. We investigated the role of cell-to-cell contact between HIV-1-exposed immature DCs and various lymphocyte subsets in the stimulation of HIV-1 replication. We found that HIV-1 replication and production in DCs were substantially enhanced by the coculture of DCs with primary CD4 T or nonpermissive B lymphocytes but not with primary activated CD8 T lymphocytes or human transformed CD4 T lymphocytes. Most of the new virions released by cocultures of HIV-1-exposed immature DCs and primary B lymphocytes expressed the DC-specific marker CD1a and were infectious for both immature DCs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Cocultured DCs thus produced large numbers of infectious viral particles under these experimental conditions. The soluble factors present in the supernatants of the cocultures were not sufficient to enhance HIV-1 replication in DCs, for which cell-to-cell contact was required. The neutralizing monoclonal antibody IgG1b12 and polyclonal anti-HIV-1 sera efficiently blocked HIV-1 transfer to CD4 T lymphocytes but did not prevent the increase in viral replication in DCs. Neutralizing antibodies thus proved to be more efficient at blocking HIV-1 transfer than previously thought. Our findings show that HIV-1 exploits DC-lymphocyte cross talk to upregulate replication within the DC reservoir. We provide evidence for a novel mechanism that may facilitate HIV-1 replication and transmission. This mechanism may favor HIV-1 pathogenesis, immune evasion, and persistence. PMID:20147388

  10. Increased Intrathecal Immune Activation in Virally Suppressed HIV-1 Infected Patients with Neurocognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Edén, Arvid; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Heaton, Robert K.; Nilsson, Staffan; Zetterberg, Henrik; Fuchs, Dietmar; Franklin, Donald; Price, Richard W.; Grant, Igor; Letendre, Scott L.; Gisslén, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although milder forms of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) remain prevalent, a correlation to neuronal injury has not been established in patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART). We examined the relationship between mild HAND and CSF neurofilament light protein (NFL), a biomarker of neuronal injury; and CSF neopterin, a biomarker of CNS immunoactivation, in virally suppressed patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Design and Methods We selected 99 subjects on suppressive ART followed longitudinally from the CNS HIV Anti-Retroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) study. Based on standardized comprehensive neurocognitive performance (NP) testing, subjects were classified as neurocognitively normal (NCN; n = 29) or impaired (NCI; n = 70). The NCI group included subjects with asymptomatic (ANI; n = 37) or mild (MND; n = 33) HAND. CSF biomarkers were analyzed on two occasions. Results Geometric mean CSF neopterin was 25% higher in the NCI group (p = 0.04) and NFL and neopterin were significantly correlated within the NCI group (r = 0.30; p<0.001) but not in the NCN group (r = -0.13; p = 0.3). Additionally, a trend towards higher NFL was seen in the NCI group (p = 0.06). Conclusions Mild HAND was associated with increased intrathecal immune activation, and the correlation between neopterin and NFL found in NCI subjects indicates an association between neurocognitive impairment, CNS inflammation and neuronal damage. Together these findings suggest that NCI despite ART may represent an active pathological process within the CNS that needs further characterization in prospective studies. PMID:27295036

  11. Small Molecule Inhibitors of BAF; A Promising Family of Compounds in HIV-1 Latency Reversal.

    PubMed

    Stoszko, Mateusz; De Crignis, Elisa; Rokx, Casper; Khalid, Mir Mubashir; Lungu, Cynthia; Palstra, Robert-Jan; Kan, Tsung Wai; Boucher, Charles; Verbon, Annelies; Dykhuizen, Emily C; Mahmoudi, Tokameh

    2016-01-01

    Persistence of latently infected cells in presence of Anti-Retroviral Therapy presents the main obstacle to HIV-1 eradication. Much effort is thus placed on identification of compounds capable of HIV-1 latency reversal in order to render infected cells susceptible to viral cytopathic effects and immune clearance. We identified the BAF chromatin remodeling complex as a key player required for maintenance of HIV-1 latency, highlighting its potential as a molecular target for inhibition in latency reversal. Here, we screened a recently identified panel of small molecule inhibitors of BAF (BAFi's) for potential to activate latent HIV-1. Latency reversal was strongly induced by BAFi's Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester and Pyrimethamine, two molecules previously characterized for clinical application. BAFi's reversed HIV-1 latency in cell line based latency models, in two ex vivo infected primary cell models of latency, as well as in HIV-1 infected patient's CD4 + T cells, without inducing T cell proliferation or activation. BAFi-induced HIV-1 latency reversal was synergistically enhanced upon PKC pathway activation and HDAC-inhibition. Therefore BAFi's constitute a promising family of molecules for inclusion in therapeutic combinatorial HIV-1 latency reversal. PMID:26870822

  12. Small Molecule Inhibitors of BAF; A Promising Family of Compounds in HIV-1 Latency Reversal

    PubMed Central

    Stoszko, Mateusz; De Crignis, Elisa; Rokx, Casper; Khalid, Mir Mubashir; Lungu, Cynthia; Palstra, Robert-Jan; Kan, Tsung Wai; Boucher, Charles; Verbon, Annelies; Dykhuizen, Emily C.; Mahmoudi, Tokameh

    2015-01-01

    Persistence of latently infected cells in presence of Anti-Retroviral Therapy presents the main obstacle to HIV-1 eradication. Much effort is thus placed on identification of compounds capable of HIV-1 latency reversal in order to render infected cells susceptible to viral cytopathic effects and immune clearance. We identified the BAF chromatin remodeling complex as a key player required for maintenance of HIV-1 latency, highlighting its potential as a molecular target for inhibition in latency reversal. Here, we screened a recently identified panel of small molecule inhibitors of BAF (BAFi's) for potential to activate latent HIV-1. Latency reversal was strongly induced by BAFi's Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester and Pyrimethamine, two molecules previously characterized for clinical application. BAFi's reversed HIV-1 latency in cell line based latency models, in two ex vivo infected primary cell models of latency, as well as in HIV-1 infected patient's CD4 + T cells, without inducing T cell proliferation or activation. BAFi-induced HIV-1 latency reversal was synergistically enhanced upon PKC pathway activation and HDAC-inhibition. Therefore BAFi's constitute a promising family of molecules for inclusion in therapeutic combinatorial HIV-1 latency reversal. PMID:26870822

  13. Optimized and enhanced DNA plasmid vector based in vivo construction of a neutralizing anti-HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein Fab.

    PubMed

    Muthumani, Kar; Flingai, Seleeke; Wise, Megan; Tingey, Colleen; Ugen, Kenneth E; Weiner, David B

    2013-10-01

    Monoclonal antibody preparations have demonstrated considerable clinical utility in the treatment of specific malignancies, as well as inflammatory and infectious diseases. Antibodies are conventionally delivered by passive administration, typically requiring costly large-scale laboratory development and production. Additional limitations include the necessity for repeat administrations, and the length of in vivo potency. Therefore, the development of methods to generate therapeutic antibodies and antibody like molecules in vivo, distinct from an active antigen-based immunization strategy, would have considerable clinical utility. In fact, adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector mediated delivery of immunoglobulin genes with subsequent generation of functional antibodies has recently been developed. As well, anon-viral vector mediated nucleic acid based delivery technology could permit the generation of therapeutic/prophylactic antibodies in vivo, obviating potential safety issues associated with viral vector based gene delivery. This delivery strategy has limitations as well, mainly due to very low in vivo production and expression of protein from the delivered gene. In the study reported here we have constructed an "enhanced and optimized" DNA plasmid technology to generate immunoglobulin heavy and light chains (i.e., Fab fragments) from an established neutralizing anti-HIV envelope glycoprotein monoclonal antibody (VRC01). This "enhanced" DNA (E-DNA) plasmid technology includes codon/RNA optimization, leader sequence utilization, as well as targeted potentiation of delivery and expression of the Fab immunoglobulin genes through use of "adaptive" in vivo electroporation. The results demonstrate that delivery by this method of a single administration of the optimized Fab expressing constructs resulted in generation of Fab molecules in mouse sera possessing high antigen specific binding and HIV neutralization activity for at least 7 d after injection, against diverse

  14. Optimized and enhanced DNA plasmid vector based in vivo construction of a neutralizing anti-HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein Fab

    PubMed Central

    Muthumani, Kar; Flingai, Seleeke; Wise, Megan; Tingey, Colleen; Ugen, Kenneth E; Weiner, David B

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody preparations have demonstrated considerable clinical utility in the treatment of specific malignancies, as well as inflammatory and infectious diseases. Antibodies are conventionally delivered by passive administration, typically requiring costly large-scale laboratory development and production. Additional limitations include the necessity for repeat administrations, and the length of in vivo potency. Therefore, the development of methods to generate therapeutic antibodies and antibody like molecules in vivo, distinct from an active antigen-based immunization strategy, would have considerable clinical utility. In fact, adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector mediated delivery of immunoglobulin genes with subsequent generation of functional antibodies has recently been developed. As well, anon-viral vector mediated nucleic acid based delivery technology could permit the generation of therapeutic/prophylactic antibodies in vivo, obviating potential safety issues associated with viral vector based gene delivery. This delivery strategy has limitations as well, mainly due to very low in vivo production and expression of protein from the delivered gene. In the study reported here we have constructed an “enhanced and optimized” DNA plasmid technology to generate immunoglobulin heavy and light chains (i.e., Fab fragments) from an established neutralizing anti-HIV envelope glycoprotein monoclonal antibody (VRC01). This “enhanced” DNA (E-DNA) plasmid technology includes codon/RNA optimization, leader sequence utilization, as well as targeted potentiation of delivery and expression of the Fab immunoglobulin genes through use of “adaptive” in vivo electroporation. The results demonstrate that delivery by this method of a single administration of the optimized Fab expressing constructs resulted in generation of Fab molecules in mouse sera possessing high antigen specific binding and HIV neutralization activity for at least 7 d after injection

  15. Rationally Targeted Mutations at the V1V2 Domain of the HIV-1 Envelope to Augment Virus Neutralization by Anti-V1V2 Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guomiao; Upadhyay, Chitra; Zhang, Jing; Pan, Ruimin; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Kong, Xiang-Peng; Hioe, Catarina E

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env) are the only viral antigens present on the virus surface and serve as the key targets for virus-neutralizing antibodies. However, HIV-1 deploys multiple strategies to shield the vulnerable sites on its Env from neutralizing antibodies. The V1V2 domain located at the apex of the HIV-1 Env spike is known to encompass highly variable loops, but V1V2 also contains immunogenic conserved elements recognized by cross-reactive antibodies. This study evaluates human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against V2 epitopes which overlap with the conserved integrin α4β7-binding LDV/I motif, designated as the V2i (integrin) epitopes. We postulate that the V2i Abs have weak or no neutralizing activities because the V2i epitopes are often occluded from antibody recognition. To gain insights into the mechanisms of the V2i occlusion, we evaluated three elements at the distal end of the V1V2 domain shown in the structure of V2i epitope complexed with mAb 830A to be important for antibody recognition of the V2i epitope. Amino-acid substitutions at position 179 that restore the LDV/I motif had minimal effects on virus sensitivity to neutralization by most V2i mAbs. However, a charge change at position 153 in the V1 region significantly increased sensitivity of subtype C virus ZM109 to most V2i mAbs. Separately, a disulfide bond introduced to stabilize the hypervariable region of V2 loop also enhanced virus neutralization by some V2i mAbs, but the effects varied depending on the virus. These data demonstrate that multiple elements within the V1V2 domain act independently and in a virus-dependent fashion to govern the antibody recognition and accessibility of V2i epitopes, suggesting the need for multi-pronged strategies to counter the escape and the shielding mechanisms obstructing the V2i Abs from neutralizing HIV-1. PMID:26491873

  16. Inhibition of HIV-1 reactivation by a telomerase-derived peptide in a HSP90-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong; Choi, Myung-Soo; Inn, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2016-01-01

    A peptide vaccine designed to induce T-cell immunity to telomerase, GV1001, has been shown to modulate cellular signaling pathways and confer a direct anti-cancer effect through the interaction with heat shock protein (HSP) 90 and 70. Here, we have found that GV1001 can modulate transactivation protein-mediated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 transactivation in an HSP90-dependent manner. GV1001 treatment resulted in significant suppression of HIV-1 replication and rescue of infected cells from death by HIV-1. Transactivation of HIV-long terminal repeat (LTR) was inhibited by GV1001, indicating that GV1001 suppressed the transcription from proviral HIV DNA. The anti-HIV-1 activity of GV1001 was completely abrogated by an HSP90-neutralizing antibody, indicating that the antiviral activity depends on HSP90. Further mechanistic studies revealed that GV1001 suppresses basal NF-κB activation, which is required for HIV-1 LTR transactivation in an HSP90-dependent manner. Inhibition of LTR transactivation by GV1001 suggests its potential to suppress HIV-1 reactivation from latency. Indeed, PMA-mediated reactivation of HIV-1 from latent infected cells was suppressed by GV1001. The results suggest the potential therapeutic use of GV1001, a peptide proven to be safe for human use, as an anti-HIV-1 agent to suppress the reactivation from latently infected cells. PMID:27363520

  17. Inhibition of HIV-1 reactivation by a telomerase-derived peptide in a HSP90-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong; Choi, Myung-Soo; Inn, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2016-01-01

    A peptide vaccine designed to induce T-cell immunity to telomerase, GV1001, has been shown to modulate cellular signaling pathways and confer a direct anti-cancer effect through the interaction with heat shock protein (HSP) 90 and 70. Here, we have found that GV1001 can modulate transactivation protein-mediated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 transactivation in an HSP90-dependent manner. GV1001 treatment resulted in significant suppression of HIV-1 replication and rescue of infected cells from death by HIV-1. Transactivation of HIV-long terminal repeat (LTR) was inhibited by GV1001, indicating that GV1001 suppressed the transcription from proviral HIV DNA. The anti-HIV-1 activity of GV1001 was completely abrogated by an HSP90-neutralizing antibody, indicating that the antiviral activity depends on HSP90. Further mechanistic studies revealed that GV1001 suppresses basal NF-κB activation, which is required for HIV-1 LTR transactivation in an HSP90-dependent manner. Inhibition of LTR transactivation by GV1001 suggests its potential to suppress HIV-1 reactivation from latency. Indeed, PMA-mediated reactivation of HIV-1 from latent infected cells was suppressed by GV1001. The results suggest the potential therapeutic use of GV1001, a peptide proven to be safe for human use, as an anti-HIV-1 agent to suppress the reactivation from latently infected cells. PMID:27363520

  18. Pyrrolobenzoxazepinone derivatives as non-nucleoside HIV-1 RT inhibitors: further structure-activity relationship studies and identification of more potent broad-spectrum HIV-1 RT inhibitors with antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Campiani, G; Morelli, E; Fabbrini, M; Nacci, V; Greco, G; Novellino, E; Ramunno, A; Maga, G; Spadari, S; Caliendo, G; Bergamini, A; Faggioli, E; Uccella, I; Bolacchi, F; Marini, S; Coletta, M; Nacca, A; Caccia, S

    1999-10-21

    Pyrrolobenzoxazepinone (PBO) derivatives represent a new class of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NNRTs) whose prototype is (+/-)-6-ethyl-6-phenylpyrrolo[2,1-d][1,5]benzoxazepin-7(6H)- one (6). Docking studies based on the three-dimensional structure of RT prompted the synthesis and biological evaluation of novel derivatives and analogues of 6 featuring a meta-substituted phenyl or a 2-thienyl ring at C-6 and a pyridine system in place of the fused-benzene ring to yield pyrrolopyridooxazepinones (PPOs). Compared with the lead 6 and nevirapine, several of the synthesized compounds (PBOs 13a-d and PPOs 13i-k) displayed higher inhibitory activity against wild-type RT and clinically relevant mutant RTs containing the single amino acid substitutions L100I, K103N, V106A, Y181I, and Y188L. The most potent inhibitors were further evaluated for in vitro antiviral activity on lymphocytes and monocyte-macrophages, for cytotoxicity on a panel of cell lines, and for potential synergistic antiviral activity with AZT. Pharmacokinetic studies performed on 13b, 13c, and 13i showed that these compounds achieve high concentrations in the brain. The results of the biological and pharmacokinetic experiments suggest a potential clinical utility of analogues such as 13b-d, 13i, and 13j, in combination with nucleoside RT inhibitors, against strains of HIV-1 bearing those mutations that confer resistance to known NNRTI. PMID:10543890

  19. Antimycobacterial and HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Activity of Julianaceae and Clusiaceae Plant Species from Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Cansino, Rocio; Espitia-Pinzón, Clara Inés; Campos-Lara, María Guadalupe; Guzmán-Gutiérrez, Silvia Laura; Segura-Salinas, Erika; Echeverría-Valencia, Gabriela; Torras-Claveria, Laura; Cuevas-Figueroa, Xochitl Marisol; Reyes-Chilpa, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    The extracts of 14 Julianaceae and 5 Clusiaceae species growing in Mexico were tested in vitro (50 µg/mL) against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and HIV reverse transcriptase (HIV-RT). The Julianaceae bark and leaf extracts inhibited M. tuberculosis (>84.67%) and HIV-RT (<49.89%). The Clusiaceae leaves extracts also inhibited both targets (>58.3% and >67.6%), respectively. The IC50 values for six selected extracts and their cytotoxicity (50 µg/mL) to human macrophages were then determined. Amphipterygium glaucum, A. molle, and A. simplicifolium fairly inhibited M. tuberculosis with IC50 of 1.87–2.35 µg/mL; but their IC50 against HIV-RT was 59.25–97.83 µg/mL. Calophyllum brasiliense, Vismia baccifera, and Vismia mexicana effect on M. tuberculosis was noteworthy (IC50 3.02–3.64 µg/mL) and also inhibited RT-HIV (IC50 26.24–35.17 µg/mL). These 6 extracts (50 µg/mL) presented low toxicity to macrophages (<23.8%). The HPLC profiles of A. glaucum, A. molle, and A. simplicifolium indicated that their antimycobacterial activity cannot be related to masticadienonic, 3α, or 3β-hydromasticadienonic acids, suggesting that other compounds may be responsible for the observed activity or this might be a synergy result. The anti-HIV-RT and antimycobacterial activities induced by C. brasiliense can be attributed to the content of calanolides A, B, as well as soulatrolide. PMID:25983849

  20. Drug targeting of HIV-1 RNA.DNA hybrid structures: thermodynamics of recognition and impact on reverse transcriptase-mediated ribonuclease H activity and viral replication.

    PubMed

    Li, Tsai-Kun; Barbieri, Christopher M; Lin, Hsin-Chin; Rabson, Arnold B; Yang, Gengcheng; Fan, Yupeng; Gaffney, Barbara L; Jones, Roger A; Pilch, Daniel S

    2004-08-01

    RNA degradation via the ribonuclease H (RNase H) activity of human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) is a critical component of the reverse transcription process. In this connection, mutations of RT that inactivate RNase H activity result in noninfectious virus particles. Thus, interfering with the RNase H activity of RT represents a potential vehicle for the inhibition of HIV-1 replication. Here, we demonstrate an approach for inhibiting the RNase H activity of HIV-1 RT by targeting its RNA.DNA hybrid substrates. Specifically, we show that the binding of the 4,5-disubstituted 2-deoxystreptamine aminoglycosides, neomycin, paromomycin, and ribostamycin, to two different chimeric RNA-DNA duplexes, which mimic two distinct intermediates in the reverse transcription process, inhibits specific RT-mediated RNase H cleavage, with this inhibition being competitive in nature. UV melting and isothermal titration calorimetry studies reveal a correlation between the relative binding affinities of the three drugs for each of the chimeric RNA-DNA host duplexes and the relative extents to which the drugs inhibit RT-mediated RNase H cleavage of the duplexes. Significantly, this correlation also extends to the relative efficacies with which the drugs inhibit HIV-1 replication. In the aggregate, our results highlight a potential strategy for AIDS chemotherapy that should not be compromised by the unusual genetic diversity of HIV-1. PMID:15274628

  1. Enhanced HIV-1 neutralization by antibody heteroligation

    PubMed Central

    Mouquet, Hugo; Warncke, Malte; Scheid, Johannes F.; Seaman, Michael S.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2012-01-01

    Passive transfer of broadly neutralizing human antibodies against HIV-1 protects macaques against infection. However, HIV-1 uses several strategies to escape antibody neutralization, including mutation of the gp160 viral surface spike, a glycan shield to block antibody access to the spike, and expression of a limited number of viral surface spikes, which interferes with bivalent antibody binding. The latter is thought to decrease antibody apparent affinity or avidity, thereby interfering with neutralizing activity. To test the idea that increasing apparent affinity might enhance neutralizing activity, we engineered bispecific anti–HIV-1 antibodies (BiAbs) that can bind bivalently by virtue of one scFv arm that binds to gp120 and a second arm to the gp41 subunit of gp160. The individual arms of the BiAbs preserved the binding specificities of the original anti-HIV IgG antibodies and together bound simultaneously to gp120 and gp41. Heterotypic bivalent binding enhanced neutralization compared with the parental antibodies. We conclude that antibody recognition and viral neutralization of HIV can be improved by heteroligation. PMID:22219363

  2. Actinomycin D binding mode reveals the basis for its potent HIV-1 and cancer activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paramanathan, Thayaparan; Vladescu, Ioana D.; McCauley, Micah J.; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark C.

    2011-03-01

    Actinomycin D (ActD) is one of the most studied antibiotics, which has been used as an anti-cancer agent and also shown to inhibit HIV reverse transcription. Initial studies with ActD established that it intercalates double stranded DNA (dsDNA). However, recent studies have shown that ActD binds with even higher affinity to single stranded DNA (ssDNA). In our studies we use optical tweezers to stretch and hold single dsDNA molecule at constant force in the presence of varying ActD concentrations until the binding reaches equilibrium. The change in dsDNA length upon ActD binding measured as a function of time yields the rate of binding in addition to the equilibrium lengthening of DNA. The results suggest extremely slow kinetics, on the order of several minutes and 0.52 +/- 0.06 μ M binding affinity. Holding DNA at constant force while stretching and relaxing suggests that ActD binds to two single strands that are close to each other rather than to pure dsDNA or ssDNA. This suggests that biological activity of ActD that contributes towards the inhibition of cellular replication is due to its ability to bind at DNA bubbles during RNA transcription, thereby stalling the transcription process.

  3. Elevated levels of invariant natural killer T-cell and natural killer cell activation correlate with disease progression in HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections

    PubMed Central

    Bächle, Susanna M.; Malone, David F.G.; Buggert, Marcus; Karlsson, Annika C.; Isberg, Per-Erik; Biague, Antonio J.; Norrgren, Hans; Medstrand, Patrik; Moll, Markus; Sandberg, Johan K.; Jansson, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In this study, we aimed to investigate the frequency and activation of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells and natural killer (NK) cells among HIV-1, HIV-2, or dually HIV-1/HIV-2 (HIV-D)-infected individuals, in relation to markers of disease progression. Design: Whole blood samples were collected from treatment-naive HIV-1 (n = 23), HIV-2 (n = 34), and HIV-D (n = 11) infected individuals, as well as HIV-seronegative controls (n = 25), belonging to an occupational cohort in Guinea-Bissau. Methods: Frequencies and activation levels of iNKT and NK cell subsets were analysed using multicolour flow cytometry, and results were related to HIV-status, CD4+ T-cell levels, viral load, and T-cell activation. Results: HIV-1, HIV-D, and viremic HIV-2 individuals had lower numbers of CD4+ iNKT cells in circulation compared with seronegative controls. Numbers of CD56bright NK cells were also reduced in HIV-infected individuals as compared with control study participants. Notably, iNKT cell and NK cell activation levels, assessed by CD38 expression, were increased in HIV-1 and HIV-2 single, as well as dual, infections. HIV-2 viremia was associated with elevated activation levels in CD4+ iNKT cells, CD56bright, and CD56dim NK cells, as compared with aviremic HIV-2 infection. Additionally, disease markers such as CD4+ T-cell percentages, viral load, and CD4+ T-cell activation were associated with CD38 expression levels of both iNKT and NK cells, which activation levels also correlated with each other. Conclusion: Our data indicate that elevated levels of iNKT-cell and NK-cell activation are associated with viremia and disease progression markers in both HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections. PMID:27163705

  4. Toward the development of a single-round infection assay based on EGFP reporting for anti-HIV-1 drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Soezi, Mahdieh; Memarnejadian, Arash; Aminzadeh, Saeed; Zabihollahi, Rezvan; Sadat, Seyed Mehdi; Amini, Safieh; Hekmat, Soheila; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: The rapid increase of HIV-1 strains resistant to current antiretroviral drugs is a challenge for successful AIDS therapy. This necessitates the development of novel drugs, and to this end, availability of screening systems for in vitro drug discovery is a priority. Herein, we report the modification of a previously developed system for increased sensitivity, ease of use, and cost-efficiency, based on the application of the EGFP marker. Methods: A PCR-amplified gfp gene (gfp) was cloned into pmzNL4-3, the plasmid already designed to produce single-cycle replicable virions, in frame with the reverse-transcriptase gene to construct the pmzNL4-3/GFP plasmid. GFP-mzNL4-3 pseudo-typed virions, as the first progeny viruses, were recovered from the culture supernatant of HEK293T cells co-transfected with pmzNL4-3/GFP and the helper plasmids pSPAX2 and pMD2G, which respectively encode HIV-1 Gag-Pol and vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein. Single-cycle replication and virion production were assessed by syncytia formation, p24 antigen assays, and electron and fluorescence microscopy. Results: The incorporation of EGFP into the viral particles allowed their quantification by fluorometry, flow-cytometry, and fluorescence microscopy; however, this modification did not affect the single-round infectivity or production rate of the GFP fluorescence-emitting virions. Conclusions: Our results certify the development of a rapid, inexpensive, and safe GFP-reporting single-cycle replicable system for anti-HIV drug discovery. Further experiments are needed to measure the validity and robustness of the assay. PMID:26989744

  5. Natural Stilbenoids Isolated from Grapevine Exhibiting Inhibitory Effects against HIV-1 Integrase and Eukaryote MOS1 Transposase In Vitro Activities

    PubMed Central

    Chaignepain, Stéphane; Subra, Frederic; Munir, Soundasse; Delelis, Olivier; Lesbats, Paul; Calmels, Christina; Andreola, Marie-Line; Merillon, Jean-Michel; Auge-Gouillou, Corinne; Parissi, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Polynucleotidyl transferases are enzymes involved in several DNA mobility mechanisms in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Some of them such as retroviral integrases are crucial for pathogenous processes and are therefore good candidates for therapeutic approaches. To identify new therapeutic compounds and new tools for investigating the common functional features of these proteins, we addressed the inhibition properties of natural stilbenoids deriving from resveratrol on two models: the HIV-1 integrase and the eukaryote MOS-1 transposase. Two resveratrol dimers, leachianol F and G, were isolated for the first time in Vitis along with fourteen known stilbenoids: E-resveratrol, E-piceid, E-pterostilbene, E-piceatannol, (+)-E-ε-viniferin, E-ε-viniferinglucoside, E-scirpusin A, quadragularin A, ampelopsin A, pallidol, E-miyabenol C, E-vitisin B, hopeaphenol, and isohopeaphenol and were purified from stalks of Vitis vinifera (Vitaceae), and moracin M from stem bark of Milliciaexelsa (Moraceae). These compounds were tested in in vitro and in vivo assays reproducing the activity of both enzymes. Several molecules presented significant inhibition on both systems. Some of the molecules were found to be active against both proteins while others were specific for one of the two models. Comparison of the differential effects of the molecules suggested that the compounds could target specific intermediate nucleocomplexes of the reactions. Additionally E-pterostilbene was found active on the early lentiviral replication steps in lentiviruses transduced cells. Consequently, in addition to representing new original lead compounds for further modelling of new active agents against HIV-1 integrase, these molecules could be good tools for identifying such reaction intermediates in DNA mobility processes. PMID:24312275

  6. Single-chain protein mimetics of the N-terminal heptad-repeat region of gp41 with potential as anti-HIV-1 drugs.

    PubMed

    Crespillo, Sara; Cámara-Artigas, Ana; Casares, Salvador; Morel, Bertrand; Cobos, Eva S; Mateo, Pedro L; Mouz, Nicolas; Martin, Christophe E; Roger, Marie G; El Habib, Raphaelle; Su, Bin; Moog, Christiane; Conejero-Lara, Francisco

    2014-12-23

    During HIV-1 fusion to the host cell membrane, the N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) and the C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR) of the envelope subunit gp41 become transiently exposed and accessible to fusion inhibitors or Abs. In this process, the NHR region adopts a trimeric coiled-coil conformation that can be a target for therapeutic intervention. Here, we present an approach to rationally design single-chain protein constructs that mimic the NHR coiled-coil surface. The proteins were built by connecting with short loops two parallel NHR helices and an antiparallel one with the inverse sequence followed by engineering of stabilizing interactions. The constructs were expressed in Escherichia coli, purified with high yield, and folded as highly stable helical coiled coils. The crystal structure of one of the constructs confirmed the predicted fold and its ability to accurately mimic an exposed gp41 NHR surface. These single-chain proteins bound to synthetic CHR peptides with very high affinity, and furthermore, they showed broad inhibitory activity of HIV-1 fusion on various pseudoviruses and primary isolates. PMID:25489108

  7. Fuzzy ARTMAP prediction of biological activities for potential HIV-1 protease inhibitors using a small molecular data set.

    PubMed

    Andonie, Răzvan; Fabry-Asztalos, Levente; Abdul-Wahid, Christopher Badi'; Abdul-Wahid, Sarah; Barker, Grant I; Magill, Lukas C

    2011-01-01

    Obtaining satisfactory results with neural networks depends on the availability of large data samples. The use of small training sets generally reduces performance. Most classical Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) studies for a specific enzyme system have been performed on small data sets. We focus on the neuro-fuzzy prediction of biological activities of HIV-1 protease inhibitory compounds when inferring from small training sets. We propose two computational intelligence prediction techniques which are suitable for small training sets, at the expense of some computational overhead. Both techniques are based on the FAMR model. The FAMR is a Fuzzy ARTMAP (FAM) incremental learning system used for classification and probability estimation. During the learning phase, each sample pair is assigned a relevance factor proportional to the importance of that pair. The two proposed algorithms in this paper are: 1) The GA-FAMR algorithm, which is new, consists of two stages: a) During the first stage, we use a genetic algorithm (GA) to optimize the relevances assigned to the training data. This improves the generalization capability of the FAMR. b) In the second stage, we use the optimized relevances to train the FAMR. 2) The Ordered FAMR is derived from a known algorithm. Instead of optimizing relevances, it optimizes the order of data presentation using the algorithm of Dagher et al. In our experiments, we compare these two algorithms with an algorithm not based on the FAM, the FS-GA-FNN introduced in [4], [5]. We conclude that when inferring from small training sets, both techniques are efficient, in terms of generalization capability and execution time. The computational overhead introduced is compensated by better accuracy. Finally, the proposed techniques are used to predict the biological activities of newly designed potential HIV-1 protease inhibitors. PMID:21071799

  8. HIV-1 activates proinflammatory and interferon-inducible genes in human brain microvascular endothelial cells: putative mechanisms of blood-brain barrier dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Anathbandhu; Duan, Fenghai; Morsey, Brenda; Persidsky, Yuri; Kanmogne, Georgette D

    2008-04-01

    The mechanisms underlying blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction seen in human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) infection are poorly understood; however, they are believed to be caused by interactions of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) with virus-infected macrophages. Using a transwell system and Affymetrix arrays, we investigated HIV-1-induced genomic changes in HBMEC after coculture with HIV-1-infected or -uninfected monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). Differentially expressed genes were determined by linear modeling and then were grouped by hierarchical clustering. Compared to HBMEC cocultured with noninfected MDM, 184 probe sets corresponding to 84 genes were differentially expressed in HBMEC cocultured with HIV-infected MDM. Genes activated in HIV-1 MDM-exposed HBMEC included proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced proteins, interferon (IFN)-inducible genes, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, transcription factors of the nuclear factor-kappaB family, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1. Analysis of molecular networks and canonical pathways associated with differentially expressed genes suggest that HIV-1 causes BBB impairment by mechanisms involving inflammation, cytokine, and IFN signaling in HBMEC. PMID:17940540

  9. HMBA Enhances Prostratin-Induced Activation of Latent HIV-1 via Suppressing the Expression of Negative Feedback Regulator A20/TNFAIP3 in NF-κB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Duchu; Wang, Huiping; Aweya, Jude Juventus; Chen, Yanheng; Chen, Meihua; Wu, Xiaomeng; Chen, Xiaonan; Lu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, much emphasis has been put on the transcriptional activation of HIV-1, which is proposed as a promised strategy for eradicating latent HIV-1 provirus. Two drugs, prostratin and hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA), have shown potent effects as inducers for releasing HIV-1 latency when used alone or in combination, although their cellular target(s) are currently not well understood, especially under drug combination. Here, we have shown that HMBA and prostratin synergistically release HIV-1 latency via different mechanisms. While prostratin strongly stimulates HMBA-induced HIV-1 transcription via improved P-TEFb activation, HMBA is capable of boosting NF-κB-dependent transcription initiation by suppressing prostratin-induced expression of the deubiquitinase A20, a negative feedback regulator in the NF-κB signaling pathway. In addition, HMBA was able to increase prostratin-induced phosphorylation and degradation of NF-κB inhibitor IκBα, thereby enhancing and prolonging prostratin-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB, a prerequisite for stimulation of transcription initiation. Thus, by blocking the negative feedback circuit, HMBA functions as a signaling enhancer of the NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:27529070

  10. The BET inhibitor OTX015 reactivates latent HIV-1 through P-TEFb

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Panpan; Qu, Xiying; Shen, Yinzhong; Jiang, Zhengtao; Wang, Pengfei; Zeng, Hanxian; Ji, Haiyan; Deng, Junxiao; Yang, Xinyi; Li, Xian; Lu, Hongzhou; Zhu, Huanzhang

    2016-01-01

    None of the currently used anti-HIV-1 agents can effectively eliminate latent HIV-1 reservoirs, which is a major hurdle to a complete cure for AIDS. We report here that a novel oral BET inhibitor OTX015, a thienotriazolodiazepine compound that has entered phase Ib clinical development for advanced hematologic malignancies, can effectively reactivate HIV-1 in different latency models with an EC50 value 1.95–4.34 times lower than JQ1, a known BET inhibitor that can reactivate HIV-1 latency. We also found that OTX015 was more potent when used in combination with prostratin. More importantly, OTX015 treatment induced HIV-1 full-length transcripts and viral outgrowth in resting CD4+ T cells from infected individuals receiving suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART), while exerting minimal toxicity and effects on T cell activation. Finally, biochemical analysis showed that OTX015-mediated activation of HIV-1 involved an increase in CDK9 occupancy and RNAP II C-terminal domain (CTD) phosphorylation. Our results suggest that the BET inhibitor OTX015 may be a candidate for anti-HIV-1-latency therapies. PMID:27067814

  11. Development of a novel anti-HIV-1 agent from within: Effect of chimeric Vpr-containing protease cleavage site residues on virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Serio, D.; Rizvi, T. A.; Cartas, M.; Kalyanaraman, V. S.; Weber, I. T.; Koprowski, H.; Srinivasan, A.

    1997-01-01

    Effective antiviral agents will be of great value in controlling virus replication and delaying the onset of HIV-1-related disease symptoms. Current therapy involves the use of antiviral agents that target the enzymatic functions of the virus, resulting in the emergence of resistant viruses to these agents, thus lowering their effectiveness. To overcome this problem, we have considered the idea of developing novel agents from within HIV-1 as inhibitors of virus replication. The specificity of the Vpr protein for the HIV-1 virus particle makes it an attractive molecule for the development of antiviral agents targeting the events associated with virus maturation. We have generated chimeric Vpr proteins containing HIV-1-specific sequences added to the C terminus of Vpr. These sequences correspond to nine cleavage sites of the Gag and Gag–Pol precursors of HIV-1. The chimeric Vpr constructs were introduced into HIV-1 proviral DNA to assess their effect on virus infectivity using single- and multiple-round replication assays. The virus particles generated exhibited a variable replication pattern depending on the protease cleavage site used as a fusion partner. Interestingly, the chimeric Vpr containing the cleavage sequences from the junction of p24 and p2, 24/2, completely abolished virus infectivity. These results show that chimeric proteins generated from within HIV-1 have the ability to suppress HIV-1 replication and make ideal agents for gene therapy or intracellular immunization to treat HIV-1 infection. PMID:9096396

  12. Substituted indoles as HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors: a patent evaluation (WO2015044928).

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Gao, Ping; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2016-05-01

    The invention described in this patent (WO2015044928) is related to compounds based on the substituted indole scaffold, their synthetic process and application to inhibit HIV-1 replication as non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). Some of the newly claimed compounds presented improved potency against wild-type (WT) HIV-1 strain in comparison to previously disclosed indole-based NNRTIs and were also shown to be effective against common resistant HIV-1 strains. In light of their novel structural characteristics, simple synthetic route and improved anti-HIV activity, these compounds deserve further study as promising NNRTIs. PMID:26742549

  13. HIV-1 Protein Nef Inhibits Activity of ATP-binding Cassette Transporter A1 by Targeting Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperone Calnexin*

    PubMed Central

    Jennelle, Lucas; Hunegnaw, Ruth; Dubrovsky, Larisa; Pushkarsky, Tatiana; Fitzgerald, Michael L.; Sviridov, Dmitri; Popratiloff, Anastas; Brichacek, Beda; Bukrinsky, Michael

    2014-01-01

    HIV-infected patients are at increased risk of developing atherosclerosis, in part due to an altered high density lipoprotein profile exacerbated by down-modulation and impairment of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) activity by the HIV-1 protein Nef. However, the mechanisms of this Nef effect remain unknown. Here, we show that Nef interacts with an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone calnexin, which regulates folding and maturation of glycosylated proteins. Nef disrupted interaction between calnexin and ABCA1 but increased affinity and enhanced interaction of calnexin with HIV-1 gp160. The Nef mutant that did not bind to calnexin did not affect the calnexin-ABCA1 interaction. Interaction with calnexin was essential for functionality of ABCA1, as knockdown of calnexin blocked the ABCA1 exit from the endoplasmic reticulum, reduced ABCA1 abundance, and inhibited cholesterol efflux; the same effects were observed after Nef overexpression. However, the effects of calnexin knockdown and Nef on cholesterol efflux were not additive; in fact, the combined effect of these two factors together did not differ significantly from the effect of calnexin knockdown alone. Interestingly, gp160 and ABCA1 interacted with calnexin differently; although gp160 binding to calnexin was dependent on glycosylation, glycosylation was of little importance for the interaction between ABCA1 and calnexin. Thus, Nef regulates the activity of calnexin to stimulate its interaction with gp160 at the expense of ABCA1. This study identifies a mechanism for Nef-dependent inactivation of ABCA1 and dysregulation of cholesterol metabolism. PMID:25170080

  14. A cooperative interaction between NF-kappa B and Sp1 is required for HIV-1 enhancer activation.

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, N D; Edwards, N L; Duckett, C S; Agranoff, A B; Schmid, R M; Nabel, G J

    1993-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) long terminal repeat (LTR) contains two binding sites for NF-kappa B in close proximity to three binding sites for the constitutive transcription factor, Sp1. Previously, stimulation of the HIV enhancer in response to mitogens has been attributed to the binding of NF-kappa B to the viral enhancer. In this report, we show that the binding of NF-kappa B is not by itself sufficient to induce HIV gene expression. Instead, a protein-protein interaction must occur between NF-kappa B and Sp1 bound to an adjacent site. Cooperativity both in DNA binding and in transcriptional activation of NF-kappa B and Sp1 was confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift gel analysis, DNase footprinting, chemical cross-linking and transfection studies in vivo. With a heterologous promoter, we find that the interaction of NF-kappa B with Sp1 is dependent on orientation and position, and is not observed with other elements, including GATA, CCAAT or octamer. An increase in the spacing between the kappa B and Sp1 elements virtually abolishes this functional interaction, which is not restored when these sites are brought back into the same helical position. Several other promoters regulated by NF-kappa B also contain kappa B in proximity to Sp1 binding sites. These findings suggest that an interaction between NF-kappa B and Sp1 is required for inducible HIV-1 gene expression and may serve as a regulatory mechanism to activate specific viral and cellular genes. Images PMID:8253080

  15. The Effect of Clade-Specific Sequence Polymorphisms on HIV-1 Protease Activity and Inhibitor Resistance Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Bandaranayake, Rajintha M.; Kolli, Madhavi; King, Nancy M.; Nalivaika, Ellen A.; Heroux, Annie; Kakizawa, Junko; Sugiura, Wataru; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2010-09-08

    The majority of HIV-1 infections around the world result from non-B clade HIV-1 strains. The CRF01{_}AE (AE) strain is seen principally in Southeast Asia. AE protease differs by {approx}10% in amino acid sequence from clade B protease and carries several naturally occurring polymorphisms that are associated with drug resistance in clade B. AE protease has been observed to develop resistance through a nonactive-site N88S mutation in response to nelfinavir (NFV) therapy, whereas clade B protease develops both the active-site mutation D30N and the nonactive-site mutation N88D. Structural and biochemical studies were carried out with wild-type and NFV-resistant clade B and AE protease variants. The relationship between clade-specific sequence variations and pathways to inhibitor resistance was also assessed. AE protease has a lower catalytic turnover rate than clade B protease, and it also has weaker affinity for both NFV and darunavir (DRV). This weaker affinity may lead to the nonactive-site N88S variant in AE, which exhibits significantly decreased affinity for both NFV and DRV. The D30N/N88D mutations in clade B resulted in a significant loss of affinity for NFV and, to a lesser extent, for DRV. A comparison of crystal structures of AE protease shows significant structural rearrangement in the flap hinge region compared with those of clade B protease and suggests insights into the alternative pathways to NFV resistance. In combination, our studies show that sequence polymorphisms within clades can alter protease activity and inhibitor binding and are capable of altering the pathway to inhibitor resistance.

  16. APOBEC3H polymorphisms and susceptibility to HIV-1 infection in an Indian population.

    PubMed

    Naruse, Taeko K; Sakurai, Daisuke; Ohtani, Hitoshi; Sharma, Gaurav; Sharma, Surendra K; Vajpayee, Madhu; Mehra, Narinder K; Kaur, Gurvinder; Kimura, Akinori

    2016-03-01

    Human APOBEC3H (A3H) is a member of APOBEC cytidine deaminase family intensively constraining the HIV-1 replication. A3H is known to be polymorphic with different protein stability and anti-HIV-1 activity in vitro. We recently reported that A3H haplotypes composed of two functional polymorphisms, rs139292 (N15del) and rs139297 (G105R), were associated with the susceptibility to HIV-1 infection in Japanese. To confirm the association of A3H and HIV-1 infection in another ethnic group, a total of 241 HIV-1-infected Indian individuals and ethnic-matched 286 healthy controls were analyzed for the A3H polymorphisms. The frequency of 15del allele was high in the HIV-1-infected subjects as compared with the controls (0.477 vs 0.402, odds ratio (OR)=1.36, P=0.014). Haplotype analysis showed that the frequencies of 15del-105R was high (0.475 vs 0.400, OR=1.36, permutation P=0.037) in the HIV-1-infected subjects, confirming the association of A3H polymorphisms with the susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. PMID:26559750

  17. Activity of phosphino palladium(II) and platinum(II) complexes against HIV-1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gama, Ntombenhle H; Elkhadir, Afag Y F; Gordhan, Bhavna G; Kana, Bavesh D; Darkwa, James; Meyer, Debra

    2016-08-01

    Treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is currently complicated by increased prevalence of co-infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The development of drug candidates that offer the simultaneous management of HIV and tuberculosis (TB) would be of great benefit in the holistic treatment of HIV/AIDS, especially in sub-Saharan Africa which has the highest global prevalence of HIV-TB coinfection. Bis(diphenylphosphino)-2-pyridylpalladium(II) chloride (1), bis(diphenylphosphino)-2-pyridylplatinum(II) chloride (2), bis(diphenylphosphino)-2-ethylpyridylpalladium(II) chloride (3) and bis(diphenylphosphino)-2-ethylpyridylplatinum(II) (4) were investigated for the inhibition of HIV-1 through interactions with the viral protease. The complexes were subsequently assessed for biological potency against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv by determining the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) using broth microdilution. Complex (3) showed the most significant and competitive inhibition of HIV-1 protease (p = 0.014 at 100 µM). Further studies on its in vitro effects on whole virus showed reduced viral infectivity by over 80 % at 63 µM (p < 0.05). In addition, the complex inhibited the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis at an MIC of 5 µM and was non-toxic to host cells at all active concentrations (assessed by tetrazolium dye and real time cell electronic sensing). In vitro evidence is provided here for the possibility of utilizing a single metal-based compound for the treatment of HIV/AIDS and TB. PMID:27246555

  18. High-throughput screening uncovers a compound that activates latent HIV-1 and acts cooperatively with a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Micheva-Viteva, Sofiya; Kobayashi, Yoshifumi; Edelstein, Leonard C; Pacchia, Annmarie L; Lee, Hui-Ling Rose; Graci, Jason D; Breslin, Jamie; Phelan, Bradley D; Miller, Leia K; Colacino, Joseph M; Gu, Zhengxian; Ron, Yacov; Peltz, Stuart W; Dougherty, Joseph P

    2011-06-17

    Current antiretroviral therapy (ART) provides potent suppression of HIV-1 replication. However, ART does not target latent viral reservoirs, so persistent infection remains a challenge. Small molecules with pharmacological properties that allow them to reach and activate viral reservoirs could potentially be utilized to eliminate the latent arm of the infection when used in combination with ART. Here we describe a cell-based system modeling HIV-1 latency that was utilized in a high-throughput screen to identify small molecule antagonists of HIV-1 latency. A more detailed analysis is provided for one of the hit compounds, antiviral 6 (AV6), which required nuclear factor of activated T cells for early mRNA expression while exhibiting RNA-stabilizing activity. It was found that AV6 reproducibly activated latent provirus from different lymphocyte-based clonal cell lines as well as from latently infected primary resting CD4(+) T cells without causing general T cell proliferation or activation. Moreover, AV6 complemented the latency antagonist activity of a previously described histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. This is a proof of concept showing that a high-throughput screen employing a cell-based model of HIV-1 latency can be utilized to identify new classes of compounds that can be used in concert with other persistent antagonists with the aim of viral clearance. PMID:21498519

  19. Isolation of a ribonuclease with antiproliferative and HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory activities from Japanese large brown buckwheat seeds.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Susu; Yan, Juan; Ye, Xiujuan; Wu, Zujian; Ng, Tzibun

    2015-03-01

    A ribonuclease, with a molecular mass of 22.5 kDa and an N-terminal sequence exhibiting resemblance to previously isolated buckwheat storage proteins and allergens, was isolated from Japanese large brown buckwheat seeds. The ribonuclease was purified using a simple protocol that comprised ion exchange chromatography on Q-Sepharose and DEAE-cellulose and gel filtration on Superdex 75. The ribonuclease exhibited low activity toward poly U, lower activity toward poly C, and very low activity toward poly A and poly G. The enzyme was activated upon exposure to 10 mM of Fe(2+) and Zn(2+) ions but was inhibited by Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and Mn(2+) ions at the same concentration. The optimum pH and optimum temperature for the enzyme were pH 9 and 60 °C, respectively. It inhibited proliferation of HepG2 hepatoma and MCF 7 breast cancer cells, with an IC50 value of 79.2 and 63.8 μM, respectively. It potently inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activity with an IC50 of 48 μM. However, there were no antifungal and mitogenic activities. PMID:25503363

  20. Pharmacologic Inhibition of Nedd8 Activation Enzyme Exposes CD4-Induced Epitopes within Env on Cells Expressing HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Tokarev, Andrey; Stoneham, Charlotte; Lewinski, Mary K.; Mukim, Amey; Deshmukh, Savitha; Vollbrecht, Thomas; Spina, Celsa A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 Vpu decreases the exposure of epitopes within the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) on the surface of infected cells by downregulating both BST2 and CD4. To test the hypothesis that inhibiting Vpu activity would increase the exposure of these epitopes and sensitize infected cells to antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), we treated cells with the Nedd8 activation enzyme (NAE) inhibitor MLN4924, which inhibits the cullin1-based ubiquitin ligase complex coopted by Vpu to degrade cellular targets. Treatment of HeLa cells with MLN4924 or expression of a dominant negative mutant of cullin1 inhibited the Vpu-mediated downregulation of CD4 but not the downregulation of BST2. NAE inhibition also increased the surface exposure of CD4-induced epitopes within Env on HEK293 cells containing an inducible HIV genome, on infected CEM T cells, and on infected primary T cells. In contrast, the Vpu-mediated downregulation of BST2 was substantially inhibited by MLN4924 only when T cells were treated with alpha interferon (IFN-α) to induce high levels of BST2 expression. As reported previously, the absence of vpu or nef and even more so the combined absence of these two genes sensitized infected cells to ADCC. However, NAE inhibition affected ADCC minimally. Paradoxically, even in infected, IFN-treated cells in which NAE inhibition substantially rescued the surface level of BST2, the surface level of Env detected with an antibody recognizing a CD4-independent epitope (2G12) was minimally increased. Mutation of the C-terminal Vpu residue W76, which supports the ability of Vpu to stimulate virion release by displacing BST2 from assembly sites on the plasma membrane by a cullin1-independent mechanism, increased the exposure of Env detected by 2G12 on infected T cells. Thus, inhibiting the displacement function of Vpu together with its ability to degrade CD4 and BST2 may be required to sensitize infected cells to ADCC. IMPORTANCE Pathogenic viruses encode gene

  1. Structural Basis of the Cross-Reactivity of Genetically Related Human Anti-HIV-1 mAbs: Implications for Design of V3-Based Immunogens

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, V.; Williams, C; Sukumaran, M; Kim, S; Li, H; Wang, X; Gorny, M; Zolla-Pazner, S; Kong, X

    2009-01-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies 447-52D and 537-10D, both coded by the VH3 gene and specific for the third variable region (V3) of the HIV-1 gp120, were found to share antigen-binding structural elements including an elongated CDR H3 forming main-chain interactions with the N terminus of the V3 crown. However, water-mediated hydrogen bonds and a unique cation- sandwich stacking allow 447-52D to be broadly reactive with V3 containing both the GPGR and GPGQ crown motifs, while the deeper binding pocket and a buried Glu in the binding site of 537-10D limit its reactivity to only V3 containing the GPGR motif. Our results suggest that the design of immunogens for anti-V3 antibodies should avoid the Arg at the V3 crown, as GPGR-containing epitopes appear to select for B cells making antibodies of narrower specificity than V3 that carry Gln at this position.

  2. L-selectin and P-selectin are novel biomarkers of cervicovaginal inflammation for preclinical mucosal safety assessment of anti-HIV-1 microbicide.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Maohua; He, Benxia; Yang, Jingyi; Bao, Rong; Zhang, Yan; Zhou, Dihan; Chen, Yaoqing; Li, Liangzhu; Han, Chen; Yang, Yi; Sun, Ying; Cao, Yuan; Li, Yaoming; Shi, Wei; Jiang, Shibo; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Yan, Huimin

    2012-06-01

    A major obstacle thwarting preclinical development of microbicides is the lack of a validated biomarker of cervicovaginal inflammation. Therefore, the present study aims to identify novel noninvasive soluble markers in a murine model for assessment of microbicide mucosal safety. By performing cytokine antibody array analysis, we identified two adhesion molecules, L-selectin and P-selectin, which significantly increased when mucosal inflammation was triggered by nonoxynol-9 (N9), an anti-HIV-1 microbicide candidate that failed clinical trials, in a refined murine model of agent-induced cervicovaginal inflammation. We found that patterns of detection of L-selectin and P-selectin were obviously different from those of the two previously defined biomarkers of cervicovaginal inflammation, monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) and interleukin 6 (IL-6). The levels of these two soluble selectins correlated better than those of MCP-1 and IL-6 with the duration and severity of mucosal inflammation triggered by N9 and two approved proinflammatory compounds, benzalkonium chloride (BZK) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), but not by two nonproinflammatory compounds, carboxymethyl celluose (CMC; microbicide excipients) and tenofovir (TFV; microbicide candidate). These data indicated that L-selectin and P-selectin can serve as additional novel cervicovaginal inflammation biomarkers for preclinical mucosal safety evaluation of candidate microbicides for the prevention of infection with HIV and other sexually transmitted pathogens. PMID:22391529

  3. GADD45 proteins inhibit HIV-1 replication through specific suppression of HIV-1 transcription.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhibin; Liu, Ruikang; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Suzhen; Hu, Xiaomei; Tan, Juan; Liang, Chen; Qiao, Wentao

    2016-06-01

    GADD45 proteins are a group of stress-induced proteins and participate in various cellular pathways including cell cycle regulation, cell survival and death, DNA repair and demethylation. It was recently shown that HIV-1 infection induces the expression of GADD45 proteins. However, the effect of GADD45 on HIV-1 replication has not been studied. Here, we report that overexpression of GADD45 proteins reduces HIV-1 production through suppressing transcription from the HIV-1 LTR promoter. This inhibitory effect is specific to HIV-1, since GADD45 proteins neither inhibit the LTR promoters from other retroviruses nor reduce the production of these viruses. Knockdown of endogenous GADD45 modestly activates HIV-1 in the J-Lat A72 latency cell line, which suggests GADD45 proteins might play a role in maintaining HIV-1 latency. PMID:26994425

  4. A Laccase with HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitory Activity from the Broth of Mycelial Culture of the Mushroom Lentinus tigrinus

    PubMed Central

    Xu, LiJing; Wang, HeXiang; Ng, TziBun

    2012-01-01

    A 59 kDa laccase with inhibitory activity against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (IC50 = 2.4 μM) was isolated from the broth of mycelial culture of the mushroom Lentinus tigrinus. The isolation procedure involved ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and CM-cellulose, and gel filtration by fast protein liquid chromatography on Superdex 75. The laccase was adsorbed on both types of ion exchangers. About 95-fold purification was achieved with a 25.9% yield of the enzyme. The procedure resulted in a specific enzyme activity of 76.6 U/mg. Its N-terminal amino acid sequence was GIPDLHDLTV, which showed little similarity to other mushroom laccase and other Lentinus tigrinus strain laccase. Its characteristics were different from previously reported laccase of other Lentinus tigrinus strain. Maximal laccase activity was observed at a pH of 4 and at a temperature of 60°C, respectively. This study yielded the information about the potentially exploitable activities of Lentinus tigrinus laccase. PMID:22536022

  5. HIV-1 protease-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Apoptosis is one of the presumptive causes of CD4+ T cell depletion during HIV infection and progression to AIDS. However, the precise role of HIV-1 in this process remains unexplained. HIV-1 protease (PR) has been suggested as a possible factor, but a direct link between HIV-1 PR enzymatic activity and apoptosis has not been established. Results Here, we show that expression of active HIV-1 PR induces death in HeLa and HEK-293 cells via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. This conclusion is based on in vivo observations of the direct localization of HIV-1 PR in mitochondria, a key player in triggering apoptosis. Moreover, we observed an HIV-1 PR concentration-dependent decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and the role of HIV-1 PR in activation of caspase 9, PARP cleavage and DNA fragmentation. In addition, in vitro data demonstrated that HIV-1 PR mediates cleavage of mitochondrial proteins Tom22, VDAC and ANT, leading to release of AIF and Hsp60 proteins. By using yeast two-hybrid screening, we also identified a new HIV-1 PR interaction partner, breast carcinoma-associated protein 3 (BCA3). We found that BCA3 accelerates p53 transcriptional activity on the bax promoter, thus elevating the cellular level of pro-apoptotic Bax protein. Conclusion In summary, our results describe the involvement of HIV-1 PR in apoptosis, which is caused either by a direct effect of HIV-1 PR on mitochondrial membrane integrity or by its interaction with cellular protein BCA3. PMID:24886575

  6. Interaction between Tat and Drugs of Abuse during HIV-1 Infection and Central Nervous System Disease

    PubMed Central

    Maubert, Monique E.; Pirrone, Vanessa; Rivera, Nina T.; Wigdahl, Brian; Nonnemacher, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    In many individuals, drug abuse is intimately linked with HIV-1 infection. In addition to being associated with one-third of all HIV-1 infections in the United States, drug abuse also plays a role in disease progression and severity in HIV-1-infected patients, including adverse effects on the central nervous system (CNS). Specific systems within the brain are known to be damaged in HIV-1-infected individuals and this damage is similar to that observed in drug abuse. Even in the era of anti-retroviral therapy (ART), CNS pathogenesis occurs with HIV-1 infection, with a broad range of cognitive impairment observed, collectively referred to as HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). A number of HIV-1 proteins (Tat, gp120, Nef, Vpr) have been implicated in the etiology of pathogenesis and disease as a result of the biologic activity of the extracellular form of each of the proteins in a number of tissues, including the CNS, even in ART-suppressed patients. In this review, we have made Tat the center of attention for a number of reasons. First, it has been shown to be synthesized and secreted by HIV-1-infected cells in the CNS, despite the most effective suppression therapies available to date. Second, Tat has been shown to alter the functions of several host factors, disrupting the molecular and biochemical balance of numerous pathways contributing to cellular toxicity, dysfunction, and death. In addition, the advantages and disadvantages of ART suppression with regard to controlling the genesis and progression of neurocognitive impairment are currently under debate in the field and are yet to be fully determined. In this review, we discuss the individual and concerted contributions of HIV-1 Tat, drug abuse, and ART with respect to damage in the CNS, and how these factors contribute to the development of HAND in HIV-1-infected patients. PMID:26793168

  7. Preservation of Tetherin and CD4 Counter-Activities in Circulating Vpu Alleles despite Extensive Sequence Variation within HIV-1 Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Pickering, Suzanne; Hué, Stephane; Kim, Eun-Young; Reddy, Susheel; Wolinsky, Steven M.; Neil, Stuart J. D.

    2014-01-01

    The HIV-1 Vpu protein is expressed from a bi-cistronic message late in the viral life cycle. It functions during viral assembly to maximise infectious virus release by targeting CD4 for proteosomal degradation and counteracting the antiviral protein tetherin (BST2/CD317). Single genome analysis of vpu repertoires throughout infection in 14 individuals infected with HIV-1 clade B revealed extensive amino acid diversity of the Vpu protein. For the most part, this variation in Vpu increases over the course of infection and is associated with predicted epitopes of the individual's MHC class I haplotype, suggesting CD8+ T cell pressure is the major driver of Vpu sequence diversity within the host. Despite this variability, the Vpu functions of targeting CD4 and counteracting both physical virus restriction and NF-κB activation by tetherin are rigorously maintained throughout HIV-1 infection. Only a minority of circulating alleles bear lesions in either of these activities at any given time, suggesting functional Vpu mutants are heavily selected against even at later stages of infection. Comparison of Vpu proteins defective for one or several functions reveals novel determinants of CD4 downregulation, counteraction of tetherin restriction, and inhibition of NF-κB signalling. These data affirm the importance of Vpu functions for in vivo persistence of HIV-1 within infected individuals, not simply for transmission, and highlight its potential as a target for antiviral therapy. PMID:24465210

  8. 2B4 expression on natural killer cells increases in HIV-1 infected patients followed prospectively during highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, S R; Ullum, H; Pedersen, B K; Gerstoft, J; Katzenstein, T L

    2005-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection influences natural killer (NK) cell expression of inhibitory NK receptors and activating natural cytotoxicity receptors. It is unknown whether expression of the co-stimulatory NK cell receptor 2B4 (CD244) on NK cells and CD3+ CD8+ cells are affected by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), low-level viraemia, proviral-DNA or immune activation in HIV-1 infected patients. A total of 101 HAART-treated HIV-1 infected patients with < or = 200 HIV-RNA copies/ml were followed prospectively for 24 months. HIV-RNA was investigated 3-monthly and 2B4 expression on CD3- CD16+ NK cells and CD3+ CD8+ cells, proviral-DNA and plasma soluble tumour necrosis factor receptor (sTNFr)-II were investigated 6-monthly. For comparison, 2B4 expression was investigated in 20 healthy individuals. The concentration of 2B4+ NK cells was initially reduced in HIV-1 infected patients (P < 0.001) but increased to a normal level during the 24 months' follow-up. The concentration of CD3+ CD8+ 2B4+ cells in HIV-1 infected patients was normal and did not change during follow-up. The relative fluorescence intensity (RFI) of 2B4 increased on both NK cells and CD3+ CD8+ cells during follow-up (both P < 0.001). Higher levels of proviral-DNA carrying cells and plasma sTNFrII were associated with reductions in the concentration of 2B4+ NK cells (all P < 0.05). HIV-RNA had no effect on 2B4 expression on NK cells or CD3+ CD8+ cells. These findings demonstrate that the concentration of 2B4+ NK cells normalizes during long-term HAART in HIV-1 infected patients. The finding that proviral-DNA and sTNFrII were associated negatively with the concentration of 2B4+ NK cells suggests that immune activation in HIV-1 infected patients receiving HAART influences the target cell recognition by NK cells. PMID:16045743

  9. Dendritic Cell-Lymphocyte Cross Talk Downregulates Host Restriction Factor SAMHD1 and Stimulates HIV-1 Replication in Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Biedma, Marina Elizabeth; Lederle, Alexandre; Peressin, Maryse; Lambotin, Mélanie; Proust, Alizé; Decoville, Thomas; Schmidt, Sylvie; Laumond, Géraldine

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in dendritic cells (DCs) is restricted by SAMHD1. This factor is counteracted by the viral protein Vpx; Vpx is found in HIV-2 and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) from sooty mangabeys (SIVsm) or from macaques (SIVmac) but is absent from HIV-1. We previously observed that HIV-1 replication in immature DCs is stimulated by cocultivation with primary T and B lymphocytes, suggesting that HIV-1 restriction in DCs may be overcome under coculture conditions. Here, we aimed to decipher the mechanism of SAMHD1-mediated restriction in DC-lymphocyte coculture. We found that coculture with lymphocytes downregulated SAMHD1 expression and was associated with increased HIV-1 replication in DCs. Moreover, in infected DC-T lymphocyte cocultures, DCs acquired maturation status and secreted type 1 interferon (alpha interferon [IFN-α]). The blockade of DC-lymphocyte cross talk by anti-ICAM-1 antibody markedly inhibited the stimulation of HIV-1 replication and prevented the downregulation of SAMHD1 expression in cocultured DCs. These results demonstrate that, in contrast to purified DCs, cross talk with lymphocytes downregulates SAMHD1 expression in DCs, triggering HIV-1 replication and an antiviral immune response. Therefore, HIV-1 replication and immune sensing by DCs should be investigated in more physiologically relevant models of DC/lymphocyte coculture. IMPORTANCE SAMHD1 restricts HIV-1 replication in dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we demonstrate that, in a coculture model of DCs and lymphocytes mimicking early mucosal HIV-1 infection, stimulation of HIV-1 replication in DCs is associated with downregulation of SAMHD1 expression and activation of innate immune sensing by DCs. We propose that DC-lymphocyte cross talk occurring in vivo modulates host restriction factor SAMHD1, promoting HIV-1 replication in cellular reservoirs and stimulating immune sensing. PMID:24574390

  10. HIV-1 assembly in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms involved in the assembly of newly synthesized Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) particles are poorly understood. Most of the work on HIV-1 assembly has been performed in T cells in which viral particle budding and assembly take place at the plasma membrane. In contrast, few studies have been performed on macrophages, the other major target of HIV-1. Infected macrophages represent a viral reservoir and probably play a key role in HIV-1 physiopathology. Indeed macrophages retain infectious particles for long periods of time, keeping them protected from anti-viral immune response or drug treatments. Here, we present an overview of what is known about HIV-1 assembly in macrophages as compared to T lymphocytes or cell lines. Early electron microscopy studies suggested that viral assembly takes place at the limiting membrane of an intracellular compartment in macrophages and not at the plasma membrane as in T cells. This was first considered as a late endosomal compartment in which viral budding seems to be similar to the process of vesicle release into multi-vesicular bodies. This view was notably supported by a large body of evidence involving the ESCRT (Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport) machinery in HIV-1 budding, the observation of viral budding profiles in such compartments by immuno-electron microscopy, and the presence of late endosomal markers associated with macrophage-derived virions. However, this model needs to be revisited as recent data indicate that the viral compartment has a neutral pH and can be connected to the plasma membrane via very thin micro-channels. To date, the exact nature and biogenesis of the HIV assembly compartment in macrophages remains elusive. Many cellular proteins potentially involved in the late phases of HIV-1 cycle have been identified; and, recently, the list has grown rapidly with the publication of four independent genome-wide screens. However, their respective roles in infected cells

  11. Psychoneuroimmunology and HIV-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antoni, Michael H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Presents evidence describing benefits of behavioral interventions such as aerobic exercise training on both psychological and immunological functioning among high risk human immunodeficiency virus-Type 1 (HIV-1) seronegative and very early stage seropositive homosexual men. HIV-1 infection is cast as chronic disease for which early…

  12. HbAHP-25, an In-Silico Designed Peptide, Inhibits HIV-1 Entry by Blocking gp120 Binding to CD4 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Tahir; Patgaonkar, Mandar; Kumar C, Selvaa; Pasi, Achhelal; Reddy, Kudumula Venkata Rami

    2015-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) poses a serious threat to the developing world and sexual transmission continues to be the major source of new infections. Therefore, the development of molecules, which prevent new HIV-1 infections, is highly warranted. In the present study, a panel of human hemoglobin (Hb)-α subunit derived peptides and their analogues, with an ability to bind gp120, were designed in-silico and their anti-HIV-1 activity was evaluated. Of these peptides, HbAHP-25, an analogue of Hb-α derived peptide, demonstrated significant anti-HIV-1 activity. HbAHP-25 was found to be active against CCR5-tropic HIV-1 strains (ADA5 and BaL) and CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 strains (IIIB and NL4-3). Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and ELISA revealed direct interaction between HbAHP-25 and HIV-1 envelope protein, gp120. The peptide prevented binding of CD4 to gp120 and blocked subsequent steps leading to entry and/or fusion or both. Anti-HIV activity of HbAHP-25 appeared to be specific as it failed to inhibit the entry of HIV-1 pseudotyped virus (HIV-1 VSV). Further, HbAHP-25 was found to be non-cytotoxic to TZM-bl cells, VK2/E6E7 cells, CEM-GFP cells and PBMCs, even at higher concentrations. Moreover, HbAHP-25 retained its anti-HIV activity in presence of seminal plasma and vaginal fluid. In brief, the study identified HbAHP-25, a novel anti-HIV peptide, which directly interacts with gp120 and thus has a potential to inhibit early stages of HIV-1 infection. PMID:25915507

  13. HbAHP-25, an In-Silico Designed Peptide, Inhibits HIV-1 Entry by Blocking gp120 Binding to CD4 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Tahir; Patgaonkar, Mandar; Kumar, Selvaa C; Pasi, Achhelal; Reddy, Kudumula Venkata Rami

    2015-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) poses a serious threat to the developing world and sexual transmission continues to be the major source of new infections. Therefore, the development of molecules, which prevent new HIV-1 infections, is highly warranted. In the present study, a panel of human hemoglobin (Hb)-α subunit derived peptides and their analogues, with an ability to bind gp120, were designed in-silico and their anti-HIV-1 activity was evaluated. Of these peptides, HbAHP-25, an analogue of Hb-α derived peptide, demonstrated significant anti-HIV-1 activity. HbAHP-25 was found to be active against CCR5-tropic HIV-1 strains (ADA5 and BaL) and CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 strains (IIIB and NL4-3). Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and ELISA revealed direct interaction between HbAHP-25 and HIV-1 envelope protein, gp120. The peptide prevented binding of CD4 to gp120 and blocked subsequent steps leading to entry and/or fusion or both. Anti-HIV activity of HbAHP-25 appeared to be specific as it failed to inhibit the entry of HIV-1 pseudotyped virus (HIV-1 VSV). Further, HbAHP-25 was found to be non-cytotoxic to TZM-bl cells, VK2/E6E7 cells, CEM-GFP cells and PBMCs, even at higher concentrations. Moreover, HbAHP-25 retained its anti-HIV activity in presence of seminal plasma and vaginal fluid. In brief, the study identified HbAHP-25, a novel anti-HIV peptide, which directly interacts with gp120 and thus has a potential to inhibit early stages of HIV-1 infection. PMID:25915507

  14. Celastrol ameliorates HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses via NF-kappaB and AP-1 inhibition and heme oxygenase-1 induction in astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Youn, Gi Soo; Kwon, Dong-Joo; Ju, Sung Mi; Rhim, Hyangshuk; Bae, Yong Soo; Choi, Soo Young; Park, Jinseu

    2014-10-01

    HIV-1 Tat causes extensive neuroinflammation that may progress to AIDS-related encephalitis and dementia. Celastrol possesses various biological activities such as anti-oxidant, anti-tumor, and anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, we investigated the modulatory effects of celastrol on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses and the molecular mechanisms underlying its action in astrocytes. Pre-treatment of CRT-MG human astroglioma cells with celastrol significantly inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of ICAM-1/VCAM-1 and subsequent monocyte adhesiveness in CRT-MG cells. In addition, celastrol suppressed HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of pro-inflammatory chemokines, such as CXCL10, IL-8, and MCP-1. Celastrol decreased HIV-1 Tat-induced activation of JNK MAPK, AP-1, and NF-κB. Furthermore, celastrol induced mRNA and protein expression of HO-1 as well as Nrf2 activation. Blockage of HO-1 expression using siRNA reversed the inhibitory effect of celastrol on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses. These results suggest that celastrol has regulatory effects on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses by blocking the JNK MAPK-AP-1/NF-κB signaling pathways and inducing HO-1 expression in astrocytes. - Highlights: • Celastrol suppressed HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of pro-inflammatory genes. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat -induced activation of JNK MAPK. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced activation of both NF-κB and AP-1. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses via HO-1 induction.

  15. Antibody Conjugation Approach Enhances Breadth and Potency of Neutralization of Anti-HIV-1 Antibodies and CD4-IgG

    PubMed Central

    Gavrilyuk, Julia; Ban, Hitoshi; Uehara, Hisatoshi; Sirk, Shannon J.; Saye-Francisco, Karen; Cuevas, Angelica; Zablowsky, Elise; Oza, Avinash; Seaman, Michael S.; Burton, Dennis R.

    2013-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies PG9 and PG16 effectively neutralize 70 to 80% of circulating HIV-1 isolates. In this study, the neutralization abilities of PG9 and PG16 were further enhanced by bioconjugation with aplaviroc, a small-molecule inhibitor of virus entry into host cells. A novel air-stable diazonium hexafluorophosphate reagent that allows for rapid, tyrosine-selective functionalization of proteins and antibodies under mild conditions was used to prepare a series of aplaviroc-conjugated antibodies, including b12, 2G12, PG9, PG16, and CD4-IgG. The conjugated antibodies blocked HIV-1 entry through two mechanisms: by binding to the virus itself and by blocking the CCR5 receptor on host cells. Chemical modification did not significantly alter the potency of the parent antibodies against nonresistant HIV-1 strains. Conjugation did not alter the pharmacokinetics of a model IgG in blood. The PG9-aplaviroc conjugate was tested against a panel of 117 HIV-1 strains and was found to neutralize 100% of the viruses. PG9-aplaviroc conjugate IC50s were lower than those of PG9 in neutralization studies of 36 of the 117 HIV-1 strains. These results support this new approach to bispecific antibodies and offer a potential new strategy for combining HIV-1 therapies. PMID:23427154

  16. Antibody conjugation approach enhances breadth and potency of neutralization of anti-HIV-1 antibodies and CD4-IgG.

    PubMed

    Gavrilyuk, Julia; Ban, Hitoshi; Uehara, Hisatoshi; Sirk, Shannon J; Saye-Francisco, Karen; Cuevas, Angelica; Zablowsky, Elise; Oza, Avinash; Seaman, Michael S; Burton, Dennis R; Barbas, Carlos F

    2013-05-01

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies PG9 and PG16 effectively neutralize 70 to 80% of circulating HIV-1 isolates. In this study, the neutralization abilities of PG9 and PG16 were further enhanced by bioconjugation with aplaviroc, a small-molecule inhibitor of virus entry into host cells. A novel air-stable diazonium hexafluorophosphate reagent that allows for rapid, tyrosine-selective functionalization of proteins and antibodies under mild conditions was used to prepare a series of aplaviroc-conjugated antibodies, including b12, 2G12, PG9, PG16, and CD4-IgG. The conjugated antibodies blocked HIV-1 entry through two mechanisms: by binding to the virus itself and by blocking the CCR5 receptor on host cells. Chemical modification did not significantly alter the potency of the parent antibodies against nonresistant HIV-1 strains. Conjugation did not alter the pharmacokinetics of a model IgG in blood. The PG9-aplaviroc conjugate was tested against a panel of 117 HIV-1 strains and was found to neutralize 100% of the viruses. PG9-aplaviroc conjugate IC50s were lower than those of PG9 in neutralization studies of 36 of the 117 HIV-1 strains. These results support this new approach to bispecific antibodies and offer a potential new strategy for combining HIV-1 therapies. PMID:23427154

  17. Viral Tropism and Antiretroviral Drug Resistance in HIV-1 Subtype C-Infected Patients Failing Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy in Johannesburg, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Ketseoglou, Irene; Lukhwareni, Azwidowi; Steegen, Kim; Carmona, Sergio; Stevens, Wendy S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Reports show that up to 30% of antiretroviral drug-naive patients in Johannesburg have CXCR4-utilizing HIV-1 subtype C. We assessed whether HIV-1 subtype C-infected individuals failing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) have a higher proportion of CXCR4-utilizing viruses compared to antiretroviral drug-naive patients. The V3 loop was sequenced from plasma from 100 randomly selected HAART-failing patients, and tropism was established using predictive algorithms. All patients harbored HIV-1 subtype C with at least one antiretroviral drug resistance mutation. Viral tropism prediction in individuals failing HAART revealed similar proportions (29%) of X4-utilizing viruses compared to antiretroviral drug-naive patients (30%). Findings are in contrast to reports from Durban in which 60% of HAART-failing subjects harbored X4/dual/mixed-tropic viruses. Despite differences in proportions of X4-tropism within South Africa, the high proportion of thymidine analogue mutations (TAMs) and CXCR4-utilizing HIV-1 highlights the need for intensified monitoring of HAART patients and the predicament of diminishing drug options, including CCR5 antagonists, for patients failing therapy. PMID:24224886

  18. Antitumor and HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitory Activities of a Hemagglutinin and a Protease Inhibitor from Mini-Black Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiu Juan; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2011-01-01

    Protease inhibitors (PIs) and hemagglutinins are defense proteins produced by many organisms. From Chinese mini-black soybeans, a 17.5-kDa PI was isolated using chromatography on Q-Sepharose, SP-Sepharose, and DEAE-cellulose. A 25-kDa hemagglutinin was purified similarly, but using Superdex 75 instead of DEAE-cellulose in the final step. The PI inhibited trypsin and chymotrypsin (IC50 = 7.2 and 8.8 μM). Its trypsin inhibitory activity was stable from pH 2 to pH 13 and from 0°C to 70°C. The hemagglutinin activity of the hemagglutinin was stable from pH 2 to pH 13 and from 0°C to 75°C. The results indicated that both PI and hemagglutinin were relatively thermostable and pH-stable. The trypsin inhibitory activity was inhibited by dithiothreitol, signifying the importance of the disulfide bond to the activity. The hemagglutinating activity was inhibited most potently by D (+)-raffinose and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, suggesting that the hemagglutinin was specific for these two sugars. Both PI and hemagglutinin inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (IC50 = 3.2 and 5.5 μM), proliferation of breast cancer cells (IC50 = 9.7 and 3.5 μM), and hepatoma cells (IC50 = 35 and 6.2 μM), with relatively high potencies. PMID:21527979

  19. An immunogen containing four tandem 10E8 epitope repeats with exposed key residues induces antibodies that neutralize HIV-1 and activates an ADCC reporter gene.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhiwu; Zhu, Yun; Wang, Qian; Ye, Ling; Dai, Yanyan; Su, Shan; Yu, Fei; Ying, Tianlei; Yang, Chinglai; Jiang, Shibo; Lu, Lu

    2016-01-01

    After three decades of intensive research efforts, an effective vaccine against HIV-1 remains to be developed. Several broadly neutralizing antibodies to HIV-1, such as 10E8, recognize the membrane proximal external region (MPER) of the HIV-1 gp41 protein. Thus, the MPER is considered to be a very important target for vaccine design. However, the MPER segment has very weak immunogenicity and tends to insert its epitope residues into the cell membrane, thereby avoiding antibody binding. To address this complication in vaccine development, we herein designed a peptide, designated 10E8-4P, containing four copies of the 10E8 epitope as an immunogen. As predicted by structural simulation, 10E8-4P exhibits a well-arranged tandem helical conformation, with the key residues in the 10E8 epitope oriented at different angles, thus suggesting that some of these key residues may be exposed outside of the lipid membrane. Compared with a peptide containing a single 10E8 epitope (10E8-1P), 10E8-4P not only exhibited better antigenicity but also elicited neutralizing antibody response against HIV-1 pseudoviruses, whereas 10E8-1P could not induce detectable neutralizing antibody response. Importantly, antibodies elicited by 10E8-4P also possessed a strong ability to activate an antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) reporter gene, thus suggesting that they may have ADCC activity. Therefore, this strategy shows promise for further optimization and application in future HIV-1 vaccine design. PMID:27329850

  20. An immunogen containing four tandem 10E8 epitope repeats with exposed key residues induces antibodies that neutralize HIV-1 and activates an ADCC reporter gene

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhiwu; Zhu, Yun; Wang, Qian; Ye, Ling; Dai, Yanyan; Su, Shan; Yu, Fei; Ying, Tianlei; Yang, Chinglai; Jiang, Shibo; Lu, Lu

    2016-01-01

    After three decades of intensive research efforts, an effective vaccine against HIV-1 remains to be developed. Several broadly neutralizing antibodies to HIV-1, such as 10E8, recognize the membrane proximal external region (MPER) of the HIV-1 gp41 protein. Thus, the MPER is considered to be a very important target for vaccine design. However, the MPER segment has very weak immunogenicity and tends to insert its epitope residues into the cell membrane, thereby avoiding antibody binding. To address this complication in vaccine development, we herein designed a peptide, designated 10E8-4P, containing four copies of the 10E8 epitope as an immunogen. As predicted by structural simulation, 10E8-4P exhibits a well-arranged tandem helical conformation, with the key residues in the 10E8 epitope oriented at different angles, thus suggesting that some of these key residues may be exposed outside of the lipid membrane. Compared with a peptide containing a single 10E8 epitope (10E8-1P), 10E8-4P not only exhibited better antigenicity but also elicited neutralizing antibody response against HIV-1 pseudoviruses, whereas 10E8-1P could not induce detectable neutralizing antibody response. Importantly, antibodies elicited by 10E8-4P also possessed a strong ability to activate an antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) reporter gene, thus suggesting that they may have ADCC activity. Therefore, this strategy shows promise for further optimization and application in future HIV-1 vaccine design. PMID:27329850

  1. A discrete element 3' of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2 mRNA initiation sites mediates transcriptional activation by an HIV trans activator

    SciTech Connect

    Jakobovits, A.; Smith, D.H.; Jakobovits, E.B.; Capon, D.J.

    1988-06-01

    An important point of regulation in the reproductive growth and latency of the human and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and SIV, respectively) is provided by virally encoded trans-activators (tat), proteins capable of dramatically increasing viral gene expression. The mechanism of this autostimulatory pathway has remained unclear, however, with substantial effects having been reported at the level of either mRNA accumulation, translational efficiency, or both. The authors' previous findings indicated that trans-activation results primarily from induction of RNA levels but could not distinguish between the roles of transcriptional rate, RNA stabilization, and RNA transport in this event. In addition, the boundaries of tat-responding elements, which would be valuable in elucidating the mode of tat action, are not precisely known. In this study, HIV-1 and HIV-2 long terminal repeat-directed expression was characterized by using in an vitro nuclear transcription assay to clarify this mechanism, and a detailed mutational analysis was undertaken to localize precisely the sequences participating in this process. Two key findings were revealed: an increased transcription rate was the primary event in tat-mediated activation of HIV-1 and HIV-2, and trans-activation was impaired by mutations in two regions, the TATA box and sequences between +19 to +42, a region lacking enhancer activity. These results implicate a discrete 3' regulatory element in the transcriptional activation of the HIVs.

  2. A solution NMR study of the interactions of oligomannosides and the anti-HIV-1 2G12 antibody reveals distinct binding modes for branched ligands.

    PubMed

    Enríquez-Navas, Pedro M; Marradi, Marco; Padro, Daniel; Angulo, Jesús; Penadés, Soledad

    2011-02-01

    The structural and affinity details of the interactions of synthetic oligomannosides, linear (di-, tri-, and tetra-) and branched (penta- and hepta-), with the broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 antibody 2G12 (HIV=human immunodeficiency virus) have been investigated in solution by using ligand-based NMR techniques, specifically saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy and transferred NOE experiments. Linear oligomannosides show similar binding modes to the antibody, with the nonreducing terminal disaccharide Manα(1→2)Man (Man=mannose) making the closest protein/ligand contacts in the bound state. In contrast, the branched pentamannoside shows two alternate binding modes, involving both ligand arms (D2- and D3-like), a dual binding description of the molecular recognition of this ligand by 2G12 in solution that differs from the single binding mode deduced from X-ray studies. On the contrary, the antibody shows an unexpected selectivity for one arm (D1-like) of the other branched ligand (heptamannoside). This result explains the previously reported lack of affinity enhancement relative to that of the D1-like tetramannoside. Single-ligand STD NMR titration experiments revealed noticeable differences in binding affinities among the linear and branched ligands in solution, with the latter showing decreased affinity. Among the analyzed series of ligands, the strongest 2G12 binders were the linear tri- and tetramannosides because both show similar affinity for the antibody. These results demonstrate that NMR spectroscopic techniques can deliver abundant structural, dynamics, and affinity information for the characterization of oligomannose-2G12 binding in solution, thus complementing, and, as in the case of the pentamannoside, extending, the structural view from X-ray crystallography. This information is of key importance for the development of multivalent synthetic gp120 high-mannose glycoconjugate mimics in the context of vaccine development. PMID:21268157

  3. HIV-1 induces complement factor C3 synthesis in astrocytes and neurons by modulation of promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Bruder, Cornelia; Hagleitner, Magdalena; Darlington, Gretchen; Mohsenipour, Iradj; Würzner, Reinhard; Höllmüller, Isolde; Stoiber, Heribert; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Dierich, Manfred P; Speth, Cornelia

    2004-02-01

    Virus-induced complement expression and activation in the brain is hypothesized to contribute to the process of neurodegeneration in AIDS-associated neurological disorders. Previous experiments have shown that the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) upregulates the low basal production of complement factor C3 in astrocytes and neurons. Since inhibition of complement synthesis and activation in the brain may represent a putative therapeutic goal to prevent virus-induced damage, we analysed the mechanism of the HIV-induced modulation of C3 expression. Detailed studies using different C3 promoter constructs revealed that HIV activates the synthesis of C3 by stimulation of the promoter. This HIV-induced promoter activation could be measured both in different astrocytic cell lines and in neurons. Deletion constructs of the C3 promoter defined the IL-6/IL-1beta responsive element within the promoter region as a central element for the responsiveness of the C3 promoter towards the influence of HIV. A binding site for the transcription factor C/EBPdelta was identified as important regulatory domain within the IL-6/IL-1beta responsive element, since a point mutation which eliminates the binding capacity of C/EBPdelta to this site also abolishes the induction by HIV-1. Similarly, the viral proteins Nef and gp41 which had also been shown to stimulate the synthesis of C3, exert their effect via the IL-6/IL-1beta responsive element with binding of the transcription factor C/EBPdelta representing the critical step. Our experiments clearly define the mechanism for the induction of complement factors in the HIV-infected brain and reveal a decisive role of the regulator protein C/EBPdelta for the HIV-induced increase in C3 expression. PMID:14725791

  4. The Roles of HIV-1 Proteins and Antiretroviral Drug Therapy in HIV-1-Associated Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Erik R.; Sutliff, Roy L.

    2008-01-01

    Since the emergence of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1)-infected patients have demonstrated dramatic decreases in viral burden and opportunistic infections, and an overall increase in life expectancy. Despite these positive HAART-associated outcomes, it has become increasingly clear that HIV-1 patients have an enhanced risk of developing cardiovascular disease over time. Clinical studies are instrumental in our understanding of vascular dysfunction in the context of HIV-1 infection. However, most clinical studies often do not distinguish whether HIV-1 proteins, HAART, or a combination of these 2 factors cause cardiovascular complications. This review seeks to address the roles of both HIV-1 proteins and antiretroviral drugs in the development of endothelial dysfunction because endothelial dysfunction is the hallmark initial step of many cardiovascular diseases. We analyze recent in vitro and in vivo studies examining endothelial toxicity in response to HIV-1 proteins or in response to the various classes of antiretroviral drugs. Furthermore, we discuss the multiple mechanisms by which HIV-1 proteins and HAART injure the vascular endothelium in HIV-1 patients. By understanding the molecular mechanisms of HIV-1 protein- and antiretroviral-induced cardiovascular disease, we may ultimately improve the quality of life of HIV-1 patients through better drug design and the discovery of new pharmacological targets. PMID:18525451

  5. ING116070: A Study of the Pharmacokinetics and Antiviral Activity of Dolutegravir in Cerebrospinal Fluid in HIV-1–Infected, Antiretroviral Therapy–Naive Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Letendre, Scott L.; Mills, Anthony M.; Tashima, Karen T.; Thomas, Deborah A.; Min, Sherene S.; Chen, Shuguang; Song, Ivy H.; Piscitelli, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Dolutegravir (DTG), a once-daily, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase inhibitor, was evaluated for distribution and antiviral activity in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Methods. ING116070 is an ongoing, single-arm, open-label, multicenter study in antiretroviral therapy–naive, HIV-1–infected adults. Subjects received DTG (50 mg) plus abacavir/lamivudine (600/300 mg) once daily. The CSF and plasma (total and unbound) DTG concentrations were measured at weeks 2 and 16. The HIV-1 RNA levels were measured in CSF at baseline and weeks 2 and 16 and in plasma at baseline and weeks 2, 4, 8, 12, and 16. Results. Thirteen white men enrolled in the study; 2 withdrew prematurely, 1 because of a non–drug-related serious adverse event (pharyngitis) and 1 because of lack of treatment efficacy. The median DTG concentrations in CSF were 18 ng/mL (range, 4–23 ng/mL) at week 2 and 13 ng/mL (4–18 ng/mL) at week 16. Ratios of DTG CSF to total plasma concentration were similar to the unbound fraction of DTG in plasma. Median changes from baseline in CSF (n = 11) and plasma (n = 12) HIV-1 RNA were −3.42 and −3.04 log10 copies/mL, respectively. Nine of 11 subjects (82%) had plasma and CSF HIV-1 RNA levels <50 copies/mL and 10 of 11 (91%) had CSF HIV-1 RNA levels <2 copies/mL at week 16. Conclusions. The DTG concentrations in CSF were similar to unbound plasma concentrations and exceeded the in vitro 50% inhibitory concentration for wild-type HIV (0.2 ng/mL), suggesting that DTG achieves therapeutic concentrations in the central nervous system. The HIV-1 RNA reductions were similar in CSF and plasma. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT01499199. PMID:24944232

  6. The perlecan heparan sulfate proteoglycan mediates cellular uptake of HIV-1 Tat through a pathway responsible for biological activity

    SciTech Connect

    Argyris, Elias G.; Kulkosky, Joseph; Meyer, Marie E.; Xu Yan; Mukhtar, Muhammad; Pomerantz, Roger J. . E-mail: roger.j.pomerantz@jefferson.edu; Williams, Kevin Jon . E-mail: K_Williams@mail.jci.tju.edu

    2004-12-20

    Cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) mediate internalization of HIV-1 Tat. Herein, we report that human WiDr cells, which express perlecan but no other HSPGs, can internalize {sup 125}I-labeled Tat with minimal lysosomal degradation. Pre-treatment of cells with heparitinase almost completely abolished {sup 125}I-Tat surface binding, while the use of an HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter-reporter construct demonstrated that transactivation was potently blocked by pretreatment of cells with heparitinase, indicating an essential role for perlecan in the biologic effects of Tat. We conclude that the perlecan mediates Tat uptake and is required for HIV-1 LTR-directed transactivation in this human cell type.

  7. Curcumin inhibits HIV-1 by promoting Tat protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Ali, Amjad; Banerjea, Akhil C

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Tat is an intrinsically unfolded protein playing a pivotal role in viral replication by associating with TAR region of viral LTR. Unfolded proteins are degraded by 20S proteasome in an ubiquitin independent manner. Curcumin is known to activate 20S proteasome and promotes the degradation of intrinsically unfolded p53 tumor suppressor protein. Since HIV-1 Tat protein is largerly unfolded, we hypothesized that Tat may also be targeted through this pathway. Curcumin treated Tat transfected HEK-293T cells showed a dose and time dependent degradation of Tat protein. Contrary to this HIV-1 Gag which is a properly folded protein, remained unaffected with curcumin. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that curcumin treatment did not affect Tat gene transcription. Curcumin increased the rate of Tat protein degradation as shown by cycloheximide (CHX) chase assay. Degradation of the Tat protein is accomplished through proteasomal pathway as proteasomal inhibitor MG132 blocked Tat degradation. Curcumin also decreased Tat mediated LTR promoter transactivation and inhibited virus production from HIV-1 infected cells. Taken together our study reveals a novel observation that curcumin causes potent degradation of Tat which may be one of the major mechanisms behind its anti HIV activity. PMID:27283735

  8. Curcumin inhibits HIV-1 by promoting Tat protein degradation

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Amjad; Banerjea, Akhil C.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Tat is an intrinsically unfolded protein playing a pivotal role in viral replication by associating with TAR region of viral LTR. Unfolded proteins are degraded by 20S proteasome in an ubiquitin independent manner. Curcumin is known to activate 20S proteasome and promotes the degradation of intrinsically unfolded p53 tumor suppressor protein. Since HIV-1 Tat protein is largerly unfolded, we hypothesized that Tat may also be targeted through this pathway. Curcumin treated Tat transfected HEK-293T cells showed a dose and time dependent degradation of Tat protein. Contrary to this HIV-1 Gag which is a properly folded protein, remained unaffected with curcumin. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that curcumin treatment did not affect Tat gene transcription. Curcumin increased the rate of Tat protein degradation as shown by cycloheximide (CHX) chase assay. Degradation of the Tat protein is accomplished through proteasomal pathway as proteasomal inhibitor MG132 blocked Tat degradation. Curcumin also decreased Tat mediated LTR promoter transactivation and inhibited virus production from HIV-1 infected cells. Taken together our study reveals a novel observation that curcumin causes potent degradation of Tat which may be one of the major mechanisms behind its anti HIV activity. PMID:27283735

  9. Synergistic Activation of Latent HIV-1 Expression by Novel Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors and Bryostatin-1

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Bonet, Marta; Isabel Clemente, Maria; Jesús Serramía, Maria; Muñoz, Eduardo; Moreno, Santiago; Ángeles Muñoz-Fernández, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Viral reactivation from latently infected cells has become a promising therapeutic approach to eradicate HIV. Due to the complexity of the viral latency, combinations of efficient and available drugs targeting different pathways of latency are needed. In this work, we evaluated the effect of various combinations of bryostatin-1 (BRY) and novel histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) on HIV-reactivation and on cellular phenotype. The lymphocyte (J89GFP) or monocyte/macrophage (THP89GFP) latently infected cell lines were treated with BRY, panobinostat (PNB) and romidepsin (RMD) either alone or in combination. Thus, the effect on the viral reactivation was evaluated. We calculated the combination index for each drug combination; the BRY/HDACIs showed a synergistic HIV-reactivation profile in the majority of the combinations tested, whereas non-synergistic effects were observed when PNB was mixed with RMD. Indeed, the 75% effective concentrations of BRY, PNB and RMD were reduced in these combinations. Moreover, primary CD4 T cells treated with such drug combinations presented similar activation and proliferation profiles in comparison with single drug treated cells. Summing up, combinations between BRY, PNB and/or RMD presented a synergistic profile by inducing virus expression in HIV-latently infected cells, rendering these combinations an attractive novel and safe option for future clinical trials. PMID:26563568

  10. Toxicity and in vitro activity of HIV-1 latency-reversing agents in primary CNS cells.

    PubMed

    Gray, Lachlan R; On, Hung; Roberts, Emma; Lu, Hao K; Moso, Michael A; Raison, Jacqueline A; Papaioannou, Catherine; Cheng, Wan-Jung; Ellett, Anne M; Jacobson, Jonathan C; Purcell, Damian F J; Wesselingh, Steve L; Gorry, Paul R; Lewin, Sharon R; Churchill, Melissa J

    2016-08-01

    Despite the success of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), HIV persists in long lived latently infected cells in the blood and tissue, and treatment is required lifelong. Recent clinical studies have trialed latency-reversing agents (LRA) as a method to eliminate latently infected cells; however, the effects of LRA on the central nervous system (CNS), a well-known site of virus persistence on cART, are unknown. In this study, we evaluated the toxicity and potency of a panel of commonly used and well-known LRA (panobinostat, romidepsin, vorinostat, chaetocin, disulfiram, hexamethylene bisacetamide [HMBA], and JQ-1) in primary fetal astrocytes (PFA) as well as monocyte-derived macrophages as a cellular model for brain perivascular macrophages. We show that most LRA are non-toxic in these cells at therapeutic concentrations. Additionally, romidepsin, JQ-1, and panobinostat were the most potent at inducing viral transcription, with greater magnitude observed in PFA. In contrast, vorinostat, chaetocin, disulfiram, and HMBA all demonstrated little or no induction of viral transcription. Together, these data suggest that some LRA could potentially activate transcription in latently infected cells in the CNS. We recommend that future trials of LRA also examine the effects of these agents on the CNS via examination of cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:26727904

  11. A broad spectrum anti-HIV inhibitor significantly disturbs V1/V2 domain rearrangements of HIV-1 gp120 and inhibits virus entry.

    PubMed

    Berinyuy, Emiliene; Soliman, Mahmoud E S

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) entry into target human cells is considered as a critical strategy for preventing HIV infection. Conformational shifts of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (gp120) facilitates the attachment of the virus to target cells, therefore gp120 remains an attractive target for antiretroviral therapy development. Compound 18A has been recently identified as a broad-spectrum anti-HIV inhibitor. It was proposed that 18A disrupts rearrangements of V1/V2 region in gp120; however, the precise mechanism by which 18A interferes with the inherent motion of V1/V2 domain remains obscure. In this report, we elaborate on the binding mode of compound 18A to the closed conformation of a soluble cleaved gp120 and further examine the dynamic motion of V1/V2 region in both gp120 and the gp120-18A complex via all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. In this work, comparative molecular dynamic analyses revealed that 18A makes contact with Leu179, Ile194, Ile424, Met426 W427, E370 and Met475 in the main hydrophobic cavity of the unliganded gp120 and disrupts the restructuring of V1/V2 domain observed in apo gp120. The unwinding of α1 and slight inversion of β2 in gp120 leads to the shift of VI/V2 domain away from the V3 N-terminal regions and toward the outer domain. Stronger contacts between Trp425 and Trp112 rings may contribute to the reduced flexibility of α1 observed upon 18A binding thereby inhibiting the shifts of the V1/V2 region. Binding of 18A to gp120: (1) decreases the overall flexibility of the protein and (2) inhibits the formation a gp120 conformation that closely ressembles a CD4-bound-like conformation. Information gained from this report not only elaborates on important dynamic features of gp120, but will also assist with the future designs of potent gp120 inhibitors as anti-HIV. PMID:26446906

  12. Secondary structure in solution of two anti-HIV-1 hammerhead ribozymes as investigated by two-dimensional 1H 500 MHz NMR spectroscopy in water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarma, R. H.; Sarma, M. H.; Rein, R.; Shibata, M.; Setlik, R. S.; Ornstein, R. L.; Kazim, A. L.; Cairo, A.; Tomasi, T. B.

    1995-01-01

    Two hammerhead chimeric RNA/DNA ribozymes (HRz) were synthesized in pure form. Both were 30 nucleotides long, and the sequences were such that they could be targeted to cleave the HIV-1 gag RNA. Named HRz-W and HRz-M, the former had its invariable core region conserved, the latter had a uridine in the invariable region replaced by a guanine. Their secodary structures were determined by 2D NOESY 1H 500 MHz NMR spectroscopy in 90% water and 10% D2(0), following the imino protons. The data show that both HRz-M and HRz-W form identical secondary structures with stem regions consisting of continuous stacks of AT and GT pairs. An energy minimized computer model of this stem region is provided. The results suggest that the loss of catalytic activity that is known to result when an invariant core residue is replaced is not related to the secondary structure of the ribozymes in the absence of substrate.

  13. Synthesis and anti-HIV activity of 4-(naphthalen-1-yl)-1,2,5-thiadiazol-3-hydroxyl derivatives.

    PubMed

    Rai, Diwakar; Chen, Wenmin; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Hong; Tian, Ye; Liang, Xin; De Clercq, Erik; Pannecouque, Christophe; Balzarini, Jan; Liu, Xinyong

    2014-10-01

    A series of 4-(naphthalen-1-yl)-1,2,5-thiadiazol-3-hydroxyl derivatives (Ia-Im and IIa-IIe) designed as novel HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) was synthesized via an expeditious route and evaluated for their anti-HIV activities in MT-4 cell cultures. All the synthesized compounds were structurally confirmed by spectral analyses. Biological results showed that three analogues displayed moderate inhibitory activity against wild-type (wt) HIV-1 replication with EC(50) values ranging from 16 to 22 μm. Molecular docking of compound Ih with wt HIV-1 RT was performed to understand the binding mode between these inhibitors and the wt HIV-1 RT and to rationalize some SARs. PMID:24674646

  14. Second generation bisheteroarylpiperazine (BHAP) HIV-1 reverse transcriptasae inhibitors: Enhancement of antiviral activity and aqueous solubility via 5- and 6-substitution of the indole ring

    SciTech Connect

    Poel, T.; Thomas, R.C.; Romero, D.L.; Hosley, M.J.; Morge, R.A.; Biles, C.; Reusser, F.; Althaus, I.W.; Schinzer, W.C.; Platzer, D.J.

    1993-12-31

    U-87201E, a potent HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) discovered at Upjohn, is currently in Phase II clinical trials. Additional structure-activity studies have identified second-generation BHAPs with enhanced antiviral activity and improved pharmaceutical properties, notably increased aqueous solubility. Capitalizing on initial SAR studies which demonstrated a tolerance for substitution in the indole ring, a series of BHAPs bearing 5- and 6-substituted indoles was evaluated. Substituents such as ethers, sulfonamides, ureas, and sulfamides containing water-solubilizing groups such as polyethers or basic amines provided highly potent BHAPs with greatly enhanced solubility, such as U-93923. The synthesis, antiviral evaluation and solubility properties of these potent HIV-1 RTIs will be detailed.

  15. Activation of HIV-1 pre-mRNA 3' processing in vitro requires both an upstream element and TAR.

    PubMed Central

    Gilmartin, G M; Fleming, E S; Oetjen, J

    1992-01-01

    The architecture of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genome presents an intriguing dilemma for the 3' processing of viral transcripts--to disregard a canonical 'core' poly(A) site processing signal present at the 5' end of the transcript and yet to utilize efficiently an identical signal that resides at the 3' end of the message. The choice of processing sites in HIV-1 appears to be influenced by two factors: (i) proximity to the cap site, and (ii) sequences upstream of the core poly(A) site. We now demonstrate that an in vivo-defined upstream element that resides within the U3 region, 76 nucleotides upstream of the AAUAAA hexamer, acts specifically to enhance 3' processing at the HIV-1 core poly(A) site in vitro. We furthermore show that efficient in vitro 3' processing requires the RNA stem-loop structure of TAR, which serves to juxtapose spatially the upstream element and the core poly(A) site. An analysis of the stability of 3' processing complexes formed at the HIV-1 poly(A) site in vitro suggests that the upstream element may function by increasing processing complex stability at the core poly(A) site. Images PMID:1425577

  16. GTP activator and dNTP substrates of HIV-1 restriction factor SAMHD1 generate a long-lived activated state

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Erik C.; Seamon, Kyle J.; Cravens, Shannen L.; Stivers, James T.

    2014-01-01

    The HIV-1 restriction factor sterile α-motif/histidine-aspartate domain-containing protein 1 (SAMHD1) is a tetrameric protein that catalyzes the hydrolysis of all dNTPs to the deoxynucleoside and tripolyphosphate, which effectively depletes the dNTP substrates of HIV reverse transcriptase. Here, we establish that SAMHD1 is activated by GTP binding to guanine-specific activator sites (A1) as well as coactivation by substrate dNTP binding to a distinct set of nonspecific activator sites (A2). Combined activation by GTP and dNTPs results in a long-lived tetrameric form of SAMHD1 that persists for hours, even after activating nucleotides are withdrawn from the solution. These results reveal an ordered model for assembly of SAMHD1 tetramer from its inactive monomer and dimer forms, where GTP binding to the A1 sites generates dimer and dNTP binding to the A2 and catalytic sites generates active tetramer. Thus, cellular regulation of active SAMHD1 is not determined by GTP alone but instead, the levels of all dNTPs and the generation of a persistent tetramer that is not in equilibrium with free activators. The significance of the long-lived activated state is that SAMHD1 can remain active long after dNTP pools have been reduced to a level that would lead to inactivation. This property would be important in resting CD4+ T cells, where dNTP pools are reduced to nanomolar levels to restrict infection by HIV-1. PMID:24753578

  17. 8-Modified-2′-Deoxyadenosine Analogues Induce Delayed Polymerization Arrest during HIV-1 Reverse Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Sleiman, Marwan; Smyth, Redmond; Ben Gaied, Nouha; Barhoum, Patrick; Laumond, Géraldine; Bec, Guillaume; Götte, Matthias; Mak, Johnson; Aubertin, Anne-Marie; Burger, Alain; Marquet, Roland

    2011-01-01

    The occurrence of resistant viruses to any of the anti-HIV-1 compounds used in the current therapies against AIDS underlies the urge for the development of new drug targets and/or new drugs acting through novel mechanisms. While all anti-HIV-1 nucleoside analogues in clinical use and in clinical trials rely on ribose modifications for activity, we designed nucleosides with a natural deoxyribose moiety and modifications of position 8 of the adenine base. Such modifications might induce a steric clash with helix αH in the thumb domain of the p66 subunit of HIV-1 RT at a distance from the catalytic site, causing delayed chain termination. Eleven new 2′-deoxyadenosine analogues modified on position 8 of the purine base were synthesized and tested in vitro and in cell-based assays. In this paper we demonstrate for the first time that chemical modifications on position 8 of 2′-deoxyadenosine induce delayed chain termination in vitro, and also inhibit DNA synthesis when incorporated in a DNA template strand. Furthermore, one of them had moderate anti-HIV-1 activity in cell-culture. Our results constitute a proof of concept indicating that modification on the base moiety of nucleosides can induce delayed polymerization arrest and inhibit HIV-1 replication. PMID:22087320

  18. Effect of Biomolecular Conformation on Docking Simulation: A Case Study on a Potent HIV-1 Protease Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Razzaghi-Asl, Nima; Sepehri, Saghi; Ebadi, Ahmad; Miri, Ramin; Shahabipour, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) is a disease pertained to the human immune system. Given its crucial role in viral replication, HIV-1 protease (HIV-1 PR) is a prime therapeutic target in AIDS therapy. In this regard, the dynamic aspects of ligand-enzyme interactions may indicate an important role of conformational variability in HIV-1 PR inhibitor/drug design. In the present contribution, the effect of HIV-1 PR flexibility (within multiple crystallographic structures of HIV-1 PR) on binding to the Amprenavir was elucidated via an ensemble docking approach. Molecular docking studies were performed via advanced AutoDock4.2 software. Ensemble docking of Amprenavir into the active site of various conformations of HIV-1 PR predicted different interaction modes/energies. Analysis of binding factors in terms of docking false negatives/positives revealed a determinant role of enzyme conformational variation in prediction of optimum induced fit (PDB ID: 1HPV). The outcomes of this study demonstrated that conformation of receptor may significantly affect the accuracy of docking/binding results in structure-based rational design of anti HIV-1 PR agents. Furthermore; some strategies to re-score the docking results in HIV-1 PR targeted docking studies were proposed. PMID:26330867

  19. Innate immunity in HIV-1 infection: epithelial and non-specific host factors of mucosal immunity- a workshop report.

    PubMed

    Nittayananta, W; Weinberg, A; Malamud, D; Moyes, D; Webster-Cyriaque, J; Ghosh, S

    2016-04-01

    The interplay between HIV-1 and epithelial cells represents a critical aspect in mucosal HIV-1 transmission. Epithelial cells lining the oral cavity cover subepithelial tissues, which contain virus-susceptible host cells including CD4(+) T lymphocytes, monocytes/macrophages, and dendritic cells. Oral epithelia are among the sites of first exposure to both cell-free and cell-associated virus HIV-1 through breast-feeding and oral-genital contact. However, oral mucosa is considered to be naturally resistant to HIV-1 transmission. Oral epithelial cells have been shown to play a crucial role in innate host defense. Nevertheless, it is not clear to what degree these local innate immune factors contribute to HIV-1 resistance of the oral mucosa. This review paper addressed the following issues that were discussed at the 7th World Workshop on Oral Health and Disease in AIDS held in Hyderabad, India, during November 6-9, 2014: (i) What is the fate of HIV-1 after interactions with oral epithelial cells?; (ii) What are the keratinocyte and other anti-HIV effector oral factors, and how do they contribute to mucosal protection?; (iii) How can HIV-1 interactions with oral epithelium affect activation and populations of local immune cells?; (iv) How can HIV-1 interactions alter functions of oral epithelial cells? PMID:27109285

  20. Alkaloids from the Sponge Stylissa carteri Present Prospective Scaffolds for the Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1)

    PubMed Central

    O’Rourke, Aubrie; Kremb, Stephan; Bader, Theresa Maria; Helfer, Markus; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Gerwick, William H.; Brack-Werner, Ruth; Voolstra, Christian R.

    2016-01-01

    The sponge Stylissa carteri is known to produce a number of secondary metabolites displaying anti-fouling, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer activity. However, the anti-viral potential of metabolites produced by S. carteri has not been extensively explored. In this study, an S. carteri extract was HPLC fractionated and a cell based assay was used to evaluate the effects of HPLC fractions on parameters of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) infection and cell viability. Candidate HIV-1 inhibitory fractions were then analyzed for the presence of potential HIV-1 inhibitory compounds by mass spectrometry, leading to the identification of three previously characterized compounds, i.e., debromohymenialdisine (DBH), hymenialdisine (HD), and oroidin. Commercially available purified versions of these molecules were re-tested to assess their antiviral potential in greater detail. Specifically, DBH and HD exhibit a 30%–40% inhibition of HIV-1 at 3.1 μM and 13 μM, respectively; however, both exhibited cytotoxicity. Conversely, oroidin displayed a 50% inhibition of viral replication at 50 μM with no associated toxicity. Additional experimentation using a biochemical assay revealed that oroidin inhibited the activity of the HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase up to 90% at 25 μM. Taken together, the chemical search space was narrowed and previously isolated compounds with an unexplored anti-viral potential were found. Our results support exploration of marine natural products for anti-viral drug discovery. PMID:26861355

  1. Alkaloids from the Sponge Stylissa carteri Present Prospective Scaffolds for the Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1).

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, Aubrie; Kremb, Stephan; Bader, Theresa Maria; Helfer, Markus; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Gerwick, William H; Brack-Werner, Ruth; Voolstra, Christian R

    2016-02-01

    The sponge Stylissa carteri is known to produce a number of secondary metabolites displaying anti-fouling, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer activity. However, the anti-viral potential of metabolites produced by S. carteri has not been extensively explored. In this study, an S. carteri extract was HPLC fractionated and a cell based assay was used to evaluate the effects of HPLC fractions on parameters of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) infection and cell viability. Candidate HIV-1 inhibitory fractions were then analyzed for the presence of potential HIV-1 inhibitory compounds by mass spectrometry, leading to the identification of three previously characterized compounds, i.e., debromohymenialdisine (DBH), hymenialdisine (HD), and oroidin. Commercially available purified versions of these molecules were re-tested to assess their antiviral potential in greater detail. Specifically, DBH and HD exhibit a 30%-40% inhibition of HIV-1 at 3.1 μM and 13 μM, respectively; however, both exhibited cytotoxicity. Conversely, oroidin displayed a 50% inhibition of viral replication at 50 μM with no associated toxicity. Additional experimentation using a biochemical assay revealed that oroidin inhibited the activity of the HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase up to 90% at 25 μM. Taken together, the chemical search space was narrowed and previously isolated compounds with an unexplored anti-viral potential were found. Our results support exploration of marine natural products for anti-viral drug discovery. PMID:26861355

  2. Ebselen, a Small-Molecule Capsid Inhibitor of HIV-1 Replication.

    PubMed

    Thenin-Houssier, Suzie; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S; Pedro-Rosa, Laura; Brady, Angela; Richard, Audrey; Konnick, Briana; Opp, Silvana; Buffone, Cindy; Fuhrmann, Jakob; Kota, Smitha; Billack, Blase; Pietka-Ottlik, Magdalena; Tellinghuisen, Timothy; Choe, Hyeryun; Spicer, Timothy; Scampavia, Louis; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Kojetin, Douglas J; Valente, Susana T

    2016-04-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) capsid plays crucial roles in HIV-1 replication and thus represents an excellent drug target. We developed a high-throughput screening method based on a time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (HTS-TR-FRET) assay, using the C-terminal domain (CTD) of HIV-1 capsid to identify inhibitors of capsid dimerization. This assay was used to screen a library of pharmacologically active compounds, composed of 1,280in vivo-active drugs, and identified ebselen [2-phenyl-1,2-benzisoselenazol-3(2H)-one], an organoselenium compound, as an inhibitor of HIV-1 capsid CTD dimerization. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis confirmed the direct interaction of ebselen with the HIV-1 capsid CTD and dimer dissociation when ebselen is in 2-fold molar excess. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry revealed that ebselen covalently binds the HIV-1 capsid CTD, likely via a selenylsulfide linkage with Cys198 and Cys218. This compound presents anti-HIV activity in single and multiple rounds of infection in permissive cell lines as well as in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Ebselen inhibits early viral postentry events of the HIV-1 life cycle by impairing the incoming capsid uncoating process. This compound also blocks infection of other retroviruses, such as Moloney murine leukemia virus and simian immunodeficiency virus, but displays no inhibitory activity against hepatitis C and influenza viruses. This study reports the use of TR-FRET screening to successfully identify a novel capsid inhibitor, ebselen, validating HIV-1 capsid as a promising target for drug development. PMID:26810656

  3. The Low-Cost Compound Lignosulfonic Acid (LA) Exhibits Broad-Spectrum Anti-HIV and Anti-HSV Activity and Has Potential for Microbicidal Applications

    PubMed Central

    D’huys, Thomas; Petrova, Mariya I.; Lebeer, Sarah; Snoeck, Robert; Andrei, Graciela; Schols, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Lignosulfonic acid (LA), a low-cost lignin-derived polyanionic macromolecule, was extensively studied for its anti-HIV and anti-HSV activity in various cellular assays, its mechanism of viral inhibition and safety profile as potential microbicide. Results LA demonstrated potent inhibitory activity of HIV replication against a wide range of R5 and X4 HIV strains and prevented the uptake of HIV by bystander CD4+ T cells from persistently infected T cells in vitro (IC50: 0.07 – 0.34 μM). LA also inhibited HSV-2 replication in vitro in different cell types (IC50: 0.42 – 1.1 μM) and in rodents in vivo. Furthermore, LA neutralized the HIV-1 and HSV-2 DC-SIGN-mediated viral transfer to CD4+ T cells (IC50: ∼1 μM). In addition, dual HIV-1/HSV-2 infection in T cells was potently blocked by LA (IC50: 0.71 μM). No antiviral activity was observed against the non-enveloped viruses Coxsackie type B4 and Reovirus type 1. LA is defined as a HIV entry inhibitor since it interfered with gp120 binding to the cell surface of T cells. Pretreatment of PBMCs with LA neither increased expression levels of cellular activation markers (CD69, CD25 and HLA-DR), nor enhanced HIV-1 replication. Furthermore, we found that LA had non-antagonistic effects with acyclovir, PRO2000 or LabyA1 (combination index (CI): 0.46 – 1.03) in its anti-HSV-2 activity and synergized with tenofovir (CI: 0.59) in its anti-HIV-1 activity. To identify mechanisms of LA resistance, we generated in vitro a mutant HIV-1 NL4.3LAresistant virus, which acquired seven mutations in the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins: S160N, V170N, Q280H and R389T in gp120 and K77Q, N113D and H132Y in gp41. Additionally, HIV-1 NL4.3LAresistant virus showed cross-resistance with feglymycin, enfuvirtide, PRO2000 and mAb b12, four well-described HIV binding/fusion inhibitors. Importantly, LA did not affect the growth of vaginal Lactobacilli strains. Conclusion Overall, these data highlight LA as a potential and unique low

  4. Elucidating a Key Anti-HIV-1 and Cancer-Associated Axis: The Structure of CCL5 (Rantes) in Complex with CCR5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamamis, Phanourios; Floudas, Christodoulos A.

    2014-06-01

    CCL5 (RANTES) is an inflammatory chemokine which binds to chemokine receptor CCR5 and induces signaling. The CCL5:CCR5 associated chemotactic signaling is of critical biological importance and is a potential HIV-1 therapeutic axis. Several studies provided growing evidence for the expression of CCL5 and CCR5 in non-hematological malignancies. Therefore, the delineation of the CCL5:CCR5 complex structure can pave the way for novel CCR5-targeted drugs. We employed a computational protocol which is primarily based on free energy calculations and molecular dynamics simulations, and report, what is to our knowledge, the first computationally derived CCL5:CCR5 complex structure which is in excellent agreement with experimental findings and clarifies the functional role of CCL5 and CCR5 residues which are associated with binding and signaling. A wealth of polar and non-polar interactions contributes to the tight CCL5:CCR5 binding. The structure of an HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop in complex with CCR5 has recently been derived through a similar computational protocol. A comparison between the CCL5 : CCR5 and the HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop : CCR5 complex structures depicts that both the chemokine and the virus primarily interact with the same CCR5 residues. The present work provides insights into the blocking mechanism of HIV-1 by CCL5.

  5. Specific Interaction between eEF1A and HIV RT Is Critical for HIV-1 Reverse Transcription and a Potential Anti-HIV Target.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongsheng; Wei, Ting; Rawle, Daniel J; Qin, Fangyun; Wang, Rui; Soares, Dinesh C; Jin, Hongping; Sivakumaran, Haran; Lin, Min-Hsuan; Spann, Kirsten; Abbott, Catherine M; Harrich, David

    2015-12-01

    Reverse transcription is the central defining feature of HIV-1 replication. We previously reported that the cellular eukaryotic elongation factor 1 (eEF1) complex associates with the HIV-1 reverse transcription complex (RTC) and the association is important for late steps of reverse transcription. Here we show that association between the eEF1 and RTC complexes occurs by a strong and direct interaction between the subunit eEF1A and reverse transcriptase (RT). Using biolayer interferometry and co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) assays, we show that association between the eEF1 and RTC complexes occurs by a strong (KD ~3-4 nM) and direct interaction between eEF1A and reverse transcriptase (RT). Biolayer interferometry analysis of cell lysates with titrated levels of eEF1A indicates it is a predominant cellular RT binding protein. Both the RT thumb and connection domains are required for interaction with eEF1A. A single amino acid mutation, W252A, within the thumb domain impaired co-IP between eEF1A and RT, and also significantly reduced the efficiency of late reverse transcription and virus replication when incorporated into infectious HIV-1. Molecular modeling analysis indicated that interaction between W252 and L303 are important for RT structure, and their mutation to alanine did not impair heterodimerisation, but negatively impacted interaction with eEF1A. Didemnin B, which specifically binds eEF1A, potently inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcription by greater than 2 logs at subnanomolar concentrations, especially affecting reverse transcription late DNA synthesis. Analysis showed reduced levels of RTCs from HIV-1-infected HEK293T treated with didemnin B compared to untreated cells. Interestingly, HIV-1 with a W252A RT mutation was resistant to didemnin B negative effects showing that didemnin B affects HIV-1 by targeting the RT-eEF1A interaction. The combined evidence indicates a direct interaction between eEF1A and RT is crucial for HIV reverse transcription and

  6. Specific Interaction between eEF1A and HIV RT Is Critical for HIV-1 Reverse Transcription and a Potential Anti-HIV Target

    PubMed Central

    Rawle, Daniel J.; Qin, Fangyun; Wang, Rui; Soares, Dinesh C.; Jin, Hongping; Sivakumaran, Haran; Lin, Min-Hsuan; Spann, Kirsten; Abbott, Catherine M.; Harrich, David

    2015-01-01

    Reverse transcription is the central defining feature of HIV-1 replication. We previously reported that the cellular eukaryotic elongation factor 1 (eEF1) complex associates with the HIV-1 reverse transcription complex (RTC) and the association is important for late steps of reverse transcription. Here we show that association between the eEF1 and RTC complexes occurs by a strong and direct interaction between the subunit eEF1A and reverse transcriptase (RT). Using biolayer interferometry and co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) assays, we show that association between the eEF1 and RTC complexes occurs by a strong (KD ~3–4 nM) and direct interaction between eEF1A and reverse transcriptase (RT). Biolayer interferometry analysis of cell lysates with titrated levels of eEF1A indicates it is a predominant cellular RT binding protein. Both the RT thumb and connection domains are required for interaction with eEF1A. A single amino acid mutation, W252A, within the thumb domain impaired co-IP between eEF1A and RT, and also significantly reduced the efficiency of late reverse transcription and virus replication when incorporated into infectious HIV-1. Molecular modeling analysis indicated that interaction between W252 and L303 are important for RT structure, and their mutation to alanine did not impair heterodimerisation, but negatively impacted interaction with eEF1A. Didemnin B, which specifically binds eEF1A, potently inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcription by greater than 2 logs at subnanomolar concentrations, especially affecting reverse transcription late DNA synthesis. Analysis showed reduced levels of RTCs from HIV-1-infected HEK293T treated with didemnin B compared to untreated cells. Interestingly, HIV-1 with a W252A RT mutation was resistant to didemnin B negative effects showing that didemnin B affects HIV-1 by targeting the RT-eEF1A interaction. The combined evidence indicates a direct interaction between eEF1A and RT is crucial for HIV reverse transcription and

  7. Molecular modeling, synthesis and biological evaluation of N-heteroaryl compounds as reverse transcriptase inhibitors against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anuradha; Yadav, Dipti; Yadav, Madhu; Dhamanage, Ashwini; Kulkarni, Smita; Singh, Ramendra K

    2015-03-01

    Different N-heteroaryl compounds bearing pyrimidine and benzimidazole moieties have been designed in silico using Discovery studio 2.5 software, synthesized and evaluated for their inhibitory activity as reverse transcriptase inhibitors against HIV-1 replication using laboratory adapted strains HIV-1IIIB (X4, subtype B) and HIV-1Ada5 (R5, subtype B), and the primary isolates HIV-1UG070 (X4, subtype D) and HIV-1VB59 (R5, subtype C). Cell-based assay showed that compounds were active at 1.394 μm concentrations (Selectivity Index: 1.29-38.39). The studies on structure-activity relationship clearly suggested anti-HIV activity of pyrimidine and benzimidazole derivatives and these findings were consistent with the in vitro cell-based experimental data. The results of molecular modeling and docking confirmed that all compounds assumed a butterfly-like conformation and showed H-bond, 'π-π' and 'π-+' and hydrophobic interactions within flexible non-nucleoside inhibitor binding pocket of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, similar to known non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, such as nevirapine. In view of the results obtained, it can be said that the chemical skeletons of N, N'-bis-(pyridin-2-yl)-succinamide (14 and 15) and 1, 4-bis-benzoimidazol-1-yl-butane-1, 4-dione (16 and 17) may be used for developing potent inhibitors of HIV-1 replication, with suitable structure/pharmacophore modifications. PMID:25055732

  8. Aqueous Extracts of the Marine Brown Alga Lobophora variegata Inhibit HIV-1 Infection at the Level of Virus Entry into Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kremb, Stephan; Helfer, Markus; Kraus, Birgit; Wolff, Horst; Wild, Christian; Schneider, Martha; Voolstra, Christian R.; Brack-Werner, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, marine algae have emerged as a rich and promising source of molecules with potent activities against various human pathogens. The widely distributed brown alga Lobophora variegata that is often associated with tropical coral reefs exerts strong antibacterial and antiprotozoal effects, but so far has not been associated with specific anti-viral activities. This study investigated potential HIV-1 inhibitory activity of L. variegata collected from different geographical regions, using a cell-based full replication HIV-1 reporter assay. Aqueous L. variegata extracts showed strong inhibitory effects on several HIV-1 strains, including drug-resistant and primary HIV-1 isolates, and protected even primary cells (PBMC) from HIV-1-infection. Anti-viral potency was related to ecological factors and showed clear differences depending on light exposition or epiphyte growth. Assays addressing early events of the HIV-1 replication cycle indicated that L. variegata extracts inhibited entry of HIV-1 into cells at a pre-fusion step possibly by impeding mobility of virus particles. Further characterization of the aqueous extract demonstrated that even high doses had only moderate effects on viability of cultured and primary cells (PBMCs). Imaging-based techniques revealed extract effects on the plasma membrane and actin filaments as well as induction of apoptosis at concentrations exceeding EC50 of anti-HIV-1 activity by more than 400 fold. In summary, we show for the first time that L. variegata extracts inhibit HIV-1 entry, thereby suggesting this alga as promising source for the development of novel HIV-1 inhibitors. PMID:25144758

  9. A dichotomy in cortical actin and chemotactic actin activity between human memory and naive T cells contributes to their differential susceptibility to HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weifeng; Guo, Jia; Yu, Dongyang; Vorster, Paul J; Chen, WanJun; Wu, Yuntao

    2012-10-12

    Human memory and naive CD4 T cells can mainly be identified by the reciprocal expression of the CD45RO or CD45RA isoforms. In HIV-1 infection, blood CD45RO memory CD4 T cells are preferentially infected and serve as a major viral reservoir. The molecular mechanism dictating this differential susceptibility to HIV-1 remains largely obscure. Here, we report that the different susceptibility of memory and naive T cells to HIV is not determined by restriction factors such as Apobec3G or BST2. However, we observed a phenotypic distinction between human CD45RO and CD45RA resting CD4 T cells in their cortical actin density and actin dynamics. CD45RO CD4 T cells possess a higher cortical actin density and can be distinguished as CD45RO(+)Actin(high). In contrast, CD45RA T cells are phenotypically CD45RA(+)Actin(low). In addition, the cortical actin in CD45RO memory CD4 T cells is more dynamic and can respond to low dosages of chemotactic induction by SDF-1, whereas that of naive cells cannot, despite a similar level of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 present on both cells. We further demonstrate that this difference in the cortical actin contributes to their differential susceptibility to HIV-1; resting memory but not naive T cells are highly responsive to HIV-mediated actin dynamics that promote higher levels of viral entry and early DNA synthesis in resting memory CD4 T cells. Furthermore, transient induction of actin dynamics in resting naive T cells rescues HIV latent infection following CD3/CD28 stimulation. These results suggest a key role of chemotactic actin activity in facilitating HIV-1 latent infection of these T cell subsets. PMID:22879601

  10. In Vitro HIV-1 LTR Integration into T-Cell Activation Gene CD27 Segment and the Decoy Effect of Modified-Sequence DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ohmori, Rei; Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki

    2012-01-01

    Integration into the host genome is an essential step in the HIV-1 life cycle. However, the host genome sequence that is favored by HIV-1 during integration has never been documented. Here, we report that CD27, a T cell activation gene, includes a sequence that is a target for in vitro HIV-1 cDNA integration. This sequence has a high affinity for integrase, and the target nucleotides responsible for this higher affinity were identified using a crystal microbalance assay. In experiments involving a segment of the CD27 gene, integration converged in the target nucleotides and flanking sequence DNA, indicating that integration is probably dependent upon the secondary structure of the substrate DNA. Notably, decoy modified CD27 sequence DNAs in which the target nucleotides were replaced suppressed integration when accompanying the original CD27 sequence DNA. Our identified CD27 sequence DNA is useful for investigating the biochemistry of integrase and for in vitro assessment of integrase-binding inhibitors. PMID:23209625

  11. Vaccine Focusing to Cross-Subtype HIV-1 gp120 Variable Loop Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Cardozo, Timothy; Wang, Shixia; Jiang, Xunqing; Kong, Xiang-Peng; Hioe, Catarina; Krachmarov, Chavdar

    2014-01-01

    We designed synthetic, epitope-focused immunogens that preferentially display individual neutralization epitopes targeted by cross-subtype anti-HIV V3 loop neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Vaccination of rabbits with these immunogens resulted in the elicitation of distinct polyclonal serum Abs that exhibit cross-subtype neutralization specificities mimicking the mAbs that guided the design. Our results prove the principle that a predictable range of epitope-specific polyclonal cross-subtype HIV-1 neutralizing Abs can be intentionally elicited in mammals by vaccination. The precise boundaries of the epitopes and conformational flexibility in the presentation of the epitopes in the immunogen appeared to be important for successful elicitation. This work may serve as a starting point for translating the activities of human broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies (bNAbs) into matched immunogens that can contribute to an efficacious HIV-1 vaccine. PMID:25045827

  12. Kinase Control of Latent HIV-1 Infection: PIM-1 Kinase as a Major Contributor to HIV-1 Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Duverger, Alexandra; Wolschendorf, Frank; Anderson, Joshua C.; Wagner, Frederic; Bosque, Alberto; Shishido, Takao; Jones, Jennifer; Planelles, Vicente; Willey, Christopher; Cron, Randall Q.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the clinical relevance of latent HIV-1 infection as a block to HIV-1 eradication, the molecular biology of HIV-1 latency remains incompletely understood. We recently demonstrated the presence of a gatekeeper kinase function that controls latent HIV-1 infection. Using kinase array analysis, we here expand on this finding and demonstrate that the kinase activity profile of latently HIV-1-infected T cells is altered relative to that of uninfected T cells. A ranking of altered kinases generated from these kinome profile data predicted PIM-1 kinase as a key switch involved in HIV-1 latency control. Using genetic and pharmacologic perturbation strategies, we demonstrate that PIM-1 activity is indeed required for HIV-1 reactivation in T cell lines and primary CD4 T cells. The presented results thus confirm that kinases are key contributors to HIV-1 latency control. In addition, through mutational studies we link the inhibitory effect of PIM-1 inhibitor IV (PIMi IV) on HIV-1 reactivation to an AP-1 motif in the CD28-responsive element of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR). The results expand our conceptual understanding of the dynamic interactions of the host cell and the latent HIV-1 integration event and position kinome profiling as a research tool to reveal novel molecular mechanisms that can eventually be targeted to therapeutically trigger HIV-1 reactivation. PMID:24155393

  13. Kinase control of latent HIV-1 infection: PIM-1 kinase as a major contributor to HIV-1 reactivation.

    PubMed

    Duverger, Alexandra; Wolschendorf, Frank; Anderson, Joshua C; Wagner, Frederic; Bosque, Alberto; Shishido, Takao; Jones, Jennifer; Planelles, Vicente; Willey, Christopher; Cron, Randall Q; Kutsch, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Despite the clinical relevance of latent HIV-1 infection as a block to HIV-1 eradication, the molecular biology of HIV-1 latency remains incompletely understood. We recently demonstrated the presence of a gatekeeper kinase function that controls latent HIV-1 infection. Using kinase array analysis, we here expand on this finding and demonstrate that the kinase activity profile of latently HIV-1-infected T cells is altered relative to that of uninfected T cells. A ranking of altered kinases generated from these kinome profile data predicted PIM-1 kinase as a key switch involved in HIV-1 latency control. Using genetic and pharmacologic perturbation strategies, we demonstrate that PIM-1 activity is indeed required for HIV-1 reactivation in T cell lines and primary CD4 T cells. The presented results thus confirm that kinases are key contributors to HIV-1 latency control. In addition, through mutational studies we link the inhibitory effect of PIM-1 inhibitor IV (PIMi IV) on HIV-1 reactivation to an AP-1 motif in the CD28-responsive element of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR). The results expand our conceptual understanding of the dynamic interactions of the host cell and the latent HIV-1 integration event and position kinome profiling as a research tool to reveal novel molecular mechanisms that can eventually be targeted to therapeutically trigger HIV-1 reactivation. PMID:24155393

  14. Second-site suppressors of HIV-1 capsid mutations: restoration of intracellular activities without correction of intrinsic capsid stability defects

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Disassembly of the viral capsid following penetration into the cytoplasm, or uncoating, is a poorly understood stage of retrovirus infection. Based on previous studies of HIV-1 CA mutants exhibiting altered capsid stability, we concluded that formation of a capsid of optimal intrinsic stability is crucial for HIV-1 infection. Results To further examine the connection between HIV-1 capsid stability and infectivity, we isolated second-site suppressors of HIV-1 mutants exhibiting unstable (P38A) or hyperstable (E45A) capsids. We identified the respective suppressor mutations, T216I and R132T, which restored virus replication in a human T cell line and markedly enhanced the fitness of the original mutants as revealed in single-cycle infection assays. Analysis of the corresponding purified N-terminal domain CA proteins by NMR spectroscopy demonstrated that the E45A and R132T mutations induced structural changes that are localized to the regions of the mutations, while the P38A mutation resulted in changes extending to neighboring regions in space. Unexpectedly, neither suppressor mutation corrected the intrinsic viral capsid stability defect associated with the respective original mutation. Nonetheless, the R132T mutation rescued the selective infectivity impairment exhibited by the E45A mutant in aphidicolin-arrested cells, and the double mutant regained sensitivity to the small molecule inhibitor PF74. The T216I mutation rescued the impaired ability of the P38A mutant virus to abrogate restriction by TRIMCyp and TRIM5α. Conclusions The second-site suppressor mutations in CA that we have identified rescue virus infection without correcting the intrinsic capsid stability defects associated with the P38A and E45A mutations. The suppressors also restored wild type virus function in several cell-based assays. We propose that while proper HIV-1 uncoating in target cells is dependent on the intrinsic stability of the viral capsid, the effects of stability

  15. Mathematical model of the Tat-Rev regulation of HIV-1 replication in an activated cell predicts the existence of oscillatory dynamics in the synthesis of viral components

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The life cycle of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) makes possible the realization of regulatory strategies that can lead to complex dynamical behavior of the system. We analyze the strategy which is based on two feedback mechanisms, one mediating a positive regulation of the virus replication by Tat protein via the antitermination of the genomic RNAs transcription on TAR (transactivation responsive) element of the proviral DNA and the second mechanism providing a negative regulation of the splicing of the full-length (9 kb) RNAs and incompletely spliced (4 kb) RNAs via their transport from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Although the existence of these two regulatory feedback loops has been considered in other mathematical models, none of them examined the conditions for the emergence of complex oscillatory patterns in the intracellular dynamics of viral components. Results We developed a mechanistic mathematical model for the Tat-Rev mediated regulation of HIV-1 replication, which considers the activation of proviral DNA transcription, the Tat-specific antitermination of transcription on TAR-element, resulting in the synthesis of the full-length 9 kb RNA, the splicing of the 9 kb RNA down to the 4 kb RNA and the 4 kb RNA to 2 kb RNA, the transport of 2 kb mRNAs from the nucleus to the cytoplasm by the intracellular mechanisms, the multiple binding of the Rev protein to RRE (Rev Response Element) sites on 9 kb and 4 kb RNA resulting in their export to the cytoplasm and the synthesis of Tat and Rev proteins in the cytoplasm followed by their transport into the nucleus. The degradation of all viral proteins and RNAs both in the cytoplasm and the nucleus is described. The model parameters values were derived from the published literature data. The model was used to examine the dynamics of the synthesis of the viral proteins Tat and Rev, the mRNAs under the intracellular conditions specific for activated HIV-1 infected macrophages. In addition, we

  16. Role of APOBEC3F Gene Variation in HIV-1 Disease Progression and Pneumocystis Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    An, Ping; Penugonda, Sudhir; Thorball, Christian W.; Bartha, Istvan; Goedert, James J.; Donfield, Sharyne; Buchbinder, Susan; Binns-Roemer, Elizabeth; Kirk, Gregory D.; Zhang, Wenyan; Fellay, Jacques; Yu, Xiao-Fang; Winkler, Cheryl A.

    2016-01-01

    Human APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases are intrinsic resistance factors to HIV-1. However, HIV-1 encodes a viral infectivity factor (Vif) that degrades APOBEC3 proteins. In vitro APOBEC3F (A3F) anti-HIV-1 activity is weaker than A3G but is partially resistant to Vif degradation unlike A3G. It is unknown whether A3F protein affects HIV-1 disease in vivo. To assess the effect of A3F gene on host susceptibility to HIV- acquisition and disease progression, we performed a genetic association study in six well-characterized HIV-1 natural cohorts. A common six-Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) haplotype of A3F tagged by a codon-changing variant (p. I231V, with allele (V) frequency of 48% in European Americans) was associated with significantly lower set-point viral load and slower rate of progression to AIDS (Relative Hazards (RH) = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.56, 0.91) and delayed development of pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) (RH = 0.53, 95% CI: 0.37–0.76). A validation study in the International Collaboration for the Genomics of HIV (ICGH) showed a consistent association with lower set-point viral load. An in vitro assay revealed that the A3F I231V variant may influence Vif mediated A3F degradation. Our results provide genetic epidemiological evidence that A3F modulates HIV-1/AIDS disease progression. PMID:26942578

  17. Synthesis of a Vpr-Binding Derivative for Use as a Novel HIV-1 Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Hagiwara, Kyoji; Ishii, Hideki; Murakami, Tomoyuki; Takeshima, Shin-nosuke; Chutiwitoonchai, Nopporn; Kodama, Eiichi N.; Kawaji, Kumi; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Honda, Kaori; Osada, Hiroyuki; Tsunetsugu-Yokota, Yasuko; Suzuki, Masaaki; Aida, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant viruses compromises the efficacy of anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) therapy and limits treatment options. Therefore, new targets that can be used to develop novel antiviral agents need to be identified. We previously identified a potential parent compound, hematoxylin, which suppresses the nuclear import of HIV-1 via the Vpr-importin α interaction and inhibits HIV-1 replication in a Vpr-dependent manner by blocking nuclear import of the pre-integration complex. However, it was unstable. Here, we synthesized a stable derivative of hematoxylin that bound specifically and stably to Vpr and inhibited HIV-1 replication in macrophages. Furthermore, like hematoxylin, the derivative inhibited nuclear import of Vpr in an in vitro nuclear import assay, but had no effect on Vpr-induced G2/M phase cell cycle arrest or caspase activity. Interestingly, this derivative bound strongly to amino acid residues 54–74 within the C-terminal α-helical domain (αH3) of Vpr. These residues are highly conserved among different HIV strains, indicating that this region is a potential target for drug-resistant HIV-1 infection. Thus, we succeeded in developing a stable hematoxylin derivative that bound directly to Vpr, suggesting that specific inhibitors of the interaction between cells and viral accessory proteins may provide a new strategy for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:26701275

  18. Role of APOBEC3F Gene Variation in HIV-1 Disease Progression and Pneumocystis Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    An, Ping; Penugonda, Sudhir; Thorball, Christian W; Bartha, Istvan; Goedert, James J; Donfield, Sharyne; Buchbinder, Susan; Binns-Roemer, Elizabeth; Kirk, Gregory D; Zhang, Wenyan; Fellay, Jacques; Yu, Xiao-Fang; Winkler, Cheryl A

    2016-03-01

    Human APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases are intrinsic resistance factors to HIV-1. However, HIV-1 encodes a viral infectivity factor (Vif) that degrades APOBEC3 proteins. In vitro APOBEC3F (A3F) anti-HIV-1 activity is weaker than A3G but is partially resistant to Vif degradation unlike A3G. It is unknown whether A3F protein affects HIV-1 disease in vivo. To assess the effect of A3F gene on host susceptibility to HIV- acquisition and disease progression, we performed a genetic association study in six well-characterized HIV-1 natural cohorts. A common six-Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) haplotype of A3F tagged by a codon-changing variant (p. I231V, with allele (V) frequency of 48% in European Americans) was associated with significantly lower set-point viral load and slower rate of progression to AIDS (Relative Hazards (RH) = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.56, 0.91) and delayed development of pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) (RH = 0.53, 95% CI: 0.37-0.76). A validation study in the International Collaboration for the Genomics of HIV (ICGH) showed a consistent association with lower set-point viral load. An in vitro assay revealed that the A3F I231V variant may influence Vif mediated A3F degradation. Our results provide genetic epidemiological evidence that A3F modulates HIV-1/AIDS disease progression. PMID:26942578

  19. Conserved hydrogen bonds and water molecules in MDR HIV-1 protease substrate complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Yong; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Dewdney, Tamaria G.; Reiter, Samuel J.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2012-12-19

    Success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in anti-HIV therapy is severely compromised by the rapidly developing drug resistance. HIV-1 protease inhibitors, part of HAART, are losing their potency and efficacy in inhibiting the target. Multi-drug resistant (MDR) 769 HIV-1 protease (resistant mutations at residues 10, 36, 46, 54, 62, 63, 71, 82, 84, 90) was selected for the present study to understand the binding to its natural substrates. The nine crystal structures of MDR769 HIV-1 protease substrate hepta-peptide complexes were analyzed in order to reveal the conserved structural elements for the purpose of drug design against MDR HIV-1 protease. Our structural studies demonstrated that highly conserved hydrogen bonds between the protease and substrate peptides, together with the conserved crystallographic water molecules, played a crucial role in the substrate recognition, substrate stabilization and protease stabilization. Additionally, the absence of the key flap-ligand bridging water molecule might imply a different catalytic mechanism of MDR769 HIV-1 protease compared to that of wild type (WT) HIV-1 protease.

  20. The Dual Role of Dendritic cells in the Immune Response to HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hogue, Ian B.; Bajaria, Seema H.; Fallert, Beth A.; Qin, Shulin; Reinhart, Todd A.; Kirschner, Denise E.

    2009-01-01

    Many aspects of the complex interaction between HIV-1 and the human immune system remain elusive. Our objective is to study these interactions, focusing on the specific roles of dendritic cells (DCs). DCs enhance HIV-1 infection processes as well as promote an anti-viral immune response. We explore the implications of these dual roles. We present and analyse a mathematical model describing the dynamics of HIV-1, CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, and DCs interacting in a human lymph node. We validate the behaviour of our model against non-human primate SIV experimental data and published human HIV-1 data. Our model qualitatively and quantitatively recapitulates clinical HIV-1 infection dynamics. We perform sensitivity analyses on the model to determine which mechanisms strongly affect infection dynamics. Sensitivity analysis identifies system interactions that contribute to infection progression, including DC-related mechanisms. We compare DC-dependent and DC-independent routes of CD4+ T-cell infection. The model predicts that simultaneous priming and infection of T cells by DCs drives early infection dynamics when activated T-helper cell numbers are low. Further, our model predicts that, while direct failure of DC function and an indirect failure due to loss of CD4+ T-cell help are both significant contributors to infection dynamics, our results support the hypothesis that the former has a more significant impact on HIV-1 immunopathogenesis. PMID:18753232

  1. Characterization of a folding intermediate from HIV-1 ribonuclease H.

    PubMed Central

    Kern, G.; Handel, T.; Marqusee, S.

    1998-01-01

    The RNase H domain from HIV-1 (HIV RNase H) encodes an essential retroviral activity. Refolding of the isolated HIV RNase H domain shows a kinetic intermediate detectable by stopped-flow far UV circular dichroism and pulse-labeling H/D exchange. In this intermediate, strands 1, 4, and 5 as well as helices A and D appear to be structured. Compared to its homolog from Escherichia coli, the rate limiting step in refolding of HIV RNase H appears closer to the native state. We have modeled this kinetic intermediate using a C-terminal deletion fragment lacking helix E. Like the kinetic intermediate, this variant folds rapidly and shows a decrease in stability. We propose that inhibition of the docking of helix E to this folding intermediate may present a novel strategy for anti HIV-1 therapy. PMID:9792104

  2. Nup153 and Nup98 bind the HIV-1 core and contribute to the early steps of HIV-1 replication

    SciTech Connect

    Di Nunzio, Francesca; Fricke, Thomas; Miccio, Annarita; Valle-Casuso, Jose Carlos; Perez, Patricio; Souque, Philippe; Rizzi, Ermanno; Severgnini, Marco; Mavilio, Fulvio; Charneau, Pierre; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2013-05-25

    The early steps of HIV-1 replication involve the entry of HIV-1 into the nucleus, which is characterized by viral interactions with nuclear pore components. HIV-1 developed an evolutionary strategy to usurp the nuclear pore machinery and chromatin in order to integrate and efficiently express viral genes. In the current work, we studied the role of nucleoporins 153 and 98 (Nup153 and Nup98) in infection of human Jurkat lymphocytes by HIV-1. We showed that Nup153-depleted cells exhibited a defect in nuclear import, while depletion of Nup 98 caused a slight defect in HIV integration. To explore the biochemical viral determinants for the requirement of Nup153 and Nup98 during HIV-1 infection, we tested the ability of these nucleoporins to interact with HIV-1 cores. Our findings showed that both nucleoporins bind HIV-1 cores suggesting that this interaction is important for HIV-1 nuclear import and/or integration. Distribution analysis of integration sites in Nup153-depleted cells revealed a reduced tendency of HIV-1 to integrate in intragenic sites, which in part could account for the large infectivity defect observed in Nup153-depleted cells. Our work strongly supports a role for Nup153 in HIV-1 nuclear import and integration. - Highlights: ► We studied the role of Nup98 and Nup153 in HIV-1 infection. ► Nup98 binds the HIV-1 core and is involved in HIV-1 integration. ► Nup153 binds the HIV-1 core and is involved in HIV-1 nuclear import. ► Depletion of Nup153 decreased the integration of HIV-1 in transcriptionally active sites.

  3. Discovery of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors: pharmacophore mapping, virtual screening, molecular docking, synthesis, and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Hardik; Patel, Paresh; Pannecouque, Christophe

    2014-02-01

    HIV-1 integrase enzyme plays an important role in the life cycle of HIV and responsible for integration of virus into human genome. Here, both computational and synthetic approaches were used to design and synthesize newer HIV-1 integrase inhibitors. Pharmacophore mapping was performed on 20 chemically diverse molecules using DISCOtech, and refinement was carried out using GASP. Ten pharmacophore models were generated, and model 2, containing four features including two donor sites, one acceptor atom, and one hydrophobic region, was considered the best model as it has the highest fitness score. It was used as a query in NCI and Maybridge databases. Molecules having more than 99% Q(fit) value were used to design 30 molecules bearing pteridine ring and were docked on co-crystal structure of HIV-1 integrase enzyme. Among these, six molecules, showing good docking score compared with the reference standards, were synthesized by conventional as well as microwave-assisted methods. All compounds were characterized by physical and spectral data and evaluated for in vitro anti-HIV activity against the replication of HIV-1 (IIIB) in MT-4 cells. The used approach of molecular docking and anti-HIV activity data of designed molecules will provide significant insights to discover novel HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors. PMID:23957390

  4. Potent and highly selective human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) inhibition by a series of alpha-anilinophenylacetamide derivatives targeted at HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed Central

    Pauwels, R; Andries, K; Debyser, Z; Van Daele, P; Schols, D; Stoffels, P; De Vreese, K; Woestenborghs, R; Vandamme, A M; Janssen, C G

    1993-01-01

    In vitro evaluation of a large chemical library of pharmacologically acceptable prototype compounds in a high-capacity, cellular-based screening system has led to the discovery of another family of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) inhibitors. Through optimization of a lead compound, several alpha-anilinophenylacetamide (alpha-APA) derivatives have been identified that inhibit the replication of several HIV-1 strains (IIIB/LAI, RF, NDK, MN, HE) in a variety of host cell types at concentrations that are 10,000- to 100,000-fold lower than their cytotoxic concentrations. The IC50 of the alpha-APA derivative R 89439 for HIV-1 cytopathicity in MT-4 cells was 13 nM. The median 90% inhibitory concentration (IC90) in a variety of host cells was 50-100 nM. Although these alpha-APA derivatives are active against a tetrahydroimidazo [4,5,1-jk][1,4]benzodiazepin-2(1H)-thione-(TIBO)-resistant HIV-1 strain, they do not inhibit replication of HIV-2 (strains ROD and EHO) or simian immunodeficiency virus (strains Mac251, mndGB1, and agm3). An HIV-1 strain containing the Tyr181-->Cys mutation in the reverse transcriptase region displayed reduced sensitivity. alpha-APA derivative R 89439 inhibited virion and recombinant reverse transcriptase of HIV-1 but did not inhibit that of HIV-2. Reverse transcriptase inhibition depended upon the template/primer used. The relatively uncomplicated synthesis of R 89439, its potent anti-HIV-1 activity, and its favorable pharmacokinetic profile make R 89439 a good candidate for clinical studies. PMID:7680476

  5. Punica granatum (Pomegranate) juice provides an HIV-1 entry inhibitor and candidate topical microbicide

    PubMed Central

    Neurath, A Robert; Strick, Nathan; Li, Yun-Yao; Debnath, Asim K

    2004-01-01

    Background For ≈ 24 years the AIDS pandemic has claimed ≈ 30 million lives, causing ≈ 14,000 new HIV-1 infections daily worldwide in 2003. About 80% of infections occur by heterosexual transmission. In the absence of vaccines, topical microbicides, expected to block virus transmission, offer hope for controlling the pandemic. Antiretroviral chemotherapeutics have decreased AIDS mortality in industrialized countries, but only minimally in developing countries. To prevent an analogous dichotomy, microbicides should be: acceptable; accessible; affordable; and accelerative in transition from development to marketing. Already marketed pharmaceutical excipients or foods, with established safety records and adequate anti-HIV-1 activity, may provide this option. Methods Fruit juices were screened for inhibitory activity against HIV-1 IIIB using CD4 and CXCR4 as cell receptors. The best juice was tested for inhibition of: (1) infection by HIV-1 BaL, utilizing CCR5 as the cellular coreceptor; and (2) binding of gp120 IIIB and gp120 BaL, respectively, to CXCR4 and CCR5. To remove most colored juice components, the adsorption of the effective ingredient(s) to dispersible excipients and other foods was investigated. A selected complex was assayed for inhibition of infection by primary HIV-1 isolates. Results HIV-1 entry inhibitors from pomegranate juice adsorb onto corn starch. The resulting complex blocks virus binding to CD4 and CXCR4/CCR5 and inhibits infection by primary virus clades A to G and group O. Conclusion These results suggest the possibility of producing an anti-HIV-1 microbicide from inexpensive, widely available sources, whose safety has been established throughout centuries, provided that its quality is adequately standardized and monitored. PMID:15485580

  6. Multifaceted counter-APOBEC3G mechanisms employed by HIV-1 Vif

    PubMed Central

    Britan-Rosich, Elena; Nowarski, Roni; Kotler, Moshe

    2011-01-01

    In the absence of HIV-1 Vif protein, the host antiviral deaminase APOBEC3G (A3G) restricts the production of infectious HIV-1 by deamination of dC residues in the negative ssDNA produced by reverse transcription. The Vif protein averts the lethal threat of deamination by precluding the packaging of A3G into assembling virions by mediating proteasomal degradation of A3G. In spite of this robust Vif activity, residual A3G molecules that escape degradation and incorporate into newly assembled virions are potentially deleterious to the virus. We hypothesized that virion-associated Vif inhibits A3G enzymatic activity, and therefore prevents lethal mutagenesis of the newly synthesized viral DNA. Here we show that: (i) Vif-proficient HIV-1 particles released from H9 cells contain A3G with lower specific activity compared with Δvif virus associated A3G; (ii) Encapsidated HIV-1 Vif inhibits the deamination activity of recombinant A3G, and (iii) Purified HIV-1 Vif protein and the Vif-derived peptide Vif25-39 inhibit A3G activity in vitro at nanomolar concentrations in an uncompetitive manner. Our results manifest the potentiality of Vif to control the deamination threat in virions or in the pre-integration complexes (PICs) following entry to target cells. Hence, virion-associated Vif could serve as a last line of defense, protecting the virus against A3G anti-viral activity. PMID:21763507

  7. TRIM5 and the Regulation of HIV-1 Infectivity.

    PubMed

    Luban, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    The past ten years have seen an explosion of information concerning host restriction factors that inhibit the replication of HIV-1 and other retroviruses. Among these factors is TRIM5, an innate immune signaling molecule that recognizes the capsid lattice as soon as the retrovirion core is released into the cytoplasm of otherwise susceptible target cells. Recognition of the capsid lattice has several consequences that include multimerization of TRIM5 into a complementary lattice, premature uncoating of the virion core, and activation of TRIM5 E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Unattached, K63-linked ubiquitin chains are generated that activate the TAK1 kinase complex and downstream inflammatory mediators. Polymorphisms in the capsid recognition domain of TRIM5 explain the observed species-specific differences among orthologues and the relatively weak anti-HIV-1 activity of human TRIM5. Better understanding of the complex interaction between TRIM5 and the retrovirus capsid lattice may someday lead to exploitation of this interaction for the development of potent HIV-1 inhibitors. PMID:22701176

  8. HIV-1 Tat protein enhances the intracellular growth of Leishmania amazonensis via the ds-RNA induced protein PKR

    PubMed Central

    Vivarini, Áislan de Carvalho; Santos Pereira, Renata de Meirelles; Barreto-de-Souza, Victor; Temerozo, Jairo Ramos; Soares, Deivid C.; Saraiva, Elvira M.; Saliba, Alessandra Mattos; Bou-Habib, Dumith Chequer; Lopes, Ulisses Gazos

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 co-infection with human parasitic diseases is a growing public health problem worldwide. Leishmania parasites infect and replicate inside macrophages, thereby subverting host signaling pathways, including the response mediated by PKR. The HIV-1 Tat protein interacts with PKR and plays a pivotal role in HIV-1 replication. This study shows that Tat increases both the expression and activation of PKR in Leishmania-infected macrophages. Importantly, the positive effect of Tat addition on parasite growth was dependent on PKR signaling, as demonstrated in PKR-deficient macrophages or macrophages treated with the PKR inhibitor. The effect of HIV-1 Tat on parasite growth was prevented when the supernatant of HIV-1-infected macrophages was treated with neutralizing anti-HIV-1 Tat prior to Leishmania infection. The addition of HIV-1 Tat to Leishmania-infected macrophages led to inhibition of iNOS expression, modulation of NF-kB activation and enhancement of IL-10 expression. Accordingly, the expression of a Tat construct containing mutations in the basic region (49–57aa), which is responsible for the interaction with PKR, favored neither parasite growth nor IL-10 expression in infected macrophages. In summary, we show that Tat enhances Leishmania growth through PKR signaling. PMID:26608746

  9. Combined chronic blockade of hyper-active L-type calcium channels and NMDA receptors ameliorates HIV-1 associated hyper-excitability of mPFC pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Khodr, Christina E; Chen, Lihua; Dave, Sonya; Al-Harthi, Lena; Hu, Xiu-Ti

    2016-10-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection induces neurological and neuropsychological deficits, which are associated with dysregulation of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and other vulnerable brain regions. We evaluated the impact of HIV infection in the mPFC and the therapeutic potential of targeting over-active voltage-gated L-type Ca(2+) channels (L-channel) and NMDA receptors (NMDAR), as modeled in HIV-1 transgenic (Tg) rats. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording was used to assess the membrane properties and voltage-sensitive Ca(2+) potentials (Ca(2+) influx) in mPFC pyramidal neurons. Neurons from HIV-1 Tg rats displayed reduced rheobase, spike amplitude and inwardly-rectifying K(+) influx, increased numbers of action potentials, and a trend of aberrant firing compared to those from non-Tg control rats. Neuronal hyper-excitation was associated with abnormally-enhanced Ca(2+) influx (independent of NMDAR), which was eliminated by acute L-channel blockade. Combined chronic blockade of over-active L-channels and NMDARs with open-channel blockers abolished HIV effects on spiking, aberrant firing and Ca(2+) potential half-amplitude duration, though not the reduced inward rectification. In contrast, individual chronic blockade of over-active L-channels or NMDARs did not alleviate HIV-induced mPFC hyper-excitability. These studies demonstrate that HIV alters mPFC neuronal activity by dysregulating membrane excitability and Ca(2+) influx through the L-channels. This renders these neurons more susceptible and vulnerable to excitatory stimuli, and could contribute to HIV-associated neuropathogenesis. Combined targeting of over-active L-channels/NMDARs alleviates HIV-induced dysfunction of mPFC pyramidal neurons, emphasizing a potential novel therapeutic strategy that may effectively decrease HIV-induced Ca(2+) dysregulation in the mPFC. PMID:27326669

  10. A computational analysis of the structural determinants of APOBEC3's catalytic activity and vulnerability to HIV-1 Vif

    PubMed Central

    Shandilya, M.D. Shivender; Bohn, Markus-Frederik; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2016-01-01

    APOBEC3s (A3) are Zn2+ dependent cytidine deaminases with diverse biological functions and implications for cancer and immunity. Four of the seven human A3s restrict HIV by 'hypermutating' the reverse-transcribed viral genomic DNA. HIV Virion Infectivity Factor (Vif) counters this restriction by targeting A3s to proteasomal degradation. However, there is no apparent correlation between catalytic activity, Vif binding, and sequence similarity between A3 domains. Our comparative structural analysis reveals features required for binding Vif and features influencing polynucleotide deaminase activity in A3 proteins. All Vif-binding A3s share a negatively charged surface region that includes residues previously implicated in binding the highly-positively charged Vif. Additionally, catalytically active A3s share a positively charged groove near the Zn2+ coordinating active site, which may accommodate the negatively charged polynucleotide substrate. Our findings suggest surface electrostatics, as well as the spatial extent of substrate accommodating region, are critical determinants of substrate and Vif binding across A3 proteins with implications for anti-retroviral and anti-cancer therapeutic design. PMID:25461536

  11. Identification of flavopiridol analogues that selectively inhibit positive transcription elongation factor (P-TEFb) and block HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Ali, Akbar; Ghosh, Animesh; Nathans, Robin S; Sharova, Natalia; O'Brien, Siobhan; Cao, Hong; Stevenson, Mario; Rana, Tariq M

    2009-08-17

    The positive transcription elongation factor (P-TEFb; CDK9/cyclin T1) regulates RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription of cellular and integrated viral genes. It is an essential cofactor for HIV-1 Tat transactivation, and selective inhibition of P-TEFb blocks HIV-1 replication without affecting cellular transcription; this indicates that P-TEFb could be a potential target for developing anti-HIV-1 therapeutics. Flavopiridol, a small molecule CDK inhibitor, blocks HIV-1 Tat transactivation and viral replication by inhibiting P-TEFb kinase activity, but it is highly cytotoxic. In the search for selective and less cytotoxic P-TEFb inhibitors, we prepared a series of flavopiridol analogues and evaluated their kinase inhibitory activity against P-TEFb and CDK2/cyclin A, and tested their cellular antiviral potency and cytotoxicity. We identified several analogues that selectively inhibit P-TEFb kinase activity in vitro and show antiviral potency comparable to that of flavopiridol, but with significantly reduced cytotoxicity. These compounds are valuable molecular probes for understanding P-TEFb-regulated cellular and HIV-1 gene transcription and provide potential anti-HIV-1 therapeutics. PMID:19603446

  12. HIV-1 Tat Promotes Integrin-Mediated HIV Transmission to Dendritic Cells by Binding Env Spikes and Competes Neutralization by Anti-HIV Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Monini, Paolo; Cafaro, Aurelio; Srivastava, Indresh K.; Moretti, Sonia; Sharma, Victoria A.; Andreini, Claudia; Chiozzini, Chiara; Ferrantelli, Flavia; Cossut, Maria R. Pavone.; Tripiciano, Antonella; Nappi, Filomena; Longo, Olimpia; Bellino, Stefania; Picconi, Orietta; Fanales-Belasio, Emanuele; Borsetti, Alessandra; Toschi, Elena; Schiavoni, Ilaria; Bacigalupo, Ilaria; Kan, Elaine; Sernicola, Leonardo; Maggiorella, Maria T.; Montin, Katy; Porcu, Marco; Leone, Patrizia; Leone, Pasqualina; Collacchi, Barbara; Palladino, Clelia; Ridolfi, Barbara; Falchi, Mario; Macchia, Iole; Ulmer, Jeffrey B.; Buttò, Stefano; Sgadari, Cecilia; Magnani, Mauro; Federico, Maurizio P. M.; Titti, Fausto; Banci, Lucia; Dallocchio, Franco; Rappuoli, Rino; Ensoli, Fabrizio; Barnett, Susan W.; Garaci, Enrico; Ensoli, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Use of Env in HIV vaccine development has been disappointing. Here we show that, in the presence of a biologically active Tat subunit vaccine, a trimeric Env protein prevents in monkeys virus spread from the portal of entry to regional lymph nodes. This appears to be due to specific interactions between Tat and Env spikes that form a novel virus entry complex favoring R5 or X4 virus entry and productive infection of dendritic cells (DCs) via an integrin-mediated pathway. These Tat effects do not require Tat-transactivation activity and are blocked by anti-integrin antibodies (Abs). Productive DC infection promoted by Tat is associated with a highly efficient virus transmission to T cells. In the Tat/Env complex the cysteine-rich region of Tat engages the Env V3 loop, whereas the Tat RGD sequence remains free and directs the virus to integrins present on DCs. V2 loop deletion, which unshields the CCR5 binding region of Env, increases Tat/Env complex stability. Of note, binding of Tat to Env abolishes neutralization of Env entry or infection of DCs by anti-HIV sera lacking anti-Tat Abs, which are seldom present in natural infection. This is reversed, and neutralization further enhanced, by HIV sera containing anti-Tat Abs such as those from asymptomatic or Tat-vaccinated patients, or by sera from the Tat/Env vaccinated monkeys. Thus, both anti-Tat and anti-Env Abs are required for efficient HIV neutralization. These data suggest that the Tat/Env interaction increases HIV acquisition and spreading, as a mechanism evolved by the virus to escape anti-Env neutralizing Abs. This may explain the low effectiveness of Env-based vaccines, which are also unlikely to elicit Abs against new Env epitopes exposed by the Tat/Env interaction. As Tat also binds Envs from different clades, new vaccine strategies should exploit the Tat/Env interaction for both preventative and therapeutic interventions. PMID:23152803

  13. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of 2-Thioxopyrimidin-4(1H)-one Derivatives as Potential Non-Nucleoside HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Khalifa, Nagy M.; Al-Omar, Mohamed A.

    2014-01-01

    A series of new 5-allyl-6-benzylpyrimidin-4(3H)-ones bearing different substituents at the C-2 position of the pyrimidine core have been synthesized and evaluated for their in vitro activities against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in the human T-lymphotropic type (MT-4 cell cultures). The majority of the title compounds showed moderate to good activities against HIV-1. Amongst them, 5-allyl-6-benzyl-2-(3-hydroxypropylthio)pyrimidin-4(3H)-one analogue 11c exhibited the most potent anti-HIV-1 activity (IC50 0.32 µM). The biological testing results clearly indicated that the substitution at C-2 position of the pyrimidine ring could increase the anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) activity. PMID:25397597

  14. Enzymatic Activities of RNase H Domains of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase with Substrate Binding Domains of Bacterial RNases H1 and H2.

    PubMed

    Permanasari, Etin-Diah; Yasukawa, Kiyoshi; Kanaya, Shigenori

    2015-06-01

    Thermotoga maritima RNase H1 and Bacillus stearothermophilus RNase H2 have an N-terminal substrate binding domain, termed hybrid binding domain (TmaHBD), and N-terminal domain (BstNTD), respectively. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) is a heterodimer consisting of a P66 subunit and a P51 subunit. The P66 subunit contains a C-terminal RNase H domain, which exhibits RNase H activity either in the presence of Mg(2+) or Mn(2+) ions. The isolated RNase H domain of HIV-1 RT (RNH(HIV)) is inactive, possibly due to the lack of a substrate binding ability, disorder of a loop containing His539, and increased flexibility. To examine whether the activity of RNH(HIV) is restored by the attachment of TmaHBD or BstNTD to its N-terminus, two chimeric proteins, TmaHBD-RNH(HIV) and BstNTD-RNH(HIV), were constructed and characterized. Both chimeric proteins bound to RNA/DNA hybrid more strongly than RNH(HIV) and exhibited enzymatic activity in the presence of Mn(2+) ions. They did not exhibit activity or exhibited very weak activity in the presence of Mg(2+) ions. These results indicate that TmaHBD and BstNTD function as an RNA/DNA hybrid binding tag, and greatly increase the substrate binding affinity and Mn(2+)-dependent activity of RNH(HIV) but do not restore the Mg(2+)-dependent activity of RNH(HIV). PMID:25673083

  15. Arylthiopyrrole (AThP) derivatives as non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors: synthesis, structure-activity relationships, and docking studies (part 1).

    PubMed

    Di Santo, Roberto; Costi, Roberta; Artico, Marino; Miele, Gaetano; Lavecchia, Antonio; Novellino, Ettore; Bergamini, Alberto; Cancio, Reynel; Maga, Giovanni

    2006-12-01

    Novel arylthio isopropyl pyridinylmethylpyrrolemethanol (AThP) derivatives 3-5, which are related to capravirine (S-1153), were synthesized and tested for their ability to block the replication cycle of HIV-1 in infected cells. The newly synthesized AThPs are active in the concentration range of 0.008-53 microM. Even if compounds 3-5 are generally less potent than S-1153, their SI values are in some cases similar to that of the reference drug. In fact, the cytotoxicities of AThPs are generally lower than that of S-1153. Compound 4e was the most active derivative of this series in cell-based assays; its potency is similar to that of S-1153 (EC(50)=8 and 3 nM, respectively), as is its selectivity index (SI=6250 and 7000, respectively). AThP derivatives were proven to target HIV-1 RT. In fact, compounds 3-5 generally inhibited the viral enzyme at concentrations similar to those observed in cell-based assays. A selected number of AThPs (4k and 5a,e) were tested against clinically relevant drug-resistant forms of recombinant reverse transcriptase (rRT) carrying the K103N and Y181I mutations. Carbamate 5e showed an approximate 240-fold decrease in activity against Y181I, but only a 10-fold loss in potency against the K103N rRT form. Docking calculations were also performed to investigate the binding mode of compounds 2, 4e, 4j, 4k and 5e into the non-nucleoside binding site of HIV-1 RT and to rationalize some structure-activity relationships and resistance data. PMID:17089433

  16. ADAR1 Facilitates HIV-1 Replication in Primary CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    van Hamme, John L.; Jansen, Machiel H.; van Dort, Karel A.; Vanderver, Adeline; Rice, Gillian I.; Crow, Yanick J.; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2015-01-01

    Unlike resting CD4+ T cells, activated CD4+T cells are highly susceptible to infection of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1). HIV-1 infects T cells and macrophages without activating the nucleic acid sensors and the anti-viral type I interferon response. Adenosine deaminase acting on RNA 1 (ADAR1) is an RNA editing enzyme that displays antiviral activity against several RNA viruses. Mutations in ADAR1 cause the autoimmune disorder Aicardi-Goutieères syndrome (AGS). This disease is characterized by an inappropriate activation of the interferon-stimulated gene response. Here we show that HIV-1 replication, in ADAR1-deficient CD4+T lymphocytes from AGS patients, is blocked at the level of protein translation. Furthermore, viral protein synthesis block is accompanied by an activation of interferon-stimulated genes. RNA silencing of ADAR1 in Jurkat cells also inhibited HIV-1 protein synthesis. Our data support that HIV-1 requires ADAR1 for efficient replication in human CD4+T cells. PMID:26629815

  17. Increased HIV-1 activity in anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions compared with unaffected anal mucosa in men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Pollakis, Georgios; Richel, Olivier; Vis, Joost D; Prins, Jan M; Paxton, William A; de Vries, Henry J C

    2014-06-01

    We studied 3 patients with focal intra-anal tissue high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs). All had increased human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA and DNA in lesions compared with that in healthy mucosa. HIV-1 RNA and HIV-1 episomal DNA were indicative of ongoing viral replication, more so in anal HSILs. PMID:24604897

  18. A Novel Aspartic Protease with HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitory Activity from Fresh Fruiting Bodies of the Wild Mushroom Xylaria hypoxylon

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qing-Xiu; Zhang, Guo-Qing; Zhang, Rui-Ying; Hu, Dan-Dan; Wang, He-Xiang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2012-01-01

    A novel aspartic protease with HIV-1 RT inhibitory activity was isolated and characterized from fruiting bodies of the wild mushroom Xylaria hypoxylon. The purification protocol comprised distilled water homogenization and extraction step, three ion exchange chromatographic steps (on DEAE-cellulose, Q-Sepharose, and CM-cellulose in succession), and final purification was by FPLC on Superdex 75. The protease was adsorbed on all the three ion exchangers. It was a monomeric protein with a molecular mass of 43 kDa as estimated by SDS-PAGE and FPLC. Its N-terminal amino acid sequence was HYTELLSQVV, which exhibited no sequence homology to other proteases reported. The activity of the protease was adversely affected by Pepstatin A, indicating that it is an aspartic protease. The protease activity was maximal or nearly so in the pH range 6–8 and in the temperature range 35–60°C. The purified enzyme exhibited HIV-1 RT inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 8.3 μM, but was devoid of antifungal, ribonuclease, and hemagglutinating activities. PMID:22675256

  19. The G-quadruplex-forming aptamer AS1411 potently inhibits HIV-1 attachment to the host cell

    PubMed Central

    Perrone, Rosalba; Butovskaya, Elena; Lago, Sara; Garzino-Demo, Alfredo; Pannecouque, Christophe; Palù, Giorgio; Richter, Sara N.

    2016-01-01

    AS1411 is a G-rich aptamer that forms a stable G-quadruplex structure and displays antineoplastic properties both in vitro and in vivo. This oligonucleotide has undergone phase 2 clinical trials. The major molecular target of AS1411 is nucleolin (NCL), a multifunctional nucleolar protein also present in the cell membrane where it selectively mediates the binding and uptake of AS1411. Cell-surface NCL has been recognised as a low-affinity co-receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) anchorage on target cells. Here we assessed the anti-HIV-1 properties and underlying mechanism of action of AS1411. The antiviral activity of AS1411 was determined towards different HIV-1 strains, host cells and at various times post-infection. Acutely, persistently and latently infected cells were tested, including HIV-1-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a healthy donor. Mechanistic studies to exclude modes of action other than virus binding via NCL were performed. AS1411 efficiently inhibited HIV-1 attachment/entry into the host cell. The aptamer displayed antiviral activity in the absence of cytotoxicity at the tested doses, therefore displaying a wide therapeutic window and favourable selectivity indexes. These findings, besides validating cell-surface-expressed NCL as an antiviral target, open the way for the possible use of AS1411 as a new potent and promisingly safe anti-HIV-1 agent. PMID:27032748

  20. The G-quadruplex-forming aptamer AS1411 potently inhibits HIV-1 attachment to the host cell.

    PubMed

    Perrone, Rosalba; Butovskaya, Elena; Lago, Sara; Garzino-Demo, Alfredo; Pannecouque, Christophe; Palù, Giorgio; Richter, Sara N

    2016-04-01

    AS1411 is a G-rich aptamer that forms a stable G-quadruplex structure and displays antineoplastic properties both in vitro and in vivo. This oligonucleotide has undergone phase 2 clinical trials. The major molecular target of AS1411 is nucleolin (NCL), a multifunctional nucleolar protein also present in the cell membrane where it selectively mediates the binding and uptake of AS1411. Cell-surface NCL has been recognised as a low-affinity co-receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) anchorage on target cells. Here we assessed the anti-HIV-1 properties and underlying mechanism of action of AS1411. The antiviral activity of AS1411 was determined towards different HIV-1 strains, host cells and at various times post-infection. Acutely, persistently and latently infected cells were tested, including HIV-1-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a healthy donor. Mechanistic studies to exclude modes of action other than virus binding via NCL were performed. AS1411 efficiently inhibited HIV-1 attachment/entry into the host cell. The aptamer displayed antiviral activity in the absence of cytotoxicity at the tested doses, therefore displaying a wide therapeutic window and favourable selectivity indexes. These findings, besides validating cell-surface-expressed NCL as an antiviral target, open the way for the possible use of AS1411 as a new potent and promisingly safe anti-HIV-1 agent. PMID:27032748

  1. Anti-diabetic Activity.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The hyperglycaemia continues to be a major health problem in India and other developing countries. This imbalance of blood glucose causes serious health problems such as damages to the blood vessel, poor healing of wounds, retinal damage, renal damage--kidney failure. The in vitro enzyme models and evaluation of hypoglycaemic effect of sample on normal and glucose-loaded rats has been used as a prediction experiment in this chapter before going for anti-diabetic experiment using animal models. PMID:26939280

  2. Differential in vitro inhibitory activity against HIV-1 of alpha-(1-3)- and alpha-(1-6)-D-mannose specific plant lectins : Implication for microbicide development

    PubMed Central

    Saïdi, Hela; Nasreddine, Nadine; Jenabian, Mohammad-Ali; Lecerf, Maxime; Schols, Dominique; Krief, Corinne; Balzarini, Jan; Bélec, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    Background Plant lectins such as Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) and Hippeastrum hybrid agglutinin (HHA) are natural proteins able to link mannose residues, and therefore inhibit HIV-target cell interactions. Plant lectins are candidate for microbicide development. Objective To evaluate the activity against HIV of the mannose-specific plant lectins HHA and GNA at the cellular membrane level of epithelial cells and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC), two potential target cells of HIV at the genital mucosal level. Methods The inhibitory effects of HHA and GNA were evaluated on HIV adsorption to genital epithelial HEC-1A cell line, on HIV transcytosis throughout a monolayer of polarized epithelial HEC-1A cells, on HIV adsorption to MDDC and on transfer of HIV from MDDC to autologous T lymphocytes. Results HHA faintly inhibited attachment to HEC-1A cells of the R5-tropic HIV-1Ba-L strain, in a dose-dependent manner, whereas GNA moderately inhibited HIV adsorption in the same context, but only at high drug doses. Only HHA, but not GNA, inhibited HIV-1JR-CSF transcytosis in a dose-dependent manner. By confocal microscopy, HHA, but not GNA, was adsorbed at the epithelial cell surface, suggesting that HHA interacts specifically with receptors mediating HIV-1 transcytosis. Both plant lectins partially inhibited HIV attachment to MDDC. HHA inhibited more efficiently the transfer of HIV from MDDC to T cell, than GNA. Both HHA and GNA lacked toxicity below 200 μg/ml irrespective the cellular system used and do not disturb the monolayer integrity of epithelial cells. Conclusion These observations demonstrate higher inhibitory activities of the lectin plant HHA by comparison to GNA, on HIV adsorption to HEC-1A cell line, HIV transcytosis through HEC-1A cell line monolayer, HIV adsorption to MDDC and HIV transfer from MDDC to T cells, highlighting the potential interest of HHA as effective microbicide against HIV. PMID:17565674

  3. Incarceration is associated with used syringe lending among active injection drug users with detectable plasma HIV-1 RNA: a longitudinal analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Informed by recent studies demonstrating the central role of plasma HIV-1 RNA viral load (VL) on HIV transmission, interventions to employ HIV antiretroviral treatment as prevention (TasP) are underway. To optimize these efforts, evidence is needed to identify factors associated with both non-suppressed VL and HIV risk behaviours. Thus, we sought to assess the possible role played by exposure to correctional facilities on VL non-suppression and used syringe lending among HIV-seropositive people who use injection drugs (PWID). Methods We used data from the ACCESS study, a community-recruited prospective cohort. We used longitudinal multivariate mixed-effects analyses to estimate the relationship between incarceration and plasma HIV-1 RNA > 500 copies/mL among antiretroviral therapy (ART)-exposed active PWID and, during periods of non-suppression, the relationship between incarceration and used syringe lending. Results Between May 1996 and March 2012, 657 ART-exposed PWID were recruited. Incarceration was independently associated with higher odds of VL non-suppression (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] = 1.54, 95% Confidence Interval [95% CI]: 1.10, 2.16). In a separate multivariate model restricted to periods of VL non-suppression, incarceration was independently associated with lending used syringes (AOR = 1.81, 95% CI: 1.03, 3.18). Conclusions The current findings demonstrate that incarceration is associated with used syringe lending among active PWID with detectable plasma HIV-1 RNA. Our results provide a possible pathway for the commonly observed association between incarceration and increased risk of HIV transmission. Our results suggest that alternatives to incarceration of non-violent PWID and evidence-based combination HIV prevention interventions for PWID within correctional facilities are urgently needed. PMID:24289651

  4. Exosomes: Implications in HIV-1 Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Madison, Marisa N.; Okeoma, Chioma M.

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are membranous nanovesicles of endocytic origin that carry host and pathogen derived genomic, proteomic, and lipid cargos. Exosomes are secreted by most cell types into the extracellular milieu and are subsequently internalized by recipient cells. Upon internalization, exosomes condition recipient cells by donating their cargos and/or activating various signal transduction pathways, consequently regulating physiological and pathophysiological processes. The role of exosomes in viral pathogenesis, especially human immunodeficiency virus type 1 [HIV-1] is beginning to unravel. Recent research reports suggest that exosomes from various sources play important but different roles in the pathogenesis of HIV-1. From these reports, it appears that the source of exosomes is the defining factor for the exosomal effect on HIV-1. In this review, we will describe how HIV-1 infection is modulated by exosomes and in turn how exosomes are targeted by HIV-1 factors. Finally, we will discuss potentially emerging therapeutic options based on exosomal cargos that may have promise in preventing HIV-1 transmission. PMID:26205405

  5. HIV-1 Fusion Assay

    PubMed Central

    Cavrois, Marielle; Neidleman, Jason; Greene, Warner C.

    2016-01-01

    The HIV-1 fusion assay measures all steps in the HIV-1 life cycle up to and including viral fusion. It relies on the incorporation of a β-lactamase Vpr (BlaM-Vpr) protein chimera into the virion and the subsequent transfer of this chimera into the target cell by fusion (Figure 1). The transfer is monitored by the enzymatic cleavage of CCF2, a fluorescent dye substrate of β-lactamase, loaded into the target cells. Cleavage of the β-lactam ring in CCF2 by β-lactamase changes the fluorescence emission spectrum of the dye from green (520 nm) to blue (447 nm). This change reflects virion fusion and can be detected by flow cytometry (Figure 2).

  6. Synthesis, cellular uptake and HIV-1 Tat-dependent trans-activation inhibition activity of oligonucleotide analogues disulphide-conjugated to cell-penetrating peptides

    PubMed Central

    Turner, John J.; Arzumanov, Andrey A.; Gait, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    Oligonucleotides composed of 2′-O-methyl and locked nucleic acid residues complementary to HIV-1 trans-activation responsive element TAR block Tat-dependent trans-activation in a HeLa cell assay when delivered by cationic lipids. We describe an improved procedure for synthesis and purification under highly denaturing conditions of 5′-disulphide-linked conjugates of 3′-fluorescein labelled oligonucleotides with a range of cell-penetrating peptides and investigate their abilities to enter HeLa cells and block trans-activation. Free uptake of 12mer OMe/LNA oligonucleotide conjugates to Tat (48–58), Penetratin and R9F2 was observed in cytosolic compartments of HeLa cells. Uptake of the Tat conjugate was enhanced by N-terminal addition of four Lys or Arg residues or a second Tat peptide. None of the conjugates entered the nucleus or inhibited trans-activation when freely delivered, but inhibition was obtained in the presence of cationic lipids. Nuclear exclusion was seen for free delivery of Tat (48–58), Penetratin and R9 conjugates of 16mer phosphorothioate OMe oligonucleotide. Uptake into human fibroblast cytosolic compartments was seen for Tat, Penetratin, R9F2 and Transportan conjugates. Large enhancements of HeLa cell uptake into cytosolic compartments were seen when free Tat peptide was added to Tat conjugate of 12mer OMe/LNA oligonucleotide or Penetratin peptide to Penetratin conjugate of the same oligonucleotide. PMID:15640444

  7. Anti-inflammatory Activity.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is the body's first response to infection or injury and is critical for both innate and adaptive immunity. It can be considered as part of the complex biological response of vascular tissues to harmful stimuli such as pathogens, damaged cells, or irritants. The search for natural compounds and phytoconstituents that are able to interfere with these mechanisms by preventing a prolonged inflammation could be useful for human health. Here, the anti-inflammatory properties of plant-based drugs are put together with both in vitro and acute (carrageenan, egg albumin and croton oil) and chronic (cotton pellet) in vivo models. PMID:26939273

  8. Arylthiopyrrole (AThP) derivatives as non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors: synthesis, structure-activity relationships, and docking studies (part 2).

    PubMed

    Lavecchia, Antonio; Costi, Roberta; Artico, Marino; Miele, Gaetano; Novellino, Ettore; Bergamini, Alberto; Crespan, Emmanuele; Maga, Giovanni; Di Santo, Roberto

    2006-12-01

    Arylthio isopropyl pyridinylmethylpyrrolemethanols (AThPs) have been recently reported as a new class of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors acting at the non-nucleoside binding site (NNBS) of this enzyme. Docking experiments of the potent inhibitors 4k (IC(50) = 0.24 microM, SI = 167) and 5e (IC(50) = 0.11 microM, SI > 1667) of wild-type RT prompted the synthesis and biological evaluation of novel AThP derivatives featuring a number of polar groups in position 3 of the pyrrole ring and larger and more hydrophobic alicyclic substituents in place of the isopropyl group at position 4. Among the compounds synthesized and tested in cell-based assays against HIV-1 infected cells, 19b was the most active, with EC(50) = 0.007 microM, CC(50) = 114.5 microm, and SI = 16357. This compound and its precursor 18b retained interesting activities against clinically relevant drug-resistant RT forms carrying K103N, Y181I, and L100I mutations. Docking calculations of 10, 14, 18b, and 19b were also performed to investigate their binding mode into the RT NNBS and to rationalize both structure-activity relationship and resistance data. PMID:17089434

  9. GPI-anchored single chain Fv - an effective way to capture transiently-exposed neutralization epitopes on HIV-1 envelope spike

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Identification of broad neutralization epitopes in HIV-1 envelope spikes is paramount for HIV-1 vaccine development. A few broad neutralization epitopes identified so far are present on the surface of native HIV-1 envelope spikes whose recognition by antibodies does not depend on conformational changes of the envelope spikes. However, HIV-1 envelope spikes also contain transiently-exposed neutralization epitopes, which are more difficult to identify. Results In this study, we constructed single chain Fvs (scFvs) derived from seven human monoclonal antibodies and genetically linked them with or without a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) attachment signal. We show that with a GPI attachment signal the scFvs are targeted to lipid rafts of plasma membranes. In addition, we demonstrate that four of the GPI-anchored scFvs, but not their secreted counterparts, neutralize HIV-1 with various degrees of breadth and potency. Among them, GPI-anchored scFv (X5) exhibits extremely potent and broad neutralization activity against multiple clades of HIV-1 strains tested. Moreover, we show that GPI-anchored scFv (4E10) also exhibited more potent neutralization activity than its secretory counterpart. Finally, we demonstrate that expression of GPI-anchored scFv (X5) in the lipid raft of plasma membrane of human CD4+ T cells confers long-term resistance to HIV-1 infection, HIV-1 envelope-mediated cell-cell fusion, and the infection of HIV-1 captured and transferred by human DCs. Conclusions Thus GPI-anchored scFv could be used as a general and effective way to identify antibodies that react with transiently-exposed neutralization epitopes in envelope proteins of HIV-1 and other enveloped viruses. The GPI-anchored scFv (X5), because of its breadth and potency, should have a great potential to be developed into anti-viral agent for HIV-1 prevention and therapy. PMID:20923574

  10. Productive Replication and Evolution of HIV-1 in Ferret Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fadel, Hind J.; Saenz, Dyana T.; Guevara, Rebekah; von Messling, Veronika; Peretz, Mary

    2012-01-01

    A rodent or other small animal model for HIV-1 has not been forthcoming, with the principal obstacles being species-specific restriction mechanisms and deficits in HIV-1 dependency factors. Some Carnivorans may harbor comparatively fewer impediments. For example, in contrast to mice, the domestic cat genome encodes essential nonreceptor HIV-1 dependency factors. All Feliformia species and at least one Caniformia species also lack a major lentiviral restriction mechanism (TRIM5α/TRIMCyp proteins). Here we investigated cells from two species in another carnivore family, the Mustelidae, for permissiveness to the HIV-1 life cycle. Mustela putorius furo (domesticated ferret) primary cells and cell lines did not restrict HIV-1, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), or N-tropic murine leukemia virus (MLV) postentry and supported late HIV-1 life cycle steps comparably to human cells. The ferret TRIM5α gene exon 8, which encodes the B30.2 domain, was found to be pseudogenized. Strikingly, ferret (but not mink) cells engineered to express human HIV-1 entry receptors supported productive spreading replication, amplification, and serial passage of wild-type HIV-1. Nevertheless, produced virions had relatively reduced infectivity and the virus accrued G→A hypermutations, consistent with APOBEC3 protein pressure. Ferret cell-passaged HIV-1 also evolved amino acid changes in the capsid cyclophilin A binding loop. We conclude that the genome of this carnivore can provide essential nonreceptor HIV-1 dependency factors and that ferret APOBEC3 proteins with activity against HIV-1 are likely. Even so, unlike in cat cells, HIV-1 can replicate in ferret cells without vif substitution. The virus evolves in this novel nonprimate cell adaptive landscape. We suggest that further characterization of HIV-1 adaptation in ferret cells and delineation of Mustelidae restriction factor repertoires are warranted, with a view to the potential for an HIV-1

  11. Synthesis and SAR of novel CXCR4 antagonists that are potent inhibitors of T tropic (X4) HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Skerlj, Renato; Bridger, Gary; McEachern, Ernie; Harwig, Curtis; Smith, Chris; Wilson, Trevor; Veale, Duane; Yee, Helen; Crawford, Jason; Skupinska, Krystyna; Wauthy, Rossana; Yang, Wen; Zhu, Yongbao; Bogucki, David; Di Fluri, Maria; Langille, Jonathon; Huskens, Dana; De Clercq, Erik; Schols, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    An early lead from the AMD070 program was optimized and a structure-activity relationship was developed for a novel series of heterocyclic containing compounds. Potent CXCR4 antagonists were identified based on anti-HIV-1 activity and Ca(2+) flux inhibition that displayed good pharmacokinetics in rat and dog. PMID:21109432

  12. Approaches for identification of HIV-1 entry inhibitors targeting gp41 pocket.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fei; Lu, Lu; Du, Lanying; Zhu, Xiaojie; Debnath, Asim K; Jiang, Shibo

    2013-01-01

    The hydrophobic pocket in the HIV-1 gp41 N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) domain plays an important role in viral fusion and entry into the host cell, and serves as an attractive target for development of HIV-1 fusion/entry inhibitors. The peptide anti-HIV drug targeting gp41 NHR, T-20 (generic name: enfuvirtide; brand name: Fuzeon), was approved by the U.S. FDA in 2003 as the first HIV fusion/entry inhibitor for treatment of HIV/AIDS patients who fail to respond to the current antiretroviral drugs. However, because T20 lacks the pocket-binding domain (PBD), it exhibits low anti-HIV-1 activity and short half-life. Therefore, several next-generation HIV fusion inhibitory peptides with PBD have been developed. They possess longer half-life and more potent antiviral activity against a broad spectrum of HIV-1 strains, including the T-20-resistant variants. Nonetheless, the clinical application of these peptides is still limited by the lack of oral availability and the high cost of production. Thus, development of small molecule compounds targeting the gp41 pocket with oral availability has been promoted. This review describes the main approaches for identification of HIV fusion/entry inhibitors targeting the gp41 pocket and summarizes the latest progress in developing these inhibitors as a new class of anti-HIV drugs. PMID:23344560

  13. Linker-Extended Native Cyanovirin-N Facilitates PEGylation and Potently Inhibits HIV-1 by Targeting the Glycan Ligand

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Bo; Wu, Chongchao; Peng, Zhou; Fan, Jun; Hou, Zhibo; Fang, Yongsheng; Wang, Yifei; Kitazato, Kaio; Yu, Guoying; Zou, Chunbin; Qian, Chuiwen; Xiong, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Cyanovirin-N (CVN) potently inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, but both cytotoxicity and immunogenicity have hindered the translation of this protein into a viable therapeutic. A molecular docking analysis suggested that up to 12 residues were involved in the interaction of the reverse parallel CVN dimer with the oligosaccharide targets, among which Leu-1 was the most prominent hot spot residue. This finding provided a possible explanation for the lack of anti-HIV-1 activity observed with N-terminal PEGylated CVN. Therefore, linker-CVN (LCVN) was designed as a CVN derivative with a flexible and hydrophilic linker (Gly4Ser)3 at the N-terminus. The N-terminal α-amine of LCVN was PEGylated to create 10 K PEG-aldehyde (ALD)-LCVN. LCVN and 10 K PEG-ALD-LCVN retained the specificity and affinity of CVN for high mannose N-glycans. Moreover, LCVN exhibited significant anti-HIV-1 activity with attenuated cytotoxicity in the HaCaT keratinocyte cell line and MT-4 T lymphocyte cell lines. 10 K PEG-ALD-LCVN also efficiently inactivated HIV-1 with remarkably decreased cytotoxicity and pronounced cell-to-cell fusion inhibitory activity in vitro. The linker-extended CVN and the mono-PEGylated derivative were determined to be promising candidates for the development of an anti-HIV-1 agent. This derivatization approach provided a model for the PEGylation of biologic candidates without introducing point mutations. PMID:24475123

  14. Short chain fatty acids potently induce latent HIV-1 in T-cells by activating P-TEFb and multiple histone modifications.

    PubMed

    Das, Biswajit; Dobrowolski, Curtis; Shahir, Abdel-Malek; Feng, Zhimin; Yu, Xiaolan; Sha, Jinfeng; Bissada, Nabil F; Weinberg, Aaron; Karn, Jonathan; Ye, Fengchun

    2015-01-01

    HIV patients with severe periodontitis have high levels of residual virus in their saliva and plasma despite effective therapy (HAART). Multiple short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) from periodontal pathogens reactivate HIV-1 in both Jurkat and primary T-cell models of latency. SCFAs not only activate positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), which is an essential cellular cofactor for Tat, but can also reverse chromatin blocks by inducing histone modifications. SCFAs simultaneously increase histone acetylation by inhibiting class-1/2 histone deacetylases (HDACs) and decrease repressive histone tri-methylation at the proviral LTR by downregulating expression of the class-3 HDAC sirtuin-1 (SIRT1), and the histone methyltransferases enhancer of Zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) and suppressor of variegation 3-9 homolog 1 (SUV39H1). Our findings provide a mechanistic link between periodontal disease and enhanced HIV-1 replication, and suggest that treatment of periodontal disease, or blocking the activities of SCFAs, will have a therapeutic benefit for HIV patients. PMID:25463605

  15. Short Chain Fatty Acids Potently Induce Latent HIV-1 in T-cells by Activating P-TEFb and Multiple Histone Modifications