Science.gov

Sample records for anti-malarial drug sensitivity

  1. In vitro studies on the sensitivity pattern of Plasmodium falciparum to anti-malarial drugs and local herbal extracts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The resistance of human malaria parasites to anti-malarial compounds has become considerable concern, particularly in view of the shortage of novel classes of anti-malarial drugs. One way to prevent resistance is by using new compounds that are not based on existing synthetic antimicrobial agents. Results Sensitivity of 100 Plasmodium falciparum isolates to chloroquine, quinine, amodiaquine, mefloquine, sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine, artemisinin, Momordica charantia (‘Ejirin’) Diospyros monbuttensis (‘Egun eja’) and Morinda lucida (‘Oruwo’) was determined using the in vitro microtest (Mark III) technique to determine the IC50 of the drugs. All the isolates tested were sensitive to quinine, mefloquine and artesunate. Fifty-one percent of the isolates were resistant to chloroquine, 13% to amodiaquine and 5% to sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine. Highest resistance to chloroquine (68.9%) was recorded among isolates from Yewa zone while highest resistance to amodiaquine (30%) was observed in Ijebu zone. Highest resistance to sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine was recorded in Yewa and Egba zones, respectively. A positive correlation was observed between the responses to artemisinin and mefloquine (P<0.05), artemisinin and quinine (P<0.05) and quinine and mefloquine (P<0.05). A negative correlation was observed between the responses to chloroquine and mefloquine (P>0.05). Highest anti-plasmodial activity was obtained with the ethanolic extract of D. monbuttensis (IC50 = 3.2nM) while the lowest was obtained from M. lucida (IC50 =25nM). Conclusions Natural products isolated from plants used in traditional medicine, which have potent anti-plasmodial action in vitro, represent potential sources of new anti-malarial drugs. PMID:24555525

  2. Anti-malarial Drug Design by Targeting Apicoplasts: New Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Avinaba; Sadhukhan, Gobinda Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Malaria has been a major global health problem in recent times with increasing mortality. Current treatment methods include parasiticidal drugs and vaccinations. However, resistance among malarial parasites to the existing drugs has emerged as a significant area of concern in anti-malarial drug design. Researchers are now desperately looking for new targets to develop anti-malarials drug which is more target specific. Malarial parasites harbor a plastid-like organelle known as the ‘apicoplast’, which is thought to provide an exciting new outlook for the development of drugs to be used against the parasite. This review elaborates on the current state of development of novel compounds targeted againstemerging malaria parasites. Methods: The apicoplast, originates by an endosymbiotic process, contains a range of metabolic pathways and housekeeping processes that differ from the host body and thereby presents ideal strategies for anti-malarial drug therapy. Drugs are designed by targeting the unique mechanism of the apicoplasts genetic machinery. Several anabolic and catabolic processes, like fatty acid, isopenetyl diphosphate and heme synthess in this organelle, have also been targeted by drugs. Results: Apicoplasts offer exciting opportunities for the development of malarial treatment specific drugs have been found to act by disrupting this organelle’s function, which wouldimpede the survival of the parasite. Conclusion: Recent advanced drugs, their modes of action, and their advantages in the treatment of malaria by using apicoplasts as a target are discussed in this review which thought to be very useful in desigining anti-malarial drugs. Targetting the genetic machinery of apicoplast shows a great advantange regarding anti-malarial drug design. Critical knowledge of these new drugs would give a healthier understanding for deciphering the mechanism of action of anti-malarial drugs when targeting apicoplasts to overcome drug resistance. PMID

  3. Artemisinin anti-malarial drugs in China

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zongru

    2016-01-01

    Discovered by Youyou Tu, one of the 2015 Nobel Prize winners in Physiology or Medicine, together with many other Chinese scientists, artemisinin, artemether and artesunate, as well as other artemisinins, have brought the global anti-malarial treatment to a new era, saving millions of lives all around the world for the past 40 years. The discoveries of artemisinins were carried out beginning from the 1970s, a special period in China, by hundreds of scientists all together under the “whole nation” system. This article focusing on medicinal chemistry research, briefly introduced the discovery and invention course of the scientists according to the published papers, and highlighted their academic contribution and achievements. PMID:27006895

  4. Artemisinin anti-malarial drugs in China.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zongru

    2016-03-01

    Discovered by Youyou Tu, one of the 2015 Nobel Prize winners in Physiology or Medicine, together with many other Chinese scientists, artemisinin, artemether and artesunate, as well as other artemisinins, have brought the global anti-malarial treatment to a new era, saving millions of lives all around the world for the past 40 years. The discoveries of artemisinins were carried out beginning from the 1970s, a special period in China, by hundreds of scientists all together under the "whole nation" system. This article focusing on medicinal chemistry research, briefly introduced the discovery and invention course of the scientists according to the published papers, and highlighted their academic contribution and achievements. PMID:27006895

  5. Ex vivo anti-malarial drugs sensitivity profile of Plasmodium falciparum field isolates from Burkina Faso five years after the national policy change

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The recent reports on the decreasing susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum to artemisinin derivatives along the Thailand and Myanmar border are worrying. Indeed it may spread to India and then Africa, repeating the same pattern observed for chloroquine resistance. Therefore, it is essential to start monitoring P. falciparum sensitivity to artemisinin derivatives and its partner drugs in Africa. Efficacy of AL and ASAQ were tested by carrying out an in vivo drug efficacy test, with an ex vivo study against six anti-malarial drugs nested into it. Results of the latter are reported here. Methods Plasmodium falciparum ex-vivo susceptibility to chloroquine (CQ), quinine (Q), lumefantrine (Lum), monodesethylamodiaquine (MDA), piperaquine (PPQ) and dihydroartemisinin (DHA) was investigated in children (6 months – 15 years) with a parasitaemia of at least ≥4,000/μl. The modified isotopic microtest technique was used. The results of cellular proliferation were analysed using ICEstimator software to determine the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values. Results DHA was the most potent among the 6 drugs tested, with IC50 values ranging from 0.8 nM to 0.9 nM (Geometric mean IC50 = 0.8 nM; 95% CI [0.8 - 0.9]). High IC50 values ranged between 0.8 nM to 166.1 nM were reported for lumefantrine (Geometric mean IC50 = 25.1 nM; 95% CI [22.4 - 28.2]). MDA and Q IC50s were significantly higher in CQ-resistant than in CQ-sensitive isolates (P = 0.0001). However, the opposite occurred for Lum and DHA (P < 0.001). No difference was observed for PPQ. Conclusion Artemisinin derivatives are still very efficacious in Burkina Faso and DHA-PPQ seems a valuable alternative ACT. The high lumefantrine IC50 found in this study is worrying as it may indicate a decreasing efficacy of one of the first-line treatments. This should be further investigated and monitored over time with large in vivo and ex vivo studies that will include also plasma drug measurements

  6. Stated preferences for anti-malarial drug characteristics in Zomba, a malaria endemic area of Malawi

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    elasticity (simulated median, inter-quartile range) was highest (most responsive) to speed of symptom resolution (0.88, 0.80-0.89) and pruritus risk (0.25, 0.08-0.62). Conclusions Most adult antimalarial users are willing to use treatments without recommendation from health professional, and may be influenced by price. Future studies should investigate the magnitude of differences in price and treatment attribute sensitivity between adult anti-malarial drug users in rural, peri-urban and urban areas in order to determine optimal price subsidies. PMID:25005466

  7. Inclusion of gametocyte parameters in anti-malarial drug efficacy studies: filling a neglected gap needed for malaria elimination.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Ghani, Rashad; Basco, Leonardo K; Beier, John C; Mahdy, Mohammed A K

    2015-01-01

    Standard anti-malarial drug efficacy and drug resistance assessments neglect the gametocyte parameters in their protocols. With the spread of drug resistance and the absence of clinically proven vaccines, the use of gametocytocidal drugs or drug combinations with transmission-blocking activity is a high priority for malaria control and elimination. However, the limited repertoire of gametocytocidal drugs and induction of gametocytogenesis after treatment with certain anti-malarial drugs necessitate both regular monitoring of gametocytocidal activities of anti-malarial drugs in clinical use and the effectiveness of candidate gametocytocidal agents. Therefore, updating current protocols of anti-malarial drug efficacy is needed to reflect the effects of anti-malarial drugs or drug combinations on gametocyte carriage and gametocyte density along with asexual parasite density. Developing protocols of anti-malarial drug efficacy that include gametocyte parameters related to both microscopic and submicroscopic gametocytaemias is important if drugs or drug combinations are to be strategically used in transmission-blocking interventions in the context of malaria elimination. The present piece of opinion highlights the challenges in gametocyte detection and follow-up and discuss the need for including the gametocyte parameter in anti-malarial efficacy studies. PMID:26481312

  8. Evaluation of bioluminescence-based assays of anti-malarial drug activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Transgenic Plasmodium falciparum expressing luciferase offers an attractive bioluminescence-based assay platform for the investigation of the pharmacological properties of anti-malarial drugs. Here a side-by-side comparison of bioluminescence and fluorescence-based assays, utilizing a luciferase reporter cassette that confers a strong temporal pattern of luciferase expression during the S-phase of intraerythrocytic development, is reported. Methods Key assay parameters for a range of commercially available luminogenic substrates are determined and compared to those measured using a Malaria Sybr Green I fluorescence assay. In addition, the short-term temporal effects of anti-malarial compounds are evaluated using both bioluminescent and fluorescent assay platforms. Results The Z’, % coefficient of variation and 50% inhibition concentrations are essentially the same for bioluminescent and fluorescent assays in transgenic parasites generated in both chloroquine-sensitive and -resistant genetic backgrounds. Bioluminescent assays, irrespective of the luminogenic agent employed, do, however, offer significantly enhanced signal-to-noise ratios. Moreover, the bioluminescent assay is more dynamic in terms of determining temporal effects immediately following drug perturbation. Conclusion This study suggests that opportunities for bioluminescence-based assays lie not in the measurement of 50% inhibition concentrations, where the cheaper fluorescence assay performs excellently and is not restricted by the need to genetically modify the parasite clone under investigation. Instead, assays that use the dynamic response of the luciferase reporter for semi-automated screening of additional pharmacological properties, such as relative rate-of-kill and lethal dose estimation, are a more attractive development opportunity. PMID:23394077

  9. CRIMALDDI: a prioritized research agenda to expedite the discovery of new anti-malarial drugs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The CRIMALDDI Consortium has been a three-year project funded by the EU Framework Seven Programme. It aimed to develop a prioritized set of recommendations to speed up anti-malarial drug discovery research and contribute to the setting of the global research agenda. It has attempted to align thinking on the high priority issues and then to develop action plans and strategies to address these issues. Through a series of facilitated and interactive workshops, it has concluded that these priorities can be grouped under five key themes: attacking artemisinin resistance; creating and sharing community resources; delivering enabling technologies; exploiting high throughput screening hits quickly; and, identifying novel targets. Recommendations have been prioritized into one of four levels: quick wins; removing key roadblocks to future progress; speeding-up drug discovery; and, nice to have (but not essential). Use of this prioritization allows efforts and resources to be focused on the lines of work that will contribute most to expediting anti-malarial drug discovery. Estimates of the time and finances required to implement the recommendations have also been made, along with indications of when recommendations within each theme will make an impact. All of this has been collected into an indicative roadmap that, it is hoped, will guide decisions about the direction and focus of European anti-malarial drug discovery research and contribute to the setting of the global research agenda. PMID:24191947

  10. Assessing the utility of an anti-malarial pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model for aiding drug clinical development

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mechanistic within-host models relating blood anti-malarial drug concentrations with the parasite-time profile help in assessing dosing schedules and partner drugs for new anti-malarial treatments. A comprehensive simulation study to assess the utility of a stage-specific pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) model for predicting within-host parasite response was performed. Methods Three anti-malarial combination therapies were selected: artesunate-mefloquine, dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine, and artemether-lumefantrine. The PK-PD model included parameters to represent the concentration-time profiles of both drugs, the initial parasite burden and distribution across the parasite life cycle, and the parasite multiplication factor due to asexual reproduction. The model also included the maximal killing rate of each drug, and the blood drug concentration associated with half of that killing effect (in vivo EC50), derived from the in vitro IC50, the extent of binding to 0.5% Albumax present in the in vitro testing media, and the drugs plasma protein binding and whole blood to plasma partitioning ratio. All stochastic simulations were performed using a Latin-Hypercube-Sampling approach. Results The simulations demonstrated that the proportion of patients cured was highly sensitive to the in vivo EC50 and the maximal killing rate of the partner drug co-administered with the artemisinin derivative. The in vivo EC50 values that corresponded to on average 95% of patients cured were much higher than the adjusted values derived from the in vitro IC50. The proportion clinically cured was not strongly influenced by changes in the parameters defining the age distribution of the initial parasite burden (mean age of 4 to 16 hours) and the parasite multiplication factor every life cycle (ranging from 8 to 12 fold/cycle). The median parasite clearance times, however, lengthened as the standard deviation of the initial parasite burden increased (i.e. the infection became

  11. Factors determining anti-malarial drug use in a peri-urban population from malaria holoendemic region of western kenya

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Interventions to reverse trends in malaria-related morbidity and mortality in Kenya focus on preventive strategies and drug efficacy. However, the pattern of use of anti-malarials in malaria-endemic populations, such as in western Kenya, is still poorly understood. It is critical to understand the patterns of anti-malarial drug use to ascertain that the currently applied new combination therapy to malaria treatment, will achieve sustained cure rates and protection against parasite resistance. Therefore, this cross-sectional study was designed to determine the patterns of use of anti-malarial drugs in households (n = 397) in peri-urban location of Manyatta-B sub-location in Kisumu in western Kenya. Methods Household factors, associated with the pattern of anti-malarials use, were evaluated. Using clusters, questionnaire was administered to a particular household member who had the most recent malaria episode (within <2 weeks) and used an anti-malarial for cure. Mothers/caretakers provided information for children aged <13 years. Results Stratification of the type of anti-malarial drugs taken revealed that 37.0% used sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP), 32.0% artemisinin-based combined therapy (ACT), 11.1% anti-pyretics, 7.3% chloroquine (CQ), 7.1% quinine, 2.5% amodiaquine (AQ), while 3.0% used others which were perceived as anti-malarials (cough syrups and antibiotics). In a regression model, it was demonstrated that age (P = 0.050), household size (P = 0.047), household head (P = 0.049), household source of income (P = 0.015), monthly income (P = 0.020), duration of use (P = 0.029), dosage of drugs taken (P = 0.036), and source of drugs (P = 0.005) significantly influenced anti-malarial drug use. Overall, 38.8% of respondents used drugs as recommended by the Ministry of Health. Conclusion This study demonstrates that consumers require access to correct and comprehensible information associated with use of drugs, including self-prescription. There is

  12. Current issues for anti-malarial drugs to control P. falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, D; Abdulla, S; Roper, C

    2006-03-01

    Successful malaria control depends heavily on efficacious anti-malarial drugs for the treatment of malaria. Artesunate-containing Combination Treatments (ACT) are increasingly recommended as first line malaria treatment in endemic countries, but implementation of this recommendation is limited by the small number of available and affordable co-formulated anti-malarial drugs. In recent years Intermittent Preventive Treatment has been recommended for malaria control in pregnancy and has been shown to be of potential public health importance in the prevention of malaria and anaemia in children. The use of drugs for malaria treatment or prevention is associated with the development of resistance and recent advances in molecular biology facilitate the evaluation of the impact on drug resistance of new drug-based strategies. This review concentrates on the challenges surrounding the use of ACT, the current understanding of IPT in infants and the use of molecular approaches to enhance our understanding of the effects of interventions on the spread of drug resistance. PMID:16515515

  13. Molecular Farming in Artemisia annua, a Promising Approach to Improve Anti-malarial Drug Production

    PubMed Central

    Pulice, Giuseppe; Pelaz, Soraya; Matías-Hernández, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a parasite infection affecting millions of people worldwide. Even though progress has been made in prevention and treatment of the disease; an estimated 214 million cases of malaria occurred in 2015, resulting in 438,000 estimated deaths; most of them occurring in Africa among children under the age of five. This article aims to review the epidemiology, future risk factors and current treatments of malaria, with particular focus on the promising potential of molecular farming that uses metabolic engineering in plants as an effective anti-malarial solution. Malaria represents an example of how a health problem may, on one hand, influence the proper development of a country, due to its burden of the disease. On the other hand, it constitutes an opportunity for lucrative business of diverse stakeholders. In contrast, plant biofarming is proposed here as a sustainable, promising, alternative for the production, not only of natural herbal repellents for malaria prevention but also for the production of sustainable anti-malarial drugs, like artemisinin (AN), used for primary parasite infection treatments. AN, a sesquiterpene lactone, is a natural anti-malarial compound that can be found in Artemisia annua. However, the low concentration of AN in the plant makes this molecule relatively expensive and difficult to produce in order to meet the current worldwide demand of Artemisinin Combination Therapies (ACTs), especially for economically disadvantaged people in developing countries. The biosynthetic pathway of AN, a process that takes place only in glandular secretory trichomes of A. annua, is relatively well elucidated. Significant efforts have been made using plant genetic engineering to increase production of this compound. These include diverse genetic manipulation approaches, such as studies on diverse transcription factors which have been shown to regulate the AN genetic pathway and other biological processes. Results look promising; however, further

  14. CRIMALDDI: a co-ordinated, rational, and integrated effort to set logical priorities in anti-malarial drug discovery initiatives

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Despite increasing efforts and support for anti-malarial drug R&D, globally anti-malarial drug discovery and development remains largely uncoordinated and fragmented. The current window of opportunity for large scale funding of R&D into malaria is likely to narrow in the coming decade due to a contraction in available resources caused by the current economic difficulties and new priorities (e.g. climate change). It is, therefore, essential that stakeholders are given well-articulated action plans and priorities to guide judgments on where resources can be best targeted. The CRIMALDDI Consortium (a European Union funded initiative) has been set up to develop, through a process of stakeholder and expert consultations, such priorities and recommendations to address them. It is hoped that the recommendations will help to guide the priorities of the European anti-malarial research as well as the wider global discovery agenda in the coming decade. PMID:20626844

  15. Psychiatric effects of malaria and anti-malarial drugs: historical and modern perspectives.

    PubMed

    Nevin, Remington L; Croft, Ashley M

    2016-01-01

    The modern medical literature implicates malaria, and particularly the potentially fatal form of cerebral malaria, with a risk of neurocognitive impairment. Yet historically, even milder forms of malaria were associated in the literature with a broad range of psychiatric effects, including disorders of personality, mood, memory, attention, thought, and behaviour. In this article, the history of psychiatric effects attributed to malaria and post-malaria syndromes is reviewed, and insights from the historical practice of malariotherapy in contributing to understanding of these effects are considered. This review concludes with a discussion of the potentially confounding role of the adverse effects of anti-malarial drugs, particularly of the quinoline class, in the unique attribution of certain psychiatric effects to malaria, and of the need for a critical reevaluation of the literature in light of emerging evidence of the chronic nature of these adverse drug effects. PMID:27335053

  16. A SYBR Green 1-based in vitro test of susceptibility of Ghanaian Plasmodium falciparum clinical isolates to a panel of anti-malarial drugs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Based on report of declining efficacy of chloroquine, Ghana shifted to the use of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) in 2005 as the first-line anti-malarial drug. Since then, there has not been any major evaluation of the efficacy of anti-malarial drugs in Ghana in vitro. The sensitivity of Ghanaian Plasmodium falciparum isolates to anti-malarial drugs was, therefore, assessed and the data compared with that obtained prior to the change in the malaria treatment policy. Methods A SYBR Green 1 fluorescent-based in vitro drug sensitivity assay was used to assess the susceptibility of clinical isolates of P. falciparum to a panel of 12 anti-malarial drugs in three distinct eco-epidemiological zones in Ghana. The isolates were obtained from children visiting health facilities in sentinel sites located in Hohoe, Navrongo and Cape Coast municipalities. The concentration of anti-malarial drug inhibiting parasite growth by 50% (IC50) for each drug was estimated using the online program, ICEstimator. Results Pooled results from all the sentinel sites indicated geometric mean IC50 values of 1.60, 3.80, 4.00, 4.56, 5.20, 6.11, 10.12, 28.32, 31.56, 93.60, 107.20, and 8952.50 nM for atovaquone, artesunate, dihydroartemisin, artemether, lumefantrine, amodiaquine, mefloquine, piperaquine, chloroquine, tafenoquine, quinine, and doxycycline, respectively. With reference to the literature threshold value indicative of resistance, the parasites showed resistance to all the test drugs except the artemisinin derivatives, atovaquone and to a lesser extent, lumefantrine. There was nearly a two-fold decrease in the IC50 value determined for chloroquine in this study compared to that determined in 2004 (57.56 nM). This observation is important, since it suggests a significant improvement in the efficacy of chloroquine, probably as a direct consequence of reduced drug pressure after cessation of its use. Compared to that measured prior to the change in treatment policy

  17. Policy options for deploying anti-malarial drugs in endemic countries: a population genetics approach

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Anti-malarial drugs are constantly exposed to the threat of evolving drug resistance so good stewardship of existing therapy is an essential component of public health policy. However, the widespread availability of numerous different drugs through informal providers could undermine official drug deployment policies. A policy of multiple first-line therapy (MFT) is compared with the conventional policy of sequential drug deployment, i.e., where one drug is used until resistance evolves and then replaced by the next drug in the sequence. Methods Population genetic models of drug resistance are used to make the comparison; this methodology explicitly tracks the genetics of drug resistance (including, importantly, recombination in the sexual stage, intrahost dynamics, and direction of linkage disequilibrium). Results A policy of MFT outlasts sequential application providing drug usages are low to moderate, and appears not to drive widespread multi-drug resistance. Inadequate dosing is an even more potent driver of drug resistance than the MFT/sequential policy decision. Conclusions The provision of MFT as a deliberate policy can be encouraged provided overall treatment rates are low or moderate (less than around half of malaria infections are treated) and the ad hoc provision of MFT through the private sector may be tolerated. This must be fully supported by education to ensure people take adequate doses of each of the drugs. PMID:23244624

  18. Quinine, an old anti-malarial drug in a modern world: role in the treatment of malaria

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Quinine remains an important anti-malarial drug almost 400 years after its effectiveness was first documented. However, its continued use is challenged by its poor tolerability, poor compliance with complex dosing regimens, and the availability of more efficacious anti-malarial drugs. This article reviews the historical role of quinine, considers its current usage and provides insight into its appropriate future use in the treatment of malaria. In light of recent research findings intravenous artesunate should be the first-line drug for severe malaria, with quinine as an alternative. The role of rectal quinine as pre-referral treatment for severe malaria has not been fully explored, but it remains a promising intervention. In pregnancy, quinine continues to play a critical role in the management of malaria, especially in the first trimester, and it will remain a mainstay of treatment until safer alternatives become available. For uncomplicated malaria, artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) offers a better option than quinine though the difficulty of maintaining a steady supply of ACT in resource-limited settings renders the rapid withdrawal of quinine for uncomplicated malaria cases risky. The best approach would be to identify solutions to ACT stock-outs, maintain quinine in case of ACT stock-outs, and evaluate strategies for improving quinine treatment outcomes by combining it with antibiotics. In HIV and TB infected populations, concerns about potential interactions between quinine and antiretroviral and anti-tuberculosis drugs exist, and these will need further research and pharmacovigilance. PMID:21609473

  19. Quality of anti-malarial drugs provided by public and private healthcare providers in south-east Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Onwujekwe, Obinna; Kaur, Harparkash; Dike, Nkem; Shu, Elvis; Uzochukwu, Benjamin; Hanson, Kara; Okoye, Viola; Okonkwo, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Background There is little existing knowledge about actual quality of drugs provided by different providers in Nigeria and in many sub-Saharan African countries. Such information is important for improving malaria treatment that will help in the development and implementation of actions designed to improve the quality of treatment. The objective of the study was to determine the quality of drugs used for the treatment of malaria in a broad spectrum of public and private healthcare providers. Methods The study was undertaken in six towns (three urban and three rural) in Anambra state, south-east Nigeria. Anti-malarials (225 samples), which included artesunate, dihydroartemisinin, sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP), quinine, and chloroquine, were either purchased or collected from randomly selected providers. The quality of these drugs was assessed by laboratory analysis of the dissolution profile using published pharmacopoeial monograms and measuring the amount of active ingredient using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Findings It was found that 60 (37%) of the anti-malarials tested did not meet the United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) specifications for the amount of active ingredients, with the suspect drugs either lacking the active ingredients or containing suboptimal quantities of the active ingredients. Quinine (46%) and SP formulations (39%) were among drugs that did not satisfy the tolerance limits published in USP monograms. A total of 78% of the suspect drugs were from private facilities, mostly low-level providers, such as patent medicine dealers (vendors). Conclusion This study found that there was a high prevalence of poor quality drugs. The findings provide areas for public intervention to improve the quality of malaria treatment services. There should be enforced checks and regulation of drug supply management as well as stiffer penalties for people stocking substandard and counterfeit drugs. PMID:19208221

  20. Ex vivo susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Dakar, Senegal, to seven standard anti-malarial drugs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background As a result of widespread chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine resistance, artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) (which includes artemether-lumefantrine and artesunate-amodiaquine) has been recommended as a first-line anti-malarial regimen in Senegal since 2006. Since then, there have been very few reports on the ex vivo susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum to anti-malarial drugs. To examine whether parasite susceptibility has been affected by the widespread use of ACT, the ex vivo susceptibility of local isolates was assessed at the military hospital of Dakar. Methods The ex vivo susceptibility of 93 P. falciparum isolates from Dakar was successfully determined using the Plasmodium lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH) ELISA for the following drugs: chloroquine (CQ), quinine (QN), mefloquine (MQ), monodesethylamodiaquine (MDAQ), lumefantrine (LMF), dihydroartemisinin (DHA) and doxycycline (DOX). Results After transformation of the isolate IC50 in ratio of IC50 according to the susceptibility of the 3D7 reference strain (isolate IC50/3D7 IC50), the prevalence of the in vitro resistant isolates with reduced susceptibility was 50% for MQ, 22% for CQ, 12% for DOX, 6% for both QN and MDAQ and 1% for the drugs LMF and DHA. The highest significant positive correlations were shown between responses to CQ and MDAQ (r = 0.569; P < 0.0001), LMF and QN (r = 0.511; P < 0.0001), LMF and DHA (r = 0.428; P = 0.0001), LMF and MQ (r = 0.413; P = 0.0002), QN and DHA (r = 0.402; P = 0.0003) and QN and MQ (r = 0.421; P = 0.0001). Conclusions The introduction of ACT in 2002 has not induced a decrease in P. falciparum susceptibility to the drugs DHA, MDAQ and LMF, which are common ACT components. However, the prevalence of P. falciparum isolates with reduced susceptibility has increased for both MQ and DOX. Taken together, these data suggest that intensive surveillance of the P. falciparum in vitro susceptibility to anti-malarial drugs in Senegal is required. PMID

  1. Assessment of global reporting of adverse drug reactions for anti-malarials, including artemisinin-based combination therapy, to the WHO Programme for International Drug Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In spite of enhanced control efforts, malaria remains a major public health problem causing close to a million deaths annually. With support from several donors, large amounts of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) are being deployed in endemic countries raising safety concerns as little is known about the use of ACT in several of the settings where they are deployed. This project was undertaken to profile the provenance of the pharmacovigilance reporting of all anti-malarials, including ACT to the WHO adverse drug reaction (ADR) database (Vigibase™) over the past 40 years. Methods The WHO Programme for International Drug Monitoring, the Uppsala Monitoring Centre (UMC) provided anonymized extracts of Vigibase™ covering the period 1968-2008. All countries in the programme were clustered according to their malaria control phase and income status. The number of individual case safety reports (ICSRs) of anti-malarials was analyzed according to those clusters. Results From 1968 to 2008, 21,312 ICSRs suspecting anti-malarials were received from 64 countries. Low-income countries, that are also malaria-endemic (categorized as priority 1 countries) submitted only 1.2% of the ICSRs. Only 60 out of 21,312 ICSRs were related to ACT, 51 of which were coming from four sub-Saharan African countries. Although very few ICSRs involved artemisinin-based compounds, many of the adverse events reported were potentially serious. Conclusions This paper illustrates the low reporting of ADRs to anti-malarials in general and ACT in particular. Most reports were submitted by non-endemic and/or high-income countries. Given the current mix of large donor funding, the insufficient information on safety of these drugs, increasing availability of ACT and artemisinin-based monotherapies in public and private sector channels, associated potential for inappropriate use and finally a pipeline of more than 10 new novel anti-malarials in various stages of development, the

  2. Plasmodium falciparum susceptibility to anti-malarial drugs in Dakar, Senegal, in 2010: an ex vivo and drug resistance molecular markers study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2006, the Senegalese National Malaria Control Programme recommended artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) as the first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria. Since the introduction of ACT, there have been very few reports on the level of resistance of P. falciparum to anti-malarial drugs. To determine whether parasite susceptibility has been affected by the new anti-malarial policies, an ex vivo susceptibility and drug resistance molecular marker study was conducted on local isolates obtained from the Centre de santé Elizabeth Diouf (Médina, Dakar, Senegal). Methods The prevalence of genetic polymorphisms in genes associated with anti-malarial drug resistance, i.e., pfcrt, pfdhfr, pfdhps and pfmdr1, were evaluated for a panel of 165 isolates collected from patients recruited from 17 August 2010 to 6 January 2011. The malaria isolates were assessed for susceptibility to chloroquine (CQ); quinine (QN); monodesethylamodiaquine (MDAQ), the active metabolite of amodiaquine; mefloquine (MQ); lumefantrine (LMF); dihydroartemisinin (DHA), the active metabolite of artemisinin derivatives; and doxycycline (DOX) using the Plasmodium lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH) ELISA. Results The prevalence of the in vitro resistant isolates, or isolates with reduced susceptibility, was 62.1% for MQ, 24.2% for CQ, 10.3% for DOX, 11.8% MDAQ, 9.7% for QN, 2.9% for LMF and 0% for DHA. The Pfcrt 76T mutation was identified in 43.6% of the samples. The pfmdr1 86Y, 184F and 1246Y mutations were found in 16.2%, 50.0% and 1.6% of the samples, respectively. The pfdhfr 108N, 51I and 59R mutations were identified in 81.9%, 77.4% and 79.4% of the samples, respectively. The double mutant (108N and 51I) was detected in 75.5% of the isolates, and the triple mutant (108N, 51I and 59R) was detected in 73.6% of the isolates. The pfdhps 437G, 436A and 613S mutations were found in 54.4%, 38.6% and 1.2% of the samples, respectively. There was only one double mutant, 437G and 540E, and one

  3. Malaria Related Perceptions, Care Seeking after Onset of Fever and Anti-Malarial Drug Use in Malaria Endemic Settings of Southwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Birhanu, Zewdie; Abebe, Lakew; Sudhakar, Morankar; Dissanayake, Gunawardena; Yihdego, Yemane Ye-ebiyo; Alemayehu, Guda; Yewhalaw, Delenasaw

    2016-01-01

    Background Prompt care seeking and appropriate use of anti-malarial drugs are critical components of malaria prevention and control. This study assessed malaria related perceptions, care seeking behavior and anti-malarial drug use in malaria endemic settings of Ethiopia. Methods Data were generated from a community based cross-sectional study conducted among 798 households during January 2014 as part of a larger household behavioral study in three malaria endemic districts of Jimma Zone, Southwest Ethiopia. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected and analyzed using SPSS 17.0 and STATA 12.0. Results In this study, only 76.1% of the respondents associated malaria to mosquito bite, and incorrect beliefs and perceptions were noted. Despite moderate level of knowledge (estimated mean = 62.2, Std Err = 0.7, 95% CI: 60.6–63.8%), quite high favorable attitude (overall estimated mean = 91.5, Std Err = 0.6, 95% CI: 90.1–92.9%) were recorded towards malaria preventive measures. The mean attitude score for prompt care seeking, appropriate use of anti-malarial drugs, LLIN use and Indoor Residual Spray acceptance was 98.5 (Std Err = 0.4, 95% CI:97.5–99.4), 92.7 (Std Err = 0.6 95% CI:91.5–93.9), 88.8 (Std Err = 0.5, 95% CI:85.5–92.1) and 86.5 (Std Err = 1.2, 95% CI: 83.9–89.1), respectively. The prevalence of fever was 2.9% (116/4107) and of the study participants with fever, 71.9% (95% CI: 65.5–78.3%) sought care and all of them consulted formal health care system. However, only 17 (19.8%) sought care within 24 hours after onset of fever. The frequency of care seeking was higher (77.8%, n = 21/27) and more prompt (28.6%, 6/21) for children under five as compared to old age groups despite it was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). However, higher median time of seeking first care was observed among Muslims and people who did not attend school (p < 0.05). Of those who used anti-malarial drugs, 9.1% indicated that they used it inappropriately

  4. Plasmodial sugar transporters as anti-malarial drug targets and comparisons with other protozoa

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Glucose is the primary source of energy and a key substrate for most cells. Inhibition of cellular glucose uptake (the first step in its utilization) has, therefore, received attention as a potential therapeutic strategy to treat various unrelated diseases including malaria and cancers. For malaria, blood forms of parasites rely almost entirely on glycolysis for energy production and, without energy stores, they are dependent on the constant uptake of glucose. Plasmodium falciparum is the most dangerous human malarial parasite and its hexose transporter has been identified as being the major glucose transporter. In this review, recent progress regarding the validation and development of the P. falciparum hexose transporter as a drug target is described, highlighting the importance of robust target validation through both chemical and genetic methods. Therapeutic targeting potential of hexose transporters of other protozoan pathogens is also reviewed and discussed. PMID:21676209

  5. In vitro and in vivo assessment of the anti-malarial activity of Caesalpinia pluviosa

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To overcome the problem of increasing drug resistance, traditional medicines are an important source for potential new anti-malarials. Caesalpinia pluviosa, commonly named "sibipiruna", originates from Brazil and possess multiple therapeutic properties, including anti-malarial activity. Methods Crude extract (CE) was obtained from stem bark by purification using different solvents, resulting in seven fractions. An MTT assay was performed to evaluate cytotoxicity in MCF-7 cells. The CE and its fractions were tested in vitro against chloroquine-sensitive (3D7) and -resistant (S20) strains of Plasmodium falciparum and in vivo in Plasmodium chabaudi-infected mice. In vitro interaction with artesunate and the active C. pluviosa fractions was assessed, and mass spectrometry analyses were conducted. Results At non-toxic concentrations, the 100% ethanolic (F4) and 50% methanolic (F5) fractions possessed significant anti-malarial activity against both 3D7 and S20 strains. Drug interaction assays with artesunate showed a synergistic interaction with the F4. Four days of treatment with this fraction significantly inhibited parasitaemia in mice in a dose-dependent manner. Mass spectrometry analyses revealed the presence of an ion corresponding to m/z 303.0450, suggesting the presence of quercetin. However, a second set of analyses, with a quercetin standard, showed distinct ions of m/z 137 and 153. Conclusions The findings show that the F4 fraction of C. pluviosa exhibits anti-malarial activity in vitro at non-toxic concentrations, which was potentiated in the presence of artesunate. Moreover, this anti-malarial activity was also sustained in vivo after treatment of infected mice. Finally, mass spectrometry analyses suggest that a new compound, most likely an isomer of quercetin, is responsible for the anti-malarial activity of the F4. PMID:21535894

  6. Repurposing the anti-malarial drug artesunate as a novel therapeutic agent for metastatic renal cell carcinoma due to its attenuation of tumor growth, metastasis, and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sharon; Lee, Se Jeong; Lim, Joung Eun; Nam, Do-Hyun; Joo, Kyeung Min; Jeong, Byong Chang; Jeon, Seong Soo; Choi, Han Yong; Lee, Hye Won

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in the development of molecularly targeted therapies, metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is still incurable. Artesunate (ART), a well-known anti-malarial drug with low toxicity, exhibits highly selective anti-tumor actions against various tumors through generation of cytotoxic carbon-centered free radical in the presence of free iron. However, the therapeutic efficacy of ART against metastatic RCC has not yet been fully elucidated. In the analysis on a dataset from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) (n = 469) and a tissue microarray set from Samsung Medical Center (n = 119) from a cohort of patients with clear cell RCC (ccRCC), up-regulation of transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1), which is a well-known predictive marker for ART, was correlated with the presence of distant metastasis and an unfavorable prognosis. Moreover, ART exerted potent selective cytotoxicity against human RCC cell lines (Caki-1, 786-O, and SN12C-GFP-SRLu2) and sensitized these cells to sorafenib in vitro, and the extent of ART cytotoxicity correlated with TfR1 expression. ART-mediated growth inhibition of human RCC cell lines was shown to result from the induction of cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and oncosis-like cell death. Furthermore, ART inhibited cell clonogenicity and invasion of human RCC cells and anti-angiogenic effects in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. Consistent with these in vitro data, anti-tumor, anti-metastatic and anti-angiogenic effects of ART were also validated in human 786-O xenografts. Taken together, ART is a promising novel candidate for treating human RCC, either alone or in combination with other therapies. PMID:26426994

  7. Use of the atmospheric generators for capnophilic bacteria Genbag-CO2 for the evaluation of in vitro Plasmodium falciparum susceptibility to standard anti-malarial drugs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the cultivation system in which the proper atmospheric conditions for growing Plasmodium falciparum parasites were maintained in a sealed bag. The Genbag® system associated with the atmospheric generators for capnophilic bacteria Genbag CO2® was used for in vitro susceptibility test of nine standard anti-malarial drugs and compared to standard incubator conditions. Methods The susceptibility of 36 pre-identified parasite strains from a wide panel of countries was assessed for nine standard anti-malarial drugs (chloroquine, quinine, mefloquine, monodesethylamodiaquine, lumefantrine, dihydroartemisinin, atovaquone and pyrimethamine) by the standard 42-hour 3H-hypoxanthine uptake inhibition method using the Genbag CO2® system and compared to controlled incubator conditions (5% CO2 and 10% O2). Results The counts per minute values in the control wells in incubator atmospheric conditions (5% CO2 and 10% O2) were significantly higher than those of Genbag® conditions (2738 cpm vs 2282 cpm, p < 0.0001). The geometric mean IC50 estimated under the incubator atmospheric conditions was significantly lower for atovaquone (1.2 vs 2.1 nM, p = 0.0011) and higher for the quinolines: chloroquine (127 vs 94 nM, p < 0.0001), quinine (580 vs 439 nM, p < 0.0001), monodesethylamodiaquine (41.4 vs 31.8 nM, p < 0.0001), mefloquine (57.5 vs 49.7 nM, p = 0.0011) and lumefantrine (23.8 vs 21.2 nM, p = 0.0044). There was no significant difference of IC50 between the 2 conditions for dihydroartemisinin, doxycycline and pyrimethamine. To reduce this difference in term of anti-malarial susceptibility, a specific cut-off was estimated for each drug under Genbag® conditions by regression. The cut-off was estimated at 77 nM for chloroquine (vs 100 nM in 10% O2), 611 nM for quinine (vs 800 nM), 30 nM for mefloquine (vs 30 nM), 61 nM for monodesethylamodiaquine (vs 80 nM) and 1729 nM for pyrimethamine (vs 2000 nM). Conclusions The atmospheric

  8. The effect of E. coli STa enterotoxin on the absorption of weakly dissociable anti-malarial drugs from rat intestine in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, J. M.; Lynch, J.; Lucas, M. L.

    1991-01-01

    1. The effect of E. coli heat stable (STa) enterotoxin on the absorption of radiolabelled anti-malarial weak bases and their appearance in peripheral blood was assessed in vivo by a recirculation procedure in rat intestinal loops. 2. Enterotoxin increased the jejunal disappearance of quinine (P less than 0.05), trimethoprim (P less than 0.05), proguanil (P less than 0.05) and chloroquine (P less than 0.001) and left pyrimethamine disappearance unaltered. Peripheral blood levels of trimethoprim (P less than 0.02) and proguanil (P less than 0.05) were higher after STa exposure. 3. In the ileum, enterotoxin increased the luminal disappearance (P less than 0.05) and peripheral blood appearance (P less than 0.001) of chloroquine. The luminal disappearance rate of trimethoprim was reduced (P less than 0.05) and that of pyrimethamine unchanged. 4. The increased jejunal absorption of the anti-malarial drugs occurred despite STa causing a reduction in the amount of net fluid absorption. It seems likely that the enhanced absorption with STa exposure is related to the effect of STa on the microclimate pH. An elevation in the microclimate pH would increase the amount of undissociated weak base available for non-ionic diffusion. 5. The favourable elevation of microclimate pH by STa seemed to be outweighted by the reduced fluid absorption in the ileum. Only chloroquine still showed enhanced absorption in the ileum and this may have been because unlike the other antimalarial drugs, chloroquine has two dissociable groups likely to be affected by the mucosal surface pH changes. PMID:1878755

  9. Finding parasites and finding challenges: improved diagnostic access and trends in reported malaria and anti-malarial drug use in Livingstone district, Zambia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Understanding the impact of malaria rapid diagnostic test (RDT) use on management of acute febrile disease at a community level, and on the consumption of anti-malarial medicines, is critical to the planning and success of scale-up to universal parasite-based diagnosis by health systems in malaria-endemic countries. Methods A retrospective study of district-wide community-level RDT introduction was conducted in Livingstone District, Zambia, to assess the impact of this programmed on malaria reporting, incidence of mortality and on district anti-malarial consumption. Results Reported malaria declined from 12,186 cases in the quarter prior to RDT introduction in 2007 to an average of 12.25 confirmed and 294 unconfirmed malaria cases per quarter over the year to September 2009. Reported malaria-like fever also declined, with only 4,381 RDTs being consumed per quarter over the same year. Reported malaria mortality declined to zero in the year to September 2009, and all-cause mortality declined. Consumption of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) dropped dramatically, but remained above reported malaria, declining from 12,550 courses dispensed by the district office in the quarter prior to RDT implementation to an average of 822 per quarter over the last year. Quinine consumption in health centres also declined, with the district office ceasing to supply due to low usage, but requests for sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) rose to well above previous levels, suggesting substitution of ACT with this drug in RDT-negative cases. Conclusions RDT introduction led to a large decline in reported malaria cases and in ACT consumption in Livingstone district. Reported malaria mortality declined to zero, indicating safety of the new diagnostic regime, although adherence and/or use of RDTs was still incomplete. However, a deficiency is apparent in management of non-malarial fever, with inappropriate use of a low-cost single dose drug, SP, replacing ACT. While large

  10. Induction of multiple pleiotropic drug resistance genes in yeast engineered to produce an increased level of anti-malarial drug precursor, artemisinic acid

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Dae-Kyun; Ouellet, Mario; Paradise, Eric M; Burd, Helcio; Eng, Diana; Paddon, Chris J; Newman, Jack D; Keasling, Jay D

    2008-01-01

    Background Due to the global occurrence of multi-drug-resistant malarial parasites (Plasmodium falciparum), the anti-malarial drug most effective against malaria is artemisinin, a natural product (sesquiterpene lactone endoperoxide) extracted from sweet wormwood (Artemisia annua). However, artemisinin is in short supply and unaffordable to most malaria patients. Artemisinin can be semi-synthesized from its precursor artemisinic acid, which can be synthesized from simple sugars using microorganisms genetically engineered with genes from A. annua. In order to develop an industrially competent yeast strain, detailed analyses of microbial physiology and development of gene expression strategies are required. Results Three plant genes coding for amorphadiene synthase, amorphadiene oxidase (AMO or CYP71AV1), and cytochrome P450 reductase, which in concert divert carbon flux from farnesyl diphosphate to artemisinic acid, were expressed from a single plasmid. The artemisinic acid production in the engineered yeast reached 250 μg mL-1 in shake-flask cultures and 1 g L-1 in bio-reactors with the use of Leu2d selection marker and appropriate medium formulation. When plasmid stability was measured, the yeast strain synthesizing amorphadiene alone maintained the plasmid in 84% of the cells, whereas the yeast strain synthesizing artemisinic acid showed poor plasmid stability. Inactivation of AMO by a point-mutation restored the high plasmid stability, indicating that the low plasmid stability is not caused by production of the AMO protein but by artemisinic acid synthesis or accumulation. Semi-quantitative reverse-transcriptase (RT)-PCR and quantitative real time-PCR consistently showed that pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR) genes, belonging to the family of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporter, were massively induced in the yeast strain producing artemisinic acid, relative to the yeast strain producing the hydrocarbon amorphadiene alone. Global transcriptional analysis by

  11. Anti-malarial property of steroidal alkaloid conessine isolated from the bark of Holarrhena antidysenterica

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the face of chronic and emerging resistance of parasites to currently available drugs and constant need for new anti-malarials, natural plant products have been the bastion of anti-malarials for thousands of years. Moreover natural plant products and their derivatives have traditionally been a common source of drugs, and represent more than 30% of the current pharmaceutical market. The present study shows evaluation of anti-malarial effects of compound conessine isolated from plant Holarrhena antidysenterica frequently used against malaria in the Garhwal region of north-west Himalaya. Methods In vitro anti-plasmodial activity of compound was assessed using schizont maturation and parasite lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH) assay. Cytotoxic activities of the examined compound were determined on L-6 cells of rat skeletal muscle myoblast. The four-day test for anti-malarial activity against a chloroquine-sensitive Plasmodium berghei NK65 strain in BALB/c mice was used for monitoring in vivo activity of compound. In liver and kidney function test, the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was examined by p-NPP method, bilirubin by Jendrassik and Grof method. The urea percentage was determined by modified Berthelot method and creatinine by alkaline picrate method in serum of mice using ENZOPAK/CHEMPAK reagent kits. Results Compound conessine showed in vitro anti-plasmodial activity with its IC50 value 1.9 μg/ml and 1.3 μg/ml using schizont maturation and pLDH assay respectively. The compound showed cytotoxity IC50= 14 μg/ml against L6 cells of rat skeletal muscle myoblast. The isolated compound from plant H. antidysenterica significantly reduced parasitaemia (at 10 mg/kg exhibited 88.95% parasite inhibition) in P. berghei-infected mice. Due to slightly toxic nature (cytotoxicity = 14), biochemical analysis (liver and kidney function test) of the serum from mice after administration of conessine were also observed. Conclusion The present investigation

  12. Community management of anti-malarials in Africa and iatrogenic risk.

    PubMed

    Orostegui, Lupé; Balu, Laurent; Chevret, Laurent; Habes, Dalila; Pussard, Eric

    2011-06-01

    Distribution of anti-malarials at the community level is one of the interventions recommended to reduce mortality from febrile illnesses. Inappropriate treatment of fever with anti-malarials may result in missed diagnosis and delays in appropriate treatments including consideration of other illnesses than malaria. We report the case of an 8-year-old black girl receiving prophylaxis with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine from the caretaker of the community during her holidays in Ivory Coast. A persistent fever suspected to be due to malaria was treated inappropriately with atovaquone-proguanil and then with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine again. Cumulative toxicity of anti-malarials leads to irreversible hepatic damages requiring hepatic transplantation. Community caretakers must be aware of the potential side effects and the contraindications of anti-malarials. Early identification of drug-induced toxicity and immediate discontinuation of the drug are the more effective tools to limit the progression of tissue damage. PMID:20807830

  13. Evaluation of anti-malarial drugs’ use in Fitche Hospital, North Shoa, Oromia Region, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Getachew, Rosa; Amelo, Wote; Bobasa, Eshetu Mulisa

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Retrospective evaluation of anti-malarial drugs’ use in Fitche Hospital, North Shoa, Oromia Region, Ethiopia. Methods: Retrospective cross-sectional study design was conducted using selected patients cards of 1-year (January 2012–January 2013 G.C) with anti-malarial agents from January 18 to 30, 2013. The sample size was calculated by using Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Health care Organization criteria and sampling was done by using a systematic random sampling technique. Results: One hundred and twenty-five patient cards with anti-malarial drugs were reviewed of which 32.8%, 21.6%, 15.2% belongs to age range of 20–29, 10–19, and 30–39, respectively. Chloroquine prescription accounts for 50.4% from total anti-malarial drugs. 71.2% and 78.4% of patients received antibiotics and analgesics, respectively, with anti-malarial drugs. 77.6% of drugs were prescribed by generic name while the brand name was 22.39%. Conclusions: The study done in Fitche Hospital revealed that the use of anti-malarial agent was not in complete agreement with the current guideline of Ethiopia despite good practice. PMID:26957867

  14. Biological activities of nitidine, a potential anti-malarial lead compound

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nitidine is thought to be the main active ingredient in several traditional anti-malarial remedies used in different parts of the world. The widespread use of these therapies stresses the importance of studying this molecule in the context of malaria control. However, little is known about its potential as an anti-plasmodial drug, as well as its mechanism of action. Methods In this study, the anti-malarial potential of nitidine was evaluated in vitro on CQ-sensitive and -resistant strains. The nitidine's selectivity index compared with cancerous and non-cancerous cell lines was then determined. In vivo assays were then performed, using the four-day Peter's test methodology. To gain information about nitidine's possible mode of action, its moment of action on the parasite cell cycle was studied, and its localization inside the parasite was determined using confocal microscopy. The in vitro abilities of nitidine to bind haem and to inhibit β-haematin formation were also demonstrated. Results Nitidine showed similar in vitro activity in CQ-sensitive and resistant strains, and also a satisfying selectivity index (> 10) when compared with a non-cancerous cells line. Its in vivo activity was moderate; however, no sign of acute toxicity was observed during treatment. Nitidine's moment of action on the parasite cycle showed that it could not interfere with DNA replication; this was consistent with the observation that nitidine did not localize in the nucleus, but rather in the cytoplasm of the parasite. Nitidine was able to form a 1-1 complex with haem in vitro and also inhibited β-haematin formation with the same potency as chloroquine. Conclusion Nitidine can be considered a potential anti-malarial lead compound. Its ability to complex haem and inhibit β-haematin formation suggests a mechanism of action similar to that of chloroquine. The anti-malarial activity of nitidine could therefore be improved by structural modification of this molecule to increase

  15. Adverse drug events resulting from use of drugs with sulphonamide-containing anti-malarials and artemisinin-based ingredients: findings on incidence and household costs from three districts with routine demographic surveillance systems in rural Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anti-malarial regimens containing sulphonamide or artemisinin ingredients are widely used in malaria-endemic countries. However, evidence of the incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADR) to these drugs is limited, especially in Africa, and there is a complete absence of information on the economic burden such ADR place on patients. This study aimed to document ADR incidence and associated household costs in three high malaria transmission districts in rural Tanzania covered by demographic surveillance systems. Methods Active and passive surveillance methods were used to identify ADR from sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) and artemisinin (AS) use. ADR were identified by trained clinicians at health facilities (passive surveillance) and through cross-sectional household surveys (active surveillance). Potential cases were followed up at home, where a complete history and physical examination was undertaken, and household cost data collected. Patients were classified as having ‘possible’ or ‘probable’ ADR by a physician. Results A total of 95 suspected ADR were identified during a two-year period, of which 79 were traced, and 67 reported use of SP and/or AS prior to ADR onset. Thirty-four cases were classified as ‘probable’ and 33 as ‘possible’ ADRs. Most (53) cases were associated with SP monotherapy, 13 with the AS/SP combination (available in one of the two areas only), and one with AS monotherapy. Annual ADR incidence per 100,000 exposures was estimated based on ‘probable’ ADR only at 5.6 for AS/SP in combination, and 25.0 and 11.6 for SP monotherapy. Median ADR treatment costs per episode ranged from US$2.23 for those making a single provider visit to US$146.93 for patients with four visits. Seventy-three per cent of patients used out-of-pocket funds or sold part of their farm harvests to pay for treatment, and 19% borrowed money. Conclusion Both passive and active surveillance methods proved feasible methods for anti-malarial ADR

  16. In vitro and in vivo anti-malarial activity of Boerhavia elegans and Solanum surattense

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There is an urgent need to identify new anti-malarial drug targets for both prophylaxis and chemotherapy, due to the increasing problem of drug resistance to malaria parasites. In the present study, the aim was to discover novel, effective plant-based extracts for the activity against malaria. Methods Ten plants found in Iran were selected by ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plants. The crude ethanolic extracts were tested for in vitro anti-plasmodial activity against two strains of Plasmodium falciparum: K1 (chloroquine-resistant strain) and CY27 (chloroquine-sensitive strain), using the parasite lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH) assay. The anti-plasmodial activity of the extracts was also assessed in the 4-day suppressive anti-malarial assay in mice inoculated with Plasmodium berghei (ANKA strain). Crude ethanolic extracts showed good anti-plasmodial activity were further fractionated by partitioning in water and dichloromethane. Results Of 10 plant species assayed, three species: Boerhavia elegans (Choisy), Solanum surattense (Burm.f.) and Prosopis juliflora (Sw.) showed promising anti-plasmodial activity in vitro (IC50 ≤ 50 μg/ml) and in vivo with no toxicity. The dichloromethane fraction of three extracts revealed stronger anti-plasmodial activity than the total extracts. Conclusion Anti-plasmodial activities of extracts of B. elegans and S. surattense are reported for the first time. PMID:20462416

  17. Fake anti-malarials: start with the facts.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Harparkash; Clarke, Siȃn; Lalani, Mirza; Phanouvong, Souly; Guérin, Philippe; McLoughlin, Andrew; Wilson, Benjamin K; Deats, Michael; Plançon, Aline; Hopkins, Heidi; Miranda, Debora; Schellenberg, David

    2016-01-01

    This meeting report presents the key findings and discussion points of a 1-day meeting entitled 'Fake anti-malarials: start with the facts' held on 28th May 2015, in Geneva, Switzerland, to disseminate the findings of the artemisinin combination therapy consortium's drug quality programme. The teams purchased over 10,000 samples, using representative sampling approaches, from six malaria endemic countries: Equatorial Guinea (Bioko Island), Cambodia, Ghana, Nigeria, Rwanda and Tanzania. Laboratory analyses of these samples showed that falsified anti-malarials (<8 %) were found in just two of the countries, whilst substandard artemisinin-based combinations were present in all six countries and, artemisinin-based monotherapy tablets are still available in some places despite the fact that the WHO has urged regulatory authorities in malaria-endemic countries to take measures to halt the production and marketing of these oral monotherapies since 2007. This report summarizes the presentations that reviewed the public health impact of falsified and substandard drugs, sampling strategies, techniques for drug quality analysis, approaches to strengthen health systems capacity for the surveillance of drug quality, and the ensuing discussion points from the dissemination meeting. PMID:26873700

  18. Repositioning: the fast track to new anti-malarial medicines?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Repositioning of existing drugs has been suggested as a fast track for developing new anti-malarial agents. The compound libraries of GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), Pfizer and AstraZeneca (AZ) comprising drugs that have undergone clinical studies in other therapeutic areas, but not achieved approval, and a set of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs and other bio-actives were tested against Plasmodium falciparum blood stages. Methods Molecules were tested initially against erythrocytic co-cultures of P. falciparum to measure proliferation inhibition using one of the following methods: SYBR®I dye DNA staining assay (3D7, K1 or NF54 strains); [3H] hypoxanthine radioisotope incorporation assay (3D7 and 3D7A strain); or 4’,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) DNA imaging assay (3D7 and Dd2 strains). After review of the available clinical pharmacokinetic and safety data, selected compounds with low μM activity and a suitable clinical profile were tested in vivo either in a Plasmodium berghei four-day test or in the P. falciparum Pf3D70087/N9 huSCID ‘humanized’ mouse model. Results Of the compounds included in the GSK and Pfizer sets, 3.8% (9/238) had relevant in vitro anti-malarial activity while 6/100 compounds from the AZ candidate drug library were active. In comparison, around 0.6% (24/3,800) of the FDA-approved drugs and other bio-actives were active. After evaluation of available clinical data, four investigational drugs, active in vitro were tested in the P. falciparum humanized mouse model: UK-112,214 (PAF-H1 inhibitor), CEP-701 (protein kinase inhibitor), CEP-1347 (protein kinase inhibitor), and PSC-833 (p-glycoprotein inhibitor). Only UK-112,214 showed significant efficacy against P. falciparum in vivo, although at high doses (ED90 131.3 mg/kg [95% CI 112.3, 156.7]), and parasitaemia was still present 96 hours after treatment commencement. Of the six actives from the AZ library, two compounds (AZ-1 and AZ-3) were marginally

  19. Access to artesunate-amodiaquine, quinine and other anti-malarials: policy and markets in Burundi

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Malaria is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in post-conflict Burundi. To counter the increasing challenge of anti-malarial drug resistance and improve highly effective treatment Burundi adopted artesunate-amodiaquine (AS-AQ) as first-line treatment for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria and oral quinine as second-line treatment in its national treatment policy in 2003. Uptake of this policy in the public, private and non-governmental (NGO) retail market sectors of Burundi is relatively unknown. This study was conducted to evaluate access to national policy recommended anti-malarials. Methods Adapting a standardized methodology developed by Health Action International/World Health Organization (HAI/WHO), a cross-sectional survey of 70 (24 public, 36 private, and 10 NGO) medicine outlets was conducted in three regions of Burundi, representing different levels of transmission of malaria. The availability on day of the survey, the median prices, and affordability (in terms of number of days' wages to purchase treatment) of AS-AQ, quinine and other anti-malarials were calculated. Results Anti-malarials were stocked in all outlets surveyed. AS-AQ was available in 87.5%, 33.3%, and 90% of public, private, and NGO retail outlets, respectively. Quinine was the most common anti-malarial found in all outlet types. Non-policy recommended anti-malarials were mainly found in the private outlets (38.9%) compared to public (4.2%) and NGO (0%) outlets. The median price of a course of AS-AQ was US$0.16 (200 Burundi Francs, FBu) for the public and NGO markets, and 3.5-fold higher in the private sector (US$0.56 or 700 FBu). Quinine tablets were similarly priced in the public (US$1.53 or 1,892.50 FBu), private and NGO sectors (both US$1.61 or 2,000 FBu). Non-policy anti-malarials were priced 50-fold higher than the price of AS-AQ in the public sector. A course of AS-AQ was affordable at 0.4 of a day's wage in the public and NGO sectors, whereas, it was

  20. The association between price, competition, and demand factors on private sector anti-malarial stocking and sales in western Kenya: considerations for the AMFm subsidy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Households in sub-Saharan Africa are highly reliant on the retail sector for obtaining treatment for malaria fevers and other illnesses. As donors and governments seek to promote the use of artemisinin combination therapy in malaria-endemic areas through subsidized anti-malarials offered in the retail sector, understanding the stocking and pricing decisions of retail outlets is vital. Methods A survey of all medicine retailers serving Bungoma East District in western Kenya was conducted three months after the launch of the AMFm subsidy in Kenya. The survey obtained information on each anti-malarial in stock: brand name, price, sales volume, outlet characteristics and GPS co-ordinates. These data were matched to household-level data from the Webuye Health and Demographic Surveillance System, from which population density and fever prevalence near each shop were determined. Regression analysis was used to identify the factors associated with retailers’ likelihood of stocking subsidized artemether lumefantrine (AL) and the association between price and sales for AL, quinine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP). Results Ninety-seven retail outlets in the study area were surveyed; 11% of outlets stocked subsidized AL. Size of the outlet and having a pharmacist on staff were associated with greater likelihood of stocking subsidized AL. In the multivariable model, total volume of anti-malarial sales was associated with greater likelihood of stocking subsidized AL and competition was important; likelihood of stocking subsidized AL was considerably higher if the nearest neighbour stocked subsidized AL. Price was a significant predictor of sales volume for all three types of anti-malarials but the relationship varied, with the largest price sensitivity found for SP drugs. Conclusion The results suggest that helping small outlets overcome the constraints to stocking subsidized AL should be a priority. Competition between retailers and prices can play an important

  1. Poor quality vital anti-malarials in Africa - an urgent neglected public health priority

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Plasmodium falciparum malaria remains a major public health problem. A vital component of malaria control rests on the availability of good quality artemisinin-derivative based combination therapy (ACT) at the correct dose. However, there are increasing reports of poor quality anti-malarials in Africa. Methods Seven collections of artemisinin derivative monotherapies, ACT and halofantrine anti-malarials of suspicious quality were collected in 2002/10 in eleven African countries and in Asia en route to Africa. Packaging, chemical composition (high performance liquid chromatography, direct ionization mass spectrometry, X-ray diffractometry, stable isotope analysis) and botanical investigations were performed. Results Counterfeit artesunate containing chloroquine, counterfeit dihydroartemisinin (DHA) containing paracetamol (acetaminophen), counterfeit DHA-piperaquine containing sildenafil, counterfeit artemether-lumefantrine containing pyrimethamine, counterfeit halofantrine containing artemisinin, and substandard/counterfeit or degraded artesunate and artesunate+amodiaquine in eight countries are described. Pollen analysis was consistent with manufacture of counterfeits in eastern Asia. These data do not allow estimation of the frequency of poor quality anti-malarials in Africa. Conclusions Criminals are producing diverse harmful anti-malarial counterfeits with important public health consequences. The presence of artesunate monotherapy, substandard and/or degraded and counterfeit medicines containing sub-therapeutic amounts of unexpected anti-malarials will engender drug resistance. With the threatening spread of artemisinin resistance to Africa, much greater investment is required to ensure the quality of ACTs and removal of artemisinin monotherapies. The International Health Regulations may need to be invoked to counter these serious public health problems. PMID:22152094

  2. The counterfeit anti-malarial is a crime against humanity: a systematic review of the scientific evidence

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The counterfeiting of anti-malarials represents a form of attack on global public health in which fake and substandard anti-malarials serve as de facto weapons of mass destruction, particularly in resource-constrained endemic settings, where malaria causes nearly 660,000 preventable deaths and threatens millions of lives annually. It has been estimated that fake anti-malarials contribute to nearly 450,000 preventable deaths every year. This crime against humanity is often underestimated or ignored. This study attempts to describe and characterize the direct and indirect effects of counterfeit anti-malarials on public health, clinical care and socio-economic conditions. Methods A search was performed using key databases, WHO documents, and English language search engines. Of 262 potential articles that were identified using a fixed set of criteria, a convenience sample of 105 appropriate articles was selected for this review. Results Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is an important tool in the fight against malaria, but a sizable number of patients are unable to afford to this first-line treatment. Consequently, patients tend to procure cheaper anti-malarials, which may be fake or substandard. Forensic palynology reveals that counterfeits originate in Asia. Fragile drug regulations, ineffective law-enforcement agencies and corruption further burden ailing healthcare facilities. Substandard/fake anti-malarials can cause (a) economic sabotage; (b) therapeutic failure; (c) increased risk of the emergence and spread of resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax; (d) an undermining of trust/confidence in healthcare stakeholders/systems; and, (e) serious side effects or death. Conclusion Combating counterfeit anti-malarials is a complex task due to limited resources and poor techniques for the detection and identification of fake anti-malarials. This situation calls for sustainable, global, scientific research and policy change

  3. A “reverse pharmacology” approach for developing an anti-malarial phytomedicine

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A “reverse pharmacology” approach to developing an anti-malarial phytomedicine was designed and implemented in Mali, resulting in a new standardized herbal anti-malarial after six years of research. The first step was to select a remedy for development, through a retrospective treatment-outcome study. The second step was a dose-escalating clinical trial that showed a dose-response phenomenon and helped select the safest and most efficacious dose. The third step was a randomized controlled trial to compare the phytomedicine to the standard first-line treatment. The last step was to identify active compounds which can be used as markers for standardization and quality control. This example of “reverse pharmacology” shows that a standardized phytomedicine can be developed faster and more cheaply than conventional drugs. Even if both approaches are not fully comparable, their efficiency in terms of public health and their complementarity should be thoroughly considered. PMID:21411019

  4. Two series of new semisynthetic triterpene derivatives: differences in anti-malarial activity, cytotoxicity and mechanism of action

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The discovery and development of anti-malarial compounds of plant origin and semisynthetic derivatives thereof, such as quinine (QN) and chloroquine (CQ), has highlighted the importance of these compounds in the treatment of malaria. Ursolic acid analogues bearing an acetyl group at C-3 have demonstrated significant anti-malarial activity. With this in mind, two new series of betulinic acid (BA) and ursolic acid (UA) derivatives with ester groups at C-3 were synthesized in an attempt to improve anti-malarial activity, reduce cytotoxicity, and search for new targets. In vitro activity against CQ-sensitive Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 and an evaluation of cytotoxicity in a mammalian cell line (HEK293T) are reported. Furthermore, two possible mechanisms of action of anti-malarial compounds have been evaluated: effects on mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and inhibition of β-haematin formation. Results Among the 18 derivatives synthesized, those having shorter side chains were most effective against CQ-sensitive P. falciparum 3D7, and were non-cytotoxic. These derivatives were three to five times more active than BA and UA. A DiOC6(3) ΔΨm assay showed that mitochondria are not involved in their mechanism of action. Inhibition of β-haematin formation by the active derivatives was weaker than with CQ. Compounds of the BA series were generally more active against P. falciparum 3D7 than those of the UA series. Conclusions Three new anti-malarial prototypes were obtained from natural sources through an easy and relatively inexpensive synthesis. They represent an alternative for new lead compounds for anti-malarial chemotherapy. PMID:23497003

  5. Access to Artemisinin-Combination Therapy (ACT) and other Anti-Malarials: National Policy and Markets in Sierra Leone

    PubMed Central

    Amuasi, John H.; Diap, Graciela; Nguah, Samuel Blay; Karikari, Patrick; Boakye, Isaac; Jambai, Amara; Lahai, Wani Kumba; Louie, Karly S.; Kiechel, Jean-Rene

    2012-01-01

    Malaria remains the leading burden of disease in post-conflict Sierra Leone. To overcome the challenge of anti-malarial drug resistance and improve effective treatment, Sierra Leone adopted artemisinin-combination therapy artesunate-amodiaquine (AS+AQ) as first-line treatment for uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria. Other national policy anti-malarials include artemether-lumefantrine (AL) as an alternative to AS+AQ, quinine and artemether for treatment of complicated malaria; and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) for intermittent preventive treatment (IPTp). This study was conducted to evaluate access to national policy recommended anti-malarials. A cross-sectional survey of 127 medicine outlets (public, private and NGO) was conducted in urban and rural areas. The availability on the day of the survey, median prices, and affordability policy and available non-policy anti-malarials were calculated. Anti-malarials were stocked in 79% of all outlets surveyed. AS+AQ was widely available in public medicine outlets; AL was only available in the private and NGO sectors. Quinine was available in nearly two-thirds of public and NGO outlets and over one-third of private outlets. SP was widely available in all outlets. Non-policy anti-malarials were predominantly available in the private outlets. AS+AQ in the public sector was widely offered for free. Among the anti-malarials sold at a cost, the same median price of a course of AS+AQ (US$1.56), quinine tablets (US$0.63), were found in both the public and private sectors. Quinine injection had a median cost of US$0.31 in the public sector and US$0.47 in the private sector, while SP had a median cost of US$0.31 in the public sector compared to US$ 0.63 in the private sector. Non-policy anti-malarials were more affordable than first-line AS+AQ in all sectors. A course of AS+AQ was affordable at nearly two days’ worth of wages in both the public and private sectors. PMID:23133522

  6. Synthesis and biological screening of some pyridine derivatives as anti-malarial agents.

    PubMed

    Bekhit, Adnan A; Hymete, Ariaya; Damtew, Ashenafi; Mohamed, Abdel Maaboud I; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din A

    2012-02-01

    Two series of pyridine derivatives were synthesised and evaluated for their in vivo anti-malarial activity against Plasmodium berghei. The anti-malarial activity was determined in vivo by applying 4-day standard suppressive test using chloroquine (CQ)-sensitive P. berghei ANKA strain-infected mice. Compounds 2a, 2g and 2h showed inhibition of the parasite multiplication by 90, 91 and 80%, respectively, at a dose level of 50 µmol/kg. Moreover, The most active compounds (2a, 2g and 2h) were tested in vitro against CQ-resistant Plasmodium falciparum RKL9 strains where compound 2g showed promising activity with IC(50) = 0.0402 µM. The compounds were non-toxic at 300 and 100 mg/kg through the oral and parenteral routes, respectively. The docking pose of the most active compounds (2a, 2g and 2h) in the active site of dihydrofolate reductase enzyme revealed several hydrogen and hydrophobic interactions that contribute to the observed anti-malarial activities. PMID:21612373

  7. Anticancer Effect of AntiMalarial Artemisinin Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Das, AK

    2015-01-01

    The anti-malarial drug artemisinin has shown anticancer activity in vitro and animal experiments, but experience in human cancer is scarce. However, the ability of artemisinins to kill cancer cells through a variety of molecular mechanisms has been explored. A PubMed search of about 127 papers on anti-cancer effects of antimalarials has revealed that this class of drug, including other antimalarials, have several biological characteristics that include anticancer properties. Experimental evidences suggest that artemisinin compounds may be a therapeutic alternative in highly aggressive cancers with rapid dissemination, without developing drug resistance. They also exhibit synergism with other anticancer drugs with no increased toxicity toward normal cells. It has been found that semisynthetic artemisinin derivatives have much higher antitumor activity than their monomeric counterparts via mechanisms like apoptosis, arrest of cell cycle at G0/G1, and oxidative stress. The exact mechanism of activation and molecular basis of these anticancer effects are not fully elucidated. Artemisinins seem to regulate key factors such as nuclear factor-kappa B, survivin, NOXA, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, and BMI-1, involving multiple pathways that may affect drug response, drug interactions, drug resistance, and associated parameters upon normal cells. Newer synthetic artemisinins have been developed showing substantial antineoplastic activity, but there is still limited information regarding the mode of action of these synthetic compounds. In view of the emerging data, specific interactions with established chemotherapy need to be further investigated in different cancer cells and their phenotypes and validated further using different semisynthetic and synthetic artemisinin derivatives. PMID:25861527

  8. Anti-malarial activity of Holarrhena antidysenterica and Viola canescens, plants traditionally used against malaria in the Garhwal region of north-west Himalaya

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The increasing number of multidrug-resistant Plasmodium strains warrants exploration of new anti-malarials. Medicinal plant research has become more important, particularly after the development of Chinese anti-malarial drug artemisnin from Artemisia annua. The present study shows evaluation of anti-malarial effects of two plants commonly used against malaria in the Garhwal region of north-west Himalaya, in order to discover the herbal-based medicine. Methods In vitro anti-plasmodial sensitivity of plant extracts was assessed using schizont maturation and parasite lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH) assay. Cytotoxic activities of the examined extracts were determined on L-6 cells of rat skeletal muscle myoblast. The 4-day test for anti-malarial activity against a chloroquine sensitive Plasmodium berghei NK65 strain in Swiss albino mice was used for monitoring in vivo activity of plant extracts. Results Chloroform extract of H. antidysenterica (HA-2) and petroleum ether extract of V. canescens (VC-1) plants significantly reduced parasitaemia in P. berghei infected mice. The extract HA-2 showed in vitro anti-plasmodial activity with its IC50 value 5.5 μg/ml using pLDH assay and ED50 value 18.29 mg/kg in P. berghei infected Swiss albino mice. Similarly petroleum ether extract of V. canescens (VC-1) showed in vitro anti-plasmodial activity with its IC50 value 2.76 μg/ml using pLDH assay and ED50 15.8 mg/kg in P. berghei infected mice. The extracts coded as HA-2 at 30 mg/kg and VC-1 at 20 mg/kg exhibited parasite inhibition in mice: 73.2% and 63.0% respectively. Of these two plant extracts, petroleum ether extract of V. canescens was found slightly cytotoxic. Conclusion The present investigation reflects the use of these traditional medicinal plants against malaria and these plants may work as potential source in the development of variety of herbal formulations for the treatment of malaria. PMID:21288335

  9. Selective anti-malarial minor groove binders.

    PubMed

    Scott, Fraser J; Khalaf, Abedawn I; Duffy, Sandra; Avery, Vicky M; Suckling, Colin J

    2016-07-15

    A set of 31 DNA minor groove binders (MGBs) with diverse structural features relating to both physical chemical properties and DNA binding sequence preference has been evaluated as potential drugs to treat Plasmodium falciparum infections using a chloroquine sensitive strain (3D7) and a chloroquine resistant strain (Dd2) in comparison with human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells as an indicator of mammalian cell toxicity. MGBs with an alkene link between the two N-terminal building blocks were demonstrated to be most active with IC50 values in the range 30-500nM and therapeutic ratios in the range 10->500. Many active compounds contained a C-alkylthiazole building block. Active compounds with logD7.4 values of approximately 3 or 7 were identified. Importantly the MGBs tested were essentially equally effective against both chloroquine sensitive and resistant strains. The results show that suitably designed MGBs have the potential for development into clinical candidates for antimalarial drugs effective against resistant strains of Plasmodia. PMID:27212070

  10. Do ethnobotanical and laboratory data predict clinical safety and efficacy of anti-malarial plants?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Over 1200 plant species are reported in ethnobotanical studies for the treatment of malaria and fevers, so it is important to prioritize plants for further development of anti-malarials. Methods The “RITAM score” was designed to combine information from systematic literature searches of published ethnobotanical studies and laboratory pharmacological studies of efficacy and safety, in order to prioritize plants for further research. It was evaluated by correlating it with the results of clinical trials. Results and discussion The laboratory efficacy score correlated with clinical parasite clearance (rs=0.7). The ethnobotanical component correlated weakly with clinical symptom clearance but not with parasite clearance. The safety component was difficult to validate as all plants entering clinical trials were generally considered safe, so there was no clinical data on toxic plants. Conclusion The RITAM score (especially the efficacy and safety components) can be used as part of the selection process for prioritising plants for further research as anti-malarial drug candidates. The validation in this study was limited by the very small number of available clinical studies, and the heterogeneity of patients included. PMID:21411018

  11. Formulation, characterization and anti-malarial activity of homolipid-based artemether microparticles.

    PubMed

    Agubata, Chukwuma O; Nzekwe, Ifeanyi T; Attama, Anthony A; Mueller-Goymann, Christel C; Onunkwo, Godswill C

    2015-01-15

    The anti-malarial activity of artemether is dependent on its bioavailability. The purpose of the research is to improve the solubility, bioavailability and therapeutic efficacy of lipophilic artemether using homolipid-based microparticles. Irvingia fat was extracted from Irvingia gabonensis var. excelsa (Irvingia wombolu), and its lipid matrices (LM) with Phospholipon(®) 90G (P90G) were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD). Solid lipid microparticles were formulated, characterized, filled and compressed into capsules and tablets, respectively, and drug release studied. In vivo anti-plasmodial activity of artemether SLMs was evaluated in mice. The crystallinity of the phyto-lipid reduced in the presence of P90G, which was integrated into the irvingia fat crystal lattice. SLM dispersions with 3:1 irvingia fat/P90G composition showed higher diffusion and permeability through dialysis membrane while lower proportion of P90G (9:1 LM) favored increased dissolution rate of artemether from capsules (p<0.05). Significant increase (p<0.05) in % plasmodial growth inhibition and reduced parasitemia were observed in mice administered with the SLM dispersions compared with the controls. Therefore, SLMs prepared with composite mixtures of a homolipid and P90G could be used to improve the solubility, dissolution, permeability, bioavailability and anti-malarial efficacy of artemether. PMID:25448583

  12. Natural products as starting points for future anti-malarial therapies: going back to our roots?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The discovery and development of new anti-malarials are at a crossroads. Fixed dose artemisinin combination therapy is now being used to treat a hundred million children each year, with a cost as low as 30 cents per child, with cure rates of over 95%. However, as with all anti-infective strategies, this triumph brings with it the seeds of its own downfall, the emergence of resistance. It takes ten years to develop a new medicine. New classes of medicines to combat malaria, as a result of infection by Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax are urgently needed. Results Natural product scaffolds have been the basis of the majority of current anti-malarial medicines. Molecules such as quinine, lapachol and artemisinin were originally isolated from herbal medicinal products. After improvement with medicinal chemistry and formulation technologies, and combination with other active ingredients, they now make up the current armamentarium of medicines. In recent years advances in screening technologies have allowed testing of millions of compounds from pharmaceutical diversity for anti-malarial activity in cellular assays. These initiatives have resulted in thousands of new sub-micromolar active compounds – starting points for new drug discovery programmes. Against this backdrop, the paucity of potent natural products identified has been disappointing. Now is a good time to reflect on the current approach to screening herbal medicinal products and suggest revisions. Nearly sixty years ago, the Chinese doctor Chen Guofu, suggested natural products should be approached by dao-xing-ni-shi or ‘acting in the reversed order’, starting with observational clinical studies. Natural products based on herbal remedies are in use in the community, and have the potential unique advantage that clinical observational data exist, or can be generated. The first step should be the confirmation and definition of the clinical activity of herbal medicinal products already

  13. Identification of a nucleoside/nucleobase transporter from Plasmodium falciparum, a novel target for anti-malarial chemotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, M D; Hyde, R J; Yao, S Y; McRobert, L; Cass, C E; Young, J D; McConkey, G A; Baldwin, S A

    2000-01-01

    Plasmodium, the aetiologic agent of malaria, cannot synthesize purines de novo, and hence depends upon salvage from the host. Here we describe the molecular cloning and functional expression in Xenopus oocytes of the first purine transporter to be identified in this parasite. This 422-residue protein, which we designate PfENT1, is predicted to contain 11 membrane-spanning segments and is a distantly related member of the widely distributed eukaryotic protein family the equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs). However, it differs profoundly at the sequence and functional levels from its homologous counterparts in the human host. The parasite protein exhibits a broad substrate specificity for natural nucleosides, but transports the purine nucleoside adenosine with a considerably higher apparent affinity (K(m) 0.32+/-0.05 mM) than the pyrimidine nucleoside uridine (K(m) 3.5+/-1.1 mM). It also efficiently transports nucleobases such as adenine (K(m) 0.32+/-0.10 mM) and hypoxanthine (K(m) 0.41+/-0.1 mM), and anti-viral 3'-deoxynucleoside analogues. Moreover, it is not sensitive to classical inhibitors of mammalian ENTs, including NBMPR [6-[(4-nitrobenzyl)thio]-9-beta-D-ribofuranosylpurine, or nitrobenzylthioinosine] and the coronary vasoactive drugs, dipyridamole, dilazep and draflazine. These unique properties suggest that PfENT1 might be a viable target for the development of novel anti-malarial drugs. PMID:10861212

  14. Discovery of a selective, safe and novel anti-malarial compound with activity against chloroquine resistant strain of Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Ankita; Paliwal, Sarvesh; Mishra, Ruchi; Sharma, Swapnil; Kumar Dwivedi, Anil; Tripathi, Renu; Gunjan, Sarika

    2015-01-01

    In recent years the DNA minor groove has attracted much attention for the development of anti-malarial agents. In view of this we have attempted to discover novel DNA minor groove binders through in-silico and in-vitro workflow. A rigorously validated pharmacophore model comprising of two positive ionizable (PI), one hydrophobic (HY) and one ring aromatic (RA) features was used to mine NCI chemical compound database. This led to retrieval of many hits which were screened on the basis of estimated activity, fit value and Lipinski’s violation. Finally two compounds NSC639017 and NSC371488 were evaluated for their in-vitro anti-malarial activities against Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 (CQ sensitive) and K1 (CQ resistant) strains by SYBR green-I based fluorescence assay. The results revealed that out of two, NSC639017 posses excellent anti-malarial activity particularly against chloroquine resistant strain and moreover NSC639017 also appeared to be safe (CC50 126.04 μg/ml) and selective during cytotoxicity evaluation. PMID:26346444

  15. Novel in vivo active anti-malarials based on a hydroxy-ethyl-amine scaffold.

    PubMed

    Ciana, Claire-Lise; Siegrist, Romain; Aissaoui, Hamed; Marx, Léo; Racine, Sophie; Meyer, Solange; Binkert, Christoph; de Kanter, Ruben; Fischli, Christoph; Wittlin, Sergio; Boss, Christoph

    2013-02-01

    A novel series of anti-malarials, based on a hydroxy-ethyl-amine scaffold, initially identified as peptidomimetic protease inhibitors is described. Combination of the hydroxy-ethyl-amine anti-malarial phramacophore with the known Mannich base pharmacophore of amodiaquine (57) resulted in promising in vivo active novel derivatives. PMID:23260352

  16. Anti-malarial activity and HS-SPME-GC-MS chemical profiling of Plinia cerrocampanensis leaf essential oil

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Plinia cerrocampanensis is an endemic plant of Panama. The leaf essential oil of this plant has shown antibacterial activity. However, anti-malarial activity and chemical profiling by HS-SPME-GC-MS of this essential oil have not been reported before. Methods Anti-malarial activity of the essential oil (EO) was evaluated in vitro against chloroquine-sensitive HB3 and chloroquine-resistant W2 strains of Plasmodium falciparum. Synergistic effect of chloroquine and the EO on parasite growth was evaluated by calculating the combination index. A methodology involving headspace solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS) was developed to investigate the composition of Plinia cerrocampanensis EO. Results Plinia cerrocampanensis EO showed a high anti-malarial activity and a synergistic interaction with chloroquine. The Plinia cerrocampanensis EO inhibited P. falciparum growth in vitro at an IC50 of 7.3 μg/mL. Chloroquine together with the EO decreased the IC50 of chloroquine from 0.1 μg/mL to 0.05 μg/mL, and of the EO from 7.3 μg/mL to 1.1 μg/mL. The measured combination index was 0.58, which clearly indicates that the EO acts synergistically with chloroquine. Since the EO maintained its inhibitory activity on the chloroquine-sensitive strain of the parasite, it could be acting by a different mechanism of action than chloroquine. The best HS-SPME-GC-MS analytical conditions were obtained when the temperature of extraction was 49°C, incubation time 14 min, and the time of extraction 10 min. This method allowed for the identification of 53 volatile constituents in the EO, including new compounds not reported earlier. Conclusions The anti-malarial activity exhibited by the Plinia cerrocampanensis EO may lend support for its possible use as an alternative for anti-malarial therapy. PMID:24410874

  17. The anti-malarial atovaquone increases radiosensitivity by alleviating tumour hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, Thomas M.; Fokas, Emmanouil; Kunz-Schughart, Leoni A.; Folkes, Lisa K.; Anbalagan, Selvakumar; Huether, Melanie; Kelly, Catherine J.; Pirovano, Giacomo; Buffa, Francesca M.; Hammond, Ester M.; Stratford, Michael; Muschel, Ruth J.; Higgins, Geoff S.; McKenna, William Gillies

    2016-01-01

    Tumour hypoxia renders cancer cells resistant to cancer therapy, resulting in markedly worse clinical outcomes. To find clinical candidate compounds that reduce hypoxia in tumours, we conduct a high-throughput screen for oxygen consumption rate (OCR) reduction and identify a number of drugs with this property. For this study we focus on the anti-malarial, atovaquone. Atovaquone rapidly decreases the OCR by more than 80% in a wide range of cancer cell lines at pharmacological concentrations. In addition, atovaquone eradicates hypoxia in FaDu, HCT116 and H1299 spheroids. Similarly, it reduces hypoxia in FaDu and HCT116 xenografts in nude mice, and causes a significant tumour growth delay when combined with radiation. Atovaquone is a ubiquinone analogue, and decreases the OCR by inhibiting mitochondrial complex III. We are now undertaking clinical studies to assess whether atovaquone reduces tumour hypoxia in patients, thereby increasing the efficacy of radiotherapy. PMID:27453292

  18. The anti-malarial atovaquone increases radiosensitivity by alleviating tumour hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Thomas M; Fokas, Emmanouil; Kunz-Schughart, Leoni A; Folkes, Lisa K; Anbalagan, Selvakumar; Huether, Melanie; Kelly, Catherine J; Pirovano, Giacomo; Buffa, Francesca M; Hammond, Ester M; Stratford, Michael; Muschel, Ruth J; Higgins, Geoff S; McKenna, William Gillies

    2016-01-01

    Tumour hypoxia renders cancer cells resistant to cancer therapy, resulting in markedly worse clinical outcomes. To find clinical candidate compounds that reduce hypoxia in tumours, we conduct a high-throughput screen for oxygen consumption rate (OCR) reduction and identify a number of drugs with this property. For this study we focus on the anti-malarial, atovaquone. Atovaquone rapidly decreases the OCR by more than 80% in a wide range of cancer cell lines at pharmacological concentrations. In addition, atovaquone eradicates hypoxia in FaDu, HCT116 and H1299 spheroids. Similarly, it reduces hypoxia in FaDu and HCT116 xenografts in nude mice, and causes a significant tumour growth delay when combined with radiation. Atovaquone is a ubiquinone analogue, and decreases the OCR by inhibiting mitochondrial complex III. We are now undertaking clinical studies to assess whether atovaquone reduces tumour hypoxia in patients, thereby increasing the efficacy of radiotherapy. PMID:27453292

  19. Development and Optimization of a Novel 384-Well Anti-Malarial Imaging Assay Validated for High-Throughput Screening

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Sandra; Avery, Vicky M.

    2012-01-01

    With the increasing occurrence of drug resistance in the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, there is a great need for new and novel anti-malarial drugs. We have developed a 384-well, high-throughput imaging assay for the detection of new anti-malarial compounds, which was initially validated by screening a marine natural product library, and subsequently used to screen more than 3 million data points from a variety of compound sources. Founded on another fluorescence-based P. falciparum growth inhibition assay, the DNA-intercalating dye 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, was used to monitor changes in parasite number. Fluorescent images were acquired on the PerkinElmer Opera High Throughput confocal imaging system and analyzed with a spot detection algorithm using the Acapella data processing software. Further optimization of this assay sought to increase throughput, assay stability, and compatibility with our high-throughput screening equipment platforms. The assay typically yielded Z'-factor values of 0.5–0.6, with signal-to-noise ratios of 12. PMID:22232455

  20. A retrospective analysis of the change in anti-malarial treatment policy: Peru

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Holly Ann; Vincent-Mark, Arlene; Herrera, Yenni; Chang, O Jaime

    2009-01-01

    Background National malaria control programmes must deal with the complex process of changing national malaria treatment guidelines, often without guidance on the process of change. Selecting a replacement drug is only one issue in this process. There is a paucity of literature describing successful malaria treatment policy changes to help guide control programs through this process. Objectives To understand the wider context in which national malaria treatment guidelines were formulated in a specific country (Peru). Methods Using qualitative methods (individual and focus group interviews, stakeholder analysis and a review of documents), a retrospective analysis of the process of change in Peru's anti-malarial treatment policy from the early 1990's to 2003 was completed. Results The decision to change Peru's policies resulted from increasing levels of anti-malarial drug resistance, as well as complaints from providers that the drugs were no longer working. The context of the change occurred in a time in which Peru was changing national governments, which created extreme challenges in moving the change process forward. Peru utilized a number of key strategies successfully to ensure that policy change would occur. This included a) having the process directed by a group who shared a common interest in malaria and who had long-established social and professional networks among themselves, b) engaging in collaborative teamwork among nationals and between nationals and international collaborators, c) respect for and inclusion of district-level staff in all phases of the process, d) reliance on high levels of technical and scientific knowledge, e) use of standardized protocols to collect data, and f) transparency. Conclusion Although not perfectly or fully implemented by 2003, the change in malaria treatment policy in Peru occurred very quickly, as compared to other countries. They identified a problem, collected the data necessary to justify the change, utilized

  1. The potential of anti-malarial compounds derived from African medicinal plants, part II: a pharmacological evaluation of non-alkaloids and non-terpenoids

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is currently a public health concern in many countries in the world due to various factors which are not yet under check. Drug discovery projects targeting malaria often resort to natural sources in the search for lead compounds. A survey of the literature has led to a summary of the major findings regarding plant-derived compounds from African flora, which have shown anti-malarial/antiplasmodial activities, tested by in vitro and in vivo assays. Considerations have been given to compounds with activities ranging from “very active” to “weakly active”, leading to >500 chemical structures, mainly alkaloids, terpenoids, flavonoids, coumarins, phenolics, polyacetylenes, xanthones, quinones, steroids and lignans. However, only the compounds that showed anti-malarial activity, from “very active” to “moderately active”, are discussed in this review. PMID:24602358

  2. The potential of anti-malarial compounds derived from African medicinal plants, part I: a pharmacological evaluation of alkaloids and terpenoids

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Traditional medicine caters for about 80% of the health care needs of many rural populations around the world, especially in developing countries. In addition, plant-derived compounds have played key roles in drug discovery. Malaria is currently a public health concern in many countries in the world due to factors such as chemotherapy faced by resistance, poor hygienic conditions, poorly managed vector control programmes and no approved vaccines. In this review, an attempt has been made to assess the value of African medicinal plants for drug discovery by discussing the anti-malarial virtue of the derived phytochemicals that have been tested by in vitro and in vivo assays. This survey was focused on pure compounds derived from African flora which have exhibited anti-malarial properties with activities ranging from “very active” to “weakly active”. However, only the compounds which showed anti-malarial activities from “very active” to “moderately active” are discussed in this review. The activity of 278 compounds, mainly alkaloids, terpenoids, flavonoids, coumarines, phenolics, polyacetylenes, xanthones, quinones, steroids, and lignans have been discussed. The first part of this review series covers the activity of 171 compounds belonging to the alkaloid and terpenoid classes. Data available in the literature indicated that African flora hold an enormous potential for the development of phytomedicines for malaria. PMID:24330395

  3. Development of Diaminoquinazoline Histone Lysine Methyltransferase Inhibitors as Potent Blood-stage Anti-Malarial Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Joachim; Blundell, Scott; Liu, Feng; Chen, Xin; Srimongkolpithak, Nitipol; Jin, Jian; Charman, Susan A.; Scherf, Artur; Fuchter, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Modulating epigenetic mechanisms in malarial parasites is an emerging avenue for the discovery of novel antimalarial drugs. Previously we demonstrated the potent in vitro and in vivo antimalarial activity of BIX01294 (1), a known human G9a inhibitor, together with its dose-dependent effects on histone methylation in the malarial parasite. This work describes our initial medicinal chemistry efforts to optimize the diaminoquinazoline chemotype for antimalarial activity. A variety of analogues were designed by substituting the 2 and 4 positions of the quinazoline core and these molecules were tested against Plasmodium falciparum (3D7 strain). Several analogues with IC50 values as low as 18.5 nM and with low mammalian cell toxicity (HepG2) were identified. Certain pharmacophoric features required for the antimalarial activity were found to be analogous to the previously published SAR of these analogues for G9a inhibition, thereby suggesting potential similarities between the malarial and the human HKMT targets of this chemotype. Physiochemical, in vitro activity, and in vitro metabolism studies were also performed for a select set of potent analogues to evaluate their potential as anti-malarial leads. PMID:25044750

  4. A population genetic model for the initial spread of partially resistant malaria parasites under anti-malarial combination therapy and weak intrahost competition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yuseob; Escalante, Ananias A; Schneider, Kristan A

    2014-01-01

    To develop public-health policies that extend the lifespan of affordable anti-malarial drugs as effective treatment options, it is necessary to understand the evolutionary processes leading to the origin and spread of mutations conferring drug resistance in malarial parasites. We built a population-genetic model for the emergence of resistance under combination drug therapy. Reproductive cycles of parasites are specified by their absolute fitness determined by clinical parameters, thus coupling the evolutionary-genetic with population-dynamic processes. Initial mutations confer only partial drug-resistance. Therefore, mutant parasites rarely survive combination therapy and within-host competition is very weak among parasites. The model focuses on the early phase of such unsuccessful recurrent mutations. This ends in the rare event of mutants enriching in an infected individual from which the successful spread of resistance over the entire population is initiated. By computer simulations, the waiting time until the establishment of resistant parasites is analysed. Resistance spreads quickly following the first appearance of a host infected predominantly by mutant parasites. This occurs either through a rare transmission of a resistant parasite to an uninfected host or through a rare failure of drugs in removing "transient" mutant alleles. The emergence of resistance is delayed with lower mutation rate, earlier treatment, higher metabolic cost of resistance, longer duration of high drug dose, and higher drug efficacy causing a stronger reduction in the sensitive and resistant parasites' fitnesses. Overall, contrary to other studies' proposition, the current model based on absolute fitness suggests that aggressive drug treatment delays the emergence of drug resistance. PMID:25007207

  5. Plasmodium dihydroorotate dehydrogenase: a promising target for novel anti-malarial chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Margaret A.; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.

    2010-01-01

    Malaria remains a globally prevalent infectious disease that leads to significant morbidity and mortality. While there are a number of drugs approved for its treatment, drug resistance has compromised most of them, making the development of new drugs for the treatment and prevention of malaria essential. The completion of the Plasmodium falciparum genome and a growing understanding of parasite biology are fueling the search for novel drug targets. Despite this, few targets have been chemically validated in vivo. The pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway illustrates one of the best examples of successful identification of anti-malarial drug targets. This review focuses on recent studies to exploit the fourth enzyme in the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway of P. falciparum, dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (PfDHODH), as a new target for drug discovery. Several chemical scaffolds have been identified by high throughput screening as potent inhibitors of PfDHODH and these show strong selectivity for the malarial enzyme over that from the human host. Potent activity against parasites in whole cell models with good correlation between activity on the enzyme and the parasite have also been observed for a number of the identified series. Lead optimization of a triazolopyrimidine-based series has identified an analog with prolonged plasma exposure, that is orally bioavailable, and which shows good efficacy against the in vivo mouse model of the disease. These data provide strong evidence that PfDHODH is a validated target for the identification of new antimalarial chemotherapy. The challenge remains to identify compounds with the necessary combination of potency and metabolic stability to allow identification of a clinical candidate. PMID:20334617

  6. Thiamin supplementation does not reduce the frequency of adverse events after anti-malarial therapy among patients with falciparum malaria in southern Laos

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In a recent study one third of Lao patients presenting with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria had biochemical evidence of thiamin deficiency, which was associated with a higher incidence of adverse events. Thiamin supplementation might, therefore, reduce adverse events in this population. Methods An exploratory, double-blind, parallel group, placebo-controlled, superiority trial of thiamin supplementation in patients of all ages with uncomplicated and severe falciparum malaria was conducted in Xepon District, Savannakhet Province, southern Laos. Patients were randomly assigned to either oral thiamin 10 mg/day for 7 days immediately after standard anti-malarial treatment then 5 mg daily until day 42, or identical oral placebo. Results After interim analyses when 630 patients (314 in thiamin and 316 in placebo groups) had been recruited, the trial was discontinued on the grounds of futility. On admission biochemical thiamin deficiency (alpha ≥ 25%) was present in 27% of patients and 9% had severe deficiency (alpha > 31%). After 42 days of treatment, the frequency of thiamin deficiency was lower in the thiamin (2%, 1% severe) compared to the placebo (11%, 3% severe) groups (p < 0.001 and p = 0.05), respectively. Except for diarrhoea, 7% in the placebo compared to 3% in the thiamin group (p = 0.04), and dizziness on day 1 (33% vs 25%, p = 0.045), all adverse events were not significantly different between the groups (p > 0.05). Clinical, haematological, and parasitological responses to treatment did not differ significantly between the two groups. Conclusion Thiamin supplementation reduced biochemical thiamin deficiency among Lao malaria patients following anti-malarial drug treatment, but it did not reduce the frequency of adverse events after anti-malarial therapy or have any detected clinical or parasitological impact. Trial registration ISRCTN 85411059 PMID:25027701

  7. Quality of anti-malarials collected in the private and informal sectors in Guyana and Suriname

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite a significant reduction in the number of malaria cases in Guyana and Suriname, this disease remains a major problem in the interior of both countries, especially in areas with gold mining and logging operations, where malaria is endemic. National malaria control programmes in these countries provide treatment to patients with medicines that are procured and distributed through regulated processes in the public sector. However, availability to medicines in licensed facilities (private sector) and unlicensed facilities (informal sector) is common, posing the risk of access to and use of non-recommended treatments and/or poor quality products. Methods To assess the quality of circulating anti-malarial medicines, samples were purchased in the private and informal sectors of Guyana and Suriname in 2009. The sampling sites were selected based on epidemiological data and/or distance from health facilities. Samples were analysed for identity, content, dissolution or disintegration, impurities, and uniformity of dosage units or weight variation according to manufacturer, pharmacopeial, or other validated method. Results Quality issues were observed in 45 of 77 (58%) anti-malarial medicines sampled in Guyana of which 30 failed visual & physical inspection and 18 failed quality control tests. The proportion of monotherapy and ACT medicines failing quality control tests was 43% (13/30) and 11% (5/47) respectively. A higher proportion of medicines sampled from the private sector 34% (11/32) failed quality control tests versus 16% (7/45) in the informal sector. In Suriname, 58 medicines were sampled, of which 50 (86%) were Artecom®, the fixed-dose combination of piperaquine-dihydroartemisinin-trimethoprim co-blistered with a primaquine phosphate tablet. All Artecom samples were found to lack a label claim for primaquine, thus failing visual and physical inspection. Conclusions The findings of the studies in both countries point to significant problems with

  8. A Water-Soluble Polysaccharide from the Fruit Bodies of Bulgaria inquinans (Fries) and Its Anti-Malarial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Hongtao; Han, Han; Li, Zonghong; Ni, Weihua; Chen, Yan; Zhu, Jingjing; Gao, Tingting; Hao, Miao; Zhou, Yifa

    2011-01-01

    A water-soluble polysaccharide (BIWS-4b) was purified from the fruit bodies of Bulgaria inquinans (Fries). It is composed of mannose (27.2%), glucose (15.5%) and galactose (57.3%). Its molecular weight was estimated to be 7.4 kDa (polydispersity index, Mw/Mn: 1.35). Structural analyses indicated that BIWS-4b mainly contains (1 → 6)-linked, (1 → 5)-linked and (1 → 5,6)-linked β-Galf units; (1 → 4)-linked and non-reducing terminal β-Glcp units; and (1 → 2)-linked, (1 → 6)-linked, (1 → 2,6)-linked and non-reducing terminal α-Manp units. When examined by the 4-day method and in a prophylactic assay in mice, BIWS-4b exhibited markedly suppressive activity against malaria while enhancing the activity of artesunate. Immunological tests indicated that BIWS-4b significantly enhanced macrophage phagocytosis and splenic lymphocyte proliferation in malaria-bearing mice and normal mice. The anti-malarial activity of BIWS-4b might be intermediated by enhancing immune competence and restoring artesunate-suppressed immune function. Thus, BIWS-4b is a potential adjuvant of anti-malaria drugs. PMID:21785644

  9. Self-medication with anti-malarials is a common practice in rural communities of Kilosa district in Tanzania despite the reported decline of malaria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Self-medication has been widely practiced worldwide particularly in developing countries including Tanzania. In sub-Saharan Africa high incidences of malaria have contributed to self-medication with anti-malarial drugs. In recent years, there has been a gain in malaria control, which has led to decreased malaria transmission, morbidity and mortality. Therefore, understanding the patterns of self-medication during this period when most instances of fever are presumed to be due to non-malaria febrile illnesses is important. In this study, self-medication practice was assessed among community members and information on the habit of self-medication was gathered from health workers. Methods Twelve focus group discussions (FGD) with members of communities and 14 in-depth interviews (IDI) with health workers were conducted in Kilosa district, Tanzania. The transcripts were coded into different categories by MaxQDA software and then analysed through thematic content analysis. Results The study revealed that self-medication was a common practice among FGD participants. Anti-malarial drugs including sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine and quinine were frequently used by the participants for treatment of fever. Study participants reported that they visited health facilities following failure of self-medication or if there was no significant improvement after self-medication. The common reported reasons for self-medication were shortages of drugs at health facilities, long waiting time at health facilities, long distance to health facilities, inability to pay for health care charges and the freedom to choose the preferred drugs. Conclusion This study demonstrated that self-medication practice is common among rural communities in the study area. The need for community awareness is emphasized for correct and comprehensive information about drawbacks associated with self-medication practices. Deliberate efforts by the government and other stakeholders to improve health care

  10. Culture-adapted Plasmodium falciparum isolates from UK travellers: in vitro drug sensitivity, clonality and drug resistance markers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The screening of lead compounds against in vitro parasite cultures is an essential step in the development of novel anti-malarial drugs, but currently relies on laboratory parasite lines established in vitro during the last century. This study sought to establish in continuous culture a series of recent Plasmodium falciparum isolates to represent the current parasite populations in Africa, all of which are now exposed to artemisinin combination therapy. Methods Pre-treatment P. falciparum isolates were obtained in EDTA, and placed into continuous culture after sampling of DNA. One post-treatment blood sample was also collected for each donor to monitor parasite clonality during clearance in vivo. IC50 estimates were obtained for 11 anti-malarial compounds for each established parasite line, clonal multiplicity measured in vivo and in vitro, and polymorphic sites implicated in parasite sensitivity to drugs were investigated at the pfmdr1, pfcrt, pfdhfr, pfdhps and pfap2mu loci before and after treatment, and in the cultured lines. Results Plasmodium falciparum isolates from seven malaria patients with recent travel to three West African and two East African countries were successfully established in long-term culture. One of these, HL1211, was from a patient with recrudescent parasitaemia 14 days after a full course of artemether-lumefantrine. All established culture lines were shown to be polyclonal, reflecting the in vivo isolates from which they were derived, and at least two lines reliably produce gametocytes in vitro. Two lines displayed high chloroquine IC50 estimates, and carried the CVIET haplotype at codons 72–76, whereas the remaining five lines carried the CVMNK haplotype and were sensitive in vitro. All were sensitive to the endoperoxides dihydroartemisinin and OZ277, but IC50 estimates for lumefantrine varied, with the least sensitive parasites carrying pfmdr1 alleles encoding Asn at codon 86. Conclusions This study describes the

  11. Methods for implementing a medicine outlet survey: lessons from the anti-malarial market

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent years an increasing number of public investments and policy changes have been made to improve the availability, affordability and quality of medicines available to consumers in developing countries, including anti-malarials. It is important to monitor the extent to which these interventions are successful in achieving their aims using quantitative data on the supply side of the market. There are a number of challenges related to studying supply, including outlet sampling, gaining provider cooperation and collecting accurate data on medicines. This paper provides guidance on key steps to address these issues when conducting a medicine outlet survey in a developing country context. While the basic principles of good survey design and implementation are important for all surveys, there are a set of specific issues that should be considered when conducting a medicine outlet survey. Methods This paper draws on the authors’ experience of designing and implementing outlet surveys, including the lessons learnt from ACTwatch outlet surveys on anti-malarial retail supply, and other key studies in the field. Key lessons and points of debate are distilled around the following areas: selecting a sample of outlets; techniques for collecting and analysing data on medicine availability, price and sales volumes; and methods for ensuring high quality data in general. Results and conclusions The authors first consider the inclusion criteria for outlets, contrasting comprehensive versus more focused approaches. Methods for developing a reliable sampling frame of outlets are then presented, including use of existing lists, key informants and an outlet census. Specific issues in the collection of data on medicine prices and sales volumes are discussed; and approaches for generating comparable price and sales volume data across products using the adult equivalent treatment dose (AETD) are explored. The paper concludes with advice on practical considerations

  12. Combating poor-quality anti-malarial medicines: a call to action.

    PubMed

    Bassat, Quique; Tanner, Marcel; Guerin, Philippe J; Stricker, Kirstin; Hamed, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    The circulation of poor-quality medicines continues to undermine the fight against many life-threatening diseases. Anti-malarial medicines appear to have been particularly compromised and present a major public health threat in malaria-endemic countries, negatively affecting individuals and their communities. Concerted collaborative efforts are required from global, regional and national organizations, involving the public and private sectors, to address the problem. While many initiatives are underway, a number of unmet needs deserve urgent and increased multisector attention. At the global level, there is a need for an international public health legal framework or treaty on poor-quality medicines, with statutes suitable for integration into national laws. In addition, increased international efforts are required to strengthen the governance of global supply chains and enhance cooperation between national medicine regulation authorities and law enforcement bodies. Increased investment is needed in innovative technologies that will enable healthcare teams to detect poor-quality medicines at all levels of the supply chain. At the regional level, a number of initiatives would be beneficial-key areas are standardization, simplification, and reciprocal recognition of registration processes and development of quality control capacity in regional centres of excellence that are better aligned with public health needs; improved surveillance methods and creation of a framework for compulsory and transparent reporting of poor-quality medicines; additional support for national medicine regulation authorities and other national partner authorities; and an increase in support for regional laboratories to boost their capabilities in detecting poor-quality medicines. It is vital that all stakeholders involved in efforts against poor-quality anti-malarial medicines extend and strengthen their actions in these critical areas and thus effectively support global health development

  13. Hypericum lanceolatum (Hypericaceae) as a potential source of new anti-malarial agents: a bioassay-guided fractionation of the stem bark

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Malaria is a major public health threat in Africa, and traditional medicine continues to play a key role in its control especially in rural areas. A bioassay-guided fractionation was carried out in order to evaluate the anti-malarial potential and the safety of the methanol extract of the Hypericum lanceolatum stem bark. Methods The anti-plasmodial activity was assayed by the lactate dehydrogenase method (pLDH) against the multidrug-resistant W2mef laboratory strain, and a field isolate (SHF4) of Plasmodium falciparum. Cytotoxicity tests were carried out using the LLC-MK2 monkey kidney epithelial cells. Results Five compounds were isolated from the most active and least cytotoxic ethylacetate sub-extract: betulinic acid (HLT1), 2,2',5,6'-tetrahydroxybenzophenone (HLT2), 5-hydroxy-3-methoxyxanthone (HLT3), 3-hydroxy-5-methoxyxanthone (HLT4) and HLT0 (yet to be identified). Three of the tested compounds presented significant anti-plasmodial activities (with 50% inhibitory concentration, IC50 < 5 μM), with 5-hydroxy-3-methoxyxanthone exerting the highest activity, followed by HLT0 and betulinic acid. All the compounds with significant anti-plasmodial activity were non-cytotoxic, except betulinic acid which showed a 50% cytotoxic concentration, CC50 of 25 μg/mL. Conclusions These findings justify the use of H. lanceolatum stem bark as anti-malarial by traditional healers of Western Cameroon, and could constitute a good basis for further studies towards development of new drug candidates or phytomedicines for malaria. PMID:21682873

  14. Determination of metabolic profile of anti-malarial trioxane CDRI 99/411 in rat liver microsomes using HPLC.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Smriti; Manickavasagam, Lakshmi; Jain, Girish Kumar

    2012-01-01

    CDRI 99/411 is a potent 1,2,4-trioxane anti-malarial candidate compound of the Central Drug Research Institute, India. This study aimed to conduct comprehensive in vitro metabolic investigations of CDRI 99/411 to corroborate its preclinical investigations. Preliminary in vitro metabolic investigations were performed to assess the metabolic stability [in vitro half-life (t(1/2) ) and in vitro hepatic intrinsic clearance (Cl(int) )] of CDRI 99/411 in male Sprague-Dawley rat and human liver microsomes using validated high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detector. The observed in vitro t(1/2) of the compound in rat and human liver microsomes was 13 min with in vitro Cl(int) 130.7±25.0 μL/min/mg and 19 min with in vitro Cl(int) 89.3 ± 17.40 μL/min/mg. These observations suggested moderate metabolic degradation and in vitro Cl(int) with insignificant difference (p>0.05) in the metabolic stability profile in rat and human. Hence, in vitro metabolic investigations were performed with rat liver microsomes. It was observed that CDRI 99/411 exhibited sigmoidal kinetics. At nonlinear regression (r ≥ 0.99) EC(50) and Hill slope values were 17 µm and 1.50, respectively. The metabolism of CDRI 99/411 was primarily mediated by CYP3A2 and was inferred by CYP reaction phenotyping with known potent inhibitors. Two metabolites of CDRI 99/411 were detected which were undetectable on incubation with 1-aminobenzotriazole and ketoconazole. PMID:21503937

  15. Chinese propriety medicines: an "alternative modernity?" The case of the anti-malarial substance artemisinin in East Africa.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses various modes of "modernizing" traditional Chinese medical drugs (zhongyao [image: see text]) and transforming them into so-called Chinese propriety medicines (zhongchengyao [image: see text]) that are flooding the current neoliberal wellness markets. This article argues that the chemical procedures used in the manufacture of Chinese propriety medicines are highly culture-specific and deserve being considered as instantiations of an "alternative modernity" (e.g., Knauft 2002), rather than of "Westernization." These Western-Chinese combinations, produced in strife toward fulfilling Mao Zedong's Communist-revolutionary vision, have a potential to represent a critical alterity to Western health policies, challenging rhetoric against such combinations. However, as is also noted in this article based on ethnographic fieldwork in East Africa, their potential alterity has been corroded for at least two reasons. First, the medical rationale for dispensing these medications has been shaped by commercial demands in ways that have worked toward transforming the formerly scholarly Chinese medical tradition (as outlined by Bates 1995) into a consumer-near and popular "folk medicine" (as defined by Farquhar 1994:212). Second, the repertoire of Chinese propriety medicines is impoverished as its efficacious "alternatively modern" drugs are being redefined as "modern" biomedical drugs. The article concludes that the potentially critical alterity of any formerly scholarly traditional medicine is more likely to be lost in those fields of health care that are both highly commercialized and polarized by the biomedical imperative to distinguish between "traditional" and "modern" medicines. As example for demonstrating how contentious the issue is, qinghaosu [image: see text] (artemisinin) is put center stage. It is an anti-malarial substance which in the 1970s Chinese scientists extracted from the Chinese medical drug qinghao [image: see text] (Herba Artemisiae

  16. Combinatorial pathway engineering for optimized production of the anti-malarial FR900098.

    PubMed

    Freestone, Todd S; Zhao, Huimin

    2016-02-01

    As resistance to current anti-malarial therapeutics spreads, new compounds to treat malaria are increasingly needed. One promising compound is FR900098, a naturally occurring phosphonate. Due to limitations in both chemical synthesis and biosynthetic methods for FR900098 production, this potential therapeutic has yet to see widespread implementation. Here we applied a combinatorial pathway engineering strategy to improve the production of FR900098 in Escherichia coli by modulating each of the pathway's nine genes with four promoters of different strengths. Due to the large size of the library and the low screening throughput, it was necessary to develop a novel screening strategy that significantly reduced the sample size needed to find an optimal strain. This was done by using biased libraries that localize searching around top hits and home in on high-producing strains. By incorporating this strategy, a significantly improved strain was found after screening less than 3% of the entire library. When coupled with culturing optimization, a strain was found to produce 96 mg/L, a 16-fold improvement over the original strain. We believe the enriched library method developed here can be used on other large pathways that may be difficult to engineer by combinatorial methods due to low screening throughput. PMID:26245694

  17. Novel Inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase with Anti-malarial Activity in the Mouse Model

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, Michael L.; Bastos, Cecilia M.; Kramer, Martin L.; Barker, Jr., Robert H.; Skerlj, Renato; Sidhu, Amar Bir; Deng, Xiaoyi; Celatka, Cassandra; Cortese, Joseph F.; Guerrero Bravo, Jose E.; Crespo Llado, Keila N.; Serrano, Adelfa E.; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Viera, Sara; Garuti, Helen; Wittlin, Sergio; Papastogiannidis, Petros; Lin, Jing-wen; Janse, Chris J.; Khan, Shahid M.; Duraisingh, Manoj; Coleman, Bradley; Goldsmith, Elizabeth J.; Phillips, Margaret A.; Munoz, Benito; Wirth, Dyann F.; Klinger, Jeffrey D.; Wiegand, Roger; Sybertz, Edmund

    2010-11-22

    Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the most deadly form of human malaria, is unable to salvage pyrimidines and must rely on de novo biosynthesis for survival. Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway and represents a potential target for anti-malarial therapy. A high throughput screen and subsequent medicinal chemistry program identified a series of N-alkyl-5-(1H-benzimidazol-1-yl)thiophene-2-carboxamides with low nanomolar in vitro potency against DHODH from P. falciparum, P. vivax, and P. berghei. The compounds were selective for the parasite enzymes over human DHODH, and x-ray structural data on the analog Genz-667348, demonstrated that species selectivity could be attributed to amino acid differences in the inhibitor-binding site. Compounds from this series demonstrated in vitro potency against the 3D7 and Dd2 strains of P. falciparum, good tolerability and oral exposure in the mouse, and ED{sub 50} values in the 4-day murine P. berghei efficacy model of 13-21 mg/kg/day with oral twice-daily dosing. In particular, treatment with Genz-667348 at 100 mg/kg/day resulted in sterile cure. Two recent analogs of Genz-667348 are currently undergoing pilot toxicity testing to determine suitability as clinical development candidates.

  18. In vitro inhibition of Toxoplasma gondii by the anti-malarial candidate, 6-(1,2,6,7-tetraoxaspiro[7.11]nonadec-4-yl)hexan-1-ol.

    PubMed

    Xin, Chun-Feng; Kim, Hye-Sook; Sato, Akira; Lee, Hak-Jae; Lee, You-Won; Pyo, Kyoung-Ho; Shin, Eun-Hee

    2016-10-01

    An anti-malarial candidate, 6-(1,2,6,7-tetraoxaspiro[7.11]nonadec-4-yl)hexan-1-ol (N-251), was studied to characterize its potential as a novel anti-Toxoplasma gondii drug. In the present study, IC50 and LC50 of N-251 on host cells and T. gondii were compared to those of artemisinin and sulfadiazine. The IC50 on Huh-7 cells was 10.19μg/ml, 67.69μg/ml and 310.17μg/ml for N-251, artemisinin, and sulfadiazine, respectively. The LC50 for anti-T. gondii effect was shown to be 1.11μg/ml, 5.79μg/ml, and 5.45μg/ml for N-251, artemisinin and sulfadiazine, respectively. N-251 concentration causing complete parasiticidal effect with minimal cytotoxicity on host cells was determined to be 5μg/ml. Additionally, the anti-T. gondii effect of N-251 was confirmed by ultrastructural changes, loss of organelles, degenerated morphology and the increase of amylopectin as detected by transmission electron microscope (TEM). Accordingly, the present study suggests that the anti-malarial synthetic endoperoxide, N-251, is an emerging drug candidate more effective than artemisinin and sulfadiazine. PMID:27380994

  19. Intravenous pharmacokinetics, oral bioavailability, dose proportionality and in situ permeability of anti-malarial lumefantrine in rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite the wide spread use of lumefantrine, there is no study reporting the detailed preclinical pharmacokinetics of lumefantrine. For the development of newer anti-malarial combination(s) and selection of better partner drugs, it is long felt need to understand the detailed preclinical pharmacokinetics of lumefantrine in preclinical experimental animal species. The focus of present study is to report bioavailability, pharmacokinetics, dose linearity and permeability of lumefantrine in rats. Methods A single dose of 10, 20 or 40 mg/kg of lumefantrine was given orally to male rats (N = 5 per dose level) to evaluate dose proportionality. In another study, a single intravenous bolus dose of lumefantrine was given to rats (N = 4) at 0.5 mg/kg dose following administration through the lateral tail vein in order to obtain the absolute oral bioavailability and clearance parameters. Blood samples were drawn at predetermined intervals and the concentration of lumefantrine and its metabolite desbutyl-lumefantrine in plasma were determined by partially validated LC-MS/MS method. In-situ permeability study was carried in anaesthetized rats. The concentration of lumefantrine in permeability samples was determined using RP-HPLC. Results For nominal doses increasing in a 1:2:4 proportion, the Cmax and AUC0-∞ values increased in the proportions of 1:0.6:1.5 and 1:0.8:1.8, respectively. For lumefantrine nominal doses increasing in a 1:2:4 proportion, the Cmax and the AUC0-t values for desbutyl-lumefantrine increased in the proportions of 1:1.45:2.57 and 1:1.08:1.87, respectively. After intravenous administration the clearance (Cl) and volume of distribution (Vd) of lumefantrine in rats were 0.03 (± 0.02) L/h/kg and 2.40 (± 0.67) L/kg, respectively. Absolute oral bioavailability of lumefantrine across the tested doses ranged between 4.97% and 11.98%. Lumefantrine showed high permeability (4.37 × 10-5 cm/s) in permeability study. Conclusions The pharmacokinetic

  20. Effect of selenium (Se) deficiency on the anti-malarial action of Qinghaosu (QHS) in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Levander, O.A.; Ager, A.L.; May, R.

    1986-03-01

    QHS is an endoperoxide, so it occurred to the authors that its anti-malarial action might be potentiated by low glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity. Weanling female mice were fed 1 of 4 diets: chow or a Torula yeast-based diet supplemented with 0, 0.1 or 0.5 ppm Se as Na/sub 2/SeO/sub 3/. After 6 weeks, mean hepatic GSH-Px activities and plasma Se levels in these 4 dietary groups were 17.3, 0.1, 5.4, and 14.5 munits/mg protein and 242, 4, 230, and 532 ng/ml, respectively. At this time, all mice were inoculated i.p. with asexual blood stages of Plasmodium yoelii. Then groups of 7 or 8 mice fed each diet were given 0, 4, 16, or 64 mg QHS/kg orally bid at 3, 4, and 5 days post inoculation. On the 6th day, blood films were taken and antimalarial activity was assessed by determining % parasitemia (% PARA). Mice given 0 or 4 mg QHS/kg averaged 47% PARA and this was not affected by diet. Mice receiving 64 mg QHS/kg averaged about 1% PARA irrespective of diet. However, mice given 16 mg QHS/kg had 25% PARA when fed chow but only 8 to 11% PARA when fed the Torula diet, regardless of Se intake. Thus, while Se status did not appear to influence the antimalarial potency of QHS, some factor(s) in the Torula diet enhanced its activity at intermediate doses vs. the chow diet.

  1. Innovative public-private partnerships to maximize the delivery of anti-malarial medicines: lessons learned from the ASAQ Winthrop experience

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This case study describes how a public-private partnership initiated to develop a new anti-malarial combination, ASAQ Winthrop, has evolved over time to address issues posed by its effective deployment in the field. Case description In 2002, DNDi created the FACT project to develop two fixed-dose combinations, artesunate-amodiaquine and artesunate-mefloquine, to meet the WHO anti-malarial treatment recommendations and international regulatory agencies approval standards. In 2002, Sanofi-aventis had started a development programme for a fixed-dose combination of artesunate and amodiaquine, to replace its co-blister combination. DNDi and sanofi-aventis joined forces in 2004, with the objective of developing within the shortest possible time frame a non-patented, affordable and easy to use fixed-dose combination of artesunate and amodiaquine adapted to the needs of patients, in particular, those of children. The partners developed Coarsucam®/Artesunate Amodiaquine Winthrop® ("ASAQ Winthrop") which was prequalified by the WHO in 2008. Additional partnerships have since been established by DNDi and sanofi-aventis to ensure: 1) the adoption of this new medicine by malaria-endemic countries, 2) its appropriate usage through a broad range of information tools, and 3) the monitoring of its safety and efficacy in the field through an innovative Risk Management Plan. Discussion and evaluation The partnership between DNDi and sanofi-aventis has enabled the development and pre-qualification of ASAQ Winthrop in a short timeframe. As a result of the multiple collaborations established by the two partners, as of late 2010, ASAQ Winthrop was registered in 30 sub-Saharan African countries and in India, with over 80 million treatments distributed in 21 countries. To date, 10 clinical studies, involving 3432 patients with ASAQ Winthrop were completed to document efficacy and safety issues identified in the Risk Management Plan. Conclusions The speed at which ASAQ Winthrop

  2. Anti-malarial and anti-inflammatory effects of Gleichenia truncata mediated through inhibition of GSK3β.

    PubMed

    Suhaini, S; Liew, S Z; Norhaniza, J; Lee, P C; Jualang, G; Embi, N; Hasidah, M S

    2015-09-01

    Gleichenia truncata is a highland fern from the Gleicheniaceae family known for its traditional use among indigenous communities in Asia to treat fever. The scientific basis of its effect has yet to be documented. A yeast-based kinase assay conducted in our laboratory revealed that crude methanolic extract (CME) of G. truncata exhibited glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3)-inhibitory activity. GSK3β is now recognized to have a pivotal role in the regulation of inflammatory response during bacterial infections. We have also previously shown that lithium chloride (LiCl), a GSK3 inhibitor suppressed development of Plasmodium berghei in a murine model of malarial infection. The present study is aimed at evaluating G. truncata for its anti-malarial and anti-inflammatory effects using in vivo malarial and melioidosis infection models respectively. In a four-day suppressive test, intraperitoneal injections of up to 250 mg/kg body weight (bw) G. truncata CME into P.berghei-infected mice suppressed parasitaemia development by >60%. Intraperitoneal administration of 150 mg/kg bw G. truncata CME into Burkholderia pseudomallei-infected mice improved survivability by 44%. G. truncata CME lowered levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-γ) in serum and organs of B. pseudomallei-infected mice. In both infections, increased phosphorylations (Ser9) of GSK3β were detected in organ samples of animals administered with G. truncata CME compared to controls. Taken together, results from this study strongly suggest that the anti-malarial and anti-inflammatory effects elicited by G. truncata in part were mediated through inhibition of GSK3β. The findings provide scientific basis for the ethnomedicinal use of this fern to treat inflammation-associated symptoms. PMID:26695202

  3. In vitro genotoxicity of the West African anti-malarial herbal Cryptolepis sanguinolenta and its major alkaloid cryptolepine.

    PubMed

    Ansah, Charles; Khan, Ayesha; Gooderham, Nigel J

    2005-03-01

    Cryptolepine (CLP), the major alkaloid of the West African anti-malarial herbal Cryptolepis sanguinolenta (Periplocaceae) is a DNA intercalator that exhibits potent toxicity to a variety of mammalian cells in vitro. We have hypothesized that the DNA intercalating properties of cryptolepine could trigger genetic damage in mammalian cells. The objective of the present study was therefore to assess the ability of both cryptolepine (CLP) and the traditional anti-malarial formulation, the aqueous extract from the roots (CSE) to induce mutation at the hprt locus and micronuclei (MN) formation in V79, a Chinese hamster fibroblast cell line commonly used in genetic toxicity studies. CSE at a high concentration (50 microg/ml) induced an apparent significant ten fold increase in mutant frequency compared to vehicle control (mean of 38 versus 4 mutant clones/10(6) surviving cells) but, this concentration of CSE was very toxic (<15% cell survival). CLP did not appear to be mutagenic in the dosage range used (up to 2.5 microM, equivalent to 1.1 microg/ml). However, after 24h treatment of V79 cells both CSE and CLP induced a dose-dependent increase in micronuclei of 4.15% and 6.43% (25 microg/ml CSE and 2.5 microM, equivalent to 1.1 microg/ml CLP, respectively) compared to 0.36% in vehicle control. These results show that treatment of mammalian cells with CSE and CLP can lead to DNA damage and we suggest that the routine use of CSE and the potential use of CLP derivatives in malaria chemotherapy could carry a genotoxic risk. PMID:15664441

  4. Development and evaluation of anti-malarial bio-conjugates: artesunate-loaded nanoerythrosomes.

    PubMed

    Agnihotri, Jaya; Saraf, Shubhini; Singh, Sobhna; Bigoniya, Papiya

    2015-10-01

    Biodegradable cellular carrier has desired properties for achieving effective long-term controlled release of drugs having short half life. To reduce the undesired effects of drug, advanced drug delivery systems are needed which are based on specific cell targeting module. Artesunate (ART) conjugation on nanoerythrosomes (NE) can have controlled delivery to avoid drug leakage, increase the stability, and reduce cost and toxicities. In this study nanosized lipoprotein membrane vesicles bearing ART were prepared by extrusion method. Developed ART-NE conjugate formulations were optimized on the basis of vesicle morphology, size and size distribution, polydispersity index, integrity of membrane, loaded drug concentration, drug leakage, effect of temperature and viscosity, syringeability, in vitro release profile and in vivo plasma concentration estimation studies. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy reveals that lipid chain order of RBCs are insignificantly affected in moderate conditions after ART loading. The formulated ART-NE carrier revealed non aggregated, uniformly sized particles with smooth surfaces. The maximum drug loading was found to be 25.20 ± 1.3 μg/ml. ART-NE formulation was best fit for zero order kinetics and was found to be capable of controlled release of drug for 8 hrs. ART-NE formulation showed good redispersibility with desirable properties for parenteral administration. Formulation was stable when subjected to stress by centrifugal force of 7500 rpm and could bear turbulence shock of 15 passes from hypodermic needle of size 23 gauges. The ART-NE formulation administered intravenously showed higher plasma concentration compared to free drug signifying not only controlled release but higher rate of in vivo release. The developed formulation exhibited zero order release profile as per kinetic study analysis suggesting the suitability of carrier for the sustained and targeted delivery of ART. The developed ART-NE drug delivery system

  5. Mind the gaps - the epidemiology of poor-quality anti-malarials in the malarious world - analysis of the WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network database

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Poor quality medicines threaten the lives of millions of patients and are alarmingly common in many parts of the world. Nevertheless, the global extent of the problem remains unknown. Accurate estimates of the epidemiology of poor quality medicines are sparse and are influenced by sampling methodology and diverse chemical analysis techniques. In order to understand the existing data, the Antimalarial Quality Scientific Group at WWARN built a comprehensive, open-access, global database and linked Antimalarial Quality Surveyor, an online visualization tool. Analysis of the database is described here, the limitations of the studies and data reported, and their public health implications discussed. Methods The database collates customized summaries of 251 published anti-malarial quality reports in English, French and Spanish by time and location since 1946. It also includes information on assays to determine quality, sampling and medicine regulation. Results No publicly available reports for 60.6% (63) of the 104 malaria-endemic countries were found. Out of 9,348 anti-malarials sampled, 30.1% (2,813) failed chemical/packaging quality tests with 39.3% classified as falsified, 2.3% as substandard and 58.3% as poor quality without evidence available to categorize them as either substandard or falsified. Only 32.3% of the reports explicitly described their definitions of medicine quality and just 9.1% (855) of the samples collected in 4.6% (six) surveys were conducted using random sampling techniques. Packaging analysis was only described in 21.5% of publications and up to twenty wrong active ingredients were found in falsified anti-malarials. Conclusions There are severe neglected problems with anti-malarial quality but there are important caveats to accurately estimate the prevalence and distribution of poor quality anti-malarials. The lack of reports in many malaria-endemic areas, inadequate sampling techniques and inadequate chemical analytical methods and

  6. Acyloxyalkyl ester prodrugs of FR900098 with improved in vivo anti-malarial activity.

    PubMed

    Ortmann, Regina; Wiesner, Jochen; Reichenberg, Armin; Henschker, Dajana; Beck, Ewald; Jomaa, Hassan; Schlitzer, Martin

    2003-07-01

    FR900098 represents an improved derivative of the new antimalarial drug fosmidomycin and acts through inhibition of the 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DOXP) reductoisomerase, an essential enzyme of the mevalonate independent pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis. Prodrugs with increased activity after oral administration were obtained by chemical modification of the phosphonate moiety to yield acyloxyalkyl esters. The most successful compound demonstrated 2-fold increased activity in mice infected with the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium vinckei. PMID:12798327

  7. Anti-malarial activity of a non-piperidine library of next-generation quinoline methanols

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The clinical utility for mefloquine has been eroded due to its association with adverse neurological effects. Better-tolerated alternatives are required. The objective of the present study was the identification of lead compounds that are as effective as mefloquine, but exhibit physiochemical properties likely to render them less susceptible to passage across the blood-brain barrier. Methods A library of drug-like non-piperidine analogs of mefloquine was synthesized. These compounds are diverse in structure and physiochemical properties. They were screened in appropriate in vitro assays and evaluated in terms of their potential as lead compounds. The correlation of specific structural attributes and physiochemical properties with activity was assessed. Results The most potent analogs were low molecular weight unconjugated secondary amines with no heteroatoms in their side-chains. However, these compounds were more metabolically labile and permeable than mefloquine. In terms of physiochemical properties, lower polar surface area, lower molecular weight, more freely rotatable bonds and fewer H-bond acceptors were associated with greater potency. There was no such relationship between activity and LogP, LogD or the number of hydrogen bond donors (HBDs). The addition of an H-bond donor to the side-chain yielded a series of active diamines, which were as metabolically stable as mefloquine but showed reduced permeability. Conclusions A drug-like library of non-piperidine analogs of mefloquine was synthesized. From amongst this library an active lead series of less permeable, but metabolically stable, diamines was identified. PMID:20149249

  8. Reverse pharmacology for developing an anti-malarial phytomedicine. The example of Argemone mexicana

    PubMed Central

    Simoes-Pires, Claudia; Hostettmann, Kurt; Haouala, Amina; Cuendet, Muriel; Falquet, Jacques; Graz, Bertrand; Christen, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Classical pharmacology has been the basis for the discovery of new chemical entities with therapeutic effects for decades. In natural product research, compounds are generally tested in vivo only after full in vitro characterization. However drug screening using this methodology is expensive, time-consuming and very often inefficient. Reverse pharmacology, also called bedside-to-bench, is a research approach based on the traditional knowledge and relates to reversing the classical laboratory to clinic pathway to a clinic to laboratory practice. It is a trans-disciplinary approach focused on traditional knowledge, experimental observations and clinical experiences. This paper is an overview of the reverse pharmacology approach applied to the decoction of Argemone mexicana, used as an antimalarial traditional medicine in Mali. A. mexicana appeared as the most effective traditional medicine for the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria in Mali, and the clinical efficacy of the decoction was comparable to artesunate–amodiaquine as previously published. Four stages of the reverse pharmacology process will be described here with a special emphasis on the results for stage 4. Briefly, allocryptopine, protopine and berberine were isolated through bioguided fractionation, and had their identity confirmed by spectroscopic analysis. The three alkaloids showed antiparasitic activity in vitro, of which allocryptopine and protopine were selective towards Plasmodiumfalciparum. Furthermore, the amount of the three active alkaloids in the decoction was determined by quantitative NMR, and preliminary in vivo assays were conducted. On the basis of these results, the reverse pharmacology approach is discussed and further pharmacokinetic studies appear to be necessary in order to determine whether these alkaloids can be considered as phytochemical markers for quality control and standardization of an improved traditional medicine made with this plant. PMID:25516845

  9. Genetic polymorphisms associated with anti-malarial antibody levels in a low and unstable malaria transmission area in southern Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The incidence of malaria in Sri Lanka has significantly declined in recent years. Similar trends were seen in Kataragama, a known malaria endemic location within the southern province of the country, over the past five years. This is a descriptive study of anti-malarial antibody levels and selected host genetic mutations in residents of Kataragama, under low malaria transmission conditions. Methods Sera were collected from 1,011 individuals residing in Kataragama and anti-malarial antibodies and total IgE levels were measured by a standardized ELISA technique. Host DNA was extracted and used for genotyping of selected SNPs in known genes associated with malaria. The antibody levels were analysed in relation to the past history of malaria (during past 10 years), age, sex, the location of residence within Kataragama and selected host genetic markers. Results A significant increase in antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum antigens AMA1, MSP2, NANP and Plasmodium vivax antigen MSP1 in individuals with past history of malaria were observed when compared to those who did not. A marked increase of anti-MSP1(Pf) and anti-AMA1(Pv) was also evident in individuals between 45–59 years (when compared to other age groups). Allele frequencies for two SNPs in genes that code for IL-13 and TRIM-5 were found to be significantly different between those who have experienced one or more malaria attacks within past 10 years and those who did not. When antibody levels were classified into a low-high binary trait, significant associations were found with four SNPs for anti-AMA1(Pf); two SNPs for anti-MSP1(Pf); eight SNPs for anti-NANP(Pf); three SNPs for anti-AMA1(Pv); seven SNPs for anti-MSP1(Pv); and nine SNPs for total IgE. Eleven of these SNPs with significant associations with anti-malarial antibody levels were found to be non–synonymous. Conclusions Evidence is suggestive of an age–acquired immunity in this study population in spite of low malaria

  10. The challenge to avoid anti-malarial medicine stock-outs in an era of funding partners: the case of Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Between 2007 and 2013, the Tanzanian public sector received 93.1 million doses of first-line anti-malarial artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) in the form of artemether-lumefantrine entirely supplied by funding partners. The introduction of a health facility ACT stock monitoring system using SMS technology by the National Malaria Control Programme in mid 2011 revealed a high frequency of stock-outs of ACT in primary care public health facilities. The objective of this study was to determine the pattern of availability of ACT and possible causes of observed stock-outs across public health facilities in Tanzania since mid-2011. Methods Data were collected weekly by the mobile phone reporting tool SMS for Life on ACT availability from over 5,000 public health facilities in Tanzania starting from September 2011 to December 2012. Stock data for all four age-dose levels of ACT across health facilities were summarized and supply of ACT at the national level was also documented. Results Over the period of 15 months, on average 29% of health facilities in Tanzania were completely stocked out of all four-age dose levels of the first-line anti-malarial with a median duration of total stock-out of six weeks. Patterns of total stock-out by region ranged from a low of 9% to a high of 52%. The ACT stock-outs were most likely caused by: a) insufficient ACT supplies entering Tanzania (e.g. in 2012 Tanzania received 10.9 million ACT doses compared with a forecast demand of 14.4 million doses); and b) irregular pattern of ACT supply (several months with no ACT stock). Conclusion The reduced ACT availability and irregular pattern of supply were due to cumbersome bureaucratic processes and delays both within the country and from the main donor, the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. Tanzania should invest in strengthening both the supply system and the health information system using mHealth solutions such as SMS for Life. This will continue to

  11. The anti-malarial artemisinin inhibits pro-inflammatory cytokines via the NF-κB canonical signaling pathway in PMA-induced THP-1 monocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Huang, Zhouqing; Wang, Liansheng; Meng, Shu; Fan, Yuqi; Chen, Ting; Cao, Jiatian; Jiang, Rujia; Wang, Changqian

    2011-02-01

    Several kinds of sesquiterpene lactones have been proven to inhibit NF-κB and to retard atherosclerosis by reducing lesion size and changing plaque composition. The anti-malarial artemisinin (Art) is a pure sesquiterpene lactone extracted from the Chinese herb Artemisia annua (qinghao, sweet wormwood). In the present study, we demonstrate that artemisinin inhibits the secretion and the mRNA levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1ß, and IL-6 in a dose-dependent manner in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced THP-1 human monocytes. We also found that the NF-κB specific inhibitor, Bay 11-7082, inhibited the expression of these pro-inflammatory cytokines, suggesting that the NF-κB pathway may be involved in the decreased cytokine release. At all time-points (1-6 h), artemisinin impeded the phosphorylation of IKKα/ß, the phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα and the nuclear translocation of the NF-κB p65 subunit. Additionally, artemisinin inhibited the translocation of the NF-κB p65 subunit as demonstrated by confocal laser scanning microscopic analysis and by NF-κB binding assays. Our data indicate that artemisinin exerts an anti-inflammatory effect on PMA-induced THP-1 monocytes, suggesting the potential role of artemisinin in preventing the inflammatory progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:21165548

  12. Active case detection, treatment of falciparum malaria with combined chloroquine and sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine and vivax malaria with chloroquine and molecular markers of anti-malarial resistance in the Republic of Vanuatu

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum was first described in the Republic of Vanuatu in the early 1980s. In 1991, the Vanuatu Ministry of Health instituted new treatment guidelines for uncomplicated P. falciparum infection consisting of chloroquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine combination therapy. Chloroquine remains the recommended treatment for Plasmodium vivax. Methods In 2005, cross-sectional blood surveys at 45 sites on Malo Island were conducted and 4,060 adults and children screened for malaria. Of those screened, 203 volunteer study subjects without malaria at the time of screening were followed for 13 weeks to observe peak seasonal incidence of infection. Another 54 subjects with malaria were followed over a 28-day period to determine efficacy of anti-malarial therapy; chloroquine alone for P. vivax and chloroquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine for P. falciparum infections. Results The overall prevalence of parasitaemia by mass blood screening was 6%, equally divided between P. falciparum and P. vivax. Twenty percent and 23% of participants with patent P. vivax and P. falciparum parasitaemia, respectively, were febrile at the time of screening. In the incidence study cohort, after 2,303 person-weeks of follow-up, the incidence density of malaria was 1.3 cases per person-year with P. vivax predominating. Among individuals participating in the clinical trial, the 28-day chloroquine P. vivax cure rate was 100%. The 28-day chloroquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine P. falciparum cure rate was 97%. The single treatment failure, confirmed by merozoite surface protein-2 genotyping, was classified as a day 28 late parasitological treatment failure. All P. falciparum isolates carried the Thr-76 pfcrt mutant allele and the double Asn-108 + Arg-59 dhfr mutant alleles. Dhps mutant alleles were not detected in the study sample. Conclusion Peak seasonal malaria prevalence on Malo Island reached hypoendemic levels during the study observation period. The only in

  13. In-silico studies on DegP protein of Plasmodium falciparum in search of anti-malarials.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Drista; Soni, Rani; Patel, Sachin; Joshi, Deepti; Bhatt, Tarun Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Despite encouraging progress over the past decade, malaria caused by the Plasmodium parasite continues to pose an enormous disease burden and is one of the major global health problems. The extreme challenge in malaria management is the resistance of parasites to traditional monochemotherapies like chloroquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine. No vaccine is yet in sight, and the foregoing effective drugs are also losing ground against the disease due to the resistivity of parasites. New antimalarials with novel mechanisms of action are needed to circumvent existing or emerging drug resistance. DegP protein, secretory in nature has been shown to be involved in regulation of thermo-oxidative stress generated during asexual life cycle of Plasmodium, probably required for survival of parasite in host. Considering the significance of protein, in this study, we have generated a three-dimensional structure of PfDegP followed by validation of the modeled structure using several tools like RAMPAGE, ERRAT, and others. We also performed an in-silico screening of small molecule database against PfDegP using Glide. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulation of protein and protein-ligand complex was carried out using GROMACS. This study substantiated potential drug-like molecules and provides the scope for development of novel antimalarial drugs. PMID:27491850

  14. The Plasmodium berghei sexual stage antigen PSOP12 induces anti-malarial transmission blocking immunity both in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sala, K A; Nishiura, H; Upton, L M; Zakutansky, S E; Delves, M J; Iyori, M; Mizutani, M; Sinden, R E; Yoshida, S; Blagborough, A M

    2015-01-01

    Anti-malarial transmission-blocking vaccines (TBVs) aim to inhibit the transmission of Plasmodium from humans to mosquitoes by targeting the sexual/ookinete stages of the parasite. Successful use of such interventions will subsequently result in reduced cases of malarial infection within a human population, leading to local elimination. There are currently only five lead TBV candidates under examination. There is a consequent need to identify novel antigens to allow the formulation of new potent TBVs. Here we describe the design and evaluation of a potential TBV (BDES-PbPSOP12) targeting Plasmodium berghei PSOP12 based on the baculovirus dual expression system (BDES), enabling expression of antigens on the surface of viral particles and within infected mammalian cells. In silico studies have previously suggested that PSOP12 (Putative Secreted Ookinete Protein 12) is expressed within the sexual stages of the parasite (gametocytes, gametes and ookinetes), and is a member of the previously characterized 6-Cys family of plasmodial proteins. We demonstrate that PSOP12 is expressed within the sexual/ookinete forms of the parasite, and that sera obtained from mice immunized with BDES-PbPSOP12 can recognize the surface of the male and female gametes, and the ookinete stages of the parasite. Immunization of mice with BDES-PbPSOP12 confers modest but significant transmission-blocking activity in vivo by active immunization (53.1% reduction in oocyst intensity, 10.9% reduction in oocyst prevalence). Further assessment of transmission-blocking potency ex vivo shows a dose-dependent response, with up to a 76.4% reduction in intensity and a 47.2% reduction in prevalence observed. Our data indicates that PSOP12 in Plasmodium spp. could be a potential new TBV target candidate, and that further experimentation to examine the protein within human malaria parasites would be logical. PMID:25454088

  15. Use of a colorimetric (DELI) test for the evaluation of chemoresistance of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax to commonly used anti-plasmodial drugs in the Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The emergence and spread of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax resistance to available anti-malarial drugs represents a major drawback in the control of malaria and its associated morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the chemoresistance profile of P. falciparum and P. vivax to commonly used anti-plasmodial drugs in a malaria-endemic area in the Brazilian Amazon. Methods The study was carried out in Manaus (Amazonas state), in the Brazilian Amazon. A total of 88 P. falciparum and 178 P. vivax isolates was collected from 2004 to 2007. The sensitivity of P. falciparum isolates was determined to chloroquine, quinine, mefloquine and artesunate and the sensitivity of P. vivax isolates was determined to chloroquine and mefloquine, by using the colorimetric DELI test. Results As expected, a high prevalence of P. falciparum isolates resistant to chloroquine (78.1%) was observed. The prevalence of isolates with profile of resistance or decreased sensitivity for quinine, mefloquine and artesunate was 12.7, 21.2 and 11.7%, respectively. In the case of P. vivax, the prevalence of isolates with profile of resistance for chloroquine and mefloquine was 9.8 and 28%, respectively. No differences in the frequencies of isolates with profile of resistance or geometric mean IC50s were seen when comparing the data obtained in 2004, 2005, 2006 and 2007, for all tested anti-malarials. Conclusions The great majority of P. falciparum isolates in the Brazilian malaria-endemic area remain resistant to chloroquine, and the decreased sensitivity to quinine, mefloquine and artesunate observed in 10–20% of the isolates must be taken with concern, especially for artesunate. Plasmodium vivax isolates also showed a significant proportion of isolates with decreased sensitivity to chloroquine (first-line drug) and mainly to mefloquine. The data presented here also confirm the usefulness of the DELI test to generate results able to impact on public health

  16. Pharmacological telomerase inhibition can sensitize drug-resistant and drug-sensitive cells to chemotherapeutic treatment.

    PubMed

    Ward, Ryan J; Autexier, Chantal

    2005-09-01

    Effective strategies to reverse or prevent chemotherapeutic resistance are required before cancer therapies can be curative. Telomerase is the ribonucleoprotein responsible for de novo synthesis and maintenance of telomeres, and its activity is predominantly observed in cancer cells. The telomerase enzyme has been successfully inhibited or inactivated to sensitize cells to cellular stresses; however, no studies have determined yet the effect of combining a pharmacological inhibitor of telomerase catalysis and traditional chemotherapeutics for the treatment of drug-sensitive or drug-resistant cancers. Here, we describe the effect of 2-[(E)-3-naphtalen-2-yl-but-2-enoylamino]-benzoic acid (BIBR1532), a small-molecule inhibitor of telomerase catalytic activity, on drug-resistant leukemia and breast cancer cells and their parental counterparts when treated in combination with chemotherapeutics. We observed that BIBR1532-treated cells show progressive telomere shortening, decreased proliferative capacity, and sensitization to chemotherapeutic treatment. These effects are telomere length-dependent, because cells insensitive to BIBR1532 or cells released from telomerase inhibition did not demonstrate changes in growth ability or drug sensitivity. Our novel observations suggest that pharmacological telomerase inhibition in combination therapy may be a valid strategy for the treatment of both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant cancers. PMID:15939802

  17. Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum ex vivo susceptibility to anti-malarials and gene characterization in Rondônia, West Amazon, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chloroquine (CQ), a cost effective antimalarial drug with a relatively good safety profile and therapeutic index, is no longer used by itself to treat patients with Plasmodium falciparum due to CQ-resistant strains. P. vivax, representing over 90% of malaria cases in Brazil, despite reported resistance, is treated with CQ as well as with primaquine to block malaria transmission and avoid late P. vivax malaria relapses. Resistance to CQ and other antimalarial drugs influences malaria control, thus monitoring resistance phenotype by parasite genotyping is helpful in endemic areas. Methods A total of 47 P. vivax and nine P. falciparum fresh isolates were genetically characterized and tested for CQ, mefloquine (MQ) and artesunate (ART) susceptibility in vitro. The genes mdr1 and pfcrt, likely related to CQ resistance, were analyzed in all isolates. Drug susceptibility was determined using short-term parasite cultures of ring stages for 48 to 72 hour and thick blood smears counts. Each parasite isolate was tested with the antimalarials to measure the geometric mean of 50% inhibitory concentration. Results The low numbers of P. falciparum isolates reflect the species prevalence in Brazil; most displayed low sensitivity to CQ (IC50 70 nM). However, CQ resistance was rare among P. vivax isolates (IC50 of 32 nM). The majority of P. vivax and P. falciparum isolates were sensitive to ART and MQ. One hundred percent of P. falciparum isolates carried non-synonymous mutations in the pfmdr1 gene in codons 184, 1042 and 1246, 84% in codons 1034 and none in codon 86, a well-known resistance mutation. For the pfcrt gene, mutations were observed in codons 72 and 76 in all P. falciparum isolates. One P. falciparum isolate from Angola, Africa, showing sensitivity to the antimalarials, presented no mutations. In P. vivax, mutations of pvmdr1 and the multidrug resistance gene 1 marker at codon F976 were absent. Conclusion All P. falciparum Brazilian isolates showed

  18. An Integrated Approach to Anti-Cancer Drug Sensitivity Prediction.

    PubMed

    Berlow, Noah; Haider, Saad; Wan, Qian; Geltzeiler, Mathew; Davis, Lara E; Keller, Charles; Pal, Ranadip

    2014-01-01

    A framework for design of personalized cancer therapy requires the ability to predict the sensitivity of a tumor to anticancer drugs. The predictive modeling of tumor sensitivity to anti-cancer drugs has primarily focused on generating functions that map gene expressions and genetic mutation profiles to drug sensitivity. In this paper, we present a new approach for drug sensitivity prediction and combination therapy design based on integrated functional and genomic characterizations. The modeling approach when applied to data from the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia shows a significant gain in prediction accuracy as compared to elastic net and random forest techniques based on genomic characterizations. Utilizing a Mouse Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma cell culture and a drug screen of 60 targeted drugs, we show that predictive modeling based on functional data alone can also produce high accuracy predictions. The framework also allows us to generate personalized tumor proliferation circuits to gain further insights on the individualized biological pathway. PMID:26357038

  19. Conditioned saccharin avoidance and sensitization to drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Fenu, Sandro; Cadoni, Cristina; Di Chiara, Gaetano

    2010-12-25

    Saccharin avoidance conditioned by drugs of abuse (CSA) has been interpreted as an expression of the appetitive, dopamine-dependent, properties of the drug. Repeated exposure to these drugs induces an increase (sensitization) of their motor stimulant properties associated with differential changes in DA transmission in the NAc shell and core. The present study investigated the changes in drug CSA induced by schedules of repeated drug exposure that induce behavioral sensitization. CSA was performed in a two-bottle choice paradigm with two saccharin-drug associations in rats previously sensitized to morphine, cocaine, amphetamine and nicotine. In control rats morphine (1 and 5mg/kg s.c.), cocaine (5 and 10mg/kg i.p.), amphetamine (0.25 and 0.5mg/kg s.c.) and nicotine (0.4 mg/kg s.c.) induced dose-dependent CSA. Sensitization to morphine, cocaine and nicotine, which is known to reduce the responsiveness of NAc shell DA to the same drugs, also reduced CSA. In contrast, sensitization to amphetamine, that does not affect the responsiveness of NAc shell DA to the drug, failed to affect CSA. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that NAc shell DA is a substrate of the appetitive properties of drugs of abuse. PMID:20561960

  20. Molecular modeling, in silico screening and molecular dynamics of PfPRL-PTP of P. falciparum for identification of potential anti-malarials.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sachin; Joshi, Deepti; Soni, Rani; Sharma, Drista; Bhatt, Tarun Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Millions of deaths occur every year due to malaria. Growing resistance against existing drugs for treatment of malaria has exaggerated the problem further. There is an intense demand of identifying drug targets in malaria parasite. PfPRL-PTP protein is PRL group of phosphatase, and one of the interesting drug targets being involved in three important pathways of malaria parasite (secretion, phosphorylation, and prenylation). Therefore, in this study, we have modeled three-dimensional structure of PfPRL-PTP followed by validation of 3D structure using RAMPAGE, verify3D, and other structure validation tools. We could identify 12 potential inhibitory compounds using in silico screening of NCI library against PfPRL-PTP with Glide. The molecular dynamics simulation was also performed using GROMACS on PfPRL-PTP model alone and PfPRL-PTP-inhibitor complex. This study of identifying potential drug-like molecules would add up to the process of drug discovery against malaria parasite. PMID:26313238

  1. Identification of Selective Inhibitors of the Plasmodium falciparum Hexose Transporter PfHT by Screening Focused Libraries of Anti-Malarial Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Alex; Elya, Carolyn; Anderson, Johanna; Clark, Julie; Connelly, Michele; Yang, Lei; Min, Jaeki; Sato, Yuko; Guy, R. Kiplin; Landfear, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    Development of resistance against current antimalarial drugs necessitates the search for novel drugs that interact with different targets and have distinct mechanisms of action. Malaria parasites depend upon high levels of glucose uptake followed by inefficient metabolic utilization via the glycolytic pathway, and the Plasmodium falciparum hexose transporter PfHT, which mediates uptake of glucose, has thus been recognized as a promising drug target. This transporter is highly divergent from mammalian hexose transporters, and it appears to be a permease that is essential for parasite viability in intra-erythrocytic, mosquito, and liver stages of the parasite life cycle. An assay was developed that is appropriate for high throughput screening against PfHT based upon heterologous expression of PfHT in Leishmania mexicana parasites that are null mutants for their endogenous hexose transporters. Screening of two focused libraries of antimalarial compounds identified two such compounds that are high potency selective inhibitors of PfHT compared to human GLUT1. Additionally, 7 other compounds were identified that are lower potency and lower specificity PfHT inhibitors but might nonetheless serve as starting points for identification of analogs with more selective properties. These results further support the potential of PfHT as a novel drug target. PMID:25894322

  2. Methods to Increase the Sensitivity of High Resolution Melting Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Genotyping in Malaria.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Rachel; Hamilton, Elizabeth J; Durfee, Katelyn; Ndiaye, Daouda; Wirth, Dyann F; Hartl, Daniel L; Volkman, Sarah K

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of eradication efforts, malaria remains a global burden. Recent renewed interest in regional elimination and global eradication has been accompanied by increased genomic information about Plasmodium parasite species responsible for malaria, including characteristics of geographical populations as well as variations associated with reduced susceptibility to anti-malarial drugs. One common genetic variation, single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), offers attractive targets for parasite genotyping. These markers are useful not only for tracking drug resistance markers but also for tracking parasite populations using markers not under drug or other selective pressures. SNP genotyping methods offer the ability to track drug resistance as well as to fingerprint individual parasites for population surveillance, particularly in response to malaria control efforts in regions nearing elimination status. While informative SNPs have been identified that are agnostic to specific genotyping technologies, high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis is particularly suited to field-based studies. Compared to standard fluorescent-probe based methods that require individual SNPs in a single labeled probe and offer at best 10% sensitivity to detect SNPs in samples that contain multiple genomes (polygenomic), HRM offers 2-5% sensitivity. Modifications to HRM, such as blocked probes and asymmetric primer concentrations as well as optimization of amplification annealing temperatures to bias PCR towards amplification of the minor allele, further increase the sensitivity of HRM. While the sensitivity improvement depends on the specific assay, we have increased detection sensitivities to less than 1% of the minor allele. In regions approaching malaria eradication, early detection of emerging or imported drug resistance is essential for prompt response. Similarly, the ability to detect polygenomic infections and differentiate imported parasite types from cryptic local reservoirs

  3. Methods to Increase the Sensitivity of High Resolution Melting Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Genotyping in Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Rachel; Hamilton, Elizabeth J.; Durfee, Katelyn; Ndiaye, Daouda; Wirth, Dyann F.; Hartl, Daniel L.; Volkman, Sarah K.

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of eradication efforts, malaria remains a global burden. Recent renewed interest in regional elimination and global eradication has been accompanied by increased genomic information about Plasmodium parasite species responsible for malaria, including characteristics of geographical populations as well as variations associated with reduced susceptibility to anti-malarial drugs. One common genetic variation, single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), offers attractive targets for parasite genotyping. These markers are useful not only for tracking drug resistance markers but also for tracking parasite populations using markers not under drug or other selective pressures. SNP genotyping methods offer the ability to track drug resistance as well as to fingerprint individual parasites for population surveillance, particularly in response to malaria control efforts in regions nearing elimination status. While informative SNPs have been identified that are agnostic to specific genotyping technologies, high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis is particularly suited to field-based studies. Compared to standard fluorescent-probe based methods that require individual SNPs in a single labeled probe and offer at best 10% sensitivity to detect SNPs in samples that contain multiple genomes (polygenomic), HRM offers 2-5% sensitivity. Modifications to HRM, such as blocked probes and asymmetric primer concentrations as well as optimization of amplification annealing temperatures to bias PCR towards amplification of the minor allele, further increase the sensitivity of HRM. While the sensitivity improvement depends on the specific assay, we have increased detection sensitivities to less than 1% of the minor allele. In regions approaching malaria eradication, early detection of emerging or imported drug resistance is essential for prompt response. Similarly, the ability to detect polygenomic infections and differentiate imported parasite types from cryptic local reservoirs

  4. Gene sensitizes cancer cells to chemotherapy drugs

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists have found that a gene, Schlafen-11 (SLFN11), sensitizes cells to substances known to cause irreparable damage to DNA.  As part of their study, the researchers used a repository of 60 cell types to identify predictors of cancer cell respons

  5. Ex vivo activity of the ACT new components pyronaridine and piperaquine in comparison with conventional ACT drugs against isolates of Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of the present work was to assess i) ex vivo activity of pyronaridine (PND) and piperaquine (PPQ), as new components of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT), to define susceptibility baseline, ii) their activities compared to other partner drugs, namely monodesethylamodiaquine (MDAQ), lumefantrine (LMF), mefloquine (MQ), artesunate (AS) and dihydroartemisinin (DHA) against 181 Plasmodium falciparum isolates from African countries, India and Thailand, and iii) in vitro cross-resistance with other quinoline drugs, chloroquine (CQ) or quinine (QN). Methods The susceptibility of the 181 P. falciparum isolates to the nine anti-malarial drugs was assessed using the standard 42-hours 3H-hypoxanthine uptake inhibition method. Results The IC50 values for PND ranged from 0.55 to 80.0 nM (geometric mean = 19.9 nM) and from 11.8 to 217.3 nM for PPQ (geometric mean = 66.8 nM). A significant positive correlation was shown between responses to PPQ and PND responses (rho = 0.46) and between PPQ and MDAQ (rho = 0.30). No significant correlation was shown between PPQ IC50 and responses to other anti-malarial drugs. A significant positive correlation was shown between responses to PND and MDAQ (rho = 0.37), PND and LMF (rho = 0.28), PND and QN (rho = 0.24), PND and AS (rho = 0.19), PND and DHA (rho = 0.18) and PND and CQ (rho = 0.16). All these coefficients of correlation are too low to suggest cross-resistance between PPQ or PND and the other drugs. Conclusions In this study, the excellent anti-malarial activity of PPQ and PND was confirmed. The absence of cross-resistance with quinolines and artemisinin derivatives is consistent with the efficacy of the combinations of PPQ and DHA or PND and AS in areas where parasites are resistant to conventional anti-malarial drugs. PMID:22333675

  6. Virtual screen for repurposing approved and experimental drugs for candidate inhibitors of EBOLA virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Veljkovic, Veljko; Loiseau, Philippe M.; Figadere, Bruno; Glisic, Sanja; Veljkovic, Nevena; Perovic, Vladimir R.; Cavanaugh, David P.; Branch, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    The ongoing Ebola virus epidemic has presented numerous challenges with respect to control and treatment because there are no approved drugs or vaccines for the Ebola virus disease (EVD). Herein is proposed simple theoretical criterion for fast virtual screening of molecular libraries for candidate inhibitors of Ebola virus infection. We performed a repurposing screen of 6438 drugs from DrugBank using this criterion and selected 267 approved and 382 experimental drugs as candidates for treatment of EVD including 15 anti-malarial drugs and 32 antibiotics. An open source Web server allowing screening of molecular libraries for candidate drugs for treatment of EVD was also established. PMID:25717373

  7. Multifunctional, stimuli-sensitive nanoparticulate systems for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2015-01-01

    The use of nanoparticulate pharmaceutical drug delivery systems (NDDSs) to enhance the in vivo effectiveness of drugs is now well established. The development of multifunctional and stimulus-sensitive NDDSs is an active area of current research. Such NDDSs can have long circulation times, target the site of the disease and enhance the intracellular delivery of a drug. This type of NDDS can also respond to local stimuli that are characteristic of the pathological site by, for example, releasing an entrapped drug or shedding a protective coating, thus facilitating the interaction between drug-loaded nanocarriers and target cells or tissues. In addition, imaging contrast moieties can be attached to these carriers to track their real-time biodistribution and accumulation in target cells or tissues. Here, I highlight recent developments with multifunctional and stimuli-sensitive NDDSs and their therapeutic potential for diseases including cancer, cardiovascular diseases and infectious diseases. PMID:25287120

  8. Multitask learning improves prediction of cancer drug sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Han; Paskov, Ivan; Paskov, Hristo; González, Alvaro J.; Leslie, Christina S.

    2016-01-01

    Precision oncology seeks to predict the best therapeutic option for individual patients based on the molecular characteristics of their tumors. To assess the preclinical feasibility of drug sensitivity prediction, several studies have measured drug responses for cytotoxic and targeted therapies across large collections of genomically and transcriptomically characterized cancer cell lines and trained predictive models using standard methods like elastic net regression. Here we use existing drug response data sets to demonstrate that multitask learning across drugs strongly improves the accuracy and interpretability of drug prediction models. Our method uses trace norm regularization with a highly efficient ADMM (alternating direction method of multipliers) optimization algorithm that readily scales to large data sets. We anticipate that our approach will enhance efforts to exploit growing drug response compendia in order to advance personalized therapy. PMID:27550087

  9. Adherence to and acceptability of artemether-lumefantrine as first-line anti-malarial treatment: evidence from a rural community in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Controlled clinical trials have shown that a six-dose regimen of artemether-lumefantrine (AL) therapy for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria results in cure rates >95% with good tolerability. Materials and methods A prospective study was carried out to document the adherence to and acceptability of AL administration. This was undertaken in the context of the ALIVE study, a prospective, community-based, observational study in a rural, malaria-endemic area of Tanzania. Following microscopic confirmation of P. falciparum infection, the first AL dose was taken under supervision, with the subsequent five doses taken unsupervised at home. Patients were randomized to receive a home-based assessment close to the scheduled time for one of the unsupervised doses, but were blinded to which follow-up visit they had been allocated. A structured questionnaire was administered by trained staff and AL consumption was confirmed by inspection of blister packs. Results A total of 552 patients were recruited of whom 352 (63.8%) were <13 years old. The randomization process allocated 112, 109, 110, 100 and 111 patients to a follow-up visit after doses 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, respectively. For dose 2, 92.0% of patients (103/112) correctly took AL at 8 ± 1 hours after dose 1. The remaining doses were taken within four hours of the correct time in 87-95% of cases. Nine patients (1.7%) missed one dose. Blister packs were available for inspection in 548 of cases (99.3%) and confirmed patient-reported data that the previous dose had been administered. Nearly all patients took AL with water (549/552 [99.5%]). Two patients (0.4%) took the drug with food. The dosing pictogram and clustering of tablets within the blister packs was considered helpful by 91.8% and 100.0% of patients, respectively. Overall, 87.1% of patients (481/552) found AL easier to take/administer than sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) and 87.7% (484/552) believed that AL was more effective than SP. Discussion

  10. Beneficiary price sensitivity in the Medicare prescription drug plan market.

    PubMed

    Frakt, Austin B; Pizer, Steven D

    2010-01-01

    The Medicare stand-alone prescription drug plan (PDP) came into existence in 2006 as part of the Medicare prescription drug benefit. It is the most popular plan type among Medicare drug plans and large numbers of plans are available to all beneficiaries. In this article we present the first analysis of beneficiary price sensitivity in the PDP market. Our estimate of elasticity of enrollment with respect to premium, -1.45, is larger in magnitude than has been found in the Medicare HMO market. This high degree of beneficiary price sensitivity for PDPs is consistent with relatively low product differentiation, low fixed costs of entry in the PDP market, and the fact that, in contrast to changing HMOs, beneficiaries can select a PDP without disrupting doctor-patient relationships. PMID:19191252

  11. Improvements in access to malaria treatment in Tanzania after switch to artemisinin combination therapy and the introduction of accredited drug dispensing outlets - a provider perspective

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To improve access to treatment in the private retail sector a new class of outlets known as accredited drug dispensing outlets (ADDO) was created in Tanzania. Tanzania changed its first-line treatment for malaria from sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) to artemether-lumefantrine (ALu) in 2007. Subsidized ALu was made available in both health facilities and ADDOs. The effect of these interventions on access to malaria treatment was studied in rural Tanzania. Methods The study was carried out in the villages of Kilombero and Ulanga Demographic Surveillance System (DSS) and in Ifakara town. Data collection consisted of: 1) yearly censuses of shops selling drugs; 2) collection of monthly data on availability of anti-malarials in public health facilities; and 3) retail audits to measure anti-malarial sales volumes in all public, mission and private outlets. The data were complemented with DSS population data. Results Between 2004 and 2008 access to malaria treatment greatly improved and the number of anti-malarial treatment doses dispensed increased by 78%. Particular improvements were observed in the availability (from 0.24 shops per 1,000 people in 2004 to 0.39 in 2008) and accessibility (from 71% of households within 5 km of a shop in 2004 to 87% in 2008) of drug shops. Despite no improvements in affordability this resulted in an increase of the market share from 49% of anti-malarial sales 2005 to 59% in 2008. The change of treatment policy from SP to ALu led to severe stock-outs of SP in health facilities in the months leading up to the introduction of ALu (only 40% months in stock), but these were compensated by the wide availability of SP in shops. After the introduction of ALu stock levels of the drug were relatively high in public health facilities (over 80% months in stock), but the drug could only be found in 30% of drug shops and in no general shops. This resulted in a low overall utilization of the drug (19% of all anti-malarial sales) Conclusions

  12. In Vitro Drug Sensitivity Tests to Predict Molecular Target Drug Responses in Surgically Resected Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Ryohei; Anayama, Takashi; Hirohashi, Kentaro; Okada, Hironobu; Kume, Motohiko; Orihashi, Kazumasa

    2016-01-01

    Background Epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitors have dramatically changed the strategy of medical treatment of lung cancer. Patients should be screened for the presence of the EGFR mutation or echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-ALK fusion gene prior to chemotherapy to predict their clinical response. The succinate dehydrogenase inhibition (SDI) test and collagen gel droplet embedded culture drug sensitivity test (CD-DST) are established in vitro drug sensitivity tests, which may predict the sensitivity of patients to cytotoxic anticancer drugs. We applied in vitro drug sensitivity tests for cyclopedic prediction of clinical responses to different molecular targeting drugs. Methods The growth inhibitory effects of erlotinib and crizotinib were confirmed for lung cancer cell lines using SDI and CD-DST. The sensitivity of 35 cases of surgically resected lung cancer to erlotinib was examined using SDI or CD-DST, and compared with EGFR mutation status. Results HCC827 (Exon19: E746-A750 del) and H3122 (EML4-ALK) cells were inhibited by lower concentrations of erlotinib and crizotinib, respectively than A549, H460, and H1975 (L858R+T790M) cells were. The viability of the surgically resected lung cancer was 60.0 ± 9.8 and 86.8 ± 13.9% in EGFR-mutants vs. wild types in the SDI (p = 0.0003). The cell viability was 33.5 ± 21.2 and 79.0 ± 18.6% in EGFR mutants vs. wild-type cases (p = 0.026) in CD-DST. Conclusions In vitro drug sensitivity evaluated by either SDI or CD-DST correlated with EGFR gene status. Therefore, SDI and CD-DST may be useful predictors of potential clinical responses to the molecular anticancer drugs, cyclopedically. PMID:27070423

  13. Multiple cutaneous sensitization to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo, M A; Revenga, F

    1996-01-01

    The use of topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is widespread (particularly in countries bordering the Mediterranean). Compared to their wide use, the incidence of published adverse cutaneous effects appears minimal, although they are increasing. Most of them are a form of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). Multiple sensitization and/or cross-reactions are rarely reported. Interestingly, our patient presented ACD with diclofenac and etofenamate (both from different chemical groups) and, furthermore, patch tests were positive with bencydamine and indomethacin (both indolacetic acid derivatives), piroxicam and fepradinol. We think that our results could not be explained due to cross-reactivity, and that multiple sensitization was more likely. PMID:8864624

  14. Plasmodium falciparum Transfected with Ultra Bright NanoLuc Luciferase Offers High Sensitivity Detection for the Screening of Growth and Cellular Trafficking Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Elsworth, Brendan; Charnaud, Sarah C.; Sanders, Paul R.; Crabb, Brendan S.; Gilson, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Drug discovery is a key part of malaria control and eradication strategies, and could benefit from sensitive and affordable assays to quantify parasite growth and to help identify the targets of potential anti-malarial compounds. Bioluminescence, achieved through expression of exogenous luciferases, is a powerful tool that has been applied in studies of several aspects of parasite biology and high throughput growth assays. We have expressed the new reporter NanoLuc (Nluc) luciferase in Plasmodium falciparum and showed it is at least 100 times brighter than the commonly used firefly luciferase. Nluc brightness was explored as a means to achieve a growth assay with higher sensitivity and lower cost. In addition we attempted to develop other screening assays that may help interrogate libraries of inhibitory compounds for their mechanism of action. To this end parasites were engineered to express Nluc in the cytoplasm, the parasitophorous vacuole that surrounds the intraerythrocytic parasite or exported to the red blood cell cytosol. As proof-of-concept, these parasites were used to develop functional screening assays for quantifying the effects of Brefeldin A, an inhibitor of protein secretion, and Furosemide, an inhibitor of new permeation pathways used by parasites to acquire plasma nutrients. PMID:25392998

  15. Plasmodium falciparum transfected with ultra bright NanoLuc luciferase offers high sensitivity detection for the screening of growth and cellular trafficking inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Mauro F; Nie, Catherine Q; Elsworth, Brendan; Charnaud, Sarah C; Sanders, Paul R; Crabb, Brendan S; Gilson, Paul R

    2014-01-01

    Drug discovery is a key part of malaria control and eradication strategies, and could benefit from sensitive and affordable assays to quantify parasite growth and to help identify the targets of potential anti-malarial compounds. Bioluminescence, achieved through expression of exogenous luciferases, is a powerful tool that has been applied in studies of several aspects of parasite biology and high throughput growth assays. We have expressed the new reporter NanoLuc (Nluc) luciferase in Plasmodium falciparum and showed it is at least 100 times brighter than the commonly used firefly luciferase. Nluc brightness was explored as a means to achieve a growth assay with higher sensitivity and lower cost. In addition we attempted to develop other screening assays that may help interrogate libraries of inhibitory compounds for their mechanism of action. To this end parasites were engineered to express Nluc in the cytoplasm, the parasitophorous vacuole that surrounds the intraerythrocytic parasite or exported to the red blood cell cytosol. As proof-of-concept, these parasites were used to develop functional screening assays for quantifying the effects of Brefeldin A, an inhibitor of protein secretion, and Furosemide, an inhibitor of new permeation pathways used by parasites to acquire plasma nutrients. PMID:25392998

  16. Crosslinked ionic polysaccharides for stimuli-sensitive drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Blanco-Fernandez, Barbara; Puga, Ana M; Concheiro, Angel

    2013-08-01

    Polysaccharides are gaining increasing attention as components of stimuli-responsive drug delivery systems, particularly since they can be obtained in a well characterized and reproducible way from the natural sources. Ionic polysaccharides can be readily crosslinked to render hydrogel networks sensitive to a variety of internal and external variables, and thus suitable for switching drug release on-off through diverse mechanisms. Hybrids, composites and grafted polymers can reinforce the responsiveness and widen the range of stimuli to which polysaccharide-based systems can respond. This review analyzes the state of the art of crosslinked ionic polysaccharides as components of delivery systems that can regulate drug release as a function of changes in pH, ion nature and concentration, electric and magnetic field intensity, light wavelength, temperature, redox potential, and certain molecules (enzymes, illness markers, and so on). Examples of specific applications are provided. The information compiled demonstrates that crosslinked networks of ionic polysaccharides are suitable building blocks for developing advanced externally activated and feed-back modulated drug delivery systems. PMID:23639519

  17. Drug Sensitivity in Older Adults: The Role of Physiologic and Pharmacokinetic Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherry, Katie E.; Morton, Mark R.

    1989-01-01

    Notes that age-related changes in physiology and pharmacokinetics (how drugs are used in the body) lead to increased drug sensitivity and potentially harmful drug effects. Addresses heightened sensitivity to drug effects seen in older adults. Presents three examples of physiologic decline and discusses some broad considerations for geriatric…

  18. Numerical modeling of the transmission dynamics of drug-sensitive and drug-resistant HSV-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumel, A. B.

    2001-03-01

    A competitive finite-difference method will be constructed and used to solve a modified deterministic model for the spread of herpes simplex virus type-2 (HSV-2) within a given population. The model monitors the transmission dynamics and control of drug-sensitive and drug-resistant HSV-2. Unlike the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method (RK4), which fails when the discretization parameters exceed certain values, the novel numerical method to be developed in this paper gives convergent results for all parameter values.

  19. Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance in Angola.

    PubMed

    Fançony, Cláudia; Brito, Miguel; Gil, Jose Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Facing chloroquine drug resistance, Angola promptly adopted artemisinin-based combination therapy as the first-line to treat malaria. Currently, the country aims to consolidate malaria control, while preparing for the elimination of the disease, along with others African countries in the region. However, the remarkable capacity of Plasmodium to develop drug resistance represents an alarming threat for those achievements. Herein, the available, but relatively scarce and dispersed, information on malaria drug resistance in Angola, is reviewed and discussed. The review aims to inform but also to encourage future research studies that monitor and update the information on anti-malarial drug efficacy and prevalence of molecular markers of drug resistance, key fields in the context and objectives of elimination. PMID:26858018

  20. Improving malaria home treatment by training drug retailers in rural Kenya.

    PubMed

    Marsh, V M; Mutemi, W M; Willetts, A; Bayah, K; Were, S; Ross, A; Marsh, K

    2004-04-01

    Recent global malaria control initiatives highlight the potential role of drug retailers to improve access to early effective malaria treatment. We report on the findings and discuss the implications of an educational programme for rural drug retailers and communities in Kenya between 1998 and 2001 in a study population of 70,000. Impact was evaluated through annual household surveys of over-the-counter (OTC) drug use and simulated retail client surveys in an early (1999) and a late (2000) implementation area. The programme achieved major improvements in drug selling practices. The proportion of OTC anti-malarial drug users receiving an adequate dose rose from 8% (n = 98) to 33% (n = 121) between 1998 and 1999 in the early implementation area. By 2001, and with the introduction of sulphadoxine pyrimethamine group drugs in accordance with national policy, this proportion rose to 64% (n = 441) across the early and late implementation areas. Overall, the proportion of shop-treated childhood fevers receiving an adequate dose of a recommended anti-malarial drug within 24 h rose from 1% (n = 681) to 28% (n = 919) by 2001. These findings strongly support the inclusion of private drug retailers in control strategies aiming to improve prompt effective treatment of malaria. PMID:15078263

  1. Photoactive Fluoropolymer Surfaces that Release Sensitizer Drug Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Goutam; Minnis, Mihaela; Ghogare, Ashwini A.; Abramova, Inna; Cengel, Keith; Busch, Theresa M.; Greer, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    We describe a physical-organic study of two fluoropolymers bearing a photoreleasable PEGylated photosensitizer which generates 1O2(1Δg) [chlorin e6 methoxy tri(ethylene glycol) triester]. The surfaces are Teflon/polyvinylalcohol (PVA) nanocomposite and fluorinated silica. The relative efficiency of these surfaces to photorelease the PEGylated sensitizer [shown previously to be phototoxic to ovarian cancer cells (Kimani, S. et al J. Org. Chem 2012, 77, 10638)] was slightly higher for the nanocomposite. In the presence of red light and O2, 1O2 is formed, which cleaves an ethene linkage to liberate the sensitizer in 68–92% yields. The fluoropolymers were designed to deal with multiple problems. Namely, their success relied not only high O2 solubility and drug repellency, but that the C−F bonds physically quench little 1O2 for its productive use away from the surface. The results obtained here indicate that Teflon-like surfaces have potential uses of delivering sensitizer and singlet oxygen for applications in tissue repair and photodynamic therapy (PDT). PMID:25686407

  2. In vitro drug sensitivity of Plasmodium falciparum in Acre, Brazil.

    PubMed Central

    Kremsner, P. G.; Zotter, G. M.; Feldmeier, H.; Graninger, W.; Kollaritsch, M.; Wiedermann, G.; Rocha, R. M.; Wernsdorfer, W. H.

    1989-01-01

    In Acre, the westernmost state of Brazil in the Amazon region, the sensitivity of Plasmodium falciparum to chloroquine, amodiaquine, mefloquine, quinine and sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine was determined in vitro by the Rieckmann microtechnique. The study was performed between January and June 1987; the in vitro parasite responses to all antimalarial drugs were determined according to the recommendations of WHO. Of 83 isolates of P. falciparum, all were sensitive to mefloquine and of 87 isolates of P. falciparum, 84 (97%) were sensitive to quinine. The EC50 for mefloquine was 0.27 mumol/l and for quinine 4.60 mumol/l. In contrast, 65 of 89 (73%) and 70 of 83 (84%) isolates were resistant to amodiaquine and chloroquine, respectively; 11 isolates even grew at 6.4 mumol chloroquine/l. The EC50 for amodiaquine was 0.34 mumol/l and for chloroquine 0.73 mumol/l. Sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine resistance was seen in 23 of 25 (92%) cases. These data clearly indicate that in the western part of the Amazon region the 4-aminoquinolines, as well as sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine, can no longer be recommended for the treatment of P. falciparum infections. PMID:2670298

  3. Photoactive fluoropolymer surfaces that release sensitizer drug molecules.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Goutam; Minnis, Mihaela; Ghogare, Ashwini A; Abramova, Inna; Cengel, Keith A; Busch, Theresa M; Greer, Alexander

    2015-03-12

    We describe a physical-organic study of two fluoropolymers bearing a photoreleasable PEGylated photosensitizer that generates (1)O2((1)Δg) [chlorin e6 methoxy tri(ethylene glycol) triester]. The surfaces are Teflon/poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) nanocomposite and fluorinated silica. The relative efficiency of these surfaces to photorelease the PEGylated sensitizer [shown previously to be phototoxic to ovarian cancer cells (Kimani, S. et al. J. Org. Chem 2012, 77, 10638)] was slightly higher for the nanocomposite. In the presence of red light and O2, (1)O2 is formed, which cleaves an ethene linkage to liberate the sensitizer in 68-92% yield. The fluoropolymers were designed to deal with multiple problems. Namely, their success relied not only on high O2 solubility and drug repellency but also on the C-F bonds, which physically quench little (1)O2, for singlet oxygen's productive use away from the surface. The results obtained here indicate that Teflon-like surfaces have potential uses in delivering sensitizer and singlet oxygen for applications in tissue repair and photodynamic therapy (PDT). PMID:25686407

  4. Regulation of drug sensitivity by ribosomal protein S3a.

    PubMed

    Hu, Z B; Minden, M D; McCulloch, E A; Stahl, J

    2000-02-01

    When bcl-2 is immunoprecipitated from (32)P-labeled cell extracts of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-treated acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) blasts, a phosphorylated protein of approximately 30 kd is coprecipitated. This protein has been identified as ribosomal protein S3a. The biologic effects of S3a include favoring apoptosis and enhancing the malignant phenotype. We sought to determine whether S3a, like bcl-2, influenced the response of cells to chemotherapeutic drugs and ATRA. Cell lines were studied in which S3a was genetically increased or disrupted; increased S3a was regularly associated with increased plating efficiency and increased sensitivity to either cytosine arabinoside (ara-C) or doxorubicin (DNR). S3a did not affect the sensitivity of cells to paclitaxel. Pulse exposures to either (3)HTdR or ara-C showed a greater percentage of clonogenic cells in the S phase of the cell cycle in cells with increased S3a than in controls. Cells with increased S3a responded to ATRA by increased ara-C or DNR sensitivity, whereas cells with reduced S3a protein were either protected by ATRA or not affected. We studied cryopreserved blast cells from patients with AML or chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). S3a protein levels were heterogeneous in these populations. In 32 cryopreserved blast populations, S3a levels were significantly correlated with both bcl-2 and with cell growth in culture. As in cell lines, high S3a in cryopreserved blasts was associated with ATRA-induced sensitization to ara-C. No significant association was seen between S3a levels and response to treatment. PMID:10648421

  5. Protein microarray: sensitive and effective immunodetection for drug residues

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Veterinary drugs such as clenbuterol (CL) and sulfamethazine (SM2) are low molecular weight (<1000 Da) compounds, or haptens, that are difficult to develop immunoassays due to their low immunogenicity. In this study, we conjugated the drugs to ovalbumin to increase their immunogenicity for antiserum production in rabbits and developed a protein microarray immunoassay for detection of clenbuterol and sulfamethazine. The sensitivity of this approach was then compared to traditional ELISA technique. Results The artificial antigens were spotted on microarray slides. Standard concentrations of the compounds were added to compete with the spotted antigens for binding to the antisera to determine the IC50. Our microarray assay showed the IC50 were 39.6 ng/ml for CL and 48.8 ng/ml for SM2, while the traditional competitive indirect-ELISA (ci-ELISA) showed the IC50 were 190.7 ng/ml for CL and 156.7 ng/ml for SM2. We further validated the two methods with CL fortified chicken muscle tissues, and the protein microarray assay showed 90% recovery while the ci-ELISA had 76% recovery rate. When tested with CL-fed chicken muscle tissues, the protein microarray assay had higher sensitivity (0.9 ng/g) than the ci-ELISA (0.1 ng/g) for detection of CL residues. Conclusions The protein microarrays showed 4.5 and 3.5 times lower IC50 than the ci-ELISA detection for CL and SM2, respectively, suggesting that immunodetection of small molecules with protein microarray is a better approach than the traditional ELISA technique. PMID:20158905

  6. hERG subunit composition determines differential drug sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Abi-Gerges, N; Holkham, H; Jones, EMC; Pollard, CE; Valentin, J-P; Robertson, GA

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The majority of human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) screens aiming to minimize the risk of drug-induced long QT syndrome have been conducted using heterologous systems expressing the hERG 1a subunit, although both hERG 1a and 1b subunits contribute to the K+ channels producing the repolarizing current IKr. We tested a range of compounds selected for their diversity to determine whether hERG 1a and 1a/1b channels exhibit different sensitivities that may influence safety margins or contribute to a stratified risk analysis. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We used the IonWorks™ plate-based electrophysiology device to compare sensitivity of hERG 1a and 1a/1b channels stably expressed in HEK293 cells to 50 compounds previously shown to target hERG channels. Potency was determined as IC50 values (µM) obtained from non-cumulative, eight-point concentration–effect curves of normalized data, fitted to the Hill equation. To minimize possible sources of variability, compound potency was assessed using test plates arranged in alternating columns of cells expressing hERG 1a and 1a/1b. KEY RESULTS Although the potency of most compounds was similar for the two targets, some surprising differences were observed. Fluoxetine (Prozac) was more potent at blocking hERG 1a/1b than 1a channels, yielding a corresponding reduction in the safety margin. In contrast, E-4031 was a more potent blocker of hERG 1a compared with 1a/1b channels, as previously reported, as was dofetilide, another high-affinity blocker. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The current assays may underestimate the risk of some drugs to cause torsades de pointes arrhythmia, and overestimate the risk of others. PMID:21449979

  7. Roles of sildenafil in enhancing drug sensitivity in cancer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhi; Tiwari, Amit K; Patel, Atish S; Fu, Li-Wu; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2011-06-01

    The phenomenon of multidrug resistance (MDR) has decreased the hope for successful cancer chemotherapy. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily is the largest transmembrane family. The overexpression of ABC transporters is a major determinant of MDR in cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. Unfortunately, until recently, most of the strategies used to surmount ABC-transporter-mediated MDR have had limited success. An ideal modulator of MDR would be one that has a low liability to induce toxicity and alter the pharmacokinetic profile of antineoplastic drugs. Sildenafil, an inhibitor of cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase type 5, was found to significantly reverse ABC-transporter-mediated MDR. Our results indicate that sildenafil has differential inhibitory effects on ABC transporters: It significantly decreases the efflux activity of ABCB1 and ABCG2, but has no significant effects on ABCC1. Emerging evidence indicates that sildenafil and other phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors may enhance the sensitivity of certain types of cancer to standard chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:21610107

  8. Metabolic engineering of E.coli for the production of a precursor to artemisinin, an anti-malarial drug [Chapter 25 in Manual of Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology, 3rd edition

    SciTech Connect

    Petzold, Christopher; Keasling, Jay

    2011-07-18

    This document is Chapter 25 in the Manual of Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology, 3rd edition. Topics covered include: Incorporation of Amorpha-4,11-Diene Biosynthetic Pathway into E. coli; Amorpha-4,11-Diene Pathway Optimization; "-Omics" Analyses for Increased Amorpha-4,11-Diene Production; Biosynthetic Oxidation of Amorpha-4,11-Diene.

  9. Ikaros expression sensitizes leukemic cells to the chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    He, Licai; Gao, Shenmeng; Zhu, Zhenfeng; Chen, Shang; Gu, Haihua

    2016-01-01

    Ikaros is an important transcription factor involved in the development and differentiation of hematopoietic cells. However, its role in the treatment of hematopoietic malignancies such as leukemia is less well understood. In the present study, it was observed by data mining of the Oncomine database that high expression levels of full-length Ikaros (IK1) is correlated with increased sensitivity of cancer cells to treatments with chemotherapeutic drugs, including doxorubicin (DOX). To examine the functional significance of this observation, the expression of IK1 in a leukemia cell line was altered, and the response of leukemic cells to DOX treatment was analyzed. It was observed that overexpression of IK1 could enhance DOX-induced apoptosis, while knockdown of IK1 attenuated DOX-induced apoptosis in leukemic cells. Further experiments demonstrated that IK1 sensitized leukemic cells to DOX-induced apoptosis, probably through upregulation of caspase-9. These data suggest that high expression levels of IK1 may be a potential biomarker to predict responses of leukemia patients to treatment with chemotherapy.

  10. Microfluidic Synthesis of pH-Sensitive Multicompartmental Microparticles for Multimodulated Drug Release.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon Ung; Choi, Dae Gun; Roh, Yoon Ho; Shim, Min Suk; Bong, Ki Wan

    2016-07-01

    Stimuli-responsive carriers releasing multiple drugs have been researched for synergistic combinatorial cancer treatment with reduced side-effects. However, previously used drug carriers have limitations in encapsulating multiple drug components in a single carrier and releasing each drug independently. In this work, pH-sensitive, multimodulated, anisotropic drug carrier particles are synthesized using an acid-cleavable polymer and stop-flow lithography. The particles exhibit a faster drug release rate at the acidic pH of tumors than at physiological pH, demonstrating their potential for tumor-selective drug release. The drug release rate of the particles can be adjusted by controlling the monomer composition. To accomplish multimodulated drug release, multicompartmental particles are synthesized. The drug release profile of each compartment is programmed by tailoring the monomer composition. These pH-sensitive, multicompartmental particles are promising drug carriers enabling tumor-selective and multimodulated release of multiple drugs for synergistic combination cancer therapy. PMID:27197594

  11. Glucose-sensitive polymer nanoparticles for self-regulated drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li; Xiao, Chunsheng; Wang, Liyan; Gai, Guangqing; Ding, Jianxun

    2016-06-01

    Glucose-sensitive drug delivery systems, which can continuously and automatically regulate drug release based on the concentration of glucose, have attracted much interest in recent years. Self-regulated drug delivery platforms have potential application in diabetes treatment to reduce the intervention and improve the quality of life for patients. At present, there are three types of glucose-sensitive drug delivery systems based on glucose oxidase (GOD), concanavalin A (Con A), and phenylboronic acid (PBA) respectively. This review covers the recent advances in GOD-, Con A-, or PBA-mediated glucose-sensitive nanoscale drug delivery systems, and provides their major challenges and opportunities. PMID:27194104

  12. Deficient supplies of drugs for life threatening diseases in an African community

    PubMed Central

    Lufesi, Norman N; Andrew, Marit; Aursnes, Ivar

    2007-01-01

    Background In Malawi essential drugs are provided free of charge to patients at all public health facilities in order to ensure equitable access to health care. The country thereby spends about 30% of the national health budget on drugs. In order to investigate the level of drug shortages and eventually find the reasons for the drugs shortages in Malawi, we studied the management of the drug supplies for common and life threatening diseases such as pneumonia and malaria in a random selection of health centres. Methods In July and August 2005 we visited eight out of a total of 37 health centres chosen at random in the Lilongwe District, Malawi. We recorded the logistics of eight essential and widely used drugs which according to the treatment guidelines should be available at all health centres. Five drugs are used regularly to treat pneumonia and three others to treat acute malaria. Out-of-stock situations in the course of one year were recorded retrospectively. We compared the quantity of each drug recorded on the Stock Cards with the actual stock of the drug on the shelves at the time of audit. We reviewed 8,968 Patient Records containing information on type and amount of drugs prescribed during one month. Results On average, drugs for treating pneumonia were out of stock for six months during one year of observation (median value 167 days); anti-malarial drugs were lacking for periods ranging from 42 to138 days. The cross-sectional audit was even more negative, but here too the situation was more positive for anti-malarial drugs. The main reason for the shortage of drugs was insufficient deliveries from the Regional Medical Store. Benzyl penicillin was in shortest supply (4% received). The median value for non-availability was 240 days in the course of a year. The supply was better for anti-malarial drugs, except for quinine injections (9 %). Only 66 % of Stock Card records of quantities received were reflected in Patient Records showing quantities dispensed

  13. An implantable microdevice to perform high-throughput in vivo drug sensitivity testing in tumors.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Oliver; Landry, Heather M; Fuller, Jason E; Santini, John T; Baselga, Jose; Tepper, Robert I; Cima, Michael J; Langer, Robert

    2015-04-22

    Current anticancer chemotherapy relies on a limited set of in vitro or indirect prognostic markers of tumor response to available drugs. A more accurate analysis of drug sensitivity would involve studying tumor response in vivo. To this end, we have developed an implantable device that can perform drug sensitivity testing of several anticancer agents simultaneously inside the living tumor. The device contained reservoirs that released microdoses of single agents or drug combinations into spatially distinct regions of the tumor. The local drug concentrations were chosen to be representative of concentrations achieved during systemic treatment. Local efficacy and drug concentration profiles were evaluated for each drug or drug combination on the device, and the local efficacy was confirmed to be a predictor of systemic efficacy in vivo for multiple drugs and tumor models. Currently, up to 16 individual drugs or combinations can be assessed independently, without systemic drug exposure, through minimally invasive biopsy of a small region of a single tumor. This assay takes into consideration physiologic effects that contribute to drug response by allowing drugs to interact with the living tumor in its native microenvironment. Because these effects are crucial to predicting drug response, we envision that these devices will help identify optimal drug therapy before systemic treatment is initiated and could improve drug response prediction beyond the biomarkers and in vitro and ex vivo studies used today. These devices may also be used in clinical drug development to safely gather efficacy data on new compounds before pharmacological optimization. PMID:25904741

  14. An implantable microdevice to perform high-throughput in vivo drug sensitivity testing in tumors

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, Oliver; Landry, Heather M.; Fuller, Jason E.; Santini, John T.; Baselga, Jose; Tepper, Robert I.; Cima, Michael J.; Langer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Current anticancer chemotherapy relies on a limited set of in vitro or indirect prognostic markers of tumor response to available drugs. A more accurate analysis of drug sensitivity would involve studying tumor response in vivo. To this end, we have developed an implantable device that can perform drug sensitivity testing of several anticancer agents simultaneously inside the living tumor. The device contained reservoirs that released microdoses of single agents or drug combinations into spatially distinct regions of the tumor. The local drug concentrations were chosen to be representative of concentrations achieved during systemic treatment. Local efficacy and drug concentration profiles were evaluated for each drug or drug combination on the device, and the local efficacy was confirmed to be a predictor of systemic efficacy in vivo for multiple drugs and tumor models. Currently, up to 16 individual drugs or combinations can be assessed independently, without systemic drug exposure, through minimally invasive biopsy of a small region of a single tumor. This assay takes into consideration physiologic effects that contribute to drug response by allowing drugs to interact with the living tumor in its native microenvironment. Because these effects are crucial to predicting drug response, we envision that these devices will help identify optimal drug therapy before systemic treatment is initiated and could improve drug response prediction beyond the biomarkers and in vitro and ex vivo studies used today. These devices may also be used in clinical drug development to safely gather efficacy data on new compounds before pharmacological optimization. PMID:25904741

  15. [Immunotropic and antihypoxant therapy of experimental drug-sensitive and drug-resistant tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Sukhanov, D S; Vinogradova, T I; Demidik, S N; Zabolotnyh, N V; Vasilieva, S N; Kovalenko, A L; Vitovskaya, M L

    2013-01-01

    The results of pre-clinical research of cycloferon, remaxol and runihol on the model of experimental generalized tuberculosis, caused by the MBT with a different spectrum of drug sensitivity are presented. A considerable increase of the curative effect of the therapy with the used of cycloferon and remaxol. There was manifested the strengthening of lung clearance from the office, reducing the prevalence of specific inflammation in the lungs of the index of lung damage, stimulation of sorption and destructive ability of peritoneal macrophages, inhibited in the course of development of experimental tuberculosis infection. Runihol has no impact on the effectiveness of chemotherapy in the absence of a stimulating influence on the phagocytic function of the peritoneal macrophages. PMID:23805718

  16. Triclosan Derivatives: Towards Potent Inhibitors of Drug-Sensitive and Drug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Freundlich, Joel S.; Wang, Feng; Vilchèze, Catherine; Gulten, Gulcin; Langley, Robert; Schiehser, Guy A.; Jacobus, David P.; Jacobs, Jr., William R.; Sacchettini, James C.

    2009-06-30

    Isoniazid (INH) is a frontline antitubercular drug that inhibits the enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase InhA. Novel inhibitors of InhA that are not cross-resistant to INH represent a significant goal in antitubercular chemotherapy. The design, synthesis, and biological activity of a series of triclosan-based inhibitors is reported, including their promising efficacy against INH-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. Triclosan has been previously shown to inhibit InhA, an essential enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase involved in mycolic acid biosynthesis, the inhibition of which leads to the lysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Using a structure-based drug design approach, a series of 5-substituted triclosan derivatives was developed. Two groups of derivatives with alkyl and aryl substituents, respectively, were identified with dramatically enhanced potency against purified InhA. The most efficacious inhibitor displayed an IC{sub 50} value of 21 nM, which was 50-fold more potent than triclosan. X-ray crystal structures of InhA in complex with four triclosan derivatives revealed the structural basis for the inhibitory activity. Six selected triclosan derivatives were tested against isoniazid-sensitive and resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. Among those, the best inhibitor had an MIC value of 4.7 {mu}g mL{sup -1} (13 {mu}M), which represents a tenfold improvement over the bacteriocidal activity of triclosan. A subset of these triclosan analogues was more potent than isoniazid against two isoniazid-resistant M. tuberculosis strains, demonstrating the significant potential for structure-based design in the development of next generation antitubercular drugs.

  17. Pressure-sensitive adhesives for transdermal drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Tan; Pfister

    1999-02-01

    Adhesives are a critical component in transdermal drug delivery (TDD) devices. In addition to the usual requirements of functional adhesive properties, adhesives for TDD applications must have good biocompatibility with the skin, chemical compatibility with the drug, various components of the formulation, and provide consistent, effective delivery of the drug. This review discusses the three most commonly used adhesives (polyisobutylenes, polyacrylates and silicones) in TDD devices, and provides an update on recently introduced TDD products and recent developments of new adhesives. PMID:10234208

  18. Drug sensitivity profiling and molecular characteristics of cells from pleural effusions of patients with lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hillerdal, Carl-Olof; Celep, Aytekin; Yousef-Fadhel, Eviane; Skribek, Henriette; Hjerpe, Anders; Székely, László; Dobra, Katalin

    2015-01-01

    We propose to assess the therapeutic value of biomarker-guided individualized chemotherapy in patients with metastasizing lung adenocarcinoma. In this study, we used primary cells from pleural effusions from sixteen patients diagnosed with adenocarcinomas originating in the lung and from four patients with no malignant diagnosis. The ex vivo drug sensitivity of primary cells was assessed for 32 chemotherapeutical drugs. Linear regression analyses were performed to examine possible correlations between the drug sensitivity, overall survival and expression of ERCC1 and RRM1. The ex vivo drug sensitivity profiles of the patients revealed considerable heterogeneity in drug response. Vinblastine, vinorelbine, paclitaxel and actinomycin D showed high efficiency against 50% of the tested primary cells. Significant correlation was detected between the ex vivo sensitivity to platinum based drugs and gemcitabine and the level of ERCC1 and RRM1. No significant correlation was however seen between overall survival and drug sensitivity. The heterogeneity of the drug response suggests that optimal care of the adenocarcinoma patients should include the determination of drug sensitivity of the primary cells and would benefit to use personalized therapy. PMID:26000095

  19. Comparison and validation of genomic predictors for anticancer drug sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Papillon-Cavanagh, Simon; De Jay, Nicolas; Hachem, Nehme; Olsen, Catharina; Bontempi, Gianluca; Aerts, Hugo J W L; Quackenbush, John; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Background An enduring challenge in personalized medicine lies in selecting the right drug for each individual patient. While testing of drugs on patients in large trials is the only way to assess their clinical efficacy and toxicity, we dramatically lack resources to test the hundreds of drugs currently under development. Therefore the use of preclinical model systems has been intensively investigated as this approach enables response to hundreds of drugs to be tested in multiple cell lines in parallel. Methods Two large-scale pharmacogenomic studies recently screened multiple anticancer drugs on over 1000 cell lines. We propose to combine these datasets to build and robustly validate genomic predictors of drug response. We compared five different approaches for building predictors of increasing complexity. We assessed their performance in cross-validation and in two large validation sets, one containing the same cell lines present in the training set and another dataset composed of cell lines that have never been used during the training phase. Results Sixteen drugs were found in common between the datasets. We were able to validate multivariate predictors for three out of the 16 tested drugs, namely irinotecan, PD-0325901, and PLX4720. Moreover, we observed that response to 17-AAG, an inhibitor of Hsp90, could be efficiently predicted by the expression level of a single gene, NQO1. Conclusion These results suggest that genomic predictors could be robustly validated for specific drugs. If successfully validated in patients’ tumor cells, and subsequently in clinical trials, they could act as companion tests for the corresponding drugs and play an important role in personalized medicine. PMID:23355484

  20. pH- and ion-sensitive polymers for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Takayuki; Lai, Tsz Chung; Kwon, Glen S; Sako, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Drug delivery systems (DDSs) are important for effective, safe, and convenient administration of drugs. pH- and ion-responsive polymers have been widely employed in DDS for site-specific drug release due to their abilities to exploit specific pH- or ion-gradients in the human body. Areas covered Having pH-sensitivity, cationic polymers can mask the taste of drugs and release drugs in the stomach by responding to gastric low pH. Anionic polymers responsive to intestinal high pH are used for preventing gastric degradation of drug, colon drug delivery and achieving high bioavailability of weak basic drugs. Tumor-targeted DDSs have been developed based on polymers with imidazole groups or poly(β-amino ester) responsive to tumoral low pH. Polymers with pH-sensitive chemical linkages, such as hydrazone, acetal, ortho ester and vinyl ester, pH-sensitive cell-penetrating peptides and cationic polymers undergoing pH-dependent protonation have been studied to utilize the pH gradient along the endocytic pathway for intracellular drug delivery. As ion-sensitive polymers, ion-exchange resins are frequently used for taste-masking, counterion-responsive drug release and sustained drug release. Polymers responding to ions in the saliva and gastrointestinal fluids are also used for controlled drug release in oral drug formulations. Expert opinion Stimuli-responsive DDSs are important for achieving site-specific and controlled drug release; however, intraindividual, interindividual and intercellular variations of pH should be considered when designing DDSs or drug products. Combination of polymers and other components, and deeper understanding of human physiology are important for development of pH- and ion-sensitive polymeric DDS products for patients. PMID:23930949

  1. Novel drug candidates for blast phase chronic myeloid leukemia from high-throughput drug sensitivity and resistance testing

    PubMed Central

    Pietarinen, P O; Pemovska, T; Kontro, M; Yadav, B; Mpindi, J P; Andersson, E I; Majumder, M M; Kuusanmäki, H; Koskenvesa, P; Kallioniemi, O; Wennerberg, K; Heckman, C A; Mustjoki, S; Porkka, K

    2015-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia in blast crisis (CML BC) remains a challenging disease to treat despite the introduction and advances in tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy. In this study we set out to identify novel candidate drugs for CML BC by using an unbiased high-throughput drug testing platform. We used three CML cell lines representing different types of CML blast phases (K562, EM-2 and MOLM-1) and primary leukemic cells from three CML BC patients. Profiling of drug responses was performed with a drug sensitivity and resistance testing platform comprising 295 anticancer agents. Overall, drug sensitivity scores and the drug response profiles of cell line and primary cell samples correlated well and were distinct from other types of leukemia samples. The cell lines were highly sensitive to TKIs and the clinically TKI-resistant patient samples were also resistant ex vivo. Comparison of cell line and patient sample data identified new candidate drugs for CML BC, such as vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase inhibitors. Our results indicate that these drugs in particular warrant further evaluation by analyzing a larger set of primary patient samples. The results also pave way for designing rational combination therapies. PMID:25933373

  2. Pattern of drug utilization for treatment of uncomplicated malaria in urban Ghana following national treatment policy change to artemisinin-combination therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dodoo, Alexander NO; Fogg, Carole; Asiimwe, Alex; Nartey, Edmund T; Kodua, Augustina; Tenkorang, Ofori; Ofori-Adjei, David

    2009-01-01

    Background Change of first-line treatment of uncomplicated malaria to artemisinin-combination therapy (ACT) is widespread in Africa. To expand knowledge of safety profiles of ACT, pharmacovigilance activities are included in the implementation process of therapy changes. Ghana implemented first-line therapy of artesunate-amodiaquine in 2005. Drug utilization data is an important component of determining drug safety, and this paper describes how anti-malarials were prescribed within a prospective pharmacovigilance study in Ghana following anti-malarial treatment policy change. Methods Patients with diagnosis of uncomplicated malaria were recruited from pharmacies of health facilities throughout Accra in a cohort-event monitoring study. The main drug utilization outcomes were the relation of patient age, gender, type of facility attended, mode of diagnosis and concomitant treatments to the anti-malarial regimen prescribed. Logistic regression was used to predict prescription of nationally recommended first-line therapy and concomitant prescription of antibiotics. Results The cohort comprised 2,831 patients. Curative regimens containing an artemisinin derivative were given to 90.8% (n = 2,574) of patients, although 33% (n = 936) of patients received an artemisinin-based monotherapy. Predictors of first-line therapy were laboratory-confirmed diagnosis, age >5 years, and attending a government facility. Analgesics and antibiotics were the most commonly prescribed concomitant medications, with a median of two co-prescriptions per patient (range 1–9). Patients above 12 years were significantly less likely to have antibiotics co-prescribed than patients under five years; those prescribed non-artemisinin monotherapies were more likely to receive antibiotics. A dihydroartemisinin-amodiaquine combination was the most used therapy for children under five years of age (29.0%, n = 177). Conclusion This study shows that though first-line therapy recommendations may change

  3. Drug resistance as influenced by inactivated sensitivity discs.

    PubMed

    Griffith, L J; Mullins, C G

    1968-04-01

    Reports of staphylococci resistant to the semisynthetic penicillins stimulated a study of the factors influencing the stability of the drugs in discs. The behavior of penicillin G, methicillin, oxacillin, cloxacillin, and cephalothin discs under different humidity and temperature conditions is described. Humidity was found to be the most significant factor in drug inactivation. Storage of discs in a vacuum desiccator at -20 C provides maximal antibiotic stability. PMID:4869619

  4. Identification of genes associated with platinum drug sensitivity and resistance in human ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, D; Schick, J; Conway, S; Biade, S; Laub, P B; Stevenson, J P; Hamilton, T C; O'Dwyer, P J; Johnson, S W

    2005-01-01

    Platinum-based chemotherapeutic regimens are ultimately unsuccessful due to intrinsic or acquired drug resistance. Understanding the molecular basis for platinum drug sensitivity/resistance is necessary for the development of new drugs and therapeutic regimens. In an effort to identify such determinants, we evaluated the expression of approximately 4000 genes using cDNA microarray screening in a panel of 14 unrelated human ovarian cancer cell lines derived from patients who were either untreated or treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. These data were analysed relative to the sensitivities of the cells to four platinum drugs (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (cisplatin), carboplatin, DACH-(oxalato)platinum (II) (oxaliplatin) and cis-diamminedichloro (2-methylpyridine) platinum (II) (AMD473)) as well as the proliferation rate of the cells. Correlation analysis of the microarray data with respect to drug sensitivity and resistance revealed a significant association of Stat1 expression with decreased sensitivity to cisplatin (r=0.65) and AMD473 (r=0.76). These results were confirmed by quantitative RT–PCR and Western blot analyses. To study the functional significance of these findings, the full-length Stat1 cDNA was transfected into drug-sensitive A2780 human ovarian cancer cells. The resulting clones that exhibited increased Stat1 expression were three- to five-fold resistant to cisplatin and AMD473 as compared to the parental cells. The effect of inhibiting Jak/Stat signalling on platinum drug sensitivity was investigated using the Janus kinase inhibitor, AG490. Pretreatment of platinum-resistant cells with AG490 resulted in significant increased sensitivity to AMD473, but not to cisplatin or oxaliplatin. Overall, the results indicate that cDNA microarray analysis may be used successfully to identify determinants of drug sensitivity/resistance and future functional studies of other candidate genes from this database may lead to an increased understanding of the

  5. Sensitivity of field isolates of Eimeria from two broiler complexes to anticoccidial drugs in the chicken.

    PubMed

    Chapman, H D; Hacker, A B

    1994-09-01

    The spectrum of resistance to seven currently used anticoccidial drugs in isolates of Eimeria obtained from farms two broiler complexes was examined. All isolates were resistant to monensin, salinomycin, and narasin. Lasalocid was more effective in controlling coccidiosis than the other ionophores, although most isolates were classified as resistant to the drug. The majority of isolates were sensitive or showed reduced sensitivity to robenidine, clopidol, and decoquinate. It was concluded that for drugs that have been used extensively (e.g., monensin and salinomycin), examination of isolates from one or two farms may give results applicable to the entire complex. For drugs that have been used infrequently, however (such as robenidine, clopidol, and decoquinate), examination of isolates from at least five farms would be desirable to establish the spectrum of drug sensitivity. PMID:7800639

  6. Shear-stress sensitive lenticular vesicles for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, Margaret N.; Fedotenko, Illya A.; Abegg, Daniel; Althaus, Jasmin; Babel, Lucille; Favarger, France; Reiter, Renate; Tanasescu, Radu; Zaffalon, Pierre-Léonard; Ziegler, André; Müller, Bert; Saxer, Till; Zumbuehl, Andreas

    2012-08-01

    Atherosclerosis results in the narrowing of arterial blood vessels and this causes significant changes in the endogenous shear stress between healthy and constricted arteries. Nanocontainers that can release drugs locally with such rheological changes can be very useful. Here, we show that vesicles made from an artificial 1,3-diaminophospholipid are stable under static conditions but release their contents at elevated shear stress. These vesicles have a lenticular morphology, which potentially leads to instabilities along their equator. Using a model cardiovascular system based on polymer tubes and an external pump to represent shear stress in healthy and constricted vessels of the heart, we show that drugs preferentially release from the vesicles in constricted vessels that have high shear stress.

  7. Shear-stress sensitive lenticular vesicles for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Holme, Margaret N; Fedotenko, Illya A; Abegg, Daniel; Althaus, Jasmin; Babel, Lucille; Favarger, France; Reiter, Renate; Tanasescu, Radu; Zaffalon, Pierre-Léonard; Ziegler, André; Müller, Bert; Saxer, Till; Zumbuehl, Andreas

    2012-08-01

    Atherosclerosis results in the narrowing of arterial blood vessels and this causes significant changes in the endogenous shear stress between healthy and constricted arteries. Nanocontainers that can release drugs locally with such rheological changes can be very useful. Here, we show that vesicles made from an artificial 1,3-diaminophospholipid are stable under static conditions but release their contents at elevated shear stress. These vesicles have a lenticular morphology, which potentially leads to instabilities along their equator. Using a model cardiovascular system based on polymer tubes and an external pump to represent shear stress in healthy and constricted vessels of the heart, we show that drugs preferentially release from the vesicles in constricted vessels that have high shear stress. PMID:22683843

  8. Drug Loading Capacity of Environmentally Sensitive Polymeric Microgels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonough, Ryan; Streletzky, Kiril; Bayachou, Mekki; Peiris, Pubudu

    2009-10-01

    Microgel nanoparticles consisting of cross-linked polymer hydroxypropyl cellulose chains have a temperature dependent volume phase transition, prompting the use of microgels for controlled drug transport. Drug particles aggregate in the slightly hydrophobic interior of microgels. Microgels are stored in equilibrium until the critical temperature (Tv) is reached and the volume phase transition limits available space, thus expelling the drugs. Our study was designed to test this property of microgels using amperometric electrochemical methods. A critical assumption was that small molecules inside microgels would not interact via diffusion with the electrode surface and thus total current would be decreased across the electrodes in a microgel sample. A room temperature (Troom) flow amperometric measurement comparing microgel/tylenol solution with control tylenol samples yielded about 20% tylenol concentration reduction of the microgel sample. Results from the steady state electrochemical experiment confirm the presence of about 20% tylenol concentration drop of the microgel sample compared to control sample at Troom. Using the steady-state experiment with a cyclic temperature ramp from Troom to beyond Tv showed that the tylenol concentration change between the temperature extremes was greater for the microgel solution than for the control solution.

  9. Development of pH-sensitive self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems for acid-labile lipophilic drugs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tianjing; Maniglio, Devid; Chen, Jie; Chen, Bin; Migliaresi, Claudio

    2016-03-01

    Oral administration is the most convenient way of all the drug delivery routes. Orally administered bioactive compounds must resist the harsh acidic fluids or enzyme digestion in stomach, to reach their absorbed destination in small intestine. This is the case for silibinin, a drug used to protect liver cells against toxins that has also been demonstrated in vitro to possess anti-cancer effects. However, as many other drugs, silibinin can degrade in the stomach due to the action of the gastric fluid. The use of pH-sensitive self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (pH-SNEDDS) could overcome the drawback due to degradation of the drug in the stomach while enhancing its solubility and dissolution rate. In this paper we have investigated pH-sensitive self-nanoemulsifying formulations containing silibinin as model drug. Pseudo-ternary phase diagrams have been constructed in order to identify the self-emulsification regions under different pH. Solubility of silibinin in selected formulations has been assessed and stability of the pure drug and of the silibinin loaded pH-SNEDDS formulations in simulated gastric fluid had been compared. Droplet size of the optimized pH-SNEDDS has been correlated to pH, volume of dilution medium and silibinin loading amount. TEM (transmission electron microscopy) studies have shown that emulsion droplets had spherical shape and narrow size distribution. In vitro drug release studies of the optimal pH-SNEDDS indicated substantial increase of the drug release and release rate in comparison to pure silibinin and to the commercial silibinin tablet. The results indicated that pH-SNEDDS have potential to improve the biopharmaceutics properties of acid-labile lipophilic drugs. PMID:26923270

  10. Prevalence of molecular markers of Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance in Dakar, Senegal

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background As a result of the widespread resistance to chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) (including artemether-lumefantrine and artesunate-amodiaquine) has been recommended as a first-line anti-malarial regimen in Senegal since 2006. Intermittent preventive treatments with anti-malarial drugs based on sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine are also given to children or pregnant women once per month during the transmission season. Since 2006, there have been very few reports on the susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum to anti-malarial drugs. To estimate the prevalence of resistance to several anti-malarial drugs since the introduction of the widespread use of ACT, the presence of molecular markers associated with resistance to chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine was assessed in local isolates at the military hospital of Dakar. Methods The prevalence of genetic polymorphisms in genes associated with anti-malarial drug resistance, i.e., Pfcrt, Pfdhfr, Pfdhps and Pfmdr1, and the copy number of Pfmdr1 were evaluated for a panel of 174 isolates collected from patients recruited at the military hospital of Dakar from 14 October 2009 to 19 January 2010. Results The Pfcrt 76T mutation was identified in 37.2% of the samples. The Pfmdr1 86Y and 184F mutations were found in 16.6% and 67.6% of the tested samples, respectively. Twenty-eight of the 29 isolates with the 86Y mutation were also mutated at codon 184. Only one isolate (0.6%) had two copies of Pfmdr1. The Pfdhfr 108N/T, 51I and 59R mutations were identified in 82.4%, 83.5% and 74.1% of the samples, respectively. The double mutant (108N and 51I) was detected in 83.5% of the isolates, and the triple mutant (108N, 51I and 59R) was detected in 75.3%. The Pfdhps 437G, 436F/A and 613S mutations were found in 40.2%, 35.1% and 1.8% of the samples, respectively. There was no double mutant (437G and 540E) or no quintuple mutant (Pfdhfr 108N, 51I and 59R and Pfdhps 437G and 540E

  11. Suppression of Sensitivity to Drugs and Antibiotics by High External Cation Concentrations in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Shabro, Aidin; Sunnerhagen, Per

    2015-01-01

    Background Potassium ion homeostasis plays an important role in regulating membrane potential and therefore resistance to cations, antibiotics and chemotherapeutic agents in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and other yeasts. However, the precise relationship between drug resistance in S. pombe and external potassium concentrations (particularly in its natural habitats) remains unclear. S. pombe can tolerate a wide range of external potassium concentrations which in turn affect plasma membrane polarization. We thus hypothesized that high external potassium concentrations suppress the sensitivity of this yeast to various drugs. Methods We have investigated the effect of external KCl concentrations on the sensitivity of S. pombe cells to a wide range of antibiotics, antimicrobial agents and chemotherapeutic drugs. We employed survival assays, immunoblotting and microscopy for these studies. Results We demonstrate that KCl, and to a lesser extent NaCl and RbCl can suppress the sensitivity of S. pombe to a wide range of antibiotics. Ammonium chloride and potassium hydrogen sulphate also suppressed drug sensitivity. This effect appears to depend in part on changes to membrane polarization and membrane transport proteins. Interestingly, we have found little relationship between the suppressive effect of KCl on sensitivity and the structure, polarity or solubility of the various compounds investigated. Conclusions High concentrations of external potassium and other cations suppress sensitivity to a wide range of drugs in S. pombe. Potassium-rich environments may thus provide S. pombe a competitive advantage in nature. Modulating potassium ion homeostasis may sensitize pathogenic fungi to antifungal agents. PMID:25793410

  12. Repurposing of antiparasitic drugs: the hydroxy-naphthoquinone buparvaquone inhibits vertical transmission in the pregnant neosporosis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Müller, Joachim; Aguado-Martínez, Adriana; Manser, Vera; Wong, Ho Ning; Haynes, Richard K; Hemphill, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The three anti-malarial drugs artemiside, artemisone, and mefloquine, and the naphthoquinone buparvaquone known to be active against theileriosis in cattle and Leishmania infections in rodents, were assessed for activity against Neospora caninum infection. All four compounds inhibited the proliferation of N. caninum tachyzoites in vitro with IC50 in the sub-micromolar range, but artemisone and buparvaquone were most effective (IC50 = 3 and 4.9 nM, respectively). However, in a neosporosis mouse model for cerebral infection comprising Balb/c mice experimentally infected with the virulent isolate Nc-Spain7, the three anti-malarial compounds failed to exhibit any activity, since treatment did not reduce the parasite burden in brains and lungs compared to untreated controls. Thus, these compounds were not further evaluated in pregnant mice. On the other hand, buparvaquone, shown earlier to be effective in reducing the parasite load in the lungs in an acute neosporosis disease model, was further assessed in the pregnant mouse model. Buparvaquone efficiently inhibited vertical transmission in Balb/c mice experimentally infected at day 7 of pregnancy, reduced clinical signs in the pups, but had no effect on cerebral infection in the dams. This demonstrates proof-of-concept that drug repurposing may lead to the discovery of an effective compound against neosporosis that can protect offspring from vertical transmission and disease. PMID:26883424

  13. Sensitivity Analysis of a Pharmacokinetic Model of Vaginal Anti-HIV Microbicide Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, Angela M; Gao, Yajing; Hussaini, M Yousuff; Cogan, Nicholas G; Katz, David F

    2016-05-01

    Uncertainties in parameter values in microbicide pharmacokinetics (PK) models confound the models' use in understanding the determinants of drug delivery and in designing and interpreting dosing and sampling in PK studies. A global sensitivity analysis (Sobol' indices) was performed for a compartmental model of the pharmacokinetics of gel delivery of tenofovir to the vaginal mucosa. The model's parameter space was explored to quantify model output sensitivities to parameters characterizing properties for the gel-drug product (volume, drug transport, initial loading) and host environment (thicknesses of the mucosal epithelium and stroma and the role of ambient vaginal fluid in diluting gel). Greatest sensitivities overall were to the initial drug concentration in gel, gel-epithelium partition coefficient for drug, and rate constant for gel dilution by vaginal fluid. Sensitivities for 3 PK measures of drug concentration values were somewhat different than those for the kinetic PK measure. Sensitivities in the stromal compartment (where tenofovir acts against host cells) and a simulated biopsy also depended on thicknesses of epithelium and stroma. This methodology and results here contribute an approach to help interpret uncertainties in measures of vaginal microbicide gel properties and their host environment. In turn, this will inform rational gel design and optimization. PMID:27012224

  14. pH sensitive coiled coils: a strategy for enhanced liposomal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Reja, Rahi M; Khan, Mohsina; Singh, Sumeet K; Misra, Rajkumar; Shiras, Anjali; Gopi, Hosahudya N

    2016-03-01

    Stimuli responsive controlled release from liposome based vesicles is a promising strategy for the site specific delivery of drugs. Herein, we report the design of pH sensitive coiled coils and their incorporation into the liposome as triggers for the controlled release of encapsulated drugs. The designed coiled coil peptides with the incorporation of environment sensitive fluorescent amino acids were found to be stable at physiological pH and unstructured while changing the pH of the environment to either acidic or basic. This pH dependent conformational switch of the coiled-coil polypeptides was exploited as triggers for the enhanced release of the encapsulated drug molecules from liposomes. The SEM, DLS and TEM analysis revealed the uniform morphology of the peptide liposome hybrid vesicles. Further, the drug encapsulated liposome internalization experiments with cancer cells revealed the enhanced release and accumulation of drugs in the acidic lysosomal compartments in comparison with liposomes without coiled coils. PMID:26876788

  15. Drug Predictive Cues Activate Aversion-Sensitive Striatal Neurons That Encode Drug Seeking

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Daniel S.; Robble, Mykel A.; Hebron, Emily M.; Dupont, Matthew J.; Ebben, Amanda L.

    2015-01-01

    Drug-associated cues have profound effects on an addict's emotional state and drug-seeking behavior. Although this influence must involve the motivational neural system that initiates and encodes the drug-seeking act, surprisingly little is known about the nature of such physiological events and their motivational consequences. Three experiments investigated the effect of a cocaine-predictive stimulus on dopamine signaling, neuronal activity, and reinstatement of cocaine seeking. In all experiments, rats were divided into two groups (paired and unpaired), and trained to self-administer cocaine in the presence of a tone that signaled the immediate availability of the drug. For rats in the paired group, self-administration sessions were preceded by a taste cue that signaled delayed drug availability. Assessments of hedonic responses indicated that this delay cue became aversive during training. Both the self-administration behavior and the immediate cue were subsequently extinguished in the absence of cocaine. After extinction of self-administration behavior, the presentation of the aversive delay cue reinstated drug seeking. In vivo electrophysiology and voltammetry recordings in the nucleus accumbens measured the neural responses to both the delay and immediate drug cues after extinction. Interestingly, the presentation of the delay cue simultaneously decreased dopamine signaling and increased excitatory encoding of the immediate cue. Most importantly, the delay cue selectively enhanced the baseline activity of neurons that would later encode drug seeking. Together these observations reveal how cocaine cues can modulate not only affective state, but also the neurochemical and downstream neurophysiological environment of striatal circuits in a manner that promotes drug seeking. PMID:25948270

  16. Drug predictive cues activate aversion-sensitive striatal neurons that encode drug seeking.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Daniel S; Robble, Mykel A; Hebron, Emily M; Dupont, Matthew J; Ebben, Amanda L; Wheeler, Robert A

    2015-05-01

    Drug-associated cues have profound effects on an addict's emotional state and drug-seeking behavior. Although this influence must involve the motivational neural system that initiates and encodes the drug-seeking act, surprisingly little is known about the nature of such physiological events and their motivational consequences. Three experiments investigated the effect of a cocaine-predictive stimulus on dopamine signaling, neuronal activity, and reinstatement of cocaine seeking. In all experiments, rats were divided into two groups (paired and unpaired), and trained to self-administer cocaine in the presence of a tone that signaled the immediate availability of the drug. For rats in the paired group, self-administration sessions were preceded by a taste cue that signaled delayed drug availability. Assessments of hedonic responses indicated that this delay cue became aversive during training. Both the self-administration behavior and the immediate cue were subsequently extinguished in the absence of cocaine. After extinction of self-administration behavior, the presentation of the aversive delay cue reinstated drug seeking. In vivo electrophysiology and voltammetry recordings in the nucleus accumbens measured the neural responses to both the delay and immediate drug cues after extinction. Interestingly, the presentation of the delay cue simultaneously decreased dopamine signaling and increased excitatory encoding of the immediate cue. Most importantly, the delay cue selectively enhanced the baseline activity of neurons that would later encode drug seeking. Together these observations reveal how cocaine cues can modulate not only affective state, but also the neurochemical and downstream neurophysiological environment of striatal circuits in a manner that promotes drug seeking. PMID:25948270

  17. Drug sensitivity of coccidia from broiler breeder pullets and from broilers in the same integrated company.

    PubMed

    Mathis, G F; McDougald, L R; McMurray, B

    1984-01-01

    Coccidia isolated from 12 breeder pullet farms and 18 broiler farms were tested for sensitivity to anticoccidial drugs. The species Eimeria acervulina, E. maxima, and E. tenella were common in the isolates and were fully pathogenic. Broiler coccidia were generally resistant to Zoalene but sensitive to nicarbazin. About half of the isolates had reduced sensitivity to amprolium and monensin. Most of the breeder pullet coccidia were resistant to Zoalene and amprolium, but almost all were highly sensitive to nicarbazin and monensin. There was some difference in responses of broiler isolates to various ionophores. Isolates responded best to salinomycin and lasalocid, which had not been previously used on the farms. Monensin controlled coccidia slightly better when given at 120 ppm than when given at 100 ppm. These results suggest that broiler coccidia have lost some responsiveness to ionophores as a result of long-term exposure, but that breeder pullet coccidia, which have never been exposed to those drugs, have retained their sensitivity. Resistance or sensitivity to other drugs was consistent with history of use: more isolates were sensitive to older drugs that had not been used for several years than was reported in previous surveys. PMID:6743177

  18. Evaluation of the drug sensitivity and expression of 16 drug resistance-related genes in canine histiocytic sarcoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    ASADA, Hajime; TOMIYASU, Hirotaka; GOTO-KOSHINO, Yuko; FUJINO, Yasuhito; OHNO, Koichi; TSUJIMOTO, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Canine histiocytic sarcoma (HS) is an aggressive tumor type originating from histiocytic cell lineages. This disease is characterized by poor response to chemotherapy and short survival time. Therefore, it is of critical importance to identify and develop effective antitumor drugs against HS. The objectives of this study were to examine the drug sensitivities of 10 antitumor drugs. Using a real-time RT-PCR system, the mRNA expression levels of 16 genes related to drug resistance in 4 canine HS cell lines established from dogs with disseminated HS were determined and compared to 2 canine lymphoma cell lines (B-cell and T-cell). These 4 canine HS cell lines showed sensitivities toward microtubule inhibitors (vincristine, vinblastine and paclitaxel), comparable to those in the canine B-cell lymphoma cell line. Moreover, it was shown that P-gp in the HS cell lines used in this study did not have enough function to efflux its substrate. Sensitivities to melphalan, nimustine, methotrexate, cytarabine, doxorubicin and etoposide were lower in the 4 HS cell lines than in the 2 canine lymphoma cell lines. The data obtained in this study using cultured cell lines could prove helpful in the developing of advanced and effective chemotherapies for treating dogs that are suffering from HS. PMID:25715778

  19. Ototoxic drugs: difference in sensitivity between mice and guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Poirrier, A L; Van den Ackerveken, P; Kim, T S; Vandenbosch, R; Nguyen, L; Lefebvre, P P; Malgrange, B

    2010-03-01

    The development of experimental animal models has played an invaluable role in understanding the mechanisms of neurosensory deafness and in devising effective treatments. The purpose of this study was to develop an adult mouse model of ototoxic drug-induced hearing loss and to compare the ototoxicity in the adult mouse to that in the well-described guinea pig model. Mice are a powerful model organism, especially due to the large availability of antibodies, probes and genetic mutants. In this study, mice (n=114) and guinea pigs (n=35) underwent systemic treatment with either kanamycin or cisplatin. Auditory brainstem responses showed a significant threshold shift in guinea pigs 2 weeks after the beginning of the ototoxic treatment, while there was no significant hearing impairment recorded in mice. Hair cells and neuronal loss were correlated with hearing function in both guinea pigs and mice. These results indicate that the mouse is not a good model for ototoxicity, which should be taken into consideration in all further investigations concerning ototoxicity-induced hearing loss. PMID:20015469

  20. Delivering anti-cancer drugs with endosomal pH-sensitive anti-cancer liposomes.

    PubMed

    Moku, Gopikrishna; Gulla, Suresh Kumar; Nimmu, Narendra Varma; Khalid, Sara; Chaudhuri, Arabinda

    2016-04-01

    Numerous prior studies have been reported on the use of pH-sensitive drug carriers such as micelles, liposomes, peptides, polymers, nanoparticles, etc. that are sensitive to the acidic (pH = ∼6.5) microenvironments of tumor tissues. Such systems have been primarily used in the past as effective drug/gene/microRNA carriers for releasing their anti-cancer payloads selectively to tumor cells/tissues. Herein, we report on the development of new liposomal drug carriers prepared from glutamic acid backbone-based cationic amphiphiles containing both endosomal pH-sensitive histidine as well as cellular uptake & solubility enhancing guanidine moieties in their polar head-group regions. The most efficient one among the four presently described endosomal pH-sensitive liposomal drug carriers not only effectively delivers potent anti-cancer drugs (curcumin & paclitaxel) to mouse tumor, but also significantly contributes to inhibiting mouse tumor growth. The findings in the in vitro mechanistic studies are consistent with apoptosis of tumor cells being mediated through increased cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase. Findings in the FRET assay and in vitro drug release studies conducted with the liposomes of the most efficient pH-sensitive lipid demonstrated its pH dependent fusogenic and controlled curcumin release properties. Importantly, the presently described liposomal formulation of curcumin & paclitaxel enhanced overall survivability of tumor bearing mice. To the best of our knowledge, the presently described system (curcumin, paclitaxel and liposomal carrier itself) is the first of its kind pH-sensitive liposomal formulation of potent chemotherapeutics in which the liposomal drug itself exhibits significant mouse tumor growth inhibition properties. PMID:26806172

  1. Pharmacogenomic Approach to Identify Drug Sensitivity in Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wildey, Gary; Chen, Yanwen; Lent, Ian; Stetson, Lindsay; Pink, John; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Dowlati, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    There are currently no molecular targeted approaches to treat small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) similar to those used successfully against non-small-cell lung cancer. This failure is attributable to our inability to identify clinically-relevant subtypes of this disease. Thus, a more systematic approach to drug discovery for SCLC is needed. In this regard, two comprehensive studies recently published in Nature, the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia and the Cancer Genome Project, provide a wealth of data regarding the drug sensitivity and genomic profiles of many different types of cancer cells. In the present study we have mined these two studies for new therapeutic agents for SCLC and identified heat shock proteins, cyclin-dependent kinases and polo-like kinases (PLK) as attractive molecular targets with little current clinical trial activity in SCLC. Remarkably, our analyses demonstrated that most SCLC cell lines clustered into a single, predominant subgroup by either gene expression or CNV analyses, leading us to take a pharmacogenomic approach to identify subgroups of drug-sensitive SCLC cells. Using PLK inhibitors as an example, we identified and validated a gene signature for drug sensitivity in SCLC cell lines. This gene signature could distinguish subpopulations among human SCLC tumors, suggesting its potential clinical utility. Finally, circos plots were constructed to yield a comprehensive view of how transcriptional, copy number and mutational elements affect PLK sensitivity in SCLC cell lines. Taken together, this study outlines an approach to predict drug sensitivity in SCLC to novel targeted therapeutics. PMID:25198282

  2. Fluorescent graphene quantum dots as traceable, pH-sensitive drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jichuan; Zhang, Ruibin; Li, Jianhua; Sang, Yuanhua; Tang, Wei; Rivera Gil, Pilar; Liu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) were rationally fabricated as a traceable drug delivery system for the targeted, pH-sensitive delivery of a chemotherapeutic drug into cancer cells. The GQDs served as fluorescent carriers for a well-known anticancer drug, doxorubicin (Dox). The whole system has the capacity for simultaneous tracking of the carrier and of drug release. Dox release is triggered upon acidification of the intracellular vesicles, where the carriers are located after their uptake by cancer cells. Further functionalization of the loaded carriers with targeting moieties such as arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptides enhanced their uptake by cancer cells. DU-145 and PC-3 human prostate cancer cell lines were used to evaluate the anticancer ability of Dox-loaded RGD-modified GQDs (Dox-RGD-GQDs). The results demonstrated the feasibility of using GQDs as traceable drug delivery systems with the ability for the pH-triggered delivery of drugs into target cells. PMID:26604747

  3. Integrating Domain Specific Knowledge and Network Analysis to Predict Drug Sensitivity of Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sebo; Sundaresan, Varsha; Zhou, Lei; Kahveci, Tamer

    2016-01-01

    One of fundamental challenges in cancer studies is that varying molecular characteristics of different tumor types may lead to resistance to certain drugs. As a result, the same drug can lead to significantly different results in different types of cancer thus emphasizing the need for individualized medicine. Individual prediction of drug response has great potential to aid in improving the clinical outcome and reduce the financial costs associated with prescribing chemotherapy drugs to which the patient's tumor might be resistant. In this paper we develop a network based classifier (NBC) method for predicting sensitivity of cell lines to anticancer drugs from transcriptome data. In the literature, this strategy has been used for predicting cancer types. Here, we extend it to estimate sensitivity of cells from different tumor types to various anticancer drugs. Furthermore, we incorporate domain specific knowledge such as the use of apoptotic gene list and clinical dose information in our method to impart biological significance to the prediction. Our experimental results suggest that our network based classifier (NBC) method outperforms existing classifiers in estimating sensitivity of cell lines for different drugs. PMID:27607242

  4. Effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids on drug-sensitive and resistant tumor cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies showed that γ-linolenic acid (GLA, 18: 3 ω-6), arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4 ω -6), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20: 5 ω -3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6 ω -3) have selective tumoricidal action. In the present study, it was observed that dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (DGLA) and AA, EPA and DHA have cytotoxic action on both vincristine-sensitive (KB-3-1) and resistant (KB-ChR-8-5) cancer cells in vitro that appeared to be a free-radical dependent process but not due to the formation of prostaglandins, leukotrienes and thromboxanes. Uptake of vincristine and fatty acids was higher while their efflux was lower in KB-3-1 cells compared with KB-ChR-8-5 cells, suggesting that drug resistant cells have an effective efflux pump. GLA, DGLA, AA, EPA and DHA enhanced the uptake and decreased efflux in both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant cells and augmented the susceptibility of tumor cells especially, of drug-resistant cells to the cytotoxic action of vincristine. These results suggest that certain polyunsaturated fatty acids have tumoricidal action and are capable of enhancing the cytotoxic action of anti-cancer drugs specifically, on drug-resistant cells by enhancing drug uptake and reducing its efflux. Thus, polyunsaturated fatty acids either by themselves or in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs have the potential as anti-cancer molecules. PMID:21917129

  5. Enhancing cancer targeting and anticancer activity by a stimulus-sensitive multifunctional polymer-drug conjugate.

    PubMed

    Tu, Ying; Zhu, Lin

    2015-08-28

    Undesirable physicochemical properties, low tumor targeting, insufficient cell internalization, acquired drug resistance, and severe side effects significantly limit the applications of anticancer drugs. In this study, to improve the tumor targeting and drug efficacy of the poorly water-soluble drug, doxorubicin (DOX), a novel drug delivery platform (PEG-ppTAT-DOX) was developed, which contained a polyethylene glycol (PEG), a matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2)-sensitive peptide linker (pp), a cell penetrating peptide (TAT), and a model drug (doxorubicin). The prepared drug platform possessed several key features, including: (i) the nanoparticle formation via the self-assembly; (ii) prevention of the non-specific interaction via the PEGylation; (iii) tumor targeting via the MMP2-mediated PEG deshielding and exposure of the TAT; (iv) the TAT-mediated cell internalization; (v) the TAT-induced endosomal escape; (vi) the inhibition of P-glycoprotein mediated drug efflux; and (vii) the TAT-medicated nuclear translocation. These cooperative functions ensured the improved tumor targetability, enhanced tumor cell internalization, improved intracellular distribution, and potentiated anticancer activity. Compared to the multi-component nanocarriers, the proposed simple but multifunctional polymer-drug conjugate might have greater potential for tumor-targeted drug delivery and enhanced chemotherapy. PMID:26113423

  6. Return of chloroquine-sensitive Plasmodium falciparum parasites and emergence of chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium vivax in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Increased resistance by Plasmodium falciparum parasites led to the withdrawal of the antimalarial drugs chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine in Ethiopia. Since 2004 artemether-lumefantrine has served to treat uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria. However, increasing reports on delayed parasite clearance to artemisinin opens up a new challenge in anti-malarial therapy. With the complete withdrawal of CQ for the treatment of Plasmodium falciparum malaria, this study assessed the evolution of CQ resistance by investigating the prevalence of mutant alleles in the pfmdr1 and pfcrt genes in P. falciparum and pvmdr1 gene in Plasmodium vivax in Southern and Eastern Ethiopia. Methods Of the 1,416 febrile patients attending primary health facilities in Southern Ethiopia, 329 febrile patients positive for P. falciparum or P. vivax were recruited. Similarly of the 1,304 febrile patients from Eastern Ethiopia, 81 febrile patients positive for P. falciparum or P. vivax were included in the study. Of the 410 finger prick blood samples collected from malaria patients, we used direct sequencing to investigate the prevalence of mutations in pfcrt and pfmdr1. This included determining the gene copy number in pfmdr1 in 195 P. falciparum clinical isolates, and mutations in the pvmdr1 locus in 215 P. vivax clinical isolates. Results The pfcrt K76 CQ-sensitive allele was observed in 84.1% of the investigated P.falciparum clinical isolates. The pfcrt double mutations (K76T and C72S) were observed less than 3%. The pfcrt SVMNT haplotype was also found to be present in clinical isolates from Ethiopia. The pfcrt CVMNK-sensitive haplotypes were frequently observed (95.9%). The pfmdr1 mutation N86Y was observed only in 14.9% compared to 85.1% of the clinical isolates that carried sensitive alleles. Also, the sensitive pfmdr1 Y184 allele was more common, in 94.9% of clinical isolates. None of the investigated P. falciparum clinical isolates carried S1034C, N1042D and D1246Y

  7. pH-Sensitive drug delivery system based on modified dextrin coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongyu; Zheng, Diwei; Liu, Jia; Kuang, Ying; Li, Qilin; Zhang, Min; Ye, Haifeng; Qin, Hongyang; Xu, Yanglin; Li, Cao; Jiang, Bingbing

    2016-04-01

    In this work, a novel pH-sensitive drug delivery system based on modified dextrin coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs), DOX@MSN-DDA-CL, are prepared. The dextrin grafting on the surface of MSNs is oxidized by KIO4 to obtain dextrin dialdehyde, which is then cross-linked by tetraethylenepentamine through a pH-sensitive Schiff's base. Under physiological conditions, the cross-linked dextrin dialdehyde blocks the pores to prevent premature release of model drug doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX). In the weak acidic environment, pH 6.0 in this work, the Schiff's base can be hydrolyzed and released the drug. The in vitro drug release studies at different pHs prove the pH-sensitivity of DOX@MSN-DDA-CL. The cytotoxicity and cell internalization behavior are also investigated in detail. In vivo tissue distribution and pharmacokinetics with a H22-bearing mouse animal mode are also studied, prove that DOX@MSN-DDA-CL has a longer retention time than that of pure DOX and can accumulate in tumor region via enhanced permeation and retention and nanomaterials-induced endothelial cell leakiness effects. In conclusion, the pH-sensitive modified dextrin/MSNs complex drug delivery system has a great potential for cancer therapy. PMID:26776872

  8. Improved Tumor-Specific Drug Accumulation by Polymer Therapeutics with pH-Sensitive Drug Release Overcomes Chemotherapy Resistance.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Anne-Kathrin; Lucas, Henrike; Schindler, Lucie; Chytil, Petr; Etrych, Tomáš; Mäder, Karsten; Mueller, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    The success of chemotherapy is limited by poor selectivity of active drugs combined with occurrence of tumor resistance. New star-like structured N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer-based drug delivery systems containing doxorubicin attached via a pH-sensitive hydrazone bond were designed and investigated for their ability to overcome chemotherapy resistance. These conjugates combine two strategies to achieve a high drug concentration selectively at the tumor site: (I) high accumulation by passive tumor targeting based on enhanced permeability and retention effect and (II) pH-sensitive site-specific drug release due to an acidic tumor microenvironment. Mice bearing doxorubicin-resistant xenograft tumors were treated with doxorubicin, PBS, poly HPMA (pHPMA) precursor or pHPMA-doxorubicin conjugate at different equivalent doses of 5 mg/kg bodyweight doxorubicin up to a 7-fold total dose using different treatment schedules. Intratumoral drug accumulation was analyzed by fluorescence imaging utilizing intrinsic fluorescence of doxorubicin. Free doxorubicin induced significant toxicity but hardly any tumor-inhibiting effects. Administering at least a 3-fold dose of pHPMA-doxorubicin conjugate was necessary to induce a transient response, whereas doses of about 5- to 6-fold induced strong regressions. Tumors completely disappeared in some cases. The onset of response was differential delayed depending on the tumor model, which could be ascribed to distinct characteristics of the microenvironment. Further fluorescence imaging-based analyses regarding underlying mechanisms of the delayed response revealed a related switch to a more supporting intratumoral microenvironment for effective drug release. In conclusion, the current study demonstrates that the concept of tumor site-restricted high-dose chemotherapy is able to overcome therapy resistance. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(5); 998-1007. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26939698

  9. Review: Effect of drugs on human cough reflex sensitivity to inhaled capsaicin

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent extract of red peppers, has been used in clinical research for almost three decades. Capsaicin has gained favor as the provocative agent of choice to measure cough reflex sensitivity, as it induces cough in a safe, reproducible, and dose-dependent manner. One of the major uses of capsaicin cough challenge testing has been to evaluate the effect of a pharmacological intervention on the human cough reflex. The current review summarizes the published experience with capsaicin inhalation challenge in the evaluation of drug effects on cough reflex sensitivity. A notable contrast evident between studies demonstrating a drug effect (inhibition of cough reflex sensitivity) and those that do not, is the predominance of healthy volunteers as subjects in the latter. This observation suggests that subjects with pathological cough, rather than normal volunteers, comprise the optimal group in which to evaluate the effect of potential antitussive agents on human cough reflex sensitivity. PMID:23146824

  10. Drug-sensitivity of 99 isolates of coccidia from broiler farms.

    PubMed

    McDougald, L R; Fuller, L; Solis, J

    1986-01-01

    Coccidia were isolated from 99 broiler farms in 12 broiler-producing states and tested for sensitivity to contemporary anticoccidial drugs. The isolates usually comprised two or more species, including 92 Eimeria acervulina, 47 E. maxima, 28 E. tenella, and 10 E. brunetti. Based on intestinal-lesion-score reduction of 30% or more, 38% of isolates were resistant to monensin (110 ppm), 29% to salinomycin (60 ppm), 20% to nicarbazin (125 ppm), and 46% to amprolium + ethopabate (125 + 4 ppm). Isolates with 50% or greater reduction of lesion scores were considered sensitive. Thirty-three percent were sensitive to monensin, 53% to salinomycin, 67% to nicarbazin, and 39% to amprolium + ethopabate. Other isolates had intermediate response to drugs and were considered to have "reduced sensitivity." There was some evidence for incomplete cross resistance to the polyether, ionophorous products. PMID:3814006

  11. Malaria in South America: a drug discovery perspective

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The challenge of controlling and eventually eradicating malaria means that new tools are urgently needed. South America’s role in this fight spans both ends of the research and development spectrum: both as a continent capable of discovering and developing new medicines, and also as a continent with significant numbers of malaria patients. This article reviews the contribution of groups in the South American continent to the research and development of new medicines over the last decade. Therefore, the current situation of research targeting malaria control and eradication is discussed, including endemicity, geographical distribution, treatment, drug-resistance and diagnosis. This sets the scene for a review of efforts within South America to discover and optimize compounds with anti-malarial activity. PMID:23706107

  12. pH-sensitive drug-delivery systems for tumor targeting.

    PubMed

    He, Xi; Li, Jianfeng; An, Sai; Jiang, Chen

    2013-12-01

    Drug-delivery system responses to stimuli have been well investigated recently. As pH decrease is observed in most solid tumors, drug-delivery systems responsive to the slightly acidic extracellular pH environment of solid tumors have been developed as a general strategy for tumor targeting. Drug vehicles that are sensitive to acidic endosome/lysosome pH have been constructed for efficient drug release in tumor cells. This review explains the mechanisms of acidic pH in the tumor microenvironment and endocytic-related organelles, endosomes and lysosomes. Nanoparticle responses to acidic extracellular pH are discussed, along with approaches for improving tumor-specific therapy. Endosome/lysosome pH-triggered vehicles are reviewed, which achieve rapid drug release in tumor cells and overcome multidrug resistance. PMID:24304248

  13. Flunarizine enhancement of melphalan activity against drug-sensitive/resistant rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed Central

    Castellino, S. M.; Friedman, H. S.; Elion, G. B.; Ong, E. T.; Marcelli, S. L.; Page, R.; Bigner, D. D.; Dewhirst, M. W.

    1995-01-01

    Flunarizine, a diphenylpiperazine calcium channel blocker, is known to increase tumor blood flow. It also interferes with calmodulin function, repair of DNA damage and drug resistance associated with P-glycoprotein. Flunarizine was tested for its ability to modulate either cyclophosphamide- or melphalan-induced growth delay for a drug-resistant rhabdomyosarcoma xenograft (TE-671 MR) and the drug-sensitive parent line (TE-671), in which P-glycoprotein is not involved in the mechanism of drug resistance. Tumour blood flow was increased by 30% after a flunarizine dose of 4 mg kg-1, but no modification in growth delay was induced by melphalan (12 mg kg-1). In contrast, a 60 mg kg-1 dose of flunarizine had no effect on tumour blood flow, but the same dose created significant enhancement in melphalan-induced tumour regrowth delay in both tumour lines. The dose-modifying factor for flunarizine as an adjuvant to melphalan was approximately 2 for both tumour lines. Although blood flow measurements were not performed with the combination of flunarizine and melphalan, the results from flunarizine alone suggested that augmentation of melphalan cytotoxicity is not mediated by changes in blood flow. In contrast, flunarizine did not affect drug sensitivity to cyclophosphamide in groups of animals bearing the drug-sensitive parent tumour line. These results suggest that the mechanism of drug sensitivity modification by flunarizine is not related to modification of tumour blood flow, but may be mediated by modification of transport mechanisms that are differentially responsible for cellular uptake and retention of melphalan as compared with cyclophosphamide. PMID:7779708

  14. Drug-resistant malaria in Sudan: A review of evidence and scenarios for the future

    PubMed Central

    Adeel, Ahmed Awad

    2012-01-01

    Resistance of falciparum malaria to chloroquine (CQ) has gradually emerged in the late 1970s, reaching unacceptably high proportions over the following three decades of use as frst line treatment in Sudan. By 2004–2006 CQ was replaced by artemisinin-based combination treatment (ACTs), with combination of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) and artesunate (AS) deployed as frst-line drug against falciparum malaria. The present review follows the evolution of CQ resistance in Sudan and the available evidence on the response to the present frst-line drugs. The fndings in Sudan are analyzed in view of developments in other African countries and at the global level, with the hope of elucidating possible scenarios for the course of events in the Sudan. Northern Sudan has been one of the areas where signals indicating the emergence of drug resistant malaria parasites have frst originated in Africa. The pattern of low endemicity and low population immunity to malaria, together with massive deployment and improper use of anti-malarial drugs created the ideal environment for creation of anti-malarial drug resistance. Such an environment existed in certain areas in South East Asia that had historically been the epicenter from which falciparum malaria parasites resistant to pyrimethamine and chloroquine have spread to the rest of the world. The alarming recent reports about the emergence of artemisinin (ART) resistance in South East Asia have lead WHO to take specifc measures for prevention, early detection and containment of drug resistance. What could be applicable in Sudan in these measures is discussed here.

  15. Transcriptomic analysis predicts survival and sensitivity to anticancer drugs of patients with a pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Duconseil, Pauline; Gilabert, Marine; Gayet, Odile; Loncle, Celine; Moutardier, Vincent; Turrini, Olivier; Calvo, Ezequiel; Ewald, Jacques; Giovannini, Marc; Gasmi, Mohamed; Bories, Erwan; Barthet, Marc; Ouaissi, Mehdi; Goncalves, Anthony; Poizat, Flora; Raoul, Jean Luc; Secq, Veronique; Garcia, Stephane; Viens, Patrice; Iovanna, Juan; Dusetti, Nelson

    2015-04-01

    A major impediment to the effective treatment of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the molecular heterogeneity of this disease, which is reflected in an equally diverse pattern of clinical outcome and in responses to therapies. We developed an efficient strategy in which PDAC samples from 17 consecutive patients were collected by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration or surgery and were preserved as breathing tumors by xenografting and as a primary culture of epithelial cells. Transcriptomic analysis was performed from breathing tumors by an Affymetrix approach. We observed significant heterogeneity in the RNA expression profile of tumors. However, the bioinformatic analysis of these data was able to discriminate between patients with long- and short-term survival corresponding to patients with moderately or poorly differentiated PDAC tumors, respectively. Primary culture of cells allowed us to analyze their relative sensitivity to anticancer drugs in vitro using a chemogram, similar to the antibiogram for microorganisms, establishing an individual profile of drug sensitivity. As expected, the response was patient dependent. We also found that transcriptomic analysis predicts the sensitivity of cells to the five anticancer drugs most frequently used to treat patients with PDAC. In conclusion, using this approach, we found that transcriptomic analysis could predict the sensitivity to anticancer drugs and the clinical outcome of patients with PDAC. PMID:25765988

  16. A Copula Based Approach for Design of Multivariate Random Forests for Drug Sensitivity Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Haider, Saad; Rahman, Raziur; Ghosh, Souparno; Pal, Ranadip

    2015-01-01

    Modeling sensitivity to drugs based on genetic characterizations is a significant challenge in the area of systems medicine. Ensemble based approaches such as Random Forests have been shown to perform well in both individual sensitivity prediction studies and team science based prediction challenges. However, Random Forests generate a deterministic predictive model for each drug based on the genetic characterization of the cell lines and ignores the relationship between different drug sensitivities during model generation. This application motivates the need for generation of multivariate ensemble learning techniques that can increase prediction accuracy and improve variable importance ranking by incorporating the relationships between different output responses. In this article, we propose a novel cost criterion that captures the dissimilarity in the output response structure between the training data and node samples as the difference in the two empirical copulas. We illustrate that copulas are suitable for capturing the multivariate structure of output responses independent of the marginal distributions and the copula based multivariate random forest framework can provide higher accuracy prediction and improved variable selection. The proposed framework has been validated on genomics of drug sensitivity for cancer and cancer cell line encyclopedia database. PMID:26658256

  17. New chemotherapeutic drug sensitivity assay for colon carcinomas in monolayer culture.

    PubMed

    Schroy, P C; Cohen, A; Winawer, S J; Friedman, E A

    1988-06-01

    Ten previously untreated colon carcinomas were tested for chemotherapeutic drug sensitivity in primary monolayer culture. Colon carcinomas were partly digested to groups of epithelial cells which plated with a mean efficiency of 42 +/- 9% (SE) on a collagen I-bovine serum albumin substrate in serum-free medium, producing patches of tightly adherent epithelial cells. The cultured cells were judged epithelial by the presence of cytokeratins, an epithelial cell surface epitope, junctional complexes, and brush borders. Each carcinoma was plated in 40 to 60 Petri dishes (35 mm), yielding a mean of 28 +/- 8 (SE) colonies per dish (6832 +/- 1952 cells). Drugs tested in duplicate plates were mitomycin C, cisplatin, streptozotocin, and 5-fluorouracil at 0.1, 1, 10, and 100 micrograms/ml, and at 0.1, 1, and 2x the peak tolerated drug concentration in serum. Twenty-four h after plating, any nonadherent cells were removed, and the adherent tumor cells were continuously exposed to the drugs for 3 days. Each drug induced colony lysis in a dose-dependent manner in responsive tumors. Drug-resistant, cycling cells were identified by [3H]thymidine incorporation in colonies which were not lysed by drug treatment. Each of the ten carcinomas exhibited inherent resistance to one or more chemotherapy drugs within the concentration ranges clinically achievable. PMID:2966672

  18. Polypyrrole nanoparticles for tunable, pH-sensitive and sustained drug release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Devleena; Meiser, Jana L.; Zare, Richard N.

    2015-05-01

    We report the development of a generalized pH-sensitive drug delivery system that can release any charged drug preferentially at the pH range of interest. Our system is based on polypyrrole nanoparticles (PPy NPs), synthesized via a simple one-step microemulsion technique. These nanoparticles are highly monodisperse, stable in solution over the period of a month, and have good drug loading capacity (~15 wt%). We show that PPy NPs can be tuned to release drugs at both acidic and basic pH by varying the pH, the charge of the drug, as well as by adding small amounts of charged amphiphiles. Moreover, these NPs may be delivered locally by immobilizing them in a hydrogel. Our studies show encapsulation within a calcium alginate hydrogel results in sustained release of the incorporated drug for more than 21 days. Such a nanoparticle-hydrogel composite drug delivery system is promising for treatment of long-lasting conditions such as cancer and chronic pain which require controlled, localized, and sustained drug release.

  19. A community effort to assess and improve drug sensitivity prediction algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Costello, James C; Heiser, Laura M; Georgii, Elisabeth; Gönen, Mehmet; Menden, Michael P; Wang, Nicholas J; Bansal, Mukesh; Ammad-ud-din, Muhammad; Hintsanen, Petteri; Khan, Suleiman A; Mpindi, John-Patrick; Kallioniemi, Olli; Honkela, Antti; Aittokallio, Tero; Wennerberg, Krister; Collins, James J; Gallahan, Dan; Singer, Dinah; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Kaski, Samuel; Gray, Joe W; Stolovitzky, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Predicting the best treatment strategy from genomic information is a core goal of precision medicine. Here we focus on predicting drug response based on a cohort of genomic, epigenomic and proteomic profiling data sets measured in human breast cancer cell lines. Through a collaborative effort between the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Dialogue on Reverse Engineering Assessment and Methods (DREAM) project, we analyzed a total of 44 drug sensitivity prediction algorithms. The top-performing approaches modeled nonlinear relationships and incorporated biological pathway information. We found that gene expression microarrays consistently provided the best predictive power of the individual profiling data sets; however, performance was increased by including multiple, independent data sets. We discuss the innovations underlying the top-performing methodology, Bayesian multitask MKL, and we provide detailed descriptions of all methods. This study establishes benchmarks for drug sensitivity prediction and identifies approaches that can be leveraged for the development of new methods. PMID:24880487

  20. Synthesis, characterization, and controllable drug release of pH-sensitive hybrid magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lilin; Yuan, Jinying; Yuan, Weizhong; Sui, Xiaofeng; Wu, Sizhu; Li, Zhaolong; Shen, Dezhong

    2009-09-01

    The synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles coated with pH-sensitive poly((2-dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) for use as novel potential carriers for targeted drug delivery and controllable release is reported. The organic/inorganic hybrid nanoparticles were obtained with a narrow molecular weight distribution. The pH-sensitivity of the nanoparticles was investigated by the measurement of the pH dependence of hydrodynamic radius and the superparamagnetism was illustrated by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The behavior of model drug phenolphthalein released from the nanoparticles indicated that the rate of drug release could be effectively controlled by altering the pH values of the environment.

  1. Synthesis and evaluation of sensitizer drug photorelease chemistry: Micro-optic method applied to singlet oxygen generation and drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Goutam

    This thesis summarizes a new micro-optic method for singlet oxygen generation and sensitizer drug delivery, which include i) synthesis and evaluation of a first generation device for drug delivery from native and fluorinated silica probe tips, ii) synthesis of PEG conjugated sensitizers to study phototoxicity in ovarian cancer cells, and iii) synthesis and evaluation of tris-PEGylated chlorin conjugated fluorinated silica for its future integration into the device to use as a 2nd generation device. A first generation micro-optic device was developed that works by sparging O2 gas and light generating cytotoxic singlet oxygen that cleaves the covalently attached drug (sensitizer) from the probe tip at the distal end of the fiber. The aim is to develop a 1st and 2nd generation device for site specific delivery of photosensitizer and singlet oxygen to overcome the challenges involved in systemic administration of the sensitizer. Synthesis and evaluation of drug (pheophorbide-a) delivery applying micro-optic method from native and fluorinated silica probe tip was achieved. The amount of sensitizer photocleavage depends on the loading level of sensitizer onto the probe tips. We also found that photorelease efficiency depends on the nature of the solvents where sensitizer is photocleaved. For example, no photorelease was observed in an aqueous solvent where sensitizer remained adsorbed to the native silica probe-tip. But, 90% photocleavage was obtained in octanol. A significant amount of photosensitizer (formate ester of pyropheophorbide- a) diffused into the liposome when photocleavage study was carried out in liposome. Substantial increase of photorelease was observed in organic solvent when pyropheophorbide-a (PPa) sensitizer was attached to the partially fluorinated porous Vycor glass. We also explored sensitizer photorelease from the fluorinated silica surface at various temperatures and we found that autocatalytic photorelease happened at room temperature and above

  2. One-step synthesis of interpenetrating network hydrogels: Environment sensitivities and drug delivery properties.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jingqiong; Li, Yinhui; Hu, Deng; Chen, Xiaoling; Liu, Yongmei; Wang, Liping; Ashraf, Muhammmad Aqeel; Zhao, Yansheng

    2016-01-01

    A novel interpenetrating network hydrogel for drug controlled release, composed of modified poly(aspartic acid) (KPAsp) and carboxymethyl chitosan (CMCTS), was prepared in aqueous system. The surface morphology and composition of hydrogels were characterized by SEM and FTIR. The swelling properties of KPAsp, KPAsp/CMCTS semi-IPN and KPAsp/CMCTS IPN hydrogels were investigated and the swelling dynamics of the hydrogels was analyzed based on the Fickian equation. The pH, temperature and salt sensitivities of hydrogels were further studied, and the prepared hydrogels showed extremely sensitive properties to pH, temperature, the ionic salts kinds and concentration. The results of controlled drug release behaviors of the hydrogels revealed that the introduction of IPN observably improved the drug release properties of hydrogels, the release rate of drug from hydrogels can be controlled by the structure of the hydrogels and pH value of the external environment, a relative large amount of drug released was preferred under simulated intestinal fluid. These results illustrated high potential of the KPAsp/CMCTS IPN hydrogels for application as drug carriers. PMID:26858562

  3. One-step synthesis of interpenetrating network hydrogels: Environment sensitivities and drug delivery properties

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jingqiong; Li, Yinhui; Hu, Deng; Chen, Xiaoling; Liu, Yongmei; Wang, Liping; Ashraf, Muhammmad Aqeel; Zhao, Yansheng

    2015-01-01

    A novel interpenetrating network hydrogel for drug controlled release, composed of modified poly(aspartic acid) (KPAsp) and carboxymethyl chitosan (CMCTS), was prepared in aqueous system. The surface morphology and composition of hydrogels were characterized by SEM and FTIR. The swelling properties of KPAsp, KPAsp/CMCTS semi-IPN and KPAsp/CMCTS IPN hydrogels were investigated and the swelling dynamics of the hydrogels was analyzed based on the Fickian equation. The pH, temperature and salt sensitivities of hydrogels were further studied, and the prepared hydrogels showed extremely sensitive properties to pH, temperature, the ionic salts kinds and concentration. The results of controlled drug release behaviors of the hydrogels revealed that the introduction of IPN observably improved the drug release properties of hydrogels, the release rate of drug from hydrogels can be controlled by the structure of the hydrogels and pH value of the external environment, a relative large amount of drug released was preferred under simulated intestinal fluid. These results illustrated high potential of the KPAsp/CMCTS IPN hydrogels for application as drug carriers. PMID:26858562

  4. pH sensitive coiled coils: a strategy for enhanced liposomal drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reja, Rahi M.; Khan, Mohsina; Singh, Sumeet K.; Misra, Rajkumar; Shiras, Anjali; Gopi, Hosahudya N.

    2016-02-01

    Stimuli responsive controlled release from liposome based vesicles is a promising strategy for the site specific delivery of drugs. Herein, we report the design of pH sensitive coiled coils and their incorporation into the liposome as triggers for the controlled release of encapsulated drugs. The designed coiled coil peptides with the incorporation of environment sensitive fluorescent amino acids were found to be stable at physiological pH and unstructured while changing the pH of the environment to either acidic or basic. This pH dependent conformational switch of the coiled-coil polypeptides was exploited as triggers for the enhanced release of the encapsulated drug molecules from liposomes. The SEM, DLS and TEM analysis revealed the uniform morphology of the peptide liposome hybrid vesicles. Further, the drug encapsulated liposome internalization experiments with cancer cells revealed the enhanced release and accumulation of drugs in the acidic lysosomal compartments in comparison with liposomes without coiled coils.Stimuli responsive controlled release from liposome based vesicles is a promising strategy for the site specific delivery of drugs. Herein, we report the design of pH sensitive coiled coils and their incorporation into the liposome as triggers for the controlled release of encapsulated drugs. The designed coiled coil peptides with the incorporation of environment sensitive fluorescent amino acids were found to be stable at physiological pH and unstructured while changing the pH of the environment to either acidic or basic. This pH dependent conformational switch of the coiled-coil polypeptides was exploited as triggers for the enhanced release of the encapsulated drug molecules from liposomes. The SEM, DLS and TEM analysis revealed the uniform morphology of the peptide liposome hybrid vesicles. Further, the drug encapsulated liposome internalization experiments with cancer cells revealed the enhanced release and accumulation of drugs in the acidic

  5. Salinomycin sensitizes antimitotic drugs-treated cancer cells by increasing apoptosis via the prevention of G2 arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ju-Hwa; Yoo, Hye-In; Kang, Han Sung; Ro, Jungsil; Yoon, Sungpil

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sal sensitizes antimitotic drugs-treated cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sal sensitizes them by prevention of G2 arrest and reduced cyclin D1 levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sal also sensitizes them by increasing DNA damage and reducing p21 level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A low concentration of Sal effectively sensitized the cancer cells to antimitotic drugs. -- Abstract: Here, we investigated whether Sal could sensitize cancer cells to antimitotic drugs. We demonstrated that Sal sensitized paclitaxcel (PAC)-, docetaxcel (DOC)-, vinblastin (VIN)-, or colchicine (COL)-treated cancer cell lines, suggesting that Sal has the ability to sensitize the cells to any form of microtubule-targeting drugs. Sensitization to the antimitotic drugs could be achieved with very low concentrations of Sal, suggesting that there is a possibility to minimize Sal toxicity associated with human cancer patient treatments. Sensitization by Sal increased apoptosis, which was observed by C-PARP production. Sal sensitized the cancer cells to antimitotic drugs by preventing G2 arrest, suggesting that Sal contributes to the induction of mitotic catastrophe. Sal generally reduced cyclin D1 levels in PAC-, DOC-, and VIN-treated cells. In addition, Sal treatment increased pH2AX levels and reduced p21 levels in antimitotic drugs-treated cells. These observations suggest that the mechanisms underlying Sal sensitization to DNA-damaging compounds, radiation, and microtubule-targeting drugs are similar. Our data demonstrated that Sal sensitizes cancer cells to antimitotic drugs by increasing apoptosis through the prevention of G2 arrest via conserved Sal-sensitization mechanisms. These results may contribute to the development of Sal-based chemotherapy for cancer patients treated with antimitotic drugs.

  6. pH-sensitive, polymer modified, plasma stable niosomes: promising carriers for anti-cancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Tila, Dena; Yazdani-Arazi, Seyede Narjes; Ghanbarzadeh, Saeed; Arami, Sanam; Pourmoazzen, Zhaleh

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was the design and evaluation of a novel plasma stable, pH-sensitive niosomal formulation of Mitoxantrone by a modified ethanol injection method. Cholesterol hemisuccinate was added instead of cholesterol in order to produce pH-sensitivity property and using PEG-Poly (monomethyl itaconate)-CholC6 (PEG-PMMI-CholC6) copolymer introduced simultaneously pH-sensitivity and plasma stability properties in prepared niosomes. The pH-sensitivity and cytotoxicity of Mitoxantrone niosomes were evaluated in vitro in phosphate buffer with different pHs as well as using human ovarian cancer cell line (OVCAR-3), human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Results showed that both cholesterol derivatives bearing formulations had pH-sensitive property and were found to release their contents under mild acidic conditions rapidly. In addition, the PEG-PMMI-CholC6-based niosomes could reserve the pH-sensitivity after incubation in plasma. Both Mitoxantrone-loaded pH-sensitive niosomes showed higher cytotoxicity than the conventional niosomes on OVCAR-3 and MCF-7 cell lines. However, both pH-sensitive niosomes exhibited lower cytotoxic effect on HUVEC cell line. Plasma stable, pH-sensitive niosomes could improve the cytotoxic effect and reduce the side effects of anti-tumor drugs. PMID:26417350

  7. Multi-wavelength pulse plethysmography for real-time drug delivery monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Pratik; Magaña, Isidro B.; O'Neal, Patrick D.

    2014-02-01

    A novel multi-wavelength photoplethysmograph (PPG), previously utilized to quantify optically absorptive circulating gold nanoparticles, has demonstrated the potential to enhance therapeutic treatment predictability as pharmacokinetic metrics are provided throughout the intravenous delivery phase of quinine in real-time. This report demonstrates how the PPG could be used to assess the real-time bioavailability of other types of intravenously delivered optically-absorbing nanoparticles and drugs. The drug currently under investigation is anti-malarial quinine (absorption peak ~350 nm). We describe how the algorithm has been adapted to quantify the concentration of quinine in the pulsatile, circulating blood based on its extinction at three wavelengths (340, 660 and 940 nm). We show an example of the system collecting data representing the baseline, injection, and the clearance phases. An examination of the raw signal suggests that the system is well suited to sense the concentration of quinine in the therapeutic range (10mg/kg).

  8. Curcumin loaded pH-sensitive hybrid lipid/block copolymer nanosized drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Jelezova, Ivelina; Drakalska, Elena; Momekova, Denitsa; Shalimova, Natalia; Momekov, Georgi; Konstantinov, Spiro; Rangelov, Stanislav; Pispas, Stergios

    2015-10-12

    Curcumin is a perspective drug candidate with pleiotropic antineoplastic activity, whose exceptionally low aqueous solubility and poor pharmacokinetic properties have hampered its development beyond the preclinical level. A possible approach to overcome these limitations is the encapsulation of curcumin into nano-carriers, incl. liposomes. The present contribution is focused on feasibility of using hybrid pH-sensitive liposomes, whereby curcumin is entrapped as a free drug and as a water soluble inclusion complex with PEGylated tert-butylcalix[4]arene, which allows the drug to occupy both the phospholipid membranes and the aqueous core of liposomes. The inclusion complexes were encapsulated in dipalmithoylphosphathydilcholine:cholesterol liposomes, whose membranes were grafted with a poly(isoprene-b-acrylic acid) diblock copolymer to confer pH-sensitivity. The liposomes were characterized by DLS, ζ-potential measurements, cryo-TEM, curcumin encapsulation efficacy, loading capacity, and in vitro release as a function of pH. Free and formulated curcumin were further investigated for cytotoxicity, apoptosis-induction and caspase-8, and 9 activation in chemosensitive HL-60 and its resistant sublines HL-60/Dox and HL-60/CDDP. Formulated curcumin was superior cytotoxic and apoptogenic agent vs. the free drug. The mechanistic assay demonstrated that the potent proapoptotic effects of pH-sensitive liposomal curcumin presumably mediated via recruitment of both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways in both HL-60 and HL-60/CDDP cells. PMID:26159739

  9. Activator of G protein signaling 3: a gatekeeper of cocaine sensitization and drug seeking.

    PubMed

    Bowers, M Scott; McFarland, Krista; Lake, Russell W; Peterson, Yuri K; Lapish, Christopher C; Gregory, Mary Lee; Lanier, Stephen M; Kalivas, Peter W

    2004-04-22

    Chronic cocaine administration reduces G protein signaling efficacy. Here, we report that the expression of AGS3, which binds to GialphaGDP and inhibits GDP dissociation, was upregulated in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) during late withdrawal from repeated cocaine administration. Increased AGS3 was mimicked in the PFC of drug-naive rats by microinjecting a peptide containing the Gialpha binding domain (GPR) of AGS3 fused to the cell permeability domain of HIV-Tat. Infusion of Tat-GPR mimicked the phenotype of chronic cocaine-treated rats by manifesting sensitized locomotor behavior and drug seeking and by increasing glutamate transmission in nucleus accumbens. By preventing cocaine withdrawal-induced AGS3 expression with antisense oligonucleotides, signaling through Gialpha was normalized, and both cocaine-induced relapse to drug seeking and locomotor sensitization were prevented. When antisense oligonucleotide infusion was discontinued, drug seeking and sensitization were restored. It is proposed that AGS3 gates the expression of cocaine-induced plasticity by regulating G protein signaling in the PFC. PMID:15091342

  10. Modulating cell-to-cell variability and sensitivity to death ligands by co-drugging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flusberg, Deborah A.; Sorger, Peter K.

    2013-06-01

    TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) holds promise as an anti-cancer therapeutic but efficiently induces apoptosis in only a subset of tumor cell lines. Moreover, even in clonal populations of responsive lines, only a fraction of cells dies in response to TRAIL and individual cells exhibit cell-to-cell variability in the timing of cell death. Fractional killing in these cell populations appears to arise not from genetic differences among cells but rather from differences in gene expression states, fluctuations in protein levels and the extent to which TRAIL-induced death or survival pathways become activated. In this study, we ask how cell-to-cell variability manifests in cell types with different sensitivities to TRAIL, as well as how it changes when cells are exposed to combinations of drugs. We show that individual cells that survive treatment with TRAIL can regenerate the sensitivity and death-time distribution of the parental population, demonstrating that fractional killing is a stable property of cell populations. We also show that cell-to-cell variability in the timing and probability of apoptosis in response to treatment can be tuned using combinations of drugs that together increase apoptotic sensitivity compared to treatment with one drug alone. In the case of TRAIL, modulation of cell-to-cell variability by co-drugging appears to involve a reduction in the threshold for mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization.

  11. Synthesis and Evaluation of Thermo-Sensitive, Magnetic Fluorescent Nanocomposite as Trifunctional Drug Delivery Carrier.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Chen, Binhua; Wu, Juan; Xu, Shanshan; Tian, Renbing

    2016-01-01

    The thermo-sensitive magnetic fluorescent trifunctional nanocomposite (Fe₃O₄/ZnS@PNIPAM) has been synthesized via a facile route. The obtained biocompatible nanocomposite was composed of monodisperse heterostructural Fe₃O₄/ZnS core and a thermo-sensitive poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) (PNIPAM) shell. Fe₃O₄/ZnS acted as magnetic response and fluorescence luminous body, PNIPAM acted as drug loaded platform which can adsorb and release drug controllably. Fe₃O₄/ZnS@PNIPAM was characterized and all of the results showed that it had excellent magnetic response, photostability and thermo-sensitivity. Moreover, the drug release studies in vitro showed that the release rate increased with increasing temperature. MTT assays in model HepG2 cells demonstrated that Fe₃O₄/ZnS@PNIPAM was practically non-toxic. Thus, our results revealed that Fe₃O₄/ZnS@PNIPAM would be used in biomedical fields such as targeted drug delivery, as well as cancer diagnosis and treatment in the nearly future. PMID:27398451

  12. The absence of functional glucosylceramide synthase does not sensitize melanoma cells for anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Veldman, Robert Jan; Mita, Alain; Cuvillier, Olivier; Garcia, Virginie; Klappe, Karin; Medin, Jeffrey A; Campbell, John D; Carpentier, Stéphane; Kok, Jan Willem; Levade, Thierry

    2003-06-01

    Conversion of ceramide, a putative mediator of anticancer drug-induced apoptosis, into glucosylceramide, by the action of glucosylceramide synthase (GCS), has been implicated in drug resistance. Herein, we compared GM95 mouse melanoma cells deficient in GCS activity, with cells stably transfected with a vector encoding GCS (GM95/GCS). Enzymatic and metabolic analysis demonstrated that GM95/GCS cells expressed a fully functional enzyme, resulting in normal ceramide glycosylation. However, cytotoxicity assays, as well as caspase activation and cytochrome c release studies, did not reveal any difference between the two cell lines with respect to their sensitivity toward doxorubicin, vinblastine, paclitaxel, cytosine arabinoside, or short-chain ceramide analogs. Administration of doxorubicin resulted in ceramide accumulation in both cell lines, with similar kinetics and amplitude. Although glucosylceramide formation was detected in doxorubicin-treated GM95/GCS cells, metabolism of drug-induced ceramide did not appear to be instrumental in cell survival. Furthermore, N-(n-butyl)deoxynojirimycin, a potent and non-toxic GCS inhibitor, had no chemosensitizing effect on wild-type melanoma cells. Altogether, both genetic and pharmacological alterations of the cellular ceramide glycosylation capacity failed to sensitize melanoma cells to anticancer drugs, therefore moderating the importance of ceramide glucosylation in drug-resistance mechanisms. PMID:12692077

  13. Rapid Sensitization of Physiological, Neuronal, and Locomotor Effects of Nicotine: Critical Role of Peripheral Drug Actions

    PubMed Central

    Lenoir, Magalie; Tang, Jeremy S.; Woods, Amina S.

    2013-01-01

    Repeated exposure to nicotine and other psychostimulant drugs produces persistent increases in their psychomotor and physiological effects (sensitization), a phenomenon related to the drugs' reinforcing properties and abuse potential. Here we examined the role of peripheral actions of nicotine in nicotine-induced sensitization of centrally mediated physiological parameters (brain, muscle, and skin temperatures), cortical and VTA EEG, neck EMG activity, and locomotion in freely moving rats. Repeated injections of intravenous nicotine (30 μg/kg) induced sensitization of the drug's effects on all these measures. In contrast, repeated injections of the peripherally acting analog of nicotine, nicotine pyrrolidine methiodide (nicotinePM, 30 μg/kg, i.v.) resulted in habituation (tolerance) of the same physiological, neuronal, and behavioral measures. However, after repeated nicotine exposure, acute nicotinePM injections induced nicotine-like physiological responses: powerful cortical and VTA EEG desynchronization, EMG activation, a large brain temperature increase, but weaker hyperlocomotion. Additionally, both the acute locomotor response to nicotine and nicotine-induced locomotor sensitization were attenuated by blockade of peripheral nicotinic receptors by hexamethonium (3 mg/kg, i.v.). These data suggest that the peripheral actions of nicotine, which precede its direct central actions, serve as a conditioned interoceptive cue capable of eliciting nicotine-like physiological and neural responses after repeated nicotine exposure. Thus, by providing a neural signal to the CNS that is repeatedly paired with the direct central effects of nicotine, the drug's peripheral actions play a critical role in the development of nicotine-induced physiological, neural, and behavioral sensitization. PMID:23761889

  14. The sensitivity of human tumour cells to quinone bioreductive drugs: what role for DT-diaphorase?

    PubMed

    Robertson, N; Stratford, I J; Houlbrook, S; Carmichael, J; Adams, G E

    1992-08-01

    15 human tumour cell lines (lung, breast and colon) have been evaluated for their sensitivity to the quinone based anti-cancer drugs Mitomycin C, Porfiromycin, and EO9 (3-hydroxymethyl-5-aziridinyl-1-methyl-2-(IH-indole-4,7-dione)prop-beta- en-alpha-ol). Sensitivity has been compared with the intra-cellular levels of DT-diaphorase, an enzyme thought to be important in the reductive activation of these quinones. No correlation exists between levels of DT-diaphorase and sensitivity to Mitomycin C or Porfiromycin. However, for EO9 those cell lines showing highest levels of DT-diaphorase activity tend to be the most sensitive. PMID:1510692

  15. Discovery of New Monocarbonyl Ligustrazine-Curcumin Hybrids for Intervention of Drug-Sensitive and Drug-Resistant Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ai, Yong; Zhu, Bin; Ren, Caiping; Kang, Fenghua; Li, Jinlong; Huang, Zhangjian; Lai, Yisheng; Peng, Sixun; Ding, Ke; Tian, Jide; Zhang, Yihua

    2016-03-10

    The elevation of oxidative stress preferentially in cancer cells by inhibiting thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and/or enhancing reactive oxygen species (ROS) production has emerged as an effective strategy for selectively targeting cancer cells. In this study, we designed and synthesized 21 ligustrazine-curcumin hybrids (10a-u). Biological evaluation indicated that the most active compound 10d significantly inhibited the proliferation of drug-sensitive (A549, SPC-A-1, LTEP-G-2) and drug-resistant (A549/DDP) lung cancer cells but had little effect on nontumor lung epithelial-like cells (HBE). Furthermore, 10d suppressed the TrxR/Trx system and promoted intracellular ROS accumulation and cancer cell apoptosis. Additionally, 10d inhibited the NF-κB, AKT, and ERK signaling, P-gp-mediated efflux of rhodamine 123, P-gp ATPase activity, and P-gp expression in A549/DDP cells. Finally, 10d repressed the growth of implanted human drug-resistant lung cancer in mice. Together, 10d acts a novel TrxR inhibitor and may be a promising candidate for intervention of lung cancer. PMID:26891099

  16. Effects of X-shaped reduction-sensitive amphiphilic block copolymer on drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Haijun; Wang, Lu

    2015-01-01

    To study the effects of X-shaped amphiphilic block copolymers on delivery of docetaxel (DTX) and the reduction-sensitive property on drug release, a novel reduction-sensitive amphiphilic copolymer, (PLGA)2-SS-4-arm-PEG2000 with a Gemini-like X-shape, was successfully synthesized. The formation of nanomicelles was proved with respect to the blue shift of the emission fluorescence as well as the fluorescent intensity increase of coumarin 6-loaded particles. The X-shaped polymers exhibited a smaller critical micelle concentration value and possessed higher micellar stability in comparison with those of linear ones. The size of X-shaped (PLGA)2-SS-4-arm-PEG2000 polymer nanomicelles (XNMs) was much smaller than that of nanomicelles prepared with linear polymers. The reduction sensitivity of polymers was confirmed by the increase of micellar sizes as well as the in vitro drug release profile of DTX-loaded XNMs (DTX/XNMs). Cytotoxicity assays in vitro revealed that the blank XNMs were nontoxic against A2780 cells up to a concentration of 50 µg/mL, displaying good biocompatibility. DTX/XNMs were more toxic against A2780 cells than other formulations in both dose- and time-dependent manners. Cellular uptake assay displayed a higher intracellular drug delivery efficiency of XNMs than that of nanomicelles prepared with linear polymers. Besides, the promotion of tubulin polymerization induced by DTX was visualized by immunofluorescence analysis, and the acceleration of apoptotic process against A2780 cells was also imaged using a fluorescent staining method. Therefore, this X-shaped reduction-sensitive (PLGA)2-SS-4-arm-PEG2000 copolymer could effectively improve the micellar stability and significantly enhance the therapeutic efficacy of DTX by increasing the cellular uptake and selectively accelerating the drug release inside cancer cells. PMID:26346880

  17. Effects of X-shaped reduction-sensitive amphiphilic block copolymer on drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Haijun; Wang, Lu

    2015-01-01

    To study the effects of X-shaped amphiphilic block copolymers on delivery of docetaxel (DTX) and the reduction-sensitive property on drug release, a novel reduction-sensitive amphiphilic copolymer, (PLGA)2-SS-4-arm-PEG2000 with a Gemini-like X-shape, was successfully synthesized. The formation of nanomicelles was proved with respect to the blue shift of the emission fluorescence as well as the fluorescent intensity increase of coumarin 6-loaded particles. The X-shaped polymers exhibited a smaller critical micelle concentration value and possessed higher micellar stability in comparison with those of linear ones. The size of X-shaped (PLGA)2-SS-4-arm-PEG2000 polymer nanomicelles (XNMs) was much smaller than that of nanomicelles prepared with linear polymers. The reduction sensitivity of polymers was confirmed by the increase of micellar sizes as well as the in vitro drug release profile of DTX-loaded XNMs (DTX/XNMs). Cytotoxicity assays in vitro revealed that the blank XNMs were nontoxic against A2780 cells up to a concentration of 50 µg/mL, displaying good biocompatibility. DTX/XNMs were more toxic against A2780 cells than other formulations in both dose- and time-dependent manners. Cellular uptake assay displayed a higher intracellular drug delivery efficiency of XNMs than that of nanomicelles prepared with linear polymers. Besides, the promotion of tubulin polymerization induced by DTX was visualized by immunofluorescence analysis, and the acceleration of apoptotic process against A2780 cells was also imaged using a fluorescent staining method. Therefore, this X-shaped reduction-sensitive (PLGA)2-SS-4-arm-PEG2000 copolymer could effectively improve the micellar stability and significantly enhance the therapeutic efficacy of DTX by increasing the cellular uptake and selectively accelerating the drug release inside cancer cells. PMID:26346880

  18. Development of an in vitro drug sensitivity assay based on newly excysted larvae of Echinostoma caproni

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Echinostomiasis is one of the major food-borne trematodiases and the species Echinostoma caproni serves as a useful model for trematocidal drug discovery. The current in vitro drug sensitivity assay uses adult E. caproni worms that are incubated with candidate drugs and scored microscopically for viability at 72 hrs. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of newly excysted larvae (NEL) of E. caproni for in vitro drug testing, which would be faster, more cost effective and more ethical compared to adult worm assays. Methods Larvae were obtained by collecting metacercariae from snails and triggering their excystation using the trypsin-bile salt excystation method. Studies concerning various parameters of this chemical transformation process as well as appropriate NEL culturing conditions were carried out and findings evaluated. NEL and adult worms were incubated with praziquantel, tribendimidine, albendazole and quinine and evaluated microscopically 72 hrs post-incubation. In addition, the colorimetric markers resazurin, CellTiter-Glo® and Vybrant® were tested as an alternative assay read-out method. Results The chemical excystation method successfully induced E. caproni metacercariae to excyst at a rate of about 20-60%. NEL remained viable in culture medium for 5–7 days. The results of an in vitro drug assay using NEL mirrored the results of an assay using adult worms incubated with the same drugs. None of the markers could reliably produce signals proportional to NEL viability or cytotoxicity without significant complications. Conclusion NEL are adequate for in vitro drug testing. Challenges remain in further improving the excystation yield and the practicability of the assay setup. Resolving these issues could also improve read-outs using colorimetric markers. Using NEL is in alignment with the 3 R rules of the ethical use of laboratory animals and can greatly increase the rate and affordability with which drugs are screened in vitro

  19. Novel application of Eudragit RL and cholesteryl oleyl carbonate to thermo-sensitive drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Emel Oyku; Gundogdu, Evren; Baspinar, Yücel; Karasulu, Ercument; Kirilmaz, Levent

    2013-12-01

    The Eudragit RL 100 and propylene glycol (PG) membranes with and without cholesteryl oleyl carbonate (COC) were prepared by the solvent casting method to pioneer a novel application of a thermo-sensitive drug delivery system. After that, the properties of these membranes were investigated by thermal, scanning, and porosity studies. Drug permeation studies through all membranes were carried out using salbuthamol sulphate (SBS) at constant temperatures (25°C and 37°C), respectively. The permeability of SBS through the membranes with COC has been shown to be a discontinuous function of temperature, that is, their permeability increased steeply above the phase transition temperature (37°C) of the COC. The thermo-sensitive permeation mechanism for the membranes might be based on the structure change of the membranes caused by the phase transition, so that the membranes could absorb more water. Considering the high biological safety of Eudragit RL 100 and PG membranes with and without COC might be used to develop a novel thermo-sensitive drug delivery system. PMID:22397637

  20. The Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia enables predictive modeling of anticancer drug sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Barretina, Jordi; Caponigro, Giordano; Stransky, Nicolas; Venkatesan, Kavitha; Margolin, Adam A.; Kim, Sungjoon; Wilson, Christopher J.; Lehár, Joseph; Kryukov, Gregory V.; Sonkin, Dmitriy; Reddy, Anupama; Liu, Manway; Murray, Lauren; Berger, Michael F.; Monahan, John E.; Morais, Paula; Meltzer, Jodi; Korejwa, Adam; Jané-Valbuena, Judit; Mapa, Felipa A.; Thibault, Joseph; Bric-Furlong, Eva; Raman, Pichai; Shipway, Aaron; Engels, Ingo H.; Cheng, Jill; Yu, Guoying K.; Yu, Jianjun; Aspesi, Peter; de Silva, Melanie; Jagtap, Kalpana; Jones, Michael D.; Wang, Li; Hatton, Charles; Palescandolo, Emanuele; Gupta, Supriya; Mahan, Scott; Sougnez, Carrie; Onofrio, Robert C.; Liefeld, Ted; MacConaill, Laura; Winckler, Wendy; Reich, Michael; Li, Nanxin; Mesirov, Jill P.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Getz, Gad; Ardlie, Kristin; Chan, Vivien; Myer, Vic E.; Weber, Barbara L.; Porter, Jeff; Warmuth, Markus; Finan, Peter; Harris, Jennifer L.; Meyerson, Matthew; Golub, Todd R.; Morrissey, Michael P.; Sellers, William R.; Schlegel, Robert; Garraway, Levi A.

    2012-01-01

    The systematic translation of cancer genomic data into knowledge of tumor biology and therapeutic avenues remains challenging. Such efforts should be greatly aided by robust preclinical model systems that reflect the genomic diversity of human cancers and for which detailed genetic and pharmacologic annotation is available1. Here we describe the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE): a compilation of gene expression, chromosomal copy number, and massively parallel sequencing data from 947 human cancer cell lines. When coupled with pharmacologic profiles for 24 anticancer drugs across 479 of the lines, this collection allowed identification of genetic, lineage, and gene expression-based predictors of drug sensitivity. In addition to known predictors, we found that plasma cell lineage correlated with sensitivity to IGF1 receptor inhibitors; AHR expression was associated with MEK inhibitor efficacy in NRAS-mutant lines; and SLFN11 expression predicted sensitivity to topoisomerase inhibitors. Altogether, our results suggest that large, annotated cell line collections may help to enable preclinical stratification schemata for anticancer agents. The generation of genetic predictions of drug response in the preclinical setting and their incorporation into cancer clinical trial design could speed the emergence of “personalized” therapeutic regimens2. PMID:22460905

  1. Effect of Anticancer Drug on the Cell Sensitivity to Ultrasound In Vitro and In Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamaev, Pavel P.; Rapoport, Natalya Y.

    2006-05-01

    Ultrasound bioeffects: loss of cell viability, cell membrane damage, intracellular uptake of anthracyclin drug doxorubicin (DOX), and cell proliferation, were investigated for drug-sensitive and multi-drug resistant (MDR) ovarian carcinoma cells. Cells were exposed to 1.1 MHz focused and 1.0 MHz unfocused ultrasound at different acoustic energies (1-1000 J/cm2) and DOX concentrations (1-20 μg/ml). It was found that MDR cells were more susceptible to the ultrasound action than sensitive cells if sonicated in suspension. At the same delivered energy, cell membrane damage increased with increasing acoustic pressure. Proliferation rate of the viable cells with compromised membranes was lower than that of intact cells. No effect of ultrasound (peak pressures up to 5 MPa, 30 sec exposure time) on the tumor growth in mice and their survival rates were found in the absence of DOX, while a synergistic effect of drug and ultrasound was observed in DOX presence.

  2. Monitoring temperature-sensitive vaccines and immunologic drugs, including anthrax vaccine.

    PubMed

    Frank, K J

    1999-10-15

    The experience of the U.S. Army Medical Materiel Center, Europe (USAMMCE), in monitoring temperature-sensitive vaccines and immunologic drugs, including anthrax vaccine, during storage and shipment is discussed. USAMMCE uses an electronic monitoring device to monitor and archive the time-temperature history of shipments of various vaccines, immunoglobulins, and other drugs requiring refrigeration. Using these monitors, USAMMCE can track its carriers' performance, reduce product loss, and validate quality. USAMMCE trains people to pack refrigerated items and to activate and place the monitoring device inside the packing container. Over 1200 temperature-monitor readings from 44 U.S. military logistical depots, hospitals, and clinics located outside the United States are evaluated annually by the USAMMCE pharmacist; each reading represents one shipment or packed box. When deactivated during unpacking, the device flashes green for a successful shipment (all temperature readings within the ideal range) or red for a potentially problematic shipment. From January through October 1998, the device was used in 750 temperature-sensitive shipments; 72% of the devices were returned to USAMMCE in green condition and the remainder in red. Of the red-flashing monitors, 15% were determined to signal that the drugs were received in unacceptable condition. USAMMCE successfully shipped more than 26,000 vials of anthrax vaccine from February through October 1998 within the manufacturer's guidelines for storage temperature. Temperature monitoring is essential for proper storage and transport of vaccines and immunologic drugs. PMID:10541032

  3. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug sensitizes Mycobacterium tuberculosis to endogenous and exogenous antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Ben; Pingle, Maneesh; Brickner, Steven J.; Shah, Nilesh; Roberts, Julia; Rundell, Mark; Bracken, W. Clay; Warrier, Thulasi; Somersan, Selin; Venugopal, Aditya; Darby, Crystal; Jiang, Xiuju; Warren, J. David; Fernandez, Joseph; Ouerfelli, Ouathek; Nuermberger, Eric L.; Cunningham-Bussel, Amy; Rath, Poonam; Chidawanyika, Tamutenda; Deng, Haiteng; Realubit, Ronald; Glickman, J. Fraser; Nathan, Carl F.

    2012-01-01

    Existing drugs are slow to eradicate Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in patients and have failed to control tuberculosis globally. One reason may be that host conditions impair Mtb’s replication, reducing its sensitivity to most antiinfectives. We devised a high-throughput screen for compounds that kill Mtb when its replication has been halted by reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNIs), acid, hypoxia, and a fatty acid carbon source. At concentrations routinely achieved in human blood, oxyphenbutazone (OPB), an inexpensive anti-inflammatory drug, was selectively mycobactericidal to nonreplicating (NR) Mtb. Its cidal activity depended on mild acid and was augmented by RNIs and fatty acid. Acid and RNIs fostered OPB’s 4-hydroxylation. The resultant 4-butyl-4-hydroxy-1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-phenylpyrazolidine-3,5-dione (4-OH-OPB) killed both replicating and NR Mtb, including Mtb resistant to standard drugs. 4-OH-OPB depleted flavins and formed covalent adducts with N-acetyl-cysteine and mycothiol. 4-OH-OPB killed Mtb synergistically with oxidants and several antituberculosis drugs. Thus, conditions that block Mtb’s replication modify OPB and enhance its cidal action. Modified OPB kills both replicating and NR Mtb and sensitizes both to host-derived and medicinal antimycobacterial agents. PMID:23012453

  4. Keto-Mycolic Acid-Dependent Pellicle Formation Confers Tolerance to Drug-Sensitive Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sambandan, Dhinakaran; Dao, Dee N.; Weinrick, Brian C.; Vilchèze, Catherine; Gurcha, Sudagar S.; Ojha, Anil; Kremer, Laurent; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Hatfull, Graham F.; Jacobs, William R.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The chronic nature of tuberculosis (TB), its requirement of long duration of treatment, its ability to evade immune intervention, and its propensity to relapse after drug treatment is discontinued are reminiscent of other chronic, biofilm-associated bacterial diseases. Historically, Mycobacterium tuberculosis was grown as a pellicle, a biofilm-like structure, at the liquid-air interface in a variety of synthetic media. Notably, the most widely administered human vaccine, BCG, is grown as a pellicle for vaccine production. However, the molecular requirements for this growth remain ill defined. Here, we demonstrate that keto-mycolic acids (keto-MA) are essential for pellicle growth, and mutants lacking in or depleted of this MA species are unable to form a pellicle. We investigated the role of the pellicle biofilm in the reduction of antibiotic sensitivity known as drug tolerance using the pellicle-defective ΔmmaA4 mutant strain. We discovered that the ΔmmaA4 mutant, which is both pellicle defective and highly sensitive to rifampicin (RIF) under planktonic growth, when incorporated within the wild-type pellicle biofilm, was protected from the bactericidal activity of RIF. The observation that growth within the M. tuberculosis pellicle biofilm can confer drug tolerance to a drug-hypersensitive strain suggests that identifying molecular requirements for pellicle growth could lead to development of novel interventions against mycobacterial infections. Our findings also suggest that a class of drugs that can disrupt M. tuberculosis biofilm formation, when used in conjunction with conventional antibiotics, has the potential to overcome drug tolerance. PMID:23653446

  5. Formulation and characterization of sustained release dosage form of moisture sensitive drug

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Priya; Dave, Abhishek; Vasava, Amit; Patel, Paresh

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to prepare sustained release tablet of moisture sensitive drug like Ranitidine Hydrochloride for treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease along with the improvement of moisture stability to get better therapeutic efficacy. Materials and Methods: Pan coating technique was used for coating of the tablet. Film coating was done using Eudragit RLPO and Eugragit EPO as coating polymer. 32 full factorial design was applied for optimization purpose, and 9 runs were conducted. In that Eudragit RLPO and Eudragit EPO taken as an independent variables and moisture gain and Cummulative Drug Release (CDR) were taken as dependent variables. Drug and excipient compatibility was done using differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy study. The tablet was evaluated for precompression parameter and all postcompression parameter. Stability study was carried out at room temperature (30°C ± 2°C/65% ± 5% relative humidity). Final formulation was compared with marketed formulation RANTEC 300. Result: Tablets were passing out all precompression parameter along with postcompression parameter. Stability study shows that the parameter such as hardness, friability, and dissolution are in the range. Hence, there is no significant change shown after stability study. Our final formulation was compared with marketed formulation RANTEC 300 and result demonstrates that our final formulation have less moisture gain and give release up to 12 h. Conclusion: The result of present study demonstrates that final formulation has less moisture gain and getting desired CDR for sustained release of drug. On the basis of all study, it was concluded that the tablet was coated by combination of Eudragit RLPO 10% and Eudragit EPO 10% give better result. This formation provided promising approach for the drug release up to 12 h for moisture sensitive drug like ranitidine hydrochloride. PMID:25838994

  6. Sensitive, resistant and multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumanii at Saudi Arabia hospital eastern region.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mughis Uddin; Farooq, Reshma; Al-Hawashim, Nadia; Ahmed, Motasim; Yiannakou, Nearchos; Sayeed, Fatima; Sayed, Ali Rifat; Lutfullah, Sualiha

    2015-05-01

    Since the Physicians start use of antibiotics long ago with un-notice drug resistance. However actual problem was recognized about 85 years ago. Antibiotic resistant and Multi-drug resistant bacterial strains are at rise throughout the world. It is physicians and researchers to take scientific research based appropriate action to overcome this ever-spreading problem. This study is designed to find out sensitive (S), resistant (R) and multi-drug resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumanii strain along with other isolates in the resident patients of Eastern Region of Saudi Arabia. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is excluded from other gram-negative organisms isolated from different sites as it will be dealt separately. This study is based in was retrospective observations designed to collect data of different stains of Acinetobacter baumanii with reference to their Sensitivity (S), Resistance (R), Multi-Drug Resistance (MDR) along with other Gram negative isolated from different sites (from 1st January 2004 to 31st December 2011) at King Abdulaziz Hospital located Eastern Region of Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). All necessary techniques were used to culture and perform sensitivity of these isolates. There were 4532 isolates out of which 3018 (67%) were from patients. Out of Acinetobacter baumanii infected were 906 (20%) while other 3626 (80%) isolates were miscellaneous. Numbers of patients or cases were 480 (53%) out of 906 isolates and numbers of patients or cases in other organisms were 2538 (70%) out of 3626 isolates. Acinetobacter baumanii infected patients 221 (46%) were male and 259 (54%) were female and the male and female ratio of 1:1.2. In other organisms this male female ratio was almost same. There was steady rise in number of patients and the hence the isolates from 2004 to 2011. Majority of the bacterial strains were isolated as single organism but some were isolated as double or triple or quadruple or more organisms from different sites. Sensitive, Resistant and

  7. Sensitizing nanoparticle based platinum(IV) drugs by curcumin for better chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xiang; Zhao, Chen; Yan, Lesan; Qi, Ruogu; Jing, Xiabin; Wang, Zehua

    2016-09-01

    A polymer-cisplatin(IV) conjugate was prepared by attaching Pt(IV)-COOH to a biodegradable amphiphilic block copolymer containing pendant OH groups. The conjugate can assemble into micelles (M(Pt)) with a mean diameter of ca. 169nm. Further, curcumin (CM) was used to sensitize platinum drug based nanoparticles to overcome cisplatin resistance and enhance antitumor efficacy. In vitro studies showed that M(Pt)/CM combinations had great synergistic effect both on cisplatin sensitive and cisplatin resistant cell lines (A2780 and A2780DDP). In vivo studies showed that M(Pt)/CM had a much lower systemic toxicity and an enhanced antitumor efficacy compared to cisplatin alone or the corresponding cisplatin/CM combinations. Therefore, polymer-cisplatin(IV) conjugate with small molecules that serve as a non-cytotoxic or minimally cytotoxic sensitizer or enhancer provide a promising strategy, which may have potential clinical implications in the near future. PMID:27311131

  8. Fabrication and evaluation of the novel reduction-sensitive starch nanoparticles for controlled drug release.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinlong; Huang, Yinjuan; Gao, Chunmei; Liu, Mingzhu; Zhang, Xinjie

    2014-03-01

    A novel type of reduction-sensitive starch nanoparticles was prepared via the reversed-phase microemulsion method by using crosslinker, N,N-bisacryloylcystamine (BAC) with the disulfide linkages, which was specifically cleaved by dithiothreitol (DTT). Starch nanoparticles had a spherical morphology with a small size of 40 nm in the optimal condition. The influences of process parameters (starch amount, surfactant amount and oil/water (O/W) ratio) on the size of starch nanoparticles were studied by dynamic light scattering (DLS). BAC crosslinked starch nanoparticles were degraded into oligomers with the reducing agent of DTT due to the cleavage of the disulfide linkages. A model drug 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) could be loaded efficiently into starch nanoparticles and the in vitro drug release behaviors were also studied. The results suggested that the disulfide crosslinked starch nanoparticles exhibited an accelerated drug release behavior in the presence of DTT. In vitro methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assays indicated that BAC crosslinked starch nanoparticles had a good biocompatibility when cocultured with human HeLa cancer cells. Hence, with excellent biocompatibility and biodegradability, and rapid drug release in response to DTT, BAC crosslinked starch nanoparticles showed a great potential as a biomaterial carrier for the application of drug controlled release. In contrast to BAC crosslinked starch nanoparticles, N,N-methylenebisacrylamine (MBA) crosslinked starch nanoparticles were prepared as the control without the disulfide linkages. PMID:24463097

  9. Sensitization for Anticancer Drug-Induced Apoptosis by Betulinic Acid1

    PubMed Central

    Fulda, Simone; Debatin, Klaus-Michael

    2005-01-01

    Abstract We previously described that betulinic acid (BetA), a naturally occurring pentacyclic triterpenoid, induces apoptosis in tumor cells through the mitochondrial pathway. Here, for the first time, we provide evidence that BetA cooperated with anticancer drugs to induce apoptosis and to inhibit clonogenic survival of tumor cells. Combined treatment with BetA and anticancer drugs acted in concert to induce loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and the release of cytochrome c and Smac from mitochondria, resulting in activation of caspases and apoptosis. Overexpression of Bcl-2, which blocked mitochondrial perturbations, also inhibited the cooperative effect of BetA and anticancer drugs, indicating that cooperative interaction involved the mitochondrial pathway. Notably, cooperation of BetA and anticancer drugs was found for various cytotoxic compounds with different modes of action (e.g., doxorubicin, cisplatin, Taxol, VP16, or actinomycin D). Importantly, BetA and anticancer drugs cooperated to induce apoptosis in different tumor cell lines, including p53 mutant cells, and also in primary tumor cells, but not in human fibroblasts indicating some tumor specificity. These findings indicate that using BetA as sensitizer in chemotherapy-based combination regimens may be a novel strategy to enhance the efficacy of anticancer therapy, which warrants further investigation. PMID:15802021

  10. Sonochemically synthesized biocompatible zirconium phosphate nanoparticles for pH sensitive drug delivery application.

    PubMed

    Kalita, Himani; Prashanth Kumar, B N; Konar, Suraj; Tantubay, Sangeeta; Kr Mahto, Madhusudan; Mandal, Mahitosh; Pathak, Amita

    2016-03-01

    The present work reports the synthesis of biocompatible zirconium phosphate (ZP) nanoparticles as nanocarrier for drug delivery application. The ZP nanoparticles were synthesized via a simple sonochemical method in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and their efficacy for the delivery of drugs has been tested through various in-vitro experiments. The particle size and BET surface area of the nanoparticles were found to be ~48 nm and 206.51 m(2)/g respectively. The conventional MTT assay and cellular localization studies of the particles, performed on MDA-MB-231 cell lines, demonstrate their excellent biocompatibility and cellular internalization behavior. The loading of curcumin, an antitumor drug, onto the ZP nanoparticles shows the rapid drug uptake ability of the particles, while the drug release study, performed at two different pH values (at 7.4 and 5) depicts pH sensitive release-profile. The MTT assay and cellular localization studies revealed higher cellular inhibition and better bioavailability of the nanoformulated curcumin compared to free curcumin. PMID:26706510

  11. Hepatic drug metabolizing profile of Flinders Sensitive Line rat model of depression.

    PubMed

    Kotsovolou, Olga; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Lang, Matti A; Marselos, Marios; Overstreet, David H; Papadopoulou-Daifoti, Zoi; Johanson, Inger; Fotopoulos, Andrew; Konstandi, Maria

    2010-08-16

    The Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rat model of depression exhibits some behavioral, neurochemical, and pharmacological features that have been reported in depressed patients and has been very effective in screening antidepressants. Major factor that determines the effectiveness and toxicity of a drug is the drug metabolizing capacity of the liver. Therefore, in order to discriminate possible differentiation in the hepatic drug metabolism between FSL rats and Sprague-Dawley (SD) controls, their hepatic metabolic profile was investigated in this study. The data showed decreased glutathione (GSH) content and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and lower expression of certain major CYP enzymes, including the CYP2B1, CYP2C11 and CYP2D1 in FSL rats compared to SD controls. In contrast, p-nitrophenol hydroxylase (PNP), 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase (EROD) and 16alpha-testosterone hydroxylase activities were higher in FSL rats. Interestingly, the wide spread environmental pollutant benzo(alpha)pyrene (B(alpha)P) induced CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B1/2 and ALDH3c at a lesser extend in FSL than in SD rats, whereas the antidepressant mirtazapine (MIRT) up-regulated CYP1A1/2, CYP2C11, CYP2D1, CYP2E1 and CYP3A1/2, mainly, in FSL rats. The drug also further increased ALDH3c whereas suppressed GSH content in B(alpha)P-exposed FSL rats. In conclusion, several key enzymes of the hepatic biotransformation machinery are differentially expressed in FSL than in SD rats, a condition that may influence the outcome of drug therapy. The MIRT-induced up-regulation of several drug-metabolizing enzymes indicates the critical role of antidepressant treatment that should be always taken into account in the designing of treatment and interpretation of insufficient pharmacotherapy or drug toxicity. PMID:20595028

  12. Spontaneous temperature-sensitive Pluronic(®) based niosomes: Triggered drug release using mild hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Tavano, Lorena; Oliviero Rossi, Cesare; Picci, Nevio; Muzzalupo, Rita

    2016-09-25

    Inclusion of lipids or polymers with a transition temperature closer to physiological body temperature (40-42°C) is a strategy used in tumor therapy for more than 30 years, because it allows induction of drug release from delivery systems by mild hyperthermia. Unfortunately, most of these thermo-sensitive carriers are removed from circulation before completion of their function. Thus, novel multi-functional niosomes possessing spontaneous stealth and thermo-sensitive properties were developed from L64 Pluronic(®) and L64ox as its derivative, in presence or absence of cholesterol. The use of L64 both as amphiphilic constituent and thermo-sensitive molecule, gave the possibility to bypass the use of additional excipients and increased the system biocompatibility. Niosomes diameter ranged from 400 to 750nm and were long term stable. Calcein and 5-FU possess great affinity to niosomal matrices rich in PEO groups. Negative Z-potential values were attributed to the negative charges onto the niosomes surface and generally change according to the temperature. The in vitro drugs release studies were performed at 25°C, 37°C and 42°C, that are representative of certain conditions (storage, physiological condition and mild hyperthermia, respectively). Results showed that L64-based niosomes possess spontaneous thermo-sensitive properties: drugs releases were found to be more pronounced at 42°C. These early results are a promising first step for the development of multi-functional devices that combine several advantages such as stealth properties and temperature controllability at the desired location and time, for a more specific and efficient pharmacological therapy. PMID:27484834

  13. The wisdom of crowds and the repurposing of artesunate as an anticancer drug

    PubMed Central

    Augustin, Yolanda; Krishna, Sanjeev; Kumar, Devinder; Pantziarka, Pan

    2015-01-01

    Artesunate, a semi-synthetic and water-soluble artemisinin-derivative used as an anti-malarial agent, has attracted the attention of cancer researchers due to a broad range of anti-cancer activity including anti-angiogenic, immunomodulatory and treatment-sensitisation effects. In addition to pre-clinical evidence in a range of cancers, a recently completed randomised blinded trial in colorectal cancer has provided a positive signal for further clinical investigation. Used perioperatively artesunate appears to reduce the rate of disease recurrence - and the Neo-Art trial, a larger Phase II RCT, is seeking to confirm this positive effect. However, artesunate is a generic medication, and as with other trials of repurposed drugs, the Neo-Art trial does not have commercial sponsorship. In an innovative move, the trial is seeking funds directly from members of the public via a crowd-funding strategy that may have resonance beyond this single trial. PMID:26557887

  14. The wisdom of crowds and the repurposing of artesunate as an anticancer drug.

    PubMed

    Augustin, Yolanda; Krishna, Sanjeev; Kumar, Devinder; Pantziarka, Pan

    2015-01-01

    Artesunate, a semi-synthetic and water-soluble artemisinin-derivative used as an anti-malarial agent, has attracted the attention of cancer researchers due to a broad range of anti-cancer activity including anti-angiogenic, immunomodulatory and treatment-sensitisation effects. In addition to pre-clinical evidence in a range of cancers, a recently completed randomised blinded trial in colorectal cancer has provided a positive signal for further clinical investigation. Used perioperatively artesunate appears to reduce the rate of disease recurrence - and the Neo-Art trial, a larger Phase II RCT, is seeking to confirm this positive effect. However, artesunate is a generic medication, and as with other trials of repurposed drugs, the Neo-Art trial does not have commercial sponsorship. In an innovative move, the trial is seeking funds directly from members of the public via a crowd-funding strategy that may have resonance beyond this single trial. PMID:26557887

  15. Polydopamine-based surface modification of mesoporous silica nanoparticles as pH-sensitive drug delivery vehicles for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Danfeng; Gao, Yongfeng; Wang, Lijun; Liu, Gan; Chen, Yuhan; Wang, Teng; Tao, Wei; Mei, Lin; Huang, Laiqiang; Zeng, Xiaowei

    2016-02-01

    A novel pH-sensitive drug delivery system of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) which were modified by polydopamine (PDA) for controlled release of cationic amphiphilic drug desipramine (DES) was prepared. MSNs-DES-PDA were characterized in terms of size, size distribution, surface morphology, BET surface area, mesoporous size and pore volume, drug loading content and in vitro drug release profile. MSNs-DES-PDA had high drug loading content and pH sensitivity. The DES release profiles of MSNs-DES and MSNs-DES-PDA were totally different, and the drug release of MSNs-DES-PDA accelerated with increasing acidity. MSNs-DES-PDA can be internalized into cells. In vitro experiments demonstrated that MSNs-DES-PDA had higher cytotoxicity and inhibitory effects on acid sphingomyelinase than those of free DES. This drug delivery system was beneficial for controlled release and cancer therapy. PMID:26550786

  16. Modeling Expression Plasticity of Genes that Differentiate Drug-sensitive from Drug-resistant Cells to Chemotherapeutic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ningtao; Wang, Yaqun; Han, Hao; Huber, Kathryn J; Yang, Jin-Ming; Li, Runze; Wu, Rongling

    2014-01-01

    By measuring gene expression at an unprecedented resolution and throughput, RNA-seq has played a pivotal role in studying biological functions. Its typical application in clinical medicine is to identify the discrepancies of gene expression between two different types of cancer cells, sensitive and resistant to chemotherapeutic treatment, in a hope to predict drug response. Here we modified and used a mechanistic model to identify distinct patterns of gene expression in response of different types of breast cancer cell lines to chemotherapeutic treatment. This model was founded on a mixture likelihood of Poisson-distributed transcript read data, with each mixture component specified by the Skellam function. By estimating and comparing the amount of gene expression in each environment, the model can test how genes alter their expression in response to environment and how different genes interact with each other in the responsive process. Using the modified model, we identified the alternations of gene expression between two cell lines of breast cancer, resistant and sensitive to tamoxifen, which allows us to interpret the expression mechanism of how genes respond to metabolic differences between the two cell types. The model can have a general implication for studying the plastic pattern of gene expression across different environments measured by RNA-seq. PMID:25435798

  17. Formation of thermo-sensitive polyelectrolyte complex micelles from two biocompatible graft copolymers for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Li, Guiying; Meng, Yanfeng; Guo, Lei; Zhang, Ting; Liu, Junshen

    2014-07-01

    Thermo-sensitive polyelectrolyte complex (PEC) micelles assembled from two biocompatible graft copolymers chitosan-g-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (CS-g-PNIPAM) and carboxymethyl cellulose-g-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (CMC-g-PNIPAM) were prepared for delivery of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The PEC micelles showed a narrow size distribution with core-shell structure, in which the core formed from positively charged CS and negatively charged CMC by electrostatic interactions and the shell formed from thermo-sensitive PNIPAM. The synthesized PEC micelles have lower critical solution temperatures (LCST) in the region of 37°C, which is favorable for smart drug delivery applications. The hydrogen bondings between PEC micelles and 5-FU increased the drug loading. Changing temperature, pH or ionic strength, a sustained and controlled release was observed due to the deformation of PEC micelles. Adding glutaraldehyde, a chemical crosslinking reagent, was an efficient way to reinforce the micelles structure and decrease the initial burst release. Cytotoxicity assays showed that drug-loaded PEC micelles retained higher cell inhibition efficiency in HeLa cells. PMID:23894021

  18. Identification of active Plasmodium falciparum calpain to establish screening system for Pf-calpain-based drug development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With the increasing resistance of malaria parasites to available drugs, there is an urgent demand to develop new anti-malarial drugs. Calpain inhibitor, ALLN, is proposed to inhibit parasite proliferation by suppressing haemoglobin degradation. This provides Plasmodium calpain as a potential target for drug development. Pf-calpain, a cysteine protease of Plasmodium falciparum, belongs to calpain-7 family, which is an atypical calpain not harboring Ca2+-binding regulatory motifs. In this present study, in order to establish the screening system for Pf-calpain specific inhibitors, the active form of Pf-calpain was first identified. Methods Recombinant Pf-calpain including catalytic subdomain IIa (rPfcal-IIa) was heterologously expressed and purified. Enzymatic activity was determined by both fluorogenic substrate assay and gelatin zymography. Molecular homology modeling was carried out to address the activation mode of Pf-calpain in the aspect of structural moiety. Results Based on the measurement of enzymatic activity and protease inhibitor assay, it was found that the active form of Pf-calpain only contains the catalytic subdomain IIa, suggesting that Pf-calpain may function as a monomeric form. The sequence prediction indicates that the catalytic subdomain IIa contains all amino acid residues necessary for catalytic triad (Cys-His-Asn) formation. Molecular modeling suggests that the Pf-calpain subdomain IIa makes an active site, holding the catalytic triad residues in their appropriate orientation for catalysis. The mutation analysis further supports that those amino acid residues are functional and have enzymatic activity. Conclusion The identified active form of Pf-calpain could be utilized to establish high-throughput screening system for Pf-calpain inhibitors. Due to its unique monomeric structural property, Pf-calpain could be served as a novel anti-malarial drug target, which has a high specificity for malaria parasite. In addition, the monomeric

  19. Overexpression of the human HAP1 protein sensitizes cells to the lethal effect of bioreductive drugs.

    PubMed

    Prieto-Alamo, M J; Laval, F

    1999-03-01

    Abasic sites (AP sites) are generated in DNA either directly by DNA-damaging agents or by DNA glycosylases acting during base excision repair. These sites are repaired in human cells by the HAP1 protein, which, besides its AP-endonuclease activity, also possesses a redox function. To investigate the ability of HAP1 protein to modulate cell resistance to DNA-damaging agents, CHO cells were transfected with HAP1 cDNA, resulting in stable expression of the protein in the cell nuclei. The sensitivity of the transfected cells to the toxic effect of various agents, e.g. methylmethane sulfonate, bleomycin and H2O2, was not modified. However, the transfected cells became more sensitive to killing by mitomycin C, porfiromycin, daunorubicin and aziridinyl benzoquinone, drugs that are activated by reduction. To test whether the redox function of HAP1 protein was involved in this increased cytotoxicity, we have constructed a mutated HAP1 protein endowed with normal AP-endonuclease activity but deleted for redox function. When this mutated protein was expressed in the cells, elevated AP-endonuclease activity was measured, but sensitization to the lethal effects of compounds requiring bioreduction was no longer observed. These results suggest that HAP1 protein, besides its involvement in DNA repair, is able to activate bioreduction of alkylating drugs used in cancer chemotherapy. PMID:10190555

  20. Polydopamine-coated liposomes as pH-sensitive anticancer drug carriers.

    PubMed

    Zong, Wei; Hu, Ying; Su, Yingchun; Luo, Nan; Zhang, Xunan; Li, Qingchuan; Han, Xiaojun

    2016-05-01

    Stimuli-responsive drug carriers are considered to play important roles in chemotherapy. We fabricated pH-sensitive polydopamine-protected liposomes (liposome@PDA) drug delivery systems, which were characterised with microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM), UV-vis spectrometer and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) technieques. The typical chemotherapeutic agent, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), was loaded into liposome@PDA capsules. The maximum release percentages of 5-FU are 3.2%, 29.5%, 52.7%, 76.7% in the solution with pH 7.42, 6.87, 4.11 and 3.16, respectively. The in vitro cell cytotoxity experiments were carried out using 5-FU-loaded capsules at pH 6.87 solution, which simulate the true pH around cancerous cells. At 1.5 μM concentration, the free 5-FU, 5-FU-loaded liposome capsules and 5-FU-loaded capsules showed the cell viability of 50.56%, 22.66% and 21.63%, respectively. It confirms that drug-loaded capsules performed better than free drug. The results demonstrate the great potential of liposome@PDA capsules as carriers in biomedical applications. PMID:27174396

  1. An Organotypic High Throughput System for Characterization of Drug Sensitivity of Primary Multiple Myeloma Cells.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ariosto; Jacobson, Timothy; Meads, Mark; Distler, Allison; Shain, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    In this work we describe a novel approach that combines ex vivo drug sensitivity assays and digital image analysis to estimate chemosensitivity and heterogeneity of patient-derived multiple myeloma (MM) cells. This approach consists in seeding primary MM cells freshly extracted from bone marrow aspirates into microfluidic chambers implemented in multi-well plates, each consisting of a reconstruction of the bone marrow microenvironment, including extracellular matrix (collagen or basement membrane matrix) and stroma (patient-derived mesenchymal stem cells) or human-derived endothelial cells (HUVECs). The chambers are drugged with different agents and concentrations, and are imaged sequentially for 96 hr through bright field microscopy, in a motorized microscope equipped with a digital camera. Digital image analysis software detects live and dead cells from presence or absence of membrane motion, and generates curves of change in viability as a function of drug concentration and exposure time. We use a computational model to determine the parameters of chemosensitivity of the tumor population to each drug, as well as the number of sub-populations present as a measure of tumor heterogeneity. These patient-tailored models can then be used to simulate therapeutic regimens and estimate clinical response. PMID:26274375

  2. Monitoring drug induced apoptosis and treatment sensitivity in non-small cell lung carcinoma using dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Taruvai Kalyana Kumar, Rajeshwari; Liu, Shanshan; Minna, John D; Prasad, Shalini

    2016-09-01

    Non-invasive real time methods for characterizing biomolecular events that contribute towards apoptotic kinetics would be of significant importance in the field of cancer biology. Effective drug-induced apoptosis is an important factor for establishing the relationship between cancer genetics and treatment sensitivity. The objective of this study was to develop a non-invasive technique to characterize cancer cells that are undergoing drug-induced apoptosis. We used dielectrophoresis to determine apoptotic cells as early as 2h post drug treatment as compared to 24h with standard flow cytometry method using non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) adenocarcinoma cell line (HCC1833) as a study model. Our studies have shown significant differences in apoptotic cells by chromatin condensation, formation of apoptotic bodies and exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the extracellular surface when the cells where treated with a potent Bcl-2 family inhibitor drug (ABT-263). Time lapse dielectrophoretic studies were performed over 24h period after exposure to ABT-263 at clinically relevant concentrations. The dielectrophoretic studies were compared to Annexin-V FITC flow assay for the detection of PS in mid-stage apoptosis using flow cytometry. As a result of physical and biochemical changes, inherent dielectric properties of cells undergoing varying stages of apoptosis showed amplified changes in their cytoplasmic and membrane capacitance. In addition, zeta potential of these fixed isolated cells was measured to obtain direct correlation to biomolecular events. PMID:27262539

  3. In silico modeling predicts drug sensitivity of patient-derived cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma (GBM) is an aggressive disease associated with poor survival. It is essential to account for the complexity of GBM biology to improve diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. This complexity is best represented by the increasing amounts of profiling (“omics”) data available due to advances in biotechnology. The challenge of integrating these vast genomic and proteomic data can be addressed by a comprehensive systems modeling approach. Methods Here, we present an in silico model, where we simulate GBM tumor cells using genomic profiling data. We use this in silico tumor model to predict responses of cancer cells to targeted drugs. Initially, we probed the results from a recent hypothesis-independent, empirical study by Garnett and co-workers that analyzed the sensitivity of hundreds of profiled cancer cell lines to 130 different anticancer agents. We then used the tumor model to predict sensitivity of patient-derived GBM cell lines to different targeted therapeutic agents. Results Among the drug-mutation associations reported in the Garnett study, our in silico model accurately predicted ~85% of the associations. While testing the model in a prospective manner using simulations of patient-derived GBM cell lines, we compared our simulation predictions with experimental data using the same cells in vitro. This analysis yielded a ~75% agreement of in silico drug sensitivity with in vitro experimental findings. Conclusions These results demonstrate a strong predictability of our simulation approach using the in silico tumor model presented here. Our ultimate goal is to use this model to stratify patients for clinical trials. By accurately predicting responses of cancer cells to targeted agents a priori, this in silico tumor model provides an innovative approach to personalizing therapy and promises to improve clinical management of cancer. PMID:24884660

  4. Sensitivity of Plasmodium falciparum to Antimalarial Drugs in Hainan Island, China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan-Qing; Wang, Guang-Ze; Li, Yu-Chun; Meng, Feng; Lin, Shi-Gan; Zhu, Zhen-Hu; Sun, Ding-Wei; He, Chang-Hua; Hu, Xi-Min; Du, Jian-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Pyronaridine and artesunate have been shown to be effective in falciparum malaria treatment. However, pyronaridine is rarely used in Hainan Island clinically, and artesunate is not widely used as a therapeutic agent. Instead, conventional antimalarial drugs, chloroquine and piperaquine, are used, explaining the emergence of chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum. In this article, we investigated the sensitivity of P. falciparum to antimalarial drugs used in Hainan Island for rational drug therapy. We performed in vivo (28 days) and in vitro tests to determine the sensitivity of P. falciparum to antimalarial drugs. Total 46 patients with falciparum malaria were treated with dihydroartemisinin/piperaquine phosphate (DUO-COTECXIN) and followed up for 28 day. The cure rate was 97.8%. The mean fever clearance time (22.5±10.6 hr) and the mean parasite clearance time (27.3±12.2 hr) showed no statistical significance with different genders, ages, temperatures, or parasite density (P>0.05). The resistance rates of chloroquine, piperaquine, pyronarididine, and artesunate detected in vitro were 71.9%, 40.6%, 12.5%, and 0%, respectively (P<0.0001). The resistance intensities decreased as follows: chloroquine>piperaquine>pyronarididine>artesunate. The inhibitory dose 50 (IC50) was 3.77×10-6 mol/L, 2.09×10-6 mol/L, 0.09×10-6 mol/L, and 0.05×10-6 mol/L, and the mean concentrations for complete inhibition (CIMC) of schizont formation were 5.60×10-6 mol/L, 9.26×10-6 mol/L, 0.55×10-6 mol/L, and 0.07×10-6 mol/L, respectively. Dihydroartemisinin showed a strong therapeutic effect against falciparum malaria with a low toxicity. PMID:25748707

  5. A Network-Based Model of Oncogenic Collaboration for Prediction of Drug Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Laderas, Ted G.; Heiser, Laura M.; Sönmez, Kemal

    2015-01-01

    Tumorigenesis is a multi-step process, involving the acquisition of multiple oncogenic mutations that transform cells, resulting in systemic dysregulation that enables proliferation, invasion, and other cancer hallmarks. The goal of precision medicine is to identify therapeutically-actionable mutations from large-scale omic datasets. However, the multiplicity of oncogenes required for transformation, known as oncogenic collaboration, makes assigning effective treatments difficult. Motivated by this observation, we propose a new type of oncogenic collaboration where mutations in genes that interact with an oncogene may contribute to the oncogene’s deleterious potential, a new genomic feature that we term “surrogate oncogenes.” Surrogate oncogenes are representatives of these mutated subnetworks that interact with oncogenes. By mapping mutations to a protein–protein interaction network, we determine the significance of the observed distribution using permutation-based methods. For a panel of 38 breast cancer cell lines, we identified a significant number of surrogate oncogenes in known oncogenes such as BRCA1 and ESR1, lending credence to this approach. In addition, using Random Forest Classifiers, we show that these significant surrogate oncogenes predict drug sensitivity for 74 drugs in the breast cancer cell lines with a mean error rate of 30.9%. Additionally, we show that surrogate oncogenes are predictive of survival in patients. The surrogate oncogene framework incorporates unique or rare mutations from a single sample, and therefore has the potential to integrate patient-unique mutations into drug sensitivity predictions, suggesting a new direction in precision medicine and drug development. Additionally, we show the prevalence of significant surrogate oncogenes in multiple cancers from The Cancer Genome Atlas, suggesting that surrogate oncogenes may be a useful genomic feature for guiding pancancer analyses and assigning therapies across many tissue

  6. [A Case of Drug-Induced Thrombocytopenia Resulting from Sensitivity to Oxaliplatin].

    PubMed

    Masuda, Taiki; Nagai, Kagami; Sanada, Katsuya

    2015-11-01

    A 67-year-old man was diagnosed with pulmonary metastasis from advanced transverse colon cancer. Thus, a local resection was performed. Adjuvant chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6 was started. Sixteen courses were carried out without problems. However, he complained of chills and chest discomfort 2 hours after beginning the 17th course of chemotherapy. Laboratory data showed remarkable thrombocytopenia, and platelet-associated IgG level was high. After administration of steroids and platelet transfusions, the platelet count improved. Therefore, we diagnosed drug-induced thrombocytopenia resulting from sensitivity to oxaliplatin (L-OHP). Since then, sLV5FU2 therapy was started, and the patient received the whole adjuvant chemotherapy without problems. Thrombocytopenia resulting from sensitivity to L-OHP is a relatively rare side effect. We herein report this case with a review of the relevant literature. PMID:26805296

  7. Registered report: Systematic identification of genomic markers of drug sensitivity in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Vanden Heuvel, John P; Bullenkamp, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology seeks to address growing concerns about the reproducibility in scientific research by conducting replications of selected experiments from a number of high-profile papers in the field of cancer biology. The papers, which were published between 2010 and 2012, were selected on the basis of citations and Altmetric scores (Errington et al., 2014). This Registered Report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from “Systematic identification of genomic markers of drug sensitivity in cancer cells” by Garnett and colleagues, published in Nature in 2012 (Garnett et al., 2012). The experiments to be replicated are those reported in Figures 4C, 4E, 4F, and Supplemental Figures 16 and 20. Garnett and colleagues performed a high throughput screen assessing the effect of 130 drugs on 639 cancer-derived cell lines in order to identify novel interactions for possible therapeutic approaches. They then tested this approach by exploring in more detail a novel interaction they identified in which Ewing’s sarcoma cell lines showed an increased sensitivity to PARP inhibitors (Figure 4C). Mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs) transformed with the signature EWS-FLI1 translocation, the hallmark of Ewing’s sarcoma family tumors, exhibited increased sensitivity to the PARP inhibitor olaparib as compared to MPCs transformed with a different translocation (Figure 4E). Knockdown mediated by siRNA of EWS-FLI1 abrogated this sensitivity to olaparib (Figure 4F). The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology is a collaboration between the Center for Open Science and Science Exchange, and the results of the replications will be published by eLife. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13620.001 PMID:27336789

  8. Registered report: Systematic identification of genomic markers of drug sensitivity in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Vanden Heuvel, John P; Bullenkamp, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology seeks to address growing concerns about the reproducibility in scientific research by conducting replications of selected experiments from a number of high-profile papers in the field of cancer biology. The papers, which were published between 2010 and 2012, were selected on the basis of citations and Altmetric scores (Errington et al., 2014). This Registered Report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from "Systematic identification of genomic markers of drug sensitivity in cancer cells" by Garnett and colleagues, published in Nature in 2012 (Garnett et al., 2012). The experiments to be replicated are those reported in Figures 4C, 4E, 4F, and Supplemental Figures 16 and 20. Garnett and colleagues performed a high throughput screen assessing the effect of 130 drugs on 639 cancer-derived cell lines in order to identify novel interactions for possible therapeutic approaches. They then tested this approach by exploring in more detail a novel interaction they identified in which Ewing's sarcoma cell lines showed an increased sensitivity to PARP inhibitors (Figure 4C). Mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs) transformed with the signature EWS-FLI1 translocation, the hallmark of Ewing's sarcoma family tumors, exhibited increased sensitivity to the PARP inhibitor olaparib as compared to MPCs transformed with a different translocation (Figure 4E). Knockdown mediated by siRNA of EWS-FLI1 abrogated this sensitivity to olaparib (Figure 4F). The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology is a collaboration between the Center for Open Science and Science Exchange, and the results of the replications will be published by eLife. PMID:27336789

  9. Microfluidic conceived pH sensitive core-shell particles for dual drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ikram Ullah; Stolch, Lukas; Serra, Christophe A; Anton, Nicolas; Akasov, Roman; Vandamme, Thierry F

    2015-01-15

    In current study, we report on the synthesis of core-shell microparticles for dual drug delivery by means of a two co-axial microfluidic device and online UV assisted free radical polymerization. Before developing pH-sensitive particles, ketoprofen loaded poly(methyl acrylate) core-ranitidine HCl loaded poly(acrylamide) shell particles were produced. Influence of inner and outer phases flow rates on particle size, shape, core diameter, shell thickness, and drug release properties was studied. All the particles were monodispersed with coefficient of variation below 5%. Furthermore, their diameter ranged from 100 to 151 μm by increasing continuous (Qc) to middle (Qm) phase flow rate ratio (Qc/Qm). Core diameter varied from 58 to 115 μm by decreasing middle (Qm) to inner (Qi) phase flow rate ratio (Qm/Qi) at constant continuous phase flow rate as confirmed by SEM images. It was observed that an optimum concentration of acrylamide (30 wt%) and an appropriate combination of surfactants were necessary to get core-shell particles otherwise Janus structure was obtained. FTIR confirmed the complete polymerization of core and shell phases. MTT assay showed variation in viability of cells under non-contact and contact conditions with less cytotoxicity for the former. Under non-contact conditions LD50 was 3.1mg/mL. Release studies in USP phosphate buffer solution showed simultaneously release of ketoprofen and ranitidine HCl for non pH-sensitive particles. However, release rates of ranitidine HCl and ketoprofen were higher at low and high pH respectively. To develop pH-sensitive particles for colon targeting, the previous shell phase was admixed with few weight percentage of pH sensitive carboxyethyl acrylate monomer. Core and shell contained the same hydrophobic and hydrophilic model drugs as in previous case. The pH-sensitive shell prevented the release of the two entrapped molecules at low pH while increasing significantly their release rate at higher pH with a maximum

  10. Merging traditional Chinese medicine with modern drug discovery technologies to find novel drugs and functional foods.

    PubMed

    Graziose, Rocky; Lila, Mary Ann; Raskin, Ilya

    2010-03-01

    Traditional Chinese Medicines (TCM) are rapidly gaining attention in the West as sources of new drugs, dietary supplements and functional foods. However, lack of consistent manufacturing practices and quality standards, fear of adulteration, and perceived deficiencies in scientific validation of efficacy and safety impede worldwide acceptance of TCM. In addition, Western pharmaceutical industries and regulatory agencies are partial toward single ingredient drugs based on synthetic molecules, and skeptical of natural product mixtures. This review concentrates on three examples of TCM-derived pharmaceuticals and functional foods that have, despite these usual obstacles, risen to wide acceptance in the West based on their remarkable performance in recent scientific investigations. They are: Sweet wormwood (Artemisia annua), the source of artemisinin, which is the currently preferred single compound anti-malarial drug widely used in combination therapies and recently approved by US FDA; Thunder god vine (Tripterygium wilfordii) which is being developed as a botanical drug for rheumatoid arthritis; and green tea (Camellia sinensis) which is used as a functional beverage and a component of dietary supplements. PMID:20156139

  11. PPO/PEO modified hollow fiber membranes improved sensitivity of 3D cultured hepatocytes to drug toxicity via suppressing drug adsorption on membranes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chong; Meng, Qin; He, Wenjuan; Wang, Qichen; Zhang, Guoliang

    2014-11-01

    The three dimensional (3D) cell culture in polymer-based micro system has become a useful tool for in vitro drug discovery. Among those polymers, polysulfone hollow fiber membrane (PSf HFM) is commonly used to create a microenvironment for cells. However, the target drug may adsorb on the polymeric surface, and this elicits negative impacts on cell exposure due to the reduced effective drug concentration in culture medium. In order to reduce the drug adsorption, PSf membrane were modified with hydrophilic Pluronic (PEO-b-PPO-b-PEO) copolymers, L121, P123 and F127 (PEO contents increase from 10%, 30% to 70%), by physical adsorption. As a result, the hydrophilicity of HFMs increased at an order of PSfF127>P123>L121 HFMs. The three modified membrane all showed significant resistance to adsorption of acid/neutral drugs. More importantly, the adsorption of base drugs were largely reduced to an average value of 11% on the L121 HFM. The improved resistance to drug adsorption could be attributed to the synergy of hydrophobic/neutrally charged PPO and hydrophilic PEO. The L121 HFM was further assessed by evaluating the drug hepatotoxicity in 3D culture of hepatocytes. The base drugs, clozapine and doxorubicin, showed more sensitive hepatotoxicity on hepatocytes in L121 HFM than in PSf HFM, while the acid drug, salicylic acid, showed the similar hepatotoxicity to hepatocytes in both HFMs. Our finding suggests that PSf HFM modified by PEO-b-PPO-b-PEO copolymers can efficiently resist the drug adsorption onto polymer membrane, and consequently improve the accuracy and sensitivity of in vitro hepatotoxic drug screening. PMID:25454662

  12. Papiine herpesvirus 2 as a Predictive Model for Drug Sensitivity of Macacine herpesvirus 1 (Monkey B Virus)

    PubMed Central

    Brush, Lauren A; Black, Darla H; McCormack, Kimberly A; Maxwell, Lara K; Wright, George; Ritchey, Jerry W; Payton, Mark E; Eberle, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Monkey B virus (Macacine herpesvirus 1; BV) is endemic in macaques. BV (a BSL4 agent) is the primary zoonotic concern for persons working with macaques in research, and human BV infections frequently are fatal. We assessed the use of a BSL2 baboon herpesvirus (Papiine herpesvirus 1; HVP2) for predicting the drug sensitivity of BV by comparing the sensitivity of the 2 viruses to 12 antiherpetic drugs. Plaque reduction assays showed that 4 drugs (HBPG, BVdU, PFA, and BrdU) were ineffective against both viruses. Of the 8 effective drugs, both viruses were most sensitive to TFT, whereas sensitivity to the remaining 7 drugs varied between BV and HVP2 as well as between strains of HVP2. In addition, the efficacy of 5 drugs (ACV, PCV, GCV, CDV, and EDU) was tested by using a murine model. ACV and EDU were completely ineffective against both HVP2 and BV, and high doses of PCV only delayed death by a few days. GCV and CDV both protected mice against death, and CDV also prevented the development of neurologic symptoms. When the initiation of drug therapy was delayed until after virus gained access to the CNS, both GCV and CDV were ineffective. The similarity of the drug sensitivities of HVP2 and BV in both models validates the use of HVP2 as a BSL2 level model that can be used to predict drug sensitivity of BV. The greater efficacy of CDV relative to GCV suggests the potential for use of CDV in the treatment of zoonotic BV infections. PMID:25402179

  13. Re-sensitizing drug-resistant bacteria to antibiotics by designing Antisense Therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtney, Colleen; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2014-03-01

    ``Super-bugs'' or ``multi-drug resistant organisms'' are a serious international health problem, with devastating consequences to patient health care. The Center for Disease Control has identified antibiotic resistance as one of the world's most pressing public health problems as a significant fraction of bacterial infections contracted are drug resistant. Typically, antibiotic resistance is encoded by ``resistance-genes'' which express proteins that carryout the resistance causing functions inside the bacterium. We present a RNA based therapeutic strategy for designing antimicrobials capable of re-sensitizing resistant bacteria to antibiotics by targeting labile regions of messenger RNAs encoding for resistance-causing proteins. We perform in silico RNA secondary structure modeling to identify labile target regions in an mRNA of interest. A synthetic biology approach is then used to administer antisense nucleic acids to our model system of ampicillin resistant Escherichia coli. Our results show a prolonged lag phase and decrease in viability of drug-resistant E. colitreated with antisense molecules. The antisense strategy can be applied to alter expression of other genes in antibiotic resistance pathways or other pathways of interest.

  14. Morphology and Drug Release of Ph-Sensitive Microspheres Containing Flavonoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paola, Scarfato; Elvira, Avallone; Pio, Lannelli; Rita, Aquino; Domenico, Acierno

    2008-08-01

    In this work we developed pH-sensitive microspherical dosage forms for poorly water soluble flavonoids (quercetin and naringenin) by using Eudragit L100 as enteric polymer. The systems were produced by water in oil (w/o) solvent evaporation method, optimizing the formulation and preparation conditions in order to obtain high encapsulation efficiency and production yield. The synthesized microspheres were characterized in terms of particle size distribution, drug loading, morphology and in vitro release properties. The performed analyses evidenced that the microspheres were free- flowing and spherical in shape, both quercetin and naringenin were microencapsulated in the amorphous state and the drug content was near to the theoretical one. Preliminary in vitro dissolution studies, carried out using a pH-change method, showed that the samples exhibit a typical biphasic drug release trend, due to the pH dependent solubility of the enteric polymers used. In particular, the samples have a fairly gastroresistance followed by an about complete release in simulated intestinal fluid.

  15. Xylan-based temperature/pH sensitive hydrogels for drug controlled release.

    PubMed

    Gao, Cundian; Ren, Junli; Zhao, Cui; Kong, Weiqing; Dai, Qingqing; Chen, Qifeng; Liu, Chuanfu; Sun, Runcang

    2016-10-20

    Xylan-based temperature/pH sensitive hydrogels were prepared by the crosslinking copolymerization of xylan with N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAm) and acrylic acid (AA) using N,Ń-methylenebis-acrylamide (MBA) as a cross-linker and 2,2-dimethoxy-2-phenylacetophenone as a photoinitiator via ultraviolet irradiation. The influence of the NIPAm, AA and MBA amount on properties of xylan-based hydrogels was discussed. The morphology and interactions of hydrogels were characterized by SEM and FTIR. The lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of hydrogels was investigated by DSC. The results indicated that the LCST of hydrogels emerged at around 34°C and increased with increasing the AA content. The drug encapsulation efficiency of as-prepared hydrogels reached to 97.60% and the cumulative release rate of acetylsalicylic acid was 90.12% and 26.35% in the intestinal and gastric fluid, respectively. Xylan-based hydrogels were proved to be biocompatible with NIH3T3 cell by MTT assay and showed the promising application as drug carriers for the intestinal-targeted oral drug delivery. PMID:27474557

  16. Nutrient-sensitized screening for drugs that shift energy metabolism from mitochondrial respiration to glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Gohil, Vishal M; Sheth, Sunil A; Nilsson, Roland; Wojtovich, Andrew P; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Perocchi, Fabiana; Chen, William; Clish, Clary B; Ayata, Cenk; Brookes, Paul S; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2010-03-01

    Most cells have the inherent capacity to shift their reliance on glycolysis relative to oxidative metabolism, and studies in model systems have shown that targeting such shifts may be useful in treating or preventing a variety of diseases ranging from cancer to ischemic injury. However, we currently have a limited number of mechanistically distinct classes of drugs that alter the relative activities of these two pathways. We screen for such compounds by scoring the ability of >3,500 small molecules to selectively impair growth and viability of human fibroblasts in media containing either galactose or glucose as the sole sugar source. We identify several clinically used drugs never linked to energy metabolism, including the antiemetic meclizine, which attenuates mitochondrial respiration through a mechanism distinct from that of canonical inhibitors. We further show that meclizine pretreatment confers cardioprotection and neuroprotection against ischemia-reperfusion injury in murine models. Nutrient-sensitized screening may provide a useful framework for understanding gene function and drug action within the context of energy metabolism. PMID:20160716

  17. Focused ultrasound mediated drug delivery from temperature-sensitive liposomes: in-vitro characterization and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escoffre, J.-M.; Novell, A.; de Smet, M.; Bouakaz, A.

    2013-11-01

    Nanomedicine-based delivery with non-invasive techniques is a promising approach to increase local drug concentration and to reduce systemic side effects. Focused ultrasound (FUS) has become a promising strategy for non-invasive local drug delivery by mild hyperthermia. In this study, traditional temperature-sensitive liposomes (TTSLs) encapsulating doxorubicin (DOX) were evaluated for FUS-mediated drug delivery with an in-vitro FUS setup. In-vitro studies showed quantitative release of the DOX from the lumen of the temperature-sensitive liposomes when heated to 42 °C with FUS using 1 MHz sinusoidal waves at 1.75 MPa for 10 min. No release was observed when heated at 37 °C. Moreover, we showed that DOX released from TTSLs by FUS is as efficiently internalized by glioblastoma cells as free DOX at 37 °C. In-vitro therapeutic evaluation showed that exposure of a cell monolayer to FUS-activated TTSLs induced a 60% and a 50% decrease in cell viability compared to cell medium and to TTSLs preheated at 37 °C, respectively. Using an in-vitro 3D cell culture model, the results showed that after FUS-mediated hyperthermia, preheated liposomes induced a 1.7-fold decrease in U-87 MG spheroid growth in comparison to the preheated liposomes at 37 °C. In conclusion, our results show that in-vitro FUS allows the evaluation of TTSLs and does not modify the cellular uptake of the released DOX nor its cytotoxic activity.

  18. Dopamine cross-sensitization between psychostimulant drugs and stress in healthy male volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Booij, L; Welfeld, K; Leyton, M; Dagher, A; Boileau, I; Sibon, I; Baker, G B; Diksic, M; Soucy, J-P; Pruessner, J C; Cawley-Fiset, E; Casey, K F; Benkelfat, C

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of the stress response system is a potential etiological factor in the development of and relapse to multiple neuropsychiatric disorders. Previously we reported that repeated intermittent d-amphetamine administration can lead to progressively greater dopamine release, thereby providing evidence of drug-induced neurochemical sensitization. Here, we test the hypothesis that repeated exposure to d-amphetamine increases dopaminergic responses to stress; that is, produces cross-sensitization. Using positron emission tomography, we measured in 17 healthy male volunteers (mean±s.d.=22.1±3.4 years) [11C]raclopride binding responses to a validated psychosocial stress task before and 2 weeks after a regimen of repeated d-amphetamine (3 × 0.3 mg kg−1, by mouth; n=8) or placebo (3 × lactose, by mouth; n=9). Mood and physiological measurements were recorded throughout each session. Before the d-amphetamine regimen, exposure to the stress task increased behavioral and physiological indices of stress (anxiety, heart rate, cortisol, all P⩽0.05). Following the d-amphetamine regimen, the stress-induced cortisol responses were augmented (P<0.04), and voxel-based analyses showed larger stress-induced decreases in [11C]raclopride non-displaceable binding potential across the striatum. In the placebo group, re-exposure to stress led to smaller clusters of decreased [11C]raclopride binding, primarily in the sensorimotor striatum (P<0.05). Together, this study provides evidence for drug × stress cross-sensitization; moreover, random exposure to stimulants and/or stress cumulatively, while enhancing dopamine release in striatal areas, may contribute to a lowered set point for psychopathologies in which altered dopamine neurotransmission is invoked. PMID:26905412

  19. Capsaicin Enhances the Drug Sensitivity of Cholangiocarcinoma through the Inhibition of Chemotherapeutic-Induced Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Zai-Fa; Zhao, Wen-Xiu; Yin, Zhen-Yu; Xie, Cheng-Rong; Xu, Ya-Ping; Chi, Xiao-Qin; Zhang, Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Min

    2015-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), a devastating cancer with a poor prognosis, is resistant to the currently available chemotherapeutic agents. Capsaicin, the major pungent ingredient found in hot red chili peppers of the genus Capsicum, suppresses the growth of several malignant cell lines. Our aims were to investigate the role and mechanism of capsaicin with respect to the sensitivity of CCA cells to chemotherapeutic agents. The effect of capsaicin on CCA tumor sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was assessed in vitro in CCA cells and in vivo in a xenograft model. The drug sensitivity of QBC939 to 5-FU was significantly enhanced by capsaicin compared with either agent alone. In addition, the combination of capsaicin with 5-FU was synergistic, with a combination index (CI) < 1, and the combined treatment also suppressed tumor growth in the CCA xenograft to a greater extent than 5-FU alone. Further investigation revealed that the autophagy induced by 5-FU was inhibited by capsaicin. Moreover, the decrease in AKT and S6 phosphorylation induced by 5-FU was effectively reversed by capsaicin, indicating that capsaicin inhibits 5-FU-induced autophagy by activating the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in CCA cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that capsaicin may be a useful adjunct therapy to improve chemosensitivity in CCA. This effect likely occurs via PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway activation, suggesting a promising strategy for the development of combination drugs for CCA. PMID:25933112

  20. Dopamine cross-sensitization between psychostimulant drugs and stress in healthy male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Booij, L; Welfeld, K; Leyton, M; Dagher, A; Boileau, I; Sibon, I; Baker, G B; Diksic, M; Soucy, J-P; Pruessner, J C; Cawley-Fiset, E; Casey, K F; Benkelfat, C

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of the stress response system is a potential etiological factor in the development of and relapse to multiple neuropsychiatric disorders. Previously we reported that repeated intermittent d-amphetamine administration can lead to progressively greater dopamine release, thereby providing evidence of drug-induced neurochemical sensitization. Here, we test the hypothesis that repeated exposure to d-amphetamine increases dopaminergic responses to stress; that is, produces cross-sensitization. Using positron emission tomography, we measured in 17 healthy male volunteers (mean ± s.d. = 22.1 ± 3.4 years) [(11)C]raclopride binding responses to a validated psychosocial stress task before and 2 weeks after a regimen of repeated d-amphetamine (3 × 0.3 mg kg(-1), by mouth; n = 8) or placebo (3 × lactose, by mouth; n = 9). Mood and physiological measurements were recorded throughout each session. Before the d-amphetamine regimen, exposure to the stress task increased behavioral and physiological indices of stress (anxiety, heart rate, cortisol, all P ⩽ 0.05). Following the d-amphetamine regimen, the stress-induced cortisol responses were augmented (P < 0.04), and voxel-based analyses showed larger stress-induced decreases in [(11)C]raclopride non-displaceable binding potential across the striatum. In the placebo group, re-exposure to stress led to smaller clusters of decreased [(11)C]raclopride binding, primarily in the sensorimotor striatum (P < 0.05). Together, this study provides evidence for drug × stress cross-sensitization; moreover, random exposure to stimulants and/or stress cumulatively, while enhancing dopamine release in striatal areas, may contribute to a lowered set point for psychopathologies in which altered dopamine neurotransmission is invoked. PMID:26905412

  1. Capsaicin Enhances the Drug Sensitivity of Cholangiocarcinoma through the Inhibition of Chemotherapeutic-Induced Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zai-Fa; Zhao, Wen-Xiu; Yin, Zhen-Yu; Xie, Cheng-Rong; Xu, Ya-Ping; Chi, Xiao-Qin; Zhang, Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Min

    2015-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), a devastating cancer with a poor prognosis, is resistant to the currently available chemotherapeutic agents. Capsaicin, the major pungent ingredient found in hot red chili peppers of the genus Capsicum, suppresses the growth of several malignant cell lines. Our aims were to investigate the role and mechanism of capsaicin with respect to the sensitivity of CCA cells to chemotherapeutic agents. The effect of capsaicin on CCA tumor sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was assessed in vitro in CCA cells and in vivo in a xenograft model. The drug sensitivity of QBC939 to 5-FU was significantly enhanced by capsaicin compared with either agent alone. In addition, the combination of capsaicin with 5-FU was synergistic, with a combination index (CI) < 1, and the combined treatment also suppressed tumor growth in the CCA xenograft to a greater extent than 5-FU alone. Further investigation revealed that the autophagy induced by 5-FU was inhibited by capsaicin. Moreover, the decrease in AKT and S6 phosphorylation induced by 5-FU was effectively reversed by capsaicin, indicating that capsaicin inhibits 5-FU-induced autophagy by activating the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in CCA cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that capsaicin may be a useful adjunct therapy to improve chemosensitivity in CCA. This effect likely occurs via PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway activation, suggesting a promising strategy for the development of combination drugs for CCA. PMID:25933112

  2. The Effect of MicroRNA-124 Overexpression on Anti-Tumor Drug Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shiau-Mei; Chou, Wen-Cheng; Hu, Ling-Yueh; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Chu, Hou-Wei; Huang, Yuan-Ling; Hsu, Huan-Ming; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Shen, Chen-Yang

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs play critical roles in regulating various physiological processes, including growth and development. Previous studies have shown that microRNA-124 (miR-124) participates not only in regulation of early neurogenesis but also in suppression of tumorigenesis. In the present study, we found that overexpression of miR-124 was associated with reduced DNA repair capacity in cultured cancer cells and increased sensitivity of cells to DNA-damaging anti-tumor drugs, specifically those that cause the formation of DNA strand-breaks (SBs). We then examined which DNA repair–related genes, particularly the genes of SB repair, were regulated by miR-124. Two SB repair–related genes, encoding ATM interactor (ATMIN) and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1), were strongly affected by miR-124 overexpression, by binding of miR-124 to the 3¢-untranslated region of their mRNAs. As a result, the capacity of cells to repair DNA SBs, such as those resulting from homologous recombination, was significantly reduced upon miR-124 overexpression. A particularly important therapeutic implication of this finding is that overexpression of miR-124 enhanced cell sensitivity to multiple DNA-damaging agents via ATMIN- and PARP1-mediated mechanisms. The translational relevance of this role of miR-124 in anti-tumor drug sensitivity is suggested by the finding that increased miR-124 expression correlates with better breast cancer prognosis, specifically in patients receiving chemotherapy. These findings suggest that miR-124 could potentially be used as a therapeutic agent to improve the efficacy of chemotherapy with DNA-damaging agents. PMID:26115122

  3. A sensitive multidimensional method for the detection, characterization, and quantification of trace free drug species in antibody-drug conjugate samples using mass spectral detection.

    PubMed

    Birdsall, Robert E; McCarthy, Sean M; Janin-Bussat, Marie Claire; Perez, Michel; Haeuw, Jean-François; Chen, Weibin; Beck, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Conjugation processes and stability studies associated with the production and shelf life of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) can result in free (non-conjugated) drug species. These free drug species can increase the risk to patients and reduce the efficacy of the ADC. Despite stringent purification steps, trace levels of free drug species may be present in formulated ADCs, reducing the therapeutic window. The reduction of sample preparation steps through the incorporation of multidimensional techniques has afforded analysts more efficient methods to assess trace drug species. Multidimensional methods coupling size-exclusion and reversed phase liquid chromatography with ultra-violet detection (SEC-RPLC/UV) have been reported, but offer limited sensitivity and can limit method optimization. The current study addresses these challenges with a multidimensional method that is specific, sensitive, and enables method control in both dimensions via coupling of an on-line solid phase extraction column to RPLC with mass spectral detection (SPE-RPLC/MS). The proposed method was evaluated using an antibody-fluorophore conjugate (AFC) as an ADC surrogate to brentuximab vedotin and its associated parent maleimide-val-cit-DSEA payload and the derived N-acetylcysteine adduct formed during the conjugation process. Assay sensitivity was found to be 2 orders more sensitive using MS detection in comparison to UV-based detection with a nominal limit of quantitation of 0.30 ng/mL (1.5 pg on-column). Free-drug species were present in an unadulterated ADC surrogate sample at concentrations below 7 ng/mL, levels not detectable by UV alone. The proposed SPE-RPLC/MS method provides a high degree of specificity and sensitivity in the assessment of trace free drug species and offers improved control over each dimension, enabling straightforward integration into existing or novel workflows. PMID:26651262

  4. A sensitive multidimensional method for the detection, characterization, and quantification of trace free drug species in antibody-drug conjugate samples using mass spectral detection

    PubMed Central

    Birdsall, Robert E.; McCarthy, Sean M.; Janin-Bussat, Marie Claire; Perez, Michel; Haeuw, Jean-François; Chen, Weibin; Beck, Alain

    2016-01-01

    abstract Conjugation processes and stability studies associated with the production and shelf life of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) can result in free (non-conjugated) drug species. These free drug species can increase the risk to patients and reduce the efficacy of the ADC. Despite stringent purification steps, trace levels of free drug species may be present in formulated ADCs, reducing the therapeutic window. The reduction of sample preparation steps through the incorporation of multidimensional techniques has afforded analysts more efficient methods to assess trace drug species. Multidimensional methods coupling size-exclusion and reversed phase liquid chromatography with ultra-violet detection (SEC-RPLC/UV) have been reported, but offer limited sensitivity and can limit method optimization. The current study addresses these challenges with a multidimensional method that is specific, sensitive, and enables method control in both dimensions via coupling of an on-line solid phase extraction column to RPLC with mass spectral detection (SPE-RPLC/MS). The proposed method was evaluated using an antibody-fluorophore conjugate (AFC) as an ADC surrogate to brentuximab vedotin and its associated parent maleimide-val-cit-DSEA payload and the derived N-acetylcysteine adduct formed during the conjugation process. Assay sensitivity was found to be 2 orders more sensitive using MS detection in comparison to UV-based detection with a nominal limit of quantitation of 0.30 ng/mL (1.5 pg on-column). Free-drug species were present in an unadulterated ADC surrogate sample at concentrations below 7 ng/mL, levels not detectable by UV alone. The proposed SPE-RPLC/MS method provides a high degree of specificity and sensitivity in the assessment of trace free drug species and offers improved control over each dimension, enabling straightforward integration into existing or novel workflows. PMID:26651262

  5. A highly sensitive magnetic biosensor for detection and quantification of anticancer drugs tagged to superparamagnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devkota, J.; Wingo, J.; Mai, T. T. T.; Nguyen, X. P.; Huong, N. T.; Mukherjee, P.; Srikanth, H.; Phan, M. H.

    2014-05-01

    We report on a highly sensitive magnetic biosensor based on the magneto-reactance (MX) effect of a Co65Fe4Ni2Si15B14 amorphous ribbon with a nanohole-patterned surface for detection and quantification of anticancer drugs (Curcumin) tagged to superparamagnetic (Fe3O4) nanoparticles. Fe3O4 nanoparticles (mean size, ˜10 nm) were first coated with Alginate, and Curcumin was then tagged to the nanoparticles. The detection and quantification of Curcumin were assessed by the change in MX of the ribbon subject to varying concentrations of the Fe3O4 nanoparticles to which Curcumin was tagged. A high capacity of the MX-based biosensor in quantitative analysis of Curcumin-loaded Fe3O4 nanoparticles was achieved in the range of 0-50 ng/ml, beyond which the detection sensitivity of the sensor remained unchanged. The detection sensitivity of the biosensor reached an extremely high value of 30%, which is about 4-5 times higher than that of a magneto-impedance (MI) based biosensor. This biosensor is well suited for detection of low-concentration magnetic biomarkers in biological systems.

  6. A highly sensitive magnetic biosensor for detection and quantification of anticancer drugs tagged to superparamagnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wingo, J.; Devkota, J.; Mai, T. T. T.; Nguyen, X. P.; Mukherjee, P.; Srikanth, H.; Phan, M. H.; Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology Collaboration; University of South Florida Team

    2014-03-01

    A precise detection of low concentrations of biomolecules attached to magnetic nanoparticles in complex biological systems is a challenging task and requires biosensors with improved sensitivity. Here, we present a highly sensitive magnetic biosensor based on the magneto-reactance (MX) effect of a Co65Fe4Ni2Si15B14 amorphous ribbon with nanohole-patterned surface for detection and quantification of anticancer drugs (Curcumin) tagged to Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The detection and quantification of Curcumin were assessed by the change in MX of the ribbon subject to varying concentrations of the functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles. A high capacity of the MX-based biosensor in quantitative analysis of the nanoparticles was achieved in the range of 0 - 50 ng/ml, beyond which the detection sensitivity (η) remained unchanged. The η of the biosensor reached an extremely high value of 30%, which is about 4-5 times higher than that of a magneto-impedance (MI) based biosensor. This biosensor is well suited for detection of low-concentration magnetic biomarkers in biological systems. This work was supported by was supported by the Florida Cluster for Advanced Smart Sensor Technologies, USAMRMC (Grant # W81XWH-07-1-0708), and the NSF-funded REU program at the USF.

  7. Genetic diversity and signatures of selection of drug resistance in Plasmodium populations from both human and mosquito hosts in continental Equatorial Guinea

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Plasmodium, the high level of genetic diversity and the interactions established by co-infecting parasite populations within the same host may be a source of selection on pathogen virulence and drug resistance. As different patterns have already been described in humans and mosquitoes, parasite diversity and population structure should be studied in both hosts to properly assess their effects on infection and transmission dynamics. This study aimed to characterize the circulating populations of Plasmodium spp and Plasmodium falciparum from a combined set of human blood and mosquito samples gathered in mainland Equatorial Guinea. Further, the origin and evolution of anti-malarial resistance in this area, where malaria remains a major public health problem were traced. Methods Plasmodium species infecting humans and mosquitoes were identified by nested-PCR of chelex-extracted DNA from dried blood spot samples and mosquitoes. Analysis of Pfmsp2 gene, anti-malarial-resistance associated genes, Pfdhps, Pfdhfr, Pfcrt and Pfmdr1, neutral microsatellites (STR) loci and Pfdhfr and Pfdhps flanking STR was undertaken to evaluate P. falciparum diversity. Results Prevalence of infection remains high in mainland Equatorial Guinea. No differences in parasite formula or significant genetic differentiation were seen in the parasite populations in both human and mosquito samples. Point mutations in all genes associated with anti-malarial resistance were highly prevalent. A high prevalence was observed for the Pfdhfr triple mutant in particular, associated with pyrimethamine resistance. Analysis of Pfdhps and Pfdhfr flanking STR revealed a decrease in the genetic diversity. This finding along with multiple independent introductions of Pfdhps mutant haplotypes suggest a soft selective sweep and an increased differentiation at Pfdhfr flanking microsatellites hints a model of positive directional selection for this gene. Conclusions Chloroquine is no longer recommended for

  8. Molecular basis and drug sensitivity of the delayed rectifier (IKr) in the fish heart.

    PubMed

    Hassinen, Minna; Haverinen, Jaakko; Vornanen, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Fishes are increasingly used as models for human cardiac diseases, creating a need for a better understanding of the molecular basis of fish cardiac ion currents. To this end we cloned KCNH6 channel of the crucian carp (Carassius carassius) that produces the rapid component of the delayed rectifier K(+) current (IKr), the main repolarising current of the fish heart. KCNH6 (ccErg2) was the main isoform of the Kv11 potassium channel family with relative transcript levels of 98.9% and 99.6% in crucian carp atrium and ventricle, respectively. KCNH2 (ccErg1), an orthologue to human cardiac Erg (Herg) channel, was only slightly expressed in the crucian carp heart. The native atrial IKr and the cloned ccErg2 were inhibited by similar concentrations of verapamil, terfenadine and KB-R7943 (P>0.05), while the atrial IKr was about an order of magnitude more sensitive to E-4031 than ccErg2 (P<0.05) suggesting that some accessory β-subunits may be involved. Sensitivity of the crucian carp atrial IKr to E-4031, terfenadine and KB-R7943 was similar to what has been reported for the Herg channel. In contrast, the sensitivity of the crucian carp IKr to verapamil was approximately 30 times higher than the previously reported values for the Herg current. In conclusion, the cardiac IKr is produced by non-orthologous gene products in fish (Erg2) and mammalian hearts (Erg1) and some marked differences exist in drug sensitivity between fish and mammalian Erg1/2 which need to be taken into account when using fish heart as a model for human heart. PMID:26215639

  9. Recurrent AKT mutations in human cancers: functional consequences and effects on drug sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Kyung H.; Lauring, Josh

    2016-01-01

    Precision oncology trials based on tumor gene sequencing depend on robust knowledge about the phenotypic consequences of the genetic variants identified in patients' tumors. Mutations in AKT1-3 occur in 3-5% of human cancers. Although a single hotspot mutation, E17K, is the most common, well characterized activating mutations account for a minority of Akt variants that have been identified in large tumor sequencing studies to date. In order to determine the potential clinical relevance of both common and rare Akt mutations, we expressed a set of over twenty recurrent Akt mutants in three different cell lines and evaluated activation of Akt pathway signaling and effects on growth. We determined their relative sensitivity to allosteric and ATP-competitive Akt inhibitors in clinical development. Most Akt mutants did not activate pathway signaling compared to wild type Akt and did not affect growth properties. In addition, the most common activating Akt mutations, including Akt1 E17K, L52R, and Q79K conferred neither sensitivity nor resistance to Akt inhibitors. Equivocal evidence was found that Akt1 D323H and Akt2 W80C mutants are relatively resistant to the allosteric Akt inhibitor MK-2206, but not an ATP-competitive inhibitor. Our results suggest that the vast majority of rare Akt variants are passenger mutations with no effect on drug sensitivity. The hypothesis that activating Akt mutations predict for Akt inhibitor sensitivity remains to be tested clinically, but is not yet supported by our preclinical data. PMID:26701849

  10. Sense and Sensitivity: Physical Limits to Multicellular Sensing, Migration, and Drug Response.

    PubMed

    Varennes, Julien; Mugler, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    Metastasis is a process of cell migration that can be collective and guided by chemical cues. Viewing metastasis in this way, as a physical phenomenon, allows one to draw upon insights from other studies of collective sensing and migration in cell biology. Here we review recent progress in the study of cell sensing and migration as collective phenomena, including in the context of metastatic cells. We describe simple physical models that yield the limits to the precision of cell sensing, and we review experimental evidence that cells operate near these limits. Models of collective migration are surveyed in order to understand how collective metastatic invasion can occur. We conclude by contrasting cells' sensory abilities with their sensitivity to drugs and suggesting potential alternatives to cell-death-based cancer therapies. PMID:26835969

  11. Design of Probabilistic Random Forests with Applications to Anticancer Drug Sensitivity Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Raziur; Haider, Saad; Ghosh, Souparno; Pal, Ranadip

    2015-01-01

    Random forests consisting of an ensemble of regression trees with equal weights are frequently used for design of predictive models. In this article, we consider an extension of the methodology by representing the regression trees in the form of probabilistic trees and analyzing the nature of heteroscedasticity. The probabilistic tree representation allows for analytical computation of confidence intervals (CIs), and the tree weight optimization is expected to provide stricter CIs with comparable performance in mean error. We approached the ensemble of probabilistic trees’ prediction from the perspectives of a mixture distribution and as a weighted sum of correlated random variables. We applied our methodology to the drug sensitivity prediction problem on synthetic and cancer cell line encyclopedia dataset and illustrated that tree weights can be selected to reduce the average length of the CI without increase in mean error. PMID:27081304

  12. SynLethDB: synthetic lethality database toward discovery of selective and sensitive anticancer drug targets.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Liu, Hui; Zheng, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic lethality (SL) is a type of genetic interaction between two genes such that simultaneous perturbations of the two genes result in cell death or a dramatic decrease of cell viability, while a perturbation of either gene alone is not lethal. SL reflects the biologically endogenous difference between cancer cells and normal cells, and thus the inhibition of SL partners of genes with cancer-specific mutations could selectively kill cancer cells but spare normal cells. Therefore, SL is emerging as a promising anticancer strategy that could potentially overcome the drawbacks of traditional chemotherapies by reducing severe side effects. Researchers have developed experimental technologies and computational prediction methods to identify SL gene pairs on human and a few model species. However, there has not been a comprehensive database dedicated to collecting SL pairs and related knowledge. In this paper, we propose a comprehensive database, SynLethDB (http://histone.sce.ntu.edu.sg/SynLethDB/), which contains SL pairs collected from biochemical assays, other related databases, computational predictions and text mining results on human and four model species, i.e. mouse, fruit fly, worm and yeast. For each SL pair, a confidence score was calculated by integrating individual scores derived from different evidence sources. We also developed a statistical analysis module to estimate the druggability and sensitivity of cancer cells upon drug treatments targeting human SL partners, based on large-scale genomic data, gene expression profiles and drug sensitivity profiles on more than 1000 cancer cell lines. To help users access and mine the wealth of the data, we developed other practical functionalities, such as search and filtering, orthology search, gene set enrichment analysis. Furthermore, a user-friendly web interface has been implemented to facilitate data analysis and interpretation. With the integrated data sets and analytics functionalities, SynLethDB would

  13. Flow perfusion effects on three-dimensional culture and drug sensitivity of Ewing sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Marco; Lamhamedi-Cherradi, Salah-Eddine; Menegaz, Brian A.; Ludwig, Joseph A.; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional tumor models accurately describe different aspects of the tumor microenvironment and are readily available for mechanistic studies of tumor biology and for drug screening. Nevertheless, these systems often overlook biomechanical stimulation, another fundamental driver of tumor progression. To address this issue, we cultured Ewing sarcoma (ES) cells on electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone) 3D scaffolds within a flow perfusion bioreactor. Flow-derived shear stress provided a physiologically relevant mechanical stimulation that significantly promoted insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1) production and elicited a superadditive release in the presence of exogenous IGF1. This finding is particularly relevant, given the central role of the IGF1/IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) pathway in ES tumorigenesis and as a promising clinical target. Additionally, flow perfusion enhanced in a rate-dependent manner the sensitivity of ES cells to IGF-1R inhibitor dalotuzumab (MK-0646) and showed shear stress-dependent resistance to the IGF-1R blockade. This study demonstrates shear stress-dependent ES cell sensitivity to dalotuzumab, highlighting the importance of biomechanical stimulation on ES-acquired drug resistance to IGF-1R inhibition. Furthermore, flow perfusion increased nutrient supply throughout the scaffold, enriching ES culture over static conditions. Our use of a tissue-engineered model, rather than human tumors or xenografts, enabled precise control of the forces experienced by ES cells, and therefore provided at least one explanation for the remarkable antineoplastic effects observed by some ES tumor patients from IGF-1R targeted therapies, in contrast to the lackluster effect observed in cells grown in conventional monolayer culture. PMID:26240353

  14. Highly Sensitive and Validated Spectrophotometric Technique for the Assay of Some Antidepressant Drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deepakumari, H. N.; Prashanth, M. K.; Kumar, B. C. Vasantha; Revanasiddappa, H. D.

    2015-01-01

    The present paper describes a simple, rapid, reproducible, and highly sensitive spectrophotometric method for the determination of the tricyclic antidepressant drugs: amitriptyline hydrochloride (AMT), imipramine hydrochloride (IMH), clomipramine hydrochloride (CPH) and desipramine hydrochloride (DPH) in pure and in pharmaceutical preparations. The method is based on the bromination of the above drugs with known excess of bromine. The unreacted bromine is determined based on its ability to bleach the dye methyl red quantitatively at 520 nm. Regression analysis of Beer-Lambert plots showed a good correlation in the concentration range 0.0-2.5, 0-1.4, 0-1.4, and 0-1.0 μg/ml for AMT, IMH, CPH, and DPH, respectively. The molar absorptivity values were found to be 0.65 × 105, 1.41 × 105, 1.93 × 105, and 2.96 × 105l/mol/cm, with the corresponding Sandell's sensitivity values were 0.0048, 0.0022, 0.0018, and 0.0010 μg/cm2 for AMT, IMH, CPH, and DPH, respectively. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) are also reported for the developed method. Intra- and inter-day accuracy and precision was established according to the current ICH guidelines. Application of the procedure to the analysis of various pharmaceutical preparations gave reproducible and accurate results. Further, the validity of the proposed method was confirmed by applying the standard addition technique, and the results obtained are in good agreement with those obtained by the official method.

  15. Construction of a novel pH-sensitive drug release system from mesoporous silica tablets coated with Eudragit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yingpu; Qu, Fengyu; Wang, Yu; Lin, Huiming; Wu, Xiang; Jin, Yingxue

    2011-03-01

    A novel pH-sensitive drug release system has been established by coating Eudragit (Eud) on drug-loaded mesoporous silica (MS) tablets. The release rate of ibuprofen (IBU) from the MS was retarded by coating with Eudragit S-100, and the higher retardation was due to the increase of coating concentration and the coating layers. The target position of the release depended on the pH of the release medium, which was confirmed by the drug release from IBU/MS/Eud increasing rapidly with the change of medium pH from 1.2 to 7.4. This drug delivery system could prohibit irritant drug from leaking in the stomach and make it only release in the intestine. The loaded and unloaded drug samples were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), N 2 adsorption/desorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  16. A simple and sensitive spectrofluorimetric method for analysis of some nitrofuran drugs in pharmaceutical preparations.

    PubMed

    Belal, Tarek Saied

    2008-09-01

    A simple, rapid, selective and sensitive spectrofluorimetric method was described for the analysis of three nitrofuran drugs, namely, nifuroxazide (NX), nitrofurantoin (NT) and nitrofurazone (NZ). The method involved the alkaline hydrolysis of the studied drugs by warming with 0.1 M sodium hydroxide solution then dilution with distilled water for NX or 2-propanol for NT and NZ. The formed fluorophores were measured at 465 nm (lambda (Ex) 265 nm), 458 nm (lambda (Ex) 245 nm) and 445 nm (lambda (Ex) 245 nm) for NX, NT and NZ, respectively. The reaction pathway was discussed and the structures of the fluorescent products were proposed. The different experimental parameters were studied and optimized. Regression analysis showed good correlation between fluorescence intensity and concentration over the ranges 0.08-1.00, 0.02-0.24 and 0.004-0.050 microg ml(-1) for NX, NT and NZ, respectively. The limits of detection of the method were 8.0, 1.9 and 0.3 ng ml(-1) for NX, NT and NZ, respectively. The proposed method was validated in terms of accuracy, precision and specificity, and it was successfully applied for the assay of the three nitrofurans in their different dosage forms. No interference was observed from common pharmaceutical adjuvants. The results were favorably compared with those obtained by reference spectrophotometric methods. PMID:18246413

  17. Simple and sensitive method for monitoring drug-induced cell injury in cultured cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shirhatti, V.; Krishna, G.

    1985-06-01

    A simple, sensitive method has been developed for evaluating cell injury noninvasively in monolayer cells in culture. The cell ATP pool was radiolabeled by incubating the cells with (/sup 14/C)adenine. The uptake and incorporation of (/sup 14/C)adenine was shown to proportional to the number of cells. As determined by HPLC, about 65-70% of the incorporated /sup 14/C label was in the ATP pool, 15-20% was in the ADP pool, and the rest was in the 5'-AMP pool. When prelabeled cells were exposed to toxic drugs (acetaminophen, calcium ionophore A-23187, or daunomycin) there was a marked decrease in cell ATP with a concomitant increase in leakage of labeled nucleotides, mainly 5'-AMP and 5'IMP. The authors have shown that leakage of /sup 14/C label into the medium from the prelabeled cells may be employed for quantitation of cell injury. This new measure of toxicity was shown to correlate very well with LDH leakage from the cells, which is a well accepted measure of cell injury. The leakage of 5'-(/sup 14/C)AMP also correlated very well with the reduction of cell ATP in cardiac myocytes. This method has been used for monitoring drug-induced toxicity in liver cells, cardiac myocytes, and LB cells.

  18. Hollow fiber based quantum cascade laser spectrometer for fast and sensitive drug identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, J.; Scherer, B.; Ruf, A.; Erb, J.; Lambrecht, A.

    2012-01-01

    Sensitive and fast identification of drugs or drug precursors is important and necessary in scenarios like baggage or container check by customs or police. Fraunhofer IPM is developing a laser spectrometer using external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCL) to obtain mid-infrared (IR) absorption spectra in the wavelength range of the specific vibrational bands of amphetamines and their precursors. The commercial EC-QCL covers a tuning range of about 225 cm-1 within 1.4 s. The system could be used for different sample types like bulk samples or liquid solutions. A sampling unit evaporates the sample. Because of small sample amounts a 3 m long hollow fiber with an inner volume smaller than 1ml is used as gas cell and wave guide for the laser beam. This setup is suitable as a detector of a gas chromatograph instead of a standard detector (TCD or FID). The advantage is the selective identification of drugs by their IR spectra in addition to the retention time in the gas chromatographic column. In comparison to Fourier Transform IR systems the EC-QCL setup shows a good mechanical robustness and has the advantage of a point light source. Because of the good fiber incoupling performance of the EC-QCL it is possible to use hollow fibers. So, a good absorption signal is achieved because of the long optical path in the small cell volume without significant dilution. In first laboratory experiments a detection limit in the microgram range for pseudo ephedrine is achieved.

  19. Prenatal drug exposures sensitize noradrenergic circuits to subsequent disruption by chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed

    Slotkin, Theodore A; Skavicus, Samantha; Seidler, Frederic J

    2015-12-01

    We examined whether nicotine or dexamethasone, common prenatal drug exposures, sensitize the developing brain to chlorpyrifos. We gave nicotine to pregnant rats throughout gestation at a dose (3mg/kg/day) producing plasma levels typical of smokers; offspring were then given chlorpyrifos on postnatal days 1-4, at a dose (1mg/kg) that produces minimally-detectable inhibition of brain cholinesterase activity. In a parallel study, we administered dexamethasone to pregnant rats on gestational days 17-19 at a standard therapeutic dose (0.2mg/kg) used in the management of preterm labor, followed by postnatal chlorpyrifos. We evaluated cerebellar noradrenergic projections, a known target for each agent, and contrasted the effects with those in the cerebral cortex. Either drug augmented the effect of chlorpyrifos, evidenced by deficits in cerebellar β-adrenergic receptors; the receptor effects were not due to increased systemic toxicity or cholinesterase inhibition, nor to altered chlorpyrifos pharmacokinetics. Further, the deficits were not secondary adaptations to presynaptic hyperinnervation/hyperactivity, as there were significant deficits in presynaptic norepinephrine levels that would serve to augment the functional consequence of receptor deficits. The pretreatments also altered development of cerebrocortical noradrenergic circuits, but with a different overall pattern, reflecting the dissimilar developmental stages of the regions at the time of exposure. However, in each case the net effects represented a change in the developmental trajectory of noradrenergic circuits, rather than simply a continuation of an initial injury. Our results point to the ability of prenatal drug exposure to create a subpopulation with heightened vulnerability to environmental neurotoxicants. PMID:26419632

  20. pH sensitive core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Lungu, Iulia Ioana; Rădulescu, Marius; Mogoşanu, George Dan; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, nanobiotechnology has evolved rapidly with an extensive impact on biomedical area. In order to improve bioavailability and minimize adverse effects, drug delivery systems based on magnetic nanocomposites are under development mainly for cancer imaging and antitumor therapy. In this regard, pH sensitive core-shell magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) with accurate controlled size and shape are synthesized by various modern methods, such as homogeneous precipitation, coprecipitation, microemulsion or polyol approaches, high temperature and hydrothermal reactions, sol-gel reactions, aerosol÷vapor processes and sonolysis. Due to their unique combined physico-chemical and biological properties (such as higher dispensability, chemical and thermal stability, biocompatibility), pH responsive core-shell magnetic NPs are widely investigated for controlled release of cytostatic drugs into the tumor site by means of pH change: magnetite@silicon dioxide (Fe3O4@SiO2), Fe3O4@titanium dioxide (TiO2), β-thiopropionate-polyethylene glycol (PEG)-modified Fe3O4@mSiO2, Fe3O4 NPs core coated with SiO2 with an imidazole group modified PEG-polypeptide (mPEG-poly-L-Asparagine), polyacrylic acid (PAA) and folic acid (FA) coating of the iron oxide NP core, methoxy polyethylene glycol-block-polymethacrylic acid-block-polyglycerol monomethacrylate (MPEG-b-PMAA-b-PGMA) attached by a PGMA block to a Fe3O4 core, PEG-modified polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer shell with Fe3O4 core and mesoporous silica coated on Fe3O4, mostly coated with an anticancer drug. This review paper highlights the modern research directions currently employed to demonstrate the utility of the pH responsive core-shell magnetic NPs in diagnosis and treatment of oncological diseases. PMID:27151685

  1. In vitro inhibition of drug-resistant and drug-sensitive strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by ethnobotanically selected South African plants.

    PubMed

    Lall, N; Meyer, J J

    1999-09-01

    Twenty South African medicinal plants used to treat pulmonary diseases were screened for activity against drug-resistant and drug-sensitive strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A preliminary screening of acetone and water plant extracts against a drug-sensitive strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, H37Rv, was done by the agar plate method. Fourteen of the 20 acetone extracts showed inhibitory activity at a concentration of 0.5 mg/ml against this strain. Acetone as well as water extracts of Cryptocarya latifolia, Euclea natalensis, Helichrysum melanacme, Nidorella anomala and Thymus vulgaris inhibited the growth of M. tuberculosis. Given the activity of 14 acetone extracts at 0.5 mg/ml against the drug-sensitive strain by the agar plate method, a further study was done employing a rapid radiometric method to confirm the inhibitory activity. These active acetone extracts were screened against the H37Rv strain as well as a strain resistant to the drugs isoniazid and rifampin. The minimal inhibitory concentration of Croton pseudopulchellus, Ekebergia capensis, Euclea natalensis, Nidorella anomala and Polygala myrtifolia was 0.1 mg/ml against the H37Rv strain by the radiometric method. Extracts of Chenopodium ambrosioides, Ekebergia capensis, Euclea natalensis, Helichrysum melanacme, Nidorella anomala and Polygala myrtifolia were active against the resistant strain at 0.1 mg/ml. Eight plants showed activity against both strains at a concentration of 1.0 mg/ml. PMID:10473184

  2. Histone variant H2A.Z.2 mediates proliferation and drug sensitivity of malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Vardabasso, Chiara; Gaspar-Maia, Alexandre; Hasson, Dan; Pünzeler, Sebastian; Valle-Garcia, David; Straub, Tobias; Keilhauer, Eva C.; Strub, Thomas; Dong, Joanna; Panda, Taniya; Chung, Chi-Yeh; Yao, Jonathan L.; Singh, Rajendra; Segura, Miguel F.; Fontanals-Cirera, Barbara; Verma, Amit; Mann, Matthias; Hernando, Eva; Hake, Sandra B.; Bernstein, Emily

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Histone variants are emerging as key regulatory molecules in cancer. Here we report a novel role for the H2A.Z isoform H2A.Z.2 as a driver of malignant melanoma. H2A.Z.2 is highly expressed in metastatic melanoma, correlates with decreased patient survival, and is required for cellular proliferation. Our integrated genomic analyses reveal that H2A.Z.2 controls the transcriptional output of E2F target genes in melanoma cells. These genes are highly expressed and display a distinct signature of H2A.Z occupancy. We identify BRD2 as an H2A.Z interacting protein, whose levels are also elevated in melanoma. We further demonstrate that H2A.Z.2 regulated genes are bound by BRD2 and E2F1 in a H2A.Z.2-dependent manner. Importantly, H2A.Z.2 deficiency sensitizes melanoma cells to chemotherapy and targeted therapies. Collectively, our findings implicate H2A.Z.2 as a mediator of cell proliferation and drug sensitivity in malignant melanoma, holding translational potential for novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:26051178

  3. Insulin and Insulin-Sensitizing Drugs in Neurodegeneration: Mitochondria as Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Susana; Santos, Renato; Correia, Sonia; Carvalho, Cristina; Zhu, Xiongwei; Lee, Hyoung-Gon; Casadesus, Gemma; Smith, Mark A.; Perry, George; Moreira, Paula I.

    2009-01-01

    Insulin, besides its glucose lowering effects, is involved in the modulation of lifespan, aging and memory and learning processes. As the population ages, neurodegenerative disorders become epidemic and a connection between insulin signaling dysregulation, cognitive decline and dementia has been established. Mitochondria are intracellular organelles that despite playing a critical role in cellular metabolism are also one of the major sources of reactive oxygen species. Mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and neuroinflammation, hallmarks of neurodegeneration, can result from impaired insulin signaling. Insulin-sensitizing drugs such as the thiazolidinediones are a new class of synthetic compounds that potentiate insulin action in the target tissues and act as specific agonists of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ). Recently, several PPAR agonists have been proposed as novel and possible therapeutic agents for neurodegenerative disorders. Indeed, the literature shows that these agents are able to protect against mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative damage, inflammation and apoptosis. This review discusses the role of mitochondria and insulin signaling in normal brain function and in neurodegeneration. Furthermore, the potential protective role of insulin and insulin sensitizers in Alzheimer´s, Parkinson´s and Huntington´s diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis will be also discussed.

  4. Drug screening and grouping by sensitivity with a panel of primary cultured cancer spheroids derived from endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Kiyohara, Yumiko; Yoshino, Kiyoshi; Kubota, Satoshi; Okuyama, Hiroaki; Endo, Hiroko; Ueda, Yutaka; Kimura, Toshihiro; Kimura, Tadashi; Kamiura, Shoji; Inoue, Masahiro

    2016-04-01

    Several molecular targeting drugs are being evaluated for endometrial cancer; selecting patients whose cancers are sensitive to these agents is of paramount importance. Previously, we developed the cancer tissue-originated spheroid method for primary cancer cells taken from patients' tumors as well as patient-derived xenografts. In this study, we successfully prepared and cultured cancer tissue-originated spheroids from endometrial cancers. Characteristics of the original tumors were well retained in cancer tissue-originated spheroids including morphology and expression of p53 or neuroendocrine markers. We screened 79 molecular targeting drugs using two cancer tissue-originated spheroid lines derived from endometrioid adenocarcinoma grade 3 and serous adenocarcinoma. Among several hits, we focused on everolimus, a mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 inhibitor, and YM155, a survivin inhibitor. When sensitivity to everolimus or YM155 was assessed in 12 or 11 cancer tissue-originated spheroids, respectively, from different endometrial cancer patients, the sensitivity varied substantially. The cancer tissue-originated spheroids sensitive to everolimus showed remarkable suppression of proliferation. The phosphorylation status of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 downstream molecules before and after everolimus treatment did not predict the effect of the drug. In contrast, the cancer tissue-originated spheroids sensitive to YM155 showed remarkable cell death. The effect of YM155 was also confirmed in vivo. The histological type correlated with YM155 sensitivity; non-endometrioid adenocarcinomas were sensitive and endometrioid adenocarcinomas were resistant. Non-canonical autophagic cell death was the most likely cause of cell death in a sensitive cancer tissue-originated spheroid. Thus, sensitivity assays using cancer tissue-originated spheroids from endometrial cancers may be useful for screening drugs and finding biomarkers. PMID:26825848

  5. Development of pH Sensitive Nanoparticles for Intestinal Drug Delivery Using Chemically Modified Guar Gum Co-Polymer.

    PubMed

    Varma, Vegesna Naga Sravan Kumar; Shivakumar, Hosakote Gurumalappa; Balamuralidhara, Veerna; Navya, Manne; Hani, Umme

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the research work was to chemically modify guargum (GG) as a pH sensitive co-polymer and formulating intestinal targeting ESO nanoparticles (NPs) using the synthesized co-polymer. Poly acrylamide-grafted-guar gum (PAAm-g-GG) co-polymer was synthesized by free radical polymerization. Chemical modification of PAAm-g-GG by alkaline hydrolysis results in formation of a pH-sensitive co-polymer. The effect of GG and acryl amide (AAm) on grafting was studied. Esomeprazole magnesium (ESO) loaded pH sensitive NPs were prepared by nano-emulsification polymer crosslinking method and characterized. Sixteen formulations were prepared and the concentration of process variables wasvaried to obtain nanoparticles of 200-600 nm. The NPs were found to be homogenous in size distribution. The encapsulation efficiency and drug loading ranged from 33.2% to 50.1% and 12.2% to 17.2% respectively. Particle size, encapsulation efficiency and drug loading increasedalong with co-polymer concentration. In-vitro release studies at pH 1.2 for 2 h, followed by pH 6.8 showed that environment pH significantly affected the drug release. SEM has shown that NPsare spherical with smooth surface. The pH sensitive PAAm-g-GGNPs resisted the initial release of the drug from the drug loaded NPs in acidic pH and delayed the release process to a longer period in alkaline environment. PMID:27610149

  6. Novel multifunctional pH-sensitive nanoparticles loaded into microbubbles as drug delivery vehicles for enhanced tumor targeting.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yongjiu; Hao, Lan; Hu, Wenjing; Ran, Ya; Bai, Yan; Zhang, Liangke

    2016-01-01

    This study fabricated novel multifunctional pH-sensitive nanoparticles loaded into microbubbles (PNP-MB) with the combined advantages of two excellent drug delivery vehicles, namely, pH-sensitive nanoparticles and microbubbles. As an antitumor drug, resveratrol (RES) was loaded into acetylated β-cyclodextrin nanoparticles (RES-PNP). The drug-loaded nanoparticles were then encapsulated into the internal space of the microbubbles. The characterization and morphology of this vehicle were investigated through dynamic light scattering and confocal laser scanning microscopy, respectively. In vitro drug release was performed to investigate the pH sensitivity of RES-PNP. The antitumor property of RES-loaded PNP-MB (RES-PNP-MB) was also analyzed in vivo to evaluate the antitumor effect of RES-PNP-MB. Results suggested that PNP exhibited pH sensitivity, and was successfully encapsulated into the microbubbles. RES-PNP-MB exhibit effective tumor growth suppressing in vivo. Therefore, such drug delivery vehicle should be of great attention in tumor therapy. PMID:27378018

  7. In vitro screening of clinical drugs identifies sensitizers of oncolytic viral therapy in glioblastoma stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Berghauser Pont, L M E; Balvers, R K; Kloezeman, J J; Nowicki, M O; van den Bossche, W; Kremer, A; Wakimoto, H; van den Hoogen, B G; Leenstra, S; Dirven, C M F; Chiocca, E A; Lawler, S E; Lamfers, M L M

    2015-12-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OV) have broad potential as an adjuvant for the treatment of solid tumors. The present study addresses the feasibility of clinically applicable drugs to enhance the oncolytic potential of the OV Delta24-RGD in glioblastoma. In total, 446 drugs were screened for their viral sensitizing properties in glioblastoma stem-like cells (GSCs) in vitro. Validation was done for 10 drugs to determine synergy based on the Chou Talalay assay. Mechanistic studies were undertaken to assess viability, replication efficacy, viral infection enhancement and cell death pathway induction in a selected panel of drugs. Four viral sensitizers (fluphenazine, indirubin, lofepramine and ranolazine) were demonstrated to reproducibly synergize with Delta24-RGD in multiple assays. After validation, we underscored general applicability by testing candidate drugs in a broader context of a panel of different GSCs, various solid tumor models and multiple OVs. Overall, this study identified four viral sensitizers, which synergize with Delta24-RGD and two other strains of OVs. The viral sensitizers interact with infection, replication and cell death pathways to enhance efficacy of the OV. PMID:26196249

  8. Novel multifunctional pH-sensitive nanoparticles loaded into microbubbles as drug delivery vehicles for enhanced tumor targeting

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Yongjiu; Hao, Lan; Hu, Wenjing; Ran, Ya; Bai, Yan; Zhang, Liangke

    2016-01-01

    This study fabricated novel multifunctional pH-sensitive nanoparticles loaded into microbubbles (PNP-MB) with the combined advantages of two excellent drug delivery vehicles, namely, pH-sensitive nanoparticles and microbubbles. As an antitumor drug, resveratrol (RES) was loaded into acetylated β-cyclodextrin nanoparticles (RES-PNP). The drug-loaded nanoparticles were then encapsulated into the internal space of the microbubbles. The characterization and morphology of this vehicle were investigated through dynamic light scattering and confocal laser scanning microscopy, respectively. In vitro drug release was performed to investigate the pH sensitivity of RES-PNP. The antitumor property of RES-loaded PNP-MB (RES-PNP-MB) was also analyzed in vivo to evaluate the antitumor effect of RES-PNP-MB. Results suggested that PNP exhibited pH sensitivity, and was successfully encapsulated into the microbubbles. RES-PNP-MB exhibit effective tumor growth suppressing in vivo. Therefore, such drug delivery vehicle should be of great attention in tumor therapy. PMID:27378018

  9. Development of pH Sensitive Nanoparticles for Intestinal Drug Delivery Using Chemically Modified Guar Gum Co-Polymer

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Vegesna Naga Sravan Kumar; Shivakumar, Hosakote Gurumalappa; Balamuralidhara, Veerna; Navya, Manne; Hani, Umme

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the research work was to chemically modify guargum (GG) as a pH sensitive co-polymer and formulating intestinal targeting ESO nanoparticles (NPs) using the synthesized co-polymer. Poly acrylamide-grafted-guar gum (PAAm-g-GG) co-polymer was synthesized by free radical polymerization. Chemical modification of PAAm-g-GG by alkaline hydrolysis results in formation of a pH-sensitive co-polymer. The effect of GG and acryl amide (AAm) on grafting was studied. Esomeprazole magnesium (ESO) loaded pH sensitive NPs were prepared by nano-emulsification polymer crosslinking method and characterized. Sixteen formulations were prepared and the concentration of process variables wasvaried to obtain nanoparticles of 200-600 nm. The NPs were found to be homogenous in size distribution. The encapsulation efficiency and drug loading ranged from 33.2% to 50.1% and 12.2% to 17.2% respectively. Particle size, encapsulation efficiency and drug loading increasedalong with co-polymer concentration. In-vitro release studies at pH 1.2 for 2 h, followed by pH 6.8 showed that environment pH significantly affected the drug release. SEM has shown that NPsare spherical with smooth surface. The pH sensitive PAAm-g-GGNPs resisted the initial release of the drug from the drug loaded NPs in acidic pH and delayed the release process to a longer period in alkaline environment. PMID:27610149

  10. Spectrophotometric study of the reaction mechanism between DDQ Π- and iodine σ-acceptors and chloroquine and pyrimethamine drugs and their determination in pure and in dosage forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayed, M. A.; Khalil, Shaban M.; El-qudaby, Hoda M.

    2005-11-01

    Two simple and accurate spectrophotometric methods are presented for the determination of anti-malarial drugs, chloroquine phosphate (CQP) and pyrimethamine (PYM), in pure and in different pharmaceutical preparations. The charge transphere (CT) reactions between CQP and PYM as electron donors and 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano- p-benzoquinone (DDQ) π-acceptor and iodine σ-acceptor reagents to give highly coloured complex species have been spectrophotometrically studied. The optimum experimental conditions have been studied carefully. Beer' law is obeyed over the concentration range of 1.0-15 μg ml -1 for CQP and 1.0-40 μg ml -1 for PYM using I 2 and at 5.0-53 μg ml -1 for CQP and 1.0-46 μg ml -1 for PYM using DDQ reagents, respectively. For more accurate results, Ringbom optimum concentration range is calculated and found to be 10-53 and 8-46 μg ml -1 for CQP and PYM using DDQ, respectively and 5-15 and 8-40 μg ml -1 for CQP and PYM using iodine, respectively. The Sandell sensitivity is found to be 0.038 and 0.046 g cm -2 for DDQ method and 0.0078 and 0.056 g cm -2 for I 2 method for CQP and PYM, respectively which indicates the high sensitivity of both methods. Standard deviation (S.D. = 0.012-0.014 and 0.013-0.015) and relative standard deviation (R.S.D. = 0.09-1.4 and 1.3-1.5%) ( n = 5) for DDQ and I 2 methods respectively, refer to the high accuracy and precision of the proposed methods. These results are also confirmed by between day precision of percent recovery of 99-100.6%, and 98-101% for CQP and PYM by DDQ method and 99-102% and 99.2-101.4% for CQP and PYM by I 2 method respectively. These data are comparable to those obtained by British and American pharmacopoeias assay for the determination of CQP and PYM in raw materials and in pharmaceutical preparations.

  11. Mirincamycin, an old candidate for malaria combination treatment and prophylaxis in the 21st century: in vitro interaction profiles with potential partner drugs in continuous culture and field isolates

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Spreading resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to existing drugs calls for the search for novel anti-malarial drugs and combinations for the treatment of falciparum malaria. Methods In vitro and ex vivo investigations were conducted with fresh P. falciparum field isolates and culture-adapted P. falciparum clones to evaluate the anti-malarial potential of mirincamycin, a lincosamide, alone and in combination with tafenoquine (TQ), dihydroartemisinin (DHA), and chloroquine (CQ). All samples were tested in a histidine-rich protein 2 (HRP2) drug susceptibility assay. Results Interaction analysis showed additive to synergistic interaction profiles with these potential partner drugs, with an overall geometric mean fractional inhibitory concentration at 50% inhibition (FIC50) of 0.78, 0.80 and 0.80 for mirincamycin with TQ, DHA, and CQ, respectively. Antagonism was not found in any of the tested field isolates or clones. The strongest tendency toward synergy (i.e. the lowest FIC) was seen with a combination ratio of 1:0.27 to 1:7.2 (mean 1:2.7) for the combination with tafenoquine. The optimal combination ratios for DHA and CQ were 1:444.4 to 1:36,000 (mean 1:10,755.5) and 1:2.7 to 1:216 (mean 1:64.5), respectively. No evidence of an activity correlation (i.e. potential cross-resistance) with DHA, mefloquine, quinine or chloroquine was seen whereas a significant correlation with the activity of clindamycin and azithromycin was detected. Conclusions Mirincamycin combinations may be promising candidates for further clinical investigations in the therapy and prophylaxis of multidrug-resistant falciparum malaria or in combination with 4 or 8-aminoquinolines for the treatment and relapse prevention of vivax malaria. PMID:24916383

  12. Sensitive and Selective Plasmon Ruler Nanosensors for Monitoring the Apoptotic Drug Response in Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Caspases are proteases involved in cell death, where caspase-3 is the chief executioner that produces an irreversible cutting event in downstream protein substrates and whose activity is desired in the management of cancer. To determine such activity in clinically relevant samples with high signal-to-noise, plasmon rulers are ideal because they are sensitively affected by their interparticle separation without ambiguity from photobleaching or blinking effects. A plasmon ruler is a noble metal nanoparticle pair, tethered in close proximity to one another via a biomolecule, that acts through dipole–dipole interactions and results in the light scattering to increase exponentially. In contrast, a sharp decrease in intensity is observed when the pair is confronted by a large interparticle distance. To align the mechanism of protease activity with building a sensor that can report a binary signal in the presence or absence of caspase-3, we present a caspase-3 selective plasmon ruler (C3SPR) composed of a pair of Zn0.4Fe2.6O4@SiO2@Au core–shell nanoparticles connected by a caspase-3 cleavage sequence. The dielectric core (Zn0.4Fe2.6O4@SiO2)-shell (Au) geometry provided a brighter scattering intensity versus solid Au nanoparticles, and the magnetic core additionally acted as a purification handle during the plasmon ruler assembly. By monitoring the decrease in light scattering intensity per plasmon ruler, we detected caspase-3 activity at single molecule resolution across a broad dynamic range. This was observed to be as low as 100 fM of recombinant material or 10 ng of total protein from cellular lysate. By thorough analyses of single molecule trajectories, we show caspase-3 activation in a drug-treated chronic myeloid leukemia (K562) cancer system as early as 4 and 8 h with greater sensitivity (2- and 4-fold, respectively) than conventional reagents. This study provides future implications for monitoring caspase-3 as a biomarker and efficacy of drugs. PMID:25166742

  13. Sensitive and selective plasmon ruler nanosensors for monitoring the apoptotic drug response in leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tajon, Cheryl A; Seo, Daeha; Asmussen, Jennifer; Shah, Neil; Jun, Young-wook; Craik, Charles S

    2014-09-23

    Caspases are proteases involved in cell death, where caspase-3 is the chief executioner that produces an irreversible cutting event in downstream protein substrates and whose activity is desired in the management of cancer. To determine such activity in clinically relevant samples with high signal-to-noise, plasmon rulers are ideal because they are sensitively affected by their interparticle separation without ambiguity from photobleaching or blinking effects. A plasmon ruler is a noble metal nanoparticle pair, tethered in close proximity to one another via a biomolecule, that acts through dipole-dipole interactions and results in the light scattering to increase exponentially. In contrast, a sharp decrease in intensity is observed when the pair is confronted by a large interparticle distance. To align the mechanism of protease activity with building a sensor that can report a binary signal in the presence or absence of caspase-3, we present a caspase-3 selective plasmon ruler (C3SPR) composed of a pair of Zn0.4Fe2.6O4@SiO2@Au core-shell nanoparticles connected by a caspase-3 cleavage sequence. The dielectric core (Zn0.4Fe2.6O4@SiO2)-shell (Au) geometry provided a brighter scattering intensity versus solid Au nanoparticles, and the magnetic core additionally acted as a purification handle during the plasmon ruler assembly. By monitoring the decrease in light scattering intensity per plasmon ruler, we detected caspase-3 activity at single molecule resolution across a broad dynamic range. This was observed to be as low as 100 fM of recombinant material or 10 ng of total protein from cellular lysate. By thorough analyses of single molecule trajectories, we show caspase-3 activation in a drug-treated chronic myeloid leukemia (K562) cancer system as early as 4 and 8 h with greater sensitivity (2- and 4-fold, respectively) than conventional reagents. This study provides future implications for monitoring caspase-3 as a biomarker and efficacy of drugs. PMID:25166742

  14. Asynchronous magnetic bead rotation (AMBR) micro-viscometer for rapid, sensitive and label-free studies of bacterial growth and drug sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Sinn, Irene; Albertson, Theodore; Kinnunen, Paivo; Breslauer, David N.; McNaughton, Brandon H.; Burns, Mark A.; Kopelman, Raoul

    2012-01-01

    The long turnaround time in antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) endangers patients and encourages the administration of wide spectrum antibiotics, thus resulting in alarming increases of multi-drug resistant pathogens. A method for faster detection of bacterial proliferation presents one avenue towards addressing this global concern. We report on a label-free asynchronous magnetic bead rotation (AMBR) based viscometry method that rapidly detects bacterial growth and determines drug sensitivity by measuring changes in the suspension’s viscosity. With this platform, we observed the growth of a uropathogenic Escherichia coli isolate, with an initial concentration of 50 cells per drop, within 20 minutes; in addition, we determined the gentamicin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the E. coli isolate within 100 minutes. We thus demonstrated a label-free, micro-viscometer platform that can measure bacterial growth and drug susceptibility more rapidly, with lower initial bacterial counts than existing commercial systems, and potentially with any microbial strains. PMID:22507307

  15. Expression of microRNA-30a-5p in drug-resistant and drug-sensitive ovarian cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin; Wu, Xiaohua; Liu, Hongmei; Liang, Yijuan; Gao, Xinping; Cai, Zhihui; Wang, Weiming; Zhang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to explore the expression of microRNA (miRNA or miR) in drug-resistant and drug-sensitive ovarian cancer cell lines, and to seek the potential therapeutic target of ovarian cancer drug-resistant mechanism in order to improve drug resistance by altering miRNA levels. The drug-resistant characteristics of SKOV3/DDP, SKOV3, COC1/DDP and COC1 cell lines were studied. The miRNAs that were differentially expressed between cisplatin-resistant cells and its parental cells in ovarian cancer were screened with a miRNA chip. The effect of miRNAs was detected, and their drug-resistant mechanism was investigated by transfection and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide methods. Among the expression screening of miRNAs, 41 mRNAs, including Homo sapiens (hsa)-miR-30a-5p and hsa-miR-34c-5p, were highly expressed in the drug-resistant cells, whereas 44 miRNAs, including hsa-miR-96-5p and hsa-miR-200c-3p, were lowly expressed. The expression levels of hsa-miR-30a-5p in two types of ovarian cancer chemotherapy-resistant cell lines were significantly higher than those in chemotherapy-sensitive cell lines, which was associated with ovarian cancer chemotherapy resistance. In conclusion, high expression of miRNA-30a-5p was able to promote cell growth and colony forming ability, and enhance cell migration and invasion. Thus, miRNA-30a-5p is expected to become a meaningful novel target for ovarian cancer resistant treatment. PMID:27602140

  16. Design and synthesis of pH-sensitive polymeric micelles for oral delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaolan; Fan, Rongrong; Wang, Wenlong; Wang, Jiexin; Le, Yuan

    2016-09-01

    pH-sensitive polymer poly (polylactide-co-methacrylic acid)-b-poly (acrylic acid) was synthesized using atom transfer radical polymerization and ring-opening polymerization and characterized by gel permeation chromatography and (1)H NMR. The polymers can self-assemble to form micelles in aqueous medium, which respond rapidly to pH change within the gastrointestinal relevant pH range. Critical micelle concentrations and pH response behavior of the polymeric micelle were investigated. Water-insoluble drug nifedipine was loaded and the drug-loading content can be controlled by tuning the composition of the polymers. The in vitro release studies indicate pH sensitivity enabled rapid drug release at the environment of simulated intestinal fluid (pH 7.36), the cumulative released amount of NFD reached more than 80% within 24 h, while only 35% in the simulated gastric fluid (pH 1.35). All the results showed that the pH-sensitive P(PLAMA-co-MAA)-b-PAA micelle may be a prospective candidate as oral drug delivery carrier for hydrophobic drugs with controlled release behavior. PMID:27342342

  17. Peroxiredoxin 1 knockdown sensitizes cancer cells to reactive oxygen species-generating drugs - an alternative approach for chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    He, Tiantian; Hatem, Elie; Vernis, Laurence; Huang, Meng-Er

    2014-10-01

    Peroxiredoxins have multiple cellular functions as major antioxidants, signaling regulators and tumor suppressors. Peroxiredoxin 1 (PRX1) is the most abundant among the six isoforms of human peroxiredoxins, catalyzing the reduction of peroxides utilizing thioredoxin 1as an electron donor. PRX1 is frequently over-expressed in various cancer cells, which is thought to be associated with carcinogenesis, metastasis and resistance to radiotherapy or chemotherapy. We investigated how modulations of intracellular redox system, especially PRX1, affect cancer cell sensitivity to reactive oxygen species (ROS)-generating drugs. We observed that stable and transient Prx1 knockdown (Prx1-) significantly enhances HeLa cell sensitivity to β-lapachone (β-lap), a potential anticancer agent, and to other ROS-generating molecules. ROS accumulation played a crucial role in drug-enhanced Prx1- cell death. For β-lap, Prx1- cells sensitization is achieved through combined action of accumulation of ROS and enhancement of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activation. The effect of other ROS-inducing drugs on Prx1- cell survival will also be presented and discussed. Taken together, our data provide evidence that PRX1 could be an interesting anticancer target and modulation of intracellular redox states through PRX1 inhibition could be an alternative approach to enhance cancer cell sensitivity to ROS-generating drugs. PMID:26461286

  18. Functionalized chalcones with basic functionalities have antibacterial activity against drug sensitive Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Liu, X L; Xu, Y J; Go, M L

    2008-08-01

    A library of chalcones with basic functionalities were evaluated for antibacterial activity against drug sensitive strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. The most active compounds were 2-52 and 2-57 (MIC 6.3 microM S. aureus). These compounds had no activity against E. coli (MIC>100 microM). Both compounds were characterized by a ring A that was substituted with 2-hydroxy-4,6-dimethoxy-3-(1-methylpiperidin-4-yl) groups. The phenolic OH and 1-methylpiperidinyl groups were required for activity but the phenolic OH may play a more critical role. While the compounds were comparable to licochalcone A in terms of antibacterial activity, they caused less hemolysis of sheep erythrocytes at high concentrations (100 microM). It was noted that the structural requirements for limiting hemolytic activity were less stringent than those required for antibacterial activity. The present findings suggest that the chalcone framework is an attractive template for optimization to achieve better potency, lower toxicity and a wider spectrum of antibacterial activity. PMID:18031869

  19. Zwitterionic Chitosan-Polyamidoamine Dendrimer Complex Nanoparticles as a pH-Sensitive Drug Carrier

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Karen C.; Yeo, Yoon

    2013-01-01

    Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers have been widely explored as carriers of therapeutics and imaging agents. However, amine-terminated PAMAM dendrimers is rarely utilized in systemic applications due to its cytotoxicity and risk of opsonization, caused by its cationic charges. Such undesirable effects may be mitigated by shielding the PAMAM dendrimer surface with polymers that reduce the charges. However, this shielding may also interfere with PAMAM dendrimers’ ability to interact with target cells, thus reducing cellular uptake and overall efficacy of the delivery system. Therefore, we propose to use zwitterionic chitosan (ZWC), a new chitosan derivative, which has a unique pH-sensitive charge profile, as an alternative biomaterial to modify the cationic surface of PAMAM dendrimers. Stable electrostatic complex of ZWC and PAMAM dendrimers was formed at pH 7.4, where the PAMAM dendrimer surface was covered with ZWC, as demonstrated by fluorescence spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The presence of ZWC coating protected red blood cells and fibroblast cells from hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of PAMAM dendrimers, respectively. Confocal microscopy showed that the protective effect of ZWC disappeared at low pH as the complex dissociated due to the charge conversion of ZWC, allowing PAMAM dendrimers to enter cells. These results demonstrate that ZWC is able to provide a surface coverage of PAMAM dendrimers in a pH-dependent manner and, thus, enhance the utility of PAMAM dendrimers as a drug carrier to solid tumors with acidifying microenvironment. PMID:23510114

  20. Novel pH-sensitive blend microspheres for controlled release of nifedipine--an antihypertensive drug.

    PubMed

    Phadke, Keerti V; Manjeshwar, Lata S; Aminabhavi, Tejraj M

    2015-04-01

    Water-soluble acrylamide (AAm)-grafted-chitosan (CS) copolymer (AAm-g-CS) was synthesized using potassium persulfate (PPS) initiator from which interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) microspheres were prepared by water-in-oil (w/o) emulsion that are cross-linked with glutaraldehyde (GA) and used for encapsulating nifedipine (NFD). Microspheres were coated with sodium alginate (NaAlg) to enhance their pH-sensitivity for extending the release time of NFD up to 14 h, releasing with 93% of NFD. The coated and uncoated microspheres were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to understand chemical interactions and blend compatibility. Morphology and particle size of the microspheres were assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and particle zeta analyzer, respectively. Swelling and in vitro release experiments were performed in pH 1.2 and 7.4 buffer media, which showed a dependence on IPN blend composition, extent of cross-linking and amount of AAm used. Empirical analysis of drug patterns suggested the differences between NaAlg coated and uncoated microspheres. PMID:25647620

  1. Single-cell analysis of targeted transcriptome predicts drug sensitivity of single cells within human myeloma tumors.

    PubMed

    Mitra, A K; Mukherjee, U K; Harding, T; Jang, J S; Stessman, H; Li, Y; Abyzov, A; Jen, J; Kumar, S; Rajkumar, V; Van Ness, B

    2016-05-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by significant genetic diversity at subclonal levels that have a defining role in the heterogeneity of tumor progression, clinical aggressiveness and drug sensitivity. Although genome profiling studies have demonstrated heterogeneity in subclonal architecture that may ultimately lead to relapse, a gene expression-based prediction program that can identify, distinguish and quantify drug response in sub-populations within a bulk population of myeloma cells is lacking. In this study, we performed targeted transcriptome analysis on 528 pre-treatment single cells from 11 myeloma cell lines and 418 single cells from 8 drug-naïve MM patients, followed by intensive bioinformatics and statistical analysis for prediction of proteasome inhibitor sensitivity in individual cells. Using our previously reported drug response gene expression profile signature at the single-cell level, we developed an R Statistical analysis package available at https://github.com/bvnlabSCATTome, SCATTome (single-cell analysis of targeted transcriptome), that restructures the data obtained from Fluidigm single-cell quantitative real-time-PCR analysis run, filters missing data, performs scaling of filtered data, builds classification models and predicts drug response of individual cells based on targeted transcriptome using an assortment of machine learning methods. Application of SCATT should contribute to clinically relevant analysis of intratumor heterogeneity, and better inform drug choices based on subclonal cellular responses. PMID:26710886

  2. Development and Application of Zirconia Coated Paper Substrate for High Sensitivity Analysis of Therapeutic Drugs in Dried Blood Spots.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yajun; Wang, Qian; Wang, Xiaoting; Chen, Ying; Wang, Xuan; Zhang, Xiaoling; Bai, Zongquan; Han, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Zhiping

    2016-07-19

    Paper spray mass spectrometry has been demonstrated to be promising for direct analysis of therapeutic drugs in dried blood spots (DBS); however, the strong hydrogen bond and van de Waals interactions between paper substrate and analytes containing polar functional groups (e.g., therapeutic drugs) affect greatly the elution behavior and analysis sensitivity of compounds of interest during paper spray. Herein, we developed a one-sided ZrO2 coated paper substrate through a facile vacuum filtration approach using commercial ZrO2 particles as coating material and soluble starch as adhesive agent. Owing to the unique surface properties, as-prepared ZrO2 paper substrate has been shown to have excellent performance for analysis of therapeutic drugs in DBS during paper spray mass spectrometry. In contrast to original cellulose paper substrates, improvements of 43-189-fold in lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) were obtained for the tested drugs using ZrO2 coated paper for paper spray. In comparing with the previously reported grade SG81 paper and one-sided silica coated paper, the LLOQs of the tested drugs with as-prepared ZrO2 paper decreased 1.5-16.5-fold relative to those from the above two, revealing that ZrO2 coated paper is a good candidate for paper spray in high sensitivity analysis of therapeutic drugs in DBS. PMID:27314839

  3. Combating malaria with nanotechnology-based targeted and combinatorial drug delivery strategies.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Miloni; S, Brijesh

    2016-08-01

    Despite the advancement of science, infectious diseases such as malaria remain an ongoing challenge globally. The main reason this disease still remains a menace in many countries around the world is the development of resistance to many of the currently available anti-malarial drugs. While developing new drugs is rather expensive and the prospect of a potent vaccine is still evading our dream of a malaria-free world, one of the feasible options is to package the older drugs in newer ways. For this, nano-sized drug delivery vehicles have been used and are proving to be promising prospects in the way malaria will be treated in the future. Since, monotherapy has given way to combination therapy in malaria treatment, nanotechnology-based delivery carriers enable to encapsulate various drug moieties in the same package, thus avoiding the complications involved in conjugation chemistry to produce hybrid drug molecules. Further, we envisage that using targeted delivery approaches, we may be able to achieve a much better radical cure and curb the side effects associated with the existing drug molecules. Thus, this review will focus on some of the nanotechnology-based combination and targeted therapies and will discuss the possibilities of better therapies that may be developed in the future. PMID:27067712

  4. A Genomewide Screen in Schizosaccharomyces pombe for Genes Affecting the Sensitivity of Antifungal Drugs That Target Ergosterol Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Lingling; Zhou, Xin; Jaiseng, Wurentuya; Zhang, Ben; Takami, Tomonori; Kuno, Takayoshi

    2012-01-01

    We performed a genomewide screen for altered sensitivity to antifungal drugs, including clotrimazole and terbinafine, that target ergosterol biosynthesis using a Schizosaccharomyces pombe gene deletion library consisting of 3,004 nonessential haploid deletion mutants. We identified 109 mutants that were hypersensitive and 11 mutants that were resistant to these antifungals. Proteins whose absence rendered cells sensitive to these antifungals were classified into various functional categories, including ergosterol biosynthesis, membrane trafficking, histone acetylation and deacetylation, ubiquitination, signal transduction, ribosome biosynthesis and assembly, regulation of transcription and translation, cell wall organization and biogenesis, mitochondrion function, amino acid metabolism, nucleic acid metabolism, lipid metabolism, meiosis, and other functions. Also, proteins whose absence rendered cells resistant to these antifungals were classified into functional categories including mitochondrion function, ubiquitination, membrane trafficking, cell polarity, chromatin remodeling, and some unknown functions. Furthermore, the 109 sensitive mutants were tested for sensitivity to micafungin, another antifungal drug that inhibits (1,3)-β-d-glucan synthase, and 57 hypersensitive mutants were identified, suggesting that these mutants were defective in cell wall integrity. Altogether, our findings in fission yeast have shed light on molecular pathways associated with the cellular response to ergosterol biosynthesis inhibitors and may provide useful information for developing strategies aimed at sensitizing cells to these drugs. PMID:22252817

  5. Preparation and characterization of a novel pH-sensitive coated microsphere for duodenum-specific drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dan; Zhu, Xi; Wang, Yang; Jin, Yun; Xu, Xuefan; Fan, Tingting; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Zhirong; Huang, Yuan

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a duodenum-specific drug delivery system on the basis of a pH-sensitive coating and a mucoadhesive inner core for eradication of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in the ulcer duodenum. Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate maleate (HPMCAM) was used as the pH-sensitive material, which dissolves around pH 3.0. The mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with furazolidone (FZD-ad-MS) were prepared by the emulsification-solvent evaporation method using Carbopol 971NP as the mucoadhesive polymer. The prepared pH-sensitive coated mucoadhesive microspheres (AM-coated-MS) were characterized in regards to particle size, drug loading efficiency, morphological change, drug stability, drug release and in vitro anti-H. pylori activity. The particle size was 160.97 ± 47.24 μm and 336.44 ± 129.34 μm, and the drug content was 42.33 ± 3.43% and 10.96 ± 1.29% for FZD-ad-MS and AM-coated-MS, respectively. The morphological changes in different pH media were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). HPMCAM coating improved the stability of the FZD-ad-MS and these particles were expected to remain intact until their arrival in the duodenum. The drug release was extremely suppressed at pH 1.2 for AM-coated-MS, but increased at pH 4.0 after regeneration of FZD-ad-MS. In addition, FZD-ad-MS exhibited excellent anti-H. pylori activity in vitro. Thus, the HPMCAM-coated microspheres developed in this study hold great promise for use as a duodenum-specific drug delivery system for H. pylori clearance. PMID:22644851

  6. Cell-specific intracellular anticancer drug delivery from mesoporous silica nanoparticles with pH sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhong; Cai, Kaiyong; Hu, Yan; Zhang, Beilu; Xu, Dawei

    2012-05-01

    A nanoreservoir for efficient intracellular anticancer drug delivery based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles end-capped with lactobionic acid-grafted bovine serum albumin is fabricated. It demonstrates great potential for both cell-specific endocytosis and intracellular pH-responsive controlled release of drugs. A possible endocytosis pathway/mechanism of the smart controlled drug release system is proposed. PMID:23184747

  7. In Vitro and Molecular Surveillance for Antimalarial Drug Resistance in Plasmodium falciparum Parasites in Western Kenya Reveals Sustained Artemisinin Sensitivity and Increased Chloroquine Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Komino, Franklin; Okoth, Sheila Akinyi; Goldman, Ira; Onyona, Philip; Wiegand, Ryan E.; Juma, Elizabeth; Shi, Ya Ping; Barnwell, John W.; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Kariuki, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Malaria control is hindered by the evolution and spread of resistance to antimalarials, necessitating multiple changes to drug policies over time. A comprehensive antimalarial drug resistance surveillance program is vital for detecting the potential emergence of resistance to antimalarials, including current artemisinin-based combination therapies. An antimalarial drug resistance surveillance study involving 203 Plasmodium falciparum malaria-positive children was conducted in western Kenya between 2010 and 2013. Specimens from enrolled children were analyzed in vitro for sensitivity to chloroquine (CQ), amodiaquine (AQ), mefloquine (MQ), lumefantrine, and artemisinin derivatives (artesunate and dihydroartemisinin) and for drug resistance allele polymorphisms in P. falciparum crt (Pfcrt), Pfmdr-1, and the K13 propeller domain (K13). We observed a significant increase in the proportion of samples with the Pfcrt wild-type (CVMNK) genotype, from 61.2% in 2010 to 93.0% in 2013 (P < 0.0001), and higher proportions of parasites with elevated sensitivity to CQ in vitro. The majority of isolates harbored the wild-type N allele in Pfmdr-1 codon 86 (93.5%), with only 7 (3.50%) samples with the N86Y mutant allele (the mutant nucleotide is underlined). Likewise, most isolates harbored the wild-type Pfmdr-1 D1246 allele (79.8%), with only 12 (6.38%) specimens with the D1246Y mutant allele and 26 (13.8%) with mixed alleles. All the samples had a single copy of the Pfmdr-1 gene (mean of 0.907 ± 0.141 copies). None of the sequenced parasites had mutations in K13. Our results suggest that artemisinin is likely to remain highly efficacious and that CQ sensitivity appears to be on the rise in western Kenya. PMID:26392510

  8. In Vitro and Molecular Surveillance for Antimalarial Drug Resistance in Plasmodium falciparum Parasites in Western Kenya Reveals Sustained Artemisinin Sensitivity and Increased Chloroquine Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lucchi, Naomi W; Komino, Franklin; Okoth, Sheila Akinyi; Goldman, Ira; Onyona, Philip; Wiegand, Ryan E; Juma, Elizabeth; Shi, Ya Ping; Barnwell, John W; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Kariuki, Simon

    2015-12-01

    Malaria control is hindered by the evolution and spread of resistance to antimalarials, necessitating multiple changes to drug policies over time. A comprehensive antimalarial drug resistance surveillance program is vital for detecting the potential emergence of resistance to antimalarials, including current artemisinin-based combination therapies. An antimalarial drug resistance surveillance study involving 203 Plasmodium falciparum malaria-positive children was conducted in western Kenya between 2010 and 2013. Specimens from enrolled children were analyzed in vitro for sensitivity to chloroquine (CQ), amodiaquine (AQ), mefloquine (MQ), lumefantrine, and artemisinin derivatives (artesunate and dihydroartemisinin) and for drug resistance allele polymorphisms in P. falciparum crt (Pfcrt), Pfmdr-1, and the K13 propeller domain (K13). We observed a significant increase in the proportion of samples with the Pfcrt wild-type (CVMNK) genotype, from 61.2% in 2010 to 93.0% in 2013 (P < 0.0001), and higher proportions of parasites with elevated sensitivity to CQ in vitro. The majority of isolates harbored the wild-type N allele in Pfmdr-1 codon 86 (93.5%), with only 7 (3.50%) samples with the N86Y mutant allele (the mutant nucleotide is underlined). Likewise, most isolates harbored the wild-type Pfmdr-1 D1246 allele (79.8%), with only 12 (6.38%) specimens with the D1246Y mutant allele and 26 (13.8%) with mixed alleles. All the samples had a single copy of the Pfmdr-1 gene (mean of 0.907 ± 0.141 copies). None of the sequenced parasites had mutations in K13. Our results suggest that artemisinin is likely to remain highly efficacious and that CQ sensitivity appears to be on the rise in western Kenya. PMID:26392510

  9. Charge-conversional and pH-sensitive PEGylated polymeric micelles as efficient nanocarriers for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gong-Yan; Li, Min; Zhu, Cong-Shan; Jin, Qiao; Zhang, Zong-Cai; Ji, Jian

    2014-09-01

    A novel amphiphilic copolymer, poly (ethylene glycol)-graft-polyethyleneimine/amide (PEG-g-PEI/amide), is synthesized by grafting PEG and1,2-cis-Cyclohexanedicarboxylic anhydride onto the PEI. PEGylated polymeric micelles can be assembled from the amphiphilic copolymers with well-defined nano-sizes, and anti-cancer drugs are successfully loaded into micelle core formed by the amide. The amides with neighboring carboxylic acid groups exhibit pH-dependent hydrolysis and can reversibly shield the cationic charge of amine groups on the PEI, giving the micelles a charge-conversion property from negative to positive in acidic tumor tissue environment. Meanwhile, the cleavage of amide bonds at acidic pH also results in the disassembly of the micelle and pH-responsive drug release. These micelles are promising drug delivery systems due to their smart properties: PEGylation, suitable size, charge-conversion, and simultaneous pH-sensitive drug release. PMID:24866398

  10. Development of a Sensitive Outcome for Economical Drug Screening for Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Treatment.

    PubMed

    Kosa, Peter; Ghazali, Danish; Tanigawa, Makoto; Barbour, Chris; Cortese, Irene; Kelley, William; Snyder, Blake; Ohayon, Joan; Fenton, Kaylan; Lehky, Tanya; Wu, Tianxia; Greenwood, Mark; Nair, Govind; Bielekova, Bibiana

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic advance in progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) has been very slow. Based on the transformative role magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast-enhancing lesions had on drug development for relapsing-remitting MS, we consider the lack of sensitive outcomes to be the greatest barrier for developing new treatments for progressive MS. The purpose of this study was to compare 58 prospectively acquired candidate outcomes in the real-world situation of progressive MS trials to select and validate the best-performing outcome. The 1-year pre-treatment period of adaptively designed IPPoMS (ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT00950248) and RIVITaLISe (ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT01212094) Phase II trials served to determine the primary outcome for the subsequent blinded treatment phase by comparing 8 clinical, 1 electrophysiological, 1 optical coherence tomography, 7 MRI volumetric, 9 quantitative T1 MRI, and 32 diffusion tensor imaging MRI outcomes. Fifteen outcomes demonstrated significant progression over 1 year (Δ) in the predetermined analysis and seven out of these were validated in two independent cohorts. Validated MRI outcomes had limited correlations with clinical scales, relatively poor signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) and recorded overlapping values between healthy subjects and MS patients with moderate-severe disability. Clinical measures correlated better, even though each reflects a somewhat different disability domain. Therefore, using machine-learning techniques, we developed a combinatorial weight-adjusted disability score (CombiWISE) that integrates four clinical scales: expanded disability status scale (EDSS), Scripps neurological rating scale, 25 foot walk and 9 hole peg test. CombiWISE outperformed all clinical scales (Δ = 9.10%; p = 0.0003) and all MRI outcomes. CombiWISE recorded no overlapping values between healthy subjects and disabled MS patients, had high SNR, and predicted changes in EDSS in a longitudinal assessment of 98 progressive MS

  11. Development of a Sensitive Outcome for Economical Drug Screening for Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kosa, Peter; Ghazali, Danish; Tanigawa, Makoto; Barbour, Chris; Cortese, Irene; Kelley, William; Snyder, Blake; Ohayon, Joan; Fenton, Kaylan; Lehky, Tanya; Wu, Tianxia; Greenwood, Mark; Nair, Govind; Bielekova, Bibiana

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic advance in progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) has been very slow. Based on the transformative role magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast-enhancing lesions had on drug development for relapsing-remitting MS, we consider the lack of sensitive outcomes to be the greatest barrier for developing new treatments for progressive MS. The purpose of this study was to compare 58 prospectively acquired candidate outcomes in the real-world situation of progressive MS trials to select and validate the best-performing outcome. The 1-year pre-treatment period of adaptively designed IPPoMS (ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT00950248) and RIVITaLISe (ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT01212094) Phase II trials served to determine the primary outcome for the subsequent blinded treatment phase by comparing 8 clinical, 1 electrophysiological, 1 optical coherence tomography, 7 MRI volumetric, 9 quantitative T1 MRI, and 32 diffusion tensor imaging MRI outcomes. Fifteen outcomes demonstrated significant progression over 1 year (Δ) in the predetermined analysis and seven out of these were validated in two independent cohorts. Validated MRI outcomes had limited correlations with clinical scales, relatively poor signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) and recorded overlapping values between healthy subjects and MS patients with moderate-severe disability. Clinical measures correlated better, even though each reflects a somewhat different disability domain. Therefore, using machine-learning techniques, we developed a combinatorial weight-adjusted disability score (CombiWISE) that integrates four clinical scales: expanded disability status scale (EDSS), Scripps neurological rating scale, 25 foot walk and 9 hole peg test. CombiWISE outperformed all clinical scales (Δ = 9.10%; p = 0.0003) and all MRI outcomes. CombiWISE recorded no overlapping values between healthy subjects and disabled MS patients, had high SNR, and predicted changes in EDSS in a longitudinal assessment of 98 progressive MS

  12. A Disposable Microfluidic Device for Controlled Drug Release from Thermal-Sensitive Liposomes by High Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Long; Deng, Zhiting; Niu, Lili; Li, Fei; Yan, Fei; Wu, Junru; Cai, Feiyan; Zheng, Hairong

    2015-01-01

    The drug release triggered thermally by high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been considered a promising drug delivery strategy due to its localized energy and non-invasive characters. However, the mechanism underlying the HIFU-mediated drug delivery remains unclear due to its complexity at the cellular level. In this paper, micro-HIFU (MHIFU) generated by a microfluidic device is introduced which is able to control the drug release from temperature-sensitive liposomes (TSL) and evaluate the thermal and mechanical effects of ultrasound on the cellular drug uptake and apoptosis. By simply adjusting the input electrical signal to the device, the temperature of sample can be maintained at 37 °C, 42 °C and 50 °C with the deviation of ± 0.3 °C as desired. The flow cytometry results show that the drug delivery under MHIFU sonication leads to a significant increase in apoptosis compared to the drug release by incubation alone at elevated temperature of 42 °C. Furthermore, increased squamous and protruding structures on the surface membrane of cells were detected by atomic force microscopy (AFM) after MHIFU irradiation of TSL. We demonstrate that compared to the routine HIFU treatment, MHIFU enables monitoring of in situ interactions between the ultrasound and cell in real time. Furthermore, it can quantitatively analyze and characterize the alterations of the cell membrane as a function of the treatment time. PMID:26379786

  13. A novel pH-sensitive membrane from chitosan--TEOS IPN; preparation and its drug permeation characteristics.

    PubMed

    Park, S B; You, J O; Park, H Y; Haam, S J; Kim, W S

    2001-02-01

    A novel organic-inorganic composite membrane was prepared, using tetra ethyl ortho silicate (TEOS) as an inorganic material and chitosan as an organic compound. Equilibrium and oscillatory swelling studies were conducted to investigate swelling behaviors of the membrane according to the pH of the swelling medium. Drug permeation experiments were also performed in phosphate buffer solution of the pH of 2.5 and 7.5, respectively. Lidocaine HCl, sodium salicylate and 4-acetamidophenol were selected as model drugs to examine the effect of ionic property of drug on the permeation behavior. The effects of membrane composition and the external pH on the swelling and the drug permeation behavior of IPN membrane could be summarized as follows; chitosan incorporated into TEOS IPN swelled at pH 2.5 while shrunk at pH 7.5. This swelling behavior was completely reversible and the membrane responded rapidly to the change in environmental pH condition. According to swelling behavior, an increase in pH from 2.5 to 7.5 yielded an increase in the rate of drug permeation because of the shrinking of the incorporated chitosan in TEOS IPN, while decrease in pH resulted in low permeation rate. The optimal TEOS-chitosan ratio for maximum pH-sensitivity existed and drug permeation was influenced not only with the external pH but also with the ionic interactions between the drug and membrane. PMID:11205435

  14. Adolescent exposure to cocaine, amphetamine, and methylphenidate cross-sensitizes adults to methamphetamine with drug- and sex-specific effects.

    PubMed

    Shanks, Ryan A; Ross, Jordan M; Doyle, Hillary H; Helton, Amanda K; Picou, Brittany N; Schulz, Jordyn; Tavares, Chris; Bryant, Sarah; Dawson, Bryan L; Lloyd, Steven A

    2015-03-15

    The increasing availability, over-prescription, and misuse and abuse of ADHD psychostimulant medications in adolescent populations necessitates studies investigating the long-term effects of these drugs persisting into adulthood. Male and female C57Bl/6J mice were exposed to amphetamine (AMPH) (1.0 and 10 mg/kg), methylphenidate (MPD) (1.0 and 10 mg/kg), or cocaine (COC) (5.0 mg/kg) from postnatal day 22 to 31, which represents an early adolescent period. After an extended period of drug abstinence, adult mice were challenged with a subacute methamphetamine (METH) dose (0.5 mg/kg), to test the long-term effects of adolescent drug exposures on behavioral cross-sensitization using an open field chamber. There were no sex- or dose-specific effects on motor activity in adolescent, saline-treated controls. However, AMPH, MPD, and COC adolescent exposures induced cross-sensitization to a subacute METH dose in adulthood, which is a hallmark of addiction and a marker of long-lasting plastic changes in the brain. Of additional clinical importance, AMPH-exposed male mice demonstrated increased cross-sensitization to METH in contrast to the female-specific response observed in MPD-treated animals. There were no sex-specific effects after adolescent COC exposures. This study demonstrates differential drug, dose, and sex-specific alterations induced by early adolescent psychostimulant exposure, which leads to behavioral alterations that persist into adulthood. PMID:25496784

  15. A survey of sensitivity to anticoccidial drugs in 60 isolates of coccidia from broiler chickens in Brazil and Argentina.

    PubMed

    McDougald, L R; Da Silva, J M; Solis, J; Braga, M

    1987-01-01

    Coccidia were isolated from 90 broiler farms in 15 poultry-producing areas in Brazil and Argentina. Sixty isolates were tested for sensitivity to 7 anticoccidial drugs. The common species were: a) Eimeria tenella, 47 isolates; b) E. maxima, 49 isolates; c) E. acervulina, 44 isolates; d) E. mitis, 26 isolates; and e) E. brunetti, 12 isolates. Isolates were considered sensitive to drugs if intestinal lesion scores of medicated broilers were reduced by at least 50% compared with unmedicated infected broilers or if weight gain was at least 75% of that of uninfected birds in a 6-day laboratory test. According to lesion scores, there was evidence of resistance or seriously reduced sensitivity to monensin in 20 isolates, narasin in 29, salinomycin in 11, maduramicin in 1, clopidol in 36, amprolium in 40, and nicarbazin in 1. According to broiler weight gain, there was resistance to monensin in 36 isolates, narasin in 32, salinomycin in 28, maduramicin in 2, clopidol in 28, amprolium in 50, and nicarbazin in 4. These results suggested incomplete cross resistance of coccidia to polyether ionophorous drugs. The degree of resistance might be explained by previous patterns of use of these drugs. PMID:3619821

  16. Mammaglobin 1 promotes breast cancer malignancy and confers sensitivity to anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Picot, Nadia; Guerrette, Roxann; Beauregard, Annie-Pier; Jean, Stéphanie; Michaud, Pascale; Harquail, Jason; Benzina, Sami; Robichaud, Gilles A

    2016-07-01

    Mammaglobin 1 (MGB1), a member of the secretoglobin family, is expressed in mammary epithelial tissues and is overexpressed in most mammary carcinomas. Despite the extensive research correlating MGB1 expression profiles to breast cancer pathogenesis and disease outcome, the biological significance of MGB1 in cancer processes is still unclear. We have thus set out to conduct a functional evaluation of the molecular and cellular roles of MGB1 in breast cancer processes leading to disease progression. Using a series of breast cancer cell models with conditional MGB1 expression, we demonstrate that MGB1 promotes cancer cell malignant features. More specifically, loss of MGB1 expression resulted in a decrease of cell proliferation, soft agar spheroid formation, migration, and invasion capacities of breast cancer cells. Concomitantly, we also observed that MGB1 expression activates signaling pathways mediated by MAPK members (p38, JNK, and ERK), the focal adhesion kinase (FAK), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and NFκB. Moreover, MGB1 regulates epithelial to mesenchymal (EMT) features and modulates Snail, Twist and ZEB1 expression levels. Interestingly, we also observed that expression of MGB1 confers breast cancer cell sensitivity to anticancer drug-induced apoptosis. Together, our results support a role for MGB1 in tumor malignancy in exchange for chemosensitivity. These findings provide one of the first descriptive overview of the molecular and cellular roles of MGB1 in breast cancer processes and may offer new insight to the development of therapeutic and prognostic strategies in breast cancer patients. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26207726

  17. Combination therapy with nilotinib for drug-sensitive and drug-resistant BCR-ABL-positive leukemia and other malignancies.

    PubMed

    Weisberg, Ellen; Nonami, Atsushi; Griffin, James D

    2014-12-01

    Despite the clinical efficacy achieved with frontline therapies for BCR-ABL-positive disease, such as imatinib and second-generation ABL inhibitors like nilotinib or dasatinib that were originally designed to override insensitivity to imatinib, drug resistance still remains a challenge, especially for patients with advanced-stage chronic myeloid leukemia or Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The discovery of BCR-ABL point mutations has been a great asset to furthering our understanding of a major cause of drug resistance, as has discovery of multidrug resistance proteins, dysregulation of signaling molecules downstream of BCR-ABL, and insights into the underlying causes of stromal-mediated chemoresistance. Such elucidation of mechanisms of resistance associated with leukemic cell survival is essential for the optimization of current therapies and enhancement of patient survival via delaying or preventing disease recurrence. Here, we present an overview of the use of nilotinib in combination with other agents against BCR-ABL-positive leukemia, as well as solid tumors, for the purpose of increasing clinical efficacy and overriding drug resistance. PMID:25331939

  18. A murine model of epicutaneous protein sensitization is useful to study efficacies of topical drugs in atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Lehto, Maili; Savinko, Terhi; Wolff, Henrik; Kvist, Peter H; Kemp, Kaare; Lauerma, Antti; Alenius, Harri

    2010-04-01

    We studied the suitability of our murine model for the treatment trials of atopic dermatitis (AD). In this model topical application of ovalbumin (OVA) together with bacterial superantigen, staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) induces a cutaneous disease resembling AD. Injured mouse skin was treated with three different drugs: a class III corticosteroid, a calcineurin inhibitor and a type 4 phosphodiesterase inhibitor. One-week treatment with corticosteroid and phosphodiesterase inhibitor remarkably decreased both epidermal and dermal thickness, whereas the calcineurin inhibitor affected only the epidermal thickness. All investigated drugs reduced the infiltration of eosinophils and mast cells onto OVA/SEB sensitized skin areas, whereas CD4+ and CD8+ T cells as well as CD11c+ dendritic cells variously diminished after corticosteroid and calcineurin inhibitor treatments. Cutaneous expression of interleukin -4, -13, -10 and interferon-gamma also decreased differently depending on drug type. Interestingly, the calcineurin inhibitor and phosphodiesterase inhibitor increased total IgE antibodies and decreased SEB-specific IgG2a antibodies in OVA/SEB sensitized mice. All these drugs can ameliorate cutaneous inflammation, although the degree of recovery depends on the type of the drug. In summary, our results show that this mouse model can be used to test new topical treatments for AD. PMID:20074670

  19. Development of novel polymeric materials for gene therapy and pH-sensitive drug delivery: Modeling, synthesis, characterization, and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Brian Curtis

    The aim of this work was to obtain a fundamental understanding of drug release mechanisms from polymers that undergo thermoreversible gelation and to synthesize new polymers based on these that exhibit both pH and temperature sensitivity. Novel block and random copolymers with cationic character have been developed for drug delivery and gene therapy applications. The development of these materials began with a study of the mechanism of drug release from poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) block copolymers. This study revealed the release rates of drugs from water-soluble hydrogels composed of the PEO-PPO-PEO block copolymer PluronicRTM F127 was dictated almost solely by the rate of interfacial dissolution at the water/gel interface. A setup was designed to measure drug release from such soluble systems in order to avoid confounding hydrodynamic effects as a result of shear on the delicate polymer/gel interface. This study was followed by a complementary analysis of the effect ionic salts play in the phase transitions and drug release profiles in aqueous F127 solutions. In an attempt to incorporate pH sensitivity into such drug release systems, several block copolymers of poly(N,N-diethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PDEAEM), PEO and PPO were synthesized via anionic polymerization. Diblock materials (PEO-b-PDEAEM), either with or without a carboxylic acid endcap, were synthesized and characterized. Tablet dissolution experiments demonstrated pH-sensitivity in their drug release profiles relative to PEO tablets. Pentablock materials (PDEAEM-b-PEO-b-PPO- b-PEO-b-PDEAEM) were synthesized that maintain the thermoreversible gelation and micellization properties of F127 while introducing pH-dependent release from aqueous gels of the copolymer. This is the first example of non-crosslinked materials that exhibit both pH- and temperature-sensitive behavior. Using a similar synthesis route, random copolymers of PDEAEM and poly(poly(ethylene glycol) methyl

  20. pH- and temperature-sensitive polymeric microspheres for drug delivery: the dissolution of copolymers modulates drug release.

    PubMed

    Fundueanu, Gheorghe; Constantin, Marieta; Stanciu, Cristina; Theodoridis, Georgios; Ascenzi, Paolo

    2009-12-01

    Most pH-/temperature-responsive polymers for controlled release of drugs are used as cross-linked hydrogels. However, the solubility properties of the linear polymers below and above the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) are not exploited. Here, the preparation and characterization of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide-co-methacrylic acid-co-methyl methacrylate) (poly (NIPAAm-co-MA-co-MM)) and poly (N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) (poly (NIPAAm-co-AAm)), known as "smart" polymers (SP), is reported. Both poly (NIPAAm-co-MA-co-MM) and poly (NIPAAm-co-AAm) display pH- and temperature-responsive properties. Poly (NIPAAm-co-MA-co-MM) was designed to be insoluble in the gastric fluid (pH = 1.2), but soluble in the intestinal fluid (pH = 6.8 and 7.4), at the body temperature (37 degrees C). Poly (NIPAAm-co-AAm) was designed to have a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) corresponding to 37 degrees C at pH = 7.4, therefore it is not soluble above the LCST. The solubility characteristics of these copolymers were exploited to modulate the rate of release of drugs by changing pH and/or temperature. These copolymers were solubilized with hydrophobic cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) and vitamin B(12) (taken as a water soluble drug model system) in an acetone/methanol mixture and dispersed in mineral oil. By a progressive evaporation of the solvent, the liquid droplets were transformed into loaded CAB/SP microspheres. Differential scanning calorimetric studies and scanning electron microscopy analysis demonstrated that the polymeric components of the microspheres precipitated separately during solvent evaporation forming small microdomains. Moreover, vitamin B(12) was found to be molecularly dispersed in both microdomains with no specific affinity for any polymeric component of microspheres. The release of vitamin B(12) was investigated as a function of temperature, pH, and the CAB/SP ratio. PMID:19562468

  1. Rheology-sensitive response of zeolite-supported anti-inflammatory drug systems.

    PubMed

    Pasquino, R; Di Domenico, M; Izzo, F; Gaudino, D; Vanzanella, V; Grizzuti, N; de Gennaro, B

    2016-10-01

    Drug release from inorganic supports is a challenge for the scientific community for various reasons, related to the low costs of the systems and the possibility of easily regulating the drug release. In the present work, surface-modified zeolite particles are used as carriers for non steroidal antiflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The release of the drug has been studied in a solution that simulates the intestinal fluid as well as in a gel-like system, based on a surfactant and a binding salt. In the solution case, the quantity of drug released has been tracked via spectrophotometric assay. Release in the gel has been monitored by rheological methods. The molecular conformation of the NSAIDs is fundamental for the interaction with the zeolite surface, whose modified surface has a strong binding energy. It has been proven that the main mechanism for the drug release is anion exchange. It has been found that the NSAIDs, used in their sodic form, can act as binding salts by themselves in the gel-like system, thus changing the viscoelastic response of the overall solution. Drug release kinetics in the solution compare quantitatively well with the released drug in the gel-like fluid, as measured by rheometry. PMID:27479877

  2. Development of Novel Polymeric Materials for Gene Therapy and pH-Sensitive Drug Delivery: Modeling, Synthesis, Characterization, and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brian Curtis Anderson

    2002-08-27

    The underlying theme of this thesis is the use of polymeric materials in bioapplications. Chapters 2-5 either develop a fundamental understanding of current materials used for bioapplications or establish protocols and procedures used in characterizing and synthesizing novel materials. In chapters 6 and 7 these principles and procedures are applied to the development of materials to be used for gene therapy and drug delivery. Chapter one is an introduction to the ideas that will be necessary to understand the subsequent chapters, as well as a literature review of these topics. Chapter two is a paper that has been published in the ''Journal of Controlled Release'' that examines the mechanism of drug release from a polymer gel, as well as experimental design suggestions for the evaluation of water soluble drug delivery systems. Chapter three is a paper that has been published in the ''Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences'' that discusses the effect ionic salts have on properties of the polymer systems examined in chapter two. Chapter four is a paper published in the Materials Research Society Fall 2000 Symposium Series dealing with the design and synthesis of a pH-sensitive polymeric drug delivery device. Chapter five is a paper that has been published in the journal ''Biomaterials'' proposing a novel polymer/metal composite for use as a biomaterial in hip arthroplasty surgery. Chapter six is a paper that will appear in an upcoming volume of the Journal ''Biomaterials'' dealing with the synthesis of a novel water soluble cationic polymer with possible applications in non-viral gene therapy. Chapter seven is a paper that has been submitted to ''Macromolecules'' discussing several novel block copolymers based on poly(ethylene glycol) and poly(diethylamino ethyl methacrylate) that possess both pH-sensitive and temperature sensitive properties. Chapter eight contains a summary of the research contained in chapters 2-7 and proposes future research for the gene therapy and

  3. Development of a glucose-sensitive drug delivery device: Microencapsulated liposomes and poly(2-ethylacrylic acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanokpanont, Sorada

    The current study is the development a self-regulated, glucose responsive drug delivery system, using dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) liposomes, a pH sensitive polymer, poly (2-ethylacrylic acid)(PEAA), and the feed back reaction of glucose with glucose oxidase enzyme (GO). The thesis investigates the use of PEAR and liposomes to work inside a microcapsule in response to the glucose level of the environment, by following the release of fluorescence probes, 8-aminonapthalene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid, disodium salt/p-xylene-bis-pyridimuim bromide (ANTS/DPX) and a model protein, myoglobin. The continuing studies of PEAR and liposome interaction indicated an evidence of the previous hypothesis of two-mode release at different pHs. Differential scanning calorimetric studies of DOPC and PEAA complexes revealed the possibility of polymer adsorption to the liposomes in the pH range 5.5--7.0 and insertion in the liposome bilayer at pH < 5.2. The rate and extent of ANTS/DPX release from un-encapsulated liposomes were found to be affected by pH, PEAR concentration, presence of cholesterol in the liposomes, Ca 2+, and the concentration of sodium alginate. We have also shown possibilities of anchoring PEAR on to liposome by covalent conjugation although this led to inactivation of the polymer. It is also possible to entrap small molecular weight PEAA in liposomes. The evidence of the pH-induced protein release by the interaction of PEAA and liposomes was first demonstrated in this thesis. Kinetic parameters of GO were estimated to use as a basis for determination optimal concentration in the capsules. The pH reduction inside the capsule due to GO reaction showed positive results for the use of GO in a non-buffered system. The procedure of liquid-core alginate capsules was modified to facilitate the pH-responsive release of ANTS/DPX and myoglobin. The capsules responded to high blood glucose concentration by releasing myoglobin within 30 minutes. Although more studies are

  4. Artesunate overcomes drug resistance in multiple myeloma by inducing mitochondrial stress and non-caspase apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Papanikolaou, Xenofon; Johnson, Sarah; Garg, Tarun; Tian, Erming; Tytarenko, Ruslana; Zhang, Qing; Stein, Caleb; Barlogie, Bart; Epstein, Joshua; Heuck, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Although novel drugs have contributed immensely to improving outcomes of patients with multiple myeloma (MM), many patients develop drug resistance and ultimately succumb to MM. Here, we show that artesunate, an anti-malarial drug, reliably induces cell death in vitro in naïve as well as drug-resistant MM cells at concentrations shown to be safe in humans. Artesunate induced apoptosis predominantly through the non-caspase mediated pathway by primarily targeting mitochondria and causing outer mitochondrial membrane permeabilization that led to cytosolic and subsequent nuclear translocation of mitochondrial proteins apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) and endonuclease G (EndoG). Nuclear translocation of AIF and EndoG was accompanied by low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increased mitochondrial production of superoxide. These effects were present before apoptosis was evident and were related to intracellular levels of bivalent iron (Fe+2). Artesunate's unique mechanism probably was at least partially responsible for, its ability to act synergistically with multiple anti-myeloma agents. Our findings suggest that artesunate acts through iron to affect the mitochondria and induce low ROS and non-caspase–mediated apoptosis. Its potency, toxicity profile, and synergism with other drugs make it an intriguing new candidate for MM treatment. PMID:24948357

  5. pH-sensitive pullulan-based nanoparticle carrier for adriamycin to overcome drug-resistance of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hua; Liu, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yan; Wu, Jing; Yang, Xiaoying; Li, Rongshan; Wang, Yinsong; Zhang, Ning

    2014-10-13

    Urocanic acid was conjugated to pullulan to synthesize O-urocanyl pullulan (URPA) with degree of substitution (DS) of 8.2%. URPA nanoparticles prepared by dialysis method had spherical shapes and a mean diameter of 156.8 ± 16.8 nm. Adriamycin (ADR) was successfully loaded into URPA nanoparticles and exhibited pH-sensitive in vitro release property. MTT assay showed that ADR-loaded URPA (ADR/URPA) nanoparticles had a significant higher toxicity against drug resistant MCF-7/ADR cells than free ADR, and the reversal index reached up to 9.6. The results of flow cytometry and confocal microscopy showed that URPA nanoparticles efficiently enhanced accumulation and retention of ADR in MCF-7/ADR cells and successfully delivered ADR into cell nucleus. The reversal effect of ADR/URPA nanoparticles on the drug resistance of MCF-7/ADR cells was perhaps related with their cell entry and intracellular drug release mechanisms. PMID:25037431

  6. Importance of P450 reductase activity in determining sensitivity of breast tumour cells to the bioreductive drug, tirapazamine (SR 4233).

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, A. V.; Barham, H. M.; Chinje, E. C.; Adams, G. E.; Harris, A. L.; Stratford, I. J.

    1995-01-01

    P450 reductase (NADPH:cytochrome P450 reductase, EC 1.6.2.4) is known to be important in the reductive activation of the benzotriazene-di-N-oxide tirapazamine (SR 4233). Using a panel of six human breast adenocarcinoma cell lines we have examined the relationship between P450 reductase activity and sensitivity to tirapazamine. The toxicity of tirapazamine was found to correlate strongly with P450 reductase activity following an acute (3 h) exposure under hypoxic conditions, the drug being most toxic in the cell lines with the highest P450 reductase activity. A similar correlation was also observed following a chronic (96 h) exposure to the drug in air but not following acute (3 h) exposure in air. We have also determined the ability of lysates prepared from the cell lines to metabolise tirapazamine to its two-electron reduced product, SR 4317, under hypoxic conditions using NADPH as an electron donor. The rate of SR 4317 formation was found to correlate both with P450 reductase activity and with sensitivity to tirapazamine, the highest rates of SR 4317 formation being associated with the highest levels of P450 reductase activity and the greatest sensitivity to the drug. These findings indicate a major role for P450 reductase in determining the hypoxic toxicity of tirapazamine in breast tumour cell lines. Images Figure 4 PMID:7577460

  7. Enhanced anticancer activity of nanopreparation containing an MMP2-sensitive PEG-drug conjugate and cell-penetrating moiety.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lin; Wang, Tao; Perche, Federico; Taigind, Anton; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2013-10-15

    In response to the challenges of cancer chemotherapeutics, including poor physicochemical properties, low tumor targeting, insufficient tumor cell internalization/bioavailability, and side effects, we developed a unique tumor-targeted micellar drug-delivery platform. Using paclitaxel as a model therapeutic, a nanopreparation composed of a matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2)-sensitive self-assembly PEG 2000-paclitaxel conjugate (as a prodrug and MMP 2-sensitive moiety), transactivating transcriptional activator peptide-PEG1000-phosphoethanolamine (PE) (a cell-penetrating enhancer), and PEG1000-PE (a nanocarrier building block) was prepared. Several major drug delivery strategies, including self-assembly, PEGylation, the enhanced permeability and retention effect, stimulus sensitivity, a cell-penetrating moiety, and the concept of prodrug, were used in design of this nanoparticle in a collaborative manner. The nanopreparation allowed superior cell internalization, cytotoxicity, tumor targeting, and antitumor efficacy in vitro and in vivo over its nonsensitive counterpart, free paclitaxel and conventional micelles. This uniquely engineered nanoparticle has potential for effective intracellular delivery of drug into cancer cells. PMID:24062440

  8. Enzyme- and pH-Sensitive Branched Polymer-Doxorubicin Conjugate-Based Nanoscale Drug Delivery System for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoli; Luo, Qiang; Sun, Ling; Li, Xue; Zhu, Hongyan; Guan, Pujun; Wu, Min; Luo, Kui; Gong, Qiyong

    2016-05-11

    Owing to their dendritic architectural features, branched copolymers have been investigated as drug delivery systems. In this paper, an enzyme- and pH-sensitive branched poly[N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide] (polyHPMA) copolymer-doxorubicin (DOX) conjugate possessing a molecular weight (MW) of 165 kDa was designed and prepared via a one-pot reaction and drug conjugation. This conjugate's potential as a smart, nanoscale drug delivery system (NDDS) is also investigated. The branched conjugate was capable of forming nanoparticles with a negative surface charge. The self-assembled nanoparticles were 102 nm in diameter as measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and 95 nm in diameter via scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The nanoparticles were degraded to low-MW products (23∼25 kDa) in the presence of papain or cathepsin B, and the degradation was monitored via DLS and size-exclusion chromatography. The nanoparticles demonstrated pH-sensitive drug release, as the DOX was attached to the branched copolymer via a hydrazone bond. In comparison to free DOX, the conjugate-based nanoparticles exhibited greater accumulation in breast tumors, resulting in enhanced antitumor therapeutic indexes. Furthermore, widespread dissemination of the conjugate among breast tumor cells was confirmed by immunohistochemical assay. Finally, no obvious systemic toxicities were observed in vivo in normal mice. Thus, the branched HPMA copolymer-DOX conjugate may be employed as a safe and efficient pH- and enzyme-responsive NDDS for cancer therapy. PMID:27102364

  9. The butyrylcholinesterase knockout mouse a research tool in the study of drug sensitivity, bio-distribution, obesity and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Duysen, Ellen G; Li, Bin; Lockridge, Oksana

    2009-05-01

    Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) mutations common in the human population may result in complete or partial BChE deficiency, making the BChE knockout (KO) mouse a model for human deficiencies. The BChE KO mouse cannot tolerate standard doses of the muscle relaxant succinylcholine or the Alzheimer's disease drugs huperzine A and donepezil. It is resistant to the asthma drug bambuterol. The importance of BChE in detoxication of cocaine has been demonstrated by hepatotoxicity and cardiotoxicity in cocaine-challenged BChE KO mice. The BChE KO mouse becomes obese on a high-fat diet, suggesting a role for BChE in fat metabolism. BChE serves as a backup for acetylcholinesterase by hydrolyzing the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in acetylcholinesterase knockout mice. Imaging studies show that BChE injected intrathecally crosses the blood-brain barrier. Mice, but not humans, have carboxylesterase in their blood. Carboxylesterase obscures the role of BChE in detoxication of organophosphorus pesticides. Future studies will make a double knockout that has neither BChE nor carboxylesterase. The double knockout is expected to be unusually sensitive to the toxicity of organophosphorus pesticides. Knowledge of drug sensitivities in the mouse model of human BChE deficiency will aid in understanding adverse drug effects in humans. PMID:19416087

  10. Light-sensitive Lipid-based Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery: Design Principles and Future Considerations for Biological Applications

    PubMed Central

    Yavlovich, Amichai; Smith, Brandon; Gupta, Kshitij; Blumenthal, Robert; Puri, Anu

    2011-01-01

    Radiation-based therapies aided by nanoparticles have been developed since decades, and can be primarily categorized into two main platforms. First, delivery of payload of photo-reactive drugs (photosensitizers) using the conventional nanoparticles, and second, design and development of photo-triggerable nanoparticles (primarily liposomes) to attain light-assisted on-demand drug delivery. The main focus of this review is to provide an update of the history, current status and future applications of photo-triggerable lipid-based nanoparticles (light-sensitive liposomes). We will begin with a brief overview on the applications of liposomes for delivery of photosensitizers, including the choice of photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy, as well as the currently available light sources (lasers) used for these applications. The main segment of this review will encompass the details on the strategies to develop photo-triggerable designer liposomes for their drug delivery function. The principles underlying the assembly of photoreactive lipids into nanoparticles (liposomes) and photo-triggering mechanisms will be presented. We will also discuss factors that limit the applications of these liposomes for in vivo triggered drug delivery and emerging concepts that may lead to the biologically viable photo-activation strategies. We will conclude with our view point on the future perspectives of light-sensitive liposomes in the clinic. PMID:20939770

  11. Magnetic targeted drug delivery carriers encapsulated with pH-sensitive polymer: synthesis, characterization and in vitro doxorubicin release studies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Juan; Shen, Yueqing; Jiang, Wei; Jiang, Wei; Shen, Yewen

    2016-09-01

    Targeted and efficient delivery of drug to tumor is one of the crucial issues in cancer therapy. In this work, we have successfully designed and prepared the pH-sensitive magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as targeted anticancer drug carriers, in which the MNPs were coated by poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and the obtained PAA@MNPs exhibited a size within 100 nm, good stability, and superparamagnetic responsibility (Ms 45.97 emu/g). Doxorubicin (DOX) can be successfully loaded onto MNPs via electrostatic interaction, and the drug loading content and loading efficiency are 26.4 and 88.1%, respectively. Moreover, the release studies showed that the drug-loaded carriers (MNPs-DOX) had excellent pH sensitivity, 75.6% of the loaded DOX was released at pH 4.0 within 48 h. Importantly, MTT assays in HUVEC and MCF-7 cells demonstrated that MNPs-DOX exhibited high anti-tumor activity, while the PAA@MNPs were practically nontoxic. Thus, our results revealed that PAA@MNPs would be a competitive candidate for biomedical application and MNPs-DOX could be used in targeted cancer therapy. PMID:27252073

  12. Survival of Civilian and Prisoner Drug-Sensitive, Multi- and Extensive Drug- Resistant Tuberculosis Cohorts Prospectively Followed in Russia

    PubMed Central

    Balabanova, Yanina; Nikolayevskyy, Vladyslav; Ignatyeva, Olga; Kontsevaya, Irina; Rutterford, Clare M.; Shakhmistova, Anastasiya; Malomanova, Nadezhda; Chinkova, Yulia; Mironova, Svetlana; Fedorin, Ivan; Drobniewski, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective and Methods A long-term observational study was conducted in Samara, Russia to assess the survival and risk factors for death of a cohort of non-multidrug resistant tuberculosis (non-MDRTB) and multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDRTB) civilian and prison patients and a civilian extensive drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDRTB) cohort. Results MDRTB and XDRTB rates of 54.8% and 11.1% were identified in the region. Half (50%) of MDRTB patients and the majority of non-MDRTB patients (71%) were still alive at 5 years. Over half (58%) of the patients died within two years of establishing a diagnosis of XDRTB. In the multivariate analysis, retreatment (HR = 1.61, 95%CI 1.04, 2.49) and MDRTB (HR = 1.67, 95%CI 1.17, 2.39) were significantly associated with death within the non-MDR/MDRTB cohort. The effect of age on survival was relatively small (HR = 1.01, 95%CI 1.00, 1.02). No specific factor affected survival of XDRTB patients although median survival time for HIV-infected versus HIV-negative patients from this group was shorter (185 versus 496 days). The majority of MDRTB and XDRTB strains (84% and 92% respectively) strains belonged to the Beijing family. Mutations in the rpoB (codon 531 in 81/92; 88.8%), katG (mutation S315T in 91/92, 98.9%) and inhA genes accounted for most rifampin and isoniazid resistance respectively, mutations in the QRDR region of gyrA for most fluroquinolone resistance (68/92; 73.5%). Conclusions Alarmingly high rates of XDRTB exist. Previous TB treatment cycles and MDR were significant risk factors for mortality. XDRTB patients' survival is short especially for HIV-infected patients. Beijing family strains comprise the majority of drug-resistant strains. PMID:21695213

  13. A simple, rapid, and sensitive system for the evaluation of anti-viral drugs in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaoguang; Qian, Hua; Miyamoto, Fusako; Kawaji, Kumi; Hattori, Toshio; Watanabe, Kentaro; Oishi, Shinya; Fujii, Nobutaka; and others

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We established a novel, simple and rapid in vivo system for evaluation of anti-HIV-1 drugs with rats. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The system may be applicable for other antiviral drugs, and/or useful for initial screening in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In this system, TRI-1144 displayed the most potent anti-HIV-1 activity in vivo. -- Abstract: The lack of small animal models for the evaluation of anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) agents hampers drug development. Here, we describe the establishment of a simple and rapid evaluation system in a rat model without animal infection facilities. After intraperitoneal administration of test drugs to rats, antiviral activity in the sera was examined by the MAGI assay. Recently developed inhibitors for HIV-1 entry, two CXCR4 antagonists, TF14016 and FC131, and four fusion inhibitors, T-20, T-20EK, SC29EK, and TRI-1144, were evaluated using HIV-1{sub IIIB} and HIV-1{sub BaL} as representative CXCR4- and CCR5-tropic HIV-1 strains, respectively. CXCR4 antagonists were shown to only possess anti-HIV-1{sub IIIB} activity, whereas fusion inhibitors showed both anti-HIV-1{sub IIIB} and anti-HIV-1{sub BaL} activities in rat sera. These results indicate that test drugs were successfully processed into the rat sera and could be detected by the MAGI assay. In this system, TRI-1144 showed the most potent and sustained antiviral activity. Sera from animals not administered drugs showed substantial anti-HIV-1 activity, indicating that relatively high dose or activity of the test drugs might be needed. In conclusion, the novel rat system established here, 'phenotypic drug evaluation', may be applicable for the evaluation of various antiviral drugs in vivo.

  14. Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter, PfCRT, enlarge the parasite's food vacuole and alter drug sensitivities.

    PubMed

    Pulcini, Serena; Staines, Henry M; Lee, Andrew H; Shafik, Sarah H; Bouyer, Guillaume; Moore, Catherine M; Daley, Daniel A; Hoke, Matthew J; Altenhofen, Lindsey M; Painter, Heather J; Mu, Jianbing; Ferguson, David J P; Llinás, Manuel; Martin, Rowena E; Fidock, David A; Cooper, Roland A; Krishna, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter, PfCRT, are the major determinant of chloroquine resistance in this lethal human malaria parasite. Here, we describe P. falciparum lines subjected to selection by amantadine or blasticidin that carry PfCRT mutations (C101F or L272F), causing the development of enlarged food vacuoles. These parasites also have increased sensitivity to chloroquine and some other quinoline antimalarials, but exhibit no or minimal change in sensitivity to artemisinins, when compared with parental strains. A transgenic parasite line expressing the L272F variant of PfCRT confirmed this increased chloroquine sensitivity and enlarged food vacuole phenotype. Furthermore, the introduction of the C101F or L272F mutation into a chloroquine-resistant variant of PfCRT reduced the ability of this protein to transport chloroquine by approximately 93 and 82%, respectively, when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. These data provide, at least in part, a mechanistic explanation for the increased sensitivity of the mutant parasite lines to chloroquine. Taken together, these findings provide new insights into PfCRT function and PfCRT-mediated drug resistance, as well as the food vacuole, which is an important target of many antimalarial drugs. PMID:26420308

  15. Nationwide survey of the development of drug-resistance in the pediatric field: drug sensitivity of Haemophilus influenzae in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Hiroshi; Toyonaga, Yoshikiyo; Sato, Yoshitake; Hanaki, Hideaki; Nonoyama, Masato; Oishi, Tomohiro; Sunakawa, Keisuke

    2009-12-01

    We evaluated the beta-lactamase-producing ability and resistance to 20 antibacterial agents of 448 clinically isolated strains of Haemophilus influenzae accumulated from October 2000 to July 2001 (phase 1) and of 376 different strains accumulated from January to June 2004 (phase 2), from institutions that participated in a nationwide Drug-Resistant Pathogen Surveillance Group in Pediatric Infectious Disease. Between phase 1 and phase 2 the proportion of beta-lactamase-negative ampicillin (ABPC)-susceptible (BLNAS) strains declined from 62.9% to 34.3%; the proportions of beta-lactamase-positive ABPC-resistant (BLPAR) strains were 8.3% and 6.4% in phases 1 and 2, but the proportion of beta-lactamase-negative ABPC-resistant (BLNAR) strains increased from 28.8% in phase 1 to 59.3% in phase 2. Comparison of the MIC(90) values of the antibacterial agents for H. influenzae in phase 1 and phase 2 showed that cefcapene, cefpodoxime, ceftriaxone, panipenem, and clarithromycin kept the same level, while cefdinir, faropenem, and rokitamycin showed 2-fold to 8-fold decreases. With the exception of the above antibiotics, all of the other antibacterial agents tested showed 2-fold to 4-fold increases. The MIC(90) values of the beta-lactam drugs for BLNAR were 2-fold to 32-fold higher than the values for BLNAS. The proportion of BLNAR H. influenzae strains rose dramatically over the 3 years between phases 1 and 2. In relation to age, prior administration of antibacterial agents, and attendance at a day nursery as background factors, no significant differences between BLNAS and BLNAR were detected in phase 1. In the phase 2 survey, the proportion of BLNAR strains showed significant differences between children under 3 years and those aged 3 years or more, and there were also significant differences according to whether antibacterial agents, especially beta-lactams, had been administered previously. No significant difference was found in resistant bacteria according to whether or not

  16. Development of Nano-Liposomal Formulations of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Inhibitors and their Pharmacological Interactions on Drug-Sensitive and Drug-Resistant Cancer Cell Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trummer, Brian J.

    , due to leaky tumor vasculature and the resulting Enhanced Permeability and Retention (EPR) phenomenon. In Chapter 2 we report that both gefitinib and the structurally similar EGFR inhibitor erlotinib display environment-dependent fluorescence properties. Peak excitation was 345 nm, and the emission peak ranged from 365 to 476 nm, depending upon the polarity of the environment and physical state of the drug. The fluorescence was negligible in aqueous solution, but intense in organic solvents or membrane bilayers. The environment-sensitive fluorescence properties of these drugs enabled rapid evaluation of numerous parameters affecting liposomal drug incorporation and performance. Up to 4-6 mol% of gefitinib could be incorporated in the liposome bilayer, based upon hydrophobic interactions with membrane bilayers. In contrast, 40-60 mol% could be loaded into the aqueous core of pre-formed liposomes at high efficiency, using a remote loading procedure. A stable formulation consisting of distearoylphosphatidylcholine: polyethylene glycol-distereoylphosphatidylethanolamine: cholesterol (DSPC:PEGDSPE:Chol, 9:1:5 mol:mol:mol) and containing drug at 50-60 mol% gefitinib (L-GEF) showed minimal leakage in serum-containing medium over 24 h at 37°C, which should be sufficient to improve biodistribution in vivo. Chapter 3 investigated the pharmacological activity of liposome-encapsulated gefitinib, alone and in combination with several prevalent anticancer agents. Experiments with MCF7 breast cancer cell lines demonstrated that liposome encapsulated gefitinib formulation (L-GEF) had a 2-fold higher IC50 (concentration of drug resulting in half-maximal growth inhibition) than free gefitinib. Lower in vitro potency would be consistent with delayed drug release from the carrier. Therapeutic effects were investigated in combination with the cytotoxic agents paclitaxel and doxorubicin. The drug-resistant MCF7R cell line was 23-fold more resistant to paclitaxel than the parental, drug-sensitive

  17. Graphene oxide-enhanced sol-gel transition sensitivity and drug release performance of an amphiphilic copolymer-based nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huawen; Wang, Xiaowen; Lee, Ka I; Ma, Kaikai; Hu, Hong; Xin, John H

    2016-01-01

    We report the fabrication of a highly sensitive amphiphilic copolymer-based nanocomposite incorporating with graphene oxide (GO), which exhibited a low-intensity UV light-triggered sol-gel transition. Non-cytotoxicity was observed for the composite gels after the GO incorporation. Of particular interest were the microchannels that were formed spontaneously within the GO-incorporated UV-gel, which expedited sustained drug release. Therefore, the present highly UV-sensitive, non-cytotoxic amphiphilic copolymer-based composites is expected to provide enhanced photothermal therapy and chemotherapy by means of GO's unique photothermal properties, as well as through efficient passive targeting resulting from the sol-gel transition characteristic of the copolymer-based system with improved sensitivity, which thus promises the enhanced treatment of patients with cancer and other diseases. PMID:27539298

  18. Graphene oxide-enhanced sol-gel transition sensitivity and drug release performance of an amphiphilic copolymer-based nanocomposite

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Huawen; Wang, Xiaowen; Lee, Ka I; Ma, Kaikai; Hu, Hong; Xin, John H.

    2016-01-01

    We report the fabrication of a highly sensitive amphiphilic copolymer-based nanocomposite incorporating with graphene oxide (GO), which exhibited a low-intensity UV light-triggered sol-gel transition. Non-cytotoxicity was observed for the composite gels after the GO incorporation. Of particular interest were the microchannels that were formed spontaneously within the GO-incorporated UV-gel, which expedited sustained drug release. Therefore, the present highly UV-sensitive, non-cytotoxic amphiphilic copolymer-based composites is expected to provide enhanced photothermal therapy and chemotherapy by means of GO’s unique photothermal properties, as well as through efficient passive targeting resulting from the sol-gel transition characteristic of the copolymer-based system with improved sensitivity, which thus promises the enhanced treatment of patients with cancer and other diseases. PMID:27539298

  19. Sensitive liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous determination of nine local anesthetic drugs.

    PubMed

    Tonooka, Keiko; Naruki, Nobuhiko; Honma, Kou; Agei, Kohei; Okutsu, Mayumi; Hosono, Tetsuji; Kunisue, Yoko; Terada, Masaru; Tomobe, Koji; Shinozuka, Tatsuo

    2016-08-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) with electrospray ionization (ESI) procedure for the simultaneous determination of nine local anesthetic drugs (procaine, mepivacaine, lidocaine, ropivacaine, oxybuprocaine, tetracaine, bupivacaine, T-caine and dibucaine) in human serum is described. The chromatographic separation was performed on a Mightysil-RP-18 GP II column (2.0mm×150mm, particle size 5μm). The mobile phase consisted of 10mM acetic ammonium buffer (pH 5.4) and acetonitrile and was delivered at a flow rate of 0.20mL/min. The triple quadrupole mass spectrometer was operated in positive ion mode, and multiple reaction monitoring was used for drug quantification. Solid-phase extraction of the nine local anesthetic drugs added to the human serum was performed with an Oasis(®) HLB extraction cartridges column. The method was linear for the investigated drugs over the concentration range of 10-100ng/mL. The recoveries of these drugs were in the range of 81.4-144%. The standard deviation (SD) values for all analytes were <0.10 for both intraday and interday accuracy and precision. The selectivity, accuracy and precision of this method are satisfactory for clinical and forensic applications. The sensitive and selective method offers the opportunity for the simultaneous screening and quantification, for clinical and forensic purposes, of almost all local anesthetics available in Japan. PMID:26986505

  20. Correlation between rhodamine 123 accumulation and azole sensitivity in Candida species: possible role for drug efflux in drug resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, F S; Parkinson, T; Hitchcock, C A; Gow, N A

    1996-01-01

    A wide variety of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells exhibit a multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype, indicating that resistance to potentially toxic compounds is mediated by their active efflux from the cell. We have sought to determine whether resistance to azoles in some strains of Candida species may be due in part to active drug efflux. Rhodamine 123 (Rh123) is a fluorescent compound that is transported by a wide variety of MDR cell types. We have shown that certain azole-resistant strains of Candida albicans, C. glabrata, and C. krusei accumulate less Rh123 than azole-susceptible ones. In C. albicans, Rh123 accumulation was growth phase and temperature dependent and was increased by proton uncouplers and by reserpine, an MDR modulator. This is consistent with an energy-dependent efflux mechanism for Rh123, mediated by an MDR transporter. In C. glabrata, but not in C. albicans, there was competition between Rh123 and fluconazole for efflux. Thus, in C. glabrata, Rh123 and fluconazole appear to be transported via a common MDR-like transporter, whereas in C. albicans, the Rh123 transporter does not appear to transport azoles. PMID:8834890

  1. Propargyl-Linked Antifolates Are Potent Inhibitors of Drug-Sensitive and Drug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hajian, Behnoush; Scocchera, Eric; Keshipeddy, Santosh; G-Dayanandan, Narendran; Shoen, Carolyn; Krucinska, Jolanta; Reeve, Stephanie; Cynamon, Michael; Anderson, Amy C; Wright, Dennis L

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis continues to cause widespread, life-threatening disease. In the last decade, this threat has grown dramatically as multi- and extensively-drug resistant (MDR and XDR) bacteria have spread globally and the number of agents that effectively treat these infections is significantly reduced. We have been developing the propargyl-linked antifolates (PLAs) as potent inhibitors of the essential enzyme dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) from bacteria and recently found that charged PLAs with partial zwitterionic character showed improved mycobacterial cell permeability. Building on a hypothesis that these PLAs may penetrate the outer membrane of M. tuberculosis and inhibit the essential cytoplasmic DHFR, we screened a group of PLAs for antitubercular activity. In this work, we identified several PLAs as potent inhibitors of the growth of M. tuberculosis with several of the compounds exhibiting minimum inhibition concentrations equal to or less than 1 μg/mL. Furthermore, two of the compounds were very potent inhibitors of MDR and XDR strains. A high resolution crystal structure of one PLA bound to DHFR from M. tuberculosis reveals the interactions of the ligands with the target enzyme. PMID:27580226

  2. Regulation of sensitivity of tumor cells to antitubulin drugs by Cdk1-TAZ signalling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yulei; Yang, Xiaolong

    2015-01-01

    Antitubulin drugs are commonly used for the treatment of numerous cancers. However, either the intrinsic or acquired resistances of patients to these drugs result in the failure of the treatment and high mortality of cancers. Therefore, identifying genes or signalling pathways involved in antitubulin drug resistances is critical for future successful treatment of cancers. TAZ (Transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif), which is a core component of the Hippo pathway, is overexpressed in various cancers. We have recently shown that high levels of TAZ in cancer cells result in Taxol resistance through up-regulation of downstream targets Cyr61 and CTGF. However, how TAZ is regulated in response to Taxol is largely unknown. In this study, we found that Cdk1 (Cyclin-dependent kinase 1) directly phosphorylated TAZ on six novel sites independent of the Hippo pathway, which further resulted in TAZ degradation through proteasome system. Phosphorylation-mimicking TAZ mutant was unstable, and therefore abolished TAZ-induced antitubulin drug resistances. This study provides first evidence that Cdk1 is a novel kinase phosphorylating and regulating TAZ stability and suggests that Cdk1-TAZ signalling is a critical regulator of antitubulin drug response in cancer cells and may be a potential target for the treatment of antitubulin-drug resistant cancer patients. PMID:26183396

  3. Delivering instilled hydrophobic drug to the bladder by a cationic nanoparticle and thermo-sensitive hydrogel composite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Men, Ke; Liu, Wei; Li, Lin; Duan, Xingmei; Wang, Pan; Gou, Maling; Wei, Xiawei; Gao, Xiang; Wang, Bilan; Du, Yanan; Huang, Meijuan; Chen, Lijuan; Qian, Zhiyong; Wei, Yuquan

    2012-09-01

    Some bladder disease therapies can benefit from intravesical drug delivery, which involves direct instillation of drug into the bladder via a catheter, to attain high local concentrations of the drug with minimal systemic effects. Deguelin is a potential anticancer agent, however, its poor water solubility and neurotoxicity restrict its clinical application. To address these challenges, we investigated the promising application of deguelin in the intravesical therapy of bladder cancer by designing a novel intravesical drug delivery system for deguelin. It was found that deguelin could efficiently kill bladder cancer cells and inhibit angiogenesis. Intravesically administrated deguelin had better tolerance than systemically applied deguelin. Encapsulation of deguelin in cationic DOTAP and monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone) (MPEG-PCL) hybrid nanoparticles (DMP) created the deguelin loaded DMP nanoparticles (D/DMP). They had a mean particle size of 35 nm and zeta potential of 21 mV, rendering deguelin completely dispersible in aqueous media. Encapsulation of deguelin in cationic DMP nanoparticles enhanced the anticancer activity of deguelin in vitro. In addition, D/DMP nanoparticles were incorporated into a thermo-sensitive Pluronic F127 hydrogel, forming a novel D/DMP-F system, which remained in a flowing liquid state at lower than 25 °C, but underwent gelation at higher temperatures. The DMP nanoparticles in the F127 hydrogel system (DMP-F) could significantly extend the hydrophobic drug residence time and increase the drug concentration within the bladder. These results suggested that DMP-F was a good intravesical drug delivery system and D/DMP-F may have promising applications in intravesical therapy of bladder cancer.

  4. pH-Sensitive micelles self-assembled from amphiphilic copolymer brush for delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Yang, You Qiang; Zheng, Ling Shan; Guo, Xin Dong; Qian, Yu; Zhang, Li Juan

    2011-01-10

    A novel pH-sensitive amphiphilic copolymer brush poly(methyl methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid)-b-poly(poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether monomethacrylate) [P(MMA-co-MAA)-b-PPEGMA] was defined and synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) technique. The molecular structures and characteristics of this copolymer and its precursors were confirmed by (1)H NMR, FT-IR, and GPC. The CMC of P(MMA-co-MAA)-b-PPEGMA in aqueous medium was determined to be 1-4 mg/L. This copolymer could self-assemble into micelles in aqueous solution with an average size of 120-250 nm determined by DLS. The morphologies of the micelles were found to be spherical by SEM and TEM. Ibuprofen (IBU), a poorly water-soluble drug, was selected as the model drug and wrapped into the core of micelles via dialysis method. Drug entrapment efficiency reached to 90%. The in vitro release behavior of IBU from these micelles was pH-dependent. The cumulative release percent of IBU was less than 20% of the initial drug content in simulated gastric fluid (SGF, pH 1.2) over 12 h, but 90% was released in simulated intestinal fluid (SIF, pH 7.4) within 6 h. The release profiles showed that the P(MMA-co-MAA)-b-PPEGMA micelles could inhibit the premature burst drug release under the intestinal conditions. All the results indicate that the P(MMA-co-MAA)-b-PPEGMA micelle may be a potential oral drug delivery carrier for poorly water-soluble drugs. PMID:21121600

  5. Mathematical spatio-temporal model of drug delivery from low temperature sensitive liposomes during radiofrequency tumour ablation

    PubMed Central

    GASSELHUBER, ASTRID; DREHER, MATTHEW R.; NEGUSSIE, AYELE; WOOD, BRADFORD J.; RATTAY, FRANK; HAEMMERICH, DIETER

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Studies have demonstrated a synergistic effect between hyperthermia and chemotherapy, and clinical trials in image-guided drug delivery combine high-temperature thermal therapy (ablation) with chemotherapy agents released in the heating zone via low temperature sensitive liposomes (LTSL). The complex interplay between heat-based cancer treatments such as thermal ablation and chemotherapy may require computational models to identify the relationship between heat exposure and pharmacokinetics in order to optimise drug delivery. Materials and methods Spatio-temporal data on tissue temperature and perfusion from heat-transfer models of radiofrequency ablation were used as input data. A spatio-temporal multi-compartmental pharmacokinetic model was built to describe the release of doxorubicin (DOX) from LTSL into the tumour plasma space, and subsequent transport into the extracellular space, and the cells. Systemic plasma and tissue compartments were also included. We compared standard chemotherapy (free-DOX) to LTSL-DOX administered as bolus at a dose of 0.7 mg/kg body weight. Results Modelling LTSL-DOX treatment resulted in tumour tissue drug concentration of ~9.3 μg/g with highest values within 1 cm outside the ablation zone boundary. Free-DOX treatment produced comparably uniform tissue drug concentrations of ~3.0 μg/g. Administration of free-DOX resulted in a considerably higher peak level of drug concentration in the systemic plasma compartment (16.1 μg/g) compared to LTSL-DOX (4.4 μg/g). These results correlate well with a prior in vivo study. Conclusions Combination of LTSL-DOX with thermal ablation allows localised drug delivery with higher tumour tissue concentrations than conventional chemotherapy. Our model may facilitate drug delivery optimisation via investigation of the interplays among liposome properties, tumour perfusion, and heating regimen. PMID:20377363

  6. High-Throughput 3D Screening Reveals Differences in Drug Sensitivities between Culture Models of JIMT1 Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fey, Vidal; Mpindi, John-Patrick; Kleivi Sahlberg, Kristine; Kallioniemi, Olli; Perälä, Merja

    2013-01-01

    The traditional method for studying cancer in vitro is to grow immortalized cancer cells in two-dimensional monolayers on plastic. However, many cellular features are impaired in these artificial conditions, and large changes in gene expression compared to tumors have been reported. Three-dimensional cell culture models have become increasingly popular and are suggested to be better models than two-dimensional monolayers due to improved cell-to-cell contact and structures that resemble in vivo architecture. The aim of this study was to develop a simple high-throughput three-dimensional drug screening method and to compare drug responses in JIMT1 breast cancer cells when grown in two dimensions, in poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) induced anchorage-independent three-dimensional models, and in Matrigel three-dimensional cell culture models. We screened 102 compounds with multiple concentrations and biological replicates for their effects on cell proliferation. The cells were either treated immediately upon plating, or they were allowed to grow in three-dimensional cultures for 4 days before the drug treatment. Large variations in drug responses were observed between the models indicating that comparisons of culture model-influenced drug sensitivities cannot be made based on the effects of a single drug. However, we show with the 63 most prominent drugs that, in general, JIMT1 cells grown on Matrigel were significantly more sensitive to drugs than cells grown in two-dimensional cultures, while the responses of cells grown in poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) resembled those of the two-dimensional cultures. Furthermore, comparing the gene expression profiles of the cell culture models to xenograft tumors indicated that cells cultured in Matrigel and as xenografts most closely resembled each other. In this study, we also suggest that three-dimensional cultures can provide a platform for systematic experimentation of larger compound collections in a high-throughput mode

  7. Carboxymethyl Chitosan-Modified Polyamidoamine Dendrimer Enables Progressive Drug Targeting of Tumors via pH-Sensitive Charge Inversion.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiaole; Qin, Jiayi; Fan, Yuchao; Qin, Xiaoxue; Jiang, Yujie; Wu, Zhenghong

    2016-04-01

    Polyamidoamine dendrimers are potential candidates for drug delivery systems due to their remarkable cell-penetrating power that results from their strong positive surface charge. However, the positively charged surfaces always lead to serious cytotoxicity and the rapid clearance of polyamidoamine in vivo, which limit the application of these dendrimers. To overcome these drawbacks, we developed a carboxymethyl chitosan-modified polyamidoamine dendrimer to achieve progressive drug targeting of tumors via pH-sensitive charge inversion. With the shielding of carboxymethyl chitosan, the complex was negatively charged at physiological conditions (pH 7.4) and prone to enrich at tumor sites due to the enhanced permeation and retention effect; however, it regained a positive charge via the removal of the carboxymethyl chitosan coating under tumor-acidic conditions (pH 6.5) and achieved high intracellular uptake in tumor cells through electrostatic adsorptive endocytosis. In this study, these dendrimers exhibited 1.99- and 1.76-times higher cellular uptake efficiencies at pH 7.4 in MCF-7 or A549 cells, respectively, compared with efficiencies at pH 6.5, indicating an effective pH-dependent accumulation; the fluorescence intensities of these cells exposed to the dendrimers at pH 6.5 were also 16.45- and 9.27-fold greater, respectively, than those of free doxorubicin. After intravenous administration in mice bearing H22 tumors, doxorubicin-loaded dendrimers exhibited a 1.50-fold greater antitumor activity and presented no obvious systematic toxicity based on histological analysis compared with free drugs. Overall, a simple decoration of carboxymethyl chitosan demonstrated to be a promising way for cationic nanocarriers to achieve pH-sensitive drug release and charge conversion response to tumor microenvironment pH and enhance the antitumor therapy efficiency of anticancer drugs. PMID:27301193

  8. Neutralizing antibody and anti-retroviral drug sensitivities of HIV-1 isolates resistant to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Pugach, Pavel; Ketas, Thomas J.; Michael, Elizabeth; Moore, John P.

    2008-08-01

    The small molecule CCR5 inhibitors are a new class of drugs for treating infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). They act by binding to the CCR5 co-receptor and preventing its use during HIV-1-cell fusion. Escape mutants can be raised against CCR5 inhibitors in vitro and will arise when these drugs are used clinically. Here, we have assessed the responses of CCR5 inhibitor-resistant viruses to other anti-retroviral drugs that act by different mechanisms, and their sensitivities to neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). The rationale for the latter study is that the resistance pathway for CCR5 inhibitors involves changes in the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), which are also targets for NAbs. The escape mutants CC101.19 and D1/85.16 were selected for resistance to AD101 and vicriviroc (VVC), respectively, from the primary R5 HIV-1 isolate CC1/85. Each escape mutant was cross-resistant to other small molecule CCR5 inhibitors (aplaviroc, maraviroc, VVC, AD101 and CMPD 167), but sensitive to protein ligands of CCR5: the modified chemokine PSC-RANTES and the humanized MAb PRO-140. The resistant viruses also retained wild-type sensitivity to the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) zidovudine, the non-nucleoside RTI nevirapine, the protease inhibitor atazanavir and other attachment and fusion inhibitors that act independently of CCR5 (BMS-806, PRO-542 and enfuvirtide). Of note is that the escape mutants were more sensitive than the parental CC1/85 isolate to a subset of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and to some sera from HIV-1-infected people, implying that sequence changes in Env that confer resistance to CCR5 inhibitors can increase the accessibility of some NAb epitopes. The need to preserve NAb resistance may therefore be a constraint upon how escape from CCR5 inhibitors occurs in vivo.

  9. Machine learning plus optical flow: a simple and sensitive method to detect cardioactive drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eugene K.; Kurokawa, Yosuke K.; Tu, Robin; George, Steven C.; Khine, Michelle

    2015-07-01

    Current preclinical screening methods do not adequately detect cardiotoxicity. Using human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPS-CMs), more physiologically relevant preclinical or patient-specific screening to detect potential cardiotoxic effects of drug candidates may be possible. However, one of the persistent challenges for developing a high-throughput drug screening platform using iPS-CMs is the need to develop a simple and reliable method to measure key electrophysiological and contractile parameters. To address this need, we have developed a platform that combines machine learning paired with brightfield optical flow as a simple and robust tool that can automate the detection of cardiomyocyte drug effects. Using three cardioactive drugs of different mechanisms, including those with primarily electrophysiological effects, we demonstrate the general applicability of this screening method to detect subtle changes in cardiomyocyte contraction. Requiring only brightfield images of cardiomyocyte contractions, we detect changes in cardiomyocyte contraction comparable to - and even superior to - fluorescence readouts. This automated method serves as a widely applicable screening tool to characterize the effects of drugs on cardiomyocyte function.

  10. Machine learning plus optical flow: a simple and sensitive method to detect cardioactive drugs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eugene K; Kurokawa, Yosuke K; Tu, Robin; George, Steven C; Khine, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Current preclinical screening methods do not adequately detect cardiotoxicity. Using human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPS-CMs), more physiologically relevant preclinical or patient-specific screening to detect potential cardiotoxic effects of drug candidates may be possible. However, one of the persistent challenges for developing a high-throughput drug screening platform using iPS-CMs is the need to develop a simple and reliable method to measure key electrophysiological and contractile parameters. To address this need, we have developed a platform that combines machine learning paired with brightfield optical flow as a simple and robust tool that can automate the detection of cardiomyocyte drug effects. Using three cardioactive drugs of different mechanisms, including those with primarily electrophysiological effects, we demonstrate the general applicability of this screening method to detect subtle changes in cardiomyocyte contraction. Requiring only brightfield images of cardiomyocyte contractions, we detect changes in cardiomyocyte contraction comparable to - and even superior to - fluorescence readouts. This automated method serves as a widely applicable screening tool to characterize the effects of drugs on cardiomyocyte function. PMID:26139150

  11. Machine learning plus optical flow: a simple and sensitive method to detect cardioactive drugs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eugene K.; Kurokawa, Yosuke K.; Tu, Robin; George, Steven C.; Khine, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Current preclinical screening methods do not adequately detect cardiotoxicity. Using human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPS-CMs), more physiologically relevant preclinical or patient-specific screening to detect potential cardiotoxic effects of drug candidates may be possible. However, one of the persistent challenges for developing a high-throughput drug screening platform using iPS-CMs is the need to develop a simple and reliable method to measure key electrophysiological and contractile parameters. To address this need, we have developed a platform that combines machine learning paired with brightfield optical flow as a simple and robust tool that can automate the detection of cardiomyocyte drug effects. Using three cardioactive drugs of different mechanisms, including those with primarily electrophysiological effects, we demonstrate the general applicability of this screening method to detect subtle changes in cardiomyocyte contraction. Requiring only brightfield images of cardiomyocyte contractions, we detect changes in cardiomyocyte contraction comparable to – and even superior to – fluorescence readouts. This automated method serves as a widely applicable screening tool to characterize the effects of drugs on cardiomyocyte function. PMID:26139150

  12. Efficacy of gene-therapy based on adenovirus encoding granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in drug-sensitive and drug-resistant experimental pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Francisco-Cruz, Alejandro; Mata-Espinosa, Dulce; Ramos-Espinosa, Octavio; Marquina-Castillo, Brenda; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Xing, Zhou; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio

    2016-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), although a curable disease, remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. It is necessary to develop a short-term therapy with reduced drug toxicity in order to improve adherence rate and control disease burden. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) may be a key cytokine in the treatment of pulmonary TB since it primes the activation and differentiation of myeloid and non-myeloid precursor cells, inducing the release of protective Th1 cytokines. In this work, we administrated by intratracheal route recombinant adenoviruses encoding GM-CSF (AdGM-CSF). This treatment produced significant bacterial elimination when administered in a single dose at 60 days of infection with drug sensitive or drug resistant Mtb strains in a murine model of progressive disease. Moreover, AdGM-CSF combined with primary antibiotics produced more rapid elimination of pulmonary bacterial burdens than conventional chemotherapy suggesting that this form of treatment could shorten the conventional treatment. PMID:27553405

  13. Antitumor effect of 5-fluorouracil is enhanced by rosemary extract in both drug sensitive and resistant colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    González-Vallinas, Margarita; Molina, Susana; Vicente, Gonzalo; de la Cueva, Ana; Vargas, Teodoro; Santoyo, Susana; García-Risco, Mónica R; Fornari, Tiziana; Reglero, Guillermo; Ramírez de Molina, Ana

    2013-06-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is the most used chemotherapeutic agent in colorectal cancer. However, resistance to this drug is relatively frequent, and new strategies to overcome it are urgently needed. The aim of this work was to determine the antitumor properties of a supercritical fluid rosemary extract (SFRE), alone and in combination with 5-FU, as a potential adjuvant therapy useful for colon cancer patients. This extract has been recognized as a healthy component by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). The effects of SFRE both alone and in combination with 5-FU were evaluated in different human colon cancer cells in terms of cell viability, cytotoxicity, and cell transformation. Additionally, colon cancer cells resistant to 5-FU were used to assay the effects of SFRE on drug resistance. Finally, qRT-PCR was performed to ascertain the mechanism by which SFRE potentiates the effect of 5-FU. Our results show that SFRE displays dose-dependent antitumor activities and exerts a synergistic effect in combination with 5-FU on colon cancer cells. Furthermore, SFRE sensitizes 5-FU-resistant cells to the therapeutic activity of this drug, constituting a beneficial agent against both 5-FU sensitive and resistant tumor cells. Gene expression analysis indicates that the enhancement of the effect of 5-FU by SFRE might be explained by the downregulation of TYMS and TK1, enzymes related to 5-FU resistance. PMID:23557932

  14. Development of Nano-Liposomal Formulations of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Inhibitors and their Pharmacological Interactions on Drug-Sensitive and Drug-Resistant Cancer Cell Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trummer, Brian J.

    , due to leaky tumor vasculature and the resulting Enhanced Permeability and Retention (EPR) phenomenon. In Chapter 2 we report that both gefitinib and the structurally similar EGFR inhibitor erlotinib display environment-dependent fluorescence properties. Peak excitation was 345 nm, and the emission peak ranged from 365 to 476 nm, depending upon the polarity of the environment and physical state of the drug. The fluorescence was negligible in aqueous solution, but intense in organic solvents or membrane bilayers. The environment-sensitive fluorescence properties of these drugs enabled rapid evaluation of numerous parameters affecting liposomal drug incorporation and performance. Up to 4-6 mol% of gefitinib could be incorporated in the liposome bilayer, based upon hydrophobic interactions with membrane bilayers. In contrast, 40-60 mol% could be loaded into the aqueous core of pre-formed liposomes at high efficiency, using a remote loading procedure. A stable formulation consisting of distearoylphosphatidylcholine: polyethylene glycol-distereoylphosphatidylethanolamine: cholesterol (DSPC:PEGDSPE:Chol, 9:1:5 mol:mol:mol) and containing drug at 50-60 mol% gefitinib (L-GEF) showed minimal leakage in serum-containing medium over 24 h at 37°C, which should be sufficient to improve biodistribution in vivo. Chapter 3 investigated the pharmacological activity of liposome-encapsulated gefitinib, alone and in combination with several prevalent anticancer agents. Experiments with MCF7 breast cancer cell lines demonstrated that liposome encapsulated gefitinib formulation (L-GEF) had a 2-fold higher IC50 (concentration of drug resulting in half-maximal growth inhibition) than free gefitinib. Lower in vitro potency would be consistent with delayed drug release from the carrier. Therapeutic effects were investigated in combination with the cytotoxic agents paclitaxel and doxorubicin. The drug-resistant MCF7R cell line was 23-fold more resistant to paclitaxel than the parental, drug-sensitive

  15. Guar gum succinate-sodium alginate beads as a pH-sensitive carrier for colon-specific drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Seeli, D Sathya; Dhivya, S; Selvamurugan, N; Prabaharan, M

    2016-10-01

    Guar gum succinate - sodium alginate (GGS-SA) beads cross-linked with barium ions were prepared and characterized as a pH sensitive carrier for colon-specific drug delivery. The structure of GGS-SA beads was confirmed by FT-IR spectroscopy. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) studies revealed that the drug loaded GGS-SA beads prepared using 2:2 (w/v) weight percent of GGS and SA had a diameter about 1.4mm and roughly spherical in shape. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies showed that the peaks corresponding to GGS and SA at 13.5°, 17.5°, 20.2° and 13.5°, 22°, 24.1°, respectively were destroyed in GGS-SA beads which show that these beads are more amorphous in nature. Swelling studies demonstrated the pH-dependent swelling behavior of GGS-SA beads. The beads showed higher swelling degrees in pH 7.4 than that in pH 1.2 due to the existence of anionic groups in the polymer chains. The drug release study showed that the amount of model drug, ibuprofen, released from the GGS-SA beads was higher in pH 7.4 than that in pH 1.2 due to the pH-dependent swelling behavior of the beads. MTT assay revealed that GGS-SA beads at a concentration range of 0-30μg/ml had no cytotoxic effect on the cultured mouse mesenchymal stem cells (C3H10T1/2). These results suggest that GGS-SA beads can be used as effective colon-specific drug delivery system with pH-dependent drug release ability. PMID:27212216

  16. MED12 methylation by CARM1 sensitizes human breast cancer cells to chemotherapy drugs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Zeng, Hao; Wang, Qiang; Zhao, Zibo; Boyer, Thomas G.; Bian, Xiuwu; Xu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The RNA polymerase II mediator complex subunit 12 (MED12) is frequently mutated in human cancers, and loss of MED12 has been shown to induce drug resistance through activation of transforming growth factor–β receptor (TGF-βR) signaling. We identified MED12 as a substrate for coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1). Not only are the expression levels of CARM1 and MED12 positively correlated, but their high expression also predicts better prognosis in human breast cancers after chemotherapy. MED12 was methylated at R1862 and R1912 by CARM1, and mutation of these sites in cell lines resulted in resistance to chemotherapy drugs. Furthermore, we showed that the methylation-dependent drug response mechanism is distinct from activation of TGF-βR signaling, because methylated MED12 potently suppresses p21/WAF1 transcription. Cells defective in MED12 methylation have up-regulated p21 protein, which correlates with poor prognosis in breast cancer patients treated with chemotherapy. Collectively, this study identifies MED12 methylation as a sensor for predicting response to commonly used chemotherapy drugs in human cancers. PMID:26601288

  17. A pH-sensitive binary drug delivery system based on poly(caprolactone)-heparin conjugates.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lin; Gao, Zemin; Zhou, Yu; Yin, Xuan; Zhang, Xinpeng; Zhang, Aiying; Feng, Zengguo

    2014-03-01

    PCL-heparin conjugates were synthesized by coupling mono-hydroxyl terminated PCL (Mn = 2000-10000 g/mol) with heparin via EDC/NHS chemistry. The conjugates enabled to self-assemble into the core-shell nanoparticles in around 100 nm diameter to load binary anti-cancer drugs. Lipophilic and neutral paclitaxel (PTX) was first encapsulated in the core, and then hydrophilic and positive charged doxorubicin (DOX) was incorporated into the negative charged shell of PTX loaded nanoparticles via the electrostatic interaction. The in vitro release profiles of the binary-drug loaded nanoparticles revealed that both PTX and DOX were sustainably released from the particles but behaved differently. The release of DOX was pH dependent, ensuring more drug to be released in the tumor cells than in the normal ones. Hence these particles were featured by a sequential controlled drug delivery behavior with a significant cytotoxicity to cervical cancer (Hela cell) and breast cancer (MDA-MB-321) cells. The CLSM observations clearly indicated that both loaded PTX and DOX aggregated in the nucleus of tumor cells to exert their anti-tumor pharmacodynamic effect on the cells. PMID:23554308

  18. Using activation status of signaling pathways as mechanism-based biomarkers to predict drug sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Amadoz, Alicia; Sebastian-Leon, Patricia; Vidal, Enrique; Salavert, Francisco; Dopazo, Joaquin

    2015-01-01

    Many complex traits, as drug response, are associated with changes in biological pathways rather than being caused by single gene alterations. Here, a predictive framework is presented in which gene expression data are recoded into activity statuses of signal transduction circuits (sub-pathways within signaling pathways that connect receptor proteins to final effector proteins that trigger cell actions). Such activity values are used as features by a prediction algorithm which can efficiently predict a continuous variable such as the IC50 value. The main advantage of this prediction method is that the features selected by the predictor, the signaling circuits, are themselves rich-informative, mechanism-based biomarkers which provide insight into or drug molecular mechanisms of action (MoA). PMID:26678097

  19. Breast Cancer Cell Lines Exhibit Differential Sensitivities to Microtubule-targeting Drugs Independent of Doubling Time

    PubMed Central

    RISINGER, APRIL L.; DYBDAL-HARGREAVES, NICHOLAS F.; MOOBERRY, SUSAN L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Microtubule-targeting agents (MTAs) are a mainstay in breast cancer treatment, yet patient responses differ. The underlying mechanisms of these differences are unknown. While MTAs are mitotic inhibitors, recent evidence highlights that non-mitotic effects of these drugs can contribute to their anticancer effects. It is critical to identify the non-mitotic mechanisms that could contribute to differences among MTAs. However, it is not clear whether rapidly dividing cells in culture are optimal tools to address these mechanistic questions in interphase cells. Materials and Methods Detailed concentration response curves for five MTAs in a panel of diverse breast cancer cell lines were generated. Results Substantial differences among both drugs and cell lines, consistent with the clinical scenario, were observed. Importantly, these differences do not correlate with cell doubling time. Conclusion The interphase actions of MTAs are critical to the full spectrum of their effects in cancer cells, even in cell culture models. PMID:26504006

  20. Neutralizing Antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum Associated with Successful Cure after Drug Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Yun Shan; Peng, Kaitian; Chia, Wan Ni; Siau, Anthony; Chotivanich, Kesinee; Gruner, Anne-Charlotte; Preiser, Peter; Mayxay, Mayfong; Pukrittayakamee, Sasithon; Sriprawat, Kanlaya; Nosten, Francois; White, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    An effective antibody response can assist drug treatment to contribute to better parasite clearance in malaria patients. To examine this, sera were obtained from two groups of adult patients with acute falciparum malaria, prior to drug treatment: patients who (1) have subsequent recrudescent infection, or (2) were cured by Day 28 following treatment. Using a Plasmodium falciparum antigen library, we examined the antibody specificities in these sera. While the antibody repertoire of both sera groups was extremely broad and varied, there was a differential antibody profile between the two groups of sera. The proportion of cured patients with antibodies against EXP1, MSP3, GLURP, RAMA, SEA and EBA181 was higher than the proportion of patients with recrudescent infection. The presence of these antibodies was associated with higher odds of treatment cure. Sera containing all six antibodies impaired the invasion of P. falciparum clinical isolates into erythrocytes. These results suggest that antibodies specific against EXP1, MSP3, GLURP, RAMA, SEA and EBA181 in P. falciparum infections could assist anti-malarial drug treatment and contribute to the resolution of the malarial infection. PMID:27427762

  1. Neutralizing Antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum Associated with Successful Cure after Drug Therapy.

    PubMed

    Goh, Yun Shan; Peng, Kaitian; Chia, Wan Ni; Siau, Anthony; Chotivanich, Kesinee; Gruner, Anne-Charlotte; Preiser, Peter; Mayxay, Mayfong; Pukrittayakamee, Sasithon; Sriprawat, Kanlaya; Nosten, Francois; White, Nicholas J; Renia, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    An effective antibody response can assist drug treatment to contribute to better parasite clearance in malaria patients. To examine this, sera were obtained from two groups of adult patients with acute falciparum malaria, prior to drug treatment: patients who (1) have subsequent recrudescent infection, or (2) were cured by Day 28 following treatment. Using a Plasmodium falciparum antigen library, we examined the antibody specificities in these sera. While the antibody repertoire of both sera groups was extremely broad and varied, there was a differential antibody profile between the two groups of sera. The proportion of cured patients with antibodies against EXP1, MSP3, GLURP, RAMA, SEA and EBA181 was higher than the proportion of patients with recrudescent infection. The presence of these antibodies was associated with higher odds of treatment cure. Sera containing all six antibodies impaired the invasion of P. falciparum clinical isolates into erythrocytes. These results suggest that antibodies specific against EXP1, MSP3, GLURP, RAMA, SEA and EBA181 in P. falciparum infections could assist anti-malarial drug treatment and contribute to the resolution of the malarial infection. PMID:27427762

  2. The future of artemisinins: natural, synthetic or recombinant?

    PubMed Central

    Hommel, Marcel

    2008-01-01

    Artemisinins are the most important anti-malarial drugs in use today, but are more costly than previous anti-malarials and production and price tend to fluctuate. Alternative ways of producing artemisinins are discussed here in the light of a recent paper in BMC Biotechnology on improving the yield of the precursor, artemisinic acid, in genetically engineered yeast. PMID:19090980

  3. Disposition of ultrasound sensitive polymeric drug carrier in a rat hepatocellular carcinoma model

    PubMed Central

    Cochran, Michael C.; Eisenbrey, John R.; Soulen, Michael C.; Schultz, Susan M.; Ouma, Richard O.; White, Sarah B.; Furth, Emma E.; Wheatley, Margaret A.

    2011-01-01

    Rational and Objectives A doxorubicin-loaded microbubble has been developed that can be destroyed with focused ultrasound resulting in fragments, or “nanoshards” capable of escaping through the leaky tumor vasculature, promoting accumulation within the interstitium. This study utilizes a rat liver cancer model to examine the biodistribution and tumoral delivery of this microbubble platform compared with de novo drug-loaded polymer nanoparticles and free doxorubicin. Methods Microbubbles (1.8µm) and 217nm nanoparticles were prepared containing 14-C labeled doxorubicin. Microbubbles, nanoparticles, a combination of the two, or free doxorubicin were administered intravenously in rats bearing hepatomas, concomitant with tumor insonation. Doxorubicin levels in plasma, organs and tumors were quantified after 4hours, 7 and 14days. Tumors were measured upon sacrifice and evaluated with autoradiography and histology. Results Animals treated with microbubbles had significantly lower plasma doxorubicin concentrations (0.466±0.068%/ml) compared with free doxorubicin (3.033±0.612%/ml, p=0.0019). Drug levels in the myocardium were significantly lower in animals treated with microbubbles compared to free doxorubicin (0.168%/g tissue vs. 0.320%/g, p=0.0088). Tumors treated with microbubbles showed significantly higher drug levels than tumors treated with free doxorubicin (2.491±0.501 %/g vs. 0.373±0.087 %/g, p=0.0472). These tumors showed significantly less growth than tumors treated with free doxorubicin (p=0.0390). Conclusions Doxorubicin loaded microbubbles triggered with ultrasound provided enhanced, sustained drug delivery to tumors, reduced plasma and myocardium doxorubicin levels and arresting tumor growth. The results offer superior treatment than injection of de novo synthesized nanoparticles. PMID:21971256

  4. Vacuolar ATPase depletion affects mitochondrial ATPase function, kinetoplast dependency, and drug sensitivity in trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Baker, Nicola; Hamilton, Graham; Wilkes, Jonathan M; Hutchinson, Sebastian; Barrett, Michael P; Horn, David

    2015-07-21

    Kinetoplastid parasites cause lethal diseases in humans and animals. The kinetoplast itself contains the mitochondrial genome, comprising a huge, complex DNA network that is also an important drug target. Isometamidium, for example, is a key veterinary drug that accumulates in the kinetoplast in African trypanosomes. Kinetoplast independence and isometamidium resistance are observed where certain mutations in the F1-γ-subunit of the two-sector F1Fo-ATP synthase allow for Fo-independent generation of a mitochondrial membrane potential. To further explore kinetoplast biology and drug resistance, we screened a genome-scale RNA interference library in African trypanosomes for isometamidium resistance mechanisms. Our screen identified 14 V-ATPase subunits and all 4 adaptin-3 subunits, implicating acidic compartment defects in resistance; V-ATPase acidifies lysosomes and related organelles, whereas adaptin-3 is responsible for trafficking among these organelles. Independent strains with depleted V-ATPase or adaptin-3 subunits were isometamidium resistant, and chemical inhibition of the V-ATPase phenocopied this effect. While drug accumulation in the kinetoplast continued after V-ATPase subunit depletion, acriflavine-induced kinetoplast loss was specifically tolerated in these cells and in cells depleted for adaptin-3 or endoplasmic reticulum membrane complex subunits, also identified in our screen. Consistent with kinetoplast dispensability, V-ATPase defective cells were oligomycin resistant, suggesting ATP synthase uncoupling and bypass of the normal Fo-A6-subunit requirement; this subunit is the only kinetoplast-encoded product ultimately required for viability in bloodstream-form trypanosomes. Thus, we describe 30 genes and 3 protein complexes associated with kinetoplast-dependent growth. Mutations affecting these genes could explain natural cases of dyskinetoplasty and multidrug resistance. Our results also reveal potentially conserved communication between the

  5. Matrix Metalloproteinase-Sensitive Thermogelling Polymer For Bioresponsive Local Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Garripelli, Vivek Kumar; Kim, Jin-Ki; Son, Sejin; Kim, Won Jong; Repka, Michael A.; Jo, Seongbong

    2011-01-01

    Development of a successful bioresponsive drug delivery system requires exquisite engineering of materials so that they are able to respond to the signals stemming from the physiological environment. In this study, we proposed a new Pluronic® based thermogelling system containing matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) responsive peptide sequences. A novel thermosensitive multiblock copolymer comprising an MMP2-labile octapeptide (Gly-Pro-Val-Gly-Leu-Ile-Gly-Lys) was synthesized from Pluronic® triblock copolymer. The polymer was designed to form thermogel at body temperature and degrade in presence of MMP overexpressed in the tumor. The synthesized polymer was a multiblock copolymer with ~ 2.5 units of Pluronic®. The multiblock copolymer solutions exhibited a reverse thermal gelation around body temperature. The gelation temperatures of the multiblock copolymer solutions were lower than those of the corresponding Pluronic® monomer at a particular concentration. The cytotoxicity of the synthesized polymer was lower comparing to its monomer. The solubility of hydrophobic anticancer drug, paclitaxel, was enhanced in the polymer solutions via micelle formation. The synthesized polymer was preferentially degraded in presence of MMP. Paclitaxel release was dependent on the enzyme concentration. These findings suggest that the synthesized polymer has the potential as controlled drug delivery system due to its unique phase transition and bioresponsive behavior. PMID:21300184

  6. Stimuli Sensitive Polymers and Self Regulated Drug Delivery Systems: A Very Partial Review

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Ronald A.

    2014-01-01

    Since the early days of the Journal of Controlled Release, there has been considerable interest in materials that can release drug on an “on-demand” basis. So called “stimuli-responsive” and “intelligent” systems have been designed to deliver drug at various times or at various sites in the body, according to a stimulus that is either endogenous or externally applied. In the past three decades, research along these lines has taken numerous directions, and each new generation of investigators has discovered new physicochemical principles and chemical schemes by which the release properties of materials can be altered. No single review could possibly do justice to all of these approaches. In this article, some general observations are made, and a partial history of the field is presented. Both open loop and closed loop systems are discussed. Special emphasis is placed on stimuli-responsive hydrogels, and on systems that can respond repeatedly. It is argued that the most success at present and in the foreseeable future is with systems in which biosensing and actuation (i.e. drug delivery) are separated, with a human and/or cybernetic operator linking the two. PMID:24984012

  7. Protection of moisture-sensitive drugs with aqueous polymer coatings: importance of coating and curing conditions.

    PubMed

    Bley, O; Siepmann, J; Bodmeier, R

    2009-08-13

    The aim of this study was to better understand the importance of coating and curing conditions of moisture-protective polymer coatings. Tablets containing freeze-dried garlic powder were coated with aqueous solutions/dispersions of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), poly(vinyl alcohol), ethyl cellulose and poly(methacrylate-methylmethacrylates). The water content of the tablets during coating and during storage at different temperatures and relative humidities (RH) was determined gravimetrically. In addition, changes in the allicin (active ingredient in garlic powder) content were monitored. During the coating process, the water uptake was below 2.7% and no drug degradation was detectable. Thermally induced drug degradation occurred only at temperatures above the coating temperatures. Different polymer coatings effectively decreased the rate, but not the extent of water uptake during open storage at room temperature and 75% RH. Tablets coated with poly(vinyl alcohol) and poly(methacrylate-methylmethacrylates) showed the lowest moisture uptake rates (0.49 and 0.57%/d, respectively). Curing at elevated temperature after coating did not improve the moisture-protective ability of the polymeric films, but reduced the water content of the tablets. Drug stability was significantly improved with tablets coated with poly(vinyl alcohol) and poly(methacrylate-methylmethacrylates). PMID:19477253

  8. Mesoscale Simulations and Experimental Studies of pH-Sensitive Micelles for Controlled Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Li, Qiu Yu; Liu, Xu Bo; Zhang, Can Yang; Wu, Zhi Min; Guo, Xin Dong

    2015-11-25

    The microstructures of doxorubicin-loaded micelles prepared from block polymers His(x)Lys10 (x = 0, 5, 10) conjugated with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are investigated under different pH conditions, using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. The conformation of micelles and the DOX distributions in micelles were obviously influenced by pH values and the length of the histidine segment. At pH >6.0, the micelles self-assembled from the polymers were dense and compact. The drugs were entrapped well within the micellar core. The particle size increases as the histidine length increases. With the decrease of pH value to be lower than 6.0, there was no distinct difference for the micelles self-assembled from the polymer without histidine residues. However, the micelles prepared from the polymers with histidine residues shows a structural transformation from dense to swollen conformation, leading to an increased particle size from 10.3 to 14.5 DPD units for DHD-His10Lys10 micelles. This structural transformation of micelles can accelerate the DOX release from micelles under lower pH conditions. The in vitro drug release from micelles is accelerated by the decrease of pH value from 7.4 (physiological environment) to 5.0 (lysosomal environment). The integration of simulation and experiments might be a valuable method for the optimization and design of biomaterials for drug delivery with desired properties. PMID:26539742

  9. Matrix metalloproteinase-sensitive thermogelling polymer for bioresponsive local drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Garripelli, Vivek Kumar; Kim, Jin-Ki; Son, Sejin; Kim, Won Jong; Repka, Michael A; Jo, Seongbong

    2011-05-01

    Development of a successful bioresponsive drug delivery system requires exquisite engineering of the materials so that they are able to respond to signals stemming from the physiological environment. In this study we propose a new Pluronic(®) based thermogelling system containing matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) responsive peptide sequences. A novel thermosensitive multiblock co-polymer comprising an MMP2-labile octapeptide (Gly-Pro-Val-Gly-Leu-Ile-Gly-Lys) was synthesized from a Pluronic(®) triblock co-polymer. The polymer was designed to form a thermogel at body temperature and degrade in the presence of MMP overexpressed in a tumor. The synthesized polymer was a multiblock co-polymer with ∼2.5 U of Pluronic(®). The multiblock co-polymer solutions exhibited reverse thermal gelation around body temperature. The gelation temperatures of the multiblock co-polymer solutions were lower than those of the corresponding Pluronic(®) monomer at a particular concentration. The cytotoxicity of the synthesized polymer was lower compared with the monomer. The solubility of the hydrophobic anticancer drug paclitaxel was enhanced in the polymer solutions by micelle formation. The synthesized polymer was preferentially degraded in the presence of MMP. Paclitaxel release was dependent on the enzyme concentration. These findings suggest that the synthesized polymer has potential as a controlled drug delivery system due to its unique phase transition and bioresponsive behavior. PMID:21300184

  10. Palmtop-assisted self-interviewing for the collection of sensitive behavioral data: randomized trial with drug use urine testing.

    PubMed

    van Griensven, Frits; Naorat, Sataphana; Kilmarx, Peter H; Jeeyapant, Supaporn; Manopaiboon, Chomnad; Chaikummao, Supaporn; Jenkins, Richard A; Uthaivoravit, Wat; Wasinrapee, Punneporn; Mock, Philip A; Tappero, Jordan W

    2006-02-01

    Palmtop-assisted self-interviewing (PASI) may provide a cheaper and more mobile alternative to audio-computer-assisted self-interviewing (ACASI) for collecting sensitive behavioral data. To evaluate PASI, in late 2002 the authors enrolled 1,283 Thai students aged 15-21 years in a randomized trial. Data collection used PASI, ACASI, self-administered questionnaire, and face-to-face interview in combination with drug-use urine testing. By use of reported levels of behaviors and agreement between self-reports of smoking and urine test results, PASI and ACASI (alpha = 0.05) were compared for noninferiority, and PASI and interview were compared for superiority (alpha = 0.05). Noninferiority of PASI was demonstrated by use of self-reports of the most sensitive areas of sexual behavior (e.g., oral sex, sexual intercourse, commercial sex, history of genital ulcers, pregnancy), as well as self-reports of less sensitive behaviors (e.g., alcohol use, dietary behaviors, symptoms of depression). Data generally showed noninferiority of PASI, ACASI, and self-administered questionnaires when compared with each other and superiority of PASI, ACASI, and self-administered questionnaires when compared with interviews. PASI agreements between self-reports of tobacco smoking and presence of nicotine metabolites in urine were noninferior to ACASI and superior to interviews. The establishment of PASI noninferiority and superiority using behavioral and biologic measures suggests that PASI is a scientifically acceptable alternative for collecting sensitive behavioral data. PMID:16357109

  11. Dissolution evaluation in vitro and bioavailability in vivo of self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems for pH-sensitive drug loratadine.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyan; Tan, Yonggang; Yang, Lixia; Gao, Lijun; Wang, Tao; Yang, Xi; Quan, Dongqin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to improve the oral absorption of loratadine, a pH-sensitive drug, by self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems (SMEDDSs). The optimal SMEDDS was analysed and evaluated after emulsification in distilled water with diameter of 26.57 ± 0.71 nm and zeta potential of -30.5 ± 4.5 mV. Dissolution experiments in vitro were carried out in different released media of pH values and the SMEDDS formulations were able to release loratadine completely in different media while market tablets just performed similarly in the media of pH 1.2. Furthermore, the oral bioavailability and the pharmacokinetic behaviour of loratadine formulations in vivo were studied after a single dose of 1 mg/kg loratadine in beagle dogs. The SMEDDS formulations displayed higher Cmax and AUC, approximately 9 and 5 times increase than those of market tablets (p < 0.01) respectively. These results demonstrated that SMEDDS formulations had significantly increased the oral absorption of loratadine in beagle dogs. PMID:25413271

  12. Characterization of Mycobacterium Abscessus Subtypes in Shanghai of China: Drug Sensitivity and Bacterial Epidemicity as well as Clinical Manifestations.

    PubMed

    Luo, Liulin; Li, Bing; Chu, Haiqing; Huang, Dongdong; Zhang, Zhemin; Zhang, Jingbo; Gui, Tao; Xu, Liyun; Zhao, Lan; Sun, Xiwen; Xiao, Heping

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the epidemic characteristics of Mycobacterium abscessus in Shanghai.Fifty-five strains from 55 M. abscessus pulmonary disease patients were isolated. Drug sensitivity was measured by a broth microdilution method. Subtypes of M. abscessus were identified by DNA sequencing. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST), mining spanning tree (MST), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were used to analyze sequence types (ST) and clonal complexes (CC). Clinical manifestations were assessed by CT imaging.We identified 42 A isolates, 11 M, and 2 B-subtypes. A and M were highly sensitive to tigecycline and amikacin (97.6-100%). The A-type easily developed drug resistance against clarithromycin. Both types were highly resistance to sulfonamides, moxifloxacin, doxycycline, imipenem, and tobramycin. MLST analysis identified 41 STs including 32 new STs. The MST algorithm distributed 55 isolates into 12 separate CC. The PFGE analysis exhibited 53 distinct restriction patterns and the M-type was closely clustered according to their ST and CC numbers. CT imaging showed that tree-in-bud and patch shadow were commonly observed in M-type, whereas pulmonary cavities were often found in A-type infection patients (P < 0.001).ST1 in A and ST23 in M-type were the main epidemic strains in Shanghai. The M-type appeared to be prone to epidemic nosocomial transmission. PMID:26817866

  13. Long-term exposure to abnormal glucose levels alters drug metabolism pathways and insulin sensitivity in primary human hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Matthew D.; Ballinger, Kimberly R.; Khetani, Salman R.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus has been linked to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which can progress to inflammation, fibrosis/cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Understanding how chronic hyperglycemia affects primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) can facilitate the development of therapeutics for these diseases. Conversely, elucidating the effects of hypoglycemia on PHHs may provide insights into how the liver adapts to fasting, adverse diabetes drug reactions, and cancer. In contrast to declining PHH monocultures, micropatterned co-cultures (MPCCs) of PHHs and 3T3-J2 murine embryonic fibroblasts maintain insulin-sensitive glucose metabolism for several weeks. Here, we exposed MPCCs to hypo-, normo- and hyperglycemic culture media for ~3 weeks. While albumin and urea secretion were not affected by glucose level, hypoglycemic MPCCs upregulated CYP3A4 enzyme activity as compared to other glycemic states. In contrast, hyperglycemic MPCCs displayed significant hepatic lipid accumulation in the presence of insulin, while also showing decreased sensitivity to insulin-mediated inhibition of glucose output relative to a normoglycemic control. In conclusion, we show for the first time that PHHs exposed to hypo- and hyperglycemia can remain highly functional, but display increased CYP3A4 activity and selective insulin resistance, respectively. In the future, MPCCs under glycemic states can aid in novel drug discovery and mechanistic investigations. PMID:27312339

  14. A new experimental model for assessing drug efficacy against Trypanosoma cruzi infection based on highly sensitive in vivo imaging.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Michael D; Francisco, Amanda Fortes; Taylor, Martin C; Kelly, John M

    2015-01-01

    The protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease, one of the world's major neglected infections. Although development of improved antiparasitic drugs is considered a priority, there have been no significant treatment advances in the past 40 years. Factors that have limited progress include an incomplete understanding of pathogenesis, tissue tropism, and disease progression. In addition, in vivo models, which allow parasite burdens to be tracked throughout the chronic stage of infection, have been lacking. To address these issues, we have developed a highly sensitive in vivo imaging system based on bioluminescent T. cruzi, which express a red-shifted luciferase that emits light in the tissue-penetrating orange-red region of the spectrum. The exquisite sensitivity of this noninvasive murine model has been exploited to monitor parasite burden in real time throughout the chronic stage, has allowed the identification of the gastrointestinal tract as the major niche of long-term infection, and has demonstrated that chagasic heart disease can develop in the absence of locally persistent parasites. Here, we review the parameters of the imaging system and describe how this experimental model can be incorporated into drug development programs as a valuable tool for assessing efficacy against both acute and chronic T. cruzi infections. PMID:25296657

  15. Dextran hydrogel coated surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) sensor for sensitive and label-free detection of small molecule drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaopeng; Yang, Mo; Zhou, Wenfei; Johnston, Trevor G.; Wang, Rui; Zhu, Jinsong

    2015-11-01

    The label-free and sensitive detection of small molecule drugs on SPRi is still a challenging task, mainly due to the limited surface immobilization capacity of the sensor. In this research, a dextran hydrogel-coated gold sensor chip for SPRi was successfully fabricated via photo-cross-linking for enhanced surface immobilization capacity. The density of the dextran hydrogel was optimized for protein immobilization and sensitive small molecule detection. The protein immobilization capacity of the hydrogel was 10 times greater than a bare gold surface, and 20 times greater than an 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) surface. Such a drastic improvement in immobilization capacity allowed the SPRi sensor to detect adequate response signals when probing small molecule binding events. The binding signal of 4 nM liquid-phase biotin to streptavidin immobilized on the dextran surface reached 435 RU, while no response was observed on bare gold or MUA surfaces. The dextran hydrogel-coated SPRi sensor was also applied in a kinetic study of the binding between an immunosuppressive drug (FK506) and its target protein (FKBP12) in a high-throughput microarray format. The measured binding affinity was shown to be consistent with reported literature values, and a detection limit of 0.5 nM was achieved.

  16. Enhancement of neutrophil autophagy by an IVIG preparation against multidrug-resistant bacteria as well as drug-sensitive strains

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Hidemasa; Kitamura, Naoko; Yamamoto, Sho; Higuchi, Takeshi; Takematsu, Hiromu; Kamikubo, Yasuhiko; Kondo, Tadakazu; Yamashita, Kouhei; Sasada, Masataka; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Adachi, Souichi

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy occurs in human neutrophils after the phagocytosis of multidrug-resistant bacteria and drug-sensitive strains, including Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The present study detected autophagy by immunoblot analysis of LC3B conversion, by confocal scanning microscopic examination of LC3B aggregate formation and by transmission electron microscopic examination of bacteria-containing autophagosomes. Patients with severe bacterial infections are often treated with IVIG alongside antimicrobial agents. Here, we showed that IVIG induced neutrophil-mediated phagocytosis of multidrug-resistant strains. Compared with untreated neutrophils, neutrophils exposed to IVIG showed increased levels of bacterial cell killing, phagocytosis, O2− release, MPO release, and NET formation. IVIG also increased autophagy in these cells. Inhibiting the late phase of autophagy (fusion of lysosomes with autophagosomes) with bafilomycin A1-reduced, neutrophil-mediated bactericidal activity. These findings indicate that autophagy plays a critical role in the bactericidal activity mediated by human neutrophils. Furthermore, the autophagosomes within the neutrophils contained bacteria only and their organelles only, or both bacteria and their organelles, a previously undocumented observation. Taken together, these results suggest that the contents of neutrophil autophagosomes may be derived from specific autophagic systems, which provide the neutrophil with an advantage. Thus, IVIG promotes the neutrophil-mediated killing of multidrug-resistant bacteria as well as drug-sensitive strains. PMID:25908735

  17. Long-term exposure to abnormal glucose levels alters drug metabolism pathways and insulin sensitivity in primary human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Matthew D; Ballinger, Kimberly R; Khetani, Salman R

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus has been linked to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which can progress to inflammation, fibrosis/cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Understanding how chronic hyperglycemia affects primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) can facilitate the development of therapeutics for these diseases. Conversely, elucidating the effects of hypoglycemia on PHHs may provide insights into how the liver adapts to fasting, adverse diabetes drug reactions, and cancer. In contrast to declining PHH monocultures, micropatterned co-cultures (MPCCs) of PHHs and 3T3-J2 murine embryonic fibroblasts maintain insulin-sensitive glucose metabolism for several weeks. Here, we exposed MPCCs to hypo-, normo- and hyperglycemic culture media for ~3 weeks. While albumin and urea secretion were not affected by glucose level, hypoglycemic MPCCs upregulated CYP3A4 enzyme activity as compared to other glycemic states. In contrast, hyperglycemic MPCCs displayed significant hepatic lipid accumulation in the presence of insulin, while also showing decreased sensitivity to insulin-mediated inhibition of glucose output relative to a normoglycemic control. In conclusion, we show for the first time that PHHs exposed to hypo- and hyperglycemia can remain highly functional, but display increased CYP3A4 activity and selective insulin resistance, respectively. In the future, MPCCs under glycemic states can aid in novel drug discovery and mechanistic investigations. PMID:27312339

  18. Study on the Association Between miRNA-202 Expression and Drug Sensitivity in Multiple Myeloma Cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xianjuan; Guo, Yuehua; Qi, Jing; Shi, Wei; Wu, Xinhua; Ni, Hongbing; Ju, Shaoqing

    2016-07-01

    An increasing amount of experimental evidence has shown that miRNAs play a causal role in hematologic tumorigenesis. In this study, we characterized the role of miR-202 in multiple myeloma (MM) drug sensitivity. The potential binding site of miR-202 and B cell-activating factor (BAFF) was confirmed by luciferase reporter assay. MM cells were transfected with miR-202 mimics and inhibitor. Cells growth was measured by WST-1 cell proliferation assay and Annexin V-FLUOS apoptosis assay. BAFF and miR-202 mRNA levels were measured by real-time PCR. Meanwhile, BAFF, Bcl-2 family survival proteins and MAPK pathway proteins were measured by Western blot. It was found that miR-202 was functioned as a modulator of BAFF expression. miR-202 over-expression sensitized MM cells to bortezomib (Bort) but less to Thalidomide (Thal) and dexamethasone (Dex). miR-202 mimics in combination with Bort inhibited MM cell survival more effectively as compared with Bort treatment alone. Our study also provided experimental evidence that JNK/SAPK signaling pathway was involved in the regulatory effect of miR-202 on drug resistance of MM cells. These results suggest that the regulatory mechanism of miR-202 expression may be a promising target for fine-tuning anti-myeloma therapy. PMID:26689580

  19. SYSTEMATIC ASSESSMENT OF ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR DRUG SENSITIVITY PREDICTION FROM CANCER CELL LINE DATA*

    PubMed Central

    Jang, In Sock; Neto, Elias Chaibub; Guinney, Justin; Friend, Stephen H.; Margolin, Adam A.

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale pharmacogenomic screens of cancer cell lines have emerged as an attractive pre-clinical system for identifying tumor genetic subtypes with selective sensitivity to targeted therapeutic strategies. Application of modern machine learning approaches to pharmacogenomic datasets have demonstrated the ability to infer genomic predictors of compound sensitivity. Such modeling approaches entail many analytical design choices; however, a systematic study evaluating the relative performance attributable to each design choice is not yet available. In this work, we evaluated over 110,000 different models, based on a multifactorial experimental design testing systematic combinations of modeling factors within several categories of modeling choices, including: type of algorithm, type of molecular feature data, compound being predicted, method of summarizing compound sensitivity values, and whether predictions are based on discretized or continuous response values. Our results suggest that model input data (type of molecular features and choice of compound) are the primary factors explaining model performance, followed by choice of algorithm. Our results also provide a statistically principled set of recommended modeling guidelines, including: using elastic net or ridge regression with input features from all genomic profiling platforms, most importantly, gene expression features, to predict continuous-valued sensitivity scores summarized using the area under the dose response curve, with pathway targeted compounds most likely to yield the most accurate predictors. In addition, our study provides a publicly available resource of all modeling results, an open source code base, and experimental design for researchers throughout the community to build on our results and assess novel methodologies or applications in related predictive modeling problems. PMID:24297534

  20. Endogenous stimuli-sensitive multistage polymeric micelleplex anticancer drug delivery system for efficient tumor penetration and cellular internalization.

    PubMed

    Li, Junjie; Ke, Wendong; Li, Hui; Zha, Zengshi; Han, Yu; Ge, Zhishen

    2015-10-28

    To efficiently deliver anticancer drugs to the entire tumor tissue and cancer cells, an endogenous stimuli-sensitive multistage polymeric micelleplex drug delivery system is developed via electrostatic complexation between poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly[(N'-dimethylmaleoyl-2-aminoethyl)aspartamide]-block-poly(ε-caprolactone) (PEG-b-PAsp(EDA-DM)-b-PCL) triblock copolymer micelles and cisplatin prodrug (Pt(IV))-conjugated cationic poly(amidoamine) dendrimers (PAMAM-Pt(IV)). The micelleplexes maintain structural stability at pH 7.4 ensuring long blood circulation and high tumor accumulation level, while they exhibit triggered release of secondary PAMAM-Pt(IV) dendrimer nanocarriers at tumoral acidity (≈pH 6.8) due to acid-labile charge-reversal properties of PAsp(EDA-DM) component under mildly acidic condition. The released PAMAM delivery nanocarriers with small size and slightly positive charges exhibit significantly deep tumor tissue penetration and efficient cellular internalization, followed by release of active cisplatin anticancer drug in intracellular reducing medium. In vivo investigation reveals that the Pt(IV)-loading micelleplexes significantly suppress tumor growth via intravenous injection due to synergistic effect of long circulation in bloodstream, high tumor accumulation, deep tumor tissue penetration, and efficient cellular internalization. Thus, the micelleplexes with stimuli-responsive multistage release feature show great potentials for better therapeutic efficacy of cancer especially through enhanced tumor penetration and cellular internalization. PMID:26346421

  1. Novel pH-sensitive polysialic acid based polymeric micelles for triggered intracellular release of hydrophobic drug.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wuxia; Dong, Dongqi; Li, Peng; Wang, Dongdong; Mu, Haibo; Niu, Hong; Duan, Jinyou

    2016-03-30

    Polysialic acid (PSA), a non-immunogenic and biodegradable natural polymer, is prone to hydrolysis under endo-lysosomal pH conditions. Here, we synthesized an intracellular pH-sensitive polysialic acid-ursolic acid conjugate by a condensation reaction. To further test the drug loading capability, we prepared paclitaxel-loaded polysialic acid-based amphiphilic copolymer micelle (PTX-loaded-PSAU) by a nanoprecipitation method. Results showed PTX-loaded-PSAU exhibited well-defined spherical shape and homogeneous distribution. The drug-loading was 4.5% with an entrapment efficiency of 67.5%. PTX released from PTX-loaded-PSAU was 15% and 42% in 72 h under simulated physiological condition (pH 7.4) and mild acidic conditions (pH 5.0), respectively. In addition, In vitro cytotoxicity assay showed that PTX-loaded-PSAU retained anti-tumor (SGC-7901) activity with a cell viability of 53.8% following 72 h incubation, indicating PTX-loaded-PSAU could efficiently release PTX into the tumor cells. These results indicated that the pH-responsive biodegradable PTX-loaded-PSAU possess superior extracellular stability and intracellular drug release ability. PMID:26794949

  2. [Preliminary study on pH-sensitive lipid bilayer-coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles as a novel drug carrier for antitumor drug].

    PubMed

    Li, Fei-Fei; Zhang, Xin-Xin; Guo, Shi-Yan; Gan, Yong; Li, Juan

    2013-02-01

    This study plans to prepare lipid bilayer-coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles (LMSNs) which are pH sensitive with core-shell structure to improve the tumor cell lethality of antitumor drug. The lipid coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles loaded with irinotecan (CPT-11) (CPT-11-LMSNs) were prepared by hot water-film hydration method, and the characterized its morphology, particle size and release in vitro. Meanwhile, the intracellular uptake and cell toxicity of CPT-11-LMSNs and intracellular accumulation of CPT-11 were evaluated on human breast carcinoma cell line (MCF-7). The results indicated that the mean diameter of the spherical LMSNs was (120.27 +/- 5.91) nm. The slow release in simulated normal physiological conditions and a rapid release under simulated intracellular condition demonstrated the pH sensitivity of CPT-11-MSNs in vitro. Moreover, the CPT-11-LMSN could improve the intracellular CPT-11 cumulant 2.1 times and reduce half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of CPT-11 1.4 times compared with CPT-11-MSNs, demonstrating a stronger cell lethality. PMID:23672029

  3. Choline kinase-alpha by regulating cell aggressiveness and drug sensitivity is a potential druggable target for ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Granata, A; Nicoletti, R; Tinaglia, V; De Cecco, L; Pisanu, M E; Ricci, A; Podo, F; Canevari, S; Iorio, E; Bagnoli, M; Mezzanzanica, D

    2014-01-01

    Background: Aberrant choline metabolism has been proposed as a novel cancer hallmark. We recently showed that epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) possesses an altered MRS-choline profile, characterised by increased phosphocholine (PCho) content to which mainly contribute over-expression and activation of choline kinase-alpha (ChoK-alpha). Methods: To assess its biological relevance, ChoK-alpha expression was downmodulated by transient RNA interference in EOC in vitro models. Gene expression profiling by microarray analysis and functional analysis was performed to identify the pathway/functions perturbed in ChoK-alpha-silenced cells, then validated by in vitro experiments. Results: In silenced cells, compared with control, we observed: (I) a significant reduction of both CHKA transcript and ChoK-alpha protein expression; (II) a dramatic, proportional drop in PCho content ranging from 60 to 71%, as revealed by 1H-magnetic spectroscopy analysis; (III) a 35–36% of cell growth inhibition, with no evidences of apoptosis or modification of the main cellular survival signalling pathways; (IV) 476 differentially expressed genes, including genes related to lipid metabolism. Ingenuity pathway analysis identified cellular functions related to cell death and cellular proliferation and movement as the most perturbed. Accordingly, CHKA-silenced cells displayed a significant delay in wound repair, a reduced migration and invasion capability were also observed. Furthermore, although CHKA silencing did not directly induce cell death, a significant increase of sensitivity to platinum, paclitaxel and doxorubicin was observed even in a drug-resistant context. Conclusion: We showed for the first time in EOC that CHKA downregulation significantly decreased the aggressive EOC cell behaviour also affecting cells' sensitivity to drug treatment. These observations open the way to further analysis for ChoK-alpha validation as a new EOC therapeutic target to be used alone or in combination with

  4. Multifunctional pH-sensitive magnetic nanoparticles for simultaneous imaging, sensing and targeted intracellular anticancer drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shashwat S.; Chen, Dong-Hwang

    2008-12-01

    A novel multifunctional magnetic nanocarrier was fabricated for synchronous cancer therapy and sensing. The nanocarrier, programed to display a response to environmental stimuli (pH value), was synthesized by coupling doxorubicin (DOX) to adipic dihydrazide-grafted gum arabic modified magnetic nanoparticles (ADH-GAMNP) via the hydrolytically degradable pH-sensitive hydrazone bond. The resultant nanocarrier, DOX-ADH-GAMNP, had a mean diameter of 13.8 nm and the amount of DOX coupled was about 6.52 mg g-1. Also, it exhibited pH triggered release of DOX in an acidic environment (pH 5.0) but was relatively stable at physiological pH (pH 7.4). Furthermore, both GAMNP and DOX were found to possess fluorescence properties when excited in the near-infrared region due to the two-photon absorption mechanism. The coupling of DOX to GAMNP resulted in a reversible self-quenching of fluorescence through the fluorescence resonant energy transfer (FRET) between the donor GAMNP and acceptor DOX. The release of DOX from DOX-ADH-GAMNP when exposed to acidic media indicated the recovery of fluorescence from both GAMNP and DOX. The change in the fluorescence intensity of DOX-ADH-GAMNP on the release of DOX can act as a potential sensor to sense the delivery of the drug. The analysis of zeta potential and plasmon absorbance in different pH conditions also confirmed the pH sensitivity of the product. This multifunctional nanocarrier is a significant breakthrough in developing a drug delivery vehicle that combines drug targeting as well as sensing and therapy at the same time.

  5. High-throughput drug profiling with voltage- and calcium-sensitive fluorescent probes in human iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Bedut, Stephane; Seminatore-Nole, Christine; Lamamy, Veronique; Caignard, Sarah; Boutin, Jean A; Nosjean, Olivier; Stephan, Jean-Philippe; Coge, Francis

    2016-07-01

    Cardiomyocytes derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are increasingly used for in vitro assays and represent an interesting opportunity to increase the data throughput for drug development. In this work, we describe a 96-well recording of synchronous electrical activities from spontaneously beating hiPSC-derived cardiomyocyte monolayers. The signal was obtained with a fast-imaging plate reader using a submillisecond-responding membrane potential recording assay, FluoVolt, based on a newly derived voltage-sensitive fluorescent dye. In our conditions, the toxicity of the dye was moderate and compatible with episodic recordings for >3 h. We show that the waveforms recorded from a whole well or from a single cell-sized zone are equivalent and make available critical functional parameters that are usually accessible only with gold standard techniques like intracellular microelectrode recording. This approach allows accurate identification of the electrophysiological effects of reference drugs on the different phases of the cardiac action potential as follows: fast depolarization (lidocaine), early repolarization (nifedipine, Bay K8644, and veratridine), late repolarization (dofetilide), and diastolic slow depolarization (ivabradine). Furthermore, the data generated with the FluoVolt dye can be pertinently complemented with a calcium-sensitive dye for deeper characterization of the pharmacological responses. In a semiautomated plate reader, the two probes used simultaneously in 96-well plates provide an easy and powerful multiparametric assay to rapidly and precisely evaluate the cardiotropic profile of compounds for drug discovery or cardiac safety. PMID:27199128

  6. Multifunctional pH-sensitive magnetic nanoparticles for simultaneous imaging, sensing and targeted intracellular anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Shashwat S; Chen, Dong-Hwang

    2008-12-17

    A novel multifunctional magnetic nanocarrier was fabricated for synchronous cancer therapy and sensing. The nanocarrier, programed to display a response to environmental stimuli (pH value), was synthesized by coupling doxorubicin (DOX) to adipic dihydrazide-grafted gum arabic modified magnetic nanoparticles (ADH-GAMNP) via the hydrolytically degradable pH-sensitive hydrazone bond. The resultant nanocarrier, DOX-ADH-GAMNP, had a mean diameter of 13.8 nm and the amount of DOX coupled was about 6.52 mg g(-1). Also, it exhibited pH triggered release of DOX in an acidic environment (pH 5.0) but was relatively stable at physiological pH (pH 7.4). Furthermore, both GAMNP and DOX were found to possess fluorescence properties when excited in the near-infrared region due to the two-photon absorption mechanism. The coupling of DOX to GAMNP resulted in a reversible self-quenching of fluorescence through the fluorescence resonant energy transfer (FRET) between the donor GAMNP and acceptor DOX. The release of DOX from DOX-ADH-GAMNP when exposed to acidic media indicated the recovery of fluorescence from both GAMNP and DOX. The change in the fluorescence intensity of DOX-ADH-GAMNP on the release of DOX can act as a potential sensor to sense the delivery of the drug. The analysis of zeta potential and plasmon absorbance in different pH conditions also confirmed the pH sensitivity of the product. This multifunctional nanocarrier is a significant breakthrough in developing a drug delivery vehicle that combines drug targeting as well as sensing and therapy at the same time. PMID:19942761

  7. Relationship between in vitro drug sensitivity and clinical response of patients to treatment in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rogalińska, Małgorzata; Błoński, Jerzy Z; Góralski, Paweł; Wawrzyniak, Ewa; Hartman, Mariusz; Rogalska, Aneta; Robak, Paweł; Koceva-Chyła, Aneta; Piekarski, Henryk; Robak, Tadeusz; Kiliańska, Zofia M

    2015-03-01

    To improve the efficacy of therapeutic options in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) an in vitro system to determine the response of mononuclear blood cells from blood of patients was elaborated. The study combines four approaches, i.e., cell viability, apoptosis rate, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and immunoblotting to develop personalized therapy protocols based on the cell sensitivity to drug exposure of individual CLL patients. The complementary analyses were performed on 28 peripheral blood samples from previously untreated CLL patients before therapy. The induction and progress of apoptosis in CLL cells exposed in vitro to purine analogs combined with mafosfamide, i.e., cladribine + mafosfamide (CM) and fludarabine + mafosfamide (FM) were assessed using the above approaches. The changes in thermal profiles (decrease/loss of transition at 95±5˚C) coincided with an accumulation of apoptotic cells, a decrease in the number of viable cells, and differences in the expression of the apoptosis‑related protein PARP‑1. No significant changes were observed in the thermal profiles of nuclei isolated from CLL cells resistant to the treatment. The complementary assays revealed a strong relationship between both the in vitro sensitivity of leukemia cells to drugs and the clinical response of the patients, determined usually after the sixth course of treatment (after ~6 months of therapy). As a summary of studies followed by complementary tests, our findings demonstrate the value of in vitro exposure of CLL cell samples to drugs intended to treat CLL patients, before their administration in order to recommend the most suitable and effective therapy for individual patients. PMID:25572009

  8. An In vivo Drug Screening Model Using Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficient Mice to Predict the Hemolytic Toxicity of 8-Aminoquinolines

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Gao, Xiugong; Ishida, Hiroshi; Amnuaysirikul, Jack; Weina, Peter J.; Grogl, Max; O'Neil, Michael T.; Li, Qigui; Caridha, Diana; Ohrt, Colin; Hickman, Mark; Magill, Alan J.; Ray, Prabhati

    2013-01-01

    Anti-malarial 8-aminoquinolines drugs cause acute hemolytic anemia in individuals with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PDD). Efforts to develop non-hemolytic 8-aminoquinolines have been severely limited caused by the lack of a predictive in vivo animal model of hemolytic potential that would allow screening of candidate compounds. This report describes a G6PDD mouse model with a phenotype closely resembling the G6PDD phenotype found in the African A-type G6PDD human. These G6PDD mice, given different doses of primaquine, which used as a reference hemolytic drug, display a full array of hemolytic anemia parameters, consistently and reproducibly. The hemolytic and therapeutic indexes were generated for evaluation of hemotoxicity of drugs. This model demonstrated a complete hemolytic toxicity response to another known hemolytic antimalarial drug, pamaquine, but no response to non-hemolytic drugs, chloroquine and mefloquine. These results suggest that this model is suitable for evaluation of selected 8-AQ type candidate antimalarial drugs for their hemolytic potential. PMID:23530079

  9. Transport proteins determine drug sensitivity and resistance in a protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Munday, Jane C.; Settimo, Luca; de Koning, Harry P.

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance in pathogenic protozoa is very often caused by changes to the ‘transportome’ of the parasites. In Trypanosoma brucei, several transporters have been implicated in uptake of the main classes of drugs, diamidines and melaminophenyl arsenicals. The resistance mechanism had been thought to be due to loss of a transporter known to carry both types of agents: the aminopurine transporter P2, encoded by the gene TbAT1. However, although loss of P2 activity is well-documented as the cause of resistance to the veterinary diamidine diminazene aceturate (DA; Berenil®), cross-resistance between the human-use arsenical melarsoprol and the diamidine pentamidine (melarsoprol/pentamidine cross resistance, MPXR) is the result of loss of a separate high affinity pentamidine transporter (HAPT1). A genome-wide RNAi library screen for resistance to pentamidine, published in 2012, gave the key to the genetic identity of HAPT1 by linking the phenomenon to a locus that contains the closely related T. brucei aquaglyceroporin genes TbAQP2 and TbAQP3. Further analysis determined that knockdown of only one pore, TbAQP2, produced the MPXR phenotype. TbAQP2 is an unconventional aquaglyceroporin with unique residues in the “selectivity region” of the pore, and it was found that in several MPXR lab strains the WT gene was either absent or replaced by a chimeric protein, recombined with parts of TbAQP3. Importantly, wild-type AQP2 was also absent in field isolates of T. b. gambiense, correlating with the outcome of melarsoprol treatment. Expression of a wild-type copy of TbAQP2 in even the most resistant strain completely reversed MPXR and re-introduced HAPT1 function and transport kinetics. Expression of TbAQP2 in Leishmania mexicana introduced a pentamidine transport activity indistinguishable from HAPT1. Although TbAQP2 has been shown to function as a classical aquaglyceroporin it is now clear that it is also a high affinity drug transporter, HAPT1. We discuss here a

  10. Mda-7/IL-24 enhances sensitivity of B cell lymphoma to chemotherapy drugs.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ming; Zhao, Lianmei; Sun, Guogui; Zhang, Chao; Liu, Lihua; Du, Yanyan; Yang, Xingxiao; Shan, Baoen

    2016-05-01

    Interleukin-24 (IL-24) is a cytokine encoded by a tumor suppressor gene of the IL-10 family, also known as the melanoma differentiation associated gene-7 (Mda-7) and first discovered in human melanoma cells. Mda-7/IL-24 has been shown to inhibit the proliferation of various human tumor cell lines, but its effect on the sensitivity of B cell lymphoma to chemotherapy agents is not yet clear. The present study investigated the effects of Mda-7/IL-24 overexpression on the sensitivity of human B cell lymphoma cells to chemotherapy, as well as its mechanism of action. The sensitivity of stable Mda-7/IL-24 overexpressing Raji and Daudi cells to cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (CDDP), epirubicin and vinblastine (VCR) were assessed by the MTS method, and the IC50 value calculated. Cell apoptosis and the intracellular accumulation of Rhodamine-123 were assayed by flow cytometry. The expression of multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR1), B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus insertion site 1 (BMI1), topoisomerase II (Topo II) and multidrug resistance-related protein 1 (MRP1) mRNA and protein were analyzed by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and western blotting, respectively. In addition, western blot analysis was also used to investigate the effect of Mda-7/IL-24 on activity of GTP-RhoA-ERK signaling pathway in Raji and Daudi cells. Growth inhibition and apoptosis rates of Mda-7/IL-24 overexpressing Raji and Daudi cells were higher than those of non-transfected cells and cells transfected with vector alone when treated with CDDP, epirubicin and VCR. The IC50 values of CDDP, epirubicin and VCR were lower for Mda-7/IL-24-overexpressing Raji and Daudi cells than for non-transfected cells and cells transfected with empty vector. Intracellular accumulation of Rhodamine-123 and the expression of Topo II were higher, while the levels of MDR1, BMI and MRP1 mRNA and protein were lower, in Mda-7/IL-24 overexpressing Raji and Daudi cells

  11. Facile synthesis of glucose-sensitive chitosan-poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel: Drug release optimization and swelling properties.

    PubMed

    Abureesh, Mosab Ali; Oladipo, Akeem Adeyemi; Gazi, Mustafa

    2016-09-01

    The study describes the development of glucose-sensitive hydrogel and optimization of bovine serum albumin release profile from the hydrogel. To enhance the glucose sensitivity and improve the swelling behaviors of the hydrogel system, boric acid crosslinking, and freeze-thawing cycle techniques were used to prepare chitosan-poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel. The structure of the resultant hydrogel was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The experimental results revealed that the swelling of the hydrogel was influenced by the pH of the medium, and the hydrogel displayed explicit glucose-sensitivity under physiological conditions. The values of the diffusion exponent range between 0.34 and 0.44 and the diffusion of water into the gel system are assumed to be pseudo-Fickian in nature. Under optimized conditions, the cumulative Bovine serum albumin (BSA) drug releases ranged between 69.33±1.95% and 86.45±1.16% at 37°C in the presence of glucose and pH 7.4, respectively. PMID:26459171

  12. Hyaluronic acid nanogels with enzyme-sensitive cross-linking group for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chenchen; Wang, Xin; Yao, Xikuang; Zhang, Yajun; Wu, Wei; Jiang, Xiqun

    2015-05-10

    A methacrylation strategy was employed to functionalize hyaluronic acid and prepare hyaluronic acid (HA) nanogels. Dynamic light scattering, zeta potential analyzer and electron microscopy were utilized to characterize the nanogels and their enzyme-degradability in vitro. It was found that these nanogels had a spherical morphology with the diameter of about 70nm, and negative surface potential. When doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded into the nanogels, the diameter decreased to approximately 50nm with a drug loading content of 16% and encapsulation efficiency of 62%. Cellular uptake examinations showed that HA nanogels could be preferentially internalized by two-dimensional (2D) cells and three-dimensional (3D) multicellular spheroids (MCs) which both overexpress CD44 receptor. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging, biodistribution and penetration examinations in tumor tissue indicated that the HA nanogels could efficiently accumulate and penetrate the tumor matrix. In vivo antitumor evaluation found that DOX-loaded HA nanogels exhibited a significantly superior antitumor effect. PMID:25665867

  13. STAT3/IRF1 Pathway Activation Sensitizes Cervical Cancer Cells to Chemotherapeutic Drugs.

    PubMed

    Walch-Rückheim, Barbara; Pahne-Zeppenfeld, Jennifer; Fischbach, Jil; Wickenhauser, Claudia; Horn, Lars Christian; Tharun, Lars; Büttner, Reinhard; Mallmann, Peter; Stern, Peter; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Bohle, Rainer Maria; Rübe, Christian; Ströder, Russalina; Juhasz-Böss, Ingolf; Solomayer, Erich-Franz; Smola, Sigrun

    2016-07-01

    Neoadjuvant radio/chemotherapy regimens can markedly improve cervical cancer outcome in a subset of patients, while other patients show poor responses, but may encounter severe adverse effects. Thus, there is a strong need for predictive biomarkers to improve clinical management of cervical cancer patients. STAT3 is considered as a critical antiapoptotic factor in various malignancies. We therefore investigated STAT3 activation during cervical carcinogenesis and its impact on the response of cervical cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs. Tyr705-phosphorylated STAT3 increased from low-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN1) to precancerous CIN3 lesions. Notably, pTyr705-STAT3 activation significantly declined from CIN3 to invasive cancer, also when compared in the same clinical biopsy. pTyr705-STAT3 was also low or absent in cultured human cervical cancer cell lines, consistent with the in vivo expression data. Unexpectedly, IL6-type cytokine signaling inducing STAT3 activation rendered cervical cancer cells significantly more susceptible to chemotherapeutic drugs, that is, cisplatin or etoposide. This chemosensitization was STAT3-dependent and we identified IFN regulatory factor-1 (IRF1) as the STAT3-inducible mediator required for cell death enhancement. In line with these data, pTyr705-STAT3 significantly correlated with nuclear IRF1 expression in cervical cancer in vivo Importantly, high IRF1 expression in pretreatment cervical cancer biopsy cells was associated with a significantly better response to neoadjuvant radio/chemotherapy of the patients. In summary, our study has identified a key role of the STAT3/IRF1 pathway for chemosensitization in cervical cancer. Our results suggest that pretherapeutic IRF1 expression should be evaluated as a novel predictive biomarker for neoadjuvant radio/chemotherapy responses. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3872-83. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27216197

  14. Integrin alpha4 blockade sensitizes drug resistant pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yao-Te; Gang, Eun Ji; Geng, Huimin; Park, Eugene; Huantes, Sandra; Chudziak, Doreen; Dauber, Katrin; Schaefer, Paul; Scharman, Carlton; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Shojaee, Seyedmehdi; Klemm, Lars; Parameswaran, Reshmi; Loh, Mignon; Kang, Eun-Suk; Koo, Hong Hoe; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Andrade, Jacob; Crooks, Gay M.; Willman, Cheryl L.; Müschen, Markus; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Heisterkamp, Nora; Bönig, Halvard

    2013-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM) provides chemoprotection for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells, contributing to lack of efficacy of current therapies. Integrin alpha4 (alpha4) mediates stromal adhesion of normal and malignant B-cell precursors, and according to gene expression analyses from 207 children with minimal residual disease, is highly associated with poorest outcome. We tested whether interference with alpha4-mediated stromal adhesion might be a new ALL treatment. Two models of leukemia were used, one genetic (conditional alpha4 ablation of BCR-ABL1 [p210+] leukemia) and one pharmacological (anti-functional alpha4 antibody treatment of primary ALL). Conditional deletion of alpha4 sensitized leukemia cell to nilotinib. Adhesion of primary pre-B ALL cells was alpha4-dependent; alpha4 blockade sensitized primary ALL cells toward chemotherapy. Chemotherapy combined with Natalizumab prolonged survival of NOD/SCID recipients of primary ALL, suggesting adjuvant alpha4 inhibition as a novel strategy for pre-B ALL. PMID:23319569

  15. Variation in Drug Sensitivity of Malignant Mesothelioma Cell Lines with Substantial Effects of Selenite and Bortezomib, Highlights Need for Individualized Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Szulkin, Adam; Nilsonne, Gustav; Mundt, Filip; Wasik, Agata M.; Souri, Pega; Hjerpe, Anders; Dobra, Katalin

    2013-01-01

    Background Malignant mesothelioma cells have an epithelioid or sarcomatoid morphology, both of which may be present in the same tumor. The sarcomatoid phenotype is associated with worse prognosis and heterogeneity of mesothelioma cells may contribute to therapy resistance, which is often seen in mesothelioma. This study aimed to investigate differences in sensitivity between mesothelioma cell lines to anti-cancer drugs. We studied two novel drugs, selenite and bortezomib and compared their effect to four conventional drugs. We also investigated the immunoreactivity of potential predictive markers for drug sensitivity; Pgp, MRP-1, ERCC1, RRM1, TS, xCT and proteasome 20S subunit. Materials and methods We treated six mesothelioma cell lines with selenite, bortezomib, carboplatin, pemetrexed, doxorubicin or gemcitabine as single agents and in combinations. Viability was measured after 24 and 48 hours. Immunocytochemistry was used to detect predictive markers. Results As a single agent, selenite was effective on four out of six cell lines, and in combination with bortezomib yielded the greatest response in the studied mesothelioma cell lines. Cells with an epithelioid phenotype were generally more sensitive to the different drugs than the sarcomatoid cells. Extensive S-phase arrest was seen in pemetrexed-sensitive cell lines. MRP-1 predicted sensitivity of cell lines to treatment with carboplatin and xCT predicted pemetrexed effect. Conclusions The observed heterogeneity in sensitivity of mesothelioma cell lines with different morphology highlights the need for more individualized therapy, requiring development of methods to predict drug sensitivity of individual tumors. Selenite and bortezomib showed a superior effect compared to conventional drugs, motivating clinical testing of these agents as future treatment regime components for patients with malignant mesothelioma. PMID:23840376

  16. Drug treatment of malaria infections can reduce levels of protection transferred to offspring via maternal immunity

    PubMed Central

    Staszewski, Vincent; Reece, Sarah E.; O'Donnell, Aidan J.; Cunningham, Emma J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Maternally transferred immunity can have a fundamental effect on the ability of offspring to deal with infection. However, levels of antibodies in adults can vary both quantitatively and qualitatively between individuals and during the course of infection. How infection dynamics and their modification by drug treatment might affect the protection transferred to offspring remains poorly understood. Using the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi, we demonstrate that curing dams part way through infection prior to pregnancy can alter their immune response, with major consequences for offspring health and survival. In untreated maternal infections, maternally transferred protection suppressed parasitaemia and reduced pup mortality by 75 per cent compared with pups from naïve dams. However, when dams were treated with anti-malarial drugs, pups received fewer maternal antibodies, parasitaemia was only marginally suppressed, and mortality risk was 25 per cent higher than for pups from dams with full infections. We observed the same qualitative patterns across three different host strains and two parasite genotypes. This study reveals the role that within-host infection dynamics play in the fitness consequences of maternally transferred immunity. Furthermore, it highlights a potential trade-off between the health of mothers and offspring suggesting that anti-parasite treatment may significantly affect the outcome of infection in newborns. PMID:22357264

  17. Preparation and characterization of thermal-sensitive ferrofluids for drug delivery application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ting-Yu; Hu, Shang-Hsiu; Hu, Sheng-Hsiang; Tsai, Szu-Ping; Chen, San-Yuan

    2007-03-01

    Novel thermal-sensitive ferrofluids (F127-ferrofluids) consisting of core-shell-type magnetic nanoparticles dispersed in Pluronic F127-containing aqueous solution were prepared. The core (magnet)-shell (Pluronic F127) nanoparticles were synthesized by in situ co-precipitation process, which were characterized using transmission electron microscope, X-ray diffraction and vibrating sample magnetometer. The F127-ferrofluids gelled above the lower critical solution temperatures (LCST) of approximately 23-28 °C, which were higher than that of pure Pluronic F127-fluids (21-25 °C). The increase in the LCST of the F127 ferrofluids may be attributed to a result of a physical interaction between the F127 molecules and the core-shell magnetic nanoparticles.

  18. Identification of genes involved in the sensitivity to antitumour drug 17-allylamino,17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17AAG).

    PubMed

    Barresi, Vincenza; Fortuna, Cosimo G; Garozzo, Roberta; Musumarra, Giuseppe; Scirè, Salvatore; Condorelli, Daniele F

    2006-05-01

    In the present study we analysed the gene expression database provided by the National Cancer Institute in an attempt to correlate activity profiles of geldanamycin, 17AAG and 11 other analogues in 60 human tumor cell lines with their gene expression profiles determined by the cDNA microarray technique. On the basis of the activity profiles two classes of geldanamycin analogues could be distinguished, having geldanamycin and 17AAG, respectively, as prototype compounds (denominated as gelda-like and 17AAG-like classes). Application of the "soft" statistical methodology of PLS (partial least squares modelling in latent variables or projections to latent structures) allowed us to evaluate the influence of each gene expression target in determining the therapeutical responses. The transcript encoding the translocating chain-associated membrane protein (TRAM) showed a significant statistical correlation with activity profiles of 17AAG. In order to validate the role of TRAM in determining sensitivity to 17AAG we induced a selective knocking-down of this transcript by the RNA interference methodology in H226 non-small cell lung carcinoma cell line. The efficiency of double-stranded RNA oligonucleotides (short-interfering RNAs, siRNAs) was determined by measuring TRAM mRNA levels by quantitative real-time RT-PCR at different times (24-72 hours) after siRNA lipotransfection. A significant increase in chemosensitivity to 17AAG was observed in siRNA-silenced cells. Although a number of factors may affect tumour sensitivity to 17AAG the present methodology allowed us to dissect out a single parameter which may be partly responsible for its activity. PMID:16880941

  19. PES1 regulates sensitivity of colorectal cancer cells to anticancer drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Wei; Qu, Like; Meng, Lin; Liu, Caiyun; Wu, Jian; Shou, Chengchao

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► PES1 was overexpressed in diverse cancer cell lines. ► PES1-ablation enhances DNA damage response by decreasing DNA repair. ► PES1-ablation increases the sensitivity of HCT116 cells to chemotherapeutic agents. ► PES1-ablation is associated with diminished nuclear entry of RAD51. -- Abstract: PES1 (also known as Pescadillo), a nucleolar protein, was involved in biogenesis of ribosomal RNA. Up-regulation of PES1 has been documented in some human cancers, indicating that PES1 may play some crucial roles in tumorigenesis. In our previous study, it was found that silencing of PES1 resulted in decreased proliferation of colorectal cancer cells. We also noticed that depletion of PES1 altered expression profiles of diverse genes. In the present study, we validated the expression changes of a subset of genotoxic stress-related genes in PES1-silenced HCT116 cells by quantitative RT-PCR. The steady and etoposide-induced phosphorylated H2AX (γ-H2AX) were higher in PES1-silenced cells than in control cells. Besides, etoposide-induced γ-H2AX persisted longer in PES1-silenced cells after removing the etoposide. Next, results of comet assay revealed decreased DNA repair after PES1-ablation. PES1-ablated cells were more sensitive to chemotherapeutic agents, which could be reversed by reconstitution with exogenous PES1. Furthermore, deletion of PES1 diminished steady and DNA damage-induced levels of nuclear RAD51. Our results uncover a potential role of PES1 in chemoresistance by regulating DNA damage response in colorectal cancer cells.

  20. Tubulin-targeted drug action: functional significance of class ii and class IVb beta-tubulin in vinca alkaloid sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Gan, Pei Pei; Kavallaris, Maria

    2008-12-01

    Aberrant expression of beta-tubulin isotypes is frequently described in tumor tissues and tubulin-binding agent (TBA)-resistant cell lines. There is limited understanding of the role of specific beta-tubulin isotypes in cellular sensitivity to TBAs, and to gain insights into the functional role of betaII- and betaIVb-tubulin, we examined these isotypes in lung cancer cell lines NCI-H460 (H460) and Calu-6. Drug-treated clonogenic assays revealed that small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of either betaII- or betaIVb-tubulin hypersensitized the lung cancer cell lines to Vinca alkaloids, with the effects more pronounced following betaIVb-tubulin knockdown. In contrast, there was no change in paclitaxel sensitivity following knockdown of either isotype. Cell cycle analysis revealed a greater propensity for the betaII- and betaIVb-tubulin knockdown cells to undergo G2-M cell cycle block following 5 nmol/L vincristine treatment, with the betaIVb knockdown cells being more sensitive than the betaII-tubulin knockdown cells compared with control. In contrast to betaII-tubulin knockdown, betaIVb-tubulin knockdown cells showed a significant increase in the sub-G1 population (cell death) following treatment with both 5 and 40 nmol/L of vincristine compared with controls. Importantly, betaIVb-tubulin knockdown in H460 cells caused a significant dose-dependent increase in Annexin V staining in response to vincristine but not paclitaxel. Therefore, increased sensitivity to induction of apoptosis is one mechanism underlying the Vinca alkaloid hypersensitivity. This study provides direct evidence that betaII- or betaIVb-tubulins have functionally distinct roles and expression of these isotypes may serve as strong predictors of Vinca alkaloid response and resistance. PMID:19047161

  1. Application of firefly luciferase assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to antimicrobial drug sensitivity testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picciolo, G. L.; Tuttle, S. A.; Schrock, C. G.; Deming, J. W.; Barza, M. J.; Wienstein, L.; Chappelle, E. W.

    1977-01-01

    The development of a rapid method for determining microbial susceptibilities to antibiotics using the firefly luciferase assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is documented. The reduction of bacterial ATP by an antimicrobial agent was determined to be a valid measure of drug effect in most cases. The effect of 12 antibiotics on 8 different bacterial species gave a 94 percent correlation with the standard Kirby-Buer-Agar disc diffusion method. A 93 percent correlation was obtained when the ATP assay method was applied directly to 50 urine specimens from patients with urinary tract infections. Urine samples were centrifuged first to that bacterial pellets could be suspended in broth. No primary isolation or subculturing was required. Mixed cultures in which one species was predominant gave accurate results for the most abundant organism. Since the method is based on an increase in bacterial ATP with time, the presence of leukocytes did not interfere with the interpretation of results. Both the incubation procedure and the ATP assays are compatible with automation.

  2. Synthesis of new thermo/pH sensitive drug delivery systems based on tragacanth gum polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Hemmati, Khadijeh; Ghaemy, Mousa

    2016-06-01

    In this study, new pH/temperature responsive graft copolymers were synthesized based on natural Tragacanth Gum (TG) carbohydrate and their controlled drug release was investigated. Amphiphilic alkyne terminated terpolymers (mPEG-PCL-PDMAEMA-CCH)s consist of methylated poly(ethyleneglycol) (mPEG), polycaprolactone (PCL), and poly(dimethylaminoethylmethacrylate) (PDMAEMA) were synthesized by using ring opening polymerization (ROP) and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), and then were grafted onto azide-functionalized TG molecules by click chemistry. Different techniques such as FT-IR, (1)H NMR, gel permeation chromatography (GPC), thermo-gravimetrical analysis (TGA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to verify the successful synthesis of graft copolymers (TG-g-PDMAEMA-PCL-mPEG)s. The graft copolymers self-assembled to single micelles in aqueous solution and upon pH changes further assembled into micellar aggregates. These micelles were used to prepare quercetin loaded nanocarriers by probe sonication method. Size and morphology of the nanocarriers were studied by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and SEM. The in vitro release behavior of quercetin from these micelles showed pH-dependence. The results showed that release profile of quercetin best followed the first order model. PMID:26955747

  3. Injections, Cocktails and Diviners: Therapeutic Flexibility in the Context of Malaria Elimination and Drug Resistance in Northeast Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Gryseels, Charlotte; Uk, Sambunny; Erhart, Annette; Gerrets, René; Sluydts, Vincent; Durnez, Lies; Muela Ribera, Joan; Hausmann Muela, Susanna; Menard, Didier; Heng, Somony; Sochantha, Tho; D’Alessandro, Umberto; Coosemans, Marc; Peeters Grietens, Koen

    2013-01-01

    Background Adherence to effective malaria medication is extremely important in the context of Cambodia’s elimination targets and drug resistance containment. Although the public sector health facilities are accessible to the local ethnic minorities of Ratanakiri province (Northeast Cambodia), their illness itineraries often lead them to private pharmacies selling “cocktails” and artemether injections, or to local diviners prescribing animal sacrifices to appease the spirits. Methods The research design consisted of a mixed methods study, combining qualitative (in-depth interviews and participant observation) and quantitative methods (household and cross-sectional survey). Results Three broad options for malaria treatment were identified: i) the public sector; ii) the private sector; iii) traditional treatment based on divination and ceremonial sacrifice. Treatment choice was influenced by the availability of treatment and provider, perceived side effects and efficacy of treatments, perceived etiology of symptoms, and patient-health provider encounters. Moreover, treatment paths proved to be highly flexible, changing mostly in relation to the perceived efficacy of a chosen treatment. Conclusions Despite good availability of anti-malarial treatment in the public health sector, attendance remained low due to both structural and human behavioral factors. The common use and under-dosage of anti-malaria monotherapy in the private sector (single-dose injections, single-day drug cocktails) represents a threat not only for individual case management, but also for the regional plan of drug resistance containment and malaria elimination. PMID:24244678

  4. Epigenetic activation of the drug transporter OCT2 sensitizes renal cell carcinoma to oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanqing; Zheng, Xiaoli; Yu, Qinqin; Wang, Hua; Tan, Fuqing; Zhu, Qianying; Yuan, Lingmin; Jiang, Huidi; Yu, Lushan; Zeng, Su

    2016-07-20

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is known for its multidrug resistance. Using data obtained from the cancer transcriptome database Oncomine and the proteome database The Human Protein Atlas, we identified the repression of organic cation transporter OCT2 as a potential factor contributing to oxaliplatin resistance in RCC. By analyzing OCT2 expression in collected patient tissues and commercial tissue microarray specimens, we demonstrated OCT2 repression in RCC at both transcription and protein levels. Epigenetic analysis revealed that the repressed OCT2 promoter in RCC is characterized by hypermethylated CpG islands and the absence of H3K4 methylation. Further mechanistic studies showed that DNA hypermethylation blocked MYC activation of OCT2 by disrupting its interaction with the E-Box motif, which prevented MYC from recruiting MLL1 to catalyze H3K4me3 at the OCT2 promoter and resulted in repressed OCT2 transcription. Targeting this mechanism, we designed a sequential combination therapy and demonstrated that epigenetic activation of OCT2 by decitabine sensitizes RCC cells to oxaliplatin both in vitro and in xenografts. Our study highlights the potential of translating "omics" data into the development of targeted therapies. PMID:27440728

  5. Tumor-targeting, pH-sensitive nanoparticles for docetaxel delivery to drug-resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tran, Tuan Hiep; Ramasamy, Thiruganesh; Choi, Ju Yeon; Nguyen, Hanh Thuy; Pham, Thanh Tung; Jeong, Jee-Heon; Ku, Sae Kwang; Choi, Han-Gon; Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Jong Oh

    2015-01-01

    The attachment of polyethylene glycol (PEG) increases the circulation time of drug-containing nanoparticles; however, this also negatively affects cellular uptake. To overcome this problem, unique lipid polymer hybrid (LPH) nanoparticles were developed with a pH-responsive PEG layer that detached prior to cell uptake. Docetaxel (DTX) was incorporated into the lipid core of the nanoparticles, which was then shielded with the pH-responsive block co-polymer polyethylene glycol-b-polyaspartic acid (PEG-b-PAsp) using a modified emulsion method. The optimized LPH nanoparticles were ~200 nm and had a narrow size distribution. Drug release from DTX-loaded LPH (DTX-LPH) nanoparticles was pH-sensitive, which is beneficial for tumor targeting. More importantly, DTX-LPH nanoparticles were able to effectively induce apoptosis in cancer cells. The negative surface charge and PEG shell of vehicle remarkably enhanced the blood circulation and physiological activity of DTX-LPH nanoparticles compared with that of free DTX. The nanoparticles were also found to reduce the size of tumors in tumor-bearing xenograft mice. The in vivo anticancer effect of DTX-LPH nanoparticles was further confirmed by the elevated levels of caspase-3 and poly ADP ribose polymerase found in the tumors after treatment. Thus, the results suggest that this novel LPH system could be an effective new treatment for cancer. PMID:26346426

  6. pH-sensitive nanocargo based on smart polymer functionalized graphene oxide for site-specific drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, Thangavelu; Abdi, Syed Izhar Haider; Park, Soo-Young

    2013-04-14

    Graphene oxide (GO) was functionalized covalently with pH-sensitive poly(2-(diethylamino) ethyl methacrylate) (PDEA) by surface-initiated in situ atom transfer radical polymerization. The structure of the PDEA-grafted GO (GO-PDEA) were examined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and atomic force microscopy. The grafted PDEA endowed the GO sheets with good solubility and stability in physiological solutions. Simple physisorption by π-π stacking and hydrophobic interactions on GO-PDEA can be used to load camptothecin (CPT), a widely used water-insoluble cancer drug. The loaded CPT was released only at the lower (acidic) pH normally found in a tumor environment but not in basic and neutral pH. GO-PDEA did not show practical toxicity to N2a cancer cells but the GO-PDEA-CPT complex exhibited high potency in killing N2a cancer cells in vitro. These results suggest that the GO-PDEA nanocargo carrier might be a promising material for site-specific anticancer drug delivery and controlled release. PMID:23454895

  7. Tumor-targeting, pH-sensitive nanoparticles for docetaxel delivery to drug-resistant cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Tuan Hiep; Ramasamy, Thiruganesh; Choi, Ju Yeon; Nguyen, Hanh Thuy; Pham, Thanh Tung; Jeong, Jee-Heon; Ku, Sae Kwang; Choi, Han-Gon; Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Jong Oh

    2015-01-01

    The attachment of polyethylene glycol (PEG) increases the circulation time of drug-containing nanoparticles; however, this also negatively affects cellular uptake. To overcome this problem, unique lipid polymer hybrid (LPH) nanoparticles were developed with a pH-responsive PEG layer that detached prior to cell uptake. Docetaxel (DTX) was incorporated into the lipid core of the nanoparticles, which was then shielded with the pH-responsive block co-polymer polyethylene glycol-b-polyaspartic acid (PEG-b-PAsp) using a modified emulsion method. The optimized LPH nanoparticles were ~200 nm and had a narrow size distribution. Drug release from DTX-loaded LPH (DTX-LPH) nanoparticles was pH-sensitive, which is beneficial for tumor targeting. More importantly, DTX-LPH nanoparticles were able to effectively induce apoptosis in cancer cells. The negative surface charge and PEG shell of vehicle remarkably enhanced the blood circulation and physiological activity of DTX-LPH nanoparticles compared with that of free DTX. The nanoparticles were also found to reduce the size of tumors in tumor-bearing xenograft mice. The in vivo anticancer effect of DTX-LPH nanoparticles was further confirmed by the elevated levels of caspase-3 and poly ADP ribose polymerase found in the tumors after treatment. Thus, the results suggest that this novel LPH system could be an effective new treatment for cancer. PMID:26346426

  8. Presumptive Treatment of Malaria from Formal and Informal Drug Vendors in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Isiguzo, Chinwoke; Anyanti, Jennifer; Ujuju, Chinazo; Nwokolo, Ernest; De La Cruz, Anna; Schatzkin, Eric; Modrek, Sepideh; Montagu, Dominic; Liu, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite policies that recommend parasitological testing before treatment for malaria, presumptive treatment remains widespread in Nigeria. The majority of Nigerians obtain antimalarial drugs from two types of for-profit drug vendors—formal and informal medicine shops—but little is known about the quality of malaria care services provided at these shops. Aims This study seeks to (1) describe the profile of patients who seek treatment at different types of drug outlets, (2) document the types of drugs purchased for treating malaria, (3) assess which patients are purchasing recommended drugs, and (4) estimate the extent of malaria over-treatment. Methods In urban, peri-urban, and rural areas in Oyo State, customers exiting proprietary and patent medicine vendor (PPMV) shops or pharmacies having purchased anti-malarial drugs were surveyed and tested with malaria rapid diagnostic test. A follow-up phone survey was conducted four days after to assess self-reported drug administration. Bivariate and multivariate regression analysis was conducted to determine the correlates of patronizing a PPMV versus pharmacy, and the likelihood of purchasing an artemisinin-combination therapy (ACT) drug. Results Of the 457participants who sought malaria treatment in 49 enrolled outlets, nearly 92% had diagnosed their condition by themselves, a family member, or a friend. Nearly 60% pharmacy customers purchased an ACT compared to only 29% of PPMV customers, and pharmacy customers paid significantly more on average. Multivariate regression results show that patrons of PPMVs were younger, less wealthy, waited fewer days before seeking care, and were less likely to be diagnosed at a hospital, clinic, or laboratory. Only 3.9% of participants tested positive with a malaria rapid diagnostic test. Conclusions Poorer individuals seeking care at PPMVs are more likely to receive inappropriate malaria treatment when compared to those who go to pharmacies. Increasing accessibility to

  9. Restoration of sensitivity to salinomycin in Eimeria following 5 flocks of broiler chickens reared in floor-pens using drug programs and vaccination to control coccidiosis.

    PubMed

    Chapman, H D; Jeffers, T K

    2015-05-01

    Five successive flocks of broilers were reared in floor-pens and given different drug programs or were vaccinated against coccidiosis. Oocysts of Eimeria were isolated from the litter of pens during the fifth flock and their sensitivity to salinomycin (Sal) investigated by measuring new oocyst production following infection of medicated and unmedicated birds. Parasites obtained following 5 flocks given Sal were not well-controlled and it was concluded that they were partially resistant to the drug. Parasites obtained following 4 unmedicated flocks and one medicated flock were better controlled by Sal and it was concluded that in the absence of continuous medication there had been an improvement in drug efficacy. Sal almost completely suppressed oocyst production of isolates from treatments in which medication was followed by vaccination, indicating that when a drug program is followed by vaccination, restoration of sensitivity to Sal had occurred. PMID:25796273

  10. Matrix metalloproteinase 2-sensitive multifunctional polymeric micelles for tumor-specific co-delivery of siRNA and hydrophobic drugs.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lin; Perche, Federico; Wang, Tao; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2014-04-01

    Co-delivery of hydrophilic siRNA and hydrophobic drugs is one of the major challenges for nanomaterial-based medicine. Here, we present a simple but multifunctional micellar platform constructed by a matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2)-sensitive copolymer (PEG-pp-PEI-PE) via self-assembly for tumor-targeted siRNA and drug co-delivery. The micellar nanocarrier possesses several key features for siRNA and drug delivery, including (i) excellent stability; (ii) efficient siRNA condensation by PEI; (iii) hydrophobic drug solubilization in the lipid "core"; (iv) passive tumor targeting via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect; (v) tumor targeting triggered by the up-regulated tumoral MMP2; and (vi) enhanced cell internalization after MMP2-activated exposure of the previously hidden PEI. These cooperative functions ensure the improved tumor targetability, enhanced tumor cell internalization, and synergistic antitumor activity of co-loaded siRNA and drug. PMID:24529391

  11. Controlled release from thermo-sensitive PNVCL-co-MAA electrospun nanofibers: The effects of hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of a drug.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin; Bai, Shaoqing; Yang, Huiqin; Li, Shubai; Quan, Jing; Zhu, Limin; Nie, Huali

    2016-10-01

    The thermo-sensitive copolymer poly(N-vinylcaprolactam-co-methacrylic acid) (PNVCL-co-MAA) was synthesized by free radical polymerization and the resulting nanofibers were fabricated using an electrospinning process. The molecular weight of the copolymer was adjusted by varying the content of methacrylic acid (MAA) while keeping that of N-vinylcaprolactam (NVCL) constant. Hydrophilic captopril and hydrophobic ketoprofen were used as model drugs, and PNVCL-co-MAA nanofibers were used as the drug carrier to investigate the effects of drug on its release properties from nanofibers at different temperatures. The results showed that slow release over several hours was observed at 40°C (above the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of PNVCL-co-MAA), while the drugs exhibited a burst release of several seconds at 20°C (below the LCST). Drug release slowed with increasing content of the hydrophobic monomer NVCL. The hydrophilic captopril was released at a higher rate than the hydrophobic ketoprofen. The drug release characteristics were dependent on the temperature, the portion of hydrophilic groups and hydrophobic groups in the copolymer and hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of drug. Study on the mechanism of release showed that Korsmeyer-Peppas model as a major drug release mechanism. Given these results, the PNVCL-co-MAA copolymers are proposed to have useful applications in intellectual drug delivery systems. PMID:27287157

  12. Nationwide survey of the development of drug-resistant pathogens in the pediatric field: drug sensitivity of Streptococcus pneumoniae in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yoshitake; Toyonaga, Yoshikiyo; Hanaki, Hideaki; Nonoyama, Masato; Oishi, Tomohiro; Sunakawa, Keisuke

    2009-12-01

    We evaluated the resistance to 20 different antibacterial agents of 362 clinically isolated strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae accumulated from October 2000 to July 2001 (phase 1) and of 332 different strains accumulated from January to June 2004 (phase 2), from institutions throughout Japan that participated in the surveys carried out by the Drug-Resistant Pathogen Surveillance Group in Pediatric Infectious Disease. In phase 1, the proportions of penicillin-sensitive S. pneumoniae (PSSP), penicillin-insensitive S. pneumoniae (PISP), and penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae (PRSP) were 35.4%, 34.8%, and 29.8%, respectively, and the proportions were almost the same in phase 2: 33.1%, 37.0%, and 29.8%, respectively. Comparison of the MIC(90) values of the antibacterial agents for PRSP in phase 1 and phase 2 revealed that these values for cefditoren, cefpodoxime, cefdinir, faropenem, ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, meropenem, and vancomycin increased by twofold to fourfold during the 3 years between phase 1 and phase 2. However the MIC(90) of rokitamycin increased more than fourfold. The proportion of S. pneumoniae that were PISP + PRSP remained almost constant over the 3 years between phase 1 and phase 2. The background factors of patient age, previous administration of antibacterial agents, and attendance at a day nursery were examined; we found that in phase 1, the proportion of PISP + PRSP was significantly higher than that of PSSP in patients under 4 years old who had previously received antibacterial agents, but no significant differences were found in any of these background factors in the phase 2 survey. No significant difference was found in the proportions of penicillin-resistant bacteria according to whether or not the child had attended a day nursery. PMID:20012731

  13. miR-134 in extracellular vesicles reduces triple-negative breast cancer aggression and increases drug sensitivity.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Keith; Lowry, Michelle C; Corcoran, Claire; Martinez, Vanesa G; Daly, Melissa; Rani, Sweta; Gallagher, William M; Radomski, Marek W; MacLeod, Roderick A F; O'Driscoll, Lorraine

    2015-10-20

    Exosomes (EVs) have relevance in cell-to-cell communication carrying pro-tumorigenic factors that participate in oncogenesis and drug resistance and are proposed to have potential as self-delivery systems. Advancing on our studies of EVs in triple-negative breast cancer, here we more comprehensively analysed isogenic cell line variants and their EV populations, tissues cell line variants and their EV populations, as well as breast tumour and normal tissues. Profiling 384 miRNAs showed EV miRNA content to be highly representative of their cells of origin. miRNAs most substantially down-regulated in aggressive cells and their EVs originated from 14q32. Analysis of miR-134, the most substantially down-regulated miRNA, supported its clinical relevance in breast tumours compared to matched normal breast tissue. Functional studies indicated that miR-134 controls STAT5B which, in turn, controls Hsp90. miR-134 delivered by direct transfection into Hs578Ts(i)8 cells (in which it was greatly down-regulated) reduced STAT5B, Hsp90, and Bcl-2 levels, reduced cellular proliferation, and enhanced cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Delivery via miR-134-enriched EVs also reduced STAT5B and Hsp90, reduced cellular migration and invasion, and enhanced sensitivity to anti-Hsp90 drugs. While the differing effects achieved by transfection or EV delivery are likely to be, at least partly, due to specific amounts of miR-134 delivered by these routes, these EV-based studies identified miRNA-134 as a potential biomarker and therapeutic for breast cancer. PMID:26416415

  14. Biophysical characterization of MDR breast cancer cell lines reveals the cytoplasm is critical in determining drug sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Coley, Helen M; Labeed, Fatima H; Thomas, Hilary; Hughes, Michael P

    2007-04-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) was used to examine a panel of MCF-7 cell lines comprising parental MCF-7 cells and MDR derivatives: MCF-7TaxR (paclitaxel-resistant, P-glycoprotein (P-gp) positive), MCF-7DoxR (doxorubicin-resistant MRP2 positive) plus MCF-7MDR1 (MDR1 transfected, P-gp positive). MCF-7DoxR and MCF-7MDR1 were broadly cross-resistant to natural product anticancer agents, whereas MCF-7TaxR cells were not, contrary to P-gp expression. Whilst DEP revealed modest membrane changes in MDR sub-lines, we saw significant changes in their cytoplasmic conductivity: MCF-7TaxRdrug sensitivity is associated with low ionic conductance (reduced cellular trafficking and ion transport) and substantial anthracycline accumulation. For classical MDR i.e. MCF-7MDR1, we saw the reverse picture. Thus, the drug resistance phenotypes of this panel of MCF-7 lines can be delineated by assessment of cytoplasmic biophysical properties using DEP. PMID:17270349

  15. Drug-Resistant Urothelial Cancer Cell Lines Display Diverse Sensitivity Profiles to Potential Second-Line Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Vallo, Stefan; Michaelis, Martin; Rothweiler, Florian; Bartsch, Georg; Gust, Kilian M; Limbart, Dominik M; Rödel, Franz; Wezel, Felix; Haferkamp, Axel; Cinatl, Jindrich

    2015-06-01

    Combination chemotherapy with gemcitabine and cisplatin in patients with metastatic urothelial cancer of the bladder frequently results in the development of acquired drug resistance. Availability of cell culture models with acquired resistance could help to identify candidate treatments for an efficient second-line therapy. Six cisplatin- and six gemcitabine-resistant cell lines were established. Cell viability assays were performed to evaluate the sensitivity to 16 different chemotherapeutic substances. The activity of the drug transporter ATP-binding cassette transporter, subfamily B, member 1 (ABCB1, a critical mediator of multidrug resistance in cancer) was evaluated using fluorescent ABCB1 substrates. For functional assessment, cells overexpressing ABCB1 were generated by transduction with a lentiviral vector encoding for ABCB1, while zosuquidar was used for selective inhibition. In this study, 8 of 12 gemcitabine- or cisplatin-resistant cell lines were cross-resistant to carboplatin, 5 to pemetrexed, 4 to methotrexate, 3 to oxaliplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and paclitaxel, and 2 to cabazitaxel, larotaxel, docetaxel, topotecan, doxorubicin, and mitomycin c, and 1 of 12 cell lines was cross-resistant to vinflunine and vinblastine. In one cell line with acquired resistance to gemcitabine (TCC-SUP(r)GEMCI(20)), cross-resistance seemed to be mediated by ABCB1 expression. Our model identified the vinca alkaloids vinblastine and vinflunine, in Europe an already approved second-line therapeutic for metastatic bladder cancer, as the most effective compounds in urothelial cancer cells with acquired resistance to gemcitabine or cisplatin. These results demonstrate that this in vitro model can reproduce clinically relevant results and may be suitable to identify novel substances for the treatment of metastatic bladder cancer. PMID:26055179

  16. A synonymous codon change alters the drug sensitivity of ΔF508 cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed

    Bali, Vedrana; Lazrak, Ahmed; Guroji, Purushotham; Fu, Lianwu; Matalon, Sadis; Bebok, Zsuzsanna

    2016-01-01

    Synonymous mutations, such as I507-ATC→ATT, in deletion of Phe508 in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (ΔF508 CFTR), the most frequent disease-associated mutant of CFTR, may affect protein biogenesis, structure, and function and contribute to an altered disease phenotype. Small-molecule drugs are being developed to correct ΔF508 CFTR. To understand correction mechanisms and the consequences of synonymous mutations, we analyzed the effect of mechanistically distinct correctors, corrector 4a (C4) and lumacaftor (VX-809), on I507-ATT and I507-ATC ΔF508 CFTR biogenesis and function. C4 stabilized I507-ATT ΔF508 CFTR band B, but without considerable biochemical and functional correction. VX-809 biochemically corrected ∼10% of both of the variants, leading to stable, forskolin+3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX)-activated whole-cell currents in the presence of the corrector. Omitting VX-809 during whole-cell recordings led to a spontaneous decline of the currents, suggesting posttranslational stabilization by VX-809. Treatment of cells with the C4+VX-809 combination resulted in enhanced rescue and 2-fold higher forskolin+IBMX-activated currents of both I507-ATT and I507-ATC ΔF508 CFTR, compared with VX-809 treatment alone. The lack of an effect of C4 on I507-ATC ΔF508 CFTR, but its additive effect in combination with VX-809, implies that C4 acted on VX-809-modified I507-ATC ΔF508 CFTR. Our results suggest that binding of C4 and VX-809 to ΔF508 CFTR is conformation specific and provide evidence that synonymous mutations can alter the drug sensitivity of proteins. PMID:26336913

  17. ET-66ER-STRESS INDUCING DRUGS SENSITIZES GBM TO TEMOZOLOMIDE THROUGH DOWNREGULATION OF MGMT AND INDUCTION OF REGULATED NECROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Xipell, Enric; Martínez-Velez, Naiara; Vera-Cano, Beatriz; Idoate, Miguel Angel; Garzón, Antonia García; Acanda, Arlet M.; Fueyo, Juan; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria; Alonso, Marta M

    2014-01-01

    Termozolamide (TMZ) is the standard treatment against GBM, unfortunately its therapeutic effect is limited due to the expression of the DNA repair protein O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT). Therefore, approaches that overcome the resistance to TMZ could be feasible therapeutic alternatives for this deadly disease. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress suppresses several DNA damage proteins through the unfolding protein response. In this work we sought to evaluate whether ER-stress inducing drugs were able to downmodulate MGMT and sensitize GBM cells to TMZ treatment. Salinomycin (SLM) is a potassium ionophore that has proven effective against cancer stem cells and a possible candidate to induce ER stress. Our data showed that SLM triggered ER stress that was accompanied by the downregulation of MGMT. We obtained the same results with other ER stress inducing drugs (thapsigergin, tunicamycin) suggesting that this is a general mechanism. Chemical inhibition of ER stress reverted the abrogation of MGMT downregulation. Of importance, SLM induced an aberrant autophagic flux that led to regulated necrosis cell death mediated by the action of AIF protein, which induces DNA damage when localized in the nucleus. Combination of TMZ and SLM displayed a potent antitumor effect in vitro and in vivo in mice bearing a GBM stem cell model. Combination treatment induced a significant increase in DNA damage as shown by H2AX activation and PARP. Moreover, we observed AIF in the nucleus, as a result of the regulated necrosis, furthering favoring the DNA damage. Combination treatment showed an increment of the median survival and of long term survivors. Moreover tissue analysis confirmed a dramatic increase in the level of DNA damage. Altogether our results showed that combination treatment induces a potent antiglioma effect in vitro and in vivo. Our data uncover the possibility to exploit ER stress and regulated necrosis as therapeutic strategies for GBM treatment.

  18. p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis sensitizes drug-resistant U251 glioblastoma stem cells to temozolomide through enhanced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    MIAO, WANG; LIU, XIAODONG; WANG, HONGQIN; FAN, YIMIN; LIAN, SHIZHONG; YANG, XIN; WANG, XINXING; GUO, GENG; LI, QICHAO; WANG, SIFEI

    2015-01-01

    Malignant glioma is a highly aggressive brain tumor with a poor prognosis. Chemotherapy has been observed to prolong overall survival rate and temozolomide (TMZ), a promising chemotherapeutic agent for treating glioblastoma (GBM), possesses the most effective clinical activity at present, although drug resistance limits its clinical outcome. Growing evidence supports the concept that initial and recurrent GBM may derive from glioblastoma stem cells, which may be responsible for drug resistance. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this resistance remain to be elucidated. In the present study, a TMZ-resistant GBM cell line, U251R, was developed and subsequently divided into two subpopulations according to the CD133 immunophenotype. No significant difference was identified in the expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) between CD133+ U251R cells and CD133− U251R cells, whereas the CD133+ cell population was more resistant to TMZ-induced growth inhibition and cell death. TMZ achieves its cytotoxic effect by inducing DNA lesions and p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) is an essential mediator of DNA damage-induced apoptosis independently of p53 status. Therefore, whether PUMA effectively enhances growth suppression and induces apoptosis when combined with TMZ was investigated. Consequently, it was found that adenoviruses expressing wild-type-PUMA not only lead to the apoptosis of CD133+ U251R cells alone, but also significantly increase their sensitivity toward TMZ by elevating the Bcl-2-associated X protein/B-cell lymphoma-2 ratio without alterations in MGMT expression. Therefore, PUMA may be a suitable target for intervention to improve the therapeutic efficacy of TMZ. PMID:25625235

  19. miR-335 Targets SIAH2 and Confers Sensitivity to Anti-Cancer Drugs by Increasing the Expression of HDAC3

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngmi; Kim, Hyuna; Park, Deokbum; Jeoung, Dooil

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported the role of histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) in response to anti-cancer drugs. The decreased expression of HDAC3 in anti-cancer drug-resistant cancer cell line is responsible for the resistance to anti-cancer drugs. In this study, we investigated molecular mechanisms associated with regulation of HDAC3 expression. MG132, an inhibitor of proteasomal degradation, induced the expression of HDAC3 in various anti-cancer drug-resistant cancer cell lines. Ubiquitination of HDAC3 was observed in various anti-cancer drug-resistant cancer cell lines. HDAC3 showed an interaction with SIAH2, an ubiquitin E3 ligase, that has increased expression in various anti-cancer drug-resistant cancer cell lines. miRNA array analysis showed the decreased expression of miR-335 in these cells. Targetscan analysis predicted the binding of miR-335 to the 3′-UTR of SIAH2. miR-335-mediated increased sensitivity to anti-cancer drugs was associated with its effect on HDAC3 and SIAH2 expression. miR-335 exerted apoptotic effects and inhibited ubiquitination of HDAC3 in anti-cancer drug-resistant cancer cell lines. miR-335 negatively regulated the invasion, migration, and growth rate of cancer cells. The mouse xenograft model showed that miR-335 negatively regulated the tumorigenic potential of cancer cells. The down-regulation of SIAH2 conferred sensitivity to anti-cancer drugs. The results of the study indicated that the miR-335/SIAH2/HDAC3 axis regulates the response to anti-cancer drugs. PMID:25997740

  20. Disulfide-Linked Amphiphilic Polymer-Docetaxel Conjugates Assembled Redox-Sensitive Micelles for Efficient Antitumor Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pei; Zhang, Huiyuan; He, Wenxiu; Zhao, Dujuan; Song, Aixin; Luan, Yuxia

    2016-05-01

    Here, we prepared novel redox-sensitive drug delivery system based on copolymer-drug conjugates methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(γ-benzyl l-glutamate)-disulfide-docetaxel (mPEG-PBLG-SS-DTX) to realize the desirable cancer therapy. First, copolymers of methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(γ-benzyl l-glutamate) (mPEG-PBLGs) with different molecular weight (mPEG2000-PBLG1750 and mPEG5000-PBLG1750) were synthesized via the ring open polymerization (ROP) of 5-benzyl-l-glutamate-N-carboxyanhydride (γ-Bzl-l-Glu-NCA) initiated by monoamino-terminated mPEG (mPEG-NH2). Then, the docetaxel (DTX) was conjugated to the block polymers through a linkage containing disulfide bond to obtain mPEG-PBLG-SS-DTXs, including mPEG2000-PBLG1750-SS-DTX and mPEG5000-PBLG1750-SS-DTX. The obtained copolymer-drug conjugates mPEG2000-PBLG1750-SS-DTX and mPEG5000-PBLG1750-SS-DTX could self-assemble into nanosized micelles in aqueous environment via dialysis method with a low critical micelle concentration (CMC, 3.98 and 6.94 μg/mL, respectively). The size of the micelles was approximately 101.3 and 148.9 nm, respectively, with a narrow size distribution. They released approximately 40% DTX in a sustained way in the presence of 50 mM DTT after 120 h in comparison with only approximately 10% DTX released from micelles in the absence of DTT. The high cytotoxicity was identified for mPEG-PBLG-SS-DTXs micelles against MCF-7/ADR and A549 cells, and the IC50 of mPEG-PBLG-SS-DTXs micelles against MCF-7/ADR for 24 h was roughly a 15th of the value of free DTX. Moreover, the mPEG-PBLG-SS-DTXs micelles could be efficiently uptaken by MCF-7/ADR and A549 cells. Thus, the present constructed mPEG-PBLG-SS-DTXs micelles were very promising for effective cancer therapy. PMID:27018501

  1. Cytotoxicity of Elaoephorbia drupifera and other Cameroonian medicinal plants against drug sensitive and multidrug resistant cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major hurdle for cancer treatment worldwide and accounts for chemotherapy failure in over 90% of patients with metastatic cancer. Evidence of the cytotoxicity of Cameroonian plants against cancer cell lines including MDR phenotypes is been intensively and progressively provided. The present work was therefore designed to evaluate the cytotoxicity of the methanol extracts of twenty-two Cameroonian medicinal plants against sensitive and MDR cancer cell lines. Methods The methanol maceration was used to obtain the crude plant extracts whilst the cytotoxicity of the studied extracts was determined using a resazurin reduction assay. Results A preliminary assay on leukemia CCRF-CEM cells at 40 μg/mL shows that six of the twenty plant extract were able to enhance less than 50% of the growth proliferation of CCRF-CEM cells. These include Crinum zeylanicum (32.22%), Entada abyssinica (34.67%), Elaoephorbia drupifera (35.05%), Dioscorea bulbifera (45.88%), Eremomastax speciosa (46.07%) and Polistigma thonningii (45.11%). Among these six plants, E. drupifera showed the best activity with IC50 values below or around 30 μg/mL against the nine tested cancer cell lines. The lowest IC50 value of 8.40 μg/mL was recorded with the extract of E. drupifera against MDA-MB231 breast cancer cell line. The IC50 values below 10 μg/mL were recorded with the extracts of E. drupifera against MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells, C. zeylanicum against HCT116 p53+/+ and HCT116p53-/- colon cancer cells and E. abyssinica against HCT116 p53+/+ cells. Conclusion The results of the present study provide evidence of the cytotoxic potential of some Cameroonian medicinal plants and a baseline information for the potential use of Elaoephorbia drupifera in the treatment of sensitive and drug-resistant cancer cell lines. PMID:24088184

  2. Cell Line Derived 5-FU and Irinotecan Drug-Sensitivity Profiles Evaluated in Adjuvant Colon Cancer Trial Data

    PubMed Central

    Delorenzi, Mauro; Jensen, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Buhl; Bosman, Fred; Tejpar, Sabine; Roth, Arnaud; Brunner, Nils; Hansen, Anker; Knudsen, Steen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluates whether gene signatures for chemosensitivity for irinotecan and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) derived from in vitro grown cancer cell lines can predict clinical sensitivity to these drugs. Methods To test if an irinotecan signature and a SN-38 signature could identify patients who benefitted from the addition of irinotecan to 5-FU, we used gene expression profiles based on cell lines and clinical tumor material. These profiles were applied to expression data obtained from pretreatment formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tumor tissue from 636 stage III colon cancer patients enrolled in the PETACC-3 prospective randomized clinical trial. A 5-FU profile developed similarly was assessed by comparing the PETACC-3 cohort with a cohort of 359 stage II colon cancer patients who underwent surgery but received no adjuvant therapy. Results There was no statistically significant association between the irinotecan or SN-38 profiles and benefit from irinotecan. The 5-FU sensitivity profile showed a statistically significant association with relapse free survival (RFS) (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.54 (0.41–0.71), p<1e-05) and overall survival (HR = 0.47 (0.34–0.63), p<1e-06) in the PETACC-3 subpopulation. The effect of the 5-FU profile remained significant in a multivariable Cox Proportional Hazards model, adjusting for several relevant clinicopathological parameters. No statistically significant effect of the 5-FU profile was observed in the untreated cohort of 359 patients (relapse free survival, p = 0.671). Conclusion The irinotecan predictor had no predictive value. The 5-FU predictor was prognostic in stage III patients in PETACC-3 but not in stage II patients with no adjuvant therapy. This suggests a potential predictive ability of the 5-FU sensitivity profile to identify colon cancer patients who may benefit from 5-FU, however, any biomarker predicting benefit for adjuvant 5-FU must be rigorously evaluated in independent cohorts. Given differences

  3. Metabolic alterations and drug sensitivity of tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistant leukemia cells with a FLT3/ITD mutation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Amin; Ju, Huai-Qiang; Liu, Kaiyan; Zhan, Guilian; Liu, Daolu; Wen, Shijun; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Huang, Peng; Hu, Yumin

    2016-07-28

    Internal tandem duplication (ITD) of the juxtamembrane region of FMS-like tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3) receptor is a common type of mutation in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and patient response to FLT3 inhibitors appears to be transient due to the emergence of drug resistance. We established two sorafenib-resistant cell lines carrying FLT3/ITD mutations, including the murine BaF3/ITD-R and human MV4-11-R cell lines. Gene expression profile analysis of the resistant and parental cells suggests that the highest ranked molecular and cellular functions of the differentially expressed genes are related to mitochondrial dysfunction. Both murine and human resistant cell lines display a longer doubling time, along with a significant inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory chain activity and substantial upregulation of glycolysis. The sorafenib-resistant cells exhibit increased expression of a majority of glycolytic enzymes, including hexokinase 2, which is also highly expressed in the mitochondrial fraction and is associated with resistance to apoptotic cell death. The sorafenib-resistant cells are collaterally sensitive to a number of glycolytic inhibitors including 2-deoxyglucose and 3-bromopyruvate propylester. Our study reveals a metabolic signature of sorafenib-resistant cells and suggests that glycolytic inhibition may override such resistance and warrant further clinical investigation. PMID:27132990

  4. Tumor cell-derived placental growth factor sensitizes antiangiogenic and antitumor effects of anti-VEGF drugs

    PubMed Central

    Hedlund, Eva-Maria Eleonora; Yang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Yin; Yang, Yunlong; Shibuya, Masabumi; Zhong, Weide; Sun, Baocun; Liu, Yizhi; Hosaka, Kayoko; Cao, Yihai

    2013-01-01

    The role of placental growth factor (PlGF) in modulation of tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth remains an enigma. Furthermore, anti-PlGF therapy in tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth remains controversial in preclinical tumor models. Here we show that in both human and mouse tumors, PlGF induced the formation of dilated and normalized vascular networks that were hypersensitive to anti-VEGF and anti–VEGFR-2 therapy, leading to dormancy of a substantial number of avascular tumors. Loss-of-function using plgf shRNA in a human choriocarcinoma significantly accelerated tumor growth rates and acquired resistance to anti-VEGF drugs, whereas gain-of-function of PlGF in a mouse tumor increased anti-VEGF sensitivity. Further, we show that VEGFR-2 and VEGFR-1 blocking antibodies displayed opposing effects on tumor angiogenesis. VEGFR-1 blockade and genetic deletion of the tyrosine kinase domain of VEGFR-1 resulted in enhanced tumor angiogenesis. These findings demonstrate that tumor-derived PlGF negatively modulates tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth and may potentially serve as a predictive marker of anti-VEGF cancer therapy. PMID:23267058

  5. The Fcp1-Wee1-Cdk1 axis affects spindle assembly checkpoint robustness and sensitivity to antimicrotubule cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Visconti, R; Della Monica, R; Palazzo, L; D'Alessio, F; Raia, M; Improta, S; Villa, M R; Del Vecchio, L; Grieco, D

    2015-09-01

    To grant faithful chromosome segregation, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) delays mitosis exit until mitotic spindle assembly. An exceedingly prolonged mitosis, however, promotes cell death and by this means antimicrotubule cancer drugs (AMCDs), that impair spindle assembly, are believed to kill cancer cells. Despite malformed spindles, cancer cells can, however, slip through SAC, exit mitosis prematurely and resist killing. We show here that the Fcp1 phosphatase and Wee1, the cyclin B-dependent kinase (cdk) 1 inhibitory kinase, play a role for this slippage/resistance mechanism. During AMCD-induced prolonged mitosis, Fcp1-dependent Wee1 reactivation lowered cdk1 activity, weakening SAC-dependent mitotic arrest and leading to mitosis exit and survival. Conversely, genetic or chemical Wee1 inhibition strengthened the SAC, further extended mitosis, reduced antiapoptotic protein Mcl-1 to a minimum and potentiated killing in several, AMCD-treated cancer cell lines and primary human adult lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Thus, the Fcp1-Wee1-Cdk1 (FWC) axis affects SAC robustness and AMCDs sensitivity. PMID:25744022

  6. Controlling the chemical stability of a moisture-sensitive drug product through monitoring and identification of coating process microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kestur, Umesh; Pandey, Preetanshu; Badawy, Sherif; Lin, Judy; Desai, Divyakant

    2014-12-10

    The objective of this work was to monitor and identify the impact of coating microenvironment, as measured by PyroButtons(®) data loggers, on the chemical stability of a moisture-sensitive drug molecule brivanib alaninate (BA). BA tablets were coated at two different scales (15 and 24 in pan). PyroButtons(®) data loggers were allowed to move freely within the tablet bed to record the temperature and relative humidity conditions of the tablet bed. The tablet moisture content at the end of the coating runs, and the rate of hydrolysis of the BA tablets based on HPLC analysis was found to be a function of the coating thermodynamic microenvironment. Wetter coating conditions resulted in tablets with higher water content and showed greater degradation upon storage. The coating process which yielded acceptable stability in a 15 in coater was transferred to a 24 in coater by maintaining similar tablet-bed relative humidity and temperature conditions. This was compared to a traditional scale-up approach where the environmental equivalency factor (EEF) was matched between scales during coating. The moisture content observed across the two scales indicated that maintaining a similar tablet-bed microenvironment ensured consistent results between scales. PMID:25261712

  7. The Fcp1-Wee1-Cdk1 axis affects spindle assembly checkpoint robustness and sensitivity to antimicrotubule cancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Visconti, R; Della Monica, R; Palazzo, L; D'Alessio, F; Raia, M; Improta, S; Villa, M R; Del Vecchio, L; Grieco, D

    2015-01-01

    To grant faithful chromosome segregation, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) delays mitosis exit until mitotic spindle assembly. An exceedingly prolonged mitosis, however, promotes cell death and by this means antimicrotubule cancer drugs (AMCDs), that impair spindle assembly, are believed to kill cancer cells. Despite malformed spindles, cancer cells can, however, slip through SAC, exit mitosis prematurely and resist killing. We show here that the Fcp1 phosphatase and Wee1, the cyclin B-dependent kinase (cdk) 1 inhibitory kinase, play a role for this slippage/resistance mechanism. During AMCD-induced prolonged mitosis, Fcp1-dependent Wee1 reactivation lowered cdk1 activity, weakening SAC-dependent mitotic arrest and leading to mitosis exit and survival. Conversely, genetic or chemical Wee1 inhibition strengthened the SAC, further extended mitosis, reduced antiapoptotic protein Mcl-1 to a minimum and potentiated killing in several, AMCD-treated cancer cell lines and primary human adult lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Thus, the Fcp1-Wee1-Cdk1 (FWC) axis affects SAC robustness and AMCDs sensitivity. PMID:25744022

  8. Carolus Linnaeus, the ash, worm-wood and other anti-malarial plants.

    PubMed

    Aydin-Schmidt, Berit; Thorsell, Walborg; Wahlgren, Mats

    2010-12-01

    In 1735 Carolus Linnaeus wrote that quinine was the preferred treatment for malaria but that the bark of the ash (Fraxinus excelsior) and worm-wood (Artemisia absinthium) also had effects on the disease. We here report that lipo- and hydrophilic extracts of the bark of the ash inhibit the in vitro growth of the asexual stages of P. falciparum. The data suggests that the knowledge of the treatment of malaria was already available in Europe some 300 years ago. PMID:20936911

  9. Evaluation of anti-malarial effects of mass chemoprophylaxis in the Republic of Korea army.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Joon-Sup; Ryu, Seung-Ho; Oh, Sejoong; Choi, Dong-Hyun; Song, Kyoung-Jun; Oh, Young-Ha; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Young-A; Ahn, Sun-Young; Yang, Hwa-Young; Cha, Je-Eun; Park, Jae-Won

    2005-10-01

    Vivax malaria was endemic on the Korean peninsula for many centuries until the late 1970's when the Republic of Korea (ROK) was declared "malaria free". Since its re-emergence in 1993, the number of malaria cases in the military increased exponentially through 2000 near the demilitarized zone. Chemoprophylaxis with chloroquine and primaquine has been used in the ROK Army since 1997 in an attempt to reduce the number of the malaria cases throughout the ROK. Data show that chemoprophylaxis contributed, in part, to the decrease in the number of malaria cases among military personnel. However, mass chemoprophylaxis on a large scale in the ROK Army is unprecedented and extensive supervision and monitoring is warranted to determine its effectiveness and to monitor the appearance of chloroquine tolerant/resistant strains of Plasmodium vivax. PMID:16224140

  10. Access to artemisinin-based anti-malarial treatment and its related factors in rural Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Artemisinin-based combination treatment (ACT) has been widely adopted as one of the main malaria control strategies. However, its promise to save thousands of lives in sub-Saharan Africa depends on how effective the use of ACT is within the routine health system. The INESS platform evaluated effective coverage of ACT in several African countries. Timely access within 24 hours to an authorized ACT outlet is one of the determinants of effective coverage and was assessed for artemether-lumefantrine (Alu), in two district health systems in rural Tanzania. Methods From October 2009 to June 2011we conducted continuous rolling household surveys in the Kilombero-Ulanga and the Rufiji Health and Demographic Surveillance Sites (HDSS). Surveys were linked to the routine HDSS update rounds. Members of randomly pre-selected households that had experienced a fever episode in the previous two weeks were eligible for a structured interview. Data on individual treatment seeking, access to treatment, timing, source of treatment and household costs per episode were collected. Data are presented on timely access from a total of 2,112 interviews in relation to demographics, seasonality, and socio economic status. Results In Kilombero-Ulanga, 41.8% (CI: 36.6–45.1) and in Rufiji 36.8% (33.7–40.1) of fever cases had access to an authorized ACT provider within 24 hours of fever onset. In neither of the HDSS site was age, sex, socio-economic status or seasonality of malaria found to be significantly correlated with timely access. Conclusion Timely access to authorized ACT providers is below 50% despite interventions intended to improve access such as social marketing and accreditation of private dispensing outlets. To improve prompt diagnosis and treatment, access remains a major bottle neck and new more innovative interventions are needed to raise effective coverage of malaria treatment in Tanzania. PMID:23651521

  11. The molecular evolution of four anti-malarial immune genes in the Anopheles gambiae species complex

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background If the insect innate immune system is to be used as a potential blocking step in transmission of malaria, then it will require targeting one or a few genes with highest relevance and ease of manipulation. The problem is to identify and manipulate those of most importance to malaria infection without the risk of decreasing the mosquito's ability to stave off infections by microbes in general. Molecular evolution methodologies and concepts can help identify such genes. Within the setting of a comparative molecular population genetic and phylogenetic framework, involving six species of the Anopheles gambiae complex, we investigated whether a set of four pre-selected immunity genes (gambicin, NOS, Rel2 and FBN9) might have evolved under selection pressure imposed by the malaria parasite. Results We document varying levels of polymorphism within and divergence between the species, in all four genes. Introgression and the sharing of ancestral polymorphisms, two processes that have been documented in the past, were verified in this study in all four studied genes. These processes appear to affect each gene in different ways and to different degrees. However, there is no evidence of positive selection acting on these genes. Conclusion Considering the results presented here in concert with previous studies, genes that interact directly with the Plasmodium parasite, and play little or no role in defense against other microbes, are probably the most likely candidates for a specific adaptive response against P. falciparum. Furthermore, since it is hard to establish direct evidence linking the adaptation of any candidate gene to P. falciparum infection, a comparative framework allowing at least an indirect link should be provided. Such a framework could be achieved, if a similar approach like the one involved here, was applied to all other anopheline complexes that transmit P. falciparum malaria. PMID:18325105

  12. Confocal fluorescence microscopy: An ultra-sensitive tool used to evaluate intracellular antiretroviral nano-drug delivery in HeLa cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Subhra; Zhou, You; Shibata, Annemarie; Destache, Christopher J.

    2015-08-01

    In the last decade, confocal fluorescence microscopy has emerged as an ultra-sensitive tool for real-time study of nanoparticles (NPs) fate at the cellular-level. According to WHO 2007 report, Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) is still one of the world's major health threats by claiming approximately 7,000 new infections daily worldwide. Although combination antiretroviral drugs (cARV) therapy has improved the life-expectancy of HIV-infected patients, routine use of high doses of cARV has serious health consequences and requires complete adherence to the regimen for success. Thus, our research goal is to fabricate long-acting novel cARV loaded poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (cARV-NPs) as drug delivery system. However, important aspects of cARV-NPs that require special emphasis are their cellular-uptake, potency, and sustained drug release efficiency over-time. In this article, ultra-sensitive confocal microscopy is been used to evaluate the uptake and sustained drug release kinetics of cARV-NPs in HeLa cells. To evaluate with the above goal, instead of cARV-drug, Rhodamine6G dye (fluorescent dye) loaded NPs (Rho6G NPs) have been formulated. To correlate the Rhodamin6G release kinetics with the ARV release from NPs, a parallel HPLC study was also performed. The results obtained indicate that Rho6G NPs were efficiently taken up at low concentration (<500 ng/ml) and that release was sustained for a minimum of 4 days of treatment. Therefore, high drug assimilation and sustained release properties of PLGA-NPs make them an attractive vehicle for cARV nano-drug delivery with the potential to reduce drug dosage as well as the number of drug administrations per month.

  13. Confocal fluorescence microscopy: An ultra-sensitive tool used to evaluate intracellular antiretroviral nano-drug delivery in HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Subhra; Zhou, You; Shibata, Annemarie; Destache, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, confocal fluorescence microscopy has emerged as an ultra-sensitive tool for real-time study of nanoparticles (NPs) fate at the cellular-level. According to WHO 2007 report, Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) is still one of the world’s major health threats by claiming approximately 7,000 new infections daily worldwide. Although combination antiretroviral drugs (cARV) therapy has improved the life-expectancy of HIV-infected patients, routine use of high doses of cARV has serious health consequences and requires complete adherence to the regimen for success. Thus, our research goal is to fabricate long-acting novel cARV loaded poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (cARV-NPs) as drug delivery system. However, important aspects of cARV-NPs that require special emphasis are their cellular-uptake, potency, and sustained drug release efficiency over-time. In this article, ultra-sensitive confocal microscopy is been used to evaluate the uptake and sustained drug release kinetics of cARV-NPs in HeLa cells. To evaluate with the above goal, instead of cARV-drug, Rhodamine6G dye (fluorescent dye) loaded NPs (Rho6G NPs) have been formulated. To correlate the Rhodamin6G release kinetics with the ARV release from NPs, a parallel HPLC study was also performed. The results obtained indicate that Rho6G NPs were efficiently taken up at low concentration (<500 ng/ml) and that release was sustained for a minimum of 4 days of treatment. Therefore, high drug assimilation and sustained release properties of PLGA-NPs make them an attractive vehicle for cARV nano-drug delivery with the potential to reduce drug dosage as well as the number of drug administrations per month. PMID:26221566

  14. Glucocorticoid Receptor-Targeted Liposomal Codelivery of Lipophilic Drug and Anti-Hsp90 Gene: Strategy to Induce Drug-Sensitivity, EMT-Reversal, and Reduced Malignancy in Aggressive Tumors.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Sujan Kumar; Jinka, Sudhakar; Pal, Krishnendu; Nelli, Swetha; Dutta, Shamit Kumar; Wang, Enfeng; Ahmad, Ajaz; AlKharfy, Khalid M; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Banerjee, Rajkumar

    2016-07-01

    Many cancers including the late stage ones become drug-resistant and undergo epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). These lead to enhanced invasion, migration, and metastasis toward manifesting its aggressiveness and malignancy. One of the key hallmarks of cancer is its overdependence on glycolysis as its preferred energy metabolism pathway. The strict avoidance of alternate energy pathway gluconeogenesis by cancer cells points to a yet-to-be hoisted role of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) especially in tumor microenvironment, where cells are known to become drug-sensitive through induction of gluconeogenesis. However, since GR is involved in metabolism, anti-inflammatory reactions, immunity besides inducing gluconeogenesis, a greater role of GR in tumor microenvironment is envisaged. We have shown previously that GR, although ubiquitously expressed in all cells; afford to be an effective cytoplasmic target for killing cancer cells selectively. Herein, we report the therapeutic use of a newly developed GR-targeted liposomal concoction (DXE) coformulating a lipophilic drug (ESC8) and an anti-Hsp90 anticancer gene against aggressive tumor models. This induced drug-sensitivity and apoptosis while reversing EMT in tumor cells toward effective retardation of aggressive growth in pancreas and skin tumor models. Additionally, the ESC8-free lipid formulation upon cotreatment with hydrophilic drugs, gemcitabine and doxorubicin, could effectively sensitize and kill pancreatic cancer and melanoma cells, respectively. The formulation-triggered EMT-reversal was GR-dependent. Overall, we found a new strategy for drug sensitization that led to the advent of new GR-targeted anticancer therapeutics. PMID:27184196

  15. Multidrug resistance-associated protein gene overexpression and reduced drug sensitivity of topoisomerase II in a human breast carcinoma MCF7 cell line selected for etoposide resistance.

    PubMed

    Schneider, E; Horton, J K; Yang, C H; Nakagawa, M; Cowan, K H

    1994-01-01

    A human breast cancer cell line (MCF7/WT) was selected for resistance to etoposide (VP-16) by stepwise exposure to 2-fold increasing concentrations of this agent. The resulting cell line (MCF7/VP) was 28-, 21-, and 9-fold resistant to VP-16, VM-26, and doxorubicin, respectively. MCF7/VP cells also exhibited low-level cross-resistance to 4'-(9-acridinylamino)-methanesulfon-m-anisidide, mitoxantrone, and vincristine and no cross-resistance to genistein and camptothecin. Furthermore, these cells were collaterally sensitive to the alkylating agents melphalan and chlorambucil. DNA topoisomerase II levels were similar in both wild-type MCF7/WT and drug-resistant MCF7/VP cells. In contrast, topoisomerase II from MCF7/VP cells appeared to be 7-fold less sensitive to drug-induced cleavable complex formation in whole cells and 3-fold less sensitive in nuclear extracts than topoisomerase II from MCF7/WT cells. Although this suggested that the resistant cells may contain a qualitatively altered topoisomerase II, no mutations were detected in either the ATP-binding nor the putative breakage/resealing regions of either DNA topoisomerase II alpha or II beta. In addition, the steady-state intracellular VP-16 concentration was reduced by 2-fold in the resistant cells, in the absence of detectable mdr1/P-gp expression and without any change in drug efflux. In contrast, expression of the gene encoding the MRP was increased at least 10-fold in resistant MCF7/VP cells as compared to sensitive MCF7/WT cells. These results suggest that resistance to epipodophyllotoxins in MCF7/VP cells is multifactorial, involving a reduction in intracellular drug concentration, possibly as a consequence of MRP overexpression, and an altered DNA topoisomerase II drug sensitivity. PMID:7903202

  16. Effect of anti-hyperlipidemia drugs on the alpha-tocopherol concentration and their potential for murine malaria infection.

    PubMed

    Kume, Aiko; Herbas, Maria Shirley; Shichiri, Mototada; Ishida, Noriko; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The current preventions of malaria are protection against mosquito bites and taking chemoprophylactic anti-malarial drugs. However, drug therapies are usually associated with adverse events and emergency of drug-resistant malaria parasites. Previous study showed that host plasma alpha-tocopherol deficiency enhanced resistance against malaria infection in mice. Here, we report a new prevention strategy against malaria by using anti-hyperlipidemia drugs, ezetimibe, berberine, cholestyramine, and probucol to modify the host plasma alpha-tocopherol concentration. The drugs were mixed with diet and fed to C57BL/6J mice for 2 weeks. Although all drugs reduced plasma alpha-tocopherol concentration after 2 weeks of feeding, probucol-treated mice showed 90 % reduction and it was the lowest alpha-tocopherol concentration among the four drugs. Ezetimibe, berberine, and combination of ezetimibe and berberine pretreatment for 2 weeks were not effective against infection of Plasmodium yoelii XL17, a lethal strain, for survival and parasitemia in mice. Two-week pretreatment and 1-week treatment after infection of cholestyramine had also no effect on malaria infection. Survival rates of cholestyramine, ezetimibe, and/or berberine treated mice were 0-22 %. However, probucol caused significant decrease in parasitemia and increased in mice survival following 2-week pretreatment and 1-week treatment after infection. All control mice died while all probucol treated mice survived during the course of infection. Thus, probucol which reduced plasma alpha-tocopherol concentration was effective in enhancing the host to resist malaria infection in mice. Our finding indicates that plasma alpha-tocopherol reducing drugs like probucol might be a candidate for beneficial prevention strategy for travelers from malaria-free area. PMID:26358099

  17. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs increase insulin release from beta cells by inhibiting ATP-sensitive potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Li, J; Zhang, N; Ye, B; Ju, W; Orser, B; Fox, J E M; Wheeler, M B; Wang, Q; Lu, W-Y

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) incidentally induce hypoglycemia, which is often seen in diabetic patients receiving sulphonylureas. NSAIDs influence various ion channel activities, thus they may cause hypoglycemia by affecting ion channel functions in insulin secreting beta cells. This study investigated the effects of the NSAID meclofenamic acid (MFA) on the electrical excitability and the secretion of insulin from pancreatic beta cells. Experimental approach: Using patch clamp techniques and insulin secretion assays, the effects of MFA on the membrane potential and transmembrane current of INS-1 cells, and insulin secretion were studied. Key results: Under perforated patch recordings, MFA induced a rapid depolarization in INS-1 cells bathed in low (2.8mM), but not high (28mM) glucose solutions. MFA, as well as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and flufenamic acid (FFA), excited the cells by inhibiting ATP-sensitive potassium channels (KATP). In whole cell recordings, KATP conductance consistently appeared when intracellular ATP was diluted. Intracellular glibenclamide prevented the development of KATP activity, whereas intracellular MFA had no effect. At low glibenclamide concentrations, MFA induced additional inhibition of the KATP current. Live cell Ca2+ imaging displayed that MFA elevated intracellular Ca2+ at low glucose concentrations. Furthermore, MFA dose-dependently increased insulin release under low, but not high, glucose conditions. Conclusions and Implications: MFA blocked KATP through an extracellular mechanism and thus increased insulin secretion. As some NSAIDs synergistically inhibit KATP activity together with sulphonylureas, the risk of NSAID-induced hypoglycemia should be considered when glucose-lowering compounds are administered. PMID:17435793

  18. Synthesis and Properties of pH-, Thermo-, and Salt-Sensitive Modified Poly(aspartic acid)/Poly(vinyl alcohol) IPN Hydrogel and Its Drug Controlled Release.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jingqiong; Li, Yinhui; Hu, Deng; Chen, Xiaoling; Liu, Yongmei; Wang, Liping; Zhao, Yansheng

    2015-01-01

    Modified poly(aspartic acid)/poly(vinyl alcohol) interpenetrating polymer network (KPAsp/PVA IPN) hydrogel for drug controlled release was synthesized by a simple one-step method in aqueous system using poly(aspartic acid) grafting 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (KH-550) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) as materials. The hydrogel surface morphology and composition were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The thermal stability was analyzed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The swelling properties and pH, temperature, and salt sensitivities of KPAsp, KPAsp/PVA semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN), and KPAsp/PVA IPN hydrogels were also investigated. All of the three hydrogels showed ampholytic pH-responsive properties, and swelling behavior was also extremely sensitive to the temperature, ionic strength, and cationic species. Finally, the drug controlled release properties of the three hydrogels were evaluated and results indicated that three hydrogels could control drug release by external surroundings stimuli. The drug controlled release properties of KPAsp/PVA IPN hydrogel are the most outstanding, and the correlative measured release profiles of salicylic acid at 37°C were 32.6 wt% at pH = 1.2 (simulated gastric fluid) and 62.5 wt% at pH = 7.4 (simulated intestinal fluid), respectively. These results indicated that KPAsp/PVA IPN hydrogels are a promising carrier system for controlled drug delivery. PMID:26351630

  19. Facile preparation of pH-sensitive micelles self-assembled from amphiphilic chondroitin sulfate-histamine conjugate for triggered intracellular drug release.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chuanming; Gao, Chunmei; Lü, Shaoyu; Chen, Chen; Yang, Jinlong; Di, Xin; Liu, Mingzhu

    2014-03-01

    Stimuli-responsive materials, enabling drugs to be released in the acidic tumor and intracellular microenvironments, draw an increasing attention in chemotherapy. Here novel pH-sensitive biodegradable micelles are fabricated using a one-step, one-medium process without organic solvent for efficient loading and rapid intracellular release of hydrophobic cargos. The amphiphilic chondroitin sulfate-histamine conjugate (CS-his) were successfully synthesized and assembled into nanoparticles in aqueous medium with desirable size (133 nm) and low critical micelle concentration (CMC) (0.05 mg/L). Owning to the pH-sensitive structure of imidazole, the nanoparticles show pH-responsive behavior upon reducing the pH value of surrounding media, accompany with formation of large aggregates and increase of ζ potential. When the nanoparticles were utilized to deliver the model drug DOX, they exhibited a specific on-off switch drug release behavior, triggering DOX release in acidic surroundings (intracellular endosomes) and sealing DOX in neutral surroundings (blood circulation or extracellular matrix). CCK-8 assays and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) against HepG2 cells indicated that the nanoparticles themselves had no associated cytotoxicity, while drug-loaded nanoparticles possessed high cytotoxicity to model cells and presented high efficiency of cellular uptake. These flexible micelles with an on-off switched drug release may offer a promising pattern to accurately deliver a wide variety of hydrophobic payloads to tumor cells for cancer therapy. PMID:24398081

  20. Synthesis and Properties of pH-, Thermo-, and Salt-Sensitive Modified Poly(aspartic acid)/Poly(vinyl alcohol) IPN Hydrogel and Its Drug Controlled Release

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jingqiong; Li, Yinhui; Hu, Deng; Chen, Xiaoling; Liu, Yongmei; Wang, Liping; Zhao, Yansheng

    2015-01-01

    Modified poly(aspartic acid)/poly(vinyl alcohol) interpenetrating polymer network (KPAsp/PVA IPN) hydrogel for drug controlled release was synthesized by a simple one-step method in aqueous system using poly(aspartic acid) grafting 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (KH-550) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) as materials. The hydrogel surface morphology and composition were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The thermal stability was analyzed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The swelling properties and pH, temperature, and salt sensitivities of KPAsp, KPAsp/PVA semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN), and KPAsp/PVA IPN hydrogels were also investigated. All of the three hydrogels showed ampholytic pH-responsive properties, and swelling behavior was also extremely sensitive to the temperature, ionic strength, and cationic species. Finally, the drug controlled release properties of the three hydrogels were evaluated and results indicated that three hydrogels could control drug release by external surroundings stimuli. The drug controlled release properties of KPAsp/PVA IPN hydrogel are the most outstanding, and the correlative measured release profiles of salicylic acid at 37°C were 32.6 wt% at pH = 1.2 (simulated gastric fluid) and 62.5 wt% at pH = 7.4 (simulated intestinal fluid), respectively. These results indicated that KPAsp/PVA IPN hydrogels are a promising carrier system for controlled drug delivery. PMID:26351630

  1. Clinical Features and Treatment Outcomes of Patients with Drug-Resistant and Drug-Sensitive Tuberculosis: A Historical Cohort Study in Porto Alegre, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Micheletti, Vania Celina Dezoti; Kritski, Afrânio Lineu; Braga, José Ueleres

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the clinical features and treatment outcomes of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis, stratified by level of drug resistance. Methods This was a historical cohort study based on data from the II National Anti-Tuberculosis Drug Resistance Survey (2006–2007) collected at eight participating health care facilities in Porto Alegre, southern Brazil. The cohort was followed for 3 years after the start of treatment. Results Of 299 cases of smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis included in the study, 216 (72.2%) were diagnosed at five public primary health care units and 83 (27.8%) at three public hospitals. Among these cases, the prevalence of drug-resistant tuberculosis was 14.4%, and that of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis was 4.7%. Overall, 32.0% of drug-resistant and 2.0% of multidrug-resistant cases occurred in previously treated patients. The most common comorbidity in the sample was HIV infection (26.2%). There was no association between drug-resistant or multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and sociodemographic variables. Cure was achieved in 66.7% of patients, and the default rate was 21.2%. The 2-month sputum conversion rate was 34.2%, and the relapse rate was 16.9%. Patients with drug-resistant tuberculosis had lower rates of cure (45.2%) and 2-month sputum conversion (25%), as well as a higher relapse rate (30.7%). Conclusion These results highlight the urgent need for a more effective TB control program in this geographical setting, with a major emphasis on treatment of drug-resistant and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. PMID:27505633

  2. Carbon Dots Embedded Magnetic Nanoparticles @Chitosan @Metal Organic Framework as a Nanoprobe for pH Sensitive Targeted Anticancer Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Chowdhuri, Angshuman Ray; Singh, Tanya; Ghosh, Sudip Kumar; Sahu, Sumanta Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Recently, nanoscale metal organic frameworks (NMOFs) have been demonstrated as a promising carrier for drug delivery, as they possess many advantages like large surface area, high porosity, and tunable functionality. However, there are no reports about the functionalization of NMOFs, which combines cancer-targeted drug delivery/imaging, magnetic property, high drug loading content, and pH-sensitive drug release into one system. Existing formulations for integrating target molecules into NMOF are based on multistep synthetic processes. However, in this study, we report an approach that combines NMOF (IRMOF-3) synthesis and target molecule (Folic acid) encapsulation on the surface of chitosan modified magnetic nanoparticles in a single step. A noticeable feature of chitosan is control and pH responsive drug release for several days. More importantly, doxorubicin (DOX) was incorporated into magnetic NMOF formulation and showed high drug loading (1.63 g DOX g(-1) magnetic NMOFs). To demonstrate the optical imaging, carbon dots (CDs) are encapsulated into the synthesized magnetic NMOF, thereby endowing fluorescence features to the nanoparticles. These folate targeted magnetic NMOF possess more specific cellular internalization toward folate-overexpressed cancer (HeLa) cells in comparison to normal (L929) cells. PMID:27305490

  3. Ex vivo cultures of glioblastoma in three-dimensional hydrogel maintain the original tumor growth behavior and are suitable for preclinical drug and radiation sensitivity screening

    SciTech Connect

    Jiguet Jiglaire, Carine; Baeza-Kallee, Nathalie; Denicolaï, Emilie; Barets, Doriane; Metellus, Philippe; and others

    2014-02-15

    Identification of new drugs and predicting drug response are major challenges in oncology, especially for brain tumors, because total surgical resection is difficult and radiation therapy or chemotherapy is often ineffective. With the aim of developing a culture system close to in vivo conditions for testing new drugs, we characterized an ex vivo three-dimensional culture system based on a hyaluronic acid-rich hydrogel and compared it with classical two-dimensional culture conditions. U87-MG glioblastoma cells and seven primary cell cultures of human glioblastomas were subjected to radiation therapy and chemotherapy drugs. It appears that 3D hydrogel preserves the original cancer growth behavior and enables assessment of the sensitivity of malignant gliomas to radiation and drugs with regard to inter-tumoral heterogeneity of therapeutic response. It could be used for preclinical assessment of new therapies. - Highlights: • We have compared primary glioblastoma cell culture in a 2D versus 3D-matrix system. • In 3D morphology, organization and markers better recapitulate the original tumor. • 3D-matrix culture might represent a relevant system for more accurate drug screening.

  4. Prediction of interindividual differences in hepatic functions and drug sensitivity by using human iPS-derived hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, Kazuo; Morisaki, Yuta; Kuno, Shuichi; Nagamoto, Yasuhito; Harada, Kazuo; Furukawa, Norihisa; Ohtaka, Manami; Nishimura, Ken; Imagawa, Kazuo; Sakurai, Fuminori; Tachibana, Masashi; Sumazaki, Ryo; Noguchi, Emiko; Nakanishi, Mahito; Hirata, Kazumasa; Kawabata, Kenji; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Interindividual differences in hepatic metabolism, which are mainly due to genetic polymorphism in its gene, have a large influence on individual drug efficacy and adverse reaction. Hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) differentiated from human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have the potential to predict interindividual differences in drug metabolism capacity and drug response. However, it remains uncertain whether human iPSC-derived HLCs can reproduce the interindividual difference in hepatic metabolism and drug response. We found that cytochrome P450 (CYP) metabolism capacity and drug responsiveness of the primary human hepatocytes (PHH)-iPS-HLCs were highly correlated with those of PHHs, suggesting that the PHH-iPS-HLCs retained donor-specific CYP metabolism capacity and drug responsiveness. We also demonstrated that the interindividual differences, which are due to the diversity of individual SNPs in the CYP gene, could also be reproduced in PHH-iPS-HLCs. We succeeded in establishing, to our knowledge, the first PHH-iPS-HLC panel that reflects the interindividual differences of hepatic drug-metabolizing capacity and drug responsiveness. PMID:25385620

  5. Antiplasmodial potential of medicinal plant extracts from Malaiyur and Javadhu hills of South India.

    PubMed

    Kamaraj, Chinnaperumal; Kaushik, Naveen Kumar; Mohanakrishnan, Dinesh; Elango, Gandhi; Bagavan, Asokan; Zahir, Abdul Abduz; Rahuman, Abdul Abdul; Sahal, Dinkar

    2012-08-01

    The emergence and spread of Plasmodium falciparum with resistance to chloroquine (CQ), the safest and cheapest anti-malarial drug, coupled with the increasing cost of alternative drugs especially in developing countries have necessitated the urgent need to tap the potential of plants for novel anti-malarials. The present study investigates the anti-malarial activity of the methanolic extracts of 13 medicinal plants from the Malaiyur and Javadhu hills of South India against blood stage CQ-sensitive (3D7) and CQ-resistant (INDO) strains of P. falciparum in culture using the fluorescence-based SYBR Green I assay. Sorbitol-synchronized parasites were incubated under normal culture conditions at 2% hematocrit and 1% parasitemia in the absence or presence of increasing concentrations of plant extracts. CQ and artemisinin were used as positive controls, while 0.4% DMSO was used as the negative control. The cytotoxic effects of extracts on host cells were assessed by functional assay using HeLa cells cultured in RPMI containing 10% fetal bovine serum, 0.21% sodium bicarbonate and 50 μg/mL gentamycin (complete medium). Plant extracts (bark methanol extracts of Annona squamosa (IC(50), 30 μg/mL), leaf extracts of Ocimum gratissimum (IC(50), 32 μg/mL), Ocimum tenuiflorum (IC(50), 31 μg/mL), Solanum torvum (IC(50), 31 μg/mL) and Justicia procumbens (IC(50), 63 μg/mL), showed moderate activity. The leaf extracts of Aristolochia indica (IC(50), 10 μg/mL), Cassia auriculata (IC(50), 14 μg/mL), Chrysanthemum indicum (IC(50), 20 μg/mL) and Dolichos biflorus (IC(50), 20 μg/mL) showed promising activity and low activity was observed in the flower methanol extracts of A. indica , leaf methanol extract of Catharanthus roseus, and Gymnema sylvestre (IC(50), >100 μg/mL). These four extracts exhibited promising IC(50) (μg/mL) of 17, 24, 19 and 24 respectively also against the CQ resistant INDO strain of P. falciparum. The high TC(50) in mammalian cell cytotoxicity assay and

  6. Sensitive and reliable proarrhythmia in vivo animal models for predicting drug-induced torsades de pointes in patients with remodelled hearts

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, A

    2008-01-01

    As an increasing number of non-cardiac drugs have been reported to cause QT interval prolongation and torsades de pointes (TdP), we extensively studied the utility of atrioventricular (AV) block animals as a model to predict their torsadogenic action in human. The present review highlights such in vivo proarrhythmia models. In the case of the canine model, test substances were administered p.o. at conscious state >4 weeks after the induction of AV block, with subsequent Holter ECG monitoring to evaluate drug effects. Control AV block dogs (no pharmacological treatment) survive for several years without TdP attack. For pharmacologically treated dogs, drugs were identified as high, low or no risk. High-risk drugs induced TdP at 1–3 times the therapeutic dose. Low-risk drugs did not induce TdP at this dose range, but induced it at higher doses. No-risk drugs never induced TdP at any dose tested. Electrophysiological, anatomical histological and biochemical adaptations against persistent bradycardia-induced chronic heart failure were observed in AV block dogs. Recently, we have developed another highly sensitive proarrhythmia model using a chronic AV block cynomolgus monkey, which possesses essentially the same pathophysiological adaptations and drug responses as those demonstrated in the canine model. As a common remodelling process leading to a diminished repolarization reserve may present in patients who experience drug-induced TdP and in the AV block animals, the in vivo proarrhythmia models described in this review may be useful for predicting the risk of pharmacologically induced TdP in humans. PMID:18552873

  7. CS/PAA@TPGS/PLGA nanoparticles with intracellular pH-sensitive sequential release for delivering drug to the nucleus of MDR cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying-Ying; Zhang, Dan-Dan; Kong, Yan-Yan; Shao, Luan-Luan; Zhang, Fen-Yi; Gao, Yu; Mu, Xu; Wang, Jie; Li, Hao-Fan; Yu, Shu-Qin; Xu, Qian

    2016-09-01

    Development of novel nano-drug delivery systems (NDDS) that can transport anticancer drugs into cell nuclei is still a highly desirable strategy for reversing multi-drug resistance (MDR) in cancer therapy. Herein, we designed and prepared a novel NDDS, designated S@L NPs, in which several smaller nanoparticles are contained within a larger nanoparticle. Our S@L NPs (CS/PAA/VP-16@TPGS/PLGA NPs) possess a structure in which smaller nanoparticles (Chitosan-Poly(acrylic acid) nanoparticles, CS/PAA NPs) containing the drug etoposide (VP-16) are loaded within a larger nanoparticle (Vitamin E d-a-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate-modified poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles, TPGS/PLGA NPs). The system utilizes intracellular pH gradients to achieve pH-sensitive sequential release within different intracellular domains of MDR cells. S@L NPs could be triggered to degrade and release CS/PAA/VP-16 NPs in the acid environment of the cytosol, endosomes or lysosomes, and CS/PAA/VP-16 NPs were capable of entering the nucleus through nucleopores. It is significant that CS/PAA/VP-16 NPs exhibit disaggregation in the alkaline environment of the nucleus and thereby release the contained anticancer drug. Further mechanistic studies showed that CS/PAA/VP-16 NPs escaped retention and degradation within lysosomes and protected the drug from P-glycoprotein-induced efflux. Simultaneously, S@L NPs enhanced the anticancer effect of the loaded drug by inducing autophagy and apoptosis of MDR cells. This novel NDDS may provide a promising platform for nuclear drug delivery for reversing MDR. PMID:27289313

  8. Decreased expression of nucleophosmin/B23 increases drug sensitivity of adriamycin-resistant Molt-4 leukemia cells through mdr-1 regulation and Akt/mTOR signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingyan; Chen, Buyuan; Lin, Minhui; Cao, Yanqin; Chen, Yingyu; Chen, Xinji; Liu, Tingbo; Hu, Jianda

    2015-03-01

    Nucleophosmin/B23 (NPM) is a nuclear protein with prosurvival and ribosomal RNA processing functions. However, the potential role of NPM involved in drug-resistance in leukemia has not been investigated clearly. In this study, we generated an adriamycin (ADM)-resistant lymphoblastic cell line Molt-4/ADR (MAR) by stepwise induction. Cell proliferation, sensitivity to chemotherapy agents and expressions of drug resistance related molecules were assessed. The IC50 of Molt-4 cells were 0.58±0.11μmol/L and MAR cells were 22.56±1.94μmol/L, meaning MAR cells were 38.63 fold resistant to Molt-4 cells. Furthermore, MAR cells gained an expression of mdr-1 (P-gp) and a higher expression of NPM compared to Molt-4 cells. Knockdown of NPM by RNA interference (RNAi) suppressed the viability of both Molt-4 and MAR cells. After NPM RNAi, the IC50 of MAR and Molt-4 cells were 3.83±0.38μmol/L and 0.19±0.02μmol/L respectively. Both of them revealed an increase of drug sensitivity with down-regulation of mdr-1 and Akt/mTOR signaling. Knockdown of mdr-1 could also reverse the drug resistance, with no change in NPM expression. It could be concluded that knockdown of NPM reversed the drug resistance by down-regulating P-gp and Akt/mTOR signal pathway, indicating that NPM may serve as a potential modulator in drug resistance. PMID:25457413

  9. Sensitization for death receptor- or drug-induced apoptosis by re-expression of caspase-8 through demethylation or gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Fulda, S; Küfer, M U; Meyer, E; van Valen, F; Dockhorn-Dworniczak, B; Debatin, K M

    2001-09-13

    Resistance of tumors to treatment with cytotoxic drugs, irradiation or immunotherapy may be due to disrupted apoptosis programs. Here, we report in a variety of different tumor cells including Ewing tumor, neuroblastoma, malignant brain tumors and melanoma that caspase-8 expression acts as a key determinant of sensitivity for apoptosis induced by death-inducing ligands or cytotoxic drugs. In tumor cell lines resistant to TRAIL, anti-CD95 or TNFalpha, caspase-8 protein and mRNA expression was decreased or absent without caspase-8 gene loss. Methylation-specific PCR revealed hypermethylation of caspase-8 regulatory sequences in cells with impaired caspase-8 expression. Treatment with the demethylation agent 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-dAzaC) reversed hypermethylation of caspase-8 resulting in restoration of caspase-8 expression and recruitment and activation of caspase-8 at the CD95 DISC upon receptor cross-linking thereby sensitizing for death receptor-, and importantly, also for drug-induced apoptosis. Inhibition of caspase-8 activity also inhibited apoptosis sensitization by 5-dAzaC. Similar to demethylation, introduction of caspase-8 by gene transfer sensitized for apoptosis induction. Hypermethylation of caspase-8 was linked to reduced caspase-8 expression in different tumor cell lines in vitro and, most importantly, also in primary tumor samples. Thus, these findings indicate that re-expression of caspase-8, e.g. by demethylation or caspase-8 gene transfer, might be an effective strategy to restore sensitivity for chemotherapy- or death receptor-induced apoptosis in various tumors in vivo. PMID:11593392

  10. Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter, PfCRT, enlarge the parasite’s food vacuole and alter drug sensitivities

    PubMed Central

    Pulcini, Serena; Staines, Henry M.; Lee, Andrew H.; Shafik, Sarah H.; Bouyer, Guillaume; Moore, Catherine M.; Daley, Daniel A.; Hoke, Matthew J.; Altenhofen, Lindsey M.; Painter, Heather J.; Mu, Jianbing; Ferguson, David J. P.; Llinás, Manuel; Martin, Rowena E.; Fidock, David A.; Cooper, Roland A.; Krishna, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter, PfCRT, are the major determinant of chloroquine resistance in this lethal human malaria parasite. Here, we describe P. falciparum lines subjected to selection by amantadine or blasticidin that carry PfCRT mutations (C101F or L272F), causing the development of enlarged food vacuoles. These parasites also have increased sensitivity to chloroquine and some other quinoline antimalarials, but exhibit no or minimal change in sensitivity to artemisinins, when compared with parental strains. A transgenic parasite line expressing the L272F variant of PfCRT confirmed this increased chloroquine sensitivity and enlarged food vacuole phenotype. Furthermore, the introduction of the C101F or L272F mutation into a chloroquine-resistant variant of PfCRT reduced the ability of this protein to transport chloroquine by approximately 93 and 82%, respectively, when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. These data provide, at least in part, a mechanistic explanation for the increased sensitivity of the mutant parasite lines to chloroquine. Taken together, these findings provide new insights into PfCRT function and PfCRT-mediated drug resistance, as well as the food vacuole, which is an important target of many antimalarial drugs. PMID:26420308

  11. Assays of drug sensitivity for cells from human tumours: in vitro and in vivo tests on a xenografted tumour.

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, A. E.; Peckham, M. J.; Steel, G. G.

    1979-01-01

    A human tumour which grows as a xenograft in immune-suppressed mice and forms colonies in vitro has been used to test the correlation between 2 methods of exposure of human tumour cells to chemotherapeutic agents. In vivo exposure to drugs was achieved by injection of tumour-bearing mice with each of 8 cytotoxic agents. For the in vitro exposure, cell suspensions were incubated for 1 h with the same series of drugs. The survival of tumour clonogenic cells was assayed in vitro after either treatment or dose-response curves were obtained. The 8 drugs were ranked according to their in vivo effect at doses equitoxic to mice, and according to their in vitro effect at concentrations designed to approximate to levels of drugs in human plasma. The ranks for in vivo and in vitro exposure correlated well. PMID:475962

  12. Mitoxantrone loaded superparamagnetic nanoparticles for drug targeting: a versatile and sensitive method for quantification of drug enrichment in rabbit tissues using HPLC-UV.

    PubMed

    Tietze, Rainer; Schreiber, Eveline; Lyer, Stefan; Alexiou, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    In medicine, superparamagnetic nanoparticles bound to chemotherapeutics are currently investigated for their feasibility in local tumor therapy. After intraarterial application, these particles can be accumulated in the targeted area by an external magnetic field to increase the drug concentration in the region of interest (Magnetic-Drug-Targeting). We here present an analytical method (HPLC-UV), to detect pure or ferrofluid-bound mitoxantrone in a complex matrix even in trace amounts in order to perform biodistribution studies. Mitoxantrone could be extracted in high yields from different tissues. Recovery of mitoxantrone in liver tissue (5000 ng/g) was 76 +/- 2%. The limit of quantification of mitoxantrone standard was 10 ng/mL +/-12%. Validation criteria such as linearity, precision, and stability were evaluated in ranges achieving the FDA requirements. As shown for pilot samples, biodistribution studies can easily be performed after application of pure or ferrofluid-bound mitoxantrone. PMID:20490266

  13. Matrix Metalloproteinase 2-sensitive Multifunctional Polymeric Micelles for Tumor-specific Co-delivery of siRNA and Hydrophobic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lin; Perche, Federico; Wang, Tao; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2014-01-01

    Co-delivery of hydrophilic siRNA and hydrophobic drugs is one of the major challenges for nanomaterial-based medicine. Here, we present a simple but multifunctional micellar platform constructed by a matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2)-sensitive copolymer (PEG-pp-PEI-PE) via self-assembly for tumor-targeted siRNA and drug co-delivery. The micellar nanocarrier possesses several key features for siRNA and drug delivery, including (i) excellent stability; (ii) efficient siRNA condensation by PEI; (iii) hydrophobic drug solubilization in the lipid “core”; (iv) passive tumor targeting via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect; (v) tumor targeting triggered by the up-regulated tumoral MMP2; and (vi) enhanced cell internalization after MMP2-activated exposure of the previously hidden PEI. These cooperative functions ensure the improved tumor targetability, enhanced tumor cell internalization, and synergistic antitumor activity of co-loaded siRNA and drug. PMID:24529391

  14. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors sensitize tumor cells to nutlin-induced apoptosis: a potent drug combination.

    PubMed

    Cheok, Chit Fang; Dey, Anwesha; Lane, David P

    2007-11-01

    Current chemotherapy focuses on the use of genotoxic drugs that may induce general DNA damage in cancer cells but also high levels of toxicity in normal tissues. Nongenotoxic activation of p53 by targeting specific molecular pathways therefore provides an attractive therapeutic strategy in cancers with wild-type p53. Here, we explored the antitumor potential of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors in combination with a small molecule inhibitor of p53-murine double minute 2 (MDM2) interaction. We show that low doses of CDK inhibitors roscovitine and DRB synergize with the MDM2 antagonist nutlin-3a in the induction of p53 activity and promote p53-dependent apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Statistical measurement of the combination effects shows that the drug combination is additive on the reduction of cell viability and synergistic on inducing apoptosis, a critical end point of cytotoxic drugs. The degree of apoptosis observed 24 to 48 h after drug treatment correlated with the accumulation of p53 protein and concomitant induction of proapoptotic proteins Puma and PIG3. The antiproliferative and cytotoxic effects of this drug combination are validated in a range of tumor-derived cells including melanoma, colon carcinoma, breast adenocarcinoma, and hepatocarcinoma cells. Furthermore, this drug combination does not induce phosphorylation of Ser(15) on p53 and does not induce genotoxic stress in the cell. Given that many cytotoxic drugs rely on their ability to induce apoptosis via DNA damage-mediated activation of p53, the data presented here may provide a new therapeutic approach for the use of CDK inhibitors and MDM2 antagonists in combinatorial drug therapy. PMID:18025259

  15. Further characterisation of the in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) assay for the flow cytometric analysis of apoptosis in drug resistant and drug sensitive leukaemic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, R.S.; Chresta, C.M.; Herberg, A.A.

    1995-07-01

    Apoptosis, originally defined by specific morphological changes, is characterized biochemically by non-random cleavage of DNA. Depending on cell type, this DNA cleavage proceeds from 300 and 50 kbp fragments prior to, concomitantly with, or in the absence of 180 bp integer fragmentation. Incorporation into fragmented DNA of biotin-labelled nucleotides by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) has recently become a standard flow cytometric assay for the identification and quantitation of apoptosis. Nucleotide incorportion is visualized using avidin-tagged fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC). Here, we characterize this assay further in three different hemopoietic cell lines. Drug-induced DNA damage is not identified by the TdT assay unless it is coupled to the apoptotic response. This was demonstrated using cells in which activation of the oncogenic Abelson-encoded protein tyrosine kinase suppressed drug-induced apoptosis, but did not inhibit drug-induced DNA damage (by melphalan, hydroxyurea, or etoposide). Furthermore, the TdT assay identifies DNA fragments formed during apoptosis induced by etoposide and N-methylformamide in HL60 and MOLT-4 cells, including those high molecular weight DNA fragments formed in MOLT-4 cells which were not further cleaved to 180-200 bp integer fragments. Our results support the use of flow cytometry and the TdT assay to reliably measure apoptotic cells in heterogeneous cell samples. 55 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. A comprehensive and sensitive method for hair analysis in drug-facilitated crimes and incorporation of zolazepam and tiletamine into hair after a single exposure.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihyun; Yum, Hyesun; Jang, Moonhee; Shin, Ilchung; Yang, Wonkyung; Baeck, Seungkyung; Suh, Joon Hyuk; Lee, Sooyeun; Han, Sang Beom

    2016-01-01

    Hair is a highly relevant specimen that is used to verify drug exposure in victims of drug-facilitated crime (DFC) cases. In the present study, a new analytical method involving ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was developed for determining the presence of model drugs, including zolazepam and tiletamine and their metabolites in hair specimens from DFCs. The incorporation of zolazepam and tiletamine into hair after a single exposure was investigated in Long-Evans rats with the ratio of the hair concentration to the area under the curve. For rapid and simple sample preparation, methanol extraction and protein precipitation were performed for hair and plasma, respectively. No interference was observed in drug-free hair or plasma, except for hair-derived diphenhydramine in blank hair. The coefficients of variance of the matrix effects were below 12%, and the recoveries of the analytes exceeded 70% in all of the matrices. The precision and accuracy results were satisfactory. The limits of quantification ranged from 20 to 50 pg in 10 mg of hair. The drug incorporation rates were 0.03 ± 0.01% for zolazepam and 2.09 ± 0.51% for tiletamine in pigmented hair. We applied the present method to real hair samples in order to determine the drug that was used in seven cases. These results suggest that this comprehensive and sensitive hair analysis method can successfully verify a drug after a single exposure in crimes and can be applied in forensic and clinical toxicology laboratories. PMID:26454443

  17. Experimental sensitization of guinea pigs by drugs. Comparison of the maximization test with the wholly intradermal test.

    PubMed

    Rantuccio, F; Coviello, C; Sinisi, D; Scardigno, A; Conte, A

    1983-11-01

    The capacity of tegobetain, pyrrolnitrin, tolcyclate and chlorquinaldol to induce delayed-type contact sensitization was studied in guinea pigs in 2 series of tests using the method of Magnusson & Kligman and the authors' modification of the wholly intradermal Draize technique. Histological examination of skin biopsies obtained from the test area demonstrated that tegobetain, pyrrolnitrin and tolcyclate are potential sensitizers. PMID:6653105

  18. Targeting Drug-Sensitive and -Resistant Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Inhibition of Src Family Kinases Lowers Disease Burden and Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Pallavi; Rajmani, R. S.; Verma, Garima; Bhavesh, Neel Sarovar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In view of emerging drug resistance among bacterial pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the development of novel therapeutic strategies is increasingly being sought. A recent paradigm in antituberculosis (anti-TB) drug development is to target the host molecules that are crucial for intracellular survival of the pathogen. We previously showed the importance of Src tyrosine kinases in mycobacterial pathogenesis. Here, we report that inhibition of Src significantly reduced survival of H37Rv as well as multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extremely drug-resistant (XDR) strains of M. tuberculosis in THP-1 macrophages. Src inhibition was also effective in controlling M. tuberculosis infection in guinea pigs. In guinea pigs, reduced M. tuberculosis burden due to Src inhibition also led to a marked decline in the disease pathology. In agreement with the theoretical framework of host-directed approaches against the pathogen, Src inhibition was equally effective against an XDR strain in controlling infection in guinea pigs. We propose that Src inhibitors could be developed into effective host-directed anti-TB drugs, which could be indiscriminately used against both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. IMPORTANCE The existing treatment regimen for tuberculosis (TB) suffers from deficiencies like high doses of antibiotics, long treatment duration, and inability to kill persistent populations in an efficient manner. Together, these contribute to the emergence of drug-resistant tuberculosis. Recently, several host factors were identified which help intracellular survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis within the macrophage. These factors serve as attractive targets for developing alternate therapeutic strategies against